The Madison enterprise-recorder

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Material Information

Title:
The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title:
Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title:
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Creation Date:
May 31, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note:
Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID:
UF00028405:00657

Related Items

Preceded by:
Enterprise-recorder


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Full Text

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More and more drivers are acting out their anger when they get behind the wheel of a car. After they have been cut off, tailgated or slowed down by trafc in front of them, these drivers sometimes commit acts of violence. Aggressive driving is a relatively new term that has been developed because of our changing society. Getting angry because of the actions of another driver has pr obably been around since the rst automobiles hit the roads. However, some people today just don't know how to control their anger. Here are some suggestions that can help lessen your chances of becoming a victim of aggressive driving. Avoid the following: Cutting off: When you merge, make sure you have plenty of room. Always use your turn signal. If you make a mistake and accidently cut someone off, try to apologize with an appropriate gesture. If someone cuts you off, slow down and allow them room to merge. Driving slowly in the left lane: If you are in the left lane and people want to pass, move over and let them by. If you are traveling at a speed below the ow of trafc, you may be in danger of making drivers behind you angry. Florida Law requires drivers to move to the right lane so vehicles traveling behind them can pass. Tailgating: Some drivers get angry when they are followed too closely. Don't tailgate. If you think another car is driving too slowly, and you are unable to pass, pull back and allow more space, not less. That way, if the car does something unexpected, you will give yourself and other drivers behind you more time and space to react. If you feel you are being followed too closely, it may be safest to allow the other driver to go by if possible. Gestures: Almost nothing makes another driver angrier than an obscene gesture. Keep your hand on the wheel. Avoid making any gestures that may anger another driver, even "harmless" expressions of irritation like shaking your head. If another driver makes an obscene or angry gesture toward you, it is best to ignore it. Don't engage in confrontation: One angry driver has a hard time starting a ght unless another driver is willing to join in. You can protect yourself against aggressive drivers by refusing to display anger toward them. Steer clear: Give angry drivers lots of space. A driver you may have offended can snap and become truly dangerous. Get away as quickly and safely as possible. Do not, under any circumstances, pull off the side of the road and try to settle things face to face. If you believe the other driver is following you or is trying to start a ght, get help. If you have a cell phone call the police. If you don't have a phone, drive to a place where there are people around, such as a police station, convenience store or shopping center. The most important actions you can take to avoid aggressive driving take place inside your head. By changing your approach to driving, you can make every trip safer. With the change of each season, comes a new crop of fruits and vegetables, and fall is no exception. Some of us measure the passage of time by the food each season brings. Seasonal fruits and vegetables add rich color and texture to our meals, not to mention good nutrition. Make sure these foods nd their way to your table. Here is a run down on fresh fruits and vegetables to look for in the stores and road side stands. Pumpkin We can't celebrate fall without pumpkins, a member of the squash family, these bold colored vegetables can only mean Halloween and Thanksgiving are around the corner. A great source of Vitamin A, they are not just for pies. Try combining pumpkin with potatoes or substitute pumpkin in recipes calling for acorn or butternut squash. Add pumpkin to wafes or pancake batters, mufns and cookie recipes for a nutrition boost. Pumpkins grown for eating are different from those grown for carving, the pulp has a different texture. Most grocery stores will label pumpkins suitable for the table as "pumpkin pie" or a similar name. That's not to say you can't cook and serve large pumpkins, but the taste may not be as appetizing. To cook a fresh pumpkin, cut one in half vertically, discarding the seeds and stringy pulp, then place it sliced side down in a large baking side, add 1 inch of water and bake at 350 degrees for one hour. Sweet Potatoes Abundant in the fall, so they are low cost, a one cup serving contains more than a day's supply of vitamin A and they are also a good source of vitamin C. There are two kinds of sweet potatoes: one has yellow esh and a dry, mealy texture; the other, which is sometimes called a yam, is moist, dark orange and high in sugar, so it has a sweeter taste. They can be cooked in a variety of ways and usually end up in sugary casseroles. Look for recipes that use sweet potatoes in different ways, alternate sliced sweet and white potatoes in an au gratin dish. You can nd recipes for potato salad, or make oven fries by cutting them into strips, brush with canola oil and bake. Try eating a baked sweet potato with a sprinkle of cinnamon; you'll discover they have a remarkable taste of their own. My favorite side dish is to cook sweet potatoes in orange juice, then add cinnamon and mash; it makes a bright addition to a meal and delivers a wonderful avor. Pears Their season starts in September and runs through November, pears ripen best if they are picked while still rm. This time of year, you will see a variety of pears with colors of yellow, green and red and the price is usually a bargain. Since pears easily bruise, be careful when handling them and store in a single layer in the refrigerator. Many people in north Florida have trees in their back yard and have no idea what to do with them. If you are able to pick fresh pears, keep in mind they have a short shelf life and should be picked while they are still hard and allowed to ripen indoors. If you have canning equipment, they can be preserved in jars for use all winter. Eat pears for a snack, slice them to serve as a salad ingredient or make a fresh cobbler. Grated pear can be used as an ingredient in mufns, pancakes or wafes. Apples Although apples are available year round due to improved storage techniques, fall is the season they are harvested. There is nothing like a fresh picked apple, so you may want to take a weekend trip to an apple orchard. Apples are a good source of soluble ber which helps remove excess cholesterol from your body. Baked, stewed or raw, apples add texture and color to your meals. Winter Squash The hard skin of winter squash can be intimidating for some cooks, but all it takes for most varieties is a vegetable peeler and you are to the edible part very quickly the dark esh is packed with vitamin A. There are a dozen or so varieties, the more common ones are acorn, butternut, Hubbard and spaghetti. This time of year, you can nd an assortment of odd looking squash at the grocery and may think they are for decorative use, but they are edible and can be used in a variety of recipes. Fall brings a change in temperatures and seasonal fruits and vegetables that add color and variety to your meals. Be adventurous and add a few to your grocery list. While enjoying the avor they bring, you will also be giving your body nutrients for a healthier season.The University of Florida Extension Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution.Viewpoints & Opinions2A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 10, 2014 From The Desk Of Chief Gary Calhoun Aggressive Driving Letter To The Editor Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper. All submitted letters must be 600 words or less Police Chief Gary Calhoun Madison County Extension Service ENJOYFALL’SHARVEST Diann DouglasGuest Columnist What Has Islam Done For The United States Some time ago, Obama read from his teleprompter telling us all of the good things Islam has done in the forming of the United States. I've always tried to keep up with what is really going on in my Country. I've read it's History many times, I couldn't remember anything that Islam had done in forming this Country. I decided to send some of Obama's speech out to people that write me nearly everyday on some article I may have written, or something they nd dear to their heart. The question was "what has Islam done for the United States"? I couldn't think of a thing but one. The following in my opinion are four of the best I received, the last is mine having just own to Texas and Back to Florida I felt I should write this.5How we Got here.The United States would not exist as we know it today, were it not for the Islamists. Most of us know, that in 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue and discovered America while searching for a new route to Asia. The reason they were looking for a new route to Asia is because Constantinople fell to the Islamist Muslims in 1453, closing the trade routes to the East. This was devastating for Europeans, who traveled to Asia for spices and other stuff they didn't have at home. Columbus's trip was to ease the pain of the Europeans merchants by messing with the Muslims and making it easy for Europeans to reach India by sea.4. SlaveryI hadn't thought of this angle, but it is true. Slavery is approved of in the Qur'an's and has been taken for granted throughout Islamic history, as it was in the West until the abolitionist movements in the U.S. and Britain. The opening of the slave trade provided Muslim slave dealers in Africa with a whole new market. One consequence of this are claims by the Hamas-linked Council on AmericanIslamic Relations (CAIR) and other Islamic bunches in the U.S. that the rst Muslims in the U.S. were slaves imported from Africa. That my friends, is a bunch of hooey. However, it makes them feel like a victim that CAIR so likes to act out for the political power it offers. The slave traders who sold slaves to Europeans, and Americans, were Muslims, operating with the sanction given by Muhammad and the Qur'an. Therefore, if it weren't for the Islamic slave industry on the African continent, there would have been no slavery in the New World, and none of the traumas that we have today.3. The Marines"From the halls of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli" The line from the Marine Corps hymn commemorates the Marines' actions during the Barbary War (1801-1805), the rst war the United States fought against Islamic jihadists. That war came around because Thomas Jefferson wouldn't succumb to the Barbary Pirates demands for bribery, made of course in accord with the Qur'an's dictum that the "People of the Book" must be made to "pay the jizya with willing submission, and feel themselves subdued" (9:29). The Barbary pirates, acting according with Islamic law kidnapped, enslaved and ransomed non-Muslims, they were seizing American ships and enslaving the crews, then demanded ransoms for their release. The Marines put a stop to all that stuff, and the line from the Marines' hymn shows how their actions on the Barbary Coast helped in forming the Marine Corps. So for the Marines also, we have Muslims to thank.2. A weakened economyOsama bin Laden explained that he mounted the 9/11 jihad terror attacks in order to weaken the American economy. In October 2004 he said: "Al-Qaeda spent $500,000 on the event, while America, lost more than $500 billion, wasted on the nationbuilding in Iraq and Afghanistan by not nishing the job. Were bin Laden alive today, he could look at America with satisfaction we have a weakened economy, high unemployment, and no prospects for real recovery. America is poorer, less productive, less efcient than it was on September 10, 2001. A contribution from Islamists.1. The TSAAir Travel: Once a romantic and even a glamorous way to travel, air travel today is an uncomfortable, uncertain, unpleasant, inhospitable, cramped affair involving inefcient security procedures that annoy and humiliate travelers. Passengers are poked, prodded, threatened, herded like cattle, beleaguered with delays, and treated as though they are criminals in a politically correct attempt to avoid focusing on the real problem. Today, the TSA and the Department of Homeland Security are two bloated and evergrowing bureaucracies, draining the coffers of the already depleted American taxpayer. And that my friends, is the crowning contribution that Muslims have made to the "building of our nation". No need to thank me, I enjoyed doing this. George Pouliotte Hunter Safety Course Offered In Madison County SubmittedThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering their second and final, free hunter safety course in Madison County this year. The course is Monday through Thursday, Oct. 20 23 from 7 to 10 p.m. and Saturday, Oct. 25 from 2 p.m. until completed in Madison. Students must attend all sessions to receive their certificate. The location for this class will be given to those who register in advance by calling the regional office at (386) 758-0525 or going to MyFWC.com/HunterSafety.All firearms, ammunition and materials are provided free of charge. Students should bring a pen or pencil and paper. An adult must accompany children younger than 16 at all times. Anyone born on or after June 1, 1975, must pass an approved hunter safety course and have a hunting license to hunt alone (unsupervised). The FWC course satisfies hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. Those interested in attending a course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes atMyFWC.com/HunterSafetyor by calling the FWC's regional office in Lake City at (386) 758-0525.

