The Madison enterprise-recorder

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Material Information

Title:
The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title:
Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title:
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Creation Date:
May 31, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note:
Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID:
UF00028405:00654

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Preceded by:
Enterprise-recorder


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A 0 n E I A D % A D K 1 D 3 b ) < A B ; A G ) , A ) A < < A B A I ; 3 A A 0 ( ) < < ) 0 A ( ; < A 0 < ) < B A 0 B A ; B ; I 0 A B A 2 ; B ( B A 0 A 0 ; ; ( B ) 0 < A B B B 0 ; I A ; A A B A ) ; B 0 ; 0 A B A 0 ; ) A b ) & G I A B ; 0 A ) ) B ) 0 A B 0 A B A 1 $ A ; < A B B A ; 2 2 0 ) B A I A B A & 0 F ; 0 ; 3 A A ) B A B A A 0 A B A B ; A ; ( ) & A ) A 0 E A < A I B A B 0 A ( ) A ) A A G 0 E A ) + A B 0 A ; ( 2 2 0 ) B A B 0 A B A 0 ) < < ) 0 3 A 6 t B 9 < A A ) B B A ; A 0 E B A B 0 A + A B B 0 ) B B 7 A < ) A ) A 0 E 3 A 0 ) < < ) 0 A B < A 4 E ; ( B ; I A A ) A 0 E A H 2 ) < B B A B ; A ) < A A 0 B A 0 A 2 ; 2 ; B ) 0 B B A & 0 < A ) B 0 A & B B ) & A ; I A 0 ; A B ) & 3 A A 0 ) < < ) 0 A G ) , A < A B E A ; ) F A B B A 0 B ) < A , A 0 f & t $ ) # n n f n t b r r b b r f n f b t b r f b f r t t r f b r b r b f n b t r f b I A ; I B A ) & 2 r r r t n A f ) < 0 0 E B I A 0 ; A 0 0 E B I A 0 ) < ( < ) 0 ; < A F 0 B A C ( D A B A B ) ; A ; & E ; A ) ( 0 B I A B ) & < I A B 0 A I A B A 2 B ) ( B ) 0 A 0 A B A f ) < 0 A 0 : < E A B 0 A 2 A A < B B E B A 0 n < A f ) < 0 A B A B A B ; 0 A B A f ) < 0 A 0 E B I 0 E ; B 0 E < 3 A A 2 ; 0 2 0 < < B B E A G 0 E A F A ) E A ; 2 ) A 0 A B A 1 K A 0 ( B < 3 A 0 ) < < ) 0 ; < A I H ; A I A ) + ; < A 0 . ) A f 0 0 ; A F 0 B & ) < B 3 A f A E & 3 A D K A D K 1 % A f ) ( < 0 A 0 : < A E A ; < ) B B A ; 0 0 B A < E ) B B A B B ; A B 0 A B A 0 ) < < ) 0 ; < A 0 A 0 A B A E A < + ) & A 0 ; A B ) < 0 E B A B 0 A A 2 A ) A B A B ; 0 A B A 0 E ; B 0 E < 3 6 A f ) < 0 A 0 : < A E G 0 E A ) + A B 0 A 0 B A A < B B E B A B 0 0 0 ; A B A < + A 0 A 0 E ; A 0 E B I 3 A G 0 E A ) + A 0 ; A B ) < A < B B E B A B 0 A 2 A ) A B A B ; A 0 A B A 0 E ; B ( 0 E < 7 A ; 0 0 B A G ; 0 B 3 ; 0 0 B A < ) A B A < B B E B A G 0 E ) E A A 0 J A < ) H ( 0 0 B A E < B A 0 n < A f ) < 0 3 A A < A G ) , A ; A 0 E < A ) ) + ) & A B 0 E < A 0 A B A 0 E ; B 0 E < 3 A t < ) B A 0 E < A 0 A A 0 A B A 0 E ; A < ) < G ) , A A A ) < B 0 ; ) A 0 E B A H 2 B 0 ; A B A ) 0 & ; 2 I A 0 A f ) < 0 3 A 0 E B < A G ) , A A < B A ) A ; 0 J 3 A 6 A 0 : < A E A < A F 0 B A B ; ) A B B A B A 0 < B A 2 2 ; 0 ( 2 ; ) B A ) < B 0 ; ) A 0 E B < A 0 ; A B ) < 0 E B A G ) , A A B A ; B ) 0 0 A t 2 . = A B A ) , A 0 A ) & B < = A B A 1 K A 0 . B < 7 A ; ( 0 0 B A < ) 3 A A ) < E < < ) 0 A B A B A 0 ) < ( < ) 0 A B ) & A G < A B A ) E < ) 0 A 0 A B 1 K A 0 . B < A 0 A B A < B B E B 3 b 0 G F ; A B A E A < ) A B A 0 ( B < A ; 2 ; < B A B A 0 ; B ) 0 A 0 B ) < A B ) 0 : < A G < 3 A 6 A A 0 . B < A G < 0 < A E < A ) B A < A ) E A B 0 ; B ) 0 A 0 A < B ; A & A B 0 E & B A B A G < A 0 A 0 E ; A B ) 0 3 A A ) E ( A 0 A B ) < A 0 E B A A A < A ) ; ) A G < A ) E ) & A E B A 0 B ) ) B A B 0 A G < A 0 A E ; ; A B B E B ; I A 2 ; 0 2 ; B I A 2 ; 0 ) B I A 0 B < 3 A A ) B A 0 . B A ) < E < A ) I A ) A 0 E ; A 0 E ; B < A G A 2 ; 0 F ) ( ) & A B < B ) 0 I 7 A ; 0 0 B A < B B A ) A B B B ; 3 A B B ; A E ; B ; A < B B A B < B B E B A A B A 0 < B A 0 A ) < B , B ) 0 G 0 E A A 2 ; 0 F ) A I A B A E A G 0 E A A ; 0 F A B A 0 A 0 < B A < 0 E , & A ) < < E < A ; ) < 3 A 6 t A B A F B A A ) B ) J A 0 A B 0 E B I A 2 ; 0 F ) < A A & A 0 B ) 0 A B 0 B A < B B E B A A B A < B B E B A ) < A E G E A B A < B B E A G ) , A A ; 0 F I A B A 0 : < A E A B A 0 A 0 < B A B 0 A B ) B ) J < A 0 A f ) < 0 7 A ; 0 0 B A G ; 0 B 3 6 A f ) < 0 A 0 : < A E A G ) , < 0 A 2 ; 0 F ) A A B B ; A 0 A ; ) B A ) A B 0 E B A 0 A 1 $ K K K A ; 0 A B A f ) < 0 0 E B I A 0 E ) B I A + A G ) A G ) , A < ) & B A 0 ; A I A & A H 2 < B A B B E B A ) & B A ; B A 0 ; A B A ) B ) ( J < A 0 A f ) < 0 3 7 A ; 0 0 B A 0 B ) E A 6 t B A ) < A < A B B G A F A B 0 A 2 ; 0 F ) A A < A E A 0 ; A & ) B A < ) & A B 0 A E B A 0 E ; A ) B ) J < 0 E B A 0 E ; A G 0 ; E A ) < B 0 ; I 3 A E B A G < A A ) F ) A 0 ; & ) J B ) 0 A A < A B 0 E & ) B A ) < A G 0 ; B A B ) < A E ; A B 0 A 0 E ; A E A B 0 2 ; 0 F ) A B ) < A < B B E B A 0 ; A B A E ; ; B A E B E ; A ) B ) J < A 0 A f ) < 0 3 7 b r r r b n t b n 0 A ; < ) B A n + ) A n 0 < 0 2 2 ; 0 A B A 0 ) < < ) 0 A ; & ; ( ) & A B A B B ; A 0 A A 0 A B A f ) ( < 0 A 0 : < A E 3 A 0 ) < < ) 0 ; < A < B A B ; A ) A < ) 0 ; A A G A ) E B < A 0 0 + ) & A 0 F ; A B 2 ; 0 2 0 < A 0 ; A ) < E < < ) 0 < A & 3 6 B A & A < ) A B A < B B ) A G A B 5 7 A F ) < A < + A n 0 < 0 3 A ) < E < < ) 0 A B A 0 F A ) B 0 B A 2 0 < < ) ) ) B I A 0 A A G < E ) B A I A B ) ( ; ( ) & ) 0 E < A & ; 0 E 2 < A < 0 E A B A 0 ) < ( < ) 0 A F 0 B A B 0 A 2 A B A 0 E B A 0 B A 0 E ; B 0 E < A G 3 A 0 E B I A B B 0 ; I A 0 I A F < ) 0 ; A B A 0 ; A ) A < 0 0 A ) r t b r t t f $ # t $ ) # ( b $ & $ t $ ) # ( t $ " ' $ # & & $ + # & + # ( % & $ % $ ' ( ( ) $ ' $ # ( $ % # ( # ( & $ ( $ # t $ ) # ( t $ ) & ( $ ) ( ) & & $ ( ( $ & ( & ) ( # r & # & # t ! # & # $ # # + ( $ ( $ # # ( % ( ( $ # n n n n

