The Madison enterprise-recorder

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Material Information

Title:
The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title:
Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title:
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Creation Date:
May 31, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note:
Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID:
UF00028405:00655

Related Items

Preceded by:
Enterprise-recorder


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Full Text

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Net Neutrality is the single greatest thing that the open market has ever had: since we have moved away from small town marketplaces and towards a global economy, it is essential to the Capitalist model. And now, Net Neutrality is under attack. For those who are not familiar with this bland, uninteresting term, here is a little exposition. Net Neutrality is the idea that all websites are treated equally. A blogging mom, for example, can get her content to her viewers with the same speed and efficiency as walmart.com : for viewers, that means that all websites display with the same speed. That movie from Netflix downloads just as quickly as the County Commission agenda from our local government website. With Net Neutrality in place, cable service providers are not allowed to show favor to websites or the companies, individuals, or organizations that own them. The Federal Communications Commission is currently discussing taking away Net Neutrality. The FCC is now headed by Tom Wheeler a former cable lobbyist. Frighteningly, Wheeler used to spearhead cable lobbying efforts. To quote Last Weeks Tonight Show host, John Oliver, “Yes. The guy who used to run the cable industry’s lobbying arm is now running the agency tasked with regulating it. That is the equivalent of needing a babysitter and hiring a dingo. […] They are practically overseeing their own oversight.” In his infinite benevolence, Wheeler has proposed a “two-tier system” which would work like this: website owners who could afford it, would pay an (exorbitant) fee or “premium” to display content at current internet speeds: cable leaders call this the “fast lane.” Those who could not afford it would be knocked down to slower speeds (think dial up). This system does not add a faster “premium” tier: it adds a slower tier that would become the new “standard.” This flies in the face of the Capitalist model, wherein companies must evolve to offer faster and cheaper services in order to survive. The two tier system, therefore, is a major setback to technological and economic advancement. It lines the pockets of cable companies. They would not only be making a killing off of their customers by offering terrible service at nearly criminal rates; but also be making a killing off of website owners by charging them a great deal just to offer content at current standard speeds. They would be getting money from both sides of the equation (the provider and the viewer) for the same slip-shod services they have been providing. This is not the problem, though. The problem is that this disenfranchises every rural community and small business owner in the United States, and removes the level playing field for which our country is renowned. It is a challenge to the capitalist economy that does nothing short of shattering the free market. In sum, it is un-American. This is one of the few countries left where the little man has a chance: where in a single generation— by the grace of his God and the sweat of his brow— a man can bring himself up from abject poverty into the middle class. Start up is costly and laborious, even in the current system; his wife and children lack for his attention, and his income goes back into his growing business—not his household. Ending Net Neutrality would squeeze him out of standard internet speeds and therefore out of business. When the business folds, his labors are lost and he is cast into poverty once again. It can be argued that American men and women have stood against all sorts of adversities and persevered. Indeed, they have, and should Net Neutrality end, they will again. And yet, that struggle would rock this country to its core. Established businesses would struggle: some would even fold. New businesses would not survive this harsh new economic climate. With so much business failure and struggles, even more people would be eligible for— and subsequently dependent upon—Social Security, a program that has already stretched this country to its limits. According to the Senate Budget Committee, the US government spent over $3.7 trillion on welfare and poverty assistance from 2009-2013: this is over five times the combined expenditures of NASA, Education and Transportation in the same years. And what of rural America? Many small businesses do not even wish to make the kind of money necessary to get standard internet speeds. They service small areas and populaces such as Jefferson and Madison County, Fl., where they and their customers are content. Such small markets do not have enough Gross Domestic Product (that is, money in the market) to spend on the premium tier. Unfortunately, when advertising for services is not convenient, most customers opt out. If a radio commercial is too loud, they turn the volume down. If a newspaper ad is too busy, they don’t read it. If a website loads too slowly, they are simply going to close the window and ignore small businesses who cannot afford standard internet display speeds. How can a farmer advertise his livestock or training services; or a restaurant their lunch specials; or an antique store their wares; if they cannot pay for the “fast lane?” But this does not just affect the common man. It is a threat to local governments and municipalities. The end of net neutrality would mean the end of small town online infrastructure. City and county departments in areas that are already strapped for funding would suffer. Jefferson and Madison Counties have worked so hard to bring themselves into the modern age. They provide public records online. They offer local government meeting agendas, property history, information about local departments, and even an interactive GIS map on the Property Appraiser’s website. Because of these capabilities, the area is blessed with informed and politically active citizens. These online resources are beneficial to the public, but would quickly be made obsolete by slower display and download speeds. For example, the GIS map would not be supported by a slower connection. The government cannot afford to pay the premium to (read: bribe) cable providers for standard speeds. Nor should they. The end of Net Neutrality is a threat to the common man; to rural communities; to municipalities; and to the protestant work ethic upon which our forefathers built this country. And today — right now — there is something you can do. The FCC is welcoming public comment until the end of September. Visit www.fcc.gov/comments and click on the link “09191: In the Matter of Preserving the Open Internet Broadband Industry Practices.”If you don’t know your cholesterol numbers, it’s time you did. September is designated as National Cholesterol Education Month to remind us to keep a check on cholesterol levels. One of the health risks for heart disease is high cholesterol. A cholesterol number of 200 or below is considered desirable. Low density lipoproteins (LDL) should be under 100 and high density lipoproteins (HDL) should be higher than 49. It is recommended healthy adults get their cholesterol checked at least once every ve years. Cholesterol is a type of dietary fat found in animal sources of food. Humans produce our own cholesterol and it plays vital roles in our bodies. The problem arises when cholesterol levels get too high, which increases your risk of heart disease. Some people have good genes and their body does an efcient job of eliminating excess cholesterol, while others people may have high levels of cholesterol. There are a number of things we can do to reduce our intake of cholesterol and improve our body’s ability to eliminate cholesterol. A combination of smart food choices and increasing physical activity will help improve cholesterol numbers. Here are a few pointers to get you started: Eat a diet low in fat and cholesterol: Switch to low-fat dairy foods. Reduced-fat cheeses are now more avorful. Take your milk down a notch by switching to a lower-fat version. If you drink whole milk, switch to two percent. Give yourself a few months, then take it down to one percent. Before you know it, you will be able to switch to skim without noticing a big change in avor and texture. Choose leaner cuts of meat and trim visible fat before cooking. Round, ank and sirloin are examples of leaner cuts that can be very tender if you prepare them with the appropriate cooking techniques. Remove skin from chicken and you’ll eliminate most of the fat. Bake, broil, simmer or roast all meat, poultry or sh. Leave frying out of your food preparation – it’s too messy anyway, so you will save time on clean up. Be careful with ready-to-serve baked goods. Many of these foods are prepared with saturated fats which tend to increase cholesterol levels. Eat less than 300 milligrams of dietary cholesterol a day: Read labels to determine the amount of cholesterol in the food you are eating. Prepare lean cuts of meat and keep it to a 3-oz. serving size, which is equal to the size of a deck of cards. Switch to low-fat and fat-free dairy foods. One egg yolk has about 300 mg. of cholesterol (the recommended number for the day), so limit your servings to two or three eggs per week. Egg whites, on the other hand have no fat or cholesterol, so get creative when serving eggs. If you are preparing scrambled eggs, use one egg with additional egg whites. When baking, use two egg whites in place of each whole egg in a recipe and you eliminate all of the cholesterol in your cakes and mufns. Eat more foods high in soluble ber: Soluble ber has been proven to help your body get rid of cholesterol and there are a variety of foods that contain soluble ber. Dried beans and peas are an excellent source of ber; increase you intake of kidney beans, limas, lentils and black-eyed peas. Vegetables rich in ber are squash, sweet potatoes and broccoli. The old saying, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away,” you guessed it, apples are high in soluble ber. Oatmeal is another source of soluble ber. Increase your physical activity: Aim for 30 minutes each day and if you can make it an hour, do so as often as you can. Walking, swimming and bicycling are examples of moderate level activities. Regular household chores like gardening and cleaning also count as activity. Be sure to consult your doctor before starting an exercise program. Weight management: Maintaining a healthy weight will also help keep your cholesterol levels in check. By keeping your food intake in check and increasing your activity level, your weight will reach a healthy level without any effort. Three components of a healthy lifestyle – sensible eating, regular activity and managing your weight all work to keep your cholesterol level at an acceptable level. If you have difculty keeping your cholesterol below 200, be sure to consult your doctor. For more information on food and nutrition, contact the Madison County Extension Service. The University of Florida Extension – Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Afrmative Institution. Conservative Corner Conservative Corner By Nelson A. Pryor, Lee, Fl.Viewpoints & Opinions2 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 19, 2014 Madison County Extension Service TIMEFORA CHOLESTEROLCHECK Diann DouglasGuest Columnist Giving out free Marijuana? That’s what it has come to, in California. Yes, in the name of medical marijuana, those suffering from maladies, such as insomnia, will qualify for a prescription. The law offers free doses for “poor” patients. “Poor” being described as anyone with an income of less than $32,000 a year for individuals. Called in the law, “the charity cannabis mandate,” officials claimed they were simply trying to ensure “equal access” to a drug they emphasized as medicine, useful for treating cancer pain and other maladies. “Instead of taking steps to help the most economically vulnerable residents get out of that state, Berkeley has said, ‘Let’s just get everybody high,’” said John Lovell, a lobbyist for the California Narcotic Officers’ Association. Mr. Lovell said the free marijuana would sap patients’ motivation to look for work-after all, it is not a drug known for encouraging anyone to get off the couch and could easily be resold on the street for profit by people who are short on money. In a New York Times article, of Sept. 3, 2014, entitled: “Berkeley Pushes a Boundary on Medical Marijuana,” the cat is let out of the bag. Who would have thought that by “legalizing Medical Marijuana,” one could open up something called “compassion for insomnia,” as a legal right for dope? “I don’t see anything progressive about that,” Mr. Lovell said. Cigarettes are bad, Marijuana OK! Are things upside down, or what? Nearly 20 years after California became the first state to legalize medical marijuana, Berkeley’s new law highlights a paradox of marijuana as medicine: Whether it is sold illegally on the street or legally in a dispensary, access to the drug depends almost entirely on whether you can pay for it. Yet, because marijuana remains illegal under federal law, insurance companies refuse to cover such treatments, which can run to hundreds of dollars per ounce for designer strains like All Star Sonoma Coma at local dispensaries. Marijuana, a gateway drug, is not difficult to find. Parents are legally required to “lock up” their firearms; but not so their “medical marijuana.” How’s that for compassion? Hooking your kids on a lifetime of dope. And that’s progressive? Give society a break! Portrayed as Compassion Sean Luse, the dispensary chief operating officer, for Berkeley Patients Group, worries that the city mandate could lead to resale on the street. Currently, about 100 people, not all of them Berkeley residents, receive free marijuana from his dispensary, representing about one percent of the drug the facility dispenses. The new law will now compel the dispensary to give away about twice as much. “No one has really quantified the legitimate demand; they just set the two percent threshold out of thin air,” Mr. Luse said. “Are we going to be forcing medicine on people just because it’s the law? There could definitely be a financial incentive for folks to resell it.” In Florida Will compassion lead Floridians to approve “Legalized Dope” this November, at the polls? Legalize Dope? No Thanks! Photo SubmittedCpl. Alan Whigham and Sheriff Ben Stewart look over a sign opposing the legalization of medical marijuana. Known as NOŽ on proposition Number 2 on the Nov. ballot. The Sheriff has a video, "The Devil Is In the Details,Ž on his Facebook Madison County Sheriff's Of“ce. The Republican Club of Madison County Oct 13 at noon at Shelby’s Restaurant. The Republican Executive Committee meets Sept 23 at 7 p.m. at the Madison County Library. EVERYONE WELCOME Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee at rec.madison@yahoo.com. Why Net Neutrality Matters