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t r f f t r b f t r t n b n f f t r r t b n % & % & & % & ) % t . &t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t ! % r % f & % % n & f ) & ) -t / B F ( / B ( / B C < / / B = = = 1 / B H = ( B C B B F / G < = C J B / C ( B b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b + ) & % r ! % r % % & % f t / B b C 1 / B t / 6 B H 1 / B = C 1 3 3 H ( B < G / B / B C < # ) # B J B B C C B < 1 1 3 < H = B = = F B B H < / / # 1 < B ( < B C < # # B G 1 ) C 1 / B / B < G 7 F = C 1 / = B 1 / < / / ( < B # C ( B # = B = H 6 B / B 1 / B @ L ( = B # B B H = F C B ) / B t / / B C C < 1 1 3 < B < / B b ) C 1 / B C < B C 1 B = B ( < ( < = C / C J B H ( / B = ( H = B 3 F B 1 G < B / / 1 / B 1 F / C J 6 1 / : = B = F C B # H C ( B C ( B < / G B f < C = B / 1 / = B b C 1 / = B ( < B 7 F = C 1 / = F < / B C ( B = C 1 3 B = ) / B # B = ( B ( B ) 3 C B n = F = B ( < = C B = ( < B = G 1 < B / B # B = ( ( B B ( 1 B ( F < ( 6 b B = 1 B G B 1 / B ( F < ( B 3 3 ( C B / ) # 1 < / B < < = B 1 # C ( < B = C C F = B = B B = / ) / < 6 B 8 t C : = B 1 3 C J 1 F C B 1 # B / B / B C B + F = C B C B C 1 1 B B 9 1 / B C 1 B C ( B t / ) / 3 1 = B C < 6 B ( B = = ( B # C B = ( B ( B C 1 B = ) C / B C 1 B b C 1 / : = 3 < ( / B F = B 1 # ( = B = C C F = B = B < 1 1 3 < 6 B 8 t : B / 1 C B # # ) C B H C ( B / J B ( F < ( t B 1 / : C B 1 B C 1 B ( F < ( 9 1 / B = 6 B ( B H ) = F C B = C C = B b C 1 / G 1 C B 1 / : = B < = C / B 1 F < C ( B / ) / C B < ( C = 6 B B C C 1 B = 3 1 = / = B C ( B 3 < C / C 1 F / : C B 1 . / C B 1 / 3 / / B C C 1 / B / b C 1 / B 1 F B / 1 C B < ( B # 1 < B 1 . / C 6 t n b 7 $ + + ( & ( 2 + ( $ ( 2 ( 1 5 ( 2 ' $ 1 2 6 # ( 2 $ & 0 ( 2 6 8 b f t b f t f f f n f f f f n f t f r n b t n $ 1 2 + ( 1 $ # r n n r n f n $ 1 2 + ( 1 $ # 1 + ( # 2 $ # 3 $ n r 3 + ( 1 $ # 5 $ $ + 6 6 0 $ $ $ 3 + ( 1 ( & n n b # ( 1 b b t $ 0 ( # ( + 1 / 1 2 & $ 2 # ( 1 . 1 2 % 9 $ b b t 3 + ( 2 ( . f f t $ # # # 0 $ 1 1 & $ 1 2 n t f r r n f n n b t n 0 5 $ 0 f f # ( 1 b b t f f ( 1 $ 5 1 / / $ 0 0 $ 1 $ 0 4 $ 1 2 $ 0 ( & 2 2 0 $ ) $ 2 6 # 4 $ 0 2 ( 1 $ $ 2 $ 5 1 2 2 $ 0 0 1 3 1 0 ( / 2 ( 1 2 2 ( 2 $ / ( ( . % 2 $ & $ $ 2 5 ( + + 2 $ % 0 2 $ $ 1 2 ( 2 $ 0 $ 1 2 % 2 $ 3 2 6 # 0 2 $ 5 $ 0 1 % 2 ( 1 $ 5 1 / / $ 0 # 2 ( 4 $ 1 2 ( & 2 $ 6 # 4 $ 0 2 ( 1 $ $ 2 1 3 ( 2 2 $ # + + / 2 1 & ( 4 $ 2 0 $ $ $ 3 + ( 1 ( & % 0 / 3 + ( 2 ( ( 2 ( 1 $ 5 1 / / $ 0 3 1 2 $ / ( $ # 3 / + 2 $ 0 2 2 1 % 0 2 $ # 2 $ 2 $ 6 0 $ # 0 / / $ # % % 0 $ $ $ 3 + ( 1 ( & 5 ( + + 2 $ 0 $ 1 / 1 ( + $ % 0 / 2 1 $ 6 # 1 ( # # $ # + ( $ f b n f b n C 1 B B # # C / B 1 = C J B C ( B ( < / 6 B J 3 C 1 = B 1 # ) @ B C 1 B 1 1 B # 1 < B / F B 1 F ( / B # # F C J < C ( / B / B / B B 1 3 / B J B B # G < B / H ( K / 6 C F < > B = C < C B 1 F < C B 1 # B 3 3 B n F = B / B ( 1 1 1 < B r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r f t b b n 3 1 < C = B 1 F C B G < B < C B = F + C = B / C < C / B H C ( = C # # B / B 3 C < 1 / = B C B < C B 1 F C C = B f B H 1 < / B 3 < C / < = ( 3 B H C ( B C ( B 1 < B f 1 C C < J B C 1 B I 3 / C ( B G < B < C B 3 < 1 < B C ( = B J < 6 B t = B 1 # = = / B = / 1 < = B / 1 H B = 3 J B 1 / B 1 C C < J B C C B C < ) / = B C B 1 / G / / B = C 1 < = 6 B / B 3 / C ) C 1 / B / B < F < J B = G / B = / 1 < = B ( G B / / C # B C ( < 1 F ( B C ( B F = B 1 # B 1 C C < J B C C B C < ) / = 6 B B B C K / = B / B = / ) F 3 B C 1 B < G B G < B < C = G B B C B ! f r r n 6 t b n t / # 1 < C 1 / B / B C ( B n B 3 1 < C B = B 3 < 1 G B C 1 B r n t b t f B J B C ( r = 1 / B 1 F / C J B ( < # # : = B # $ 6 B B 3 1 3 B < B 1 / = < B / / 1 / C B F / C 3 < 1 G / B F C J 6 B F = C 1 / = B 1 F C B 3 1 3 B / C $ B / B C ( B < 3 1 < C B = ( 1 F B B ) < C B C 1 B C ( B r B C B 4 % L 5 B 0 ? D ) & L L 2 6 t & % F < C = B f B n 1 / = B B 1 C 1 / B 1 # 3 < 1 6 n B < B F = ( B B 1 = = = = 1 / 1 # B # 1 < B / 1 C B / B F / H # F = A / F # C F < A G < A 3 1 = = = ) = 1 / B 1 # B 1 / C < 1 B = F = C / 6 Bt & % ( * B < / B b = B C C < J A = 3 B 1 = C 6 b < < C B < / = C B ( 1 3 = 1 / B B 1 = ) = = = 1 / B H C ( B / C / C B C 1 B = B 1 / C < 1 = F = C / B = B 1 # B B 1 / C < 1 B = F ) = C / B 4 < 1 I J 1 1 / 5 B 3 1 = = = = 1 / H C ( B / C / C B C 1 B = B 1 / C < 1 B = F ) = C / B 4 < 1 I J 1 1 / 5 B = B 1 # B B 1 / ) C < 1 B = F = C / B 4 < 1 I J 1 1 / B / / I 5 B / B 1 F C B 1 # B 1 F / C J B H < < / C 6 1 < / = ( B ( / C < B < ( C B F < B C 1 B 3 3 < 6 * B < / / B f B B < G ) / B !C (H / 6 ( 1 / B r < = ( B 1 H B B ' < ) G C B C C < J B H C ( B J B H 3 1 / C ( < 1 H / B J B = = = B / B < ) / B = ( # 6 Bt & % G / B F / B / ( B B ' < ) G C B = = F C B ' < G C B F = B / / C B 1 # B ( B / B = 3 B C C < J 6 B 1 F = = B B / C < B B 1 ) = C B C C < J 6 F 1 3 ( B r < = ( B B H 1 ( < = B 1 # B G 1 C 1 / B 1 # B 3 < 1 B 4 < ) F C 5 6 n = B < B b 3 C 1 / B B ) / < 6 G B G / = B B 1 C 1 / B 1 # B 3 ) < 1 B 4 1 F / C J 5 6 f / B B F < B B F C B 1 # 1 F / C J B H < < / C 6t & % b < < B f / < B B = B B 1 C 1 / 1 # B 3 < 1 B 4 1 F / C J 5 6 < / B K C ( B / / B 1 F < < = B F C B 1 # B 1 F / C J B H < < / C 6 * B B 1 F < < = B B F C 1 # B 1 F / C J B H < < / C 6t & % . B f B f 1 C C B n < 6 B B F C B 1 # 1 F / C J B H < < / C B / B C ( < B ( < = 1 # B H < C B 1 # B 1 J B C C ( / C 6 J = ( / B < J / B 1 / = 1 / B < * / B < = C < C 1 / 6 n 1 = 3 ( B f B < J / 1 < B B < / C ( # C 6t & % $ < C ( F < B / < = B G < / B B F C B 1 # 1 F / C J B H < < / C 6 n # # < J B n = 1 / B B < B C < = ) 3 = = / B / B 1 / B H 3 1 / 6t & % # * B ( 1 = B C ( B n < 6 B = = B < G / 6 ( 1 = B = ( H / B G = B B < C 1 # B 1 J B C C ( / C 6 F < < B J = = = B F < < J B B < * ) / B < = C < C 1 / 6 B = ( J B / B / K J B B 1 ) C 1 / B 1 # B 3 < 1 6 B r J < 1 / B r F < B b 1 H < B B F C 1 # B 1 F / C J B G 1 C 1 / B 1 # B 3 < 1 6 B r n t f b b nF = C B B < / < B C 1 G < J 1 / B C ( C B J 1 F / B < B C ( B ) C F B f r / B f r r r n f r / H = ) 3 3 < = B 1 / / 6 B ( B 1 / / B C 1 / B 1 # B C ( B / H = ) 3 3 < B 4 B / B ) C 1 / 5 B = B G ) B / 1 C B 1 / J B 1 / B 1 3 F C < = B F C B = 1 1 / B = B / = B 1 C ( < B C C = ( 1 / = B / B / < 1 B 3 ( 1 / = 6 B B / B J < B = F = < 3 C 1 / B C 1 B C ( B ) C 1 / B = B 1 / J B E % B 3 < B J < 6 B ( B 1 / ) / B ) C 1 / = B 1 B G B # 1 < G H / B G < J B F = J B / B ( F < = ) J B # C < / 1 1 / 6 t # B J 1 F B H 1 F B B C 1 B = F = < B C 1 C ( B ) C 1 / B / B C ( B 3 < / C B C 1 / J 1 F B = 3 J B / B C 1 B B # G B 1 < = C 1 B C ( B 1 = C B 1 # B C ( B 3 < / C B = F = < 3 C 1 / 6 F < < / C B 3 < / C B = F = < 3 C 1 / = B < B D % / ) 1 F / C J B / B & % B 1 F C ) 1 # ) 1 F / C J 6 B 1 B G H B B = 3 B 1 # B C ( B ) C 1 / B 1 B C 1 B r r r r t n 6 B B 1 B = C < C B J 1 F < B = F = < 3 C 1 / B C 1 J 1 < B # 1 < B 1 < B / # 1 < C 1 / B B 4 % L 5 0 ? D ) & 2 & 2 B 1 < B B r b r r r t n = 1 B H B / B C B C ( B / # 1 < ) C 1 / B 1 / B ( 1 H B C 1 B C B C ( B 1 / / C 1 / B C 1 B J 1 F 6 1 F / = 1 B # / B r r r t n 1 / B 1 1 B J B 1 / B C 1 B ! n r t n r r r t n t b n r r f n r t b J B < J / C B ( 3 / r n t b t f/ J 1 / B H C ( B C / C B C 1 = ( < B = B / ) G C B C 1 B 1 B 1 F C B C 1 1 J B 3 < / = B / C r C ( 1 = C B ( F < ( B 1 / C F < J B 1 G 6 B B # 1 < r = 1 / ; = B 1 C B / C B C / C B 1 3 C C 1 / B C ( C = B 1 3 / B C 1 B r = 1 / 1 F / C J B < = / C = 68 B H / C B G < J 1 / H ( 1 B ( = B C / C B C 1 B 1 1 F C 9 B = B / < n < G = B G / C B 1 1 < / ) C 1 < 6 B 8 t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SubmittedAmerica is one of the blessed nations on this earth. God has blessed us, so that we can bless others. The Haitians messenger, Dr. Touriss Guillaume will be in Madison, Oct. 13-15 for a Back to School Supplies Drive. One of our Sorority’s targets is to work with foreign countries to help improve their living conditions. We all know the importance of education in America. In the Haitian culture, education is just as important to them. Because they do not receive much support or government aid, Nu Omega Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. would like to collaborate with the Madison County community with this needed project. The Haitian’s Back to School needs are: shoes (sizes, girl’s 4-9; boy’s 3-8), school supplies, book bags and uniforms (sizes XS-L) or monetary donations will be accepted. Please bring all contributions or donations to the Madison County Court House, Oct. 15, between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., or feel free to contact Deloris M. Jones at (850) 9732823, Gwen Johnson or Tim Sanders, who has provided a place as a drop off-site at the courthouse. Take a quick look at your child or children, grandchildren and greatgrandchildren to see how blessed they are. We must remember that with the blink of an eye, we could be in the same need as the Haitians. Give because you know the Giver. Thank you Madison County in advance for your generosity. Around Madison County4A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 10, 2014 Obituaries Community Calendar Way Back When Way Back When October 10, 1952 Mrs. Simon Kinsey, Jr., entertained with a children’s party Friday afternoon honoring her small son, Bobby, on the occasion of his fifth birthday. Thirty-two children enjoyed playing games on the lawn. Favors were rubber ball balloons. 1953 Shrine Club officers elected last week were John Collett, president; Van Priest and George Corriel, v-p’s; R E Bagley, sec’y; and J M Wexler, treas. R D Baker was an emergency patient at the hospital for several days this week, under treatment for severe lacerations of the left arm as the result of being attacked by a hog at his farm south of Madison, Saturday. The Madison High School football team broke into the win column on the third try last Friday night, defeating Crawfordville 13 to 0. October 9, 1953 An automobile driven by Miss Jeannette Harris of Lee ran into the G & F train at the US 90 crossing in East Madison Saturday afternoon about 2:30. Fortunately, Miss Harris was not injured. The car was damaged somewhat. Presbyterian women will observe church extension week with a school of missions beginning Oct. 11 and lasting through Oct. 15, with classes at 7:30 each evening, except Wednesday night, when a supper will be held at 6:30 followed by study. Students registered at Valdosta State College for the fall term include James Groover and Ben N. Williams of Madison and William J. Bennett of Greenville. The Pirates’ first loss came Friday night in Sopchoppy when the score was Sopchoppy 19; Greenville 6. This was a hard fought game. Several of the Pirates were crippled either from injuries or illness. Joe Mack O’Neal made the one touchdown for the Greenville team. October 8, 1954 Marvin Reeves is recovering from a painful accident that happened Sunday afternoon, while riding with his brother-inlaw, Stanton Martin of Jacksonville, with his arm out of the car window on a very narrow road through pine trees that grew close to the road. His right arm was crushed and fractured when it was caught between the car and a tree. He was given emergency treatment at the local hospital and transferred to Archbold hospital for further treatment. The MHS Red Devils will meet the Perry Bulldogs tonight at 8 p.m. on Lanier Field. Mrs. Turner Davis entertained her bridge luncheon club last Wednesday, with two tables of guests. Radiate lilies were arranged in the rooms. A delicious two-course luncheon was served. High score prize was won by Mrs. Waring Wyche and second high by Mrs. J E Hardee. Ray Norfleet was hostess at a lovely party Saturday night in observance of her thirteenth birthday. October 10 The Junior Auxiliary and NFCC LPNRN Bridge students are sponsoring ‘Crowns for a Cure,’ a 5K Night Run/Walk at NFCC. Registration begins at 6 p.m. with the race starting at 7:30 p.m. Cost will be $20 prior to the event and $25 the day of. All proceeds will go towards breast cancer research. Registration forms are available at Madison Dental, NFCC Gym and Busy Bee.October 11 The Madison Church of God, located off Colin Kelly Hwy. is hosting a fundraiser dinner and movie. Pizza, drinks and desserts will be served at 5:30 p.m. and blockbuster movie God’s Not Dead starts at 6:15 p.m. Cost is $10 with proceeds going towards the Israel Project, helping to send missionaries to Israel. Childcare will be provided and drawings for door prizes will take place after the movie. For more information, call Pastor Jason Justus at (706) 346-9918 or Missions Director Janet Diamond at (229) 561-4469.October 11 The Suwannee Valley Humane Society will be holding their 29thAnnual Pet Show at the Suwannee County Coliseum. Registration to enter your cat or dog in contests is 10 a.m. Refreshments and baked goods will be for sale at reasonable prices. For more information, email suwanneevalley@embarqmail .com or (850) 971-9904. October 12 The 56thAnnual Gramling Reunion will be held at Shiloh Methodist Church.All family members are encouraged to attend and celebrate their family heritage.Registration will began at 10:30 a.m. Guest speaker will be Steve McHargue, President of Fellowship of Christian Athletics. Prizes will be awarded for oldest attending, youngest attending and the most distance traveled. After a brief family business meeting lunch will be served picnic style. Bring your favorite covered dish. A prize will be given for the Best Homemade Dessert! For more information call 973-4647.October 12 Genesis Missionary Baptist Church, located at 2016 NE Colin Kelly Hwy., will be holding their 3rdAnnual Pastor’s Pulpit Aide Ministry Celebration with installation of new Deaconesses’ at 3 p.m. Speaker is Rev. James Shaw from New Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church. Dinner will be served and everyone is invited to attend. October 16 The Branford Camera Club will meet at the Hatch Park Community Center, 403 SE Craven St. in Branford. The doors will open at 6:30 p.m., and the meeting will start at 7 p.m. Join us at 5 p.m. for dinner and conversation at Cuzin’s restaurant, across from Scaff’s Market. This meeting will be the nal preparation for the 3rdAnnual Fall Photo Show, and participating members and friends will be checking in their entries for the show. For more information contact Carolyn Hogue at (386) 935-2044. Have something you would like to add to the Community Calendar? Simply call Greene Publishing, Inc. at (850) 973-4141 or email your information toRose@greenepublishing.com. Pearlie Mae Moore Proverbs 31: 10, 26-31 Who can find a virtuous woman? for her price is far above rubies. She openeth her mouth with wisdom; and in her tongue is the law of kindness. She looketh well to the ways of her household, and eateth not the bread of idleness. Many daughters have done virtuously, but thou excellest them all. Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the Lord, she shall be praised. Give her the fruit of her hands; and her own works praise her in the gates. We miss and love you, Muh; From your son, Larry; your daughters: Margie, Joyce, Susan, Wanda, Rosetta and Sherman: Those who she raised: April, Sharonda and Tracey; your adopted daughter: Glenda; and grandchildren,greatgrandchildren, nieces, nephews, cousins, close friends and the Bethlehem Church Family, where she served as a faithful member AKA Will Host Haitian Back To School Supplies Rachel L. HawkinsRachel L. Hawkins, 76, passed away on Sunday, October 5, at the Madison County Memorial Hospital surrounded by family. She was the daughter of the late Mort Hubbard and Annie L. Washington. She was the beloved wife of J.W. Hawkins, who preceded her in death. A daughter also preceded her, Ann M. Glee of Madison. She is survived by a brother, Willie and Marie Washington; her children: Phyllis and Tommy Sampson, of Jacksonville; Valerie Thomas, of Madison; Sandra Martin, of Tallahassee; Billy and April Hawkins, of Loganville, Ga.; Clinita Hawkins of Tallahassee; as well as a host of grandchildren and great-grandchildren. A wake service will be held on Friday, October 10, from 5:30 – 7 p.m., at Cooks and Cooper Funeral Home, located at 162 SW Third Ave. in Madison. A Homegoing Celebration will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, October 11, at Damascus Missionary Baptist Church, located at 185 SW Smith St. in Madison. The family would like to extend their gratitude for all of the prayers and support received prior to and since their mother’s passing.January 23, 1938 … October 5, 2014

