The Madison enterprise-recorder

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Material Information

Title:
The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title:
Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title:
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Creation Date:
May 31, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note:
Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID:
UF00028405:00656

Related Items

Preceded by:
Enterprise-recorder


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Full Text

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Football season is in full swing, and the 2014-15 hunting season is cranking up. Heck, in Zone A, they’re already into general gun season. But for the rest of us, I’d like to cover some things you should know regarding three hunting seasons that are just around the corner: muzzleloading gun, gray squirrel and the rst phase of dove. Immediately following the close of crossbow season in each zone, the muzzleloading gun season begins. Season dates on private lands run Nov. 22 – Dec. 5 in Zone B, Oct. 18-31 in Zone C and Dec. 6-12 in Zone D. During muzzleloading gun season, bows and crossbows are also legal methods of taking game on private lands, in addition to muzzleloaders. But on wildlife management areas (WMAs), only muzzleloaders may be used. The most common types of game to take during muzzleloader season are deer and wild hog. Regarding deer, only bucks that are legal to take in your area may be harvested, and the daily bag limit is two. You can hunt wild hogs year-round on private lands, and there are no bag or size limits. For hunting deer, muzzleloaders ring single bullets must be at least .40-caliber. Guns ring two or more balls must be 20-gauge or larger. The only muzzleloaders that can be used during muzzleloading gun season are those that are red by wheel lock, intlock, percussion cap or centerre primer (including 209 primers). Muzzleloaders that can be loaded from the breech are not legal to use during this time. It’s also legal to shoot gobblers and bearded turkeys during muzzleloading gun season. You may now take up to two a day on private lands, but there’s still a two-bird fall-season limit. You can’t hunt turkeys in Holmes County during the fall or winter. And on WMAs, you may still shoot only one turkey per day and antler/size restrictions on bucks/hogs can differ, so check the specics of the area before you hunt. Gray squirrel season on private lands starts Oct. 11 statewide and runs through March 1. There’s a daily bag limit of 12 gray squirrels, and shooting fox squirrels is against the law. Legal shooting hours are from a halfhour before sunrise to a half-hour after sunset. Except for turkeys, hunters may take resident game over feed such as corn but only on private lands. No baiting is allowed on WMAs. The rst phase of the mourning and white-winged dove season began this year on Sept. 27 and ends Oct. 27 statewide. Shooting hours during this rst phase is noon to sunset, and there’s a 15-bird daily bag limit. The only rearm you’re allowed to use for hunting doves is a shotgun, but you can’t use one larger than a 10gauge. Shotguns must be plugged to a threeshell capacity (magazine and chamber combined). You may hunt doves over an agricultural eld, as long as the crop has been planted and manipulated under normal agricultural practices. However, it’s against the law to scatter agricultural products over an area for the purpose of baiting. Some things you can’t do while dove hunting include: using ries, pistols or crossbows; shooting from a moving vehicle; and herding or driving doves with a vehicle. In addition to a Florida hunting license, you’ll need a $5 muzzleloading gun permit to hunt during muzzleloader season. To hunt deer, you need a $5 deer permit, and if you’d like to take a fall turkey, you’ll need a $10 turkey permit ($125 for nonresidents). If you’re going to hunt doves, you’ll need a no-cost migratory bird permit, and if you hunt on a WMA, you also must have a management area permit, which costs $26.50. All are available at your local county tax collector’s ofce; through license agents; by calling 888-HUNTFLORIDA; or by going online to License.MyFWC.com. So if you’re going after that monster buck during the muzzleloading gun season or smallgame hunting with friends and family, I hope I’ve helped explain some of the things you need to know.Viewpoints & Opinions2 €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 3, 2014 For those of y’all that know me (had to say y’all with a title like that, didn’t I?). For those of y’all that know me, you know I was born and raised within a mile or three of the place where this newspaper was put together. But you also know that I have traveled the world and lived in a lot of other places. I’ve lived in the corners -Maine, Idaho, Hawai’i, and even south Florida. Many times I’ve had to explain myself with, “Sorry, it’s a Southern thing.” Not apologize, mind you, for that would be to say that I am sorry for my actions which I was not, but rather to explain them. For the vast majority, it was for one of two actions – my use of the terms ‘Sir’ or ‘Ma’am’, or the words Darlin’ or Sweetheart. And truly, at this point, I probably don’t really need to explain any of this to any one of you. The funny thing I noticed was that any time I said, “Sorry, it’s a Southern Thing,” they all nodded and understood. My son was reprimanded for saying ‘Yes, ma’am’ to his teacher until she caught onto the accent and asked him where he was from. Her response? ‘Okay, I’ll accept it from you.’ Why? Because it’s a Southern Thing. Sorry, a Southern Thaing. Think about it -southern is a direction – North, East, West, South. They are cardinal directions. But have you ever heard someone say “I’m an Easterner!” with pride in their voice? When someone says “I’m a Southerner” it means something. Do the rest capitalize it like we do? I’m from the South. Do you hear I’m from the West? The South is a place. The North, The West, The East are not; they are directions. The South is a place. I’ve lived a lot of places in this great country. I’ve visited all but ve states. Everyone is proud of where they claim; whether it be their birth place or their home, they are proud to be ‘from’ there. People in Maine are proud of being Mainers. People in Alaska are proud of being Alaskan. Everyone has pride in their home; as well they all should be. But being Southern is different. There is something instinctively different about being from The South, or rather, maybe, there is something different about being proud that you’re from the South. We like to think that it’s our upbringing. It’s our values. It’s the ‘Southern Hospitality’. I like to think that too. I never apologized for saying ‘Sir’ or ‘Ma’am,’ because I did it as a show of respect. I apologized for the fact that they took it incorrectly. “Sorry, Ma’am, it’s a Southern Thaing.” But isn’t that what we’re supposed to be all about? Respect? Is that not specically the Thaing that is so Southern? Respect? But the question to ask ourselves is, “Are we respecting the person, or we simply respecting the principle?” Should we not respect people period? If we are only respecting them because they are like us, then are we better than anyone who we have condemned for not having our ‘values?’ Should we not respect them to be their own person? I am from THE South. And I am not apologizing for it. I am merely explaining it. I respect you for being you; even if you are not like me. I still respect you. It’s a Southern Thaing. Think about it. For some households, there never seems to be enough to go around, many families barely squeak by and others may not be able to pay monthly bills. Every day, we make decisions about how to spend money. Often, these choices are made without planning, resulting in a lack of money by the end of the month. Think about it, when you break a twenty dollar bill, it just disappears, right? Truth is you spent the money without thinking, call it mindless spending. You can make the decision to take control of your money; plan your spending and control impulse purchases. Don’t think of this strategy as a budget, it’s a spending plan. There are several advantages to a spending plan; you live within your income, spend your money wisely, reduce debt and reach financial goals. Learning to manage money and control spending now will make life easier in the future. Setting goals is the first step. Write down a money goal and look at it often to remind yourself what you are working on. It may be to pay off bills, or save for a down payment on a car. Regardless, if it is written down, you are more likely to work on achieving your goal. Secondly, add up your total take home pay and know the exact amount of money you have to pay bills with each month. Track your spending for a month to determine where your money is going. This means you write down the amount of money you spend every time you take out your wallet. If you have more going out than you bring in, it’s time to trim spending. Take a look at flexible categories like food and clothing. Habits like spending money for entertainment and eating out can deplete your wallet very quickly. Here are a few ideas for cutting back on expenses and reallocating more money where it needs to go: Recycle clothing or take it to a consignment store which will sell it for you and split the profit. Have a garage sale and bank the profits or use it to pay down debt. Eliminate convenience foods and prepared snacks from your shopping list make them from scratch. Dry clothes outside on sunny days to reduce the use of your dryer and turn off light when you leave a room, both will save on the electric bill. Shop when items go on sale or when prices are lower. Set a limit on the cost of gifts. Better yet, give the gift of your time and do special favors for friends and relatives. Brown bag lunch on a regular basis and save the money you would spend eating out. Take it a step further and direct the money you didn’t spend to pay extra on a credit payment or start a savings account to have a cushion for unexpected expenses. Ask friends and coworkers what they do to spend less and save money. You will be surprised that many people have great ideas that work! You can manage money and live within your income. It is a matter of choice. For more information on money management, contact the Madison County Extension Service. The University of Florida/IFAS Extension – Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution. Something To Think AboutBy Harvey Greene Harvey GreeneGuest Columnist Madison County Extension Service CHOOSETOCONTROLYOURSPENDING Diann DouglasGuest Columnist Conservative Corner Conservative Corner By Nelson A. Pryor, Lee, Fl. The Democratic Party has been re-engineered. This is not the first time it has been transformed, from the top down. The latest is due to the Obama influence. The Obama campaign, of 2008, was the first to fully embrace a diverse metropolitan coalition. “He unabashedly campaigned on social issues, like gay rights and funding for contraception, which past Democratic candidates would have tiptoed around for fear of alienating more conservative, rural voters. This helped him run up votes in cities, but ensured cataclysmic losses in formerly Democratic stretches of West Texas and West Virginia, where restrictions on gun ownership and mining, and support for gay marriage and immigration reforms, are deeply unpopular.” In a major piece, entitled “Why Democrats Can’t Win,” the New York Times of 9/7/2014, lays out that proposition. That Obama strategy killed off the “Blue Dog Democrats.” They were expendable. He wanted the cities. He abandoned the conservative, the traditionalists, the South, where the vanquished Blue Dogs once reigned. In presidential races, Democrats used to win by expanding their appeal beyond urban areas, particularly in the South, but Mr. Obama took a different path to victory in 2008 and 2012. He won the nation’s largest cities with more than 80 percent of the vote-margins that Franklin D. Roosevelt and Lyndon B. Johnson could only have dreamed of. Mitt Romney, meanwhile, was unable to explain, or convince, rural Democrats, that their interests had been sacrificed to the liberal agenda. The engineered gap between the interest of the cities and that of the rural areas was noticed with the stagg ering Democratic margins in cities and the somewhat smaller Republican margins in the rest of the country. Change in Makeup of HouseObama’s election strategy decimated the Democrats in the House of Representatives. To retake the House, Democrats would need to build a much broader coalition than the one they currently focus on in presidential elections. They would need to attract the voters that they had so recently spun off, abandoned, and try to recapture them, the so callously jilted, as if there had been no estrangement. Obama broke up the arrangement. He was supposed to dance with the one he brought to the dance. But not him! He was too wise, too smart, too worldly. And now, his groupies are clustered in the cities, and he’s reduced the country’s competitive areas to almost zero. Some of us have seen this game being played. We also wondered how long before this slight of hands trick could be continued until it became obvious to all. Interestingly enough, the Washington Post, of 9/12/2014, in an article entitled: “Obama Losing the ‘Wal-Mart Moms’” finds the results. His new found friends, the constituencies he sought in the urban areas, are proving not to be as faithful as the friends he abandoned. The grass was too green to forego,-so he didn’t. And now the friends he so easily abandoned, the South, for instance, will be taking their revenge. UPHEAVAL! The Republican Club of Madison County meets Oct 13, 2014 at noon at Shelby’s Restaurant. The Republican Executive Committee meets Oct 28, 2014 at 7 p.m. at the Madison County Library. EVERYONE WELCOME Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee at rec.madison@yahoo.com Tony YoungGuest ColumnistCooler Weather Brings MoreHunting Opportunities It’s A Southern Thaing

