The Frostproof news
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028406/00468
 Material Information
Title: The Frostproof news
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Alfred H. Mellor
Place of Publication: Frostproof Polk County Fla
Publication Date: December 11, 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Frostproof (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Polk County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Polk -- Frostproof
Coordinates: 27.745556 x -81.531111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 46, no. 44 (Jan. 6, 1961)-
General Note: Publisher: J. David Fleming, <1977>; Diana Eichlin, <1988>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956893
oclc - 01388691
notis - AER9566
lccn - sn 95026699
System ID: UF00028406:00468
 Related Items
Preceded by: Highland news (Frostproof, Fla.)

Full Text





Scout camp gets
a helping 'Hahn'


Hope, but growing
concern over CSX plan


Alexander faces tough
budget year, again


Frostproof Ne: -1
SPO BOX o1f" 00"/ 611

Frostproof's Hometown News for more than,-- o


Volume 90 Number 96


USPS NO 3211-260


Frostproof, Polk County Florida 33843


Copyright 2010 Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.


December 11, 2010


Griffin fertilizer warehouse burns


By BILL RETTEW JR.
STAFF WRITER
Firefighters took
almost four hours to con-
trol a Wednesday stor-
age facility fire at Griffin
Fertilizer.
The smoldering blaze
at 3201 S. Scenic Hwy.
started at about 11 a.m.
Motorists on nearby
State Road 17 and U.S.
Highway 27 were able
to see white billowing
smoke rising from the
structure.
Ben Hill Griffin Inc.
owner Ben Hill Griffin III
said the damage should
be repaired within two
weeks and that he is-
thankful that no em-
ployee or firefighter was
injured. No amount of
monetary loss was given.
"We'll be back in
production in two weeks
and nobody loses their
job," said Griffin. "We
have employees who
have been with us for 30
years and we keep them
year-round. We depend
on them and they de-
pend on us."
Frostproof Fire Depart-
ment Chief Bill Lord said
that sludge, a by-product
used to produce fertil-
izer for the citrus indus-
try, smoldered in the


PHOTO BY KM THORNTON, SR.
Griffin Fertilizer plant ignited Wednesday afternoon, bringing firefighters from Frostproof, Lake
Wales and the Polk County Fire Department to assist.


38,000-square-foot struc-
ture. The chief said part
of the roof was removed
by firefighters to battle
the blaze.
Little water was used
to control the smoky fire.
Instead, the black sludge
was spread outside the
structure and allowed
to naturally cool in the
chilly afternoon sun.
For several hours, the
approximately 100-foot
by 30-foot, 1-foot deep
material smoked like


recently laid asphalt on a
roadway.
Griffin said the com-
pany was insured for the
loss, but didn't take the
fire lightly.
"It's a risk in the fertil-
izer business," said Grif-
fin. "A risk that is there."
Griffin said the sludge
fire was "set off by itself,"
and the burning sludge
was not adjacent to any
other flammable mate-
rial. About five years
ago, the same type of


sludge sparked a blaze at
another fertilizer facility
in Frostproof owned by
Griffin.
Griffin said that type of
structure contributed to
a spectacular fire inside
the town's limits in an
older wooden building.
The newer structure
that burned Wednesday
was built about four
years ago. It was made
primarily from concrete
and metal.
In addition to Frost-


PHOTO BY KM THORNTON SR.
Firefighters removed part of the roof of the plant to allow
steam and smoke to escape the building.


proof Fire Department,
Polk County Fire Ser-
vices, ILake Wales Fire
Department and Polk
County EMS responded.
Griffin said there cur-


rently is little demand for
fertilizer in the groves,
with peak use in January
and February, and that
the company is prepared
to meet the demand.


Smith is sponsored for Project


Dylan Smith is -
the most recent
Frostproof Middle-
Senior High School
upcoming gradu-
ate to be spon-
sored for Project
Graduation.
Patricia Maxcy
Wilson of Lake
Wales sponsored
Dylan with $200 to
show her support
for the Project
Graduation effort.
Dylan is the son
of Clifton Smith of
Lakeland and Susie
Smith of Lake DYLAN SMITH
Wales. His grand-
parents are Clifton A. and Diedra
Smith of Frostproof.
He is an active member of Gold's
Gym and is very interested in nutri-
tion and fitness.
After graduation Dylan would like
to pursue his interests in law enforce-


Graduation


ment education
to become a game
warden.
Project Gradua-
tion is an annual
senior celebration
coordinated by
the community to
provide graduat-
ing seniors with a
drug and alcohol
free, fully chap-
eroned, all-night
event after the
graduation cer-
emonies.
This all-night
event will cost
a minimum of
$100.00 per senior.
For those interested in sponsoring
a senior, send donations to Project
Graduation, Post Office Box 1292,
Frostproof, FL, 33843.
The next Project Graduation meet-
ing is Tuesday at 6 p.m. at Frostproof
High School in the cafeteria.


The U.S. Department of
Agriculture released its
December citrus fore-
cast Friday, estimating
Florida will produce 143
million boxes of oranges
in 2010-2011, down 3 mil-
lion boxes from the initial
October estimate.
The cold temperatures
earlier this week, which
didn't cause any material
damage to the crop, had
nothing to do with the
decrease.
"This decrease isn't
unexpected as we've been
hearing reports of smaller
fruit over the past couple
of weeks," said Michael W.
Sparks, executive VP/CEO
of Florida Citrus Mutual.
"It looks like the crop
isn't going to be as big as
initially thought."
Visit www.nass.usda.


gov/ Statistics_by State
for the complete USDA
estimate. The USDA
makes its initial forecast
in October and then re-
vises it monthly until the
end of the season in July.
The USDA predicts
Florida will harvest 19.6
million boxes of grape-
fruit in '10-'11, down
slightly from the initial 20
million boxes estimate.
The forecast for early
and midseason varieties
in Florida was reduced 1
million boxes to 68 mil-
lion boxes, and Valencias
are were reduced 2 mil-
lion to 75 million boxes.
For Florida specialty fruit,
the USDA predicts 1.1
million boxes of tangelos
and 4.4 million boxes of
tangerines.
The yield for from


concentrate orange juice
(FCOJ) is expected to be
1.61 gallons per 90-pound
box.
The Florida citrus in-
dustry creates a $9 billion
annual economic impact,
employing nearly 76,000
people, and covering
more than 569,000 acres.
Founded in 1948 and cur-
rently representing nearly
8,000 grower members,
Florida Citrus Mutual is
the state's largest citrus
grower organization.
While the most recent
cold snap didn't do much
damage, forecasts are for
perhaps even colder air
overnight early next week.
The Weather Channel
website is forecasting
a possible low Monday
night and Tuesday morn-
ing of 29 in Frostproof.


Moratorium yielding results


By STEVE STEINER
Staff Writer

Representatives from
the construction and
related industries are
pleased.
Their message to Polk
County Commissioners
on Dec. 1 was heard loud
and clear: The six month
impact fee moratorium
is not enough. Extend it
at least 18 months to two
years preferably the
latter. The extra time is
necessary in order to get
construction projects un-
der way and completed,
they said.
Bob Ziegenfuss, the


director of civil engineer-
ing services with Inter-
plan LLC, of Orlando,
said the need for more
time was crucial, primar-
ily due to paperwork.
"That process takes
three to four months," he
said, adding that was just
the beginning.
At the time he spoke,
several days after com-
missioners approved the
extension an additional
18 months, he said he
would be attending a
county staff level meet-
ing the following week.
That would be followed
by two public hearings
held a month apart each.


In. addition, his client -
Krystals, a hamburger
chain needs waiv-
ers and variances. The
county wants the build-
ing set back 35 feet from
the road. His client wants
a 32-foot setback.
"(You have) a mini-
mum eight to nine '
months right there," he
said.
That is before ground
is even broken, he added.
Once all the paperwork
and hearings are dis-
pensed with, assuming
approval, there is the
actual construction time
itself, which Ziegenfuss
said is at least another 90


days, on average. On top
of that, once construc-
tion is completed, there
are further inspections
before the business can
actually begin opera-
tions.
The impact fee mora-
torium was a factor
in where to locate the
restaurant, which is on
the county side of Cy-
press Gardens Boulevard
rather than on the Winter
Haven side. As a result, a
savings of approximately
$150,000 will be realized.
"That's a sizable
amount of money," said
Ziegenfuss. "It made
a big difference when


they ran their proforma,
whether the restaurant
will be profitable."
Ziegenfuss said the
BOCC's decision to
extend the impact fee
moratorium to July 31,
2011, goes beyond Krys-
tals. He said he will now
certainly mention Polk
County to current and
potential clients.
Allea Newbold, the
managing director with
True Partners Consulting
of Tampa, praised the
BOCC for recognizing the
need to prolong the im-
pact fee moratorium. She
said the vote was already
yielding results.


"I have several clients
looking at Polk County,"
she said.
That was good for Polk
County, because prior
to the vote, those clients
had expressed concerns
over the impact fees.
"We've been having
discussions that the fees
were too high, and that
six months was not suf-
ficient," said Newbold.
The Polk County fees,
according to Commis-
sioner Melony Bell prior
to the vote and based
upon a comparison she
had conducted, were out

RESULTS 6


7 05252 00025 8


ALSO INSIDE: CONTACT US:
Arrests.....................................A2 Out and About ....................A10 The Frostproof News
Letters to the Editor .............A5 Obituaries.......................All1 P.O. Box 67
Our View Point.....................A5 Calendar............................ All Frostproof, Florida 33843
Thinking Out Loud................A5 County Report....................A12 863-635-2171 E-mail:
0news@frostproofnews.net


1010 Deal of
the Day

ALAN JAY
Super Values
See Page A16


750


Citrus estimate falls







Page 2A Frostproof N s


COMMUNITY CALENDAR and EVENTS


Saturday,
December 11
Snowflake Ball
Snowflake Ball at the
Ramon Theater. Dance
to the music of The
Skylarks, 10 piece band
playing "Big Band"
sounds. $15 eacch or
$25 per couple includes
snacks and refreshments.
Optional cash bar will be
available. Semi-formal
or formal dress. Order
tickets online at www.
ramontheater.com or call
863-635-7222 or 863-
635-9112 or purchase at
Ramon Theater office.