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Photo SubmittedThe winner of a raf”e, being held at the Suwannee Valley Humane Society Pet Show, will win this doghouse. Shown with the house is Humane Society Director Barbara Fink and testing out the house for the future owner is shelter mascot Honey.ŽBy Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.This is a reminder that the Suwannee Valley Humane Society is holding their 29thAnnual Pet Show this Saturday, Oct. 11, at the Suwannee County Coliseum in Live Oak, located at 1302 11thStreet SW. The pet show will feature pet contests that will begin at 11 a.m., with registration at 10 a.m. Rafe tickets for the doghouse are $2 each or $5 for three tickets. Refreshments and baked goods will be available for purchase. Admission to the show is free and fees for entering the contests are $1 per contest, per pet. For more information on the show, contact the Suwannee Valley Humane Society at suwanneevalley@embarqmail.comor call (850) 971-9904. By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. The Madison County Lions Club has their Turkey Shoot coming up this weekend. The Turkey Shoot will be Saturday, Oct. 11, 18 and 25, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. in front of Greene Publishing, Inc. on South SR 53. It will be $3 per shot and there will be 12 targets a round. The shooter who hits closet to the center of the target will win the round. There will also be a 50/50 Round where there will be 20 circles and the circle with the most shots inside the circle wins. Children will be able to shoot but a guardian must be present. There will be 12 and 20 gauge shotguns available but you are welcome to bring your own. If you do bring your own, you must be willing to let anyone else at the event shoot your shotgun. The Lions Club also has their Turkey Trot 5K run on Saturday, Nov. 22. There will be a $20 registration fee that will include a t-shirt. There is an online registration form for the Turkey Trot. The website is www.madisonlionclub.com. All proceeds from the Turkey Shoot and Turkey Trot will go back into the Madison County community. Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 5A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 10, 2014Around Madison County One survey found that 77% of military personnel have some financial worries, mostly regarding their lack of savings to cover retirement or other needs. While the financial situation of military personnel and their families mirror the general population in many respects, heavy indebtedness and mismanagement of credit cards may be especially acute issues for service members. Of course, military families face unique challenges, such as deployment to conflict zones, overseas assignments and the constancy of change, making personal finance even more critical for those in the Armed Forces. Mo ney Tips to Consider The Thrift Savings Plan is one way to save for retirement and a Roth TSP is now available. The Savings Deposit Program allows eligible personnel serving in designated combat zones to invest up to $10,000 and receive a guaranteed return of 10%. Saving in a Roth IRA may be a good idea if you receive tax-free combatzone pay. This allows you to deposit tax-free income and take tax-free qualified withdrawals in retirement. The Post-9/11 GI Bill covers the full cost of in-state tuition, up to 36 months. Service members Group Life Insurance protects your family with low-cost life insurance. Set Goals„Like any mission, success begins with articulating goals you want to pursue. Establish a Budget„A budget provides the financial discipline that may help you control spending impulses that can lead to greater debt levels. Pay Yourself First„Determine how much money you need to set aside to reach your savings goal, deduct this amount from your paycheck, and attempt to live within the limits of what remains. Establish an Emergency Fund„ Uncertainty marks the life of military families, so be sure you have an emergency fund that allows you to be as prepared as possible for these changes. Control Your Debt„Indebtedness is one of the enemies of financial independence. As you think through your financial goals, remember, taking action today is your first and most important step. Stacy Bush, President Bush Wealth Management The Bush Wealth Advantage Personal Finance Tips for Military Families Our column, The Bush Wealth AdvantageŽ is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. Stacy Bush has pr acticed independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.com Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 889596 Good News Music Festival Featuring: Scrap Iron, Purvis Brothers Encore Band, Spiritual Sons, Southern Glory, Railroad Revival, Madison Boys Choir October 11, 2014 10 a.m. 7 p.m. $5 Per Person Madison Co-op 135 NE Dill Street Visit The Location Nearest You M a d i s o n 424 W. Base St. G a i n e s v i l l e 6450 SW Archer Rd. G a i n e s v i l l e 4620 NW 39thAve. P e r r y 2000 S. Byron Butler Blvd. S t e i n h a t c h e e 913 1stAve. SE or online at www.csbdirect.comOpening Fall 2014 Lions Club’s Turkey Shoot Starts SaturdayPhoto SubmittedLions member Diana Maurice (left) presented a check to President Tim Dunn (right) from Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center to help support the Madison Lions Club Turkey Trot. President Dunn also received a check from Lynette Sirmons from All Realty Services. Attend The SVHS 29thAnnualPet Show For A Chance To Win This Doghouse