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Common Core is being rebuked in Georgia! Yes, in a contest for Georgia School Superintendent, the Republican nominee, Richard L. Woods, opposes “Common Core.” Mr. Woods is a longtime educator in Irwin County, and has come out strongly for traditional education. He has, according to the Atlanta Constitution, of July 18, 2014, “opposed just about every major education initiative or change that has taken place in Georgia over the past several years.” He opposes Common Core, the federal intrusion into state control of government education. He opposed Georgia’s acceptance of a $400 million federal grant through the federal Race to the Top education program. He also opposes the state’s new system for grading schools and districts. He opposes the state’s new standardized test. And he opposes the state’s new teacher and principal evaluation system. In short, the nominee believes in local control. That the federal “group think” changes taking place in education in Georgia y in the face of state and federal Constitutional principles. Tanya Ditty, state director of Concerned Women for America, recognized his knowledge of constitutional principles as the reason she supports Woods. “What has drawn me to Richard is his understanding of the Constitution, not only the U. S. Constitution but the Georgia Constitution with the understanding that it is Georgians who should control education in Georgia,” Ditty said. Woods has extensive experience in public education, in Irwin County, just south of Atlanta. Richard has stated that education gains have been made despite work at the Georgia Department of Education. “The truth is,” Woods says, “that many of the recent successes we have seen in education fall solely on the quality of our communities and our teachers. They have managed to make the best of a difcult situation and have done so without the support they need from the GaDOE’s leadership, who sometimes seems more interested in pursuing political ambition than meaningful reform.” Mr. Woods will meet his Democratic opponent in this November’s election.Common Core Support FallsPublic support for Common Core is waning, according to an annual poll about government schools by Gallup and PDK International, a group for education professionals. While awareness of the widely embraced national “standards” has grown substantially since last year’s survey, 60 percent of poll respondents say they oppose requiring teachers to instruct using the standards. William Bushaw, chief executive of PDK International, was “surprised by the level of opposition.” The more the citizens learned of the program, the more they opposed it. The Wall Street Journal of Aug. 20, 2014, reported another survey, by the academic journal, Education Next nding declining support for the “Common Core.” While 53 percent of respondents approved of the standards, it was down from 65 percent in 2013. It will be interesting to see how Georgia votes on the “Common Core.” So far, the Legislatures of Indiana, Oklahoma, Wyoming, Missouri and South Carolina, have said no. The question is-in a referendum, such as an actual vote for State Superintendent, will the people vote their principles? Stay tuned! Iam sure most of you have at least heard of that. Three books / movies. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played with Fire, and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest, and of course the movies that have come after them. Whether or not you have read the books or seen the movies is not my point. I personally enjoyed them thoroughly, and recommend them highly for anyone that enjoys that genre of books or movies. But this again is not my point. This series of books was written by Stieg Larsson, a Swedish author. They became an almost overnight success in Sweden, then the rest of Europe, and then America. The movies from them are huge box ofce draws in Europe, and now being made in the US, the rst of which received massive approval. What a lot of people don’t know is that all of the books were published after Larsson’s death. True statement, all three books were published AFTER he died. In 2004 Larsson, a writer for a Swedish magazine, was climbing the stairs at his work due to out of service elevators when he suffered a massive heart attack and died. He was only 50 years old. The three novels were found later and published posthumously. He never saw his dream realized. All three books, in various countries and languages, two versions of movies, English and Swedish, all the awards, Stieg Larsson never lived to see any of it. Why were the books not published? No one really knows. Maybe he didn’t have the condence to publish, or maybe he intended to do it but just never got around to it because he thought he had plenty of time. On the other hand people like Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Ann Rice, J. K. Rowling, -they decided they wanted to write, worked hard and carried it to their success. Some people choose their path early, and strive for it and succeed. Others learn that perhaps they are better suited at other walks of life and see their failures in one eld as a detour sign to another. Unfortunately still others never get the chance to follow any of that through to fruition. Here recently a couple of deaths have shocked our county -a young infant that members of my family struggled in vain to save, and then one of my wife’s coworkers was killed in a tragic auto accident. She was killed on the very road that my wife and son were to be traveling a mere twenty minutes after her accident occurred. Two nurses. Both married with children. Both in the prime of their lives. Both driving down the very same road. Both on their way to work at the very same hospital. Life and death was to be divided that day by a mere twenty minutes of time. Think of that. Twenty minutes that you think is so unimportant represents the difference in the life and death of your spouse or child. I’ve spent some twenty-odd years working in some aspect of emergency medicine from the streets and ERs of rural America to the deserts and jungles of unnamed countries. I have seen death come to the most unsuspecting people literally in the blink of an eye. One second all is well; the next second they are dead. This is not the only life we shall lead; assuredly there is something beyond this. But this life is precious. You have a certain amount of time here to accomplish what you are supposed to accomplish. The only problem is that you have no idea how long that time is. Make the most of the time you have. Do the things you always wanted to do. Publish your novel. Spend a day shing with your dad, or your son. Take some time to smell the owers and notice the things around you. Talk to that person that you think you have nothing in common with. And most of all: Hug your loved ones every day and tell them that you love them as if it were the last time you were going to see them. Think about it.Viewpoints & Opinions2A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 12, 2014 Conservative Corner Conservative Corner By Nelson A. Pryor, Lee, Fl. Something To Think AboutBy Harvey Greene Fire Safety TipsBy Fire Chief Bruce Jordan Harvey GreeneGuest Columnist Whose Agenda? Electrical Safety In The Home Flipping a light switch. Plugging in a coffeemaker. Charging a laptop computer. These are second nature for most of us. Electricity makes our lives easier. However, we need to be cautious and keep safety in mind. Follow these tips to make your home safer:  Have all electrical work done by a qualied Electrician.  When buying or remodeling a home, have it inspected by a qualied Electrician.  Only plug one heat producing appliance (such as a toaster, coffee maker, space heater, etc.) into a receptacle outlet at a time. These type of appliances draw a lot of power to make heat and will usually overload the circuit (causing a tripped breaker or blown fuse) if two appliances are plugged into the same outlet.  Major appliances (such as stoves, refrigerators, air conditioners, dryers, washers, etc.) should be plugged directly into a wall receptacle outlet. Extension cords or plug strips should not be used.  Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCIs) are a kind of circuit breaker that shuts off electricity when a dangerous condition occurs (such as a short circuited wire or plug) in the circuit where it is installed. Most new homes have these breakers on the bedroom circuits. Consider having a qualied Electrician install these in your home.  Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs) reduce the risk of shock. GFCIs shut off an electrical circuit when it becomes a shock hazard. They should be installed in bathrooms, kitchens, garages and basements. All outdoor receptacles should be GFCI protected.  Test AFCIs and GFCIs once a month to make sure they are working properly.  Check electrical cords to make sure they don’t run across doorways or under carpets. Extension cords are intended for temporary use, have a qualied Electrician add more receptacle outlets so you don’t have to use extension cords.  Use light bulbs that match the recommended wattage on the lamp or xture. There should be a sticker that indicates the maximum wattage light bulb to use.  Label your electric circuit breaker box; it normally has the breaker numbers listed on a sticker on the back of the cover. This will make it easier to know which breaker is for which circuit if or when you have an electrical problem. REMINDER  Call your landlord or a qualied Electrician if you have:  Frequent problems with blowing fuses or tripping circuit breakers.  A tingling feeling when you touch an electrical appliance.  Discolored or warm electrical outlet or cover.  A burning or rubbery smell coming from an appliance (persistent smell of burning, call the re department also).  Flickering or dimming lights.  Sparks from an outlet (call the re department also). Any group(s) that would like to have someone come out and speak about any re safety topics, please contact Chief Bruce Jordan (850) 9735075 or email: bruce.jordan@cityofmadison.com. Electrical Fire Safety information provided by www.nfpa.org. Fire Chief Bruce Jordan The Republican Club of Madison County meets Oct. 13 at noon at Shelby’s Restaurant. The Republican Executive Committee meets Sept. 23 at 7 p.m. at the Madison County Library EVERYONE WELCOME! Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee at rec.madison@yahoo.com. The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo Madison County Extension ServiceIn this day and age when modern medicine has been able to increase the life expectancy of Americans, a growing health issue may soon threaten the longevity of today’s youth. Childhood obesity is becoming a health issue in our country, affecting the long term quality of life for many Americans. In 2010, a White House Paper on childhood obesity estimated the direct medical to be at $3 billion dollars. As a result, there is a growing trend to combat this issue and now September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. Lifestyle changes over the last several decades have contributed to rising obesity. Eating on the run and dining at fast food restaurants is now the norm for the average family. As a result, American households dine on food high in fat, sodium and sugar, increasing the total calories consumed in any given day. In addition to overconsumption of food, another trend contributing to overall weight gain in both youth and adults is a decrease in physical activity. Both children and adults are less active, decreasing the opportunity to burn off extra calories. Just this week, the International Food Information Council reported the results of a study using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey which identied decreased physical activity as a key factor in the rise of obesity. Instead of walking and spending time outdoors, kids are driven to school and activities, then spend hours on the computer or watching TV. During the school day, P.E. and recess are often limited and sometimes cut out altogether to make time for academics. Every hour spent in passive activities takes time away from opportunities to be physically active. Families can be proactive in the effort to maintain a normal level of calorie intake and physical activity. It doesn’t mean everyone goes on a diet and train for a 5K run; it does mean making a conscious decision to make a few changes. Parents and caregivers alike can offer healthier food choices and opportunities for physical activity. The rst step is to follow the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and let MyPlate be the model. Offer a variety of food each day from all of the food groups. Fill your grocery cart with lean protein, whole grains, fruit, vegetables and low-fat dairy foods. Plan family meals and snacks instead of randomly making selections so you consciously serve healthier meals. Cook more meals at home. Look at the calendar and prepare food when you have a block of time. For example, roast a chicken on the weekend and serve it twice during the week. While the chicken is baking; spaghetti sauce, chili or soup can be simmering on the stove. Food can be divided up and frozen for meals later in the week. Use snack time as a way to get in servings of different food groups. Forget chips and sugary drinks, besides being empty calories, they are high cost items. Instead, serve fresh fruit, peanut butter on whole wheat bread, raw vegetables with a dip or low fat yogurt. Let kids come up with their own ideas for snacks that t within the guidelines you establish. The other component in this national awareness effort is to be physically active. Provide opportunities for kids to get outside and play. Better yet, get outside with them and you’ll be burning calories too. Play a game of ball in the back yard, wash the family vehicles, ride bikes or do yard work. With little effort, families can make meals healthier and increase their physical activity to help children achieve and/or maintain a normal weight. For more information on nutrition and eating right, contact the Madison County Extension Service. The University of Florida Extension Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution. TACKLINGCHILDHOODOBESITY Diann DouglasGuest Columnist