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t r f fn r b f f t r t n b t r b f n 7 $ + + ( & ( 2 + ( $ ( 2 ( 1 5 ( 2 ' $ 1 2 6 # ( 2 $ & 0 ( 2 6 8 b f t b f t f f f n f f f f n f t f r n b t n $ 1 2 + ( 1 $ # r n n r n f n $ 1 2 + ( 1 $ # 1 + ( # 2 $ # 3 $ n r 3 + ( 1 $ # 5 $ $ + 6 6 0 $ $ $ 3 + ( 1 ( & n n b # ( 1 b b t $ 0 ( # ( + 1 / 1 2 & $ 2 # ( 1 . 1 2 % 9 $ b b t 3 + ( 2 ( . f f t $ # # # 0 $ 1 1 & $ 1 2 n t f r r n f n n b t n 0 5 $ 0 f f # ( 1 b b t f f ( 1 $ 5 1 / / $ 0 0 $ 1 $ 0 4 $ 1 2 $ 0 ( & 2 2 0 $ ) $ 2 6 # 4 $ 0 2 ( 1 $ $ 2 $ 5 1 2 2 $ 0 0 1 3 1 0 ( / 2 ( 1 2 2 ( 2 $ / ( ( . % 2 $ & $ $ 2 5 ( + + 2 $ % 0 2 $ $ 1 2 ( 2 $ 0 $ 1 2 % 2 $ 3 2 6 # 0 2 $ 5 $ 0 1 % 2 ( 1 $ 5 1 / / $ 0 # 2 ( 4 $ 1 2 ( & 2 $ 6 # 4 $ 0 2 ( 1 $ $ 2 1 3 ( 2 2 $ # + + / 2 1 & ( 4 $ 2 0 $ $ $ 3 + ( 1 ( & % 0 / 3 + ( 2 ( ( 2 ( 1 $ 5 1 / / $ 0 3 1 2 $ / ( $ # 3 / + 2 $ 0 2 2 1 % 0 2 $ # 2 $ 2 $ 6 0 $ # 0 / / $ # % % 0 $ $ $ 3 + ( 1 ( & 5 ( + + 2 $ 0 $ 1 / 1 ( + $ % 0 / 2 1 $ 6 # 1 ( # # $ # + ( $ b 0 < C ) 0 B ) B C B t ) B 2 0 < C B ) = B 2 < 0 G ) B C 0 < B F ) = ) & B b 5 B J B C B f ) = 0 B 0 F C J < ) " : = B " ) 5 B , B 2 0 2 B < B 0 = ) < B ) . 0 C F C ) B 2 < 0 G B & F ) C J 5 B F = C ) 0 = B 0 F C B 2 0 2 B ) C ) ( ) B ) B C B < 2 0 < C B = 0 F B B ) < C B C 0 B C B f C B 3 $ L 4 B / ? D ( % L L 1 5 t f r b r t f < = 0 B B f ( 0 I B B A C C 2 C B C 0 F B B 2 0 ) B 0 " ) < 2 0 = = = = ) 0 B 0 B < ) ( F B = = B C B E L & < = B 2 0 = = = = ) 0 B 0 0 ) B B 2 0 = = = = ) 0 0 B < F & B 2 < 2 < ) 5 0 < C B < C < B t < 5 B F C B 0 B 0 F C J B H < ( < C 5 f < B t 0 = 2 B ( & ) 0 B B + = = B < ) G ( ) & 5 t 0 = B f ) & F F & = B B < B G ) 0 ( C ) 0 B 0 B 2 < 0 5 = F C ) B & 0 f C C ) < B B ) 0 C ) 0 B 0 2 < 0 B B C < < & = B 0 B H < ) C B 0 B 0 ( ) J B C C C 5 n G ) B 0 < < ) = f J = B B ) 0 C ) 0 B 0 B 2 ( < 0 B 3 0 F C J 4 5 b r t f t 0 = F B t 0 B = ( ) & C 0 B B ) 0 C ) 0 B 0 2 < 0 B 3 ) < F ) C 4 5 < ) C B = 0 B ) G ( ) & = C 0 B B ) 0 C ) 0 B 0 2 < 0 B 3 ) < F ) C 4 5 ) , ) B < + ) B B + < 5 b r t f 0 < C B < + n ) C B B 5 5 b 5 < ) = C 0 2 < 0 = B f B B 0 = ( = = = ) 0 B 0 B 0 C < 0 , = F = C B H ) C 0 F C B 2 < = < ) 2 C ) 0 B 2 C ( ) B = F & & B B 2 0 = ( = = = ) 0 B 0 B < F < F & B H ) C 0 F C B B 2 < ( = < ) 2 C ) 0 5 t = B < B 2 ( C 0 B B + < 5 F = C ) B < G 0 0 F & = B B = ) = C ) & B 0 ( ) < B H ) C 0 F C B G ) 0 5 B b r t f n ) . C B < = B B ) C B ) ( G 0 G ) & B & B C 0 B G ( ) B < = ) = C ) & B < < = C H ) C 0 F C B G ) 0 < A C < C B 2 F ) = < G C A ) J B < ) G ) & B H ) B ) = = F = 2 B 0 < B < G 0 + 5 B < ) B B n . J B G ) & B = B 0 < = B H ) C B & B ) B C 0 B < ) B C < = B H ) C B ) F < J 5 b r t f < < ) + B t = f < J B B C C B C & 0 C B = = ) & 5 b r t f n ) C B < , ) , ) = B B 0 < J H ) B < B B & ( & < G C B = = F C B H ) C J B H 2 0 5 b r t f C < ) + B 0 H B t < 5 B B 5 5 b B H ) C 2 < 0 2 < C J B & 5 t 0 B K B ) 0 C ) 0 B 0 B 2 < 0 3 ) < F ) C 4 5 t n r b n t n n t n 5 B B 0 B H = 0 C B C 0 B C ) = B 0 < & ) ( K C ) 0 B F C B H ; < B ) . B 0 B F = B C 0 B 0 B < ( 2 ) < = B C 0 B C B 0 F = 5 9 8 b C ; = B 0 C B F = C B 0 < f ) = 0 B 0 F C J B F C 0 < B = F < < 0 F ) & B 0 F ( C ) = B = B H , 9 B C J B = ) 5 B F < < C J B ) B H 0 B 0 < B ) B H = B ) . B 0 B B C 2 0 < < J 0 B C 0 B = 2 B C B F ( = ) G B ) B C B 0 = = C B ( ) ) C ) = B H 0 F B B ) J 0 < B 0 < B 0 B 0 F C J 5 B 8 B + 0 H B 0 < B = F < J B C B f ) = 0 B 0 F C J < ) " ; = B " ) B C J B B 0 = C ) B G ) 0 ( B = B < + 0 F C B C J B B C 0 B < < J C B G ) C ) B C 0 B J 0 < 0 F C J B F = B H B ) ( ; C B G B 0 B < 5 B < 0 2 C ) 0 = B H 0 F B G B J 0 < B 0 F C J B 0 < , = = 5 9 B 0 < & ) K C ) 0 = B B = C ) = = ) B < J B t F < J F C B C B 0 B H = B 0 ( C B 0 F C B C H 0 0 C = B & 0 5 B 0 B + B 0 C < ) F ( C ) 0 = B C 0 B C B 0 < & ) K ( C ) 0 B 0 C ) 0 = B B < 0 2 2 B 0 " B C B C f ) = 0 B 0 ) B 2 < C ( C B 0 < B f ) = 0 0 F C J B 0 F ) C J + 5 B 0 < B 0 < B ) 0 < ( C ) 0 B 0 B C B ) = B < J B C C H ) , B 2 B C ) = B 0 < & ) K ( C ) 0 B , B 3 $ L L B % @ % ( ? @ / / 5 ) G < J B H ) , B B G ) ( B 0 < B < & B 0 < < = 5 0 C B 0 F C B C = F = = B 0 B C ) = B C 0 C , J = C F C B B G C 5 B J = F = = F B ) = = ) 0 < J F = C B ) < = C B 0 G < 0 F C F < B B & F & < < ) < = B C 0 B < B C C 2 0 2 B & < 0 F 2 9 B f < ( & F B = ) 5 B 8 B = C F ( C = B = < B H ) C = C F C = B C < B ) = B 0 F C F < B < < ) < 5 9 0 < ) & B C 0 B C ) < H = ) C B ) = B 0 B ) C & B H ) C B t " B f < ( C ) B B B = C " B 2 < ( = 0 B H 0 B 0 ) G B C ) B < 0 B B B = C ( C B < < B ) B E < 0 ) = B D % B C < = < ) & B 0 H B C 0 B 2 C 0 J : = B & < C ) 0 B 0 = C F C = B ) & B = 2 ) < ) ( C F B C C = B B C 2 C ( C ) 0 = 5 B b B C B = < ) 2 C F < n ) & B t 0 = ) B B ) F ( C ) B C & < B G < J = ) ) < B C 0 B ) = B 0 ) C B C C = B C 0 J & C < B ) = B 2 0 2 B , & B C B C 0 < B C B ) 5 B = B B < ( = F C B C J B & C ) < B F C F < 5 b B E L L % B C B t 0 = ) ( ) F B < B C < F B H B @ L L L B = C F ( C = B & C < B 0 = 0 0 B C C ) B ) = C < 0 F & 0 F C B C < B = C C = 0 < B C B ) < = C B ) = B 0 ) C B G C 5 B C B H = C B & ) . ) & B 0 B H C = B 0 B 0 B 0 B C 0 = C B = ) & ) ) C B ) C ( < C B & C < ) & B 0 = C F C = B ) B B = ) & B J 5 B 2 < 0 & < B 0 < ( & ) K B J B , 0 H = ) 2 0 B < ) = C ) B C C = 3 4 B H ) , B B ) , H ) C B 2 0 H < F B H 0 < = ) 2 F = ) B < = B < ) 2 C F < B < ) & 5 B 8 0 B 0 B 0 F C B B B 2 < C B 0 B B C ) 0 0 G C B 0 B = C F C = = < ) & B C ) < B 2 < = 0 ) C B = C 0 < ) = 5 7 b B C B = B 0 B ) ( C B H C < B C G C B H ) , B B 0 G ) C 0 B C B & J 5 B f ) = 0 B 0 F C J ) & B 0 0 B ) = B 0 C C B E @ % / B B H J 5 B / L B ) f ) = 0 5 B 0 < B 0 < B ) 0 < ( C ) 0 B G ) = ) C B t b t f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r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n b f n t n < 0 F = B C C 2 C = B C 0 0 & ) B F = ) & B ) 0 < < C 2 = = H 0 < = 5 B b B C B ) ) C B 2 < 0 G ) B B ) + B C 0 B 0 ( 0 H B C 0 B # I B C B 2 < 0 B ) 0 < B ) B C C B H 0 F B G B C 0 B 2 < 0 ( G ) B ) 0 < C ) 0 B C 0 B 2 < 0 ( B C 0 B ) = B 0 F C 5 B + B 0 B < ( ) : = B H = ) C B ) C B H < = 0 B C B + B ) B = B 0 " < = B H J B C 0 B ) ( C ) J B + B ) = 5 B + 0 B < ) B H < = B C C C J B H ) , B G < B = + B J 0 F C 0 B < 2 J B ) B B ) H ) C B J B 2 < = 0 B ) ( 0 < C ) 0 B = F B = B 0 ( ) B F < ) C J B F < = 0 < B 2 ) 5 B J B H ) , B G < C < C B C 0 B 0 = B J 0 F < 0 F C B ) B J 0 F B 0 B 0 C G < ) J B 2 < = 0 B ) 0 < ( C ) 0 B G ) B ) B 0 < ) B C 0 B B 2 < = 0 ) 0 < C ) 0 B F B C 0 B = J = ( C B F 2 & < = 5 B + B 0 < ) B H ) , B = 0 G < B = + B J 0 F B C 0 B ) , B 0 F C B F = C 0 < B = < G ) B = F < ( G J B ) B I & B 0 < 0 J B B C B = + J 0 F B C 0 B 2 < 0 G ) B J 0 F < B ( 0 F C B F < B = 0 B J 0 F B < ) G B C B 0 J 5 b B J 0 F B < ) G B B = F = ( 2 ) ) 0 F = B ) B C C B F = = + B 0 B < ) : = B C J B = + B C C J 0 F B 0 < H < B C B ) C 0 B C B C r n f b t f b B J 0 F B B C C B J 0 F G B B B G ) C ) B 0 = F B C ) G ) C J B 0 < B G . B C C 2 C B 2 = B 0 ( C C B C B < ) " : = B " ) H ) C B J B ) C ) 0 B ) ( 0 < C ) 0 B C B 3 $ L 4 B / ? D ( % L L 1 5 B r t f t n t r t b f f t J B t = = ) B 5 B 0 I r n t b t f' B ) B C 0 < & ) = C < B C 0 G 0 C B B , 0 H B C 0 B G 0 C B ) B C < B C ) 0 = B 0 r 0 G 5 B % B ) = B f 0 J B C 5 B @ 5 0 B < & ) = C < B C 0 B G 0 C B J 0 F B & 0 B C 0 B C B F 2 < G ) ( = 0 < B 0 B C ) 0 = B # 0 C B 0 B ) + J C < C 5 B 0 F B F = C B 2 < 0 ( G ) B B 0 2 J B 0 B J 0 F < 0 < ) B < ) G < : = B ) = 0 < ) B ) C ) # C ) 0 < B 0 < B 0 ) B F < ) C J F < 5 B C B , 0 C B 0 < C B < B C ) 0 < B 2 < = C C ) G B ) 0 & < = = B 0 < B ) = C < ) C B D > 0 G < 0 < B B ) F ( C . C B 0 G < 0 < > B C ( C 0 < J B < > B ) ) . ) B " ) < > 0 ) = = ) 0 < B 0 B & < ) ( F C F < > B ) = C < ) C B 0 F < C 0 B 2 2 B t F & = B 0 0 B 0 < B f < 0 < B ) = C < ) C B 1 5 B B C B , 0 C B < = 0 B C < B . C = 0 < B C B 2 F ) B C 0 B ) 0 5 B r 0 5 B 1 B ) = B C 0 B ) H C < B C 0 B ) C F = B C 0 B 6 F ) < B < = C 0 < B 0 < ) B 0 = < ( G C ) 0 B B < < C ) 0 = 5 B r 0 5 B E B ) = B C 0 B ) C B F = B 0 B ) < ) F B 0 < B < C ) ) B 0 ) C ) 0 = 5 r 0 5 B D B ) = B B 2 < 0 2 0 = . C B C C B < ( 6 F ) < = B C B 0 G < 0 < B C 0 2 < 0 = 2 C ) G J B ) , B G ( ) = B ) B B F ) ) B 0 ( ) B C 0 B H ) B C ) 0 0 < B < C C ) 0 B 2 2 ) = < = F C ) & B < 0 B C B F = ( C ) : = B 0 < B F & : = B < ( ) & B C B C 0 < J < C ) < C B & B 0 < B ) ( F < B C 0 B 6 F ) J B 0 < B B < ( C C ) 0 B C ) 0 5 b b r t f r n b t t r r t b t t n t t t t f n t r J B 0 = B n ) r n t b t f' B C < = 0 B 0 < ) & < = < G ) , B C < ) & 0 ) C C B ) = B 0 < & ) K ( ) & B C B 0 F < C B . F C < = B J B < 0 & < 0 < B C B 0 F ) C J B ) = B = + ) & B 0 < B 2 B C 0 B ( 0 2 ) = B C ) G ) C ) = 2 . B 0 < B C ) = B r 0 ( G < 5 C < = B J H + B H ) , B & ) B 0 < ) J B r 0 G 5 B ? B C B C < G ) , B C < J 0 0 B H ) C B B ( 6 F C A , B C C B & ) = C B ? B 2 5 5 B ) + C = B C 0 B C G C B < B 1 L B B 0 < B C B 0 < B ) & C B B 2 F < = B 0 < B ? $ 5 B I C B J B C ( F < J B r 0 G 5 B B = C < C = H ) C B < F B ) B " J J = B < + B 0 , 0 H B J B 2 < B C B 1 L B 5 5 B ( < B ) F 2 B H ) , B & ) C B / D L B 5 5 B b ) ( C J B 0 , 0 H ) & B C B 2 ( < B B 2 < 0 & < B ) 0 0 < B 0 B 0 B G C < ( = B H ) , B B B C B C & K 0 B ) B C B 2 < + B ( C F < ) & B B = 0 < C B = 2 ) G < B J B B 0 C < B 0 B < G ) , 5 B = C < ) & B 0 ( ) C C B 0 F B F = B B < ) , C B 0 < B < ) & & < 0 F 2 B 0 B = 0 ) < = B C 0 < < J B & = B ) B C B 2 ( < > B B & < 0 F 2 B 0 B = 0 ( ) < = B C 0 B 2 0 = C B & = B C C B 2 < 0 & < B B C C B & K 0 B B ) ) ( C < J B C < F + = B 0 C = < = B 0 < B C + = B 0 < B C 2 < B < B = C ) , 5 0 < B F < C < B ) 0 < ( C ) 0 B 0 < B C 0 B G 0 F C < 0 < B J B 0 B C B 0 G = < G ) = B 0 C C B 3 $ L 4 / % ( E $ 1 B 0 < B 3 $ L 4 B % $ / ( L 1 1 @ B 0 < B L 1 1 ? 5