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Around Madison County6A €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 10, 2014 C C IRCUS TARS S 130th Anniversary Edition SeeTigers Elephants Flying Trapeze Thunder Drome Clowns Aerial Ballet The Human Cannonball And More!TeeterboardFeats of EquilibriumClever CaninesTHE WORLDS LARGEST CIRCUS UNDER THE BIG TOPGOTOTHECIRCUS.COM SAVE $5ON ADULT ADMISSION PURCHASED IN ADVANCE FREEGOTOTHECIRCUS.COMTICKETS FOR KIDS AT PERFORMING UNDER THE BIG TOP ON THE PARKING LOT ATBUY ADVANCE TICKETS AT TICKETS.COM 1-888-332-5200FIVE POINTS SHOPPING CENTER4:30 PM 7:30 PMMON. OCT. TUES. OCT.28 27&3143 ASHLEY ST./RT. 41 ORLDS ORLDS THEW THE W W O ORLDS ORLDS THE W THE W GESTCIR GEST CIR SLAR S LAR R G GEST CIR GEST CIR SLAR S LAR CUSUNDERT CUS UNDER T R R R C CUS UNDER T CUS UNDER T R R THEBIGT HE BIG T OP OP OP OP HEBIGT THE BIG T S T S U C C R 3143 ASHLEY STFIVE POINTS SHOPPING CENTERPERFORMING UNDER THE BIG T 3143 ASHLEY STFIVE POINTS SHOPPING CENTERPERFORMING UNDER THE BIG T 4 T T. ./R Y ST T. FIVE POINTS SHOPPING CENTER A RKING L ON THE P PA OP P T TO 41FIVE POINTS SHOPPING CENTERT A ARKING LOT GOTOTHECIRCUS.COM27 F FREE F ET TICKETS OCT T. MON. EE THECIR O T GO GOTOTHECIRCUS.COM& T 27OCT TUES.B S FOR KIDS A AT CUS.COM THECIR GOTOTHECIRCUS.COM28 T T. TUES.7:30 PM 4:30 PM0 0 2 5 2 33 888 1 M O C S T E CK I T E K IC E T C N A V VA D Y A U GOTOTHECIRCUS.COM7:30 PM ANCE V CHASED V VA ED AN IN AD PUR VA C D ADMISSION R IN SION CHAS M PUR ONADUL T T ADUL ADMISS VE $5 E $A SA4:30 PM0 T S A AT T E Cole Bros. Circus Celebrates 130 th AnniversarySubmittedCole Bros. Circus, the oldest American Circus performing under the Big Top, celebrates its 130thAnniversary this year. W.W. Cole, who inaugurated the Cole Bros. Circus title in 1884, amassed fortune and fame by bringing the most astounding marvels of the day to villages and towns across the American continent. Among the amazing attractions promoted by W.W. Cole, incandescent light—a single, glowing glass globe, powered by a steam engine—drew record crowds, with young and old alike lling Cole’s tent to witness the seemingly impossible invention. The brightly lit tent of Cole Bros. Circus of the Stars bears slight resemblance to W.W. Cole’s 19thcentury Big Top, but the tradition of watching ‘what appears unbelie vable happen right before your eyes’ remains at Cole Bros. Circus. The 2014 Edition of Cole Bros. Circus celebrates 130 years of circus history with a special show reprising legendary circus acts of the past along with featuring the talents of cirque nouveau artists. In Mexico’s Angels in the Air performance, daring young men and women on the ying trapeze soar high above the hippodrome track. Circus daredevils cast caution aside in ThunderDrome, with the zany Cole Bros. Clown Crew arriving in the nick of time to provide comic relief. Elephants and acrobats, tigers and teeterboard artists take their turns in the spotlight and The Human Cannonball gets red at every show! With a dynamic new show to commemorate its anniversary, Cole Bros. Circus proves its enduring appeal. W.W. Cole introduced the public to the latest scientic achievement. Today, Cole Bros. Circus affords welcome opportunity to take a break from technology and enjoy the simple pleasure of attending the circus.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 7A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 10, 2014Around Madison County Dont Miss The Newsonline.greenepublishing.com Subscribe to our Online Edition Name__________________________________ Address________________________________ ______________________________________ City_____________State________Zip________ Email (For EPUB Subscription)______________ _______________________________________Greene Publishing P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341 Phone: 850-973-4141 Fax: 850-973-41211 Full Year 2 Newspapers a Week E-Pub $2500 Barn Quilts Of Madison County Using Art To Put Madison On The MapBy Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Artist Janet Moses, along with friends Sandy Wilson, Sandy Valladares and Deb Cucinella, has joined alongside hundreds of others in what is the largest grassroots public arts movement in our history. These four women make up Barn Quilts of Madison County and describe themselves as a motivated group putting their hearts and souls into bringing Madison into the American Quilt Trail Movement. The American Quilt Trail is a series of beautifully painted quilt squares, painted on wood or metal that is hung on buildings along a route, as part of an organized trail. The squares usually emphasize signicant architecture and/or aesthetic landscapes within a community, and with the help of clubs or groups, are organized into a trail. While fabric quilts are normally made up of many squares of the same pattern sewn together, barn quilts normally emphasize one single square on a canvas. Patterns for these quilt squares are personal and can be chosen to honor a loved one or because of the pattern name, such as "Corn and Beans," a popular quilt square among farmers. Once these squares are in place, visitors can then drive through either a downtown area or countryside for viewing. Quilt squares coordinated with farm stands, wineries, galleries or other points of interest can make the journey more memorable as well as create tourism revenue for the town. The rst ofcial quilt square was begun in 2001 in Adams County, Ohio by Donna Sue Groves, who painted a quilt square in honor of her mother, Maxine, a noted quilter. The quilt square was placed on the family barn in Manchester, later becoming part of a trail made up of 20 barn quilts that resulted in a driving trail throughout Adams County. The trail rapidly spread and with the quilt trail explosion, North America currently has 43 quilt trails with two in Canadian provinces. The Florida Quilt Trail was started in 2013 by Trenton and Gilchrist County, who commissioned Janet Moses to paint seven quilts on Trenton's buildings. Following those paintings, Moses began receiving requests from other counties to do quilt squares for them as well. Live Oak, White Springs and Branford are all currently coordinating their quilt trails and with the urging of long-time friend Sandy Wilson, Moses has enthusiastically decided to add Madison to the list and feels it couldn't be better timing because Suzi Parron, a Florida native and author of two books: Barn Quilts and the American Quilt Trail Movement, is presently working on a second volume about the expanding quilt trail movement which is set for publication in 2016. In the Quilt Trail Movement, many communities wanted to highlight their historical buildings and to attract visitors, resulting in the "Barnless Quilt Trails," where painted quilt squares were placed on homes, farm buildings, along fences, water towers and anywhere the community group felt was a place of signicance. This is the vision Moses has for Madison. While there certainly are barns that could grandly display a quilt square, Moses and her group have proposed to the City, quilt squares on City Hall, the oor of the gazebo in Four Freedoms Park and the County Courthouse water tower. Other locations in Madison already onboard with the idea are: O'Tooles Herb Farm, the Agriculture Center at NFCC, Five Acre Farm, Cucinella's Brick-Oven Pizzeria and the R.C. Horne House. Moses, who already has a following with her folk art, has been described as painting with "the soul of the South" making her a natural choice for this artful endeavor. Her group, Barn Quilts of Madison County, want to encourage those interested in sponsoring, volunteering or supplying paint donations, to come help them create these works of art that will be woven into the fabric of Madison County, allowing them to be admired for many years to come. For more information on Barn Quilts and the American Quilt Trail visit barnquiltinfo.comand be sure to click on the Facebook link to view pictures of some amazing quilt squares around the country. You can contact Janet Moses at (386) 249-4625 or Sandy Wilson at (850) 973-3102.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, September 16, 2014Artist Janet Moses, on right, and friend Sandy Wilson, on left, begin work on a quilt square that will be one of the “rst to start the Madison Quilt Trail.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, September 16, 2014This image of a Country Star FlagŽ quilt square is the logo for Barn Quilts of Madison County and was chosen for its four sides Moses connected with Four Freedoms Park in downtown Madison.

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8A €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 10, 2014Pre Hickory Grove Founder’s Day We Proudly Support The 24thAnnualHICKORYGROVEFOUNDERSDAYCelebration! Hickory Grove Founders Day Is Right Around The CornerSubmittedFounder’s Day at Hickory Grove is just a few short days away. Everything begins by 8 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 18th, and will conclude with a worship service at about 2 p.m. We have had some really great groups to sing during Founder’s Day and this year will be no different. The actual gospel singing will start at 9 a.m. Some of the groups are back again from last year. Gospel music has been around rural America for generations. When Founder’s Day first started nearly 25 years ago, the singing stage was actually on the front porch of the Church. We have moved locations a few times, and now, the location is under the oak trees on the north side of the church. There will be some seating in the old church pews, but should you want, you can bring your own lawn chairs. For the past 25 years, our very own, Cheri and Karen, daughters of Aaron and Jimmie Williams have sung at Founder’s Day. Brother Stephen was not blessed with angel-like voices like Cheri and Karen, but if asked, we just might get him to get on stage with his sisters. Both Aaron and Jimmie have gone on to Heaven, but I would bet my last dollar, they will have a front row seat somewhere listening to their girls make beautiful music. You can read more about their father, Aaron on page 13 of this year’s official program. Cousins of Cheri and Karen, Misty Williams and Chloe Carter will also bring great music to the Hickory Grove Singing Stage. Chloe is the daughter of Clinton and Michelle Williams Carter, who is the Director of this year’s Gospel Music singing stage. Other groups and individuals that will perform this year are Lifesong, Mike Scott, “Everlasting Arms,” Sam and Jan Agner along with Edna McCormick and back by popular demand, Ted McMullen and “Legends.” Ted grew up in the Hickory Grove Community and used to drive his Uncle Julian Andrews’ tractor during the summer tobacco season. Ted is known, far and wide, as a really great Elvis Presley voiced sound-alike, but he really got his start in the music business singing Gospel music. If you have never heard him, you have missed something. Sam and Jan have been members of the Church for some time now, and we all love to hear both harmonize with Sam when playing the guitar. We are really lucky at Hickory Grove to have so many talented members that can truly sing so wonderfully. And finally, we will have the Hickory Grove Choir that will end the day of singing. Our Choir has really worked hard and they do a really great job with Sandra Ulm leading the group. Founder’s Day is just around the corner, and the Singing Stage will be a place you will not want to miss. Everyone is welcome to sit a spell or stay all day! Come Join Us At Hickory Grove Founders Day, October 18 At 8 a.m.!