Pictures with Santa!
Ramon Theater pres-
ents a day of pictures
with Santa Dec. 11. Kids
and grandkids pictures
with Santa from 10 a.m.
- noon. Furry kids (i.e.
pets) pictures with Santa,
1-3 p.m. Photography
provided by Frostproof
Photography Club at a
cost of $7 for a 5" by 7"
picture.

Sunday, December
12
Soup & Sandwich
Provided by the Sev-
enth Day Adventist. Soup
& Sandwich served the
second Sunday of each
month from 1 p.m. to 3
p.m. All are welcome.

Monday,


December 6
Esmeralda Massey,
36, of 856 Fazzini Drive,
Frostproof charged
with possession of meth-
amphetamines and pos-
session of paraphernalia.
December 7
Winnie Haynes, 30, of


December 13
Pat Bowen Painting
Class
Pat Bowen teaches oils
and acrylics each Mon-
day at 9 a.m. until noon,
and again at 5:30 until
8:30 in the evening. Fee
is $10 for members; $12
non-members.
Location: Frostproof
Art League 635-7271

Relay for Life Team
Party
All team members
are invited to attend the
2011 Relay for Life Team
Party. The next party will
be held Monday, 6 p.m.,
at Ferguson Distribu-
tion Center. Come learn
about the Relay for Life
plans and activities for
the coming year event.
All team members are in-
vited to attend. For more
information about the
2011 Relay for Life Event
please visit the group's
Facebook page "Relay for
Life of Frostproof".

Tuesday,
December 14
Community Prayer
Mtg
Sponsored by the
Frostproof Ministerial
Association at the City
Hall auditorium from
12:10 to 12:30 second
Tuesday of each month.
Open to the public.
For more information


306 S. Scenic Hwy., Frost-
proof charged with
out-of-county warrant.

December 9
Augustus Dawes, 19,
of 910 Backbone Road,
Babson Park charged
with burglary, larceny and
criminal mischief.


contact: Brian Smith at
257-0244

Now I Can Draw
Frostproof Art League
and Gallery holds a
drawing class from 3:30
to 4:45 p.m. for begin-
ner to intermediate level
artist, age 10 to 14 years
old. Class size limited to
15 students. Cost is free.
Contact Martha Neher
or Gayle Reeder at (863)
635-7172.

Thursday,
December 16
Art After School
Frosptroof Art League
and Gallery holds classes
weekly covering many
different mediums of art
from 3:30 to 4:45 p.m..
Classes are geared for
children from age 6 to
age 10. Class size lim-
ited to 15 students and
the cost is free. Contact
Martha Neher or Gayle
Reeder at (863) 635-7172.

"Preparing for the
Holidays" luncheon
Lake Wales Women's
Connection invites you
to "Preparing for the
Holidays" Luncheon.
The special feature is
presented by "Happy
Flowers" of Lake Wales,
also Christmas music by
Joyce Hanlon and Bar-
bara Taylor and speaker
Ann Combs. 11:30 a.m.
to 1:00 p.m. on Thursday,


Oscar Santibanez, 25, of
222 Dawes Road, Frost-
proof- charged with
driving without a valid
license.
Bernard Verville, 54, of
981 Ulmer Road Lot 80,
Frostproof charged
with violation of proba-
tion, driving with a
suspended license and


December 16, $14. In the
spirit of giving, please
bring a food item for the
Care Center. Lake Wales
Country Club, 2925 Hwy.
60 E. 324-5984 or e-mail
Connie at connieaton@
gmail.com for reserva-
tions.

Friday, December 17
Heartland Pops con-
cert
The Frostproof Historic
Preservation Committee
will present the Heart-
land Pops Christmas
concert at the American
Legion Post #95 Memor
rial Auditorium (formerly
Frostproof High School
Auditorium). The concert
start at 7 p.m. Tickets are
$10 in advance, $15 at
the door. For information
or tickets, contact T.R.
Croley at 635-7832

Saturday, Dec. 18
Christmas Cantata
"Oh, Holy Night"
presented by the King's
Trail Christian Church.
Show starts at 7 p.m. at
the Ramon Theater, no
admission charge, open
to the public.


Monday,
December 20
City Council Meeting
Frostproof City Coun-
cil Meeting. Open to the
public. Starts at 6 p.m.


possessing or displaying
canceled or revoked
license.
Sonia Centeno, 19, of
1024 Stewart Ave., Frost-
proof charged with
giving false information
to law enforcement.
Richard Rounds, 48, of
5 Lake Ave. S., Frostproof
- charged with battery.


For information contact
Sara Adelt, City Clerk
635-7854.

Pat Bowen Painting
Class
Pat Bowen teaches oils
and acrylics each Mon-
day at 9 a.m. until noon,
and again at 5:30 until
8:30 in the evening. Fee
is $10 for members; $12
non-members.
Location: Frostproof
Art League 635-7271

Tuesday,
December 21
Now I Can Draw
Frostproof Art League
and Gallery holds a
drawing class from 3:30
to 4:45 p.m. for begin-
ner to intermediate level
artist, age 10 to 14 years
old. Class size limited to
15 students. Cost is free.
Contact Martha Neher
or Gayle Reeder at (863)
635-7172.

Thursday,
December 23


Art After School
Frosptroof Art League
and Gallery holds classes
weekly covering many
different mediums of art
from 3:30 to 4:45 p.m..
Classes are geared for
children from age 6 to
age 10. Class size lim-
ited to 15 students and
the cost is free. Contact
Martha Neher or Gayle
Reeder at (863) 635-7172.

Friday, December 24
Candelight Service
At First United Meth-
odist Church at 5, 7 and
11 p.m. Contact Lynn
Respress at 635-3107
from 8:30-3:00 for more
information.




To place your
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676-3467


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410 South 11th Street
Lake Wales, FL 33853
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Ringling College art show debuts Thursday


The Lake Wales Arts
Council will open a new


innovative visual arts col-
leges in the United States
as well as a leader in the
use of technology.
The showing is gener-
ously sponsored in part
by Polk State College
Foundation.
Lake Wales Arts Center
is open Monday through
Friday, 9 a.m. 4 p.m.,
and there is no admis-
sion fee. For information
on this exhibition or any


other event, call (863)
676-8426 or visit the
center online at www.
lakewalesartscouncil.org.


>7'o


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City: State:.-- Zip:
IZ Signature (required)
JpayC Home Phone Allernate#
The Lake Wales News Emai:
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Page 4A Frostproof News


December 11, 2010








Frostproof News Page 5A


EDITORIAL


The facts belong to the taxpayers not the
We watched in awe as Lake.Wales I "Citizens have a right to know that
Mayor Jack Van Sickle lectured his I OUR VIEWPOINT their money has been stolen. To try to
fellow commissioners about how they hide and cover that up I won't be a
should act when talking to the press. city accounts was in the half-million- part of that."
We were in awe because he was dollar range. Chief of Police Herb Gillis told
scolding his peers as if they were his Van Sickle didn't like the fact other the commission that revealing the
employees, commissioners talked to the paper amount of the taxpayer funds did not
Lake Wales does not have a strong about the theft of taxpayer funds. He jeopardize the investigation.
mayor form of government but Van disliked it so much that he called a As someone said to us recently, the
Sickle certainly played one on TV special meeting of the city commis- thieves know how much they stole.
Thursday. sion that he might question his peers So, by the time Van Sickle ended
Most of the other commissioners in public, his interrogation it was apparent that
would have none of it, and justifiably Acting as a self-appointed inter- the hastily planned meeting had no
so. rogator, Van Sickle questioned John real purpose other than to provide a
Here is how we got to the Jack Van Paul Rogers. platform for the mayor to scold his
Sickle Show. Rogers said he did nothing wrong: peers publicly.
The Lake Wales News learned that People in town were already talking We might write off Van Sickle's
a large amount of money had turned about the theft, Rogers said. behavior as just another stunt by just
up missing more than week earlier. Carter asked the city attorney if he another politician but we are talking
When approached by the newspa- had broken any laws. The attorney about the theft of a very large sum of
per, the city admitted that they were said no. He asked if any ethics law taxpayer money.
looking into an electronic theft. The was violated. The attorney again said The information about the theft
police chief confirmed that a theft no. does not.belong to Van Sickle or to
had taken place. Carter said emphatically that he be- the government.
Two commissioners, John Paul Rog- lived the public has a right to know The stolen money belongs to the
ers and Mike Carter, indicated to the that a half million dollars of taxpayer people of Lake Wales.
paper that the amount stolen from money was missing. The facts belong to the people of


government
Lake Wales.
The taxpayers are the victims of this
thievery.
Instead of wasting time scolding
his colleagues Van Sickle.could have
provided the city with the leadership
it sorely needed.
He could have used the time to
reassure the public that city staff has
changed its banking procedures.
He could have used the meeting to
share as much information with the
public as possible so that panic and
uncertainty were minimized.
We know that our police and city
staff will get to the bottom of the situ-
ation. Citizens can have confidence
in their ability.
Until then we hope the mayor can
resist the urge to act like he is in
charge of the city government and
other elected officials. He is just one
of five commissioners.
When our local government is in
crisis we should expect transparency
and honesty from our elected officials
and city leaders.