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Around Madison County4 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 3, 2014Community Calendar Way Back When Way Back When Thank You! On Saturday, August 23rdat 5 p.m. our department had a very successful fund raiser and we would like to personally thank all of our good neighbors, below: Many Thanks to our Contributors: Denny Thomas, Wallace and Rose Thigpen, Howard and Donna Pickels, John Jay Lee, Brian and Julie Townsend, Our Sheriff, Tim Sanders, Judy Webb, Roy and Karen Vickers, Jim and Sue Hunter, Paul and Patricia Brooks, Juanita Cason, Llewellyn (Pete) Fortner, Dale and Carol Gibson, Brad and Leigh Bareld and Arthur Burkett. Many Thanks to our Cake Bakers: Theresa Williams, Diann Douglas, Pat Chambers, Sonja Bass, Vonnie Davis, Wanda Brown, Carmelita Jenkins, Lynne Hanners, Immogene Wyno, Jim and Irene Durst, Rose Thigpen, Debbie Hunter, Karagan Surles and Carol Grant. Many Thanks to our other Supporters: Heath Driggers, Ron Smoak, Clover Farms, Mike Dowdy and Lee Williams. AND all of you who came and shared a Barbeque Chicken dinner with us on such a hot day! Cherry Lake Fire and Rescue October 3, 1952 Doc and Ikey Carlson's "Dairy Cup," featuring whipped soft ice cream, milk shakes, and sandwiches, opens today, Friday Oct. 3, in its location on US 90 in Buster Hall's former drive-in location. They cordially invite all to come by and try their delicious new product, whipped soft ice cream. Mr. Bob Bembry had the misfortune to get a nger cut off Monday while gathering corn with a picker. Charles Tom Henderson, assistant Attorney General of Florida, will be guest speaker at the Annual Citizenship program and school faculty dinner at the Woman's Club next Tuesday evening. The Western Union ofce is located now in the Greyhound Bus Station on West Base street. Mrs. Nelle Burnett, agent here for the Greyhound lines, is the new operator. October 2, 1953 Chief Herman Cherry of the local police caught two youthful car thieves in town Tuesday and turned them over to the sheriff for disposition. Cherry said the boys stole a car in Palatka, abandoned it at Ellaville and bummed a ride into Madison, where they made the unfortunate maneuver of being hemmed up by Herman. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bodenstein, Jr., announce the birth of a daughter September 22, at the Madison County Hospital. The little girl was named Eva Marie. Mrs. Bodenstein and baby are at home at Mrs. Charley Wynn's on North Horry Street. Van L Hinton of Pinetta is in a hospital in Valdosta under treatment for severe injuries received from the wreckage of his truck, about 1:45 p.m. Thursday on the Valdosta Highway, one fourth of a mile north of Hanson. The truck, a 1951 Chevrolet, was badly damaged. Mr. and Mrs. C N Fagan Jr. are the proud parents of a son, born Sunday, September 27, in Tallahassee. October 1, 1954 Franklin Eugene Gaskin and Maxwell G Sapp escaped minor injuries early Thursday morning when the 1950 Ford in which they were riding overturned approximately ve times. Gaskin was driving west on US 90, one mile east of Greenville, on what is known as cemetery hill when he lost control of his car. The vehicle stayed out of control for 354 ft. according to Constable A O Sistrunk, who investigated the accident. The Greenville pirates played a hard game Friday evening on Lions' Field in Greenville and managed to keep the Perry Bulldogs from scoring but two touchdowns. The Hampton Springs hotel at Hampton Springs burned the past week and thus passed into oblivion one of the old landmarks of this part of the state, a relic of the era in which tourists coming by trains loads frequented the resort. Gene Wheeler, Thed Fraleigh and Bobby Ragans were at home Sunday from the University of Florida. October 4 A "Yard Sale in the Woods" on Saturday, Oct. 4, will start at 8 a.m. and end at 1 p.m. The sale is located at Rocky Springs United Methodist Church, located north of Madison off Hwy. 53 on Rocky Springs Church Road, and will feature electronics, tools, glassware, books and other nifty junk. October 10 The Junior Auxiliary and NFCC LPN-RN Bridge students are sponsoring Crowns for a Cure,' a 5K Night Run/Walk at NFCC. Registration begins at 6 p.m. with the race starting at 7:30 p.m. Cost will be $20 prior to the event and $25 the day of. Pre-register by Sept. 26 to receive a free t-shirt. All proceeds will go towards breast cancer research. Registration forms are available at Madison Dental, NFCC Gym and Busy Bee.October 11 The Suwannee Valley Humane Society will be holding their 29th Annual Pet Show at the Suwannee County Coliseum. Registration to enter your cat or dog in contests is 10 a.m. Refreshments and baked goods will be for sale at reasonable prices. For more information, email suwanneevalley@embarqmail.com or (850) 971-9904.October 24 Run For Your Life, a social run club, will be holding a Kids Kilometer Fun Run, starting at 7 p.m. in Perry. Kids can wear a costume, search for prizes during the run and receive a medal after nishing the race. For more information, go to www.runforyourlife.org October 25 Run For Your Life will be holding a 5K run in Perry as part of the Florida Forest Festival. T-shirts are available for purchase and post-run refreshments will be provided. Proceeds from the 5K and above Fun Run will benet Gracie Tull, a seven-year-old cancer patient. To register for the races, or for more information, go to www.runforyourlife.org November 7 Greenville will be holding the Fourth Annual Veterans Day Program for Madison County starting Friday. The Elementary School will host a Banquet/Ball, beginning at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 each or a table for eight can be purchased for $75. For more information call (850) 9488521 or (850) 459-0116 or 0117. November 8 Veterans Day Celebrations continue in Greenville at Haffye Hays Park with brunch at 9 a.m. and a parade at 10 a.m. A program to honor local veterans will follow immediately after the parade at the park's gazebo. For more information, or to assist with any on the Veterans Day activities, call the numbers listed above. November 16 A Centennial Celebration will be held at the Madison County Courthouse, Sunday, Nov. 16, at 2:30 p.m. Festivities will include guest speaker Judge Edwin Browning, birthday cake and punch. The event marks the 100thAnniversary of the Courthouse. All are invited. Have something you would like to add to the Community Calendar? Simply call Greene Publishing, Inc. at (850) 973-4141 or email your information toRose@greenepublishing.com. What Domestic Violence Awareness Month Means In Madison By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and there's a purple ribbon symbol at the top of the newspaper, but what does that mean for Madison? During the week of Oct. 6 10, Cherie Rowell, the SART (Sexual Assault Response Team) Coordinator for Refuge House of Madison, will be visiting the courthouse, city hall and downtown businesses, distributing information and purple ribbons, the symbols of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. People visiting the downtown area may soon begin noticing these ribbons displayed in windows and on doors as a sign of support for the ght against domestic violence, support for those who have survived, and remembrance for those who didn't. During the second week, Oct. 13-17, Rowell will be visiting the school board and each of the administrative ofces for each school in the district, leaving purple ribbons for distribution to students. Since October is also Anti-Bullying Awareness month, Rowell has teamed with the antibullying campaign (symbolized by orange ribbons) to educate students. One thing both campaigns have in common is that in order for anyone to make any headway and make things better, rst they have to let the community know that there is an issue that needs to be dealt with, or remind the community that there is still work that needs to be done. She will also visit the administration ofce of St. Leo University during this time and have a booth on the NFCC campus all that week, giving out ribbons and information. Throughout the month, Rowell and others throughout the community will be working to spread the word, raise awareness and generate support for the ght still ahead. The month's activities will culminate in a community-wide event, the Walk, Run Or Roll Against Domestic Violence Event on Oct. 28. Plans for that are still coming together and will soon be announced. Everyone is invited to attend. Meanwhile, if you are in a domestic violence situation and need help, there is help available, through the 24-Hour Crisis Line at (850) 681-2111 or (800) 500-1119. Boys And Girls Club After School Program Fails To Receive Funding For 2014-15Story SubmittedThe Madison County 21stCentury Learning Centers Project was developed in partnership between Twin Oaks Juvenile Development and Boys & Girls Club (B&G Club) of Tabula Rasa. The District School Board of Madison County was identied as the scal agent for the 21stCentury Community Learning Center/ B&G Club grant. The program included activities related to parental involvement, tutoring, mentoring, drop-out prevention, character education, physical education and recreation, science, reading and math. The funding cycle which allowed B&G Club to operate afterschool programs at Madison County Central School, Lee Elementary School, Greenville Elementary School and Pinetta Elementary School ended on July 31, 2014. A new cycle began on August 1, 2014, and required the submission and approval of a new grant application. Twin Oaks Juvenile Development and Boys & Girls Club (B&G Club) of Tabula Rasa completed and submitted a new grant application to Florida Department of Education for review and subsequent approval to fund Madison County's B&G Club activities for the 2014-2015 academic year. Ray Grifn, Chief Academic Ofcer for the District School Board received the following ofcial notication Tuesday, September 30, 2014: "The Florida Department of Education received 128 proposals requesting over $50,000,000. We were able to fund 50 proposals, totaling $23,995,336. Each accepted proposal that met both state and federal requirements was evaluated and scored by a committee of three peer reviewers comprised of experienced educators, administrators and professionals. We regret to inform you that the application submitted in response to the 2014-15 21stCentury Community Learning Centers (21stCCLC) Request for Proposals was not selected for funding because the application did not attain a rank/score high enough to be funded." Unfortunately Boys and Girls Club of Tabula Rasa will not be offering/ operating after-school activities at the school sites within District School Board of Madison County. RECALL UPDATE If you like to go off-roading in the wilderness, and your off-road vehicle is a new Arctic Cat two-seater buggy, check the VIN number before you take it out again, especially if it has been leaking oil. Artic Cat is recalling both the Wildcat Trail and Wildcat Trail XT Side-By-Side offroad utility vehicles. This includes all 2014 Arctic Cat Wildcat Trail and Trail XT Side-By-Side utility vehicles with VIN numbers 000001 through 316232, located on the frame tube near the driver's side front wheel. The vehicles were sold in red, lime green, team arctic green and matte black. The words "Arctic Cat" and "Wildcat Trail" appear on the vehicle's sides and on the hood. Between 5000 and 6000 of these vehicles were sold by Arctic Cat dealers nationwide from December 2013 through July 2014 for about $11,400 to $12,400. Oil can leak from the oil cooler lines, posing a re hazard. Arctic Cat has received 60 reports of oil leaking and one report of re, but no one has been injured. Consumers should stop using the recalled vehicles immediately and contact an Arctic Cat dealer to schedule a free repair. For more information, contact Arctic Cat at (800) 2796851, from 8 a.m. 5 p.m. CT. Monday Friday, or go online at www.arcticcat.com and click on Consumer Care, then Recall Notices. The vehicles were manufactured in the United States, by Arctic Cat, Inc., of Thief River Falls, Minnesota.Arctic Cat Recalls Side-By-Side Due To Fire Hazard