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By Bryant Thigpen Greene Publishing, Inc.The Madison County High School JV volleyball team (3-3) left Tallahassee on Thursday, Oct. 2 with a win against Godby High School and a nal score of 2-0. "Our girls went to Godby and came away with a victory beating the cougars in straight sets 25-12 and 25-7," said Head Coach Tim Meinsen. "The girls played very well using teamwork and communication to thump our opponent." Meinsen noted several players who contributed to the team's win. "Jakayla West set some beautiful passes to Desirea Alexander during the game. Hailey Deihl and Hailey Crosby both play magnicently on defense when Godby was in the attack. Kaitlyn Walker served beautifully during the game," Meinsen noted. "Desja Smiley has improved tremendously since taking over the starting position for injured Hannah Cooper. The JV girls played with a lot of intensity and were aggressive during the game." The Cowgirls nished their season Tuesday night against Hamilton County High School, which was their last game of the season. The results of that game will appear in the Oct. 15 edition of the Madison County Carrier. By Bryant ThigpenGreene Publishing, Inc.The Madison County High School JV Cowboys (4-2) improved their season record last Thursday night with a win at home against the Taylor County High School Bulldogs (0-4, season record according to MaxPreps.com) with a nal score of 64-12. The season in review The JV team opened their season again on the road against Wakulla High School War Eagles and suffered their rst loss, 18-0. The Cowboys then took on the Columbia High School Tigers and defeated them 34-22. Their next game was on the road in Live Oak against the Suwannee High School Bulldogs, where they lost their second game of the season by a 18-6 nal score. The next opponent was the Baker County High School Wildcats, who were defeated 27-0 by the Cowboys. On Sept. 25, the Pelham High School Hornets were rattled by the Cowboys in a 50-8 win at home. Taylor County left Boothill with a 64-12 loss last Thursday night. The Cowboys traveled to Columbia County High School in Lake City on Thursday night, Oct. 9 to take on the Tigers. By Bryant ThigpenGreene Publishing, Inc.The Madison County High School Cowboys (5-2) dominated between the hedges Friday night in a showdown against rivals, the Taylor County High School Bulldogs (2-4) with a 55-21 nal score. "(I am) very proud of our kids and how hard they played last Friday night. We had a seven point lead at halftime and we felt like our tempo and conditioning could be a major difference in the second half and it was," said Head Coach Mike Coe. "We won the second half 34-7 and that's a direct reection at how hard our kids work at practice and the tempo in which they practice." Eric Bright notched 204 yards in rushing and ve touchdowns in 31 attempts, averaging 6.6 yards per carry. Patrick Brown earned 87 rushing yards and one touchdown in 17 attempts, averaging 5.1 yards per carry. In one carry, Raquon Williams marched 66 yards down the eld for a touchdown. Akevious Williams led the team in passing with three completions for 64 yards and one touchdown out of 11 attempts, averaging 21.3 yards. Jay West caught one pass for 55 yards and one touchdown. Overall, the team earned 418 yards of offense in 61 plays. The Cowboys will take a week off after six tough match-ups. "We are sitting at 10 in the district and are off this week and we need it! We have a bunch of guys out with injuries and this week will give them a chance to heal up," Coe said. "Eric Bright played really well going for 204 yards and ve touchdowns. Our offensive line did a great job against a 8-9 man box all night," Coe said. "Taylor County knew Akevious Williams couldn't run because of a hamstring injury and it affected his throwing as well, but he is a tough, tough kid and wanted to play." Coe added, "Kenny McQuay made a big play on special teams with a blocked punt and Sherod Jones, Tay Robinson and Rat Edwards all had interceptions on defense as well." The Cowboys will host the Fort White High School Indians (41) at Boothill Stadium on Friday night, Oct. 17, at 7:30 p.m. "We host Fort White at home next week in another huge district game. Rest up this Friday Cowboy fans and let's pack out Boot Hill and be loud from start to nish next Friday," Coe said.Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 9A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 10, 2014Sports Cowboys Trounce Bulldogs 55-21JV Cowboys Crush Taylor County 64-12 JV Volleyball Beats Godby High 2-0

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a a s s c c r r a a t t c c h h t t h h e e r r e e ,a chip here... a chip here...A ding here, A ding here, over time damages like these can take a toll on the condition of your cars exterior and make it harder to love and sell later on. Whatever the extent of the damage, these professionals are here to help. Give them a call! Keep Your CarLooking Sharp Tommys Discount Paint & Body Shop Business: (850) 973-6528 Home: (850) 973-4622 Cell: (850) 464-0891 Fax: (850) 973-1218 Tommy Thigpen (Owner/Operator) 4517 NE Colin Kelly Hwy. Madison, Fl 32340 Specializing In Collision Repair Insurance Claims Welcome FREEESTIMATES Its Your Insurance... Your Choice... ...CHOOSE US!!! Fall is in full swing at Lee Elementary School, and we have successfully blasted off into a successful new school year! We are very excited about all of the new faces on campus (both teachers and students), and we are proud to welcome them into our Lee Rocket family! We are excited to have the “Accelerated Reader” program back in our classrooms, and the students are excited about reading books and earning points. Please encourage your child to read as much as possible at home. Many classes are also participating in Pizza Hut’s “Book It!” program, which gives students the opportunity to earn a free personal pan pizza for reaching their target reading goal each month. Besides earning points and prizes, students who read for pleasure are developing a lifelong love for learning and reading. Even our youngest Rockets are beneting from being read to at home. Our rst fundraiser for the new school year is currently underway, and all of our students are busy selling cookie dough and other delicious treats. So if you haven’t already placed your order for some delectable delicacies, see any Lee Rocket today. Orders are due back at school by Monday, Oct. 13th. We are busy collecting “Box Tops for Education” and Campbell’s “Labels for Education” to earn cash and prizes for our school, so if you have any extra “Box Tops for Education” or “Labels for Education” and aren’t afliated with a particular school, any school in the district should be able to benet from them. We would be happy to have them here at Lee Elementary School and will be collecting them through Thursday, Oct. 16th. The class that turns in the most “Box Tops” and “Labels” will receive a special treat for their efforts. We will hold another collection drive in the spring. Our annual Fall Festival will take place Thursday, Oct. 16thfrom 5 to 7 p.m. in the school courtyard and everyone is invited to attend. Scheduled activities include a train ride, “Plinko,” a duck pond, a bounce house and slides, a cake walk, a maze through the trees, a football toss, balloons, a ring toss and more. We will also be serving food and drinks. Students are anxiously casting votes for the administrator, faculty or staff member that they would like to see “kiss the pig” at the Fall Festival! Tickets are now on sale through next Thursday morning at the price of ve for $1. Tickets may be purchased at the Fall Festival for the price of four for $1. See Mrs. Cindy in the front ofce to get your advance tickets today! As the end of the rst nine-weeks approaches, please make sure to check with your child’s teacher to see how he or she is doing in class. Now is the time to take an active part in your child’s education. Knowing you are on their side and that you care will help them far more than anything we could say or do for them here at school. We want you on our team as we cheer your child on from Pre-K all the way through college!10A €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 10, 2014 School The School BellBy Heather Douglas PreK Teacher At Lee Elementary School‘The School Bell’ is a weekly column featuring educators in Madison County. Each week, Greene Publishing, Inc. will feature one teacher who can express their views and opinions, share lesson plans, a classroom activity, or any other educational subject of their choosing. If you are an educator or school administrator and would like to submit an article, please email Rose@greenepublishing.com.Ryan Tramell, who attends Madison County High School (MCHS), is this week’s Student of the Week and was chosen by the school’s administration. Tramell is an 18year-old senior, nishing up his last year of school participating in the dual enrollment program offered by the high school. He attends part-time at the school, taking four classes, and attends part-time at North Florida Community College (NFCC), enrolled in their EMT (Emergency Medical Technician) program. His current plans after graduating from MCHS is to take the State Boards for EMT and attend Florida State Fire College over the summer, with the goal of becoming a Paramedic/Fire Fighter. Tramell participates in FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes) while at the high school, meeting in the school’s library for music and devotionals and also plays baseball for the school. His favorite thing about school is the teachers and administrators, and his favorite subject of study is his EMT class, as he looks forward to his future career. Activities Ryan enjoys outside of school are all kinds of recreational activities, especially shing and golf. He lives in Pinetta and is son to Heather Wright and stepfather Mike Maurice and father John Tramell. By Rose KleinStudent Of The Week Ryan Tramell Every week, Greene Publishing, Inc. will spotlight a student from one of the Madison County Schools in a ‘Student of the Week’ column. If you are a parent or educator and would like to nominate a student for this feature, please email Rose@greenepublishing.com. Photo SubmittedRyan Tramell, a senior at MCHS, is working towards his desired career as a Paramedic/Fire“ghter in the dual enrollment program offered through the school. Photo SubmittedHeather Douglas is a PreKindergarten teacher at Lee Elementary School and is shown here with her PreK-aged daughter Lynzee. HEY! WE’RE ON FACEBOOK!Check us out and become a fan of our page![ Greene Publishing, Inc. ]It’s never been easier to share your local news with friends and family!

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SchoolMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 11A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 10, 2014 MCHS Senior Band Members Amber BentleyAmber Bentley, 17, is a senior for the Madison County High School band. She plays the clarinet, bass clarinet and saxophone. She has been playing for six years and loves her clarinet. She chose to play the clarinet because it was the instrument that her sister played. Her favorite songs to play are the Good Bad Ghost Riders, better known as the 4thQuarter and Gypsy Moods. She will soon be graduating from Madison County High School and she is not sure what direction she wants to travel in but she plans to attend North Florida Community College to receive her A.A. Her favorite part of being in the band is Friday nights when she gets to cheer on the Cowboys. Megan Seay Makayla MobleyMakayla Mobley, 17, is a senior for the Madison County High School band. She plays the snare drum, trap set drums, bass drums and quints. She has been playing the trap set drums since she was 12 years old and has gradually added on the other instruments. She enjoys playing the drums because she can take all of her anger out on the drum and she loves to play. She is currently the only girl playing drums at MCHS. She will soon be graduating from Madison County High School and plans to graduate with honors. For her drummer friends to remember her by, she is leaving some of her broken sticks behind. Her favorite part of being in the band is the football games. Cheyenne Shef“eldCheyenne Shefeld, 17, is a senior for the Madison County High School band. She plays the trumpet in the band but she also plays the French horn, mellophone, piano and saxophone. She chose the trumpet because it was what her mother played. The French horn, mellophone and saxophone are tied for rst when it comes to her favorite instrument. She has been playing the piano for eight years, trumpet for seven years and the others for three years. She has many favorite songs to play such as: Still Fly, Sonic Boom, La Negra in Jazz and Cadences with the drums. She will soon be graduating from Madison County High School and plans to get her A.A. and work while she decides on what college she wants to attend. Her favorite part of being in the band is helping others and the rush she feels when the band is in tune, which results in a great. She also enjoys the football games. Jesse SmithJesse Smith, 17, is a senior for the Madison County High School band. He plays the alto saxophone. He chose the instrument because he thought it was a cool instrument and has been playing for ve years. His favorite song to play is La Negra Tiene Tumbao and his favorite composer is Beethoven. He will soon be graduating from Madison County High and plans to get as many scholarships as he can for college. His favorite part of band is learning the music.William Terry William Terry, 17, is a senior for the Madison County High School band. He plays the saxophone and cymbals. He has been playing for seven years. He will soon be graduating from Madison County High and plans to make good grades. His favorite part of band is the music. Megan Seay, 17, is a senior for the Madison County High School band. She plays the xylophone, marimba, trumpet and tenor saxophone. She has been playing for eight years because she loves music. If she chose a favorite, it would be the tenor saxophone. Her favorite song to play is Be Prepared. She will soon be graduating from Madison County High School and plans to go into the Army after graduation. Her favorite part about being in the band is playing in the stands and laughing with her band members. Were powered by whats most important. At Duke Energy, we care about delivering reliable energy. Whether were working to keep the lights on, day in and day out, updating you with the latest real-time information with our online outage maps, or helping you prepare for the next big storm with weather warnings and safety tips, were always powered by whats most important … you. Learn more about how were powered by you at duke-energy.com/ForYou