Powde
In the Declaration
of Independence, our
forefathers made a bold
statement of what it
meant to be a citizen of
this emerging nation:
"We hold these Truths
to be self-evident, that all
Men are created equal,
that they are endowed by
their Creator with certain
unalienable rights, that
among these are Life,
Liberty, and the Pursuit of
Happiness."
The latter phrase
sometimes is rearranged
by younger citizens to the
Happiness of Pursuit. I
have no quarrel with that.

The assertion of the
rights to Life and Liberty
is absolute; the assertion
regarding Happiness is
the right to pursue it.
It's your right, Bubba;
the pursuit is up to you.
Today, we probably
take the rights to Life and
Liberty without a second
thought. That is, in large
part, what it means to be
an American. It was not
always thus in the world,
nor is it today in many
nations.

While the Declaration
of Independence sets
forth the concepts of
these rights, it is the Con-
stitution that enumerates
them:
The right to be
protected against un-


>
,r on a pig's nose
proclaimed neo-Naz
THINKING charged with murder
OUT LOUD am not that familiar
S" d ktthe case. The first jul
S ) deadlocked 1O-to-2 i
favor of acquittal.
4 What has caught ti
S.L Frisbie tention of the press i


reasonable searches and
seizures.
The right to indict-
ment by a grand jury.
The right of protection
against double jeopardy.
The right of protec-
tion against self-incrimi-
nation.
The right to due pro-
cess of law.
The right against tak-
ing of private property for
public use without proper
compensation.
The right to a speedy
trial.
The right to trial by
jury.
The right to confront
accusers.
The right to subpoena
witnesses.
The right to a lawyer.
The right to reason-
able bail.
The right to freedom
from excessive fines and
from cruel and unusual
punishment.
The right to a cosme-
tologist.
Uh, say what?

Over in Pasco County,
there is a murder trial
going on in which a self-


i is
r. I
with
ry
n

he at-
s that


he has a swastika, a dirty
word, and various other
things tattooed on his
face and neck. The judge
has ruled that these em-
blems of self-expression
nould- he nrPludicial anrd


has ordered the


m co-
m cov-


ered up before trial each
morning.
With that I have no
problem. We have judges
to ensure fair trials.
What sort of sticks
in my craw is that the
taxpayers and we all
know who they are pay
a cosmetologist $125 each
morning to come cover
up the offensive body art
with cosmetics.
That's $625 a week in
beauty aids for a man
standing trial for murder.
Not being a rock musi-
cian, I am not that big an
expert on cosmetics for
men, but I know there are
products called conceal-
ers and pancake make-
up.
Apparently, these prod-
ucts will hide anything
but a guilty conscience.
In the final analysis,
you can put powder on


Fl


The Frostproof News
Jim Gouvellis Publisher
Aileen Hood General Manager
Brian Ackley Editor


Published every SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN POLK C
Wednesday and Saturday at Six Months..........................$25
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by Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IN-COUNI
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Periodical postage paid at One Year..............................$39
Frostproof, Florida and SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
additional Entry Office OTHER FLORIDA COUNTIES
*Phone (863) 676-3467 Six Months..........................$4(
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:Ou
5.6
1.7:
TY
4.00
9.0o

7S
0.00
5.00
ON
4.00
2.00


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


A tax giveaway for the rich


Once again we are
treated to the total wipe-
out of any serious treat-
ment of the outrageous
tax giveaway from the
middle-class Americans
to the billionaires and
corporations who now
enjoy a no tax feast while
we starve!
Billionaires report that
they pay less tax than
their secretaries, Exxon-
Mobil made trillions in
profits and paid no taxes
yet got a refund from the
American taxpayers of
hundreds of billions of
dollars.
Billionaires and corpo-
rations now rule and if
you do not like what your
Senator or Congressman
is doing to you, too bad.
The corporations still will
"buy them" and the Con-


leg
an
the
mi
thi
wr

(18

cia
pro
ju<
de
the
dil
the
lar
pr,
po
ab
co
la\
leg

Su
thi
Co
a g
an
W
Co
ua
ins
the

da
to
r'-U


cor
RISBIE 6 rep
is
no
to
no
fro
Ift
ela
UNTY do
8 brt
3 A
MAIL .i
0 lil
0
jui
op
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0 Co


gress will do what their
true masters tell them to
do.
The deficit is not and
cannot be caused by
Social Security.
The deficit is not and
cannot be caused by
minimum wages.
The deficit is not and
cannot by caused by un-
employment insurance.
The deficit is caused
by runaway spending
on wars, Greed on Wall
Street, tax breaks for bil-
lionaires who truly do not
need them, Tax loopholes
designed by corporations
and passed by Senators
and Congressmen who
are "owned" by gifts from
those same Corporations.
Make no mistake, rep-
resentatives who receive
a salary from Congress


of $174,000 per year and
in ten years come home
with many, many multi-
millions of dollars in their
pocket did not scrimp
and save and take a bag
lunch from home.
Can you spell "bribes?"
No, those are just gifts
from folks who support
me, can't vote for me but,
to whom I will also sup-
port and vote.
Call your Senators and
Representatives now
and tell them that every
American and every
corporation in America
or which does business
in America must pay a
fair share and there are
no exceptions and no tax
free rules for some on the
backs of other Americans.
Walter O'Rourke
Bartow


GOP counting on activist judges
"The powers of the I judicially enforceable
islature are defined constraints on legislative
d limited; and that actions that are irrecon-
ose limits may not be cilable with constitutional
mistaken, or forgotten, commands."
e Constitution is Thus a legislature's
written George judgment that a mea-
- Marbury v. Madison Will sure is desirable does
803) not relieve a court of the
Debates about judi- duty to judge whether it
al review concern the is constitutional. "The
opriety and scope of Willett sits, struck down a political branches decide
dicial supervision of law for violating the Texas if laws pass; courts decide
mocracy, and involve Constitution's prohibi- if laws pass muster,"
e countermajoritarian tion of retroactive laws. wrote Willett. Judges must
lemma: How to square The law immunized one recognize that legislators'
e principle of popu- company from a pending policymaking primacy "is
* sovereignty with the lawsuit by a man dying not constitutional carte
actice of allowing ap- of asbestos exposure. The blanche to regulate all
)inted judges, account- question was: Should the spheres of everyday life;
le to no contemporary court blindly defer to the pre-eminence does not
nstituency, to overturn Legislature's judgment equal omnipotence."
ws enacted by elected that its police power What Willett says of the
gislators? its general authority to states' police power is
A case destined for the protect the public welfare applicable to Congress'.
preme Court concerns trumped the constitu- power under the Com-
e health care law. The tional ban on retroactive merce Clause: "When
institution establishes legislation? police power becomes
government of limited The court said no. What a convenient talisman
d enumerated powers. Willett said in his concur- waved to shortcircuit our
which one empowers ring opinion is pertinent constitutional design,
ingress to force individ- to the health insurance deference devolves into
ls to purchase health mandate. dereliction." And: "If leg-
surance and to punish Has the U.S. Supreme islators come to believe
ose who do not? Court construed the that police power is an
Supporters of the man- Commerce Clause so ever-present constitu-
te answer: The power permissively that Con- tional trump card they
regulate interstate gress has seized, by can play whenever it suits
mmerce. Opponents increments, a sweeping them, overreaching is
ply: Unless that power police power that enables inexorable."
infinitely elastic, it does it to do virtually anything The judiciary's role as
)t authorize Congress it wants? Willett's words, referee of constitutional
forbid the inactivity of applied to the Obamacare disputes is,Willett says,
)t purchasing a product mandate debate, high- "confined yet conse-
im a private company. light this question: When quential." But, "If judicial
the power is infinitely does judicial deference review means anything,
astic, Congress can to legislative majorities it is that judicial restraint
) anything eat your become dereliction of the does not allow every-
occoli, or else -- and judicial duty to discern thing." And there can
nerica no longer has a limits to what majorities come a "constitutional
united government, are lawfully permitted to tipping point" where, by
Fortunately, a Texas do? excessive deference to a
dge recently wrote an Willett says: In our legislature in the face of
)inion that provides democracy, the legisla- a constitutional limita-
*rtinent clarity about ture's policymaking power tion, "adjudication more
e tension between "though unrivaled, is not resembles abdication."
dging and majoritarian- unlimited." The Consti- Then a state's police pow-


m. The Texas Supreme
)urt, on which Don


tution reigns supreme:
"There must remain


WILL 16


J.J,).Uch1I.JL,1 1,zu VS


"You weren't the only one he betrayed."