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In 1840, John Sever was living in Madison County; he and his wife were born around 1784 in Georgia. They had ve children under 10 and one son who was between 10 and 14. In 1845, Benjamin Sever, born 1822 in Georgia, married Mary Tillis, born 1830 in Florida. Not much is known about John and Benjamin. But if they remained in Florida, they would be considered Florida Pioneers. The story is a little muddy right here. A Benjamin Sever shows up in Jefferson County, in 1850, living with his parents, John and Elizabeth. James, born 1846, and Rebecca Sever, born 1826, are living alone in Madison County. This could be an entirely different family from the Benjamin who married Mary Tillis, or Benjamin and Mary Rebecca? could have temporarily separated, with Benjamin moving back home to be with his parents, who had moved to Jefferson County. At any rate, Benjamin resurfaces again in 1860, in Madison County, with Mary, and two children, James, same age as James in the 1850 census and Rebecca, born 1848. We don't hear from Benjamin anymore, but in 1870, James N. reappears, born in 1846. In 1866, he married Elizabeth Carlye Keeling. She was a Civil War widow, and brought four children to the marriage: George, Margaret, Robert and Mary. James and Elizabeth had a son Richard, born in 1868. James and Lizzie are in Withlacoochee in 1880, with John Henry, born in 1872. In 1910, James N. or Newton married Catherine Sloan, and the couple remain in Withlacoochee. We don't nd Richard mentioned anymore. John Henry, 1872, does carry the family name on in Madison County, with nine children. John Henry, married Martha Alice Burnett in 1896. Martha was also from a Florida Pioneer family. The couple lived in Pinetta, and are buried in Mt. Horeb Cemetery, north of Pinetta. Later their children moved to Lee. John Henry and Martha's children were: 1. Celeita, 1896, who died unmarried; 2. Alex Henry, 1898; 3. Mamie Lou, 1890, who married Fred Huggins and died in 1961; 4. John Robert, 1903; 5. Minnie Lee, 1905; who married Allen Kinard and died in 1961; 6. Willie Cleveland, 1906; 7. Felix Tyler, 1909; and twins 8. Efe Floyce, 1913, who married A.J. Gay and died in 1974; 9. Emmie Lois, 1913, who married Broward Tindell and died in 1998. Generation Five: Alex Henry All of John Henry's sons remained in the county and raised their families here. Alex Henry, 1898, married Edna Martha Watson and died in 1974. Both are buried in Lee Memorial Cemetery. They had the following children: 1. Gladys Lucille, 1920, who married Leonard Chatman Hicks; 2. Eula Grace, 1923, who married William Leon Welch; 3. Virginia Evelyn, 1930, who married James Sheldon Wynn, and 4. Elmer Henry, 1932, who married Juanita Laverne Sharpe and raised his family in Central Florida. Generation Five: John Robert John Robert, 1903, married Lula Pauline Newsome. The couple had the following children: 1. Lucille, 1928; 2. Glen, 1930; 3. Gwendolyn, 1933; and 4. Robbie Nell, 1935. Glen married Blanche Jackson. Generation Five: Willie Cleveland Willie Cleveland, 1906, married Dollie Mae Payne, and the following children were born: 1. Willie Cleveland, Jr. 1932, who married Minnie Jeanette Sumner; 2. Agnes Louise, 1933; 3. Henry Paul, 1934, who married Carol Jean Humphrey; 4. Alice E., 1935; 5. Dorothy M., 1938; and 6. James S., 1943. Generation Five: Felix Tyler Felix Tyler, 1909, married Hazel Lions and Lowell, 1932 and Larry, 1949 were born. In older documents, such as the census rolls and marriage licenses, the Sever name is spelled several different ways. In fact, Robbie Sevor Walker, in her article on John Henry Sevor, in Madison County Florida Family History Book, related that there were three different spellings of the name in the Mt. Horeb Cemetery. A few marriage records show that Seevers married in the county. In the earlier census records, Benjamin, James N. and John Henry were Seavers. Around 1920, the family began to be Sevors and Severs. Today, there are only Severs and Sevors in the phone book in Madison County. We think that the name variations happened when census and other record keepers in the 1800's and early 1900's spelled people's names the best way they could. The Madison County Florida Family History Book provided some information for this article. Other information was pieced from census reports on Ancestry.com and from the Madison County Genealogy Website. Sometimes, putting the puzzle of family histories together requires a little deduction, and sometimes the pieces might not be in the right place. Please let us know if we haven’t put the puzzle of your family together correctly. The Madison County Genealogy Society welcomes your input and invites you to join our organization. We meet on the second Thursday monthly, except during summer months, in the Madison Public Library from 6 to 7 p.m. Annual dues are $25. To add comments to our articles or to submit your own sketch of your ancestor, contact us at Madison County Genealogy Society, P.O. Box 136, Madison, Fl. 32341. Or contact us by email at mcgenealogysociety@live.com. Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 5 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 3, 2014Around Madison County JOHN & BENJAMIN SEVER Pioneers Of Madison County Visit The Location Nearest You M a d i s o n 424 W. Base St. G a i n e s v i l l e 6450 SW Archer Rd. G a i n e s v i l l e 4620 NW 39thAve. P e r r y 2000 S. Byron Butler Blvd. S t e i n h a t c h e e 913 1stAve. SE or online at www.csbdirect.comOpening Fall 2014 B u s i n e s s C a r d D i r e c t o r y www.peacockslandscaping.com€ (850) 464-1484 € € Madison, Fl. 32340 € € sailpeacock@gmail.com € IrrigationLandscaping Halls Tire & Muffler Center(850) 973-3026Owner Daryl & Lee Anne Hall1064 E. US 90 € Madison, FlBeside Clover Farm ROOFING SPECIALIST State Certified Building Contractor & Roofing Contractor License # CBC 1251818 / CCC 1328133 www.ewingconstructionandroofing.com Serving Madison & Surrounding CountiesLee (850) 971-5043€ Commercial / Residential € All Roof Types € Fully Insured € Proven Track Record € Free EstimatesQUALITY GUARANTEE! DAYS TREE SERVICE THETREESPECIALISTFree Estimates € Tree Trimming € Debris Clean Up Aerial Device € Tree Removal € Bush Hogging Stump GrindingCall Gene Day (850) 948-4757Cell: (850) 464-03866425 NW Lovett Rd. € Greenville, Fl 32331 P r o u d T T o B B e S S e r v i n g A A l l S u r r o u n d i n g C C o u n t i e sm i k e s p p u m p r r e p a i ra n dw e l l d d r i l l i n g i i n c Well Drilling € Pump Repair € Water Filters € Water SoftenersP r o u d T T o B B e S S e r v i n g A A l l S u r r o u n d i n g C C o u n t i e s(386) 590-0888 cell 24 Hour Service Mike Harris Owner Daryl Hall Dear Patients and Friends, After almost 52 years in practice in Madison County, I am writing to inform you that I will be retiring from the active practice of medicine, beginning Nov. 1, 2014. I will be available to serve your medical needs until that date. It is very important that you make arrangements, as soon as possible, to select a new physician to be certain you receive uninterrupted medical care. Please contact your medical plan to obtain a list of physicians in the area who are eligible to become your new physician. You can also contact our office for a list of physicians, in Madison County, with their phone numbers. Once you have selected a new physician, you will need to complete an authorization to release your medical records to the new physician and have that physician fax this to our office, so that we can forward the appropriate copies, promptly. After I retire, records can still be obtained by contacting me at my mailing address, P.O. Box 179, Madison, Fl 32341. However, I will not have as much help then so it is important that you try to request the records transfer within the next few weeks. Thank you for having chosen me as your physician. It has been my pleasure and honor to serve you. I wish you continued health and wellness. Kindest regards, W.J. Bibb, M.D. Honor Your Pastor This OctoberPastor Appreciation blurbs to be published next FridayBy Bryant ThigpenGreene Publishing, Inc.October is widely known as breast cancer awareness month. However, the month took on another signicant meaning in 1994 when it was named Pastor Appreciation Month by Focus on the Family. It's a time when congregations across the nation give back to their spiritual leader who has given so much to them. Pastor Appreciation Day is set for Sunday, Oct. 12. This year marks the 20thAnnual Pastor Appreciation Month and Pastor Appreciation Sunday. On Friday, Oct. 10, Greene Publishing will publish a special page designated to honor our local pastors. To celebrate this special occasion, we are asking for community members to submit words of kindness or appreciation about your pastor to this newspaper. The deadline for submissions is Wednesday, Oct. 8, at 3 p.m. Each submission must be 70 words or less. Please send your responses to bryant@greenepublishing.com or you may call the ofce at (850) 973-4141. This newspaper will also feature pastor appreciation notes in the Oct. 15, 22 and 29 editions of the Madison County Carrier The idea behind Pastor Appreciation Month was that recognizing and honoring pastors year-round is biblical and proper, but setting aside one month and one special Sunday a year brings the message to the forefront, reminding people not only of all the things their pastor does for them but also giving them occasion to ponder what they might in turn be able to do for their pastor, minister, leader and church staff.