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Farm12A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 10, 2014 The Business Of A Cattleman And His CowboysBy Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Junior Tuten wears many hats, a cowboy hat being just one. He is a cattleman, co-owner of a limited liability company, an investor, a rancher, a farmer, a husband, a father and a grandfather. He has been in the cattle business full-time since the 1980’s and has turned his cattle business into a family business. Junior’s son Gary was raised in cattle farming, with his sons Chris and Matt and daughter Jennifer, following in his footsteps. As the Tuten family has grown, so has their business, moving into three counties; Madison, Jefferson and Brooks, with a total of four companies under the umbrella of Blackwater Investors, LLC. The four businesses keep all the Tuten’s busy. Between the four entities, there are jobs of fertilizing, harvesting hay, repairing fences, feeding cattle, spraying pastures, mowing, birthing calves and if that’s not enough, they also grow cotton and peanuts. When asked if every Tuten in the family worked the farm, Junior said, “No,” but jokingly added, “All us Tutens can survive only because we have a wife, or friend, in town working.” Chris’s wife Shaughnessy, is already helping on the farm, and will be doing even more after nishing her veterinary internship, causing Chris to proudly say, “We’ll then have our own personal vet.” And when asked if his own kids would become cattle farmers, his quick reply guarantees the family business will continue, “That’s the plan.” Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 10, 2014Chris Tuten, on left, with his Grandfather Junior Tuten, on right, quickly corrected the labeling of his grandfather as a cowboy. My brother and I are the cowboys, my grandfather is a cattleman.ŽGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 10, 2014Junior Tuten, on left, talks business with cattle buyer Bobby Freeman, center and truck driver Michael Thrower, far right.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 10, 2014Every cattleman and cowboy needs a horse. FrecklesŽ belongs to Gary Tuten, father of Chris and son of Junior.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 10, 2014Calves that have been herded from the Tuten “eld, into a holding pen, will make their way to the cattle truck that will eventually lead them to feed lots in Nebraska.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 10, 2014Matt Tutens cattle dog CowgirlŽ takes a well-deserved break in the trailer while Matt and friend Tyler work the cows.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 10, 2014Cowpoke Tyler Evans helps separate cows into a second holding pen, where afterwards they will be loaded into the truck.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 10, 2014Chris waits for the cows to help herd them into the trucks door.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 10, 2014Brothers Chris and Matt Tuten, load cattle into the truck.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 10, 2014All loaded up, the cows are now ready for their long trip to Nebraska.

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE MOVING SALE YARD SALE FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED Buy, Sell or Trade In The Classi“eds Call 973-4141 Call 973-4141www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES WANTED FREE Classifieds . . . . . . LEGAL Friday, October 10, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 13A FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 10/6/2014 THROUGH 10/12/2014 Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBecome A Certi“ed Nursing Assistant Quest Training offers a nurse taught CNA prep class. No GED required if age 18. Professional training site, high pass rates. Now accepting students. 386-362-1065.10/1 10/29, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12x18 building with 6 porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/c Pressure Washing I can pressure wash your house, business, sidewalks and drive-ways. Call (850) 843-4405.7/23 rtn, n/c Asphalt Milling, 18 tons, $350 load. Call Paul Kinsley at (850) 464-1230.8/27 rtn, n/cImmediate Opening At Madison Heights Apartments 3 Bedroom Unit Applications are available at 150 SW Bumgardener Drive., Monday through Friday 8 a.m. 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. 4 p.m.8/13 rtn, c Wanted to hire someone to establish network at small of“ce. Call 850-973-99808/6, rtn, n/c Free Kitten To A Good Home He is orange, very sweet and loves people! Call (850) 464-2315. October 11 from 8 a.m. 5 p.m. is the Great Georgia Yard Sale at the Lowndes County Civic Center (old fairgrounds) with over 150 booths. It's big! It's huge! New & used household goods, baby items, furniture. Music, slides and rides and concession food available! Produced by Glynn Events www.GreatGeorgiaYardSale.com 912-580-5000.10/1, 10/8, pdLand home package starting at $395 per month. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.10/1 rtn, cWe Buy Used Mobile Homes. Call (386) 623-4218 for cash price.10/1 rtn, cRent to own with 10k down. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.10/1 rtn, cBlow out pricing on all lot model houses. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.10/1 rtn, cCustom built modular homes. Call Magic Mike for pricing and appointment. (386) 623-4218.10/1 rtn, cEver dreamed of owning a home? Contact Kathy at (386) 365-9673. Lets make your dream come true.10/1 rtn, cLet me help you make your dream come true of owning a home. Contact Kathy at (386) 365-9673. 10/1 rtn, cGot bad credit? Contact Kathy at (386) 365-9673 and Ill help you with your dream of owning a home.10/1 rtn, cNeed a custom built home? Contact Kathy at (386) 365-9673 to make an appointment.10/1 rtn, c Drivers: CDL-A. Average $52,000 per yr. plus. Excellent Home Time + Weekends. Monthly Bonuses up to $650. 5,000w APU's for YOUR Comfort + E-Logs. Excellent Bene“ts. 100% no touch. 877-704-3773.10/1, 10/8, pdFiscal Of“cer Position Available Senior Citizen Council of Madison as a position available for a Fiscal Of“cer. Quali“cations: High school diploma/GED with 5 years of experience in accounting. Attention to details and high degree of accuracy in all paper work. Mandatory computer experience. Must be able to communicate well with people. Please apply in person with a resume or application to Human Resources at the Senior Citizen Center 1161 SW Harvey Greene Drive, Madison, Fl. Applications may be picked up at the Senior Citizens Center. No phone calls please.10/1, 10/8, c FULL TIME SYSTEM ENGINEER Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an opening for a full-time entry level System Engineer in our Madison Of“ce. The candidate is required to have a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering, Civil Engineering, or Mechanical Engineering and zero to three years experience. The candidate must also have solid problem solving skills and be able to plan, design, prepare and organize technical projects or new organization initiatives. The Cooperative offers competitive salary and bene“ts. Tri-County is an EOE and DFWP. Please send resume before October 24, 2014 to: Robert McKimm Aerotek, Inc. 7077 Bonneval Rd. Jacksonville, FL 32216 rmckimm@aerotek.com 800.836.2360.10/1, 10/8, c 2 BD 1 BA Mobile Home 2 miles south of I-10 off State Road 53 South. Rent $400 per month/$400 deposit. (850) 971-5856.10/8, pdWed., Oct. 8 Sat., Oct. 11 from 10 a.m. 5 p.m. Located in Lee at 7891 E US Hwy 90, call “rst (772) 473-4558. Bedroom sets, living room set, dining room set, book shelves, folding tables and much more.10/8, pd10 Laying Hens and 1 Rooster. $100 for all. Call (850) 228-8380.10/8, pdHunting Camp For Sale Jefferson County 10 acres 2 BD 1 BA, screened front porch, well, septic, electric, skinner rack, dog pens. Located between scenic Aucilla and Wacissa Rivers. Asking $60,000. Call (850) 491-0064.10/8 10/22, pd Drivers CDL-A: Home EVERY Weekend! ALL Loaded/Empty Miles Paid! Dedicated Southeast! Or Walk Away Lease, No Money Down. 1-855-971-8524.10/8, pd Steel Fab Operator Needed Must have high school diploma or equivalent, be able to read a tape measure to 1/16th, should be pro“cient in math, and have no previous employment with Big Top Mfg. There is only one (1) position available, we will only accept the “rst ten (10) quali“ed applications. Starting Thursday the 10/9/14 @ 8:00am. Must apply in person at Big Top Mfg. 3255 North US 19 Perry, FL. EEO/AA/m/f/vets/disabled.10/8, c Sales Associate This is not an entry level sales position so individuals without any prior sales experience will not be considered. Applicant will have to travel occasionally. This is a performance based position with an emphasis on continued growth. No previous employees. Driving record report and Drug test will be required if hired. Minimum Quali“cations Education: € High school graduation required. € Bachelor Degree from an accredited school is required. € A preference will be given for an applicant with a 4 year college degree, but a ranking of“cer of the US Military or 5 years of sales experience with one company. Apply in Person at Big Top Manufacturing. Accepting the quali“ed applicants, Starting Thursday the 10/9/14 @ 8:00am. EEO/AA/m/f/vets/disabled.10/8, cBLM Laser Operator Assistant (1 position) Job Description: Laser Operator achieving immediate and short term productions objective. This position requires near perfect attendance and punctuality. You will be required to work any reasonable overtime hours in order to meet production needs. Minimum Quali“cations: € Must read and speak English € Basic understanding of hand tools and the ability to use them € Ability to read a tape measure to the 1/16Ž € Pro“cient in using a computer program of“ce € Pro“cient in math, both decimal and inch calculations € Pro“cient communication skills, both written and oral Education/Work Experience: € High School diploma or equivalent preferred but not required € One year work history or Military Service € Experience working CNC equipment for a minimum of 1 year. There is only one (1) position available, we will only accept the “rst “ve (5) quali“ed applications. Accepting the quali“ed applicants, Starting Thursday the 10/9/14 @ 8:00am. Apply in person at Big Top Mfg. 3255 North Hwy 19. We will only accept “ve quali“ed applications. EEO/AA/m/f/vets/disabled.10/8, c Employment DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for CON-WAY TRUCKLOAD. NO Experience Needed. Local CDL Training. Apply Today! 1-800-876-7364. Financial Services NEED CASH! If you are receiving payments on one of the following: note & trust deed mortgage land sale contract FAX: J.C. Patton Brokerage Service, 841 Newport Rd., Lexington, MS 39095, 1-662-834-1033. Health & Medical Attention: VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! A cheaper alternative to high drugstore prices! 50 Pill Special $99 FREE Shipping! 100 Percent Guaranteed. CALL NOW: 1-800-943-8953. Health Care Safe Step Walk-In Tub Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 1-800-605-6035 for $750 Off. Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS Start Here Get FAA certi“ed with hands on training in Aviation Maintenance. Financial aid for quali“ed students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-5838. OTR Drivers Wanted Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Quali“ed drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Real Estate/ Land for Sale Previously BANK FORECLOSED, 5.65 Acres ONLY 14,900 29.1 Acre Creek Front 29,900 Mountain Views, Rushing Trout Stream, Minutes to 40,000 Acre Lake, Adjoins State Park Roads, Utilities, Financing, Call 877-520-6719 or Remax 423-756-5700. NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The City of Madison will hold two public meetings on Thursday, October 16, 2014, in the City Commission Chambers at City Hall, 321 SW Rutledge Street, Madison FL. The purpose of the meetings is to obtain public input on the Citys application for Florida Recreation Development Program (FRDAP) Grants. The “rst meeting is scheduled at 4:15 p.m. concerning Lanier Field future Tennis Court. The second meeting is scheduled at 4:30 p.m. concerning Sumpter A. James, Jr. Park. All interested parties are encouraged to attend the meeting. For more information contact, Charles D. Hitchcock, Jr. at 850-973-5083.10/10, 10/15 www.peacockslandscaping.com€ (850) 464-1484 € € Madison, Fl. 32340 € € sailpeacock@gmail.com € IrrigationLandscaping Halls Tire & Muffler Center(850) 973-3026Owner Daryl & Lee Anne Hall1064 E. US 90 € Madison, FlBeside Clover Farm ROOFING SPECIALIST State Certified Building Contractor & Roofing Contractor License # CBC 1251818 / CCC 1328133 www.ewingconstructionandroofing.com Serving Madison & Surrounding CountiesLee (850) 971-5043€ Commercial / Residential € All Roof Types € Fully Insured € Proven Track Record € Free EstimatesQUALITY GUARANTEE! DAYS TREE SERVICE THETREESPECIALISTFree Estimates € Tree Trimming € Debris Clean Up Aerial Device € Tree Removal € Bush Hogging Stump GrindingCall Gene Day (850) 948-4757Cell: (850) 464-03866425 NW Lovett Rd. € Greenville, Fl 32331 B u s i n e s s C a r d D i r e c t o r y Daryl Hall