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M omma, you were special in so many ways: giving advice or washing for days. O bedience to serve God, your children, and church, never seeking praise because you loved serving so much. M any years you had little but were willing to share currency, food, clothing, shelter, or a prayer. M onths of sickness didn’t hinder you long. As soon as you were better we heard a song. A s we look back in our hearts, seeing through your eyes, your love and loyalty was there from the start. We realize we can’t be with you to return your love. In your heavenly home, you’ll watch us from above. From Children and Loved OnesAround Madison County4A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 12, 2014 In Loving Memory Bernice Williams BoldenSunrise: 11/25/47 Sunset: 9/11/04 Information in the Jail Report is provided to Greene Publishing, Inc. by the Madison County Sheriff’s Ofce. All people are considered innocent until proven guilty. Questions about people identied in the report should be directed to the MCSO at (850) 973-4001. Obituary Community Calendar Jail Report Way Back When Way Back When Viola Sheffield Pickles“… But the greatest of these is love.” I Corin. 13:13. Viola Shefeld Pickles left her earthly family on September 7, with her daughters: Judy, Linda and Brenda, and son-in-law, Keith, at her side. She joyfully joins her Heavenly Father and her husband, James O. “Pick” Pickles, the one and only love of her life. She was born on September 7, 1927, in Taylor County, Fl., to Jerry Russell Shefeld and Nicy Jane Wilson Shefeld. She lived in Madison County, until moving to Lake Park, Ga., in March 2001. She is survived by three daughters and two sons-in-law: Judy and Keith Allsbrook, Twin Lakes, Ga.; Brenda Pickles, Twin Lakes, Ga.; Linda and Jim Lester, and his daughter and son-inlaw, Amy and Remer Drew, Valdosta, Ga.; sisters: Florine Cope and Iris Wells Ridell of Perry; two sisters-inlaw: Mable Ragans and Lorena “Dutsy” Pickles of Madison; and numerous nieces and nephews. She is preceded in death by her husband, James O. “Pick” Pickles; brothers: J. R. Shefeld and Floyd Shefeld; and sister, Hazel Graham Alvarez. Her husband, daughters, sons-in-law, nieces, nephews, and many, many special friends and neighbors were the joy of her life and she loved spending time with them. She loved life and a good laugh better than most. She was a gracious southern beauty who had a very tender, loving, caring and compassionate heart with an extraordinary ability to see the beauty in all of God’s creation. She loved all people and was always willing to share whatever she had whenever and wherever there was a need. She loved cooking, crocheting, sewing and especially loved growing beautiful owers and plants. She was a star basketball player in her high school days in Taylor County, Fl. Nothing made her happier than an all night game of Rummy with her sisters, spending time with her girls and friends and, a great garage sale nd which, of course, had to be at a “bargain” price. She loved shing as long as someone else baited her hook and could make the best hush puppies and swamp cabbage ever. She loved cooking and prepared many great homestyle meals and loved sharing them with family and friends. Ms. Vi was one of the very best in food service and loved the profession. She began a life long career in food service as a waitress, working in an era when white uniforms and caps were the appropriate attire. She moved from Taylor County at the young age of 18 to Tampa, working in food service and later in Perry at the Blue Plate Caf, and in Madison at Hancock Grill, Madison Dining Room, The Big Oak, Pep’s Caf and later owning and managing her own restaurant, “Vi’s Restaurant” located on Highway 53. The restaurant was a popular local gathering place for many years where she fed many folks in Madison County and has long since been remembered for her great home cooking, hamburger steaks and jumbo hamburgers. Her unwavering faith and trust in God saw her through many illnesses throughout the years, however, she fought each battle with unimaginable strength and courage and she remained faithful to her Lord and Savior Jesus Christ praying for her friends and family until the very end. She was a member of Faith Baptist Church in Madison before moving to Lake Park, Ga., where she was a current member of New Life Church. A memorial service will be held at New Life Church, 7505 Zeigler Road, Lake Park, Ga. 31636, at 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 13, with her son-in-law, Pastor Keith Allsbrook ofciating. A reception in celebration of Ms. Vi’s life will be held in the Fellowship Hall at New Life Church immediately following the service. Interment will be held in a private family service at San Pedro Cemetery in Madison in the Pickles Family Plot beside her husband. Flowers will be accepted or donations may be made in her memory to New Life Church of Lake Park, P. O. Box 264, Lake Park, Ga. 31636 or Hospice of South Georgia, P.O. Box 1727 Valdosta, Ga. 31601 for donations. Condolences may be conveyed at www.mclanecares.com. Our sincere thanks and appreciation goes to Wanda Brown for her love, devotion and care for our mother and our family during these past several months.September 12, 1952 Revival services at Pinetta Baptist church begin Sunday, Sept. 14, for a week. Rev. Francis W Cruce of Perry, guest speaker. Services at 11 a.m. and 7:45 p.m. An Airman stationed at Moody Air Force Base was drowned at Cherry Lake Saturday night. The young man was identified as Airman 1-c Floyd Eugene Matlock, age 20, of Paradise, Calif. Al Taylor, well known manager of the Tri-County Electric Coop, killed a PINK rattlesnake on US 90 near the Suwannee-Columbia county line last Saturday, with two shots from a slingshot which he had in his car. The reptile had six rattles. The initials GO were plainly marked on the snake’s back. Highway Patrolman M K Hackle, 36, of Melbourne, recently of Madison, is in Brevard County Hospital, Melbourne, after having been involved in an accident with a pickup truck, Monday while en route to another accident north of Palm Bay.September 11, 1953 Jesse Johnson is held in jail pending outcome of a shoot-affray Sunday afternoon in the quarters north of Oak Ridge cemetery in which Early Frazier, was shot. Miss Joyce Gross will leave Friday to return to Brenau College, Gainesville, Ga., to resume her Senior Class studies. Mrs. B N Gross will accompany her daughter for a visit there and in Atlanta with her daughter Norma at Emory University. Live Oak, Sept. 5 – Mac Hardee was found not guilty on charges of using illegal wire baskets to take from the Suwannee River. His trial climaxed the busiest session of county court here in years. Mr. and Mrs. H N Slaughter, of Greenville, announce the birth of a son, born Sept. 8.September 10, 1954 The Play House Kindergarten, operated by Mrs. E P Sanders, Jr., opened Tuesday with an enrollment of 18. Los Angeles – the lady won her 13thdivorce, but it brought some biting words from the judge. Capt. Dan Dolack of Moody Field Air Base was a guest speaker at the Rotary Club Wednesday. Training facilities and type planes used at Moody Field was his topic. Mr. and Mrs. Donald O Laney of Greenville, Fla., announce the arrival of a son, Donald Warren, August 28thin Tallahassee Memorial hospital.September 3 Jontavia Montrell Pratt – Driving while license suspended and resisting without violence. Luther Bernard Brinson – Violation of parole (county). Kevin Sylvester Whiteside – Possession of 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Jalexis Daishun Porter – Leaving the scene of a crash and allowing unauthorized person to drive.September 5 Cedric Lavar White – Petit theft and possession of drug paraphernalia. Ray Byron Davis – Violation of parole (circuit). James Earl Hampton – Weekender. Ronald Jay Bishop – Two counts of violation of parole. Alan Lee Wood – Out of county warrant.September 6 Thaddeus Donte Dye – Resisting officer without violence and driving while license suspended. Benjamin Dean Williams – Aggravated assault and simple battery.September 7 Teonna Marie Tillman – Controlled substancepossess/sell/manufacture and attempt, solicit and conspire.September 8 Michael Demetrius Thomas – Driving knowingly while license suspended. Reginald Maurice Epkins – Counterfeit controlled substance (cocaine), two charges of controlled substance-possess/sell/manufacture and counterfeit controlled substance (marijuana). September 9 Damon Lee Pace – Out of county warrant. Cody Dewayne Lee – Robbery with a deadly weapon and petit theft (2ndoffense). Jack Roy Wilson – Two counts of controlled substancepossess/sell/manufacture and possession of a controlled substance under 20 grams. Marcus Johnson – Violation of parole. Aaron Josiah Poole – Sale of a controlled substance. William Harris – Possession of cocaine, possession of drug paraphernalia, assault domestic violence and tampering with a witness. Ferlin Eugene Austin Driving while license suspended or revoked. Mark Allen Barfield – Criminal registration. Nathaniel Burnett – Violation of parole. Amanda Jolene Langille – Writ of bodily attachment. Akeem Ola Juwon Watson – Burglary of occupied dwelling (domestic) and theft (domestic).September 15 The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety course in Madison starting Monday, Sept. 15 through Wednesday, Sept. 17, from 7 until 10 p.m. and Saturday, Sept. 20, from 2 p.m. until completed. Students must attend all sessions to receive their certificate. Location for the class will be given to those who register in advance by calling the regional office at (386) 758-0525 or by going toMyFWC.com/HunterSafety.If interested in future hunter safety courses, you can use the same contact information. All firearms, ammunition and materials are provided free of charge. Students should bring a pen or pencil and paper. An adult must accompany children younger than 16 at all times.September 21 Genesis Missionary Baptist Church, as part of their Missionary Program, would like to invite everyone to join them Sunday, Sept. 21, at 3 p.m., to hear speaker, Missionary Maggie Duval from Tallahassee. Refreshments will be served. For more information, contact Gloria Washington at (850) 9735081. September 22 A first time homebuyer series begins Monday, Sept. 22 and will continue on Sept. 23, 29 and 30, at the Madison County Extension Service, starting at 6:00 p.m. Upon completion, participants will receive a certificate that can be used for the SHIP program and Rural Development home loans. To register, call 973-4138. September 23 Madison Youth Ranch will have a prayer, dedication and opening celebration on Tuesday, Sept. 23. Campus tours will begin at 10:30 a.m., followed by the program events at 11:30 a.m. and lunch will be served at noon. The campus tours will resume at 1 p.m. following the lunch. Call (386) 668-5088 or emailmadison.ranch@fumch.orgto R.S.V.P. or for more information. Madison Youth Ranch is located at NE Captain Buie Road in Pinetta.September 25 NFCC will be holding an Open House and Employer Forum, from noon until 7 p.m., where they will be showcasing their Automation and Production Technology Program and giving tours, demonstrations and enrollment information. Location of the college is 325 NW Turner Davis Dr. in Madison. September 7, 1927 … September 7, 2014 Clari“cationIn the Wednesday edition of the Madison County Carrier, a story appeared in that edition regarding Charles Lasseter celebrating 55 years in ministry. It was reported there would be a special service at 10 a.m. on Sunday, however, the church will be holding regular services at 10:30 a.m.

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Submitted by the Madison Genealogical Society Generation Three Andrew Jackson Alfred, who we think was Andrew Jackson’s son, was married to Emily Phillips in 1872; he and Emily were the only Driggers in Madison County in 1880. He and Emily had James, born in 1872; Mary Ann, born in 1875; Isabella, born in 1877; William Burton, born in 1881; M.J., a daughter, born in 1884; Zilla l. born 1887; Abbee, born 1890; Ella, born 1878; and Ada, born 1882. Ella married Lawrence Winn in 1896, and apparently he died shortly after the marriage, because she was home in 1900 with one year old Annie B. Wynn. Alfred and Emily raised their family in the Macedonia area. We think Mary Ann married T.L. Welch in 1891. Zilla married W. H. Clark in 1898. Abbie married Al Johnson in 1903. Ada married George Tindall in 1906. Generation Three Simeon B. Elisha W., born 1843, was most likely the son of Simeon B. and Elizabeth Gornto; he married Queen Ann Lee, or Ann Elizabeth in 1870. Elisha W. and his wife spent much of their married life in Bradford County, Florida, but were back in Madison County by 1935. They had the following children: Elisha Charlie or Charlie (we think), JEM, 1883; Stephen Elisha, 1890; and Georgia, 1892. By 1870, many of the Driggers families had moved to Lafayette County, including Dennis, Jr., son of Dennis, and his children. At this time, Susan Poncher Driggers, who had been married to Simeon Driggers, was living with her two children, Ellen and Simeon Kincaid in Lafayette County with Isaac and Rebecca Walker and their children. Susan’s husband, Simeon was the son of Jonas, who was one of William’s children. (William and Dennis, the Madison Pioneer were brothers.) Simeon, the father of Ellen and Simeon Kincaid, died just before Simeon Kincaid was born, in 1872; Ellen was only two years old when her father died. Clydie Driggers Russell tells an interesting story in Madison County, Florida Family History Book. Clydie tells that in 1885, Susan, Simeon Kincaid and Ellen’s mother, died in Lafayette County, leaving Ellen and Simeon Kincaid orphaned at 10 and 12-years-old. So Simeon and Ellen walked to Madison County, in search of their half-brother, John Rufus Dickerson. They never found John Rufus, but they found folks that took them in; they worked for their room and board until they married. Ellen married Thomas McCullough, and they had one daughter, Lala. Simeon Kincaid married Elizabeth Frances Holton, in 1895, and the couple had three children, Efe Ola, who married Frank Stokes; George Dewey, who married Neva Evans; and Susie Mae, who married Frank’s brother, Edgar Stokes. They lived in the Lee area. Sim then married Piercie Waters Lane when his rst wife died. Piercie brought her three small children, Leon, Etha, and Willie Mae to the family. Then Sim and Piercie had four more children: Milton, Vernice, Clydie, and Adelia. Clydie, daughter of Simeon Kincaid, proudly recalls her father’s dedication to his family. Each May, the S. K. Driggers family reunion is held at the Lee City Hall. Mrs. Russell tells that there were two Driggers families, in the area when she was growing up: the Will Driggers and the Sim Driggers families. Will and Sim were neighboring farmers, and often met each other. When they met, they always shook hands, and one of them always wondered if they were related. Not until after they both died did the family nd the kinship. Generation Four: Children of Andrew Jackson’s son Alfred James, born 1872, son of Alfred, son of Andrew Jackson, married Margaret Wood, born 1875, and had Hunter, 1895 and Gracie, 1905, James and Margaret also lived in the Macedonia area. It seems that James remarried Lila Mae Ward in 1918 and had Raymond, born in 1922. William Burton, 1881, son of Alfred, son of Andrew Jackson, married Annie B. Clark, 1881, and had Willie, 1900; Howard B., 1901; Audry, 1904; Walter Mikle, 1907; Adell, 1910; Daisy, 1915; J.D., 1917; Richard, 1918; and Mary Lue, 1921. He lived in the Norton Creek area. Howard B. married Hoyette Albritton in 1920. Audry married Parramore McCullough in 1919. Generation Four: Children of Simeon B’s son Elisha W. EC, or Elisha Charlie, or Charlie was in the 1920 Census, in the Greenville area. He married Ella Thompson in 1894 and Lonie Knight, in 1902 and had Pearl, 1902; Elisha W. or Lige, 1904; Shellie, 1908; and Queen Ann Elizabeth, 1909. We are not positive that Charlie’s parents were Elisha W. and Queen Ann Lee. We feel like they were because Charlie was named Elisha Charlie, because he named a daughter Queen Ann Elizabeth, and because he named a son Elisha W. or Lige. Queen Ann Elizabeth married English B. Smith in 1924. Charlie is buried in the San Pedro cemetery; he died in 1925. Generation Five: Children of Andrew Jackson’s son Alfred’s son James Hunter, 1895, son of James and grandson of Alfred, married Alice Davis and had Marie, 1914; Hunter, Jr., 1918; Walter, 1923; Margret, 1923; and Marion, 1930. Marie married Robert Williams in 1928. (W.D. married Thelma Thompson in 1936.) Generation Five: Children of Simeon B’s son, Elisha W.’s son Charlie Elisha E., born 1904, son of Charlie and Lonie, married Faridy Clayton, and had the following children: C.L., born 1926; Mildred, born 1929; Johnnie, born 1931; and Pasco, born 1935. By 1940, apparently Faridy, their mother, had died, and three of the children were living with other families. Mildred was adopted by and living with Thomas and Eddie Studstill. Pasco was adopted by and living with Millie M. and Evelyn Pickles. Johnnie, born 1931, was living with grandparents Leroy and Georgia Clayton. In 1940, Elijah, their father, was married to Beatrice. Generation Six Children of Simeon B’s son, Elisha W.’s son Charlie’s son We don’t nd any generation six children of Charlie in the 1940 Census. His son Elijah’s children were not old enough to marry and raise families. Generation Six, Children of Andrew Jackson’s son Alfred’s sons James and William Burton We also don’t nd any children in the 1940 Census belonging to sons of James and William Burton. By 1940, only William Burton, 1881, and Annie Clark Driggers, 1882, were living in Madison with their unmarried children, Richard, 1918, and Mary Lou, 1921. Raymond, 1924, son of James, 1872, and Lila Mae Ward, 1909, was living with his widowed mother, also unmarried. Raymond, in 1945, married Laura Lee Bunting. In 1940, Simeon Kincaid, descendant of William, brother of Dennis, the Pioneer, had a son, George Dewey, 1899, married to Neva Evans, with sons Cleveland, 1924, and Lorenza, 1930 living in the county. So, the Driggers families in Madison County come from either Dennis, the Madison County Pioneer, by way of his sons Andrew Jackson and Simeon B. Or they descend from William, brother of Dennis, by way of Simeon Kincaid. William’s descendents lived in Lafayette, Columbia, and other counties; Simeon Kincaid returned to Madison in 1885. We do know that the two Driggers farmers, Will and Sim, who met off and on during their lifetimes and wondered if they were related, were distant cousins, by way of Dennis the Pioneer in Madison County and William his brother. And Will and Sim were William Burton and Simeon Kincaid. And we know that there were lots of Williams, Simeons and Elishas in the Driggers families. The Madison County Genealogy Society welcomes your input and invites you to join our organization. We meet on the second Thursday monthly, except during summer months, in the Madison Public Library from 6 to 7 p.m. Annual dues are $25. To add comments to our articles or to submit your own sketch of your ancestor, contact us at Madison County Genealogy Society, P.O. Box 136, Madison, Fl. 32341. Or contact us by email at mcgenealogysociety@live.com.Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 5A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 12, 2014 DENNIS DRIGGERS 1875Part 2 Pioneers Of Madison County