I


na opr h- i]- 11 m n0


I









Pag 6A Fm st ro- N ews" -_________ _____ ^_ ___ ____ ,,^.qn, ____ _____________ _. ____ ^ D ecem ber___ ^_ 11, 2010^q. ------ --- ------- ----------------------- ------- -------------------* ------ --


By BILL KACZOR
ASSOCIATED PRESS

TALLAHASSEE, Fla.
(AP) A divided Florida
Supreme Court refused to
back off Thursday from a
prior ruling centered on
an arrest in Lake Wales
that excludes evidence
obtained by police if they
knock on a suspect's door
but fail to announce why
they are there.
The 4-2 decision came
in the case of Kathy Jo
Cable, who was arrested
in 2007 at the Lake Wales
Inn on U.S. Highway
27, after a deputy was..
checking license plates
there, according to court
records.
A Polk County deputy
announced who he was
when he knocked but
failed to say he had a
warrant for her arrest for
failure to appear on a
drug possession charge.
Once inside he found
methamphetamine that
resulted in an additional
charge of drug trafficking


against Cable.
The high court ruled
the methamphetamine
had to be excluded as
evidence, citing a 1964
decision in a similar case.
The majority wrote in
the unsigned opinion that
a more recent U.S. Su-
preme Court ruling does
not apply to this case
because it's based on the
U.S. Constitution rather
than Florida law.
The federal justices in
2006 ruled that the exclu-
sion of evidence is not
an appropriate remedy
for Fourth Amendment
knock-and-announce
violations in a Michi-
gan case. Justices Ricky
Polston and Jorge Labarga
dissented.
Polston wrote that he
would have receded from
the 1964 decision because
the state law does not
provide for a remedy. The
high court in that case
decided excluding evi-
dence is an appropriate
violation of a requirement
rooted in the common-


law sanctity given to a
person's home.
"Because the majority's
decision is premised on
common-law principles,
the Florida Legislature
may choose to eliminate
the majority's exclusion-
ary rule for knock-and-
announce violations,"
Polston wrote.
Labarga joined in
Polston's dissent. Chief
Justice Charles Canady
did not participate in the
decision.
Cable pleaded no
contest to the traffick-
ing charge and received
a three-year sentence
but reserved the right to
appeal the denial of her
motion to suppress the
evidence.
The 2nd District Court
of Appeal ruled for
Cable chased on the 1964
precedent but certified
the issue to the Supreme
Court as a question of
great public importance.
It now returns to the
appeal court for further
proceedings.


WILL: Counting on activist judges


FROM PAGE 5
er (or Congress' power
under the Commerce
Clause) can "extinguish
constitutional liberties
with nonchalance."
Like the U.S. Constitu-
tion, the Texas Consti-
tution, Willett notes, is
irrefutablyy framed in
proscription." It "de-
clares an emphatic 'no'
to myriad government
undertakings," no matter
how much a majority
might desire them.
So does the U.S.
Constitution, as in the
first words of the Bill of
Rights: "Congress shall
make no law..."
Judicial review, he
writes, sometimes means
preventing a majority
today from overturning
yesterday's supermajority
- "the one that ratified
our solemn Constitu-


tion."
Hence the idea that
federal judges are ac-
countable to no current
constituency. When
construing the Constitu-
tion, however, they are
duty-bound to be faithful
to the constituency of
those who framed and
ratified it.
"There is," Willett
explains, "a profound
difference between an
activist judge and an
engaged judge.
The former creates
rights not specified or
implied by the Constitu-
tion.
The latter defends
rights the Framers actu-
ally placed there, and
prevents the elected
branches from usurping
the judiciary's duty to
declare what the Consti-
tution means. Let us
hope the Supreme Court


Legislative

delegation to meet


justices are engaged
when considering the
insurance mandate.


RESULTS: Moratorium yeilds


Supreme Court splits


over Lake Wales case


FRISBIE: Powder on a pig


FROM PAGE 5
a pig's nose, but you still
have a pig.
I would have no objec-
tion to the taxpayers'
paying a few bucks to the
Avon lady or a Mary Kay
rep for cosmetics and a
quick lesson in how to
apply them.
But by the time this
trial ends, the taxpay-
ers will have ponied up
several thousand bucks
to pretty up a defendant
who wanted everybody
who saw him to know


that he is a neo-Nazi.
I don't buy it. Except
when the tax bill arrives.

(S. L. Frisbie is retired.
Not too many months
ago, he had his friend
Mary apply a little con-
cealer to a facial bruise
- okay, it was a minor
black eye to keep from
having to explain howu
he got it. It didn't cost the
taxpayers a dime. And no,
don't ask him how he got
it; he's already forgotten.
That's his story, and he's
sticking to it.)


hi


FROM PAGE 1
of line with neighboring
counties.
Newbold added she
had clients who were
now in the beginning
stages of the permit pro-
cess. Those clients, she
said, were commercial,
not industrial.
She also lauded the
county commission for
its foresight and being
ahead of the curve.
"I think you'll see more
and more counties come
on board," she said.
One of those counties,
however, might not be
Oceola, which neighbors
Polk County in the up-
per northeast corner of
Polk at Poinciana, which
straddles both counties.
According to Jeff
Goldmacher who is
not in the construction
or related industries, but
instead is a founding
member of the Com-
mittee for the Advance-
ment of Poinciana, also
known as CAP Osceola
County has an impact fee
as high if not higher than
Polk County.
In addition, there is
a concurrency fee for
District 3 in Osceola
County; much of District
3 includes Poinciana.
Goldmacher termed this
concurrency fee a second
impact fee.
The lengthier impact
fee moratorium Polk


County commissioners
approved is going to be a
boon, he said. He called
it a "first good step." He
firmly believes that the
moratorium extension is
going to attract busi-
nesses that offer good
paying jobs to the Polk
County side of Poinciana.
In turn, that will attract
people to move to Poin-
ciana also to the Polk
County side because
it will offer an alternative
to commuting to Or-
lando. "This is something
that is really going to
help Polk County," said
Goldmacher. "I applaud
the commissioners, I ap-
plaud their vote."
'Immediate results?
Whether there has
been an uptick in the
number of applica-
tions filed (referred to as
"pulled), no figures are


T *7 'I IM
NOTICE NOTICE NOTICE
Time Running Out for Medicare
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- R .


If you want to have an
item to speak about at
the annual Legislative
Delegation meeting get
your ideas down and get
in touch with Sen. JD
Alexander's office by Dec.
22.
The annual meeting is
scheduled at 9 a.m. at the
Polk County Commis-.
sioner's chamber Room
of the Polk County Ad-
ministrative Building, 330
W. Church St., Bartow.
To get something on
the agenda
you can call 863-679-


4847 no later than noon
Dec. 22.
Alexander asks people
to submit nine copies,
prepared with a 3 hole
punch, of all handouts
and other information to
Alexander, 201 W. Central
Ave., Lake Wales.
All proposals for local
bills are expected to be
presented at the hearing
and must be drafted in
bill form, accompanied
by a resolution from the
local government sup-
porting the proposed
legislation.


YOU CAN



COVER UP











Or you can heal them.

If you have a wound that has lasted
more than 30 days, it's time to roll
up your sleeves and get help. You
need The Wound Healing Center
at Lake Wales Medical Center. Our
combination of nationally accredited
care, expertise and technology means
we can heal almost any wound -
even those that won't respond to
conventional treatment.
For more information, call
863.679.1986.


SLA K WAI.E MEDICAI. (.IC'NTEI


A Christm
Rejoicing 1


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sanctuary Cho
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ECEMBER
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of Praise and
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Nursery Provided
ly:
ir Of
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B" Street
n of:
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l9fth


available according to
Wanda Kendrick with the
county building division.
Figures for December
will not be available until
the end of the month,
and she was not aware
whether a daily count
for commercial develop-
ment has been instituted
since the Dec. 1 BOCC
vote.
This time of the year
is slow when it comes to
pulling permits, accord-
ing to Linda Stiles, one
of three lead permit tech-
nicians with the building
division.
"We've moved nine
single-family residences
this month," said Stiles.
She added that the mood
is one of ebullience
regarding the impact fee
moratorium extension.
"People are happy," she
said.


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December 11, 2010 Frostproof News Page 7A


FO


Making This Right

Beaches
Claims
Cleanup

Economic Investment

Environmental
Restoration

Health and Safety
Wildlife


For information visit: bp.com
restorethegulf.gov
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bpamerica
youtube.com/bp


.











"My family's been fishing for eight generations. It's just a way of life.
That's why we've got to get this cleaned up."
Pete Floyd
Commercial Fisherman,
Pascagoula, Mississippi



When the spill hit, a lot of people said it would be the end. BP said
they would try to make this right. But how was an energy company
going to help a fisherman?

Putting People to Work
The first thing they did was rent my boat and hire me to help with
the cleanup. They made up my losses so I could pay my bills. And
they worked with all kinds of people here from fishermen and
shrimpers to restaurant owners. It helped us keep our businesses
open. And it helped us make ends meet so we could support
our families.

Staying for the Long Haul
When they capped the well in July and finally killed it, we were all
relieved. But would BP stick around? Well, they did. The beaches
are clean and we're back on the water fishing so things are getting
a whole lot better. They are still here and have said they will keep
working for as long as it takes.

Getting Back to Normal
BP asked me to share my story with you to keep you informed. If
you still need help, please call 1-866-448-5816 or go to bp.com. If
you're wondering what you can do, well the next time you're
shopping, buy a little Gulf seafood. There is none finer.