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F > + > 1 / 8 ? 9 4

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Mr. and Mrs. Dean Tuten of Greenville proudly announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter Kehli Savannah Tuten to Kenneth Wendell Stewart, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Stewart, Sr. ,of High Springs, Fl. The bride to be is a 2007 graduate of Madison County High School and is currently enrolled at North Florida Community College RNBridge Program and is employed at the Madison County Memorial Hospital. The groom to be is a 2005 graduate of Madison County High School. He is currently employed with the State of Florida, Department of Corrections in Madison, Fl. The wedding will be held Saturday, October 4, 2014 at Honey Lake Plantation in Greenville. Around Madison County4 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 19, 2014 Obituaries Community Calendar Way Back When Way Back When Wedding AnnouncementLeon Williams Classie Williams J ose ph Con r a d M i ch alo w s k iM a x ie E s t elle H a rr ellWilliam McK inle y D a v is Jr.Leon Williams, 63, formerly of Greenville, departed this life in Deerfield Beach on Friday, September 12. Funeral services are 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 20 at Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church, with burial in New Zion Church Cemetery, in Greenville. Viewingvisitation will be 4:30-7 p.m. on Friday, September 19 at Shiloh. Tillman of Monticello, (850) 9975553, is serving the Williams family. A 1969 graduate of Greenville Training School, he earned his Bachelor's degree from the University of Miami and was pursuing his Master's at Florida Atlantic University. A devoted member of Ft. Lauderdale's Piney Grove Missionary Baptist Church, he was a quality control supervisor for Paramount Mold Company. He leaves behind a legacy of love to be cherished by his nine siblings; seven sisters: Janet W. (Lamy) Gassant, Carolyn (Joseph) Hurst, Ardrenia Collins-Smith, Angela Williams, Leola Seabrooks, Shuwanda (Howard) Miller and Denise Williams; two brothers: Jurnold (Ella) Williams and Johnny Williams III; and a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives, church family, colleagues and sorrowing friends. He was predeceased by his parents, Johnny II and Beatrice Lane Williams and a brother, Charles Williams.September 19, 1952 Samuel Sanford Smith was notied this week that he was one of the 103 successful applicants to pass the Georgia bar examination. Less than a third passed it. Smith, who is associated with Cam Young, an attorney in Valdosta, graduated from Cornell Law School in June. He also attended Emory-at-Valdosta and Siene College in Albany, N.Y. George West was arrested on a charge of reckless driving in failing to yield right of way and insufcient brakes as a result of a collision by his Plymouth car with a Mercury sedan driven by Mrs. Nat Noreet Sunday night about nine o'clock. Mr. and Mrs. H T Holton of Madison, Fla., announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter, Mary Catherine, to James B. Howard, also of the city, son of Mr. and Mrs. A S Howard of Lake Placid, Fla. The wedding will take place on November the twenty-seventh at 6 p.m. in the First Methodist Church in Madison. Madison Red Devils open their rst season game with their old rival, The Bristol Bulldogs, this Friday night.September 18, 1953 Greenville High School has elected the following girls to be cheerleaders for the football games: Shirley Ann Clayton, Sue Braswell, Emma King, Harvalyn Green, Mary Ann Patrick and Betty Jean Morris. Shirley Ann Clayton is chairman of the cheerleaders and Sue Braswell, co-captain. The badly mangled body of a man was found on the SAL railroad tracks three and a half miles west of Madison about 6:30 a.m. Wednesday. According to Sheriff Moore, the man was identied by a social security card as Lee Parson, of Haleysville, Ala., and a brother of the dead man was located there. Booker T. Thomas, living a few miles north of town on the Valdosta highway, was stabbed to death Monday night in Valdosta by Calvin Wright. Wright, claimed self-defense, said Thomas came after him with a knife following him (Wright's) and asking for $2 he claimed Thomas owed him. Mrs. E B Jones entertained with a lawn party Monday afternoon, Sept. 14., complimenting her son Jimmy on his 6thbirthday.September 17, 1954 The rst meeting of the new school year of Greenville PTA was held in the high school auditorium Thursday evening and opened with an inspirational devotional given by Pat Hagan. The School Boy Patrol of the Madison Elementary School has been organized for the 1954-55 School year. The group of sixth grade boys was divided into two patrols. Arnold Harris and Allen Pope are the two captains and Tom Coody and Butch Fisher are the lieutenants. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lewis, Jr., of Madison announce the birth of a daughter, Gwendolyn Kay, in Thomasville, Sept. 13. The young lady weighed 7 lbs., 15 oz. A truck of the Lewis Candy Co., of Gainesville caught re parked in front of the Eddins house on East Rutledge, Thursday evening causing considerable smoke, but only slight damage. The re caused by a short circuit igniting gasoline fumes, was quickly brought under control by the Fire Department.September 21 Renewed Life Outreach Center is having it's Homecoming starting at 11 a.m. Special singer at the event will be Craig Pippin. Dinner following. Please bring a covered dish. The event will take place at 131918 West U.S. 90 in Greenville, at the old First Baptist Church. For more information, you may call Pastor Chris Peterson at (850) 510-8074.September 21 The Regal Woman' Club of Greenville invites everyone to attend their anniversary program at 3 p.m. The service will be held at Allen Chapel A.M.E. Church, located at 1694 SW Grand Street. For more information, contact Vera Greenwood at (850) 948-4088 or email veranne@embarqmail.com.September 21 Genesis Missionary Baptist Church, as part of their Missionary Program, would like to invite everyone to join them at 3 p.m., to hear speaker, Missionary Maggie Duval from Tallahassee. Refreshments will be served. For more information, contact Gloria Washington at (850) 973-5081September 22 A rst time homebuyer series begins Monday, Sept. 22 and will continue on Sept. 23, 29 and 30, at the Madison County Extension Service, starting at 6 p.m. After completion, participants will receive a certicate that can be used for the SHIP program and Rural Development home loans. To register, call 973-4138.September 23 Madison Youth Ranch will have a prayer, dedication and opening celebration on Tuesday, Sept. 23. Campus tours will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by the program events at 11:30 a.m., with lunch served at noon. The campus tours will resume at 1 p.m. Call (386) 668-5088 or email madison.ranch@fumch.org to R.S.V.P. or for more information. Madison Youth Ranch is located at NE Captain Buie Road in Pinetta. Classie Hampton Williams, 55, of Greenville, passed unexpectedly at home on Saturday, September 13. Funeral services will be at 2 p.m. on Saturday, September 20 at New Hope Primitive Baptist Church, Sirmans Community, with burial in Wigginsville Community Cemetery. Viewing-visitation will be Friday, September 19 from 3-7:30 p.m. at Tillman of Monticello, (850) 997-5553. A homemaker, Classie was a member of New Hope and an avid sports fan, especially FSU football. She also was a devout fisherman, who could "fish with the best of 'em." Treasuring precious memories are her partner, Frank Houck; three daughters: Tamikka (Mardy Andrews) Williams, Sharikka (Sonny Watson) Williams and Keiontaye Williams; sisters: Theola H. Gallon, Pearlie H. (Louis) Sales, Helen Cuyler, Delorise H. (Mathis) Groover and Barbara Miller; brothers: T.C. Hampton and James (Phyllis) Hampton; seven