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14A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 10, 2014 WOW! Weve Got Em!47 to Choose From! ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TITLE & LEMON LAW FEE OF $3 AND REFLECT ALL APPLICABLE FACTORY REBATES. ALL REBATES INCLUDE INCLUDE $500 REBATE WHEN FINANCED WITH CHRYSLER CAPITAL. 1500 LARAMIE PRICE INCLUDES $500 CONQUEST REBATE TO CUSTOMER WHO OWN A COMPETITIVE BRAND TRUCK. MUST PRESENT AD AT TIME OF PURCHASE TO RECEIVE ANY OR ALL ADVERTISED PRICE. VEHICLES MAY BE LOCATED AT EITHER OF OUR QUITMAN OR VALDOSTA DEALERSHIPS. ALL PRICES GOOD THROUGH OCTOBER 11, 2014 OR UNTIL VEHICLE IS SOLD, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. 888-463-68314164 N. VALDOSTA RD. € VALDOSTA, GA 2014 JEEP WRANGLER 2014 GRAND CHEROKEE HUGE DISCOUNTS FROM THE MOST DEPENDABLE, LONGEST LASTING FULL-SIZE PICKUPS ON THE ROAD! SILVERADO 2500 HD CREW 4X4 229-263-7561 8640 HWY 84W2014 SILVERADO 1500 CREW LT 4X4 2014 CHEVY SONIC 2014 JEEP PATRIOT 2014 JEEP COMPASS2014 JEEP CHEROKEE 2015 CHRYSLER 2002014 DODGE CHARGER Everybody Knows Chevys Cost Less In Quitman! 887827 Q140502 Q140484 2014 RAM 2500 4 DOOR 4X4 HEAVY DUTY Q1403530% Example: Q140444 MSRP $20,135 -Disc. $1,743 -$2,000 Down = $16,392/72 @ $227/Month 888-304-2277801 E. SCREVEN ST € QUITMAN, GA2014 RAM 1500 4 DOOR 2014 RAM 15002014 RAM 1500 LARAMIE Q140498 V150002 Q140110 Q140312 V140314 V140499 2014 DODGE DARTQ140444 2014 GRAND CARAVANV140065 2014 DODGE JOURNEYQ140431 Q140060 2014 DODGE CHALLENGERV140458 2014 DODGE DURANGO V140181 CASS BURCH 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DOOR2014 SILVERADO 1500 C140162 C140187 DURAMAX DIESEL C140286 C150024 SPRAY-IN BEDLINER INCLUDED IN ALL TRUCKS! 2 YEAR/24,000 MILES COMPLIMENTARY MAINTENANCE!2014 CHEVY SPARKC140152 C140242 2014 CHEVY CRUZE C140270 2015 CHEVY MALIBUC150036ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TITLE & LEMON LAW FEE OF $3 AND REFLECT ALL APPLICABLE FACTORY REBATES. DISCOUNTS EQUALS MSRP DEALER DI SCOUNT ALL APPLICABLE REBATES. ALL 1500 TRUCK DISCOUNTS INCLUDE $1500 TRADE-IN ASSISTANCE. VEHICLES ARE LOCATED AT OUR QUITMAN DEALERSHIP. ALL PRI CES GOOD THROUGH OCTOBER 11, 2014 OR UNTIL VEHICLE IS SOLD, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. MUST PRESENT AD AT TIME OF PURCHASE TO RECEIVE ANY OR ALL ADV ERTISED PRICE. 2015 CHEVY EQUINOXC150034 2014 CHEVY IMPALA C140147 2015 CHEVY TRAVERSE C150056 2015 CHEVY TAHOE C150015

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Health Health And AndWellness Wellness Guide Guide Madison Enterprise-Recorder Section B October 10, 2014

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2014 Health & Wellness 2B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, October 10, 2014 www.ValdostaVeins.net ~ Valdosta, GeorgiaGreg Martin, MD, FACS In-Office Procedures Latest Laser Technology Insurance Accepted for Most ProceduresJoin the thousands of happy, satisfied patients who enjoy healthy, more beautiful, pain-free legs as we celebrate our tenth anniversary! Join the party and enjoy younger-looking legs with no more unsightly varicose or spider veins. Call now...theres a party going on and youre invited!Located in Summit Pointe Plaza

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By Jessie R. Box Greene Publishing, Inc. Florida faced an Ebola scare last week when a teenage patient visiting Miami from West Africa was showing symptoms of Ebola. It was announced Monday that the patient tested negative for Ebola but the Center of Disease Control (CDC) is conducting further testing to completely rule out Ebola. This comes after Texas has a confirmed Ebola case. The CDC has tracked the people the man has come in contact with and there are 10 definite contacts and 38 people he made possible contact with. The CDC will make contact with the 48 people for 21 days from the date of each person’s exposure to ensure they have not contracted Ebola, due to the fact that symptoms can take from two to 21 days to appear. The teen in Florida is not one of the 48 people. “While we have no confirmed cases of Ebola in Florida, we are continuing to take every step possible to best protect our citizens and our tourists,” said Governor Rick Scott. “I spoke to Texas Governor Rick Perry about what their state has learned from responding to the confirmed Ebola patient in Dallas. We will stay in communication with Texas officials as their response and treatment efforts continue to develop. Florida state agencies also held conference calls with our state’s airport and port leaders today to share information on preparedness steps at each of their facilities. Supporting the preparedness efforts of our airports and our ports means we must have a tremendous partnership between the state, federal officials and local leaders on the ground. We will continue to communicate regularly with these leaders in the days ahead as Florida continues to hope for the best even while we prepare for the worst.” The 2014 Ebola outbreak is the largest known in history and the first Ebola epidemic the world has ever known. The countries that have been affected are Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra. As of Oct. 3, there have been a total of 7,792 cases and 3,431 resulted in death. The Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) and Florida Department of Health (DOH) are working to prepare for the possibility of Ebola cases in Florida. The AHCA is identifying the hospitals that have the proper treatment kits and isolation facilities suitable for the treatment of Ebola cases. DOH is providing additional patient screening and care guidance to all local hospitals, urgent care centers, emergency medical services and all private providers of care to address the issues posed by potential Ebola cases and they are providing medical guidance to NonGovernmental Organizations and Faith-Based Organizations throughout Florida to protect humanitarian volunteers who may travel to or from regions where the disease is present. Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, October 10, 2014 € 3B 2014 Health & Wellness Florida Teenager With Ebola Symptoms Tested Negative Big Bend Hospice Is Looking For Patient Volunteers As a Big Bend Hospice volunteer, you can provide support to patients and families in a number of ways. Whether it’s sitting with a patient while the caregiver buys groceries, plan final arrangements or simply get rest, volunteers are an essential part of the hospice team and increases the level of care that our patients receive. If you are interested in volunteering, please call the Big Bend Hospice volunteer department at (850) 878-5310 or send an email to Sharon Davidson at sharon@bigbendhospice.org.

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2014 Health & Wellness 4B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, October 10, 2014 October Is SIDS, Pregnancy And Infant Loss Awareness Month The Healthy Start Coalition of Jefferson, Madison & Taylor Counties Partners with First Candle/SIDS Alliance to Help Save Infant Lives Story Submitted On this day, in communities across America, expectant moms will feel their baby’s first kick; parents will listen joyfully to their newborn’s first cry; and families will celebrate their healthy baby’s first birthday. Also on this day, 13 babies will die suddenly and unexpectedly (SIDS/SUID); more than 70 new parents will have listened sadly to their stillborn baby’s silence; and countless lives will be lost to miscarriage and other causes of infant death. October is SIDS, Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness month, and the Healthy Start Coalition of Jefferson, Madison and Taylor Counties is teaming up with the nation’s leading organization dedicated to infant health and survival to help increase awareness about these tragic causes of infant death. Donna Hagan, Coalition Executive Director, reports “our Coalition is dedicated to preventing infant and fetal death; our programming focuses on education for parents that focuses on safe sleep and healthy infant development and our community work focuses on educating the public on the factors that cause infant and fetal loss.” Last year, there were four infants that died before their first birthday in Jefferson County. There were no infant deaths in Madison and Taylor Counties. Although we celebrate these successes in Madison and Taylor, an additional six families (two in each county) had a stillborn infant (fetal death) last year. The month of October is dedicated to remembering these families. Please join us on October 15thwhen we will light a candle for the infants lost and honor these families at the Coalition office in Greenville. October 15thhas been designated National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day. Agencies and families are also encouraged to light candles to celebrate the lives that have been lost, and will continue to be lost, until we reach our goal of a future where all babies survive and thrive. For more information, visit www.october15.com. To learn more about how you can help, please call (850) 948-2741 or visit www.firstcandle.org Interested individuals can access information on ways they can help create awareness and/or show support for families and babies in their local community. Crisis counselors are also available 24/7 by calling, toll free, 1-800221-7437.

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The number one public health threat to Florida's future is unhealthy weight. Currently, only 36 percent of Floridians are at healthy weight. On our current trend, by 2030, almost 60 percent will be obese. Over the next 20 years in Florida, obesity is expected to contribute to millions of cases of preventable chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer, costing an estimated $34 billion. To address this important public health issue, the Department of Health launched the Healthiest Weight Florida initiative in January 2013. Healthiest Weight Florida is a public-private collaboration bringing together state agencies, not for profit organizations, businesses and entire communities to help Florida’s children and adults make consistent, informed choices about healthy eating and active living. The overall goal is to bend the weight curve by 5 percent by 2017. Strategies to Address Healthy Weight in Florida There are a variety of factors that play a role in unhealthy weight. This makes it a complex health issue to address. Behavior, environmental and genetic factors all influence weight. At this time, behavior and environmental factors are the most promising areas for prevention and treatment actions. Healthiest Weight Florida employs five strategies to address behavior and environmental change. These strategies, described below, closely align with national expert organization recommendations like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Institute of Medicine. Strategy One—Increase opportunities for physical activity Regular physical activity can produce long term health benefits. People of all ages, shapes, sizes and abilities can benefit from being physically active. The more physical activity you do, the greater the health benefits. Being physically active can help:  Control weight  Reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease  Reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes  Reduce the risk of some cancers  Strengthenbones and muscles  Improve mental health and mood  Improve ability to do daily activities and prevent falls in older adults  Increase the chances of living longer Strategy Two—Make healthy food available everywhere Finding healthy food is not always convenient. Studies have found that people buy food that is readily available. And today, it is often the case that communities with the highest rates of obesity also are places where residents have few opportunities to conveniently purchase nutritious, affordable food. Strategy Three—Promote health in the worksite Now that many people are spending most of their day sitting at a desk or inside an office, implementing health programs inside the workplace has become a vital piece of the healthy lifestyle puzzle. Effective workplace programs, policies and environments that are health-focused and worker-centered have the potential to significantly benefit employers, employees, their families and communities. Strategy Four—Strengthen schools as the heart of health Schools are uniquely positioned to be a national focal point for healthy weight promotion because children spend up to half of their waking hours in school and consume between one-third and onehalf of their daily calories in the school setting. Strategy Five—Market what matters for a healthy life When the messages around us focus on health, it becomes easier to think about making healthy choices. Healthiest Weight Florida seeks to make useful health information and advice available through campaigns, social media and other resources. For more information, call the Florida Department of Health in Madison at (850) 973-5000. Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, October 10, 2014 € 5B 2014 Health & Wellness What Is Healthiest Weight Florida?