For assistance, please call:
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
floridagulfresponse.com


bp


2010 BP, E&P


A.,Q-3 "d-


Frostproof News Page 7A


December 11, 2010








r ga 0 rostpro iIUL AA D'vv



Alexander facing tough budget task, again


By BILL KACZOR
ASSOCIATED PRESS

TALLAHASSEE (AP) -
A legislative economist
told the Senate Budget
Committee on Tuesday
that she expects a pre-
dicted $2.5 billion budget
gap to widen because the
state's economic recovery
has been slower than
forecast.
The panel's chairman,
JD Alexander of Lake
Wales, hinted that Gov.-
elect Rick Scott's cam-
paign promises for deep
spending and tax cuts
may run into trouble in
the Legislature.
Alexander said it's too
early to tell whether law-
makers will be able to cut
spending by $4 billion
or reduce property and
corporate income taxes
as Scott, also a Republi-
can, proposed during his
campaign.
"Now we are in the
governing mode," Al-
exander said. "I would
hope that all of us-take
a deep breath and move


away from campaign
rhetoric and start focus-
ing on how do we make
the best decisions pos-
sible to move our state
forward."
State economists in
September estimated the
$2.5 billion difference
between anticipated
revenues and expenses
ranging from high prior-
ity to critical for the
2011-12 budget year that
begins July 1.
Amy Baker, coordina-
tor of the Legislature's
Office of Economic and
Demographic Research,
told the committee that
all the numbers haven't
yet been crunched, but
it looks like general rev-
enue will be lower and
costs higher than in the
prior forecast.
"It sounds like it's all
bad, but the truth of the
matter is we are starting
to show improvement" in
the economy, Baker said.
"It's just not as strong as
we'd hoped it would be at
this point."
Baker's bad news in-


cludes up to $400 million
more in state Medic-
aid expenses and $150
million less in school
property tax collections
due to a 1.2 percent drop
in real estate values than
previously predicted for
2011-12.
The state now also
expects to collect $30
million less from util-
ity gross receipt taxes
earmarked for educa-
tion construction and
maintenance projects.
Gasoline and other
transportation taxes also
are expected to drop,
which would cut fund-
ing for road building and
maintenance.
Economists will meet
Dec. 14 to update their
forecast of general rev-
enue, mainly sales tax,
but collections are run-
ning $136 million below
estimate for the current
budget year.
Baker said it looks like
they'll be off another
$100 million for Novem-
ber when those collec-
tions are calculated in a


Tax exemptions



can be filed now


People filing for first-
time homestead exemp-
tion or agriculture clas-
sification should apply
now to beat the first time
of the year rush, Marsha
Faux, Polk County Prop-
erty Appraiser said.
The rush happens be-
tween Jan. 1-March 1.
Faux said her office is
now accepting applica-
tions for homestead,
portability, widow, wid-


ower, disability, veterans,
senior, conservation,
religious, agricultural and
charitable exemptions.
Applicants must file in


couple weeks.
The current general
revenue estimate for the
next budget year is $24.7
billion, which would be
a 7.4 percent increase,
but that that number
probably will drop in the
.update that Scott will
use to make his budget
recommendations to the
Legislature early next
year.
Other drags on the
budgetary outlook
include flat lottery


receipts and a drop in
slot machine gambling.
Motor vehicle fee collec-
tions also are projected
to drop.
Alexander said his
main focus will on reduc-
ing Medicaid expenses,
also a key plank of Scott's
platform. More than half
of those funds come
from the federal govern-
ment, but the state's por-
tion still eats up nearly
half of Florida's 6 percent
sales tax, Alexander said.


person at county offices
in Bartow, Winter Haven
or Lakeland. Call 534-
4777 for information.


Scott also has pro-
posed cutting state
contributions to its
pension fund by making
employees, who haven't
had an across-the-board
raise in five years, pay
into the plan. Alexander,
though, said that's not
the first place he'd look
for savings.
"I may have to go
there, but I'm trying to
do it by controlling costs
in other programs," Alex-
ander said.


OUR SPECIALTY

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CAROLINE C. HONCULADA, M.D., AGAF
Gastroenterology & Hepatology
Diplomate, American Boards of Internal Medicine
& Gastroenterology Fellow, American
Gastroenterological Association
Diagnosis & Treatment of Digestive & Liver
Diseases
Comprehensive Diagnostic & Therapeutic
Endoscopy
Colorectal Cancer Screening

863-679-9494
Fax: 863-679-8866
421 Linden Lane, Lake Wales, FL 33853


HEALTH 'NEWS


Knee Arthroscopy
Partial Knee
Replacement Surgery
Minimally Invasive
Hip & Knee Surgery
Primary Hip & Knee
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Alternate Bearing
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Medicare and Insurance Accepted
Affordable Fees for Uninsured
o Convenient Later Appointments
Home Visits



1110 Druid Circle, Lake Wales
(across from the Emergency Entrance of the hospital)

Monday-Thursday 9AM-8PM, Friday 9AM-12PM
www.drbarringer.com


Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Heart?

As you age, your blood vessels often become stiff to increase the risk of
high blood pressure. Luckily, a new study done through the University Of
Athens by Greek researchers showed the surprising link between drinking
coffee and preventing high blood pressure.

Previous research has been inconclusive as to whether or not coffee is bad or
good for the heart. This new study was done on 485 men and women within
the age group of 65 to 100 who lived on a small island in the Aegean Sea
called Ikaria. The natives of this island normally live up to. their 90th birth-
day,.and the researchers wanted to find out their secret to long life.

All of the participants -within the study had high blood pressure, and they
underwent scans to determine the state of the stiffness of their blood vessels.
Within the group 11% drank 3 or more cups of Joe each day, 56% drank 1
to 2 cups of coffee per day, and 33% drank less than one cup or no coffee
at all. The participants in the group that consumed 1 to 2 cups of coffee per
day also had 25% more elasticity in their blood vessels than those who did
not drink any coffee whatsoever.

This study also took into account other factors that can affect aging in the
blood vessels, such as gender, smoking, physical activity, age, education,
blood pressure, body weight, diet, and diabetes. The study also revealed that
those participants that drank I to 2 cups of coffee each day were less likely
to ha\ e cardio\ ascular disease, high cholesterol, diabetes, or be overweight.


By Mark Ramos

What is the reason for this?

The men and women within the study mostly drank traditional Greek cof-
fee that came in small, espresso-sized servings. This Greek coffee is much
stronger and contains more caffeine than espresso, and it also contains im-
portant compounds, like magnesium, potassium, flavanoids, vitamin E, and
niacin to combat damage to the blood vessels caused by age. These com-
pounds blocked the damaging effects of oxidation that can create inflam-
mation in the blood vessels. This oxidation will also produce free radical
damage, which will injure the cells in the body and cause stiffness in the
blood vessels, resulting in high blood pressure.

Traditional Greek style coffee has more of these compounds than other cof-
fee methods because it is unfiltered and boiled. The study results showed
that hypertensive patients are recommended to drink coffee in moderation at
1 to 2 cups per day to slow down the advances of arterial aging.

One other interesting aspect of the study was that the participants normally
drank their coffee at home or in caf6s as they relaxed, meaning that there
could be psychological benefits to regularly drinking coffee to benefit the
heart. This is fantastic news for fans of coffee, so take the time to try differ-
ent coffee brew methods, like Greek style coffee, which you can enjoy in
moderation to protect your heart health!


I


Pocket Kn4A

CoRedables




4CV

trw*


December 11, 2010


P 8A F f News


I







Deceber11,210 rosiroo New Pae 9


THE MOST ADVANCED HEALTH CARE IS RIGHT HERE.


"Winter Haven Hospital is

at the forefront of urologic c






Sijo Parekattil, M.D.
Director of Urology and Robotics
Winter Haven Hospital


Winter Haven
Hospital

CENTER FOR UROLOGY

www.winterhavenhospital.org

AN AFFILIATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SHANDS HEALTHCARE


We are pleased to welcome Sijo Parekattil, M.D., as Director of Urology
and Robotics at Winter Haven Hospital. Board certified in Urology,
Dr. Parekattil is one of the world's most renowned robotic micro-
surgeons having performed more robotic microsurgery procedures
than any other surgeon in the world. He joins us full time from the
University of Florida College of Medicine and Shands Healthcare and
will continue his work as Assistant Professor of Medicine and
Co-director of Robotic Surgery in the University's Urology Department.
The addition of Dr. Parekattil provides Polk County men and women
with access to university-level urologic research and care-exciting
new treatment options for prostate cancer, infertility, chronic groin pain
and women's health. Please join us in welcoming Dr. Parekattil to the
Winter Haven community.
Compassion. Innovation. Trust. We're your family's choice.


Former inormtio0aoutWiner ave Hspia'
Cete000Urloy cll86-92462


Frostproof News Page 9A


December 11, 2010







Pane iDA Frosturoof News December 11, 2010


Out


and About

With Carol Kuehn


Hahn lends a hand to Bol Scouts camp
Lake Wales' Flaming Arrow Scout Reservation on Boy Scout Road, which opened -
45 years ago, soon will be a lot easier to find. :
A 32-foot sign and mural designed by local artist James R. Hahn will be installed
at the entry to the camp to welcome visitors.
The striking oval design depicts a flaming arrow going through a bullseye. Hahn
donated the design image to the scouting organization and it is a licensed prod-
uct. It will be printed on T-shirts which will be available soon.
Sharing in the recent unveiling ceremony were Dick and Joan Nathans and Bart
and Alice Keen. Nathans is the Lake Regions district commissioner for the Boy
Scout Council. Keen is a ranger at the Flaming Arrow camp.
Several thousand Boy Scouts from Florida, other states and even troops from as
far away as Columbia, South America, have attended the camp. Opportunities to
participate in archery, swimming, boating, horseback riding and other experiences
are part of the overall program.
The flaming arrow design is part of a new program developed by James R. Hahn
Production Co. called "Art to Reality." It is specifically designed to help schools, & B
camps and other area business to "revitalize" and adopt a special easily identifi- .
able look. \
The entry sign was sponsored by Aaron's Inc. John Wood Family, Progress Ener-
gy, The Lake Wales Breakfast Rotary Club, Shawn Kellerman and Kyle and Marissa
Story.
James and Kristie Lawson of Arcade Coffee Shop and Linda Brann-Hier, manag-
er of Bob Evans, provided treats for the guests at the dinner and unveiling ceremo-
ny, which was held at Waves Gallery and Club in Lake Wales.


The Hahn designed logo will not only be on signs, but shirts as well.


James Hahn with Alice and Bart Keen and Dick and
Joan Nathans.