grandchildren; numerous nieces, nephews, other relatives and loving friends. William "Bear" McKinley Davis, Jr., passed peacefully into the arms of his Lord and Savior on Wednesday, September 10, at Madison County Memorial Hospital in Madison. "Bear" was born on August 17, 1941 in Madison. He was the oldest son of William McKinley Davis, Sr., and Carrie Mae Tyson Davis who preceded him in death. He leaves to mourn and cherish his life, four brothers: Dock J. Davis and Charlie Davis, both of Madison; Charles (Vicky) Davis, of Lakeland, Fl.; and Harold Davis, of Plant City, Fl.; four sisters: Francis Moon, of Detroit, Mich.; Peggy Ann Davis, of Plant City, Fl.; Ola (Sam) Hoillett, of Palm Coast, Fl.; and Audrey Mae Davis, of Madison; two nieces: Keehia Butler, of Miami and Merelda (Jerry) Alexander, of Madison; six nephews: Desi Butler, Kovi (Regina) McDaniel, both of Madison; Keith Hoillett, Tyson Hoillett, both of Miramar, Fl.; Travis Graves and Adrian Davis, both of Detroit, Mich.; and a host of great nieces, nephews, cousins and many, many sorrowing friends. Memorial service was held at Cooks & Cooper Funeral Chapel on Wednesday, September 17, at 11 a.m. in Madison. Memorial services were entrusted to Cooks & Cooper Funeral Home located at 162 SW Third Ave. Madison, Fl., 32340, (850) 973-6666 and fax (850) 973-6698. Joseph Conrad Michalowski, 79, died Tuesday, September 16, at his home. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 20, at Beggs Funeral Home, Madison Chapel. He was born on August 7, 1935 and moved to Greenville in 1982 coming from South Florida. He was a truck driver for Realwood Products, and was a Catholic. He is survived by his wife, Gisela Michalowski, of Greenville; three sons: Joe Michalowski, of Ft. Lauderdale; John Michalowski, of Greenville; and Eric Michalowski of Goddard, Kan.; one daughter, Lisa Ginn, of Cocoa, Fl.; three sisters: Carol Schaffer, of Greenville; Joan Carratu and Frances Robinson; two grandchildren and one great grandchild. He was preceded in death by three sisters: Rita Nicole, Connie Carbo and Marilyn King. Beggs Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements, (850) 9732258. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting their website at www.beggsfuneral.com. Maxie Estelle Harrell, 87, died Sunday, September 14, in Marianna. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m., on Friday, September 19, at Beggs Funeral Home Madison Chapel with burial at Ebenezer Cemetery. Visitation will be onehour prior to the service from 1-2 p.m. at Beggs Funeral Home. She was born in Athens, Ala., on June 16, 1927 to the late George and Myrtle Franklin. She moved to Tampa, at the age of eight and lived there until her marriage to T. W. Harrell in 1944. They moved to Madison County, where they raised their children. Later years she lived in Marianna, Fl., to be closer to her oldest daughter, Sheila. She retired from the State of Florida where she worked with the (WIC) Women, Infant, Children's program. She had a real sweet spirit and was a member of Grace United Methodist Church, in Marianna, Fl. She enjoyed life no matter what hardships came her way; she would deal with it and smile. She will be remembered for her kindness and creativity and for her love and loyalty to her family. She was a beautiful lady, loving mother and wife. She is survived by six children: Sheila Adams (Jimmy), Jimmie Agnes Lundgren (Steven), Ted Harrell (Suzanne), G. W. Harrell (Hope), Rick Harrell (Linda Lee), Susie Atwood (J. R.) and ten grandchildren: Jeannie Johnson (Matt), Landis Adams (Suzanne), Taylor Harrell, Leslie Harrell, Kelsey Harrell, Travis Harrell (Olivia), Madison Harrell, Maxwell Harrell, Delaney Atwood and Bellamy Atwood; and six great-grandchildren. Her loving husband T. W. Harrell preceded her in death in 1971. Beggs Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements, (850) 973-2258. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting their website at www.beggsfuneral.com. Tuten Stewart Have something you would like to add to the Community Calendar? Simply call Greene Publishing, Inc. at (850) 973-4141 or email your information toRose@greenepublishing.com.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 5 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 19, 2014 Purchase any vehicle & receive a World Famous Rocker to enjoy the Great Fall Weather! ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TITLE & LEMON LAW FEE OF $3 AND REFLECT ALL APPLICABLE FACTORY REBATES. DISCOUNTS EQUALS MSRP DEALER DISCOUNT ALL APPLICABLE REBATES. ALL 1500 TRUCKS DISCOUNTS INCLUDE $500 REBATE WHEN FINANCED WITH CHRYSLER CAPITAL AND $500 CONQUEST REBATE TO CUSTOMER WHO OWN A COMPETITIVE BRAND TRUCK. MUST PRESENT AD AT TIME OF PURCHASE TO RECEIVE ANY OR ALL ADVERTISED PRICE. VEHICLES MAY BE LOCATED AT EITHER OF OUR QUITMAN OR VALDOSTA DEALERSHIPS. ALL PRICES GOOD THROUGH SEPT. 20, 2014 OR UNTIL VEHICLE IS SOLD, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. 888-463-68314164 N. VALDOSTA RD. € VALDOSTA, GA888-304-2277801 E. SCREVEN ST € QUITMAN, GA %72MONTHS ON ALL 2014 RAM 1500 2014 JEEP WRANGLER 2014 GRAND CHEROKEEV140396 56 to Choose From!WOW! Weve Got Em! CASS BURCH HUGE DISCOUNTS FROM THE MOST DEPENDABLE, LONGEST LASTING FULL-SIZE PICKUPS ON THE ROAD! 2014 SILVERADO 1500 DOUBLE CAB LT SILVERADO 2500 HD CREW 4X4 C150038 2014 SILVERADO 1500 CREW LTZ 4X4 2014 SILVERADO 1500 C140264 229-263-7561 8640 HWY 84WALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TITLE & LEMON LAW FEE OF $3 AND REFLECT ALL APPLICABLE FACTORY REBATES. DISCOUNTS EQUALS MSRP DEALER DISCOUNT ALL APPLICABLE REBATES.ALL 1500 TRUCK DISCOUNTS INCLUDE $1500 TRADE-IN ASSISTANCE. VEHICLES ARE LOCATED AT OUR QUITMAN DEALERSHIP. ALL PRICES GOOD THROUGH SEPT. 20, 2014 OR UNTIL VEHICLE IS SOLD, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. MUST PRESENT AD AT TIME OF PURCHASE TO RECEIVE ANY OR ALL ADVERTISED PRICE. 2014 SILVERADO 1500 CREW LT 4X4 C140258 2014 CHEVY CRUZE 1LTC150019 2015 CHEVY TRAVERSEC150028 2014 CHEVY CAMAROC140140 2014 CHEVY SONIC LT 2015 CHEVY SUBURBAN 2015 CHEVY TAHOE Purchase any vehicle & receive a World Famous Rocker to enjoy the Great Fall Weather! C150019 C150001C140252 C140227C140239 0% Example: V140463 MSRP $26,715 -Disc. $1,652 -$2,000 Down = $23,063/72 @ $320/Month 2014 RAM 1500 CREWV140581 2014 RAM 1500V1404632014 RAM 1500 LARAMIE Q1401412014 RAM 1500 EXPRESS Q140479 2014 RAM 1500 OUTDOORSMANV140395 2014 RAM 1500 LONGHORNV140174 $AVE THOUSANDS IN INTERESTAT 0%! 2014 JEEP PATRIOT Q140318 V140251 2014 JEEP COMPASS 2014 JEEP CHEROKEEQ140265 2015 CHRYSLER 200V1500032014 DODGE CHARGER Q140480 0% or MSRP $46,370 $8,822 Discount= Sale Price $37,548 0% or MSRP $43,725 $8,485 Discount = Sale Price $35,240 0% or MSRP $41,240 -$7,658 Discount= Sale Price $33,582 0% or MSRP $52,775 -$7,415 Discount = Sale Price $45,360 0% or MSRP $48,495 $6,900 Discount = Sale Price $41,595 0% or MSRP $26,715 $3,652 Discount = Sale Price $23,063 0% or MSRP $24,165 $4,281 Discount = Sale Price $19,884 0% or MSRP $27,680 $4,417 Discount = Sale Price $23,263 0% or MSRP $27,875 Discount $3,370 = Sale Price $24,505 0% or MSRP $31,685 Discount $5,295 = Sale Price $26,930 0% or MSRP $30,875 Discount $3,139 = Sale Price $27,736 0% or MSRP $47,190 Discount $3,698 = Sale Price $43,492 MSRP $46,895 $7,805 Discount = Sale Price $39,090 MSRP $38,695 $8,117 Discount = Sale Price $30,578 C140185 MSRP $49,370 $5,068 Discount = Sale Price $44,302 MSRP $60,610 $6,141 Discount = Sale Price $54,469 MSRP $27,735 $5,518 Discount = Sale Price $22,217 MSRP $67,945 $4,280 Discount = Sale Price $63,665 MSRP $65,490 -$4,145 Discount = Sale Price $61,345 MSRP $36,795 -Discount $2,598= Sale Price $34,197 MSRP $43,290 -Discount $3,679= Sale Price $39,611 MSRP $21,870 -Discount $3,223= Sale Price $18,647 MSRP $18,305 -Discount $2,045= Sale Price $16,260Everybody Knows Chevys Cost Less In Quitman!