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By Tresa EricksonThink back to your school years. Do any teachers come to mind? We've all had our fair share of teachers, some better than others. What constitutes a good teacher to you? Consider these quotes before you answer. "A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his inuence stops." Henry Brooks Adams "The true teacher defends his pupils against his own personal inuence. He inspires self-distrust. He guides their eyes from himself to the spirit that quickens him. He will have no disciple." -Amos Bronson Alcott "The best teacher is the one who suggests rather than dogmatizes, and inspires his listener with the wish to teach himself." -Edward BulwerLytton "A teacher is one who makes himself progressively unnecessary." -Thomas Carruthers "It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge." -Albert Einstein "Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." -Benjamin Franklin "A teacher is a compass that activates the magnets of curiosity, knowledge and wisdom in the pupils." -Ever Garrison "The teacher who is indeed wise does not bid you to enter the house of his wisdom but rather leads you to the threshold of your mind." -Kahlil Gibran "Good teaching is one-fourth preparation and three-fourths theatre." -Gail Godwin "The object of teaching a child is to enable him to get along without his teacher." -Elbert Hubbard "One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings. The curriculum is so much necessary material, but warmth is the vital element for the growing plant and for the soul of the child." -Carl Jung "The dream begins with a teacher who believes in you, who tugs and pushes and leads you to the next plateau, sometimes poking you with a sharp stick called 'truth." -Dan Rather "A teacher who can arouse a feeling for one single good action, for one single good poem, accomplishes more than he who lls our memory with rows and rows of natural objects, classied with name and form." -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe "The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires." -William Arthur Ward "Education is not the lling of a pail but the lighting of a re." -William Butler Yeats What do you think are the hallmarks of a good teacher? Know of a good teacher? Thank them today! World Teachers’ Day6 €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 3, 2014 Our Teachers At Madison County Central School From, The Madison County Central Administration We Support & Appreciate Courtesy of WikipediaWorld Teachers' Day, held annually on October 5thsince 1994, commemorates teachers’ organizations worldwide. Its aim is to mobilize support for teachers and to ensure that the needs of future generations will continue to be met by teachers. According to UNESCO, World Teachers' Day represents a signicant token of the awareness, understanding and appreciation displayed for the vital contribution that teachers make to education and development. Education International (EI) (the global union federation that represents education professionals worldwide) strongly believes that World Teachers' Day should be internationally recognized and celebrated around the world. EI also believes that the principles of the 1966 and 1997 Recommendations should be considered for implementation in all nations. Over 100 countries observe World Teachers' Day. The efforts of Education International and its 401 member organizations have contributed to this widely spread recognition. Every year, EI launches a public awareness campaign to highlight the contributions of the teaching profession. What Makes A Good Teacher? Five Ways To Make World Teachers Day CountHere are some ways you can thank a teacher: 1. Work well with others Round up parent volunteers or work with an existing parent organization like the PTO or PTA to make World Teachers’ Day a school-wide event. Multiple parents working together can do anything from giving each teacher a treat for every day of the week to organizing a special lunch for all the teachers. Consider doing some fundraising in the community to help nance activities. 2. Show you care with thank you cards Let a teacher know how important he or she is by sending a card to say thank you. If you want, you can get the entire class involved. 3. Give a thoughtful gift It’s a classic suggestion, but a thoughtful gift really does brighten a teacher’s day. There’s no need to break the bank in doing so—either go with a modestly priced gift or arrange for all the classroom parents to contribute a few dollars. Try to pick a gift that corresponds to the teacher’s interests—game tickets for the sports nut, a mall gift certicate for the fashion lover, a restaurant gift certicate for the gourmand, or movie passes for the lm buff. Don’t feel pressured to spend beyond your means—remember, this week is about appreciating teachers, not impressing them. 4. Give a book of many colors Arrange for all the kids in the class to create a page for a teacher thank-you book. Kids can draw a picture of their teacher, write an acrostic poem, or write a letter. The pages can then be collected and bound inexpensively at a copy shop. Use crayons, colored pencils or markers to ensure the book is colorful. 5. Spread the word Call local radio and TV stations and ask them to publicize World Teachers’ Day. That way, teachers throughout your community will be more likely to experience the important morale boost associated with this week. Honor The Best On World Teachers Day. .

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By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. The Kiwanis Club of Madison held their banquet on Thursday, Sept. 25, to install new ofcers. President Diane Head passed the gavel to Preston Matthews, who will be President for the 20142015 year. Lieutenant Governor Elect Steve Sullivan attended the banquet to help install the new ofcers. The new ofcers are: President Preston Matthews; President Elect James Ray, First Vice-President and Secretary Deena Hames, Immediate Past President Diane Head and Treasurer Mary Ann Sanders. Diane Head was presented the Walter Zeller Fellowship for her donation of $1,250 to the Eliminate Project. The Eliminate Project’s focus is to eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus. With the donation of $1,250, it can protect or save more than 690 women and their future babies. Walter Zeller made the rst donation of 25 Canadian silver dollars that launched the Kiwanis International Foundation’s worldwide efforts. Jim Wylie of the Florida Kiwanis Foundation presented Kiwanis Club of Madison County with a check for $10,000 for the Madison Youth Ranch. The plans are to use the money for recreation.Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 7 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 3, 2014 Good News Music Festival Featuring: Scrap Iron, Purvis Brothers Encore Band, Spiritual Sons, Southern Glory, Railroad Revival, Madison Boys Choir October 11, 2014 10 a.m. 7 p.m. $5 Per Person Madison Co-op 135 NE Dill Street Kiwanis Club Of Madison Installs New Officers At BanquetGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, September 25, 2014Florida Kiwanis Foundation presented the Kiwanis Club of Madison County with a $10,000 check for the Madison Youth Ranch. Pictu red, from left to right, are: Diane Head, Steve Sullivan, Jim Holben, Jim Wylie, Ruth Moore, Mike Moore and Preston Mathews.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, September 25, 2014Kiwanis Club of Madison President Diane Head (right) presented Vince Almond, Manager of Food Giant (left) with an honorary membership for all he has done for the club. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, September 25, 2014The of“cers for 2013-2014 were uninstalled by Lieutenant Governor Elect Steve Sullivan. Pictured holding their certi“cate of ap preciation, from left to right, are: Diana Head, President; Deena Hames, Secretary; Mary Ann Sanders, Treasurer; Preston Matthews, President Elect; James Ray, VicePresident and Allen Cherry, Director. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, September 25, 2014Diane Head was presented the Walter Zeller Fellowship by Lieutenant Governor Elect Steve Sullivan for her donation of $1,250 to the Eliminate Project. She received a medallion and a pin.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, September 25, 2014There were nine members of the Kiwanis Club of Madison that had perfect attendance for the 2013-2014 year. Pictured in the fron t row, from left to right, holding their certi“cates are: Mary Ann Sanders, George Willis, Lucile Day, Deena Hames, Linda Hesketh, Jim Holben and Diane Head. In the middle row is Preston Matthews. In the back row is Jerome Wyche.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, September 25, 2014Preston Matthews (left) received his President Pin from Lieutenant Governor Elect Steve Sullivan. Matthews will be president for the 2014-2015 year.

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As an educator, understanding that every student is different is the first lesson to master. Even more challenging is the mission to channel student’s energy towards learning. What are the appropriate strategies to arouse students’ behavior in a positive, cooperative way? What must students do, if anything, to be receptive to the learning process? Both questions demand creativity and a willingness to “step outside of the box." Equally important is educators’ need to distinguish the factors that guide a student’s actions and affect interaction with the instructor and peers. This idea of “understanding who we teach” falls in the category of the classroom as a system, according to Carol Ann Tomlinson and James M. Cooper, authors of An Educator’s Guide to Differentiating Instruction The authors note that an inflexible classroom stifles growth and discourages freedom to learn from mistakes. Positive atmospheres garner motivated students who are willing to take chances and engage in learning. The desired outcome is the achievement or accomplishment of a set goal. In Psychology Applied to Teaching Robert F. Biehler and Jack Snowman suggest that motivating students to learn involves finding ways to satisfy those needs that are deficient. There are several strategies designed to help motivate students and ensure learning. However, in understanding how to develop strategies to motivate students, it is important to know theories that frame the history of learning. The components that shape the way students learn come from a long list of scholars like Lev Vygotsky, Jean Piaget, John Dewey and Jerome Bruner. Vygotsky, a Russian developmental psychologist, looked at social interaction and its role in student learning. His theory was the more students interact with peers, family and teachers, learning happens. Piaget on the other hand believed that all people pass through four stages of cognitive development – infancy, toddler/early childhood, elementary/adolescence and adolescence/adulthood. Dewey, an educational reformer, is associated with the progressive movement in education and preparing students for real-life situations. Bruner, on the other hand, believed that students must play a part in learning. The following discusses how theory and strategy collide to create learning through intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. People who are intrinsically motivated want to know how the subject matter is relevant to life. Extrinsic motivation is tied to the expectations of others. Deep learners are challenged by material that is complex and promotes critical thinking. Strategic learners on the other hand seek tokens or rewards. Several scholars have developed strategies that drive learning that include being clear about expectations and goals; allowing students as much independence to learn as possible; offering praise and constructive criticism when necessary; and allowing for discovery learning. Once a teacher is familiar with students’ preferences and style, setting up activities that inspire learning becomes a staple in the process. Once educators grasp the concept, then the development of strategies to match student excitement is clear and learning is inevitable.8 €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 3, 2014 Section 529 college savings plans are tax-advantaged college savings vehicles and one of the most popular ways to save for college today. Much like the way 401(k) plans changed the world of retirement savings a few decades ago, 529 college savings plans have changed the world of college savings. T a x a d v a n t a g e s a n d m o r e 529 college savings plans offer a unique combination of features that no other college savings vehicle can match: € Federal tax advantages: Contributions to your account grow tax deferred and earnings are tax free if the money is used to pay the beneficiarys qualified education expenses. (The earnings portion of any withdrawal not used for college expenses is taxed at the recipients rate and subject to a 10% penalty.) € State tax advantages: Many states offer income tax incentives for state residents, such as a tax deduction for contributions or a tax exemption for qualified withdrawals. € High contribution limits: Many plans let you contribute over $300,000 over the life of the plan. € Professional money management: College savings plans are offered by states, but they are managed by designated financial companies who are responsible for managing the plans underlying investment portfolios These are just a few of the many tax advantages that come with 529 plans. C h o o s i n g a c o l l e g e s a v i n g s p l a n Although 529 college savings plans are a creature of federal law, their implementation is left to the states. Currently, there are over 50 different college savings plans available because many states offer more than one plan. You can join any states 529 college savings plan, but this variety may create confusion when it comes time to select a plan. Each plan has its own rules and restrictions, which can change at any time. A c c o u n t m e c h a n i c s Once youve selected a plan, opening an account is easy. Youll need to fill out an application, where youll name a beneficiary and select one or more of the plans investment portfolios to which your contributions will be allocated. Also, youll typically be required to make an initial minimum contribution, which must be made in cash or a cash alternative. Thereafter, most plans will allow you to contribute as often as you like. This gives you the flexibility to tailor the frequency of your contributions to your own needs and budget, as well as to systematically invest your contributions. Youll also be able to change the beneficiary of your account to a qualified family member with no income tax or penalty implications. Most plans will also allow you to change your investment portfolios (either for your future or current contributions) if youre unhappy with their investment performance. Stacy Bush, President Bush Wealth Management The Bush Wealth Advantage 529 College Savings Plans Our column, The Bush Wealth AdvantageŽ is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. Stacy Bush has practiced independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.com Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 887187 School The School BellB y G l y ndell B Pr esle y M ad i s o n Co unt y Hi gh Sc h oo l‘The School Bell’ is a weekly column featuring educators in Madison County. Each week, Greene Publishing, Inc. will feature one teacher who can express their views and opinions, share lesson plans, a classroom activity, or any other educational subject of their choos ing. If you are an educator or school administrator and would like to submit an article, please email Rose@greenepublishing.com.Student Motivation Is The Key To Learning Glyndell B. Presley

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By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.In a letter sent to School Superintendent Doug Brown, Florida Senator Don Gaetz congratulated the Madison County School District on their industry certification accomplishments. Florida Legislature, in 2007, passed a CAPE (Career and Professional Education) Act to partner education with the business community. The purpose of the CAPE Act is to provide middle and high school students with career-themed courses, relevant in today’s business industry (such as nursing or business technology), enabling those students to receive industry certifications even before graduation. In doing this, the CAPE Act will support local and regional economic development, address the state’s critical workforce needs and provide residents with access to high-wage and high-demand careers. As an added bonus to the CAPE Act, when students earn an approved industry certification, their district can earn an additional $400 to $800 above the funds already given to the district for approved industry course enrollments; and the financial pay-off continues to trickle down. As students earn certifications, their teachers will earn bonuses of $25-$50 for every industry certification, earning up to a maximum of $2000. Madison County High School and Madison County Central School offer a variety of Career and Technical Programs, with students at the high school having the opportunity to earn one or more nationally recognized industry certifications. These certification courses include: Certified Nursing Assistant, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Dreamweaver, Adobe Flash, Microsoft Office Specialist (Word, PowerPoint and Excel), Certified Agricultural Technician and Certified Food Protection Manager. Accomplishments the Madison County School District earned, and praised within the letter from Senator Gaetz, was the number of industry certifications earned by students and the total amount of CAPE bonus funds allotted to the district. Madison County performed above the state average on certification tests, receiving a 98 percent passing rate from Madison County High School and Madison County Central School students, jumping the district above the statewide passage rate of 79 percent. This performance from these two schools, earned the Madison County School District to rank fifth among Florida’s 67 school districts, which Career, Technical and Alternative Coordinator Sam Stalnaker labels as a “tremendous accomplishment.” “We are excited about the Florida Senate’s recognition of the importance of Career and Technical Education and their support for these programs,” said Superintendent Brown. “We are also especially proud of the work of administrators, teachers and students in our Career and Technical Education programs; their hard work is highlighted by this recognition.”Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 9 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 3, 2014School Tickets are good through October 26th, one visit only Deadline To Enter is October 7th, 2014 Winners will be announced October 8th !""#$%&&' $()*++,*" Josie Driggers is this week’s, Student of the Week. Josie is in the third grade at Pinetta Elementary School and is eight years old, but says she will soon be nine in November. What Josie enjoys most about school is getting to be with her friends and has a best friend, Lillian, who also goes to Pinetta, and whom Josie has been friends with since she was about three years old. One of her favorite subjects in school is reading, and while she says she doesn’t have a favorite book, she did read several books over the summer. When not in school, Josie loves to play softball. She plays with a Travel Ball team, practicing in Live Oak and Madison at the Recreation Park. She has been playing softball for several years and started her softball career with T-Ball. Josie’s parents are Heath and Becky and she has one older brother, Jake. Also at home is a miniature Schnauzer, Katie and a cat named Tiger, but who gladly comes to “Kitty” and will sit in your lap and purr. Every week, Greene Publishing, Inc. will spotlight a student from one of the Madison County Schools in a ‘Student of the Week’ column. If you are a parent or educator and would like to nominate a student for this feature, please email Rose@greenepublishing.com.Josie Driggers Josie DriggersMadison County School District Scores High In Student Industry-Certifications By Rose KleinStudent Of The Week 6

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Fall gardening is a true bonanza of opportunities for home gardening. The strong and vibrant autumn colors present a final garden hurrah before the long winter recess. The splendor of golden, crimson and brown leaves is a signal of the treasure of organic gold we are about to receive. While some homeowners may see working with fall leaves as an odious chore, a garden enthusiast sees rich organic matter being delivered for free to his or her lawn and garden. All it takes is a few passes with a lawnmower to reduce a big volume to a very manageable organic resource. Leaf mulch is high in nutrient content and an extremely useful component in building rich organic matter in lawns and vegetable or flower beds. Just rake your leaf mulch into your garden beds and spread it evenly. Although leaf mulch is a very natural nitrogen resource, it needs to interact with a carbon source to help it compost into a rich garden humus. Leaf mulch is also highly mobile in fall and winter winds; so, adding a layer of shredded wood mulch will hold it in place nicely. Shredded wood mulch is the perfect carbon source to interact with leaf mulch. It also keeps the leaf mulch from blowing away and retains moisture to promote composting while insulating the ground to reduce freezing. When spring rolls around, your leaf and wood mulch will be sufficiently decomposed to work into your soils and provide that extra kick to start spring planting off right. Three helpful tips for fall mulching:  Grind fall leaves with a mower to reduce particle size and improve decomposition.  Cover leaves with shredded wood mulch to retain moisture and promote decomposition. Decom-posed leaves and mulch add valuable organic humus to garden beds.  As cold weather approaches, protect plant roots and bases with a blanket of shredded wood mulch to insulate them from ice and wind chill. The Arbor Day Foundation will brighten up your fall by offering ve free crapemyrtle trees when you join the Foundation in October. The free trees are part of the nonprot Arbor Day Foundation’s Trees for America campaign, a program dedicated to environmental stewardship through tree planting. “Crapemyrtles are especially beautiful in the fall and were selected for this campaign because of their elegant color and form,” said Matt Harris, chief executive of the Arbor Day Foundation. “Crapemyrtles make an attractive addition to the home landscape.” The trees will be shipped postpaid between Nov. 1 and Dec. 10, at the right time for planting. The six to 12inch trees are guaranteed to grow or they will be replaced free of charge. Planting instructions are enclosed with each shipment of trees. New members of the Arbor Day Foundation will also receive The Tree Book which includes information about tree planting and care. To receive the free crapemyrtle trees, send a $10 membership contribution to Five Crapemyrtles, Arbor Day Foundation, 100 Arbor Ave., Nebraska City, NE 68410, by October 31 or join online at arborday.org/october.10 €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 3, 2014 Outdoors FEED TIMESHow to use: The major and minor feeding times for each day are listed below. The major feeding times are the best for the sportsman and last about 2 hours, the minor feeding times can also have good success, but last only about 1 hour. Good luck and be careful out there. Major feed times are marked by an asterisk (*) The Week Of September 26 October 2, 2014 Friday October 3 2:30 AM *8:30 AM 2:45 AM *9:10 PM Saturday October 4 3:20 AM *9:30 AM 3:40 AM *9:55 PM Sunday October 5 4:10 AM *10:20 AM 4:30 PM *10:45 PM Monday October 6 5:00 AM *11:10 AM 5:20 PM *11:30 PM Tuesday October 7 5:50 AM *12:00 AM 6:10 PM Wednesday October 8 *12:30 AM 6:45 AM *12:50 PM 7:10 PM Thursday October 9 *1:20 AM 7:30 AM *1:50 PM 7:55 PM Floridians Hunting Deer Out Of State Need To Be Aware Of CWD LawsFlorida hunters planning to hunt deer, moose or elk out of state this year need to be aware of certain laws and regulations aimed at preventing chronic wasting disease (CWD) from entering our state. CWD is a contagious neurological disease that has been found in captive and wild cervids (whitetailed deer, mule deer, moose and elk) within 22 states, two Canadian provinces and in South Korea. The disease causes degeneration of the brains of infected animals, resulting in emaciation, abnormal behavior, loss of bodily functions and death. There is no known evidence that CWD can be transmitted to livestock or humans. The disease has been detected in New Mexico, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Kansas, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Michigan, Virginia, Missouri, North Dakota, Maryland, Texas, Alberta and Saskatchewan Canadian provinces, and in South Korea. Hunters need to know that it is against the law to bring into Florida whole carcasses of any deer from any of the above-listed areas. The purpose of this measure is to prevent CWD from being brought into the state. The infective agent is more likely to be concentrated within the brain, eyes, spinal cord, lymph nodes, tonsils and spleen of the animal. This infective agent, called a prion, can be accidentally deposited into the environment, where it can remain for years and can infect other deer. Many states have a prohibition in place that is similar to Florida’s. It is OK, however, to bring into Florida deboned meat and nished taxidermy mounts, tanned hides, cleaned skulls, antlers and teeth from any of these places, as long as all soft tissue has been removed. For more information about CWD or this rule, visit MyFWC.com/CWD The website also provides links to wildlife and health agencies with more in-depth information about the disease. Please report deer found sick or dead of unknown causes to the CWD hotline: 866-CWDWATCH (866-293-9282). Enjoy The Beauty Of Fall; Join The Arbor Day Foundation In October And Receive Five Free Crapemyrtle Trees Three Tips On Fall Mulching HEY! WE’RE ON FACEBOOK!Check us out and become a fan of our page![ Greene Publishing, Inc. ]It’s never been easier to share your local news with friends and family!

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National 4-H WeekMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 11 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 3, 2014 100 Years Of 4-H ServicePhoto SubmittedThird grade students discover what lives in the NFCC pond at 4-H Ecology Field day.Photo SubmittedCamp Cloverbud shows off all their completed projects before cooling off with water day.Photo Submitted4-H Volunteer Mrs. Ann helps Kiley Malone during Sewing Day Camp.Amber HoustonGreene Publishing, Inc.The Extension Service is celebrating their hundred-year anniversary this year: for 100 years they have provided services to farmers, communities and children. We take a week every year to join the nation in celebrating the importance of 4-H, all of the lives that the program has touched, and the huge impact that the program has on Madison County youth. In a time where technology draws us away from our environmental roots; in a time where farmers must face the changing economic climate as well as the seasons; in a time where children must struggle to understand the agricultural sources of their food, comfort and lifestyle; the Madison County Extension ofce is the beacon for rural farmers, communities and children. The Extension ofce offers workshops to local farmers, and acts as a bridge between researchers and farmers. They offer workshops to their volunteers, so not only are they recruiting volunteers to make their clubs better, they are also investing in their volunteers to make their clubs better. But perhaps the greatest inuence they have on the communities they serve is that 4H leaves a clover-shaped imprint on the hearts of the children of those communities, generation after generation. 4-H teaches children where their food comes from; how to raise rabbits, goats or cattle; personal responsibility for the impact they have on the world around them; agricultural history; and practical skills. Extension agents teach local children to can and sew. They give them the opportunity to catch bugs, explore technology, write resumes, perform public speaking, swim, kayak and grow in an educational and safe environment. According to the national 4-H website, 4h.org "The idea of practical and handson' learning came from the desire to connect public school education to country life. Building community clubs to help solve agricultural challenges was a rst step toward youth learning more about the industries in their community." This way of handson learning, that has captivated youth for over 100 years, continues today right here in our own county. .

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t 7 > 6 $ 8 2 4 t n # 6 7 6 , ; ; 2 + 4 8 < ; # 6 < 4 ; ; 2 ; < 6 5 A + > 2 4 + 4 & > 7 = 1 : ; , 8 < 4 4 r b f b r % % % ) t t t n ( : . 6 > 2 4 4 7 2 6 < % : 2 4 : . 6 > 2 4 4 n t 9 = 4 7 = ; 2 6 0 8 8 7 : < = 6 2 < AC E ? n 4 n f b t f n f t n f b t f n f t b f t f t r t r t f f b t r n t f t b 4 4 f t f t 4 4 f t f t f t b f f f r n t b f t b t ? ? ? 0 : . 6 8 = + 4 2 ; 1 2 6 0 7 5 b b t t t n r b f t r n f f r r r f r t r r r f n f b f r r ( b f f ( f ( n ( ' ( r n ( ' * 2 ; 7 6 2 0 1 < ; 8 : < 5 6 < ; n n 3 6 5 C @ @ > 2 A E D f + 6 4 E : @ ? @ F D : ? 8 5 6 D : 8 ? 6 5 7 @ C = @ H : ? 4 @ > 6 7 2 > : = : 6 D + / F > 8 2 C 5 ? 6 C C f % 2 5 : D @ ? n $ 1 7 6 r b f n b % t t B F 2 = @ F D : ? 8 A A @ C E F ? : E J r n C E ? n 4 7 5 . : < 2 C = : ; 2 6 0 ; ; 2 ; < 6 < ) F 6 D E C 2 : ? : ? 8 @ 7 7 6 C D 2 ? F C D 6 E 2 F 8 9 E & A C 6 A 4 = 2 D D f & @ C 6 B F : C 6 5 : 7 2 8 6 f ( C @ 7 6 D D : @ ? 2 = E C 2 : ? : ? 8 D : E 6 n 9 : 8 9 A 2 D D C 2 E 6 D f & @ H 2 4 4 6 A E : ? 8 D E F 5 6 ? E D f f r r n A 5 ( $ ( % % % ( ( ( ( ( ( ( & ) ( ( ( ( ( ( ) ( # # ( + $ ( t 7 2 6 + 0 2 6 6 2 6 0 8 2 6 7 4 ; ; 7 6 ; + 2 6 0 7 / / : + A $ 1 4 4 A $ 5 2 < 1 A 6 C 9 2 = 7 9 @ F C = 6 D D @ ? f ( = 6 2 D 6 4 2 = = b E @ D : 8 ? F A f r C E ? n ? r 4 7 : < 2 ; 7 6 $ 4 / $ < 7 : 0 7 6 r $ 7 = < 1 9 2 D L I L n L I L 2 ? 5 L I L F ? : E D 2 G 2 : = 2 3 = 6 f 2 = = b f r C E ? n ? r 4t n B @ t B + = 2 4 2 6 0 ? 2 < 1 B 8 7 : 1 4 7 < 7 6 $ < < # 7 r $ 7 = < 1 5 6 2 = 7 @ C 2 D > 2 = = @ C D E 2 C E F A 3 F D : ? 6 D D f @ > 6 D 6 6 7 @ C J @ F C D 6 = 7 9 @ H : E 4 @ F = 5 H @ C < 7 @ C J @ F f b f r C E ? n ? r 4 : ; ; = : ( ; 1 2 6 0 4 2 ? A C 6 D D F C 6 H 2 D 9 J @ F C 9 @ F D 6 n 3 F D : ? 6 D D n D : 5 6 H 2 = < D 2 ? 5 5 C : G 6 H 2 J D f 2 = = b f r C E ? n ? r 4 5 5 2 < 8 6 2 6 0 < 2 ; 7 6 2 0 1 < ; 8 : < 5 6 < ; r b A A = : 4 2 E : @ ? D 2 C 6 2 G 2 : = 2 3 = 6 2 E + / F > 8 2 C 5 6 ? 6 C C : G 6 f n % @ ? 5 2 J E 9 C @ F 8 9 C : 5 2 J 2 f > f A f > f 2 ? 5 A f > f A f > f r C E ? n 4 / 2 ? E 6 5 E @ 9 : C 6 D @ > 6 @ ? 6 E @ 6 D E 2 3 = : D 9 ? 6 E H @ C < 2 E D > 2 = = @ 7 M 4 6 f 2 = = r n C E ? n ? r 4 n n 7 5 # : E 4 9 6 ? 2 A A = : 2 ? 4 6 D : ? 4 = F 5 6 5 f = D @ : ? 4 = F 5 6 D = 2 H ? > 2 : ? E 6 ? 2 ? 4 6 2 ? 5 H 2 E 6 C f r > @ ? E 9 n r 5 6 A @ D : E f J 6 2 C = 6 2 D 6 f b f r n r n A 5 n # 7 + 2 4 7 5 : 3 D @ ? C = ( 2 C < H 2 J r > @ ? E 9 n r D 6 4 F C : E J f b f r n r n A 5 : . 2 < < 6 % 7 7 7 7 5 6 : D @ C 2 ? 8 6 n G 6 C J D H 6 6 E 2 ? 5 = @ G 6 D A 6 @ A = 6 2 = = b f = 4 < 2 5 2 4 A ) : $ 4 4 E f C : 5 2 J + 2 E f b 7 C @ > 2 f > f A f > f 6 2 4 9 5 2 J f @ F D 6 9 @ = 5 : E 6 > D n 2 A A = : 2 ? 4 6 D n 7 F C ? : E F C 6 n = 2 C 8 6 f f n 4 = @ E 9 6 D > 6 ? D 2 ? 5 H @ > 6 ? D b D > 2 = = E @ I = 2 C 8 6 D : K 6 D n J 2 C 5 : E 6 > D n 6 E 4 f + @ > 6 ? 6 H : E 6 > D f $ @ 4 2 E 6 5 2 E E 9 6 @ = 5 6 = = L D D 6 5 2 C D = @ E + b : ? $ 6 6 f b f r n A 5' 4 E @ 3 6 C 7 C @ > 2 f > f A f > f : D E 9 6 : < 7 : 0 2 ) : $ 4 2 E E 9 6 $ @ H ? 5 6 D @ F ? E J : G : 4 6 ? E 6 C @ = 5 7 2 : C 8 C @ F ? 5 D b H : E 9 @ G 6 C 3 @ @ E 9 D f E D 3 : 8 E D 9 F 8 6 & 6 H F D 6 5 9 @ F D 6 9 @ = 5 8 @ @ 5 D n 3 2 3 J : E 6 > D n 7 F C ? : E F C 6 f % F D : 4 n D = : 5 6 D 2 ? 5 C : 5 6 D 2 ? 5 4 @ ? 4 6 D D : @ ? 7 @ @ 5 2 G 2 : = 2 3 = 6 ( C @ 5 F 4 6 5 3 J = J ? ? G 6 ? E D n n t n r n f f r n r n A 5 6 1 7 5 8 3 0 D E 2 C E : ? 8 2 E A 6 C > @ ? E 9 f 2 = = % 2 8 : 4 % : < 6 b f r C E ? n 4( = A & ; 7 + 2 4 7 5 ; 2 = = b 7 @ C 4 2 D 9 A C : 4 6 f r C E ? n 4# 6 < < 7 7 ? 6 ? 2 < 1 t b 3 7 ? 6 2 = = % 2 8 : 4 % : < 6 b f r C E ? n 4 4 7 ? 7 = < 8 : 2 2 6 0 7 6 4 4 4 7 < 5 7 4 1 7 = ; ; 2 = = % 2 8 : 4 % : < 6 b f r C E ? n 4 = ; < 7 5 + = 2 4 < 5 7 = 4 : 1 7 5 ; 2 = = % 2 8 : 4 % : < 6 7 @ C A C : 4 : ? 8 2 ? 5 2 A A @ : ? E > 6 ? E f b f r C E ? n 4 > : : 5 7 / 7 ? 6 2 6 0 1 7 5 @ ? E 2 4 E # 2 E 9 J 2 E b f $ 6 E D > 2 < 6 J @ F C 5 C 6 2 > 4 @ > 6 E C F 6 f r C E ? n 4 < 5 1 4 8 A 7 = 5 3 A 7 = : : 5 7 5 < : = 7 / 7 ? 6 2 6 0 1 7 5 @ ? E 2 4 E # 2 E 9 J 2 E b f r C E ? n 4 7 < + : 2 < @ ? E 2 4 E # 2 E 9 J 2 E b 2 ? 5 L = = 9 6 = A J @ F H : E 9 J @ F C 5 C 6 2 > @ 7 @ H ? : ? 8 2 9 @ > 6 f r C E ? n 4 . = ; < 7 5 + = 2 4 < 1 7 5 @ ? E 2 4 E # 2 E 9 J 2 E b E @ > 2 < 6 2 ? 2 A A @ : ? E > 6 ? E f r C E ? n 4 : 2 > : ; $ f G 6 C 2 8 6 n A 6 C J C f A = F D f I 4 6 = = 6 ? E @ > 6 : > 6 t / 6 6 < 6 ? 5 D f % @ ? E 9 = J @ ? F D 6 D F A E @ f n H ( D 7 @ C 1 @ > 7 @ C E t $ @ 8 D f I 4 6 = = 6 ? E 6 ? 6 M E D f ? @ E @ F 4 9 f f r n r n A 5 2 ; 4 / C : 8 7 ; 2 < 2 7 6 > 2 4 + 4 + 6 ? : @ C : E : K 6 ? @ F ? 4 : = @ 7 % 2 5 : D @ ? 2 D 2 A @ D : E : @ ? 2 G 2 : = 2 3 = 6 7 @ C 2 : D 4 2 = 7 M 4 6 C f ) F 2 = : M 4 2 E : @ ? D : 8 9 D 4 9 @ @ = 5 : A = @ > 2 r H : E 9 J 6 2 C D @ 7 6 I A 6 C : 6 ? 4 6 : ? 2 4 4 @ F ? E : ? 8 f E E 6 ? E : @ ? E @ 5 6 E 2 : = D 2 ? 5 9 : 8 9 5 6 8 C 6 6 @ 7 2 4 4 F C 2 4 J : ? 2 = = A 2 A 6 C H @ C < f % 2 ? 5 2 E @ C J 4 @ > A F E 6 C 6 I A 6 C : 6 ? 4 6 f % F D E 3 6 2 3 = 6 E @ 4 @ > > F ? : 4 2 E 6 H 6 = = H : E 9 A 6 @ A = 6 f ( = 6 2 D 6 2 A A = J : ? A 6 C D @ ? H : E 9 2 C 6 D F > 6 @ C 2 A A = : 4 2 E : @ ? E @ F > 2 ? 6 D @ F C 4 6 D 2 E E 9 6 + 6 ? : @ C : E : K 6 ? 6 ? E 6 C + / 2 C G 6 J C 6 6 ? 6 C : G 6 n % 2 5 : D @ ? n = f A A = : 4 2 E : @ ? D > 2 J 3 6 A : 4 < 6 5 F A 2 E E 9 6 + 6 ? : @ C : E : K 6 ? D 6 ? E 6 C f & @ A 9 @ ? 6 4 2 = = D A = 6 2 D 6 f r n r n 4 & % $ ) $ % # C : @ F ? E J = 6 4 E C : 4 @ @ A 6 C 2 E : G 6 n ? 4 f 9 2 D 2 ? @ A 6 ? : ? 8 7 @ C 2 7 F = = E : > 6 6 ? E C J = 6 G 6 = + J D E 6 > ? 8 : ? 6 6 C : ? @ F C % 2 5 : D @ ? 7 M 4 6 f 9 6 4 2 ? 5 : 5 2 E 6 : D C 6 B F : C 6 5 E @ 9 2 G 6 2 2 4 9 6 = @ C 6 8 C 6 6 : ? = 6 4 E C : 4 2 = ? 8 : ? 6 6 C : ? 8 n : G : = ? 8 : ? 6 6 C : ? 8 n @ C % 6 4 9 2 ? : 4 2 = ? 8 : ? 6 6 C : ? 8 2 ? 5 K 6 C @ E @ E 9 C 6 6 J 6 2 C D 6 I A 6 C : 6 ? 4 6 f 9 6 4 2 ? 5 : 5 2 E 6 > F D E 2 = D @ 9 2 G 6 D @ = : 5 A C @ 3 = 6 > D @ = G : ? 8 D < : = = D 2 ? 5 3 6 2 3 = 6 E @ A = 2 ? n 5 6 D : 8 ? n A C 6 A 2 C 6 2 ? 5 @ C 8 2 ? : K 6 E 6 4 9 ? : 4 2 = A C @ ; 6 4 E D @ C ? 6 H @ C 8 2 ? : K 2 E : @ ? : ? : E : 2 E : G 6 D f 9 6 @ @ A 6 C 2 E : G 6 @ 7 7 6 C D 4 @ > A 6 E : E : G 6 D 2 = 2 C J 2 ? 5 3 6 ? 6 M E D f C : @ F ? E J : D 2 ? 2 ? 5 / ( f ( = 6 2 D 6 D 6 ? 5 C 6 D F > 6 3 6 7 @ C 6 4 E @ 3 6 C n E @ @ 3 6 C E % 4 # : > > 6 C @ E 6 < n ? 4 f @ ? ? 6 G 2 = 5 f 2 4 < D @ ? G : = = 6 n $ f n f f f f r n r n 4 = < 2 7 6 ; + $ , & = @ C 2 = 2 $ n t r + B 7 E 9 @ > 6 ? 6 2 C $ 2 < 6 2 4 < D @ ? n @ = 5 6 ? C @ 5 G n 4 E @ 3 6 C n A > f n f f f f f f C 2 ? 8 6 C n 9 2 8 2 C 5 D D @ 4 : 2 E 6 D n ? 4 f 2 4 < C 2 ? 8 6 C n f 4 < 1 2 4 E E 6 ? E : @ ? 2 ? 5 $ + + + 4 9 6 2 A 6 C 2 = E 6 C ? 2 E : G 6 E @ 9 : 8 9 5 C F 8 D E @ C 6 A C : 4 6 D ( : = = + A 6 4 : 2 = + 9 : A A : ? 8 ( 6 C 4 6 ? E F 2 C 2 ? E 6 6 5 f $ $ & / f 4 < 1 : + 2 7 6 + E 6 A / 2 = < ? F 3 = 6 C E 7 @ C + 6 ? : @ C D f 2 E 9 C @ @ > 7 2 = = D 4 2 ? 3 6 7 2 E 2 = f A A C @ G 6 5 3 J C E 9 C : E : D @ F ? 5 2 E : @ ? f 9 6 C 2 A 6 F E : 4 6 E D f $ 6 D D 9 2 ? ? 4 9 + E 6 A ? f / : 5 6 @ @ C f ? E : + = : A = @ @ C D f > 6 C : 4 2 ? % 2 5 6 f ? D E 2 = = 2 E : @ ? ? 4 = F 5 6 5 f 2 = = 7 @ C 7 7 f 2 ; 4 4 6 7 = ; $ & * + + E 2 C E 6 C 6 6 E 4 6 C E : M 6 5 H : E 9 9 2 ? 5 D @ ? E C 2 : ? : ? 8 : ? G : 2 E : @ ? % 2 : ? E 6 ? 2 ? 4 6 f : ? 2 ? 4 : 2 = 2 : 5 7 @ C B F 2 = : M 6 5 D E F 5 6 ? E D f @ 3 A = 2 4 6 > 6 ? E 2 D D : D E 2 ? 4 6 f 2 = = % f % # : 2 > : ; ( 6 < I A 6 C : 6 ? 4 6 5 = 2 E 3 6 5 C : G 6 C D 6 2 C ? F A E @ 4 A > = @ 2 5 6 5 f D : 8 ? @ ? E @ ) F 2 = : M 6 5 5 C : G 6 C D f @ > 6 > @ D E H 6 6 < 6 ? 5 D f 2 = = r r n f f # 4 ; < < 7 5 ; & % E ? D ? 6 2 C D 9 6 G : = = 6 f H ? 6 C > F D E D 6 = = ? 6 H = @ 8 4 2 3 : ? @ ? f 2 4 f F 8 6 A @ C 4 9 6 D n G 2 F = E 6 5 4 6 : = : ? 8 n D 7 C 6 2 5 J E @ M ? : D 9 f n n 2 5 5 = 2 4 C 6 2 8 6 2 G 2 : = f f # 4 ; < < 6 / 7 : $ 4 ( C 6 G : @ F D & # $ + n 4 C 6 D n F A E @ 4 C 6 D n % n & / @ > > F ? : E J n % @ F ? E 2 : ? : 6 H D n 4 C 6 $ 2 < 6 % : ? F E 6 D 2 H 2 J n C @ F E + E C 6 2 > D n C 6 6 < D 5 ; @ : ? D + E 2 E 6 $ 2 ? 5 D n I 4 6 = = 6 ? E : ? 2 ? 4 : ? 8 2 = = @ C 6 > 2 I f $ < 4 4 2 < % + 6 E 2 : = 6 C f + E 2 C E : ? 8 f r > @ ? E 9 7 @ C > @ D f b : ? 5 F E @ H E @ + A E @ @ 5 2 J D < 3 @ F E + % 1 ? D E 2 = = 2 E : @ ? $ $ f D E 2 C E : ? 8 2 E f r > @ f C 6 6 % @ ? E 9 D @ 7 n + E 2 C K n + / % & % 0 f * A 8 C 2 5 6 & $ + F ? 5 2 J : 4 < 6 E ? 4 = F 5 6 5 H : E 9 + 6 = 6 4 E ( 2 4 < 2 8 6 D f + @ > 6 6 I 4 = F D : @ ? D 2 A A = J $ $ f & % $ % & # ) % # f % b % + & & + f + / % + $ 1 $ $ * b f + & & + + & f & 1 & / / & + n / 1 + & & & 0 % & f & & % + ' % n 1 & + ( f + + ( + f 1 + ( % % f % n + n + n + n # + & + ( f C 2 ? 5 @ ? % F 8 8 6 F 4 E : @ ? 6 6 C n f

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www.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 3, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 13 All Legals are posted on line at www.greenepublishing.com and at www.”oridapublicnotices.com ----Legals---OUR REPUTATION AND OUR BUSINESS HAS BEEN BUILT ON FRESH QUALITY MEAT„ YOU DESERVE IT„YOULL GET IT!!! WHEN YOU WANT REAL HOPE AND CHANGE WITH A PEACE THAT SURPASSES ALL UNDERSTANDING GIVE YOUR LIFE AND BURDENS TO JESUS CHRIST OUR SAVIOR. IGA WORKING HARD TO SERVE OUR CUSTOMERS BETTER!!! 1405 N. Lee Street € 245-8300 Mon. Sat. 8:00 8:00 Sun. 8:00 5:00 WE ACCEPT WIC, EBT, ATM CARDSPrices Good O ct. 1-7 2014 Only! WE SELL AT COST PLUS 10 % 365 DAYS A YEAR ALL SHELF PRICES ARE OUR COST WITH ALL DEALS GIVEN TO YOU AT CHECKOUT, JUST 10% IS ADDED TO COVER OUR OPERATING EXPENSES. SHOP WITH US FOR THE BEST PRICES ON THE FRESHEST MEAT IN VALDOSTA EVERY DAY! Mr. B's MARKET family pack pork finger ribs or pork steaks special friday cash discount save 5% on all orders paid by cash every friday western select boneless chuck roast $ 3 19 special thursday discount for all seniors 55 or above save 5% save 5% on all orders on all orders kraft all 18 oz bbq sauces $ 1 99 twin pack boston butt pork roasts $ 2 49 $ 4 39 $ 7 89 sugar dale butt or shank portion smoked hams $ 1 99 $ 2 99 family pack fresh mid joint wings $ 1 99 western select boneless ribeye steaks 888204 EA LB LB LB LB EA LB LB LB LB EA $ 1 99 EA LB libbys select 14.5 oz cans beans, corn, peas EA carolina pride 10 oz turkey breast cooked ham or picnic 2/$ 5 00 69 ¢ iga all 48 oz cooking oils 2/$ 5 00 $ 2 99 boneless chuck steak $ 3 99 EA iga 5 lb self rising flour 2/$ 5 00 Save with a Pick-5 meat special $ 17 88 any 5 specially labeled meats EA better value 4 lb bag sugar jiffy 8 oz corn muffin mix yellow onions 3 lb bag kraft 8 oz chunk or shredded cheeses iga pizzas kraft 30 oz miracle whip or mayonnaise EA golden ripe premium bananas hunts 24 oz spaghetti sauces $ 1 00 EA iga 16 oz reg. or thin spaghetti 99 ¢ EA 3 pack small pork spare ribs gwaltney 16 oz great bologna EA hillshire farms 12-14 oz smoked sausage 3/$ 5 00 2/$ 1 00 $ 1 69 blue bonnet 1 lb 1/4s margarine 79 ¢ EA 59 ¢ EA $ 2 49 49 ¢ 99 ¢ $ 1 39 $ 2 19 family pack fresh ground beef EA fla tangerines 3 lb. bag NOTICE OF PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE BY THE CITY COMMISSION CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that proposed Ordinance No. 2014-5, bearing title as follows, will be considered Tuesday, October 14, 2014 at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall, Madison, Florida. ORDINANCE NO. 2014-5 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 25-46 OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF MADISON TO CHANGE THE MONTHLY CHARGES FOR WATER SERVICE; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING PROVISION; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE A copy of the proposed Ordinance is available for public inspection at City Hall, Madison, Florida during regular business hours. At the meeting, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City, the person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA BY:/S/ Lee Anne Hall City Clerk10/3 NOTICE OF PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE BY THE CITY COMMISSION CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that proposed Ordinance No. 2014-6, bearing title as follows, will be considered Tuesday, October 14, 2014 at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall, Madison, Florida. ORDINANCE NO. 2014-6 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 25-28 OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF MADISON TO CHANGE THE MONTHLY CHARGES FOR SEWER SERVICE; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING PROVISIONS; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE A copy of the proposed Ordinance is available for public inspection at City Hall, Madison, Florida during regular business hours. At the meeting, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City, the person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA BY:/S/ Lee Anne Hall City Clerk10/3 NOTICE OF PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE BY THE CITY COMMISSION CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that proposed Ordinance No. 2014-7, bearing title as follows, will be considered Tuesday, October 14, 2014 at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall, Madison, Florida. ORDINANCE NO. 2014-7 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA AMENDING SECTION 12-22 OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF MADISON TO INCREASE THE MONTHLY FEE IMPOSED TO REMOVE SOLID WASTE AND TRASH FOR RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE A copy of the proposed Ordinance is available for public inspection at City Hall, Madison, Florida during regular business hours. At the meeting, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City, the person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA BY:/S/ Lee Anne Hall City Clerk10/3 Per FS713.585(6), Elsie Title Services of SW FL, LLC w/POA will sell listed units to highest bidder free of any liens; Net deposited with clerk of court per 713.585; owner/lienholders right to a hearing per FS713.585(6); to post bond per FS559.917; owner may redeem for cash sum of lien; held w/reserve; inspect 1 wk prior @ lienor facility; cash or cashier's check; 25% buyers prem. Sale @ BTS Towing & Diesel Repair, 528 E Base St Madison 32340-2704 MV-85483 850 9732748 11/10/2014 @ 9:00am @ Storage @ $17.49 per day inc tax BTSr M3 lien amt $1,616.28 1989 MERZ 300SE 4D BGE WDBCA24D8KA48793310/3

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14 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, October 3, 2014 WOW! Weve Got Em!56 to Choose From! ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TITLE & LEMON LAW FEE OF $3 AND REFLECT ALL APPLICABLE FACTORY REBATES. ALL REBATES INCLUDE INCLUDE $500 REBATE WHEN FINANCED WITH CHRYSLER CAPITAL. 1500 LARAMIE PRICE INCLUDES $500 CONQUEST REBATE TO CUSTOMER WHO OWN A COMPETITIVE BRAND TRUCK. MUST PRESENT AD AT TIME OF PURCHASE TO RECEIVE ANY OR ALL ADVERTISED PRICE. VEHICLES MAY BE LOCATED AT EITHER OF OUR QUITMAN OR VALDOSTA DEALERSHIPS. ALL PRICES GOOD THROUGH OCTOBER 5, 2014 OR UNTIL VEHICLE IS SOLD, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. 888-463-68314164 N. VALDOSTA RD. € VALDOSTA, GA 2014 JEEP WRANGLER 2014 GRAND CHEROKEE HUGE DISCOUNTS FROM THE MOST DEPENDABLE, LONGEST LASTING FULL-SIZE PICKUPS ON THE ROAD! SILVERADO 2500 HD CREW 4X4 229-263-7561 8640 HWY 84W2014 SILVERADO 1500 CREW LT 4X4 2014 CHEVY SONIC 2014 JEEP PATRIOT 2014 JEEP COMPASS2014 JEEP CHEROKEE 2015 CHRYSLER 2002014 DODGE CHARGER Everybody Knows Chevys Cost Less In Quitman! 887827 Q140502 Q140484 2014 RAM 2500 4 DOOR 4X4 HEAVY DUTY Q1403530% Example: Q140444 MSRP $20,135 -Disc. $1,743 -$2,000 Down = $16,392/72 @ $227/Month 888-304-2277801 E. SCREVEN ST € QUITMAN, GA2014 RAM 1500 4 DOOR 2014 RAM 15002014 RAM 1500 LARAMIE Q140498 V150002 Q140110 Q140312 V140314 V140499 2014 DODGE DARTQ140444 2014 GRAND CARAVANV140065 2014 DODGE JOURNEYV140433 Q140060 2014 DODGE CHALLENGERV140458 2014 DODGE DURANGO V140181 CASS BURCH 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DOOR2014 SILVERADO 1500 C140162 C140187 DURAMAX DIESEL C140037 C150024 SPRAY-IN BEDLINER INCLUDED IN ALL TRUCKS! 2 YEAR/24,000 MILES COMPLIMENTARY MAINTENANCE!2014 CHEVY SPARKC140152 C140242 2014 CHEVY CRUZE C140270 2015 CHEVY MALIBUC150036ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TITLE & LEMON LAW FEE OF $3 AND REFLECT ALL APPLICABLE FACTORY REBATES. DISCOUNTS EQUALS MSRP DEALER DI SCOUNT ALL APPLICABLE REBATES. ALL 1500 TRUCK DISCOUNTS INCLUDE $1500 TRADE-IN ASSISTANCE. VEHICLES ARE LOCATED AT OUR QUITMAN DEALERSHIP. ALL PRI CES GOOD THROUGH OCTOBER 4, 2014 OR UNTIL VEHICLE IS SOLD, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. MUST PRESENT AD AT TIME OF PURCHASE TO RECEIVE ANY OR ALL ADVE RTISED PRICE. 2015 CHEVY EQUINOXC150034 2014 CHEVY IMPALA C140147 2015 CHEVY TRAVERSE C150056 2015 CHEVY TAHOE C150015