PHOTOS BY
CAROL KUEHN



Bart and Alice Keen and Kay Hahn.
7a aa a.
CERTIFIED HOME REPAIRS
863-232-8974
One Call Does it All
GENERAL
Punchouts, Power washing Walks, Driveways, Decks,
Patios, (Water Supply Needed) Screen Repairs -
Gutters New & Repairs
KITCHEN
Leaky Faucets Drains and Piping, Cabinets, Counter Tops,
Sinks, Appliance Hook-ups, Refacing
BATH
Doors,Interior, Mirrors, Vanities, Sinks, Toilets, Tubs,
Tub Walls, Refacing, Flooring
CARPENTRY
Shelving, Framing Exterior Doors, Screen Doors, Sheet Rock
Repairs or New Installation, Trim Work, Roofing Repair
FLOORING
R Tile Flooring, Wall Repairs or New Installations, Wood
SFlooring, Laminates, Sheetgoods
licenseed and Insured


When Staying Home is No Longer an Option...
And a'Nursing Home is Too Much...


Assisted Living at Water's Edge is Perfect.

It's never an easy decision but you'll feel confident knowing you've made
the right choice for your loved one. There's an array of support services from
chef prepared meals to medication management. Dedicated licensed practical
nurses offer our residents care and support 16 hours a day, 7 days a week.
The Inn at Water's Edge: Assisted living, starting at $2,650.
The Springs at Water's Edge: Secured Alzheimer's memory care.

Stop by for a tour and complimentary consultation.


Call Cindy Today!
863.678.6800


Assisted Living License #11669


WATER'S EDGE

of Lake Wales

Lake Wales Retirement Center Inc.
10 GTove Avenue West like Wales, I oi(lda 3385i3
www.',ialcl isedgeseniorhlving or


B r

For zso






SUN lC ker
HEARTLAND ,
EDMONS at :i" .i '467


OWN., WO -


FREE Digital fingerprint and photo program for all of the children
that attend! This specialized equipment tours the country and
will only be in our area during the following times!

WHO: Parents,please bring your children of 'all ages
to one of the top Child Safety programs in the country! -
There is no age limit.
WHY: So many children are reported missing each -
day in the U.S. Most are found within minutes or hours
and have happy endings. Police officials say that time
is critical in the recovery of missing children. One ma- .
jor problem that costs precious time is the gathering of .
current photographs, fingerprints, and statistical infor-'
mation to assist law enforcement agencies.

WHAT: FBI quality digital fingerprints and photo-
graphs. S.I.P. Kids will take a child's picture and finger-
prints, using a digital inkless fingerprint capture device, |
and include them as part of the child's file, which is then
provided to the parent. The parents can use the records ,,
they receive to turn directly over to authorities any- -.
where in the world to instantly aid in an investigation.
WHERE: Sorensen & Schade Chrysler Dodge Jeep -
21529 U.S. Hwy 27 North, Lake Wales

WHEN: Friday, December 10th 3:00pm-7:00pm
Saturday, December 11th 10:00am-4:00pm
No Data Basing: No records of the visit are maintained. The only record of the visit will go home ai-
rectly with parents for safekeeping. S.I.P. ,ii,: '.il not take any personal information from the children
A photo and fingerprints are taken and parents fill in the personal profile for their records once they .ar
in the privacy of their own home.

Local Contact: S.I.P. KIDS
lWayne W'ealhersby Safity il Pin Pris
863-676-0733 !-3 -16-2-4ll




xrl I I*D .S-e



l Hwy 27 N., Lake Wales
1 Mile South of E/gle R/dge A1Ja/I


Do you have
unwanted
items that you
want to sell?



Our very
knowledgeable
staff can help
you with
placing an ad.
Just call
533-4183
today.


December 11, 2010


Page IOA Frostproof News


j -- r









Frostproof News Page 1 IA


December 11 2010


OBITUARIES


Jerry Alton Horne


William Leon Mimbs


Mr. Jerry Alton Horne of
Roanoke, Alabama, died
Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2010, at
his home. He was 78.
Mr. Home was born
Aug. 3, 1932, the son
of John Lee and Lofa
Virginia Eddins Home.
He was of the Method-
ist faith, had worked for
Southern Railroad for 14
years and Citrus World
Inc. Mr. Home served in
the United States Army
during the Korean War.

S

Sarah H. Johnson of
Lake Wales passed away
Monday, Dec. 6, 2010, at
her residence. She was 80.
She was born March
9, 1930, in Tangerine,
Florida, to the late Fred
C. and Annie Pearl (Wil-
liams) Houser, and came
here from Avon Park in
1936.
She was a retired
registered nurse for Lake
Wales Hospital and a
member of First Christian
Church of Lake Wales.
She was also a former
member of Lake Wales
Eastern Starr and enjoyed
reading, puzzle books
and cooking.
Sarah was preceded in
death by her husband,
Sydney Warren Johnson,


He is survived by his
companion, Karen Stone
of Roanoke, Alabama;
a daughter, Cynthia D.
Home of Lake Wales; a
grandchild, Jaren Horne
of Lake Wales; a brother,
Thomas G. Home of
Charlotte, North Carolina.
Mr. Home was preced-
ed in death by his parents
and a sister, Virginia
Home Irvin.
In lieu of flowers dona-
tions may be made to the


Salvation Army or Coun-
try Side Hospice.
Graveside services will
be held at 1 p.m., Friday,
Dec. 10, at Fort Mitchell
Cemetery in Phenix City,
Alabama, with the Rev.
Brian Moore officiating.
Quattlebaum Funeral
Home is in charge of ar-
rangements. Condolences
may be expressed at
www.quattlebaumfuner-
alhome.com.


;arah H. Johnson


in 1998 and two sons,
Danny Johnson in 1995
and Robbie Johnson in
2009. Survivors include
her daughter, Barbara
Faye Skinner of Bartow;
son, Ted and Kathy John-
son of Avon Park; sister,
Louise Carden of Lake
Wales; and three grand-,
children, Jason and Chris-
ten Johnson, Matt Odom
and Dustin Odom; and
two great-grandchildren,
Matthew and Charles.
Memorial service will
be held 11 a.m. Friday,
Dec. 10, 2010, at Marion
'Nelson Funeral Home
in Lake Wales. In lieu of
flowers, donations may
be made to the First
Christian Church Build-
ing Fund.


Condolences may be
sent to the family and the
webcast of the service can
be viewed at www.mari-
onnelsonfuneralhome.
com.
Marion Nelson Funeral
Home is in charge of ar-
rangements.



Wilma

Guggeri

Wilma Guggeri, 92, of
Lakeshore, Florida, died
Wednesday, Dec. 8, 2010,
at Lake Wales Medical
Center.
Johnson Funeral Home,
Lake Wales is in charge of
arrangements.


COMMUNITY CALENDAR and EVENTS


Saturday,
December 11
Magic: The Gathering
Come and explore
another world as we
introduce you to clas-
sic game playing from
5:30 to 7:30 p.m.! Magic:
The Gathering has been
around since the early
90's, with good reason. It's
a fast paced card game
where you rule your own
universe! You're welcome
to bring your own Magic
cards! For teens and
adults, ages 13 and up.

Holiday Breakfast to
benefit Habitat for Hu-
manity
At Chalet Suzanne from
8:30-10:30 a.m. Vendors,
fashions and more! Please
bring donations for the
Lake Wales Care Ceenter
Angel Tree; unwrapped
gifts for children and
adults. (For suggestions
ask when making reserva-
tions) Portions of the pro-
ceeds to benefit Habitat
for Humanity. For reser-
vations call 1-800-433-
6011 or 863-676-6011.

MidFlorida Scribes
Writer's Support at Lake
Wales Library
Call 678-4004 or for
more details on this and
other Library activities go
to www.mypclc.org

2010 Christmas Parade


Lake Wales The City of
Bells and Kiwanis Club
presents "Have a High-
lander Christmas." For
more information call
Larry Tonjes at 676-7278
or via email at mike.
welsh@citrusworld.com.

Sunday,
December 12
Holiday Breakfast to
benefit Habitat for Hu-
manity
At Chalet Suzanne from
8:30-10:30 a.m. Vendors,
fashions and more! Please
bring donations for the
Lake Wales Care Center
Angel Tree; unwrapped
gifts for children and
adults. (For gift sugges-
tions ask when making
reservations) Portions of
the proceeds to benefit
Habitat for Humanity. For
reservations call 1-800-
433-6011 or 863-676-
6011.

Lake Wales Chorale &
Lake Wales Youth Cho-
rale Holiday Celebration
The combined chorus-
es celebrate songs of the
season, from traditional
to classical to pop. Holi-
day fun and memories for
the whole family.
hurch of Good Sheperd,
221 S. Fourth St. Con-
tact: 863-676-8426. The
Christmas Pagent at First
Presbyterian Church


Come and see the
children of FPC present
the traditional pageant,
"The Old, Old, Story"
presented in costume
and including music and
drama. The pageant will
be followed by walk-
ing through A Night in
Bethlehem where you will
experience what Bethle-
hem may have been like.
This presentation will be
in the Family Life Center,
First Presbyterian Church,
16 N. Third Street; 676-
0711.

Free Tae Kwon Do at
Christ's Church
Tae Kwon Move Group
every Sunday night, 7-8
p.m. at 2039 S.R. 60 E. in
the shopping plaza across
from WalMart. Contact
Rick McCoy at 863-632-
1781 or rlmccoy9383@
wildblue.net for more
information.

Monday, December
13
Drop-in Crafts for Kids
Drop into the Children's
Library and make a fun
craft, all day, free! 678-
4004 for information.






676-3467


For $30 you can place a Happy Ad to announce a
new birth, an engagement, a birthday, an anniversary,
all "A's", graduation from school or college
even a job promotion.
If it makes you happy and you want to share it with
the world call Vicky at 863-533-4183
to place your ad now.
(Ad limited to 4 inches plus picture).
We'll even send you a laminated copy for $1 each. Call now!!


CAROLINE C. HONCULADA, M.D., AGAF

Gastroenterology & Hepatology
Diplomate, American Boards Of Internal Medicine & Gastroenterology
Fellow, American Gastroenterological Association

Diagnosis & Treatment of
Digestive & Liver Diseases
"J Comprehensive Diagnostic
& Therapeutic Endoscopy
"l Colorectal Cancer Screening

425 South 11th St. Suite 1, Lake Wales, FL 33853
Phone: 863-679-9494
Fax: 863-679-8866


Leon Mimbs passed
away Tuesday, Dec. 7,
2010, in Cocoa, Florida.
He was 77.
Leon was born Dec.
10, 1932, in Lake Wales
to the late William Elmer
and Evelyn A. (Dorough)
Mimbs. Raised in the
Baptist faith, Leon left
Lake Wales in 1961 for the
phosphate mines of Polk
. County, then went to Fort
Myers in 1969 and on to
North Carolina in 1979.
He returned to Florida in
1986, settling in Cocoa.
Retiring in 2000 from
Paravant Computer Sys-
tems in Melbourne, his
diverse career included
railroad brakeman,
butcher, roofer, store-
owner, fisherman, and
logistics supervisor. At
work, he was known for
his dedication, quick wit
and fun-spirited practi-
cal jokes. At home, Leon
enjoyed fishing, garden-
ing and the outdoors, and
was a Miami Dolphins


football fan. He lived his
life by the motto from
his high school year-
book, "Hope for the best,
prepare for the worst, and
take what comes."
Survivors include his
high school sweet-heart
and wife of 58 years,
Dorothy (Scott) Mimbs;
sons William "Lee" Mimbs
Jr. (Mary) of Cape Coral,
Scott Mimbs (Carmen)
of Viera and Charles
"Chuck" Mimbs of Sparta,
North Carolina; brothers,
Byron Mimbs (Barbara)
of Melbourne, Donald


Mimbs (Arzetta) of Killen,
Alabama, Glenn Mimbs
(Connie) of Romeoville,
Illinois, and William
Elmer "Billy" Mimbs Jr. of
Palatka; seven grandchil-
dren and three great-
grandchildren.
Visitation will be held
from 1 p.m. until the
funeral service at 2 p.m.,
Thursday, Dec. 16, 2010,
in the chapel of Marion
Nelson Funeral Home in
Lake Wales. The Rev. Jo-
seph Mimbs will officiate.
Interment will follow at
Lake Wales Cemetery.
Condolences may be
expressed to the fam-
ily and a webcast of the
service can be viewed at
www.marionnelsonfuner-
alhome.com. Memorial-
donations can be made to
Hospice of Health First,
Melbourne, Florida.
"Loved family, dogs,
and ice cream."
Marion Nelson Funeral
Home is in charge'6Tar-
rangements.


Leola Black Curtis Hilton Lillie Thelma


Tullis
Leola Black Tullis, 89,
of Lake Wales died Dec. 5,
2010 of heart failure.
Visitation was held
Friday, Dec. 10 from 6
to 8 p.m at Epps Chapel.
Services will be held Sat-
urday, Dec. 11 at 1 p.m. at
First Institutional Baptist
Church in Lake Wales.
Epps Memorial Funeral
Home-Lake Wales is in
charge of arrangements.

Jack McGriff

Jr.
Jack McGriff, Jr., 64, of
Lake Wales died Nov. 29,
2010 of heart disease.
Visitation was held
Friday, Dec. 10 from 6 to 8
p.m. at Church of God by
Faith, Lake Wales.
Services will be held
Saturday, Dec. 11 at 11
a.m. at the church. Epps
Memorial Funeral Home-
Lake Wales is in charge of
arrangements.

LAMSON
LOCK & KEY




WE SHARPEN
SCISSORS
106 E. Orange Ave.
a Lake Wales


Curtis Hilton, 62, of
Lake Wales, died Dec. 5,
2010 of cancer.
Visitation will be held
Saturday, Dec. 11 from 3
to 5 p.m. at Epps Cha-
pel. Services will be held
Saturday at 5 p.m. at Epps
Chapel. Epps Memorial
Funeral Home-Lake Wales
is in charge of arrange-
ments.


Robinson
Lillie Thclma Robinson.
70 of Lake \\ales. die 4 a
the Winter Haten l-lHo- -
pital on Nov. 11, 2010 of
heart disease.
Services were held
in Columbus, Ohio on
Thursday Dec. 9.201n.
Epps Memorial Funeral
Home-Lake Wales is In
charge of arrangements.


For the first time, an auto insurance rate can be
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P.O. Drawer 1559
Lake Wales, FL 33859
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Kaleidoscope Series


performing

SOUTHLORIDA COMMUNIt s
SOUTH FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE


6~:~ ~.'.f
I-'


Outstanding
ensemble performing
well-known holiday
selections as well as
classical pieces from
Handel's Messiah to
A Charlie Brown
Christmas and
everything in
between


Florida Orchestra Brass Quintet
Monday, Dec. 13 / 7:30 p.m.
SFCC University Center Auditorium
Highlands Campus, Avon Park


SFCC Box Office: 863-784-7178
Hours: Mon.- Fri. I 1:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m.
. http://performances.southflorida.edu
Sso Spc onISm pnors:
''Charles and Anne Recynolds
Dr. and Mrs. Witford Reid/Scbring Pain Mgmn.
SDr. Richard and Elina (Ciampbell
I lighla.nds 'lday (Media Sponsor)
SOUTH FLORIDA SunCoast Media (Media Sponsor)
COMMUNITY COLLEGE Performance Sponsor:
600 W. College Drive Jean and Larry Linuencr


K.

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EPt6U' -2A Frn'IUOnrnnf New eeme-1,21


County


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Report


CSX terminal faces contra(


By STEVE STEINER and KATHY
LEIGH BERKOWITZ
STAFF WRITERS
While the fate of the
proposed CSX terminal
in Winter Haven is yet
to be determined the
current contract for its
construction expires Dec.
31 and CSX is seeking an
extension to June 2013 -
its potential impact upon
Bartow and Lake Wales
is certain, both positive
and negative.
First and foremost on
the minds of elected city
officials in both commu-
nities is one thing.
"I think the biggest ef-
fect on Lake Wales is just
the economic the jobs
that it's going to provide,
the economic stability
it's going to give to Lake
Wales," said Lake Wales
City Commissioner Mike
Carter,


He was joined in that
sentiment by fellow
Commissioner John Paul
Rogers.
"If CSX does build,
it's certainly going to
affect us economically,
it's going to affect jobs,
it's going to affect us in
transportation, so there's
a lot of far reaching
things," said Rogers. "I
don't know all the ramifi-
cations of it, but any time
you talk about bringing
jobs to an area, it sounds
positive to me."
According to Bartow
City Commissioner Pat
Huff, in most likelihood,
these will be high-paying
jobs. He also saw an-
other positive aspect to
the projected terminal:
its proximity to the Polk
State College Advanced
Technology Center at
Clear Springs campus
being constructed east of


Bartow and just north of
State Road 60.
The focus of the cam-
pus will be to address
critical industry needs
through high-skill train-
ing that incorporates the
state-of-the-art technol-
ogy, training tools and
educational support ser-
vices. One of the colleges
will be the Supply Chain
Management Institute.
Being near the Polk
State College Bartow
campus it will be a boon
to students studying
logistics, Huff said, as the
proposed CSX terminal
is to be that of an inland
distribution center.
However, that as-
pect might prove to be
a drawback to roads
and highways running
through Bartow, said
Huff.
"If it is constructed,
there would be an ad-


ditional (estimated)
700 semi-tractor trailer
trucks per day," he said.
In actuality, the num-
ber of trucks would be
greater, according to
Benjamin Dunn, long-
range planning direc-
tor with Polk County
Transportation Planning
Organization. As the lead
transportation planning
agency for the county,
TPO develops transpor-
tation plans and pro-
grams for Polk County as
mandated by federal and
state legislation, such as
road projects.
Dunn cited a study by
the Division of Regional
Impact titled the Evans-
ville Western Railway Inc.
Terminal Facility. How-
ever, instead of vehicles,
the study used what it
projected will be the av-
erage number of trips.
That figure, said Dunn,


At expir

is 1,961. Dividing that
number by half gives
the number of expected
vehicles, since each
vehicle will make a trip
into and out of the facil-
ity. Most of the vehicles
will be trucks, so it is
conceivable that as many
as 1,000 trucks per day
could enter and leave,
Dunn said;
"It will mean extra traf-
fic through Bartow," said
Bartow City Commis-
sioner James E Clements.
However, he believes
it would be a short-term
situation, citing the
projected construction of
two roads: one a bypass
around Bartow between
U.S. Highways 17 and
98; the other a northern
connector.
Clements wondered
whether discussion
about the CSX terminal
were moot, because the


action

possibility looms the
terminal may not ever be
constructed, a concern
Winter.Haven Mayor
Jeff Porter also voiced at
the Dec. 8 Winter Haven
workshop session.
Two factors have
emerged that have
prompted that concern:
one being whether the
high-speed rail between
Tampa and Orlando be-
comes a reality; the other
is the current economy.
"It looks like it's
becoming more and
more speculation," said
Clements. Regardless,
Winter Haven city com-
missioners are expected
to approve the extension
at their Dec. 13 meeting.
"I certainly hope the
extension goes through
and that the plant gets
built," said Lake Wales
City Commissioner Mike
Carter.


Chanukah parties held throu


ut Polk


By STEVE STEINER
STAFF WRITER
Chanukah ended
Wednesday but Polk
County had parties
to mark the holiday.
Held Sunday, Dec. 5, at
Chabad Lubavitch of
Polk County and Temple
Emanuel both had
parties. There was one
Saturday at Temple Beth
Shalom in Winter Haven.
Chanukah, known as
the Festival of Lights, ,
is a minor holiday in
Judaism, and lasts eight
nights. It celebrates the /
miracle God caused to
take place when the
Maccabees led the Jew-
ish people to victory
over the Syrian invaders
in 186 BC. Chanukah
also commemorates the
miracle of causing one
day's supply of oil for the
Menorah to last for eight Jonah Meyers, 5, and his friend,
days as the Temple was dreidels they received Sunday, D
rededicated. land.













Rabbi Moshe Lazaros, who heads Chabad Lubavitch of Polk
County, chats with those who came to the Chanukah party
Sunday, Dec. 5. The framed portrait is the late Menachem
Mendel Schneerson, known as the Lubavitcher Rebbe. He was
a prominent Hasidic rabbi who was the seventh and last Rebbe
(Hasidic leader) of the Chabad-Lubavitch movement.


Manny Barickman, 6, show off the paddleboards shaped as
)ec. 5, at the Chanukah celebration at Temple Emanuel in Lake-


Randi Bonner, from Bartow, holds her 10-month-old son, Brett,
at the Chanukah party Sunday, Dec. 5, at Temple Emanuel in
Lakeland.



PHOTOS BY STEVE STEINER


PThe Feig family (from left) Hadar, Ethan, Owen and Leora,
light the Chanukah candles on their menorah Sunday, Dec. 5, at
the celebration held at Temple Emanuel in Lakeland.


Even Barney, a hearing ear guide dog, was into the festivities
as Chabad of Polk County, a newly-established Orthodox Jewish
community, held its first Chanukah party.


A little girl watches with excitement as the Chanukah candles
are lit on the menorah her family brought to the celebration
held at Temple Emanuel in Lakeland, the Conservative move-
ment synagogue.


Gov.-elect Scott pleased with rail money


Governor-elect Rick Scott is pleased
with the federal government's commit-
ment of $342 million more to Florida's
planned high-speed rail line between
Tampa and Orlando.
But the Republican indicated he's still
not committed to it in a statement re-
leased Thursday by his transition office
in Fort Lauderdale.
The latest allocation would give
Florida nearly all of the $2.6 billion
needed to build the route.
U.S. Rep. John Mica, R-Orlando, said


it should be enough to ensure the train,
which was added to the state constitu-
tion in 2000 but removed in 2004, is
actually built.
The high-speed line will have one of
its five stops in Lakeland. One main site
being considered is near the planned
Polytechnic campus of the University
of South Florida.
That is near Interstate 4 and the
eastern portion of the Polk Parkway.
Another is between Mall Hill Road and
1-4 to the east of Kathleen Road. A third


is near Clark Road by the Polk and Hill-
sborough county line.
Construction is planned in 2012 with
it opening in 2015.
The Obama administration took $1.2
billion in high-speed rail money away
from Ohio and Wisconsin and awarded
it to 12 other states, Transportation
Secretary Ray LaHood said.
States gaining the most money in-
clude California, $624 million; Florida,
$342 million; Washington, $161 million;
and Illinois, $42 million. Other states


receiving lesser amounts include New
York, Maine, Massachusetts, Oregon,
North Carolina, Iowa, Vermont and
Indiana.
Both Ohio and Wisconsin elected
incoming Republican governors who
oppose the rail projects. Those gover-
nors had asked if they could divert the
money to other projects.
Scott said, though, he first wants to
review its feasibility "in terms (of return
to Florida's taxpayers" and find out the
private sector's interest in funding it.


December 11, 2010


Paue 12A Frostr)roof News


I





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Lt. Gen. William Boykin to speak at First Assembly 'mm' "i 'i


Pastor Walt Nelson of
Lake Wales First As-
sembly of God says the
community is in for a
treat Wednesday. Lt. Gen.
William Boykin is speak-
ing that evening, bring-
ing with him years of
military service memories
and faith insight that
he will share when the


The Keeping Kids Safe
Project by S.I.P Kids,
a national child safety
organization who tours
the country providing
free FBI quality digital
fingerprints for chil-
dren, will be in Lake
Wales today to host a
free child-safety fair. The
safety fair will be inside
the showroom at So-


service begins at 7 p.m.
Boykin served 36 years in
the United States Army,
achieving the rank of
lieutenant general, hold-
ing post at the U.S. Army
Special Operations Com-
mand.
He has two Purple
Heart awards, two Legion
of Merit badges, an Air


rensen & Schade Chrysler
Dodge Jeep from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. In addition to
fingerprinting, they have
extended invitations to
local organizations and
law enforcement agencies
to help educate children
and their families on
how to avoid dangerous
situations. Participating
organizations include


Medal and a Bronze Star.
Capernaum Inn, a
ministers' retreat center
in Lake Wales, invited
Boykin to speak at their
retreat later in the week
and sponsored his trip to
Lake Wales. Boykin served
in almost every recent
major American military
operation, including


Lake Wales Police and
Fire departments, Polk
County EMS, and Florida
Highway Patrol.
Sorensen & Schade
Chrysler Dodge Jeep is
located at 21529 US Hwy.
27 North in Lake Wales.
For more information
contact Jacki Powers at
(319) 268-4111 or jacki@
sipkids.com.


Grenada, Somalia, and
Iraq. Author of "Never
Surrender: A Soldier's
Journey to the. Crossroads
of Faith and Freedom," he
currently is a professor at
Hampden-Sydney College
in Virginia. First Assembly
of God is located at 1201
Burns Ave. The commu-
nity is invited.




Our very
knowledgeable
staff can help
you place an ad
today

533-4183


I 863-588-1000 16490 Hwy. 27 Lake Wales, FL


Art classes scheduled


Lake Wales Arts Center
will offer several art
classes starting in early
January.
Beginner and advance
watercolor classes will
be taught by Jan Fetters
on Tuesday, starting
Jan. 4. The beginner and
intermediate class will
meet from 1-4 p.m., while
the advanced class will
meet from 9 a.m. noon,
through March 29. There
is no class on Feb. 15.
An acrylics and oils
class for adults of all lev-
els will be held Monday's
from 9 a.m. noon Jan.
10 March 28. Lois Kim-
ball will instruct.
A beginning drawing


class for those age 15
and up will he held on
Wednesday Jan. 12 -
March 30. Classes will be
taught by Anne R. Moore
and will meet 3-5 p.m.
Cost for the six-week,
three-hour classes are
$100 for art center mem-
bers and $125 for non
members. Cost for the
six-week, two hour class
is $65 for members and
$95 for non-members.
Students are required to
bring their own supplies.
Supplies lists are avail-
able at the art center. For
more information or to
register for classes, call
the center at (863) 676-
8426.


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December 11, 2010


PaRe 14A Frostproof News


I







December~~~~~~~ Ii 00Fotro esPg 5


Sounds of the season at McLau


in


McLaughlin Middle
School dancers are put-
ting the finishing touches
on what they hope to be
one of their best perfer-
mances yet.
A flurry of business
envelops the school as
students attend final
rehearsals, get their cos-
tumes fitted, and cue the
spotlights in preparation
of upcoming concerts
at McLaughlin Middle
School and Fine Arts
Academy.
On Dec. 10 the Dance
Department presented
their Winter perfor-
mance of "Origins."
Featured in the concert
were beginning through
advanced classes and the
Dance Company. Kim-
berly May was proud to
welcome dancers from
Rochelle School of the
Arts in Lakeland to the
McLaughlin stage. They
presented selections
from their performance
of "The Nutcracker."


ABP 94.JB "R


On Tuesday at 7 p.m.
the band and guitar de-
partments will share the
stage for an evening of
great instrumental mu-
sic. Featured will be the
beginning band, concert
band, symphonic and
jazz band. Among the
groups scheduled to pre-
form are the beginning
guitar ensemble and the
Guitar Orchestra.
On Thursday the
Orchestra and Mariachi
Band will combine for
great evening of enter-
tainment.
The Beginning Orches-
tra and the Advanced Or-
chestra will be featured.
The Mariachi ensemble
blends folk instruments
with trumpets and
violins to create their
unique sounds. This en-
semble has been invited
to perform next month
for the Florida Music
Educators Conference in
Tampa. Concert begins at
7p.m.


PHOTO PROVIDED
McLaughlin Middle School
and Fine Arts Center Jazz
Band members look forward
to a melodious season. Front
row from left: Jacob Martin,
Anthony Anderson, and Tandre
Partee. Back row from left:
Meagan Yopp, Jennifer Ruiz,
Alanmichael Gardner, and
Nikolas Betancourt.


PHOTO PROVIDED
Presenting the McLaughlin Middle School and Fine Arts
Academy Guitar Orchestra. Guitar I to r: Trenton Towns, Eli
Logue, and Lilli Elliot.


OUR SPECIALTY IS CARING.
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dealer fee and includes all available incentives, rebates and 2010 Auto Show customer Cash Bonus where applicable. With approved credit through KMS. Cash back may
require qualifying for competitive rebate. (3) Towards a new 2010 or 2011 model year vehicle where applicable. Restrictions may apply. See dealer for details. Must take delivery
by Jan. 3, 2011. (4) WAC. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors. Photos for illustration purposes only.







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the Emergency Entrance of the hospital)


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Frostproof News Page 15A


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I'l


December 11 2010


A


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"I






Page 16A Frostproof News December 11, 2010








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