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Submitted by the Madison County Genealogy SocietyAtrue Florida Pioneer, William Sever and his wife Mary Priscilla Lewis arrived in Madison County before 1830 from Emmanuel County, Ga., with seven children. William’s father was Henry Sever; Mary’s parents were Abraham and Prudence Lewis. Their children follow: 1. Nancy, 1810, who married Silas Overstreet; 2. Elizabeth, 1816, who married Felix K. Eason; 3. Mary, 1818, who married James T. Leslie; 4. William Henry, 1821, who married Mary Griner; 5. Martha Ann, 1823, who married Daniel Burnett; 6. Dicey, 1825, who married James Edward Vann; and 7. Susannah, 1828, who married William Pierce. In later years (1865) William married Mrs. Ann B. Boyd. William and his son William Henry served in Capt. Livingston’s Company, 2 East, as Privates in the US Army during the Indian Wars. William and Mary are buried at the Shiloh Methodist Church Cemetery, in Greenville. William received 80 acres from the U.S. government in 1831, 80 acres in 1834, and 40 in 1835. He ended up with 640 acres in the Hamburg area, and lived there the rest of his life. Third Generation William had only one son, William Henry, 1821, to carry on the family name; but William Henry and Mary Griner did a pretty good job, by having the following ve sons and no daughters: 1. Frances M., 1845; 2. William W., 1847; 3. James Andrew, 1849; 4. Henry (George) Washington, 1852; 5. John Hunter. We think Henry W. moved to Pinellas and Hillsborough, married Julia, raised a family, and worked in citrus. Fourth Generation William W. It seems that William W. was the only son of William Henry and Mary who remained in Madison County. He married Mary M. (according to Find-A-Grave, Mary Mattox Eason) and the couple raised their children in Mosely Hall and then Harmony. They had the following 11 children: 1. William H., 1875; 2. James H., 1876; 3. Mary V., 1878, who married J. S. Cave; 3. Andrew B., 1880; 4. Jackson T., 1882, who married Rozza Beaty in 1908; 5. George W., 1885; 6. Moses E., 1899, who married Maggie Beaty in 1914; 7. John S., 1891; 8. Sarah R., 1893; 9. Louis L., 1896; 10. Lugenius, 1904. It appears that Andrew B. moved to Dade County, married Leona, raised a family, and was a police ofcer. Jackson T. lived and was buried in Lamont, Jefferson County. George W. died in 1909 and was buried in Lamont. Moses Eason married Maggie Beaty and moved to Dade County. He died in 1957. Fifth Generation: William Henry, James H., and Louis Leon. William W., and his sons William H., James H., and Louis L. all lived near each other in Harmony. William Henry, 1875; was rst married to Maggie and the couple had the following children: 1. Will T., 1896; 2. Ed Andrew, 1898; 3. Henry, 1900; 4. Trudy, 1902; 5. Charles Eason, 1904; 6. Laura May, 1905; 7. J. Broward, 1909; 8. Sallie, 1912; 9. Rebecca, 1914, who married Russell Taylor; 10. George W., 1915; 11. John W., 1918. William W. remarried Carrie Mae in 1935. James H. 1876, married Della May and the couple had Bessie May, 1902; and Charles W., 1903. Louis Leon, 1896, married Fannie Bell and the couple had Louis Leon, Jr., 1924. Henry, it appears, moved to Dade County, died in 1986, and was buried in Lamont. Fifth Generation: sons of William H. Charles Eason, 1903, lived in Tuten and married Nellie Mae and the couple had Joseph H., 1929, and Charles, 1939. Ed Andrew, 1898, married Wilhemina and the couple had Ellen W., 1929; Willard, 1930; Maggie, 1931; and Andrew Ed, Jr., 1937. Will T., 1896, married Hoyett and the couple had the following children: William H., 1930; Elbert, 1932; Glen Etheridge, 1940; and Linda, 1944. In Summary, William Sever had six daughters and one son, William Henry. (William was a big name in the Sever family, and the Williams seemed to remain here). William Henry remained in Madison County and had six sons. It seems that only one of the six sons, William W., raised his family in the county. William W. had nine sons, and three of them remained—William H., James H., and Louis Leon. William H. had three sons that raised their families in Madison County: Charles Eason, Ed Andrew, and Will T. The William Severs are only half of the Severs in Madison County. Around 1845, Benjamin Sever moved in, we think from Jefferson County, and married Mary Tillis. This branch of Severs does not seem to be at all connected to the William Sever family who arrived in 1830. Our next article will cover the Benjamin Sever family. The Madison County Florida Family History Book provided some information for this article. Other information was pieced from census reports on Ancestry.comand from the Madison County Genealogy Website. Sometimes, putting the puzzle of family histories together requires a little deduction, and sometimes the pieces might not be in the right place. Please let us know if we haven’t put the puzzle of your family together correctly. The Madison County Genealogy Society welcomes your input and invites you to join our organization. We meet on the second Thursday monthly, except during summer months, in the Madison Public Library from 6 to 7 p.m. Annual dues are $25. To add comments to our articles or to submit your own sketch of your ancestor, contact us at Madison County Genealogy Society, P.O. Box 136, Madison, Fl. 32341. Or contact us by email at mcgenealogysociety@live.com.6 €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 19, 2014 The City of Madison has tentatively adopted a measure to increase its property tax levy. Last years property tax levy: A.Initially proposed tax levy ..$601,590 B.Less tax reductions due to Value Adjustment Board and other assessment changes...$ 71,209 C.Actual property tax levy ......$530,381 This years proposed tax levy ..$646,514 All concerned citizens are invited to attend a public hearing on the tax increase to be held on: Tuesday, September 23, 2014 5:30 p.m. at City Hall, 321 SW Rutledge St., Madison, FL 32340 A FINAL DECISION on the proposed tax increase and the budget will be made at this hearing.NOTICE OF PROPOSED TAX INCREASE William Sever 1788-1870Pioneers Of Madison County

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By William Smith Greene Publishing, Inc.Two steps forward, one step backward.” Warrior head coach Colby Roberts might consider getting this mantra tattooed across his forehead after yet another performance brimming with encouraging highs and maddening lows Friday evening as Aucilla travelled to St. Augustine to defeat the Flashes of St. Joseph in conference play 28-13. It was a game of duality, a Jekyll/Hyde story of two sides of the same coin; one where the most promising aspects of the Warriors’ achievements begat ugly, evil twins that were the corruption of those very same positives. Firstly, there was the dichotomy of physicality: this was one of the most dominating performances yet by an Aucilla line in Roberts’ tenure with the team. Both offensively and defensively, the Warriors controlled the line of scrimmage in a convincing display of moxie, bulldozing their way to a 21-7 halftime lead that seemed to portend the all-but-certain occurrence of a blowout. Then, the second half came, and with it, the pestilence of penalties. “Holding,” “block in the back,” “neutral zone infraction,” “off sides;” all were called, and frequently. They were enough to derail an otherwise banner day for the trench men. Secondly, there was the contradiction of a rushing attack that was physical and intimidating, but entirely, destructively mistake-prone. The Warriors enjoyed what was easily the most productive day so far in this 2014 season for running the football (271 yards and two touchdowns on 44 carries, over six yards per carry), but frustratingly, could not stop fumbling the ball at the most inopportune of times. In fact, Aucilla suffered no less than ve fumbles lost Friday evening, a malady of epic proportions that led Roberts’ to thank his lucky stars for prevailing: “I’m not entirely sure what the percentages are for a team’s chances of winning when turning the ball over as much as we did tonight, but I’ve got to believe that it’s a fraction of a percent. We just could not hold onto the ball. That has to change in the future. It’s not acceptable to make those kinds of mistakes and beat yourself when facing conference opponents.” Unfortunately, the turnover issue facing Aucilla backs and receivers overshadowed some quality performances that seem to forecast that a burgeoning Warrior offense is nally ready to realize its potential as a powerhouse force. Chief among these performances was another bruising rushing display by senior quarterback/running back Wesley Smyrnios (23 carries, 102 yards, one touchdown). Since last week against Oak Hall, Smyrnios has deftly lled the role of power back, setting the tone as a short yardage specialist who also has the wheels to gouge opposing defenses for big gains when not properly “wrapped up” in a technique tackle. The yang to Smyrnios’ yin came from fellow senior quarterback Austin Bishop (12 carries, 124 yards), a nesse runner who gashed the Flash defense on the ground with several quarterback draw plays run to perfection. This “thunder and lightning” combo of runners has been sorely missed by the Warrior’s offense for the purpose of controlling tempo and morale this year, and can be a huge asset if it continues to be effective. As Aucilla controlled the line of scrimmage with its rushing attack, receiving opportunities opened up for the reliable senior wide receiver Timothy Burrus, who had a workman-like eight catch, 105 yard night that could have been spectacular had a 50+ yard touchdown pass not been called back due to a holding penalty. However, in light of the prevailing running game, the passing scheme played second ddle as both Bishop and Smyrnios combined for 15-21 for 154 yards, one touchdown, and one interception. Defensively, the night was highlighted by senior defensive end Nick Roberts, who turned in an outstanding game, tallying seven tackles and two sacks. Roberts lived in the ash backeld all night, pressuring St. Joseph quarterbacks and harassing their talented and speedy running backs. It was an exceptional night in general for the Warrior front seven, as several defensive linemen and linebackers easily penetrated into the opposing backeld to wreak havoc, a fact not necessarily reected by the nal score of the game. Those ever-present turnovers and penalties nearly cost Aucilla the game, as St. Joseph took full advantage and rallied late to keep this contest in doubt. “I’ll tell you that though I have condence in the way that we were moving the football throughout the game, I’m very happy that St. Joseph didn’t have another ve minutes of game clock to work with there at the end,” said coach Roberts. “For two weeks in a row, we’ve started strongly, and ended poorly. That’s a recipe for disaster. We’re going back to the drawing board to gure out how to nally play a complete game.” Aucilla will return to action this Friday evening against divisional opponent John Paul II in Tallahassee, a game that always carries with it the added bonus of the extra motivation of a rivalry: Aucilla and JPII have no love lost between them, and have had several notably one-sided matchups in the past, including a 54-26 Panther drubbing at the hands of the Warriors last year. SportsMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 7 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 19, 2014 Aucilla Prevails Despite Litany Of TurnoversBy Bryant Thigpen Greene Publishing, Inc.The Aucilla Christian Academy Warriors cross country team traveled to Panama City on Saturday to participate in the Bay Invitational, their rst time competing in that event. The boys and girls team had a successful run with both teams beating personal records. “That was our rst time racing at the Bay Invitational, so it is always exciting to go somewhere new,” said Head Coach Dan Nennstiel. “I thought our team ran decently, but we still have a lot of work to do.” Of the boys team, Dawson Bishop nished the race in 22:28, beating his former record of 22:43. Ian Hutsell completed the race in 28:12, beating his former record of 55:55. Travis Wheeler nished in 29:33, setting a new record from 30:15. Jason Hamilton also beat his personal record by 27 seconds from 30:53 to 30:26. From the girls team, Summer Dee beat her personal record of 34:30 by nishing this race in 33 minutes. Overall, the boys team nished in 10thplace out of 16 teams, and the girls nished eighth out of 12 teams. While in Panama City, the teams enjoyed a team cookout and an evening of fun in the sun on the beach. “The kids really enjoyed it, it's not something that we get to do a lot,” Nennstiel said. The team will travel to Bainbridge, Ga. on Saturday for the Bainbridge Bearcat Invitational. ACA CROSS COUNTRY COMPETES IN BAY INVITATIONAL

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Jake Murphy is a 2ndgrader who attends Lee Elementary School in Madison County. He says he likes school because he gets to learn things and see his friends, but he does NOT think kids should have homework because he goes to school all day and then has things to do at home. Jake’s favorite academic subject is Science because he gets to use tools like binoculars and his favorite thing to do at recess is “playing with my friends.” When Jake is not in school, he likes to “relax, watch TV and go swimming.”My name is Megan Dickey, and I teach an elective class at Madison County Central School. This is my fifth year here. I would like to introduce those that are not familiar, to an exciting class that is available for your child here at Madison County Central School. The world around us is changing rapidly and we are responding and adapting to these changes. The way in which students learn best is also changing. For these reasons, we are pleased to offer a STEM class (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math). In STEM, students are exposed to a variety of real world concepts with a focus on technology. Students work in teams of two and develop knowledge and skills using multimedia and hands-on activities. Students will also learn if their interests and aptitudes are suited for a wide range of technology-based careers. The following are the units in the lab that students may encounter: CAD (Computer Aided Design) Electricity and Electronics Energy and Power  Environment and Ecology Flight Technology Health and Fitness Laser Technology Pneumatics R & D (Research and Development) Robotics Structural Engineering I am thrilled to have our students experience this STEM class and I look forward to their families seeing all of the fun and interesting permanent products they get to take home! As a teacher, when asked to write an article, of course I wanted to highlight my classroom. However, the first thing that popped in my mind was my students. It is my students that make this class. I find joy in teaching when I see them running down the hall to get to my classroom because they are ready to start their modules. Nevertheless, I’ll get on to them for running, but in the back of my mind I’m just thrilled that I have the opportunity to make learning fun for these students. Just like them, I am learning something new every day. As much as I would love to highlight every single student, I’ve picked two that have shown exemplary behavior and hard work so far this school year. Dawson Rutherford and Devandre Washington are currently in my fourth period class and are working together in the R&D module (Research and Development). They are learning how to identify and define specifications, tolerances, and their required use in vehicle design, as well as producing their own prototype of a CO2 racecar. In the picture you will see Devandre Washington using a Band Saw to carve his racecar and Dawson Rutherford using a Drill Press to drill his wheel holes. When I asked these young gentlemen what they looked forward to most about coming to fourth period, Dawson replied, “I can’t wait to race my CO2 race car and hopefully I can get into Flight Technology next and build a rocket.” Devandre’s response was, “I look forward to getting to work in the Structural Engineering module, as well as Energy and Power where I can work on the motor.” After hearing what these young gentlemen had to say, it gave me extra motivation, that not only do they love what they’re doing now, but they can’t wait to experience something else and something new. This is our future. This is what teaching and learning is all about my friends!8 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 19, 2014School The School Bell Photo SubmittedDevandre Washington uses a Band Saw to carve a racecar and Dawson Rutherford is using a Drill Press to drill wheel holes for his car in Megan Dickeys STEM class at the Central School.By Megan Dickey Madison County Central School – S.T.E.M. By Rose KleinStudent Of The Week Jake Murphy Every week, Greene Publishing, Inc. will spotlight a student from one of the Madison County Schools in a ‘Student of the Week’ column. If you are a parent or educator and would like to nominate a student for this feature, please email Rose@greenepublishing.com.‘The School Bell’ is a weekly column featuring educators in Madison County. Each week, Greene Publishing, Inc. will feature one teacher who can express their views and opinions, share lesson plans, a classroom activity, or any other educational subject of their choosing. If you are an educator or school administrator and would like to submit an article, please email Rose@greenepublishing.com. The Suwannee River Water Management District has tentatively adopted a budget for Fiscal Year 2014-2015 This notice is applicable to the following counties: All of: Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee, Taylor, Union Parts of: Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Jefferson, Levy, Putnam A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES will be held on Tuesday, September 23, 2014 at 5:05 p.m. at: Suwannee River Water Management District 9225 County Road 49 (corner of US 90 and CR 49) Live Oak, FLNOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING Photo SubmittedJake Murphy is the son of Madison County residents Bill and Ginny Murphy. HEY! WE’RE ON FACEBOOK!Check us out and become a fan of our page![ Greene Publishing, Inc. ]It’s never been easier to share your local news with friends and family!

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By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.The Regal Woman’s Club was started in 1975 and was the brainchild of Ms. Clifford (Beauty) Brown, who initiated the club in order to serve the Greenville community. She formed the club with the help of Lillie Mae Jones who was the mother of charter member Gertrude Miller. The club’s mission: to advance community potential on a grassroots level. Club efforts include activities such as: awarding an annual scholarship to a college-bound Greenville student; providing aid to families in distress, such as victims of re and families experiencing chronic illness; sponsoring recreational activities such as little league teams and supporting churches and other outside organizations in their efforts to improve the community. Other community service events these lovely ladies have organized are appreciation dinners for area seniors, serving breakfast in the park during Greenville’s Annual Veteran’s Day celebration, Christmas gifts to nursing home residents, Thanksgiving baskets to local families, Easter egg hunts coordinated with JoAnn Bridges Academy and providing assistance to the Boys’ Choir and the Boys and Girls Club of Greenville. This year the club has taken on a new venture, to adopt and assist Greenville Elementary, at the request of charter member Lucile Day, who is a retired educator. The club formed a School Advisory Committee made up of Chairperson Cheryl Clemons and Vice Chair Emily Dickey, who will be the liaisons between school and club, assisting in “whatever way new Principal Barbara Pettiford requests,” says Day. All of the Regal ladies are alumni from the Greenville school system, attending the school when it was known as Greenville Training School, educating students in 1st– 12thgrades. One of the rst items on the club’s todo-list for the school is to help purchase a new curtain for their stage. Club members say for the past few years, the school has resorted to using garbage bags pieced together to mimic a curtain. Other plans the ladies have for the school is to encourage community involvement, especially in the way of role models and mentors for students, emphasizing men are especially needed. Several of the members discussed the addition of a physical education curriculum and instructor, and while they acknowledge none of the other Madison County elementary schools have this either, it is still a worthy goal considering the epidemic of today’s childhood obesity. The women in this regal group understand that although it takes hard work to accomplish all their goals and commitments, there is also need for an occasional well-deserved break. Educational trips are planned with community members and organized by member and Business Manager Gwendolyn Johnson who says they have taken as many as two Greyhound busloads on their trips. Places these ladies have visited include: Washington, D.C., Canada, New York, The World’s Fair in Knoxville, Tenn., Henning, Tenn. (author Alex Haley’s Home and Museum), Williamsburg, Va. and their latest trip, The Holy Land in Orlando. These royal ladies are proud of their Greenville community and committed to their mission in advancing the town’s potential. They do occasionally have dinners and other fundraisers to help them in their efforts, but most of the funds used in their services to the town are from their own pockets. What they will tell you about their commitment is this: “We thank God for our longevity and for the opportunity to be of service.” For more information on The Regal Woman’s Club, contact President Vera Greenwood at (850) 948-4088 or email veranne@embarqmail.com.SchoolMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 9 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 19, 2014 Visit The Location Nearest YouM a d i s o n 424 W. Base St. G a i n e s v i l l e 6450 SW Archer Rd. G a i n e s v i l l e 4620 NW 39thAve. P e r r y 2000 S. Byron Butler Blvd. S t e i n h a t c h e e 913 1stAve. SE or online at www.csbdirect.comOpening Fall 2014 RegalWoman  sClubInGreenvilleGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, September 14, 2014The Regal Womans Club exists to serve members and organizations within the Greenville community. Members of the club, some wea ring their customized royal blue and white t-shirts, standing in the back row, from left to right, are: President Vera Greenwood, Business Manager Gw endolyn Johnson, LaKaye Evans, Vice President Emily Dickey, Joyce Simmons, Secretary Andrea Day, Geraldine Roberson, prospective member Mary Alice Turner and Treasurer Peggy Williams. Sitting in the front row are the three remaining charter members, from left to right: Cheryl Brown-Clemons, Dorothy Grif“n and Lucile Day. Members not listed are: Linda Novle, Deirdre Thomas and Hattie Evans.

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10 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 19, 2014Around The City Of Madison Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 25, 2014The empty lot, beside Wells Fargo, is a popular location for people to sell their stuff.Ž Robert Easthom is retired but makes a living buying out old storage units, abandoned by their owners. Easthom says he washes and reconditions all his items before putting them out to sell and does pretty well, but admits his sales depend on the day.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 25, 2014Bobby Pafford sells plants off Hwy 90 once a month, and says his business is a hobby that went out of control. Pafford says hes been going to the sale lot for about three months and does enough sales to pay for his gas and keep him happy.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 25, 2014A small park located beside the Madison County Sheriffs Of“ce and maintained by the department, is made up of a handful of picnic tables and a boat ramp, shown here. The area is open to the public and is a convenient place for Madisonians to take a shady lunch break.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 25, 2014The Fast Track, off of South State Road 53, has one of the nicest clerks you will meet. Cassandra Rains child-like voice, sweet smile and friendly disposition will have you smiling when you leave.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 25, 2014The Consolidated Christian Ministries Food Pantry workers serve the Madison community, not only with food, but their dedication and caring.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 25, 2014Quita Evans, on the left, has been a cashier at Freds for three years, but Tabatha McDowell, right, has (happily) been at the store since only Aug. 9 as the new store manager.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 25, 2014The Madison Public Library offers books, movies, magazines, newspapers, computers, wi-“ and eBooks. They also offer programs for preschool and elementary aged kids on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Two of the four librarians that work at the library were on hand, all smiles, for a picture. On the left is April Brooks and Nanette Entriken is on her right.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, August 25, 2014Madison County High School dual enrollment allows students to attend high school while earning college credits toward a future degree. MCHS students Courtney Strickland, left, and Zack Sprenkle, center, are both dual enrolled at North Florida Comm. Coll. while attending Mad. Co. High School. Corey Borgert, far right, also attends NFCC to receive his general education credits out of the way before possibly attending FSU.Ž

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HealthMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 11 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 19, 2014 NOTICE OF PROPOSED TAX INCREASE The Madison County Board of County Commissioners has tentatively adopted a measure to increase its property tax levy. Last years property tax levy: A. Initially proposed tax levyƒ$6,248,489 B. Plus tax additions due to assessment changesƒƒ..$ 15,266 C.Actual property tax levy...... $6,263,755 This years property tax levyƒ.$6,331,665 All concerned citizens are invited to attend a public hearing on the tax increase to be held on: Monday, September 22, 2014 at 5:30 p.m. in the Commissioners Meeting Room #107 Courthouse Annex, 229 SW Pinckney Street Madison, Florida A FINAL DECISION on the proposed tax increase and the budget will be made at this hearing. Drunk Prowler Only Steals Couple's CandyPolice say a central Pennsylvania couple saw a man urinating with his pants down around his ankles moments before he broke into their home and grabbed a handful of Chick-O-Sticks from their candy bowl. Online court records don't list an attorney for 29-year-old Earl Munoz who remained jailed Tuesday. What Is Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)?Story SubmittedAmyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), sometimes called Lou Gehrig's disease or classical motor neuron disease, is a rapidly progressive, invariably fatal neurological disease that attacks the nerve cells (neurons) responsible for controlling voluntary muscles. In ALS, both the upper motor neurons and the lower motor neurons degenerate or die, ceasing to send messages to muscles. Unable to function, the muscles gradually weaken, waste away, and twitch. Eventually the ability of the brain to start and control voluntary movement is lost. Symptoms are usually rst noticed in the arms and hands, legs or swallowing muscles. Muscle weakness and atrophy occur on both sides of the body. Individuals with ALS lose their strength and the ability to move their arms and legs, and to hold the body upright. When muscles in the diaphragm and chest wall fail to function properly, individuals lose the ability to breathe without ventilatory support. The disease does not affect a person's ability to see, smell, taste, hear or recognize touch. Although the disease does not usually impair a person's mind or personality, several recent studies suggest that some people with ALS may develop cognitive problems involving word uency, decision-making and memory. The cause of ALS is not known, and scientists do not yet know why ALS strikes some people and not others. Is there any treatment?No cure has yet been found for ALS. However, the drug riluzole--the only prescribed drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat ALS--prolongs life by two to three months but does not relieve symptoms. Other treatments are designed to relieve symptoms and improve the quality of life for people with ALS. Drugs are available to help individuals with spasticity, pain, panic attacks and depression. Physical therapy, occupational therapy and rehabilitation may help to prevent joint immobility and slow muscle weakness and atrophy. Individuals with ALS may eventually consider forms of mechanical ventilation (respirators). What is the prognosis?Regardless of the part of the body rst affected by the disease, muscle weakness and atrophy spread to other parts of the body as the disease progresses. Individuals have increasing problems with moving, swallowing, and speaking or forming words. Eventually people with ALS will not be able to stand or walk, get in or out of bed on their own, or use their hands and arms. In later stages of the disease, individuals have difculty breathing as the muscles of the respiratory system weaken. Although ventilation support can ease problems with breathing and prolong survival, it does not affect the progression of ALS. Most people with ALS die from respiratory failure, usually within three to ve years from the onset of symptoms. However, about 10 percent of those individuals with ALS survive for 10 or more years. What research is being done?The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) conducts research in its laboratories at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and also supports additional research through grants to major medical institutions across the country. The goals of this research are to nd the cause or causes of ALS, understand the mechanisms involved in the progression of the disease and develop effective treatments. National ALS Registry Both the NINDS and the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are committed to studies of disease patterns or risk factors among persons with ALS in order to better understand the causes of ALS, the mechanisms involved in the progression of the disease and to develop effective treatments. In keeping with this goal, the CDC has launched the National ALS Registry, a program to collect, manage and analyze data about persons with ALS. The Registry includes data from national databases as well as de-identied information provided by persons with ALS. Persons living with ALS who choose to participate can add their information to the Registry by going to the website at www.cdc.gov/als. You may also contact the Florida Department of Health in Madison at (850) 973-5000 or in Jefferson at (850) 342-0170 for more information.

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Farm/Outdoors12 €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 19, 2014Story SubmittedProducers who have suffered eligible disaster-related losses are encouraged to act to secure assistance by Sept. 30, 2014, as congressionally mandated payment reductions will take place for producers who have not acted before that date. Livestock producers that have experienced grazing losses since October 2011 and may be eligible for benefits but have not yet contacted their local Farm Service Agency (FSA) office should do so as soon as possible. The Budget Control Act passed by Congress in 2011 requires USDA to implement reductions of 7.3 percent to the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP) in the new fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1, 2014. However, producers seeking LFP support who have scheduled appointments with their local FSA office before Oct. 1, even if the appointment occurs after Oct. 1, will not see reductions in the amount of disaster relief they receive. USDA is encouraging producers to register, request an appointment or begin a Livestock Forage Disaster Program application with their county FSA office before Oct. 1, 2014, to lock in the current zero percent sequestration rate. As an additional aid to qualified producers applying for LFP, the Farm Service's Agency has developed an online registration that enables farmers and ranchers to put their names on an electronic list before the deadline to avoid reductions in their disaster assistance. This is an alternative to visiting or contacting the county office. To place a name on the Livestock Forage Disaster Program list online, visit http://www.fsa.usda.g o-v/disaster-register Producers who already contacted the county office and have an appointment scheduled need do nothing more. The Livestock Indemnity Program, the Tree Assistance Program and the Noninsured Disaster Assistance Program Frost Freeze payments will also be cut by 7.3 percent on Oct. 1, 2014. Unlike the Livestock Forage Disaster Program, applications for these programs must be fully completed by Sept. 30. FSA offices will prioritize these applications, but as the full application process can take several days or more to complete, producers are encouraged to begin the application process as soon as possible. The Livestock Forage Disaster Program compensates eligible livestock producers who suffered grazing losses due to drought or fire between Oct. 1, 2011 and Dec. 31, 2014. Eligible livestock includes alpacas, beef cattle, buffalo, beefalo, dairy cattle, deer, elk, emus, equine, goats, llamas, poultry, reindeer, sheep or swine that have been or would have been grazing the eligible grazing land or pastureland. Producers forced to liquidate their livestock may also be eligible for program benefits. Additionally, the 2014 Farm Bill eliminated the risk management purchase requirement. Livestock producers are no longer required to purchase coverage under the federal crop insurance program or Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program to be eligible for Livestock Forage Disaster Program assistance. To learn more about USDA disaster relief program, producers can review the 2014 Farm Bill fact sheet at www.fsa.usda.gov/farmbill the LFP program fact sheet, http://go.usa.gov/5JTk or contact their local FSA office.USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 202509410 or call (866) 6329992 (Toll-free Customer Service), (800) 877-8339 (Local or Federal relay), (866) 377-8642 (Relay voice users). Youve worked hard your whole life anticipating the day you could finally retire. Well, that day has arrived! But with it comes the realization that youll need to carefully manage your assets so that your retirement savings will last. Review your portfolio regularly Traditional wisdom holds that retirees should value the safety of their principal above all else. For this reason, some people shift their investment portfolio to fixed-income investments, such as bonds and money market accounts, as they approach retirement. The problem with this approach is that youll effectively lose purchasing power if the return on your investments doesnt keep up with inflation. Spend wisely Dont assume that youll be able to live on the earnings generated by your investment portfolio and retirement accounts for the rest of your life. At some point, youll probably have to start drawing on the principal. But youll want to be careful not to spend too much too soon. This can be a great temptation, particularly early in retirement. A good guideline is to make sure your annual withdrawal rate isnt greater than 4% to 6% of your portfolio. Remember that if you whittle away your principal too quickly, you may not be able to earn enough on the remaining principal to carry you through the later years. Plan for required distributions Keep in mind that you must generally begin taking minimum distributions from employer retirement plans and traditional IRAs when you reach age 70, whether you need them or not. Plan to spend these dollars first in retirement. If you own a Roth IRA, you arent required to take any distributions during your lifetime. Your funds can continue to grow tax deferred, and qualified distributions will be tax free. Because of these unique tax benefits, it generally makes sense to withdraw funds from a Roth IRA last. Know your Social Security options Youll need to decide when to start receiving your Social Security retirement benefits. At normal retirement age (which varies from 66 to 67, depending on the year you were born), you can receive your full Social Security retirement benefit. You can elect to receive your Social Security retirement benefit as early as age 62, but if you begin receiving your benefit before your normal retirement age, your benefit will be reduced. Conversely, if you delay retirement, you can increase your Social Security retirement benefit. By planning carefully, investing wisely, and spending thoughtfully, you can increase the likelihood that your retirement will be a financially comfortable one. Stacy Bush, President Bush Wealth Management The Bush Wealth Advantage Reaching Retirement: Now What? Our column, The Bush Wealth AdvantageŽ is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. Stacy Bush has practiced independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.com Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provid e specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 886056 www.peacockslandscaping.com€ (850) 464-1484 € € Madison, Fl. 32340 € € sailpeacock@gmail.com € IrrigationLandscaping Halls Tire & Muffler Center(850) 973-3026Owner Daryl & Lee Anne Hall1064 E. US 90 € Madison, FlBeside Clover Farm ROOFING SPECIALIST State Certified Building Contractor & Roofing Contractor License # CBC 1251818 / CCC 1328133 www.ewingconstructionandroofing.com Serving Madison & Surrounding CountiesLee (850) 971-5043€ Commercial / Residential € All Roof Types € Fully Insured € Proven Track Record € Free EstimatesQUALITY GUARANTEE! DAYS TREE SERVICE THETREESPECIALISTFree Estimates € Tree Trimming € Debris Clean Up Aerial Device € Tree Removal € Bush Hogging Stump GrindingCall Gene Day (850) 948-4757Cell: (850) 464-03866425 NW Lovett Rd. € Greenville, Fl 32331 B u s i n e s s C a r d D i r e c t o r y Daryl Hall Livestock Producers Urged To Enroll In Disaster Assistance Program Before October 1st Cost Share Helps Farmers, Ranchers Conserve Natural ResourcesApplication Deadline For Environmental Quality Incentive Program Nov. 21stStory SubmittedFlorida farmers and ranchers can apply until Nov. 21 for nancial assistance in scal year 2015 through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) to improve soil, water, air, plants, animals and related resources. Through EQIP, the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) develops contracts with agricultural producers to help plan and implement conservation practices that address natural resource concerns. Eligible land includes cropland, rangeland, pastureland, private non-industrial forestland and other farm or ranch lands. The application process for conservation programs is continuous, but funding selections are typically made once a year. Begin by visiting your local NRCS eld ofce and requesting help developing a conservation plan. Our experts provide this free service to help you use your natural resources more efciently. To learn about technical and nancial assistance available from NRCS, go towww.nrcs.usda.gov/getstarted Madison Farmer Richard Terry Re-elected To Farm Credit Of Northwest Florida BoardStory SubmittedMadison farmer Richard Terry has been re-elected to the Farm Credit of Northwest Florida Board of Directors by the organization’s membership. Mr. Terry is a member of the organization as well, and will represent the interests of farmers and Farm Credit customers in Region 3 (Eastern Region), which covers Gadsden, Leon, Jefferson, Wakulla, Franklin, Madison and Taylor Counties. Nine of twelve directors are Farm Credit of Northwest Florida members elected by fellow members, which reects the organization’s cooperative, customer-owned philosophy. Mr. Terry has been a member of the Farm Credit of Northwest Florida Board since 1992. He has served as Chairman of the Board and as the District Advisory Committee for AgFirst Farm Credit Bank. Mr. Terry has been a self-employed farmer for more than 50 years, and he further serves the agricultural community in positions such as board member of the Madison County Farm Bureau, the Madison County Tobacco Warehouse Association and the Farmers Cooperative of Live Oak, Fl.A bo ut F a rm Cr ed i t of Nor th w est F l ori daFarm Credit of Northwest Florida is a member-owned nancial cooperative, headquartered in Marianna, Fl., that serves 18 counties throughout the Florida panhandle. Farm Credit offers highly competitive credit to meet the nancing needs of farmers, agribusinesses, rural landowners and homeowners. For more information about the types of nancing available, or how cooperative lenders share their prots with borrowers, please visit www.farmcredit-.com.

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1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assis tance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c MOBILE HOME FOR SALE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED HELP WANTED .greenepublishing.com SERVICES WANTED Classifieds . LEGALS Friday, September 19, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 13 Check us out on-line www.greenepublishing.com All Legals are posted on line at www.greenepublishing.comAll local legals are also published at www.floridapublicno tices.com Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBecome A Certified Nursing Assistant Quest Training offers a nurse taught CNA prep class. No GED required if age 18. Professional training site, high pass rates. Now accepting students. 386-362-1065.9/3 9/24, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12x18 building with 6 porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141. Pressure?Washing I can pressure wash your house, business, sidewalks and drive-ways. Call (850) 843-4405.7/23 rtn, n/c Asphalt Milling, 18 tons, $350 load. Call Paul Kinsley at (850) 464-1230.8/27 rtn, n/cImmediate Opening At Madison Heights Apartments 3 Bedroom Unit Applications are available at 150 SW Bumgardener Drive., Monday through Friday 8 a.m. 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. 4 p.m.8/13 rtn, cApartment For Rent 2 BD 1 BA With Large Garage. Located in Lee. $400 per month. (850) 971-5587.8/20 rtn, c Full Circle Dairy is seeking an Office Support Manager to coordi nate and help man age the office functions. This position requires a dynamic, personable, professional individual with strong organizational skills who will facilitate the smooth functioning of the of“ce and work well with others. Speci“c responsibilities include but are not limited to € Be the of“ce point of contact € Manage and organize employee “les € Order parts and supplies € Organize and maintain general business “les € Provide support to managers € Maintain detailed spreadsheets € Document shipping and receiving MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS € Must be a team player “rst and foremost € Three or more years of experience in a similar capacity with one employer € Ability to work with minimal supervision € Strong computer skills with pro“ciency in MS Of“ce (Outlook, Word, and Excel). Candidate should also have € Professional verbal and written communication skills, including phone skills € Ability to effectively organize administrative work processes and tasks for multiple Senior Managers (e.g. GM, Bookkeeper, Farm Manager, etc.) € Willingness to pitch in to help with other than assigned standard tasks, someone whom takes initiative Compensation and Benefits € $13 $17+ per hour depending on quali“cations € Health insurance € Paid vacation Please email resumes and inquires to:jobs@fcdlee.com.8/20 rtn, cSago Palms $100 (850) 661-6868.9/3 rtn, n/c Wanted to hire someone to establish network at small of“ce. Call 850-973-99808/6, rtn, n/cTwo miles south of I-10 and CR 255. Three bedrooms, two full baths. Walk-in closet in master bedroom. Spacious two car garage. Long front porch and deck on back of house. Beautiful landscaped yard. Call (850) 228-8380 to see house.9/5, 9/10, 9/17, pd FULL TIME LINEMAN POSITION Tri-County Electric Cooperative has an opening for a full-time Lineman position in our Madison Of“ce. The candidate is required to have a minimum of six years experience in power line construction and maintenance. The candidate must also have a Class A, Commercial Drivers License and live no more than 30 miles from the Madison warehouse location at 2862 West US 90. The Cooperative offers competitive salary and bene“ts. Tri-County is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and Drug Free Work Place (DFWP). Please send resume and completed Tri-County Employment Application Form, which is available at any TCEC of“ce or online at www.tcec.com, before September 26, 2014 to: Stephanie Carroll Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. 2862 West US 90 Madison, FL 32340.9/10, 9/17, cTown of Greenville Public Works Laborer The Town of Greenville (pop 837) is seeking to “ll the position of Laborer in the Public Works Department. A strong work ethic is essential. Work is performed under the direction of the Public Works Supervisor. Primary duties include unskilled work in the performance of manual labor tasks and related activities. Duties may also include operation of light Public Works vehicles and equipment. The individual must possess a high school diploma or equivalency. Must pass full background check and drug testing. Must have a valid Florida drivers license and acceptable driving record. Starting salary of $8.50 per hour. Health and dental insurance, vacation and sick leave bene“ts available. Apply at CareerSource North Florida of“ce located in Madison or Live Oak. Applicants in outlying Counties may apply in the mobile unit. Call 866-367-4758 for mobile unit schedule. Position open until 12 Noon, September 30, 2014. Town of Greenville, 154 SW Old Mission Avenue, P. O. Box 235, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Employment Opportunity/Af“rmative Action Employer.9/12, 9/17, c Administrative As sistant position available. Position responsibilities include working under the supervision of the Executive Director, the full time Administrative Assistant oversees and manages all of“ce procedures and other tasks as assigned by the Executive Director. Please apply in person at the Senior Citizens Center 1161 SW Harvey Greene Dr. Madison Florida. No phone calls please. 9/17, 9/24Mechanic to work on Semi Trucks at Capital City Travel Center in Lloyd. Must have prior experience in changing tires, alternators, batteries, & etc. E-mail resume tocapcitytravel@gmail.co m or call 850-210-7000. 9/12-9/24, c Senior Citizens Council of Madison has a position available for a Fiscal Officer. Quali“cations: A Bachelors Degree or 2 to 8 years experience in Accounting and/or Bookkeeping. Please apply in person with a resume or application to Human Resources at Senior Citizens Center 1161 SW Harvey Greene Drive, Madison, FL. Applications may be picked up at the Senior Citizens Center. No phone calls please. 9/17, 9/24, cDrivers, CDL-A Home EVERY Weekend! ALL Loaded/Empty Miles Paid! Dedicated Southeast! Or Walk Away Lease, No Money Down. 1-855-971-8524.9/17, pd Drivers: CDL-A. Average $52,000 per yr. plus. Excellent Home Time + Weekends. Monthly Bonuses up to $650. 5,000w APU's for YOUR Comfort + E-Logs. Excellent Bene“ts. 100% no touch. 877-704-3773.9/17, 9/24, pd Vinyl Fabrication Operator Needed Must be able to read a tape measure to 1/4th inch. This job requires heavy lifting, reading sketches, and working with machines. There is only one (1) position available, we will only accept the “rst “ve (5) quali“ed applications. Starting Thursday, 9/18/14 at 8 a.m. Must apply in person at Big Top Mfg. 3255 North US 19 Perry, FL EEO/AA/m/f/vets/disabled.9/17, cSteel Fab Operator Needed Must have high school diploma or equivalent, be able to read a tape measure to 1/16th, should be pro“cient in math, and have no previous employment with Big Top Mfg. There is only one (1) position available, we will only accept the “rst ten (10) quali“ed applications. Starting Thursday, 9/18/14 at 8 a.m. Must apply in person at Big Top Mfg. 3255 North US 19 Perry, FL. EEO/AA/m/f/vets/disabled.9/17, c Riverfront Getaway $14,5003 acre Hobby Farm $9000Riverfront Campsite $16,900834 acres, RV park for 4, merchantable timber, hunting2 acre Home site on Bike Trail, septic tank $12,000125 acres, two dwellings, hunting, fishing pond Per FS713.585(6), Elsie Title Services of SW FL, LLC w/POA will sell listed units to highest bidder free of any liens; Net deposited with clerk of court per 713.585; owner/lienholders right to a hearing per FS713.585(6); to post bond per FS559.917; owner may redeem for cash sum of lien; held w/reserve; inspect 1 wk prior @ lienor facility; cash or cashier's check; 25% buyers prem. Sale @ MARVIN EDWARDS Repair Services 3233 SW State Road 14 Madison FL 323404443 MV-Applied 850 566-3422 10/13/2014 @ 9:00am Storage @ $21.20 per day inc tax MARVED M1 lien amt $1,536.30 2000 NISS MAXIMA 4D WHI JN1CA31DXYT505974.9/19 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2014-76-CP IN RE:ESTATE OF MARY ELIZABETH HICKS a/k/a ELIZABETH T. HICKS Deceased. ______________________________________ NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of MARY ELIZABETH HICKS, d eceased, whose date of death was August 3, 2014; is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division; File Number 2014-76-CP; the names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against the Decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the Decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIMS FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS September 19, 2014. Attorney for Personal Representative:Personal Representative: /s/ Clay A. Schnitker/s/ Penny Hicks Worden CLAY A. SCHNITKERPENNY HICKS WORDEN Fla Bar No.349143258 NW Pickle Lane Davis, Schnitker, Reeves & Browning, P.A.Madison, Florida 32340 Post Office Drawer 652 Madison, Florida 32341 (850) 973-4186 Email: cschnitker@earthlink.net September 19, 2014 and September 26, 2014 9/19, 9/26 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2014-76-CP IN RE:ESTATE OF MARY ELIZABETH HICKS a/k/a ELIZABETH T. HICKS Deceased. ______________________________________ NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of MARY ELIZABETH HICKS, d eceased, whose date of death was August 3, 2014; is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division; File Number 2014-76-CP; the names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against the Decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the Decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIMS FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS September 19, 2014. Attorney for Personal Representative:Personal Representative: /s/ Clay A. Schnitker/s/ Penny Hicks Worden CLAY A. SCHNITKERPENNY HICKS WORDEN Fla Bar No.349143258 NW Pickle Lane Davis, Schnitker, Reeves & Browning, P.A.Madison, Florida 32340 Post Office Drawer 652 Madison, Florida 32341 (850) 973-4186 Email: cschnitker@earthlink.net September 19, 2014 and September 26, 2014 9/19, 9/26 City of Madison Seeks Maintenance Laborer The City of Madison, Fl seeks a maintenance laborer for its Public Works Department. The successful applicant must have a CDL license or acquire one within six months of hire date. Pre-employment background check, drug test and physical are required. Job applications are available at Madison City Hall, 321 SW Rutledge St., Madison, Fl 32340. Completed applications are to be turned in to Paula Jarvis at the above address. Deadline to apply is Oct. 3, 2014. For more information, phone Ms. Jarvis at (850) 973-5081.9/19, 9/24, c MADISON COUNTY SOLID WASTE AND RECYCLING DEPARTMENT The Solid Waste and Recycling Department is accepting applications for the employment of two (2) part-time collections site attendant to perform duties as a ”oater (minimum of 18 hours weekly). Applicants may secure and complete their applications at the of“ce Career Force at 705 East Base Street, Madison, FL. A copy of the job description may be reviewed at the same of“ce. Applicants must submit the application no later than close of business on October 1, 2014. Applicants must meet the following criteria in order to pass the initial paper screen: € Reside in Madison County € Possess a high school diploma or a GED equivalent € Be at least 21 years old € Possess a valid Florida drivers license € Have reliable transportation € Have a personal telephone /contact capability € Pass a favorable local background check € Capable of lifting at least, but no more than 50 pounds € Pass a favorable pre-employment physical and drug screening test € Have no previous physical injuries that would inhibit work performance € Be available to work weekends and holidays The Madison County Solid Waste and Recycling Department is an Equal Opportunity Employer that performs duties in a drug free work place. For further information, feel free to call the of“ce of Solid Waste and Recycling, Monday … Thursday (6:30 … 5:00 PM), except holidays, at 9732611.9/19, 9/24, c

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14 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 19, 2014 885409