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Photo SubmittedTres Copeland (left) and Jared Jackson visited Aucilla Christian Academy's future Warriors at Coach Colby Roberts' Football Camp earlier this summer. (Pictured with ACA second grader Josh Forehand.)6A €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 12, 2014 Sports NOTICE OF PROPOSED TAX INCREASEThe Town of Lee has tentatively adopted a measure to increase its property tax levy. Last years property tax levy: A. Initially proposed tax levy..........................................$ 42,252 B. Less tax reductions due to Value Adjustment Board and other assessment changes....................................$ 621 C. Actual property tax levy..........................................$ 41,631 This years proposed tax levy..........................................$ 44,753 All concerned citizens are invited to attend a public hearing on the tax increase to be held on August 16, 2014 6 p.m. At Lee Town Hall A FINAL DECISION on the proposed tax increase and budget will be made at this meeting Greenville Teen Is A Walk-On For FSU Football TeamTres Copeland, of Greenville, has joined the Florida State University football team as a walkon. Copeland, a 2013 graduate of Aucilla Christian Academy, was a stellar athlete at ACA where he won WCTV’s Play of the Year as a senior and earned ACA’s Offensive MVP Awards both his junior and senior years. He is the son of Tom and Debbie Copeland of Greenville. “He wanted to play football again and missed it,” said Tres’s mom, Debbie Copeland, “So, he worked really hard and went to the walkon coach/assistant. We got his game film from his senior year and reference letters from all of his coaches, and then he worked hard from there.” Copeland said he has to work hard and prove himself, but he’s excited to be on the team. He is also thrilled to be playing football again with his best friend, former ACA classmate, and now roommate, Jared Jackson of Monticello, a 2013 FSU walk-on. “They love playing together," said Copeland. "We are so proud of them both.” Be on the lookout this season for Copeland #31, a defensive back, and Jackson #87, a wide receiver.Photo SubmittedFSU football player Tres Copeland #31.Photo SubmittedFollowing ACA graduation in 2013, Tres Copeland (left) and Jared Jackson played in the Florida vs. Georgia High School Game.

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Aucilla JV Ties Georgia Christian School In Second Matchup; Aucilla Won First Game Against GCS 36-13By Bryant Thigpen Greene Publishing, Inc.The Aucilla Christian Academy Warriors JV football team (1-0-1) tied Georgia Christian School in their second game of the season Thursday night with a final score 14-14. The JV team opened their season on Aug. 28, on the road in a thriller against Georgia Christian and won 36-13. “The first game against Georgia Christian we won 36-13,” Head Coach Daryl Adams said. “Our offense was clicking and defense was strong.” The teams met again on Sept. 4, for another exciting game at Aucilla. With just 16 seconds left on the game clock, Aucilla dropped the ball in the end zone which would have won the game. However, the clock expired before either team could score and the game ended in a tie. “The next time we played (last Thursday), they brought down additional players from varsity which made for a more competitive game. We also lost our strongest player just after halftime due to a concussion,” Adams said. The JV team traveled to Florida High Thursday night for a night of football under the lights. The results of that game will appear in Wednesday's edition of the Madison County Carrier. The team returns home this Thursday night, Sept. 18, for a matchup against Sherwood Christian Academy at 6 p.m.SportsMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 7A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 12, 2014 NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AND LAND USE CHANGEThe Town of Lee, Florida proposes to amend its Comprehensive Plan as shown on the map in this advertisement, and as more fully set forth in the ordinances, the titles of which appear below. An adoption hearing of the proposed ordinances will be held on October 7, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matters may be heard, at Lee City Hall Building at 286 NE CR 255, Lee, Florida. A copy of said ordinances may be inspected by any member of the public at the office of the Town of Lee located at 286 NE CR 255, Lee, Florida during regular business hours. Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard regarding the proposed ordinances. FOR INFORMATION CALL: 850-971-5867 Ordinance No. 2014-04 An ordinance amending the Future Land Use Map of the Town of Lee Comprehensive Plan by changing the land use category of approximately 1.57 acres of property described as follows: Beginning at the right-of-way of the S.A.L. Railroad 428 feet East of the section line of Section 11, and running East 180 feet; thence North 380 feet; thence West 180 feet; thence South 380 feet to place of beginning, containing in all 68,400 square feet lying and being in the Northwest Quarter (NW ) of the Northwest Quarter (NW ) of Section 11, Township 1 South, Range 10 East as specifically described in this ordinance, from Town of Lee Residential to Town of Lee Commercial; providing directions to the Town Manager; providing a severability clause; providing a repealing clause; and providing an effective date. If any person decides to appeal a decision of this body with respect to any matter considered at the above-referenced meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceeding, and for such purposes, it may be necessary to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be basedŽ. PERSONS NEEDING SPECIAL ACCOMODATION SHOULD CONTACT THE EQUAL OPPORTUNITY DEPARTMENT AT 352-334-5051 (TTD 352-334-2069) AT LEAST 48 HOURS PRIOR TO THE MEETING DATE. MCHS JV Volleyball Beats Godby 2-0By Bryant ThigpenGreene Publishing, Inc.The Madison County High School JV volleyball team (1-2) defeated the Godby High School Cougars Tuesday night at home with a nal score 2-0. The Cowgirls dropped their rst two games of the season, but rebounded playing well, according to Head Coach Tim Meinsen. “Last night our girls came away with a victory against Godby. All of our girls played extremely well and it was a team effort that propelled us to victory,” Meisen said. “We improved tremendously on offensive in attacking our opponent and forcing them to play back on their heals. Our serve receive was a big part for our defense last night and the girls did extremely well defending the serve and giving us a chance to be aggressive and attack Godby.” The JV team played Taylor County Thursday night, and will play them again on Monday, Sept. 22. “Like any other team in our district we are not going to overlook Taylor county,” Meisen said. “We have to play with intensity and do the little things in order to win against Taylor County.” Overall season The Cowgirls got off to a rough start, dropping their rst two games to their toughest competitors, Florida High School and Hamilton County High School by the same score, 3-0. “Florida High and Hamilton are two of the best teams in our district,” Meisen said. “I liked how we matched up against them. We did some things well in both games and there are some things that we still need to work on. I look forward to playing them again.” Despite the season record, Meisen said the team is moving forward, both on and off the court. “I think our season is going good not great. We have some work to do, but over all we are progressing forward and that's what I like to see out of our girls,” he said. “They are working hard this season on and off the court, in and out of the classroom, and in the weight room. The MCHS JV volleyball team will play their next game against Taylor County High School in Perry on Thurs., Sept. 22 at 5:30 p.m. Burrus Showcased As Warriors Secure First Victory Against Oak HallBy William SmithGreene Publishing, Inc.Despite a mucky eld, wet conditions, and a myriad of questionable penalties, the Warriors are ofcially “off the schnide,” winning their rst game of the year 28-7 thanks to another solid performance by senior wide receiver Timothy Burrus against the Eagles of Oak Hall. There’s no denying that Burrus is the straw that stirs Aucilla’s drink offensively. The diminutive pocket rocket features a gamebreaking penchant for making seminal splash plays that are the leading cause of indigestion in defensive coordinators who scheme against the Warriors. Clearly, Eagle coaches’ had indeed dealt with a case of nausea concerning Burrus’ big-play ability, as Oak Hall cornerbacks afforded a healthy 10 yard chunk of vacant real estate to the senior in hopes of mitigating the risk of regular deep passes from Aucilla quarterbacks. It was of little value, however, as Burrus still had an impressive performance, hauling in nine catches for 125 yards and one touchdown. Factoring in last week’s stat line from the loss to Branford, Burrus is averaging a blistering 11 catches, 175+ receiving yards and two touchdowns per game. Of supreme importance to the Warrior offence this week was the roulette-style search for a power back capable of pounding defenses into submission to open up play-action passes from head coach Colby Roberts’ pro-style game plan against Oak Hall. Fortunately, it looks as though Roberts’ has nally struck gold in the form of gunslinger quarterback Wesley Smyrnios. Smyrnios had contributed as half of a two-quartertback system along with Austin Bishop that showcased each player’s unique talents, but Friday evening in Gainesville, the senior ran with reckless abandon en route to a 77-yard tally that included several shattering collisions that Roberts later took pleasure in. “It was denitely a relief to see someone lling that role in our offence,” said Roberts. “As long as I’ve been the head coach here, we’ve always had a reliable guy in whose hand to put the ball when the chips are down. That guy who can get the tough yards when we need them. Smyrnios was that for us tonight.” If Smyrnios can continue to provide that physical presence that had been lacking in last week’s loss, this Warrior team could continue rolling through its schedule, according to Roberts: “I have condence that if Wesley can keep defenses honest, then we can be the football team that we all expected to be when the season began. Time will tell, however.” Aucilla is in the midst of a three-game road stretch that will take them to St. Augustine this Friday to challenge St. Joseph Academy. The Flashes are currently 1-1, having beaten Munroe 33-14 to open the season but suffering a drubbing at the hands of Bronson last week, 50-0. Most recently, the Warriors defeated St. Joe in a thrilling 24-20 game last year at home.

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Natalie Vasquez is a 15-year-old sophomore at Aucilla Christian Academy. She is active in sports, playing both at school and at home. In the fall she is a guard on the basketball team and in spring she plays softball as a centerelder or leftelder. When it comes to academics, Algebra II is her favorite subject “so far.” Natalie says she loves going to Aucilla because it’s a small enough school where everybody knows each other and she is free to be a Christian. “You don’t have to be afraid to talk about and share your religion with anybody.” She is active in FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes). The group is made up of both boys and girls and conducts a Bible study that is studentled, and discusses ways students can serve their community. When asked what hobbies she enjoys outside of school, Natalie replied, “Mostly homework because we have a lot of it.” She also said she works a lot on improving her sports while at home. After Natalie graduates she wants to be a veterinarian, but rst plans to attend a two or four-year community college. Her rst choice for a University is the University of Florida in Gainesville, second is Florida State University in Tallahassee and her third choice is University of Central Florida in Orlando.Educators tend to stay inside of a box throughout their careers. We graduate college, begin teaching, work towards a master’s degree or PhD, and strive to be promoted to a higher position than teaching. There’s nothing wrong with this career path, but what about those people that step outside of the box and try something different? Well, I am one of those individuals that stepped out the box and my eyes were opened to worldwide education, which forever changed my life. I am Charmise Lenoir. I currently work as a fth grade teacher at Greenville Elementary School in Greenville, Fl. This is my fth year teaching, but my rst year teaching in America. For the past ve years I lived and worked in Egypt. I taught at International schools in Cairo and Alexandria, Egypt for four years. Having the opportunity to work outside of America allowed me to utilize my English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) endorsement that I received from Florida A&M University. I never imagined I would have great use for it, but as I began my career I heavily relied on it. When I began teaching in Egypt, I did not know what to expect. As I awaited my rst day of teaching, I thought to myself, “How will the students understand me? I don’t speak Arabic!” I knew that all of the core classes were taught only in English, but was pleasantly surprised at how well the students spoke it. I taught almost every grade and subject my rst year. I felt so overwhelmed, but I buckled down and remembered what my professors at FAMU taught me. I created behavioral systems, rewards programs and used activities and strategies that allowed students to be hands on. I went back to my ESOL professor, Dr. Gloria Poole’s book, notes and power point presentations to remember how English Language Learners (ELLs) learned best. By springtime, all of my hard work and determination had paid off! My students were behaving, listening, and learning American curriculum like they had visited America. The International schools use American and British textbooks and teach according to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). They have to stay up-to-date with standards so that their students graduate with American diplomas. However, I found that some schools lack in essential areas, and teachers are not always properly educated about specic skills they should have. Disabilities such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Attention Decit Disorder with or without Hyperactivity (ADD/ADHD) are viewed negatively in their culture. Parents do not like to admit their child has a disability that could be hindering the student’s learning ability, so it is often ignored. Most schools do not have a proper special education department to handle students with special needs, and the teachers are unaware of how best to teach those children. Since my mother was a special education teacher turned director, I learned much from her and utilized that knowledge to help my students and schools. She became a saving grace for handling many of my students’ problems. Being in Egypt allowed me to gain a greater understanding and appreciation for the English language. It is a very difcult language to comprehend and speak. There are several rules, and many of them often have an exception. The teachers I worked with spoke English well, but still made several mistakes. They taught these mistakes to the students, and I would then have to correct my kids without insulting my colleagues. I am using my understanding of teaching English as a second language as I have begun to teach at Greenville. Being native English speakers, we often do not think about all the skills we must use to speak, read, write and listen. I empathize with my students when they struggle to understand rules. Now, I feel better prepared to assist them with their challenges. Overall, Egypt was a great experience and teacher for me. It has set me on a career path that I can see taking me all across the world. However, I felt that coming home and working with our own students was the best decision at this time. It will allow me to use my knowledge and skills obtained to do great work here, as well as continue to teach me the many things that will continue to improve my skills as I strive to become a greater and more effective educator. I look forward to this school year. All of the hard work Dr. Pettiford and the Greenville Elementary School teachers and staff are putting forth will allow us to see great achievements this year. Keep a look out for us; we’re doing something special! 8A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 12, 2014School The School Bell Charmise Lenoir By Charmise Lenoir Greenville Elementary School – 5thGrade By Rose Klein Visit The Location Nearest YouM a d i s o n 424 W. Base St. G a i n e s v i l l e 6450 SW Archer Rd. G a i n e s v i l l e 4620 NW 39thAve. P e r r y 2000 S. Byron Butler Blvd. S t e i n h a t c h e e 913 1stAve. SE or online at www.csbdirect.comOpening Fall 2014 Student Of The Week Natalie Vasquez Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, September 4, 2014Natalie Vasquez is an active sophomore at Aucilla Christian Academy, a school Natalie says she loves.Every week, Greene Publishing, Inc. will spotlight a student from one of the Madison County Schools in a ‘Student of the Week’ column. If you are a parent or educator and would like to nominate a student for this feature, please email Rose@greenepublishing.com. ‘The School Bell’ is a weekly column featuring educators in Madison County. Each week, Greene Publishing, Inc. will feature one teacher who can express their views and opinions, share lesson plans, a classroom activity, or any other educational subject of their choosing. If you are an educator or school administrator and would like to submit an article, please email Rose@greenepublishing.com.

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Submitted By Jerome Wyche and Octavious TookesW ith the approval to utilize the grounds and the facilities by President John Grosskopf, North Florida Community College, the nal touches in preparation for the "Back to School Explosion" ended late Friday evening, Aug. 8. The day before, 23 volunteers for the Madison Coalition and its partners worked feverously and packed almost 1400 backpacks with school supplies. After checking last-minute details one more time, the only thing remaining for Saturday was to arrange chairs and presenter stations, brief and assign volunteers to their duty stations and make sure that the presenters were in place. Some parents and students arrived as early as 8 a.m., and the atmosphere was already festive. This event, compared to previous ones, happened with greater success and can only be described as "poetry in motion." "When opportunities avail themselves, creative communities are empowered to do great things." Such was the case for the 2014 2015 "Back to School Explosion." Over 35 volunteers, 20-plus presenters, school district employees, city and county employees, businesses and retirees rounded out the event, accounting for an estimated total of 1100 people in attendance. For the rst time, the President of the Kiwanis Club of Madison, Diane Head, and President of the Rotary Club of Madison, Pete Bucher, Past President of the Lions Club of Madison, Jay Lee and President of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Peggy Williams, were under the same roof, and brought their members to serve, along with the NFCC Fitness Center staff, led by Clyde Alexander, where the event was held. The maintenance personnel, under the direction of Skip James, led to a smooth event, without incident. M. Blair Payne, Public Defender from the 3rdJudicial Circuit in Lake City, pitched in and volunteered his services; others volunteers and contributors were from Perry, Tallahassee and Jacksonville. The presenters added further excitement to the event as they provided public information, assistance and directions to both parents and students on services that were available in Madison County and also gave away lots of door prizes. The Madison County Boys Choir provided enjoyable entertainment. The City of Madison displayed their ladder truck and some police vehicles. The Madison County Department of Health made their mobile health van accessible to help parents review immunization requirements prior to the start of the school year. Tobacco Free Madison and Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT), Abstinence Educators and Florida Health/Healthiest Weight Advocates were on hand providing valuable information. Mr. Julius Hackett, General Manager of Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc., and his family of TriCounty Employees, lled the air with the smell of grilled hotdogs, which had been donated by Stahl-Meyer's Meat Processing Center along with hotdog buns donated by Food Giant of Madison. Nestle Waters Bottling Company provided cold water and the Junior Auxiliary made a generous donation of bagged chips for the enjoyment of all participants. Sheriff Ben Stewart, and the Madison County Sheriff's Department, made a generous donation to the list of school supplies as they purchased $1,100 worth of loose-leaf notebook ller paper. Citizens, businesses, churches, clubs and agencies made known their passion for supporting this worthwhile event that "positively impacted our youth." Their donations made it possible for our Madison youth to begin the school year with backpacks and school supplies. At the end of the event, more than $7,500 was spent in Madison County on school supplies and other event needs. The Madison County Prevention Coalition and its partners would like to thank the following donors that helped make this event happen and can take pride in knowing that "you helped make a difference in the life of a youth:" Hall's Tire and Mufer, Allen Cherry, Wayne Vickers, Rick Davis, Clyde Alexander, Kiwanis Club of Madison, Judge Greg Parker (Perry), Madison County Community Bank, Ronnie Moore, Justin Hamrick, Virtual School (backpacks), Century Link (backpacks), TriCounty Medical of Greenville (backpacks) ,Safe Schools of the Madison County School District (backpacks), Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church of Madison, Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church of Cherry Lake, Darabi and Associates (Gainesville), Terrance Boatman, St. James Missionary Baptist Church, Davis, Schnitker, Reeves & Browning Law Firm, First United Methodist Church of Madison, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Thomas Hardee, Jeanne Bass, Lamar Tookes, Howard Pickels, Jim Catron, Mt. Nebo A.M.E. Church, VeEtta Hagan, Doug Brown, Cooks and Cooper Funeral Home, Lisa Tuten, Cross Roads Missionary Baptist Church, Judge E. Bailey Browning, United Methodist Cooperative Ministries, Julius Hackett, Rocky Springs Missionary Baptist Church, Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc., Lee United Methodist Church, Timothy McCray, Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church of Greenville, Tim Sanders, Gregory J. Harris, Madison County School District, Little Pine Pediatrics (Perry), Alfred Martin, Marcus Hawkins, Madison County Ministerial Association, CVS Drug Store, Tim Bennett, Judy Townsend, Madison Rotary Club, Fred's Store, Earnest Washington, Leigh Bareld, Evergreen Missionary Baptist Church, Dustin Driggers (Tallahassee), Capital City Bank, Nestle Waters Bottling Company, StahlMeyers Food Processing Center, Ronnie Cox's Barbershop, Junior Auxiliary, Food Giant of Madison, Jim Holben (Tent Builders of Madison), Florida Department of Health (Tobacco Free Madison), Florida Department of Health (Abstinence Advocate), Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church of Madison, CO-OP of Madison, Madison Media Group, Chamber of Commerce and Jerome Wyche. Our wish for success is extended to all of our school youth for the 2014 2015 school year. Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 9A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 12, 2014 www.peacockslandscaping.com€ (850) 464-1484 € € Madison, Fl. 32340 € € sailpeacock@gmail.com € IrrigationLandscaping Halls Tire & Muffler Center(850) 973-3026Owner Daryl & Lee Anne Hall1064 E. US 90 € Madison, FlBeside Clover Farm ROOFING SPECIALIST State Certified Building Contractor & Roofing Contractor License # CBC 1251818 / CCC 1328133 www.ewingconstructionandroofing.com Serving Madison & Surrounding CountiesLee (850) 971-5043€ Commercial / Residential € All Roof Types € Fully Insured € Proven Track Record € Free EstimatesQUALITY GUARANTEE! DAYS TREE SERVICE THETREESPECIALISTFree Estimates € Tree Trimming € Debris Clean Up Aerial Device € Tree Removal € Bush Hogging Stump GrindingCall Gene Day (850) 948-4757Cell: (850) 464-03866425 NW Lovett Rd. € Greenville, Fl 32331 B u s i n e s s C a r d D i r e c t o r y In a typical IRA, your beneficiary takes control of the IRA assets upon your death. Theres nothing to stop your beneficiary from withdrawing all or part of the IRA funds at any time. This ability to withdraw assets at will may be troublesome to you for several reasons. For example, you may simply be concerned that your beneficiary will squander the IRA funds. Or it may be your wish that your IRA stretchŽ after your death--that is, continue to accumulate on a tax-deferred (or in the case of Roth IRAs, potentially tax-free) basis--for as long as possible. IRA owners sometimes select much younger IRA beneficiaries because their young age means a longer life expectancy, and this in turn requires smaller required minimum distributions (RMDs) from the IRA each year after your death--allowing more of your IRA to continue to grow on a taxfavored basis for a longer period of time. Your intent to stretch out the IRA payments may be defeated if your beneficiary has total control over the IRA assets upon your death. Even if your beneficiary doesnt deplete the IRA assets, in a typical IRA you normally have no say about where the funds go when your beneficiary dies. Your beneficiary, or the IRA agreement, usually specifies who gets the funds at that point. And in a typical IRA, particularly a custodial IRA, your beneficiary is responsible for investing the IRA assets after your death, regardless of his or her inclination, skill, or experience. A trusteed IRA can help solve all of these problems. With a trusteed IRA, you cant stop the payment of RMDs to your beneficiary but you can restrict any additional payments from this IRA. For example, you could maximize the period your IRA will stretch by directing the trustee to pay only RMDs to your beneficiary. Or you can ensure that your beneficiarys needs are taken care of by providing the trustee with the discretion to make payments to your beneficiary in addition to RMDs as needed for your beneficiarys health, welfare, or education. Another option is to impose restrictions on distributions only until youre comfortable your beneficiary has reached an age where he or she will be mature enough to handle the IRA assets. In each case, the balance of the IRA (if any) passing, upon your beneficiarys death, can be paid to a contingent beneficiary of your choosing (the contingent beneficiary will continue to receive RMDs based on your primary beneficiarys remaining life expectancy). For example, if youve remarried, you may want to be sure your current spouse is provided for upon your death, but also that any IRA funds remaining on your spouses death pass to the children of your first marriage. Or you may want to ensure that if your spouse remarries, his or her new spouse wont be the ultimate recipient of your IRA assets. A trusteed IRA can also be structured to qualify, for example, as a marital, QTIP, or credit shelter (bypass) trust, potentially simplifying your estate planning. Finally, a trusteed IRA can even be a valuable tool during your lifetime. For example, the IRA can provide that if you become incapacitated the trustee will step in and take over (or continue) the investment of assets, and distribute benefits on your behalf as needed or required, ensuring that your IRA wont be in limbo until a guardian is appointed. Stacy Bush, President Bush Wealth Management The Bush Wealth Advantage Trusteed IRAs Our column, The Bush Wealth AdvantageŽ is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. Stacy Bush has practiced independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.com Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to prov ide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 885204 Another Back To School SuccessŽPhoto SubmittedVolunteers who helped monitor the event to ensure its success included Madison club members from Kiwanis, Rotary, Lions and Alpha Kappa Alpha, as well as other volunteers from Madison, Perry, Tallahassee and Jacksonville.Photo SubmittedPresenters from school resource agencies, healthcare agencies and administrators from all schools, were present at the event, giving out information and assistance as well as plenty of door prizes.Photo SubmittedJim Holben, of Tent Builders of Madison, donated the large tent that served as a concession site for attendees, to enjoy food and water donations that were served up by Tri-County Electric employees.

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Around Madison County10A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 12, 2014 A Main Street Realty Co. Celebrates One Year Anniversary Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, September 9, 2014The family-owned business, A Main Street Realty celebrated their “rst year anniversary this past Tuesday with an Open House. Standing, from left to right, are: Agent Bryant Thigpen, Broker Jessica Webb, Property Manager Heather Webb and Agent Justin Webb. Not pictured is Agent Cheryl Abercrombie. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, September 9, 2014Police Chief Gary Calhoun and wife Karen, speak to the owner of A Main Street Realty, Jessica Webb, at the Open House. By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.AMain Street Realty,’ located on Range Ave. in downtown Madison, celebrated with an Open House after successfully completing one year of being in business. Broker/Owner Jessica Webb feels their success is due to dealing with their customers honestly and fairly and states everyone in the business prides himself or herself on quality customer service. The realty company, striving to become “an integral part of the community,” must be doing well as they have just added another agent to their staff. Bryant Thigpen is the newest member of their realty team and says he is happy to be there, with Webb adding, “We are happy to have him.” Property Manager Heather Webb, and niece to Jessica, says she is looking forward to growing even more within the community and appreciates all their clients who have worked with them, helping the business to become successful in such a short period of time. Madison Garden Club No Longer Dormant Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, September 9, 2014William and Martha (Sue) Stacy of Madison was chosen for the Garden Clubs Garden of the Month for September. Sue says she does most of the designing and planting, but William is also good to plant and water saying, I do what she tells me to do.Ž Sue says she won Garden of the Year in the past, but her health now prevents her from doing more. William has volunteered for the garden club in Fort Lauderdale, helping with their ornamentals and tree trimming and says winning this award was a real honor.By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.After a threemonth break, the Madison Garden Club is back in full swing, having their rst meeting for fall on Thursday of this past week. This year’s president Laura Coleman welcomed everyone back before the meeting moved forward with a devotional led by member Mina Bloodworth. The program for the month was presented by Jerry and Carol Selph, who spoke to the group on how to prepare and conduct a juried Camellia ower show, which is good information for the attending horticulturists considering they will be holding their rst ever juried Camellia Show on January 10. The Selph’s are members of the American Camellia Society, the Atlantic Coast Camellia Society and the Wiregrass Camellia Society. They have been growing and showing camellias for nine years, but both say they grew up with the owers in their yards as they were grown by parents and grandparents. Jerry and Carol have an immense garden containing 3,000 camellias that boasts 1,200 varieties. The couple shows their owers in competitions and has placed number two in the nation for outdoor camellias. After the program, lunch was provided and followed with announcements and discussion of upcoming meetings and activities that include some interesting topics such as vermiculture, growing orchids, sculpture and raised bed gardening. The rst fall meeting ended with prizes of potted owers and herbs, with president and meeting chairman Laura Coleman winning a large potted hydrangea, the Garden Club’s Plant of the Month.

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MOBILE HOME FOR SALE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED Classifieds Work Classifieds Work$15 $15(for 20 words or less) Wednesday & Friday Wednesday & Friday & on the & on the website & e-pub website & e-pubCall 973-4141 Call 973-4141 l SERVICES WANTED Classifieds . LEGALS Friday, September 12, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 11A Check us out on-linewww.greenepublishing.c om Dresses For Sale:Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ”ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, ”owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful ”owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 Leave a message. Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBecome A Certified Nursing Assistant Quest Training offers a nurse taught CNA prep class. No GED required if age 18. Professional training site, high pass rates. Now accepting students. 386-362-1065.9/3 9/24, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12x18 building with 6 porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/c Pressure?Washing I can pressure wash your house, business, sidewalks and drive-ways. Call (850) 843-4405.7/23 rtn, n/c Asphalt Milling, 18 tons, $350 load. Call Paul Kinsley at (850) 464-1230.8/27 rtn, n/c Immediate Opening At Madison Heights Apartments 3 Bedroom nit Applications are available at 150 SW Bumgardener Drive., Monday through Friday 8 a.m. 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. 4 p.m.8/13 rtn, cApartment For Rent 2 BD 1 BA With Large Garage. Located in Lee. $400 per month. (850) 971-5587.8/20 rtn, c Full Circle Dairy is seeking an Office Support Manager to coordi nate and help man age the office functions. This position requires a dynamic, personable, professional individual with strong organizational skills who will facilitate the smooth functioning of the of“ce and work well with others. Speci“c responsibilities include but are not limited to € Be the of“ce point of contact € Manage and organize employee “les € Order parts and supplies € Organize and maintain general business “les € Provide support to managers € Maintain detailed spreadsheets € Document shipping and receiving MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS € Must be a team player “rst and foremost € Three or more years of experience in a similar capacity with one employer € Ability to work with minimal supervision € Strong computer skills with pro“ciency in MS Of“ce (Outlook, Word, and Excel). Candidate should also have € Professional verbal and written communication skills, including phone skills € Ability to effectively organize administrative work processes and tasks for multiple Senior Managers (e.g. GM, Bookkeeper, Farm Manager, etc.) € Willingness to pitch in to help with other than assigned standard tasks, someone whom takes initiative Compensation and Benefits € $13 $17+ per hour depending on quali“cations € Health insurance € Paid vacation Please email resumes and inquires to:jobs@fcdlee.com.8/20 rtn, cSago Palms $100 (850) 661-6868.9/3 rtn, n/c Drivers: CDL-A. Average $52,000 per yr. plus. Excellent Home Time + Weekends. Monthly Bonuses up to $650. 5,000w APU's for YOUR Comfort + E-Logs. Excellent Bene“ts. 100% no touch. 877-704-3773.9/3, 9/10, pdWanted to hire someone to establish network at small of“ce. Call 850-973-99808/6, rtn, n/cLead Technical Representative Need ed This position requires extensive travel including weekends, some holidays and at times overseas. We do require you have a valid drivers license, pass a back ground check and drug screen, knowledge of tools & equipment, ability to lift 50lbs, interact with customers, two (2) years crew lead experience, basic computer skills, and have professional communication skills. We prefer you have a passport and construction knowledge. We have one (1) position available; please apply in person at Big Top Mfg. on Monday 9/8/14 through Friday 9/19/14. Big Top is an equal opportunity employer that does not tolerate discrimination in employment based upon race, sex, religion, color, nation origin, age, disability, marital status, special disabled veteran or any other characteristic protected by law.9/5, 9/10, cTwo miles south of I-10 and CR 255. Three bedrooms, two full baths. Walk-in closet in master bedroom. Spacious two car garage. Long front porch and deck on back of house. Beautiful landscaped yard. Call (850) 228-8380 to see house.9/5, 9/10, 9/17, pd FULL TIME LINEMAN POSITION Tri-County Electric Cooperative has an opening for a full-time Lineman position in our Madison Of“ce. The candidate is required to have a minimum of six years experience in power line construction and maintenance. The candidate must also have a Class A, Commercial Drivers License and live no more than 30 miles from the Madison warehouse location at 2862 West US 90. The Cooperative offers competitive salary and bene“ts. Tri-County is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and Drug Free Work Place (DFWP). Please send resume and completed Tri-County Employment Application Form, which is available at any TCEC of“ce or online at www.tcec.com, before September 26, 2014 to: Stephanie Carroll Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. 2862 West US 90 Madison, FL 32340.9/10, 9/17, c Sold, but we have moreBarns, Pool, Pasture, Fencing and HomeBrick in town, beautiful location Brick, 3 Bdrm/2 Bath, 1.5 acres, $120,000 Hunting Lodge weekend getaway, 3 Bdrm/ 2 BathCherry Lake frontage, pier/dock, fully furnished SOLD IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF File No. 14-CP-68 KATHRYN ANN BRANNEN Deceased.NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of KATHRYN ANN BRANNEN, deceased, whose date of death was May 25, 2014; File Number 14-CP-68 is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 125 S. W. Range Avenue, Madison, FL 32341. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: September 5, 2014. ____________________________________ Derek B. Alvarez, Esquire FBN: 114278 DBA@GendersAlvarez.com Anthony F. Diecidue, Esquire FBN: 146528 AFD@GendersAlvarez.com Whitney C. Miranda, Esquire FBN 65928 WCM@GendersAlvarez.com GENDERS ALVAREZ DIECIDUE, P.A. 2307 West Cleveland Street Tampa, Florida 33609 Phone: (813) 254-4744 Fax: (813) 254-5222 DEBORAH JOYCE BEARRY Personal Representative 2567 NW Settlement Road Greenville, FL 32331 9/5, 9/12North Florida Community College, Madison FL., Director of Business & Tech Services. Seewww.nfcc.edufor details.8/27 9/10, cTown of Greenville Public Works Laborer The Town of Greenville (pop 837) is seeking to “ll the position of Laborer in the Public Works Department. A strong work ethic is essential. Work is performed under the direction of the Public Works Supervisor. Primary duties include unskilled work in the performance of manual labor tasks and related activities. Duties may also include operation of light Public Works vehicles and equipment. The individual must possess a high school diploma or equivalency. Must pass full background check and drug testing. Must have a valid Florida drivers license and acceptable driving record. Starting salary of $8.50 per hour. Health and dental insurance, vacation and sick leave bene“ts available. Apply at CareerSource North Florida of“ce located in Madison or Live Oak. Applicants in outlying Counties may apply in the mobile unit. Call 866-367-4758 for mobile unit schedule. Position open until 12 Noon, September 30, 2014. Town of Greenville, 154 SW Old Mission Avenue, P. O. Box 235, Greenville, FL 32331 Equal Employment Opportunity/Af“rmative Action Employer.9/12, 9/17, c NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING CITY COMMISSION MADISON, FLORIDA A special meeting of the City Commission, Madison, Florida will be held Tuesday, September 23, 2014 at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall for the following: 1.Second Public Hearing on Fiscal Year 2014-2015 Budget (a) Discuss and Possibly Adopt Proposed Resolution No. 2014-4 … A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA ADOPTING THE FINAL LEVY OF AD VALOREM TAXES FOR THE FISCAL PERIOD BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2014 AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2015; PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE (b)Discuss and Possibly Adopt Proposed Resolution No. 2014-5 … A RESOLUTION ADOPTING THE OFFICIAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL PERIOD BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2014, AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2015, FOR ALL OPERATIONS OF THE CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA, AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE (c)Discuss and Possibly Adopt Proposed Resolution No. 2014-6 … A RESOLUTION PROVIDING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2014, AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2015, TO PAY SALARIES, EXPENSES, IMPROVEMENTS AND OTHER ITEMS AS SHOWN BY THE BUDGET OF THE CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA, AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE 2.First Reading of Proposed Ordinance No. 2014-5 … AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 25-46 OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF MADISON TO CHANGE THE MONTHLY CHARGES FOR WATER SERVICE; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING PROVISIONS; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE 3.First Reading of Proposed Ordinance No. 2014-6 … AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 25-28 OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF MADISON TO CHANGE THE MONTHLY CHARGES FOR SEWER SERVICE; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING PROVISIONS; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE 4.First Reading of Proposed Ordinance No. 2014-7 … AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA AMENDING SECTION 12-22 OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF MADISON TO INCREASE THE MONTHLY FEE IMPOSED TO REMOVE SOLID WASTE AND TRASH FOR RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE 5.Award of Contracts for the Citys Community Development Block Grant Program for Housing Renovation Any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter considered of such meeting will need a record of the proceedings, and that for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based.9/12 Call 7 days a week 8am 11pm EST Promo Code: MB06141-800-831-1867 CALL NOW LIMITED TIME SAVINGS! mo Promotional Packages Starting At...FOR 12 MONTHSNot eligible f or Hopper or HD $199 Move-In Spe cial 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assis tance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c

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12A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, September 12, 2014 Purchase any vehicle & receive a World Famous Rocker to enjoy the Great Fall Weather! I T  S T H A T T I M E A G A I N A R E Y O U R E A D Y F O R S O M E ƒ I T  S T H A T T I M E A G A I N A R E Y O U R E A D Y F O R S O M E ƒ ITS THAT TIME AGAIN. ARE YOU READY FOR SOMEƒ 0% Example: V140463 MSRP $26,715 -Disc. $1,652 -$2,000 Down = $23,063/72 @ $320/Month 2014 RAM 1500 CREW 0% or $8,822 Discount V140581 2014 RAM 1500 0% or $3,652 Discount V140463 2014 RAM 1500 LARAMIE Q140141 0% or $6,900 Discount 2014 RAM 1500 EXPRESS 0 % 0 % o r 0% or $ 7 6 5 8 $7,658 D i s c o u n t Discount Q140479 2014 RAM 1500 OUTDOORSMAN 0 % 0 % o r $ 8 4 8 5 0% or $8,485 D i s c o u n t Discount V140395 2014 RAM 1500 LONGHORN V140174 0% or $7,415 Discount $AVE THOUSANDS IN INTEREST AT 0%! A LL PRICES P LUS TAX TITLE & L EMON L AW FEE OF $3 AND REFLECT ALL APPLICABLE FACTORY REBATES D ISCOUNTS EQUALS M SRP D EALER D ISCOUNT A LL A PPLICABLE R EBATES A LL 1500 T RUCKS D ISCOUNTS INCLUDE $500 REBATE WHEN FINANCED WITH C HRYSLER C APITAL AND $500 C ONQUEST R EBATE TO CUSTOMER WHO OWN A COMPETITIVE BRAND TRUCK M UST PRESENT AD AT TIME OF PURCHASE TO RECEIVE ANY OR ALL ADVERTISED PRICE V EHICLES MAY BE LO CATED AT EITHER OF OUR Q UITMAN OR V ALDOSTA DEALERSHIPS A LL PRICES GOOD THROUGH S EPT 6, 2014 OR UNTIL VEHICLE IS SOLD WHICHEVER COM ES FIRST 888-463-6831 4164 N. VALDOSTA RD. € VALDOSTA, GA 888-304-2277 801 E. SCREVEN ST € QUITMAN, GA C A S S C A S S CASS B U R C H B U R C H BURCH % 72 MONTHS ON ALL 2014 RAM 1500 2014 JEEP PATRIOT Q140318 0% or $4,281 Discount V140251 2014 JEEP COMPASS 0% or $4,417 Discount 2014 JEEP CHEROKEE Q140265 0% or $3,370 Discount 2015 CHRYSLER 200 V150003 0% or $3,139 Discount 2014 DODGE CHARGER Q140480 0% or $5,295 Discount 2014 JEEP WRANGLER 2014 GRAND CHEROKEE V140501 0% or $3,543 Discount 56 to Choose From! WOW! Weve Got Em CASS BURCH HUGE DISCOUNTS FROM THE MOST DEPENDABLE, LONGEST LASTING FULL-SIZE PICKUPS ON THE ROAD! 2014 SILVERADO 1500 DOUBLE CAB LT C140206 $8,549 Discount 2 0 1 5 2 0 1 5 SILVERADO 2500 HEAVY DUTY CREW 4 X 4 2015 C150038 $6,141 Discount 2014 SILVERADO 1500 CREW LTZ 4 X 4 $5,068 Discount 2014 SILVERADO 1500 C140264 $5,518 Discount 229-263-7561 8640 HWY 84 WEST A LL PRICES P LUS TAX TITLE & L EMON L AW FEE OF $3 AND REFLECT ALL APPLICABLE FACTORY REBATES D ISCOUNTS EQUALS MSRP D EALER D ISCOUNT A LL A PPLICABLE R EBATES A LL 1500 T RUCK DISCOUNTS INCLUDE $1500 TRADE IN A SSISTANCE V EHICLES ARE LOCATED AT OUR Q UITMAN DEA LERSHIP A LL PRICES GOOD THROUGH S EPT 6, 2014 OR UNTIL VEHICLE IS SOLD WHICHEVER COMES FIRST M UST PRESENT AD AT TIME OF PURCHASE TO RECEIVE ANY OR ALL ADVERTISED PRICE 2014 SILVERADO 1500 CREW LT 4 X 4 C140258 $7,805 Discount Eve rybody Knows Che vys Cost Le ss In Qui tman! 2014 CHEVY CRUZE 1LT C150019 C150001 2015 CHEVY TRAVERSE C150028 $2,598 Discount $3,223 Discount 2014 CHEVY CAMARO C140221 $3,692 Discount 2014 CHEVY SONIC LT $2,045 Discount 2015 CHEVY SUBURBAN 2015 CHEVY TAHOE $4,280 Discount $4,145 Discount Purchase any vehicle & receive a World Famous Rocker to enjoy the Great Fall Weather! 883809 C150019 C150001 C140252 C140227 C140239

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Health Health And AndWellness Wellness Guide Guide Madison Enterprise-Recorder Section B September 12, 2014

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2014 Health & Wellness 2B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, September 12, 2014

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, September 12, 2014 € 3B 2014 Health & Wellness Spread Of Ebola Beyond Africa Likely, Researchers Predict Story Submitted As the Ebola outbreak in West Africa continues to spread, isolated cases will likely make their way to the United States, with new estimates showing there is a nearly 20 percent chance this will occur by the end of September, according to researchers from several institutions, including the University of Florida. The analysis, published Sept. 2 in the journal PLOS Currents: Outbreaks, combined patterns of international travel with estimates of how fast Ebola is spreading to calculate how quickly the disease might move to different locations. Although some unexpected cases in the U.S. are likely inevitable, researchers anticipate they will be quickly isolated, not reaching any sort of outbreak level currently found in West Africa. Currently, the U.S. has imported three cases knowingly for treatment, with the third American health care provider to be infected with the disease in Africa arriving in the U.S. for treatment Friday (Sept. 5). “We would assume that the U.S. would have sufficient capacity to test people and treat them. We would not expect any real transmission in the U.S.,” Longini said. Initially, the disease is expected to spread to currently unaffected African countries, which further increases the likelihood of it spreading beyond the continent’s borders. There is not a See Ebola On Page 5B

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2014 Health & Wellness 4B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, September 12, 2014 Clearing Confusion On Adult Vaccination By Norman Edelman, M.D. and Gregg Sylvester, M.D. The month of August was National Immunization Awareness Month. While children are typically the targets of such preventative public health awareness campaigns, adults need a friendly reminder that vaccines aren’t just for kids. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination for all adults, and currently, a significant number of adults are not following this advice. Aging has a detrimental impact on the immune system, weakening our natural armor and leaving us more prone to illness. It is always advisable for anyone 65 years and older to speak to their health care provider about which vaccines are appropriate for them. Those with certain chronic conditions, including heart and lung disease, may be at an increased risk for serious illnesses that are potentially preventable with vaccines, such as influenza and pneumococcal pneumonia, diseases which affect the lungs. Contracting influenza or pneumococcal pneumonia can have serious, even deadly, consequences for all adults, but particularly for those with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and for those who smoke. Combined, influenza and pneumonia, including pneumococcal pneumonia, were the ninth leading causes of death in the United States in 2010, according to the CDC. It is also estimated by the CDC that 900,000 Americans contract pneumococcal pneumonia annually, with as many as 400,000 hospitalizations. See Vaccination On Page 8B

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, September 12, 2014 € 5B 2014 Health & Wellness Ebola Cont. From Page 3B high level of international travel among some of the affected countries, such as Liberia and Sierra Leone. But Nigeria, where the outbreak has also spread, is linked to many countries across the globe. In fact, according to the study, as many as 6,000 passengers travel from Nigeria to the U.S. each week. In addition, many airline passengers go from Nigeria to other countries outside of Africa. Within the past week, Ebola also spread to Senegal, home to a major international hub in Dakar, its capital. As the outbreak affects more metropolitan areas with international airports, the chances of unknowingly infected passengers bringing the virus with them to new locales is highly probable, said Ira Longini, Ph.D., a professor of biostatistics in the UF colleges of Medicine and Public Health and Health Professions, part of UF Health. Longini collaborated with senior author and physicist Alessandro Vespignani, Ph.D., of Northeastern University, and other colleagues on the study. According to the World Health Organization, or WHO, 1,841 people have died from Ebola in West African nations during the outbreak. In total, the WHO reports 3,685 confirmed and suspected cases of Ebola thus far. The epidemic is anticipated to reach 10,000 cases by the end of September, according to an unrelated report in the journal Science. Ebola spreads from person to person through contact with an infected person’s bodily fluids. It can take anywhere from two to 21 days between infection and the onset of symptoms, according to WHO. Symptoms typically include a sudden fever, muscle weakness and sore throat, eventually progressing to include vomiting, rash and even bleeding. There is currently no vaccine for the disease and all treatments, beyond supportive care and rehydration, are experimental. Although it seems logical to assume that stopping international air travel would stem the spread of the outbreak, the researchers’ analysis showed it actually would have little effect. For example, reducing air travel by 80 percent would only prevent Ebola from spreading temporarily. “Studies have shown the quarantining of entire villages and countries is highly ineffective, and this analysis shows that yet again,” Longini said. “Surveillance and containment, which includes the isolation of cases and quarantine of close contacts, is the only intervention strategy that works that is available.” The researchers describe the current risk that the virus will spread to additional countries as moderate, but as the outbreak continues to defy containment, these risks will continue to grow. Longini and colleagues, who began analyzing the data this summer, are continuing to monitor trends and update their mathematical model. The study was partially supported by the MIDAS (Models for Infectious Disease Agent Study) grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences. Photo By Cynthia Goldsmith, CDCAn Ebola virus as seen through an electron microscope.

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By April Frawley Birdwell Editor / College of Medicine Science Writer Accidents as minor as a slip of the knife while chopping onions can turn dangerous for patients with hemophilia, who lack the necessary proteins in their blood to stem the flow from a wound. People with severe hemophilia typically receive regular injections of these proteins, called clotting factors, as a treatment for the disease. But up to 30 percent of people with the most common form, hemophilia A, develop antibodies that attack these lifesaving proteins, making it difficult to prevent or treat excessive bleeding. Now, researchers from University of Florida Health and the University of Pennsylvania have developed a way to thwart production of these antibodies by using plant cells to teach the immune system to tolerate rather than attack the clotting factors. The study was published Sept. 4 in the journal Blood. “The only current treatments against (antibody) formation cost $1 million and are risky for patients,” said Henry Daniell, Ph.D., interim chairman of biochemistry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine and a coauthor on the study. “Our technique, which uses plantbased capsules, has the potential to be a cost-effective and safe alternative.” The study focused on hemophilia A, which occurs when babies are born with a defective gene on the X chromosome. Because girls have two X chromosomes — giving them two shots at having a working version of the gene — the disease typically only affects boys. Worldwide, one in 7,500 male babies is born with this disease. After receiving factor VIII treatments, between 20 and 30 percent of patients develop antibodies against the clotting protein. Instead of allowing the protein to do its job, the immune system responds to this foreign protein as an invader that must be attacked and eliminated. “In the hemophilia world these antibodies are known as inhibitors,” said UF co-author Roland Herzog, Ph.D., a professor of pediatrics in the UF College of Medicine and a member of the UF Genetics Institute. “That is what patients are all scared of, because they render their standard therapy ineffective and inhibit the blood from clotting.” Daniell and colleagues had developed a platform for delivering drugs and biotherapeutics using genetically modified plants to express proteins. After teaming with Herzog and his colleagues at UF, they devised a way to use this technique to stop the body from launching an immune attack on the hemophilia treatment. Using a combination of factor VIII DNA and another substance that can safely cross the intestinal walls and enter the bloodstream, the researchers fused the genes into tobacco plants. The team fed the resulting plant solution to mice with hemophilia A twice each week for two months and compared them with mice that were fed unmodified plant material. They then gave the 2014 Health & Wellness 6B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, September 12, 2014 Researchers Turn To Plants To Help Treat Hemophilia See Plants On Page 10B

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2014 Health & Wellness 8B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, September 12, 2014 Vaccination Cont. From Page 4B What is often largely unknown about pneumococcal pneumonia is that someone without symptoms can transmit this bacterium, which can be spread by coughing or sneezing. Common symptoms of pneumococcal pneumonia include fever, chills, productive (mucus) cough that persists or gets worse, difficulty in breathing and chest pain. Vaccination is a way to help prevent influenza and pneumococcal pneumonia. In addition to vaccination, maintaining good hygiene—including regular hand washing—is also important. Now is a great time to ask your health care provider to review your immunization records. Patients often assume their health care provider will remind them of their vaccination needs, but that’s not always the case. The key to staying current on essential vaccinations is to report all vaccinations to your primary care provider, and to ask questions about which vaccinations you might need. The CDC’s website, www.cdc.gov also provides helpful guidance. If you or someone you care about is 65 years or older, talking to your health care provider about getting vaccinated is an important step you can take. The American Lung Association and Pfizer are working together to raise adult awareness of recommended vaccinations. This Op-Ed is being submitted by Norman Edelman, M.D., Senior Medical Advisor of the American Lung Association and Gregg Sylvester, MD, Vice President, Americas Medical & Scientific Affairs, Pfizer Vaccines. For confirmation or questions, please contact Gregg Tubbs, Gregg.Tubbs@lung.org 202715-3469.

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Story By StatePoint One out of every three adults over 65 years old falls each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And for older adults with dementia, the risk of falling is three times higher than those with no cognitive impairment, according to the AARP Bulletin. However, research supports the notion that many of the physiological changes related to aging -such as loss of balance -can be prevented or postponed with regular exercise. With this in mind, it’s no surprise that many senior living communities are making comprehensive health and wellness programs available to their residents. “We’re seeing residents increase their mobility, endurance and balance, and improve their range of motion and fitness levels,” says Katie Westberg, national director of Life Enrichment at The Goodman Group, a company that has developed a new fitness program for its senior living and health care communities. Additionally, Westberg cites that participants feel better and are having fun, showing quick results to their overall well-being, “Many of the residents involved in our FIT Functional Fitness program start seeing long-lasting and significant strength training benefits within an eight to 16 week period.” The experts behind the FIT Functional Fitness program, a new, national, personalized functional fitness program developed by The Goodman Group in partnership with a physical therapist and board certified geriatric specialist, are offering some tips for older adults looking to improve their well-being and restore their vigor.  Engage in exercises that can improve your core strength, balance and cardiovascular health. If you live in a senior living community, inquire about on-site programs. Additionally, many community centers and health clubs conduct exercise classes designed specifically for senior health.  Invest in a stationary bike. It’s easy to incorporate this activity into your day while watching TV, listening to music or talking to your family, and pedaling lowers blood pressure, according to AARP.  Consult your physician before getting started. Your exercise routine should take into account your current health level and functionality as well as your physical needs.  Food and health are directly correlated, so pair your exercise with healthy eating. The FIT Functional Fitness program at The Goodman Group, for example, incorporates local, organic, seasonal produce as well as lean protein alternatives and plant strong ingredients in their menu options.  Stick to it. Results may come quickly, but a long-term health benefit requires commitment. For more information about senior fitness and health programs, visit www.TheGoodmanGroup.com While you can’t stop time, research shows that with exercise, you may feel better, longer. Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, September 12, 2014 € 9B 2014 Health & Wellness For Older Adults, Regular Exercise May Stem Aging Effects

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10B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, September 12, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness Plants Cont. From Page 6B mice infusions of factor VIII, just as human hemophilia patients would receive. As expected, the control group formed high levels of inhibitors. In contrast, the mice fed the experimental plant material formed fewer inhibitors — on average, seven times fewer. “This could potentially be a way to prevent antibodies from forming or lower the incidence of it,” Herzog said. “This is a major step forward.” The researchers discovered the mice that ate the experimental plants had more signaling molecules associated with suppressing or regulating immune responses, while mice in the control group had more associated with triggering an immune response. The researchers also tested whether the plant capsules would help reduce antibodies in mice that had already developed them. After two to three months of feedings with the plant capsules, the mice had three to seven times fewer antibodies than before the treatment began. “We have been looking for a way to induce immune tolerance in hemophilia for a while,” Herzog said. “Oral tolerance is ideal because you are feeding them something specific that addresses the problem and you don’t have to use drugs that suppress the immune system. It’s not invasive. You’re not manipulating patients’ cells. It would be an ideal way to do it.” The treatment would not be a onetime solution, however. Patients would need to continue taking the plant capsules to maintain immune system tolerance. When translated to humans, the researchers will use lettuce plants instead of tobacco plants. Daniell, Herzog and the Penn Center for Innovation are now working with a pharmaceutical company to test this strategy in other animal species, with plans to begin human trials shortly thereafter. For human use, the goal would be to use lettuce plants instead of tobacco plants. “With multimillion-dollar funding from a global pharmaceutical company and their decades of expertise in bringing numerous protein therapeutics to the clinic, we’re excited to take lettuce capsules producing human blood clotting factors to the clinic soon,” Daniell said. The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health and Bayer. Other authors included Jin Su and Shina Lin from the University of Pennsylvania, and Alexandra Sherman and Xiaomei Wang at UF.

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2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, September 12, 2014 € 11B What Every Parent Needs To Know About Childrens Heart Health By StatePoint When thinking of heart disease, older adults typically come to mind, but children also can have heart disease, often with more devastating outcomes. Pediatric cardiomyopathy is a potentially life-threatening disease and the leading cause of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in children. Cardiomyopathy is a chronic disease of the heart muscle that affects the heart’s ability to pump blood. Some children who have the disease can be symptom-free and are unknowingly at risk for SCA. Approximately 2,000 people under 25 die of SCA every year according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but there are preventative measures for families. “In many cases, if cardiomyopathy is detected early and managed properly, sudden cardiac death can be prevented,” says Lisa Yue, a parent who lost two children to cardiomyopathy and founder of the Children’s Cardiomyopathy Foundation (CCF). The Foundation is launching the first Children’s Cardiomyopathy Awareness Month in September to call attention to the disease. “Knowing the symptoms and risk factors for cardiomyopathy can help save lives.” Know the Symptoms Currently there is no formal cardiac screening process for children. While pediatricians can respond to more obvious symptoms, identifying pediatric cardiomyopathy can be challenging because some affected children are symptomfree. It is not uncommon for cardiomyopathy to be missed or misdiagnosed as a cold, flu or asthma. Symptoms include shortness of breath, rapid breathing, fainting, chest pain, dizziness, heart palpitations and fatigue. Infants may experience poor weight gain, difficulty breathing, excessive sweating or lethargy. It is important for parents to communicate concerns to the pediatrician. Know the Risk Factors “Cardiomyopathy can occur in any child and be inherited or acquired through a viral infection or from cancer chemotherapy,” explains Steven Lipshultz, M.D., pediatrician-in-chief of Children’s Hospital of Michigan and chair of CCF’s medical advisory board. Since the majority of cardiomyopathies are inherited, understanding a family’s cardiac history is the best way to prevent premature death. Hereditary risk factors include having a family member who is disabled by heart disease, has died of heart disease before age 50, or was diagnosed with Long QT syndrome, cardiomyopathy, Marfan syndrome or a heart rhythm issue. Family members who exhibit symptoms such as chest pain, discomfort upon exertion, fatigue, fainting or high blood pressure should be evaluated by a cardiologist. Protecting At-Risk Young Athletes Adolescents with an underlying heart condition like cardiomyopathy are at a higher risk for SCA due to increased physical activity and certain body changes. SCA is the top cause of death on school property, and according to the American Heart Association these deaths occur most commonly in high-intensity sports. To help keep young athletes safe, Senator Robert Menendez, Representatives Lois Capps and Bill Pascrell, Children’s Cardiomyopathy Foundation and the National Athletic Trainers’ Association introduced the Supporting Athletes, Families, and Educators to Protect the Lives of Athletic Youth (SAFE PLAY) Act, with provisions to protect student athletes from SCA. For more information about cardiomyopathy, visit www.childrenscardiomyopathy.org Whether children are at home, in school or on the sports field, it is important for parents to understand the symptoms and risk factors of the disease.

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