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More Than Ever, Be Aware Of Cancer 2014 Health & Wellness 6B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, October 10, 2014 By Terese Almquist Guest Columnist Pink. We see it in ads in the newspaper and television. We see NFL players adorned in brilliant pink each Sunday in October. We see pink flowers at the garden store. We see pink shirts, sweatshirts and sweaters in every clothing store. We are surrounded with pink in October. But the pink doesn’t tell the personal story of the millions of people who will face those words that we all dread, “You have cancer.” Each year more and more of our friends and neighbors will be diagnosed. Some will be people we work with or see each Sunday at church; others will be relatives. About 50,000 people will be diagnosed this year in North Carolina and nearly 20,000 will lose their battle this year. Cancer will cost Americans over $260 billion this year in treatment, lost wages while recovering, and lost income from a premature death. One in two men and one in three women will face cancer in their lifetime. More women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and more men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer than any other type of cancer this year. As someone who’s involved in providing cancer support services because of my affiliation with the Wig Bank of Caldwell County, I was surprised when someone said it just seems like more and more people have cancer and asked whether this means that all the money we’ve spent on research is a waste. There are pr obably several reasons for such an observation. People are living longer with cancer. (I can remember when I was growing up in the '60s, when cancer was almost an immediate death sentence. Today many cancer patients live for years after their original diagnosis and treatment.) We still do things that have been proven to cause cancer, like smoke or eat too much food high in fat. People are just living longer, which means eventually something will happen, as no one lives forever. The research that continues is amazing and certainly not a waste. The research has prolonged lives. The research is aiding in early detection. The research is finding new treatments, like the University of Florida’s Proton Therapy. We can each wage our own war with this dreaded disease. We can make an appointment and take the appropriate tests, stay out of the sun or at least use sunscreen (and make sure our children and grandchildren are also covered up), eat better, exercise more and most importantly quit smoking. We can donate to the American Cancer Society or to local agencies. Let’s help a friend or neighbor. Make a meal. Volunteer to take them to their appointments. Buy a bag of groceries. Stop by and visit. Say a prayer. Think pink.

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2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, October 10, 2014 € 7B

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By SPM Wire With breast cancer currently the second most common cancer in women, according to government health statistics, awareness and early detection are crucial for treatment outcomes. With this in mind, every October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month -a time to raise awareness of the disease and funds for research and treatment. While most women are aware of the disease, many fail to take steps to detect breast cancer in its early stages, say the experts at the National Breast Cancer Foundation. As such, each year in October, women are encouraged to create an “Early Detection Plan.” The benefits are proven; when breast cancer is detected early in what is known as a “localized stage,” the five year survival rate is 98 percent, according to the National Cancer Institute. Having a plan is all about creating reminders to conduct breast self-exams, and to schedule clinical breast exams and mammograms based on your age and health history. More free information about creating an Early Detection Plan is available at www.earlydetectionplan.org and by consulting your personal health care provider. This October, make sure the women in your family are active in helping to safeguard their own health and that of their loved ones. 2014 Health & Wellness 8B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, October 10, 2014 By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.The 2014 Nobel Price in Physiology or Medicine went to John O’Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser for their discovery of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain. This “inner GPS,” in the brain makes it possible to orient ourselves in space, demonstrating a cellular basis for higher cognitive function. In 1971, O’Keefe discovered the first component of the positioning system. He found that a type of nerve cells in the hippocampus in the brain was always active when a rat was at a certain place in the room. Other nerve cells were activated when the rat was at other places. O’Keefe concluded that these “place cells” formed a map of the room. Husband and wife team, MayBritt Moser and Edvard I. Moser discovered another key component of the brain’s positioning system in 2005. They identified "grid cells” another type of nerve cells, that generate a coordinate system that allows for precise positioning and path finding. This discovery could help with Alzheimer’s patients. In the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex are affected and the individuals lose their way and cannot recognize the environment. Knowing about the brain’s positioning system and where it is located can help scientist and doctors understand the mechanism underpinning the devastating spatial memory loss that affect people with Alzheimer’s disease. Human Brains Have Inner GPS October Is NationalBreast Cancer Awareness Month

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By StatePoint If you’re 65 or older you prob ably know that the Medicare Annual Enrollment Period runs October 15 through December 7. Generally, this is the only time you can make changes to your coverage. According to Herb Fritch, president of Cigna-HealthSpring, a leading health service company and Medicare insurance provider, here are some things to consider:  Determine priorities. Make a list of priorities -such as lowering out-of-pocket costs -and use it to compare plans.  Understand the different parts. Part A refers to hospital insurance. The amount of the deductible depends on the length of the hospital stay. Part B refers to basic medical insurance for doctor visits and other health care services. Medicare pays 80 percent of approved charges while you pay 20 percent in addition to a monthly Part B premium and annual deductible which will vary based on your income. Supplemental plans like Medigap and Medicare Advantage can help cover the 20 percent gap and most offer extra benefits. Part C refers to plans operated by private companies that combine Part A and B benefits. Most include Part D prescription drug coverage, offer no or low monthly premiums, and extras like vision, dental and gym membership benefits. Part D refers to Prescription Drug Plans offering at least a standard level of coverage set by Medicare; some are available as standalone plans.  Do your research. Benefits differ from company-to-company and even state-to-state, so do your research. Look beyond premium cost to ensure there aren’t hidden copays or fees that will end up costing you more. Pay close attention to medication quantity limits and make sure your plan offers adequate drug coverage.  Pay your Medicare Part B premium. Even if you’re enrolled in a private Medicare plan, you must continue paying your Part B premium. If you’re having trouble, contact your local Medicaid office to see if you qualify for a Medicare Savings Program.  Don’t settle. Priorities change, so the plan that worked when you were 65 may not be best when you’re 75. Plans also change year-to-year so review before renewing.  Know your network. Many plans offer choices with a network of doctors. If you visit a doctor out of network, you could be responsible for out-of-pocket costs. However, networks offered by Medicare Advantage choices, such as Cigna-HealthSpring, can foster better coordination among doctors, leading to better care. Ask your doctors what plans they accept or check your network directory.  Don’t worry about the Exchanges. With a few exceptions, Medicare will be a better option than the Exchanges (also called “Marketplaces”). In fact, it’s illegal for someone to sell you an Exchange plan if they know you have Medicare.  Use free resources. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Plan Finder helps you compare costs, covered medications and other items. Many insurance plans offer free seminars with no obligation to sign up. You can also check companies’ websites or call their Customer Service number for more information. Local agencies on aging can also be helpful. This open enrollment period, make sure your health plan works for you. Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, October 10, 2014 € 9B 2014 Health & Wellness Tips For The 2015 Medicare Annual Enrollment Period

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10B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, October 10, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness Breast Pain? Why You Can Stop Worrying About Cancer By Kristine Crane Here are nine things it pr obably is instead. The fear factor Breast pain can be scary. Your mind immediately thinks cancer, but in all likelihood, cancer is not the cause. “The important thing for patients to realize is that while it can be a sign [of cancer], it is very rare,” says Michael Cowher, a breast surgeon with Cleveland Clinic. Breast cancer rarely produces painful symptoms, and the best way to detect it is still with your fingers. Breast pain is often related to hormonal changes, but there are other causes. Here are some to consider. Premenstrual pain Women often feel heaviness in their breasts right before their period – even to the point of experiencing pain while walking up stairs. This is because the surge in the hormones estrogen and progesterone cause the breast’s milk glands and ducts to enlarge and the breasts to retain water. This type of pain usually resolves during or shortly after the menstrual cycle, when hormones have returned to their normal levels Costochondritis This is an arthritic pain in the middle of the chest, between the ribs and breast bone, and it is caused by poor posture or aging. Women describe it as a burning sensation in the breast. The symptoms may mimic those of a heart attack or other heart conditions. If swelling is involved, it might be a condition called Tietze Syndrome. Applying heat or ice or taking ibuprofen can usually treat this type of pain. Non-cyclical breast pain This type of pain, which is not related to a woman’s menstrual cycle, is often isolated to one specific area of the breast. Women may experience it following a breast biopsy, breast injury or trauma; pain from tissue or muscles surrounding the breast may also cause it. The condition is most common in women between ages 40 and 50, although it can strike both preand postmenopausal women, and it normally lasts a couple years. Fybrocystic breasts Formerly referred to as a disease, fibrocystic breasts are now recognized as a natural change women’s breasts undergo. More than 50 percent of women experience them at some point. The condition is characterized by breast tissue that feels lumpy or rope-like, and it causes pain and tenderness in the upper and outer areas of the breasts, usually right before your period. Too much caffeine Your regular cup of coffee may be the culprit of your breast pain. Cowher says caffeine intake is one of the first things he asks about – and for an estimated 25 percent of women, reducing caffeine or eliminating it will resolve breast pain. A Duke University study showed that 61 percent of women with breast pain who cut out caffeine had reduced pain. Caffeine causes blood vessels to dilate, which can cause the breasts to swell and feel painful. An old bra “I see plenty of postmenopausal women who may not have purchased a bra in several years, and that’s why they are getting pain,” Cowher says. “Both the elastic in the bra and in the body wear out as you age. Sometimes you have to adjust elastic in the bra to adjust for the elastic in the body.” Typically, weight gain or loss will cause those changes to occur, he adds. An infection Mastitis is a typical infection in which bacteria gets into the breasts and causes pockets of pus to form, Cowher says. Those need to be drained since antibiotics cannot penetrate the pus. Breast abscesses can also form, typically during breastfeeding. Cowher says if an infection is accompanied by a red See Cancer On Page 11B

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2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, October 10, 2014 € 11B Cancer Cont. From Page 10B swelling in the breast, fever or chills, women should consult their physician. Thoracic outlet syndrome Breasts are full of nerve endings, and in rare cases, women may have pain caused by a neurological condition called thoracic outlet syndrome, which compresses some nerves that pass through the breast. If you have more of a shooting pain – say, that shoots down the arm – you may have this condition. Still, persistent arm pain could also be symptomatic of a heart attack or other cardiovascular condition, Cowher says, so it should be checked out. Subareolar abscesses Also known as Zuska’s disease, this condition causes small abscesses beneath the nipple and painful discharge. Smoking is a cause, so smoking cessation is important in treating it, Cowher says. It is often misdiagnosed as breast cancer, leading to unnecessary mastectomies. It’s treated with antibiotics How To Help A Loved One Get Through A Tough Time By StatePoint Whether self-induced or unavoidable, there are a host of pitfalls that life can throw one’s way, and everyone faces a crisis at some point in his or her life. When it happens to a friend or family member, knowing how to be supportive can be difficult. “One of the grandest gifts we can extend to friends and family who are in trouble is the gift of our time,” says Beth Wiseman, author of the new novel “The Promise,” based on a friend’s experience being held captive in Pakistan. Wiseman, who worked with government agencies to help extract her friend from a dangerous situation and then supported her upon her return to the States, is offering tips to anyone looking for ways of being helpful to someone going through a tough time.  Be present: When one is at the center of a crisis, it’s often hard to see the light for all of the darkness. Friends and family can help that person see past the “now” of a situation toward what the future can bring. You can be a source of positive encouragement and a reminder that things won’t always be this way. Your troubled friend may simply need a sounding board. Identify in what capacity you can be helpful and then fulfill that role.  Give your time: So often, our time is limited and precious, which makes it worth more than monetary offerings. Perhaps that is cooking a meal, running errands on his or behalf, or babysitting. These favors can give someone a chance to just “be.”  Don’t say “I told you so: ”No one needs to hear advice on how he could have avoided a bad situation after the fact, particularly when he is suffering. You don’t need to agree with someone’s decisions or actions to find ways of being supportive. So skip the “I told you so.”  Be patient: Often times, when people are going through a rough patch, they may need space more than help. Approach the situation delicately and thoughtfully so you are not adding to his or her stress.  Have perspective: In the thick of it, don’t forget that trauma can be life changing and often has a silver lining. We are stronger than we think. “It’s how we react, endure, and survive that will mold our future, not the actual event itself,” says Wiseman. For more information about Wiseman’s new novel, “The Promise,” and the author, visit www.BethWiseman.com Being more than just a fair weather friend is not always easy, but it’s important. The next time a loved one is in need, tread lightly to discover the best way you can help him or her through it.

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12B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, October 10, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness