The Madison enterprise-recorder

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Material Information

Title:
The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title:
Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title:
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Creation Date:
May 31, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note:
Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID:
UF00028405:00646

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Preceded by:
Enterprise-recorder


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Health Health And AndWellness Wellness Guide Guide M M a a d d i i s s o o n n E E n n t t e e r r p p r r i i s s e e R R e e c c o o r r d d e e r r S S e e c c t t i i o o n n B B J J u u l l y y 1 1 1 1 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 4 4

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2014 Health & Wellness 2B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, July 11, 2014 Gov. Rick Scott Signs Charlotte's Web Legislation By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. Charlotte's Web, the title of a popular children's book by E.B. White, is now also the name of a strain of medical marijuana developed in 2011. It is lower in tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the substance that produces the high) than other strains of marijuana and higher in cannabidiol (CBD, the medicinal use element). The harvested plant is processed to extract an oil known as Realm Oil or Alepsia. It is this extract that is used for medicinal purposes. The name Charlotte's Web was chosen in recognition of Charlotte Fiji, a little girl diagnosed with Dravet syndrome (also known by its longer clinical name of severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy or SMEI) at age two. She was reported to suffer an average of 300 grand mal seizures a week, until she began treatment with medical marijuana, with the extract solution given to her in an olive oil base. It resulted in an immediate and dramatic improvement. Eventually, her seizures were down to two or three per month. When her story aired in CNN in 2011 and other news/documentary shows, it was described as the one that was changing medical marijuana laws across the country. Gov. Rick Scott recently signed legislation into law that recognizes the use of medical marijuana for a short list of illnesses, including childhood epilepsy, glaucoma, and side effects from treatments for cancer and HIV. As a father and grandfather, you never want to see kids suffer, said Scott. The approval of Charlottes Web will ensure that children in Florida who suffer from seizures and other debilitating illnesses will have the medication needed to improve their quality of life. I am proud to stand today with families who deserve the ability to provide their children with the best treatment available.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, July 11, 2014 3B 2014 Health & Wellness Madison Countys Infant Mortality Rates Low In 2013 By Jessie R. Box Greene Publishing, Inc. The Healthy Start Coalition of Jefferson, Madison and Taylor Counties, Inc., hosted a State of the Infant, presentation on Wednesday, June 25 at the Madison County Public Library. The presentation discussed the statistics surrounding the infants in Madison County. Madison Countys number of babies born has dropped from the 212 in 2012 to a total of 205 babies in 2013. Madison County had no infant deaths during 2013, which is when the child takes its first breath to before the child turns one year old. Madison County had the worst rate in the state for the three-year rolling rate for 20102012 with nine deaths. There were only two fetal deaths reported in 2013. Madison had been the worst in the state with seven fetal deaths for the threeyear rolling rate for 2010-2012. There is one issue that Madison County is currently facing concerning the babies and that is their birth weights. Madison currently has the highest in the State of Florida for low birth weight. In 2013, there were 84 babies that were born weighing below five and a half pounds. Healthy Start Coalition Executive Director Donna Hagan discussed several underlying issues that could be a cause for the low birth weights: obesity, pregnancy intervals and lack of a support system. Hagan discussed obesity as a potential cause for the low birth rate in Madison, however, according to the states three-year rolling rate for 20112013, Madison actually has a lower percentage of obese mothers during pregnancy than the state. The intervals between pregnancies were also story cont. on page 4B

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discussed as a cause for low birth weight. The recommended interval of time between pregnancies is 18 months. In Madison County, 35.4 percent of the pregnancies were not adequately spaced. A womans body needs time to recover before becoming pregnant again, however, some Madison County residents are becoming pregnant again within months after the initial delivery. An emerging societal trend is to not marry and this could potentially cause the mother of a newborn to have a lack of support to help during pregnancy and with the child after delivery. Madison County is the fourth highest in the state for unwed mothers, with 61.1 percent of the births to unwed women. Another issue that Florida faces is repeat teen births. Madison County currently has the lowest rate of repeat births to teens, ages 15-19 in the state. Healthy Start Coalition has been able to help the teenagers set goals and provide a good life for both teens and their children. 2014 Health & Wellness 4B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, July 11, 2014 William R. Howard, M.D.Board CertifiedDermatologistSpecializing In The Diagnosis And Treatment Of Skin CancerNew Patients Welcome(229) 247-25952704 North Oak St B-2 V aldosta, GA 31602 Infant Mortality Continued From Page 3B Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box June 25, 2014Healthy Start Coalition Executive Director Donna Hagan (far left) honored (left to right) Michelle Stout, Nita Mitchell and Tangela Knight with flowers for all the work they do for the citizens of Madison County at the Healthy Start Coalition of Madison.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, July 11, 2014 5B 2014 Health & Wellness Gov. Scott Funds Cancer And Alzheimers Disease Research By Jessie R. Box Greene Publishing, Inc. During the month of June, Governor Rick Scott signed numerous bills into law. He signed House Bill 709, 711 and 5230 into law on Wednesday, June 18, that will fund new research for cancer and Alzheimers disease. The National Cancer Institute estimates that approximately 40.8 percent of men and women will be diagnosed with some form of cancer at some point during their lifetime. The Alzheimers Foundation of America estimates that as many as 5.1 million Americans may currently have Alzheimer's disease. House Bill 709 and House Bill 711 creates a new Alzheimer Disease research program and addresses the needs of people with Alzheimers and their families that care for them. House Bill 709 and House Bill 711 establishes the Ed and Ethel Moore Alzheimers Disease Research Program to fund research leading to the prevention of, or a cure for, Alzheimers. An Alzheimer's Disease Research Grant Advisory Board will allocate research grants through a peerreviewed, competitive process that will identify and fund the best proposals to expand Alzheimer research in Florida. Researchers at any university or research institute in the state are eligible to apply. This legislation also requires the Division of Emergency Management to develop and maintain a Special Needs Shelter registration program to provide shelter and services to individuals with Alzheimers disease in emergency situations. It also requires the Department of Elder Affairs to provide incentive based funding for memory disorder clinics. House Bill 5203 establishes the Florida Consortium of National Cancer Institute Centers Program at the Department of Health. The Consortium is designed to enhance the quality and competitiveness of cancer care and research in this state. The Consortium will annually allocate $60 million to help Floridas Cancer Centers meet the rigorous scientific and research criteria required for the NCI designation. The Consortium will allocate these funds through a competitive formula factoring in metrics for cancer care, research and training. An additional investment of $20 million for peer-reviewed research grant funding was included in the Its Your Money Tax Cut Budget. Floridas cancer research and collaboration system already includes projects funded by the peerreviewed William G. Bill Bankhead, Jr. and David Coley Cancer Research Program, and the James and Esther King Biomedical Research Program, both of which were established by the Florida Legislature.

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6B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, July 11, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness By Ron Pollack Hepatitis C is a disease that is caused by a virus that affects the liver. Even though the disease often doesnt produce symptoms, it can seriously damage the liver and can be fatal. An estimated 3.2 million Americans have Hepatitis C. Older people are more likely to have been exposed to Hepatitis C, but many older Americans are not aware that they need to be tested for it. A December 2013 report found that Hepatitis C infections are concentrated in the Baby Boomers generation. In one major study of people with the virus, 75 percent of the patients were born between 1945 and 1964. What is Hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus, which is spread primarily through contact with the blood of an infected person. Hepatitis C ranges in severity from a mild illness that lasts a few weeks (referred to as an acute infection) to a serious, lifelong illness that can destroy the liver (referred to as a chronic infection). Most people with Hepatitis C do not have any immediate symptoms. However, 75 to 85 percent of people who are infected eventually develop a chronic infection. Chronic Hepatitis C is a serious disease that can result in long-term health problems, including liver damage, liver failure, liver cancer and even death. It is the leading cause of cirrhosis of the liver (liver scarring) and liver cancer and is the most common reason for liver transplants in the United States. Approximately 15,000 people die every year from Hepatitis C-related liver disease. What are the symptoms of chronic Hepatitis C? Most people with chronic Hepatitis C do not have any symptoms, and they may not have symptoms until years later when they develop liver problems. In people with no symptoms, Hepatitis C is often detected during routine blood tests to measure liver function. Infected people who do develop symptoms may experience the following: fatigue, joint pain, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fever, dark urine, light-colored stools or yellowish eyes and skin, called jaundice. Can a person spread Hepatitis C without having symptoms? Yes. Most people who are infected with Hepatitis C do not know they are infected because they do not look or feel sick. An infected person with no symptoms can spread the virus to others. Any activity that exchanges blood between two people can put a person at risk for exposure. Before 1992, Hepatitis C was commonly spread through blood transfusions and organ transplants. Widespread screening of the U.S. blood supply for Hepatitis C began in 1992. Should I be tested for Hepatitis C? Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Preventive Services Task Force recommend screening for the Hepatitis C virus for people born between 1945 and 1964. Talk to your doctor about being tested for Hepatitis C if any of these apply to you: You were born between 1945 and 1964 You were treated for a blood clotting problem before 1987 You received a blood transfusion or organ transplant before July 1992 You are on long-term hemodialysis treatment You have abnormal liver tests or liver disease You work in health care or public safety and were exposed to blood through a needle stick or other sharp object injury You have HIV You engaged in sex Hepatitis C: Older Americans Are At Risk story cont. on page 8B

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2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, July 11, 2014 7B

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2014 Health & Wellness 8B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, July 11, 2014 Hepatitis C Cont. From Page 6B that could have caused bleeding. You are a current or former injection drug user, even if you injected only one time or many years ago Can Hepatitis C be treated successfully? Yes. In about 25 percent of people, an acute infection clears up on its own without treatment. However, if acute hepatitis C is diagnosed, treatment reduces the risk that it will become a chronic infection. There are several medications that treat chronic Hepatitis C, including new treatments that appear to be more effective and have fewer side effects than previous options. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) keeps a list of approved treatments online at http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ByAudience/ ForPatientAdvocates/ucm151494.htm. However, treatment can be expensive. Clinical trials of new drug treatments may also be available. Hepatitis C and the Affordable Care Act Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, hundreds of thousands of people with Hepatitis C have new access to treatment. All insurance must provide free screening for Hepatitis C for anyone born between 1945 and 1964. People with Hepatitis C cannot be turned down for insurance or discriminated against by an insurance company. Limits on out-of-pocket costs will make expensive treatment more affordable. Belly Fat Linked To Metabolic Diseases In Kids Story Submitted While doctors have long used abdominal fat as a predictor for the risk of metabolic diseases in adults, the same holds true for kids, according to the results of a new study. The study from researchers in India suggests that doctors are seeing the same types of health problems in children as they do in adults who carry too much abdominal fat, including metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. As part of the study, researchers looked at 10,842 kids from five cities in India and found that the more abdominal fat a child carried, the more likely the child also suffered from metabolic syndrome, defined as having three or more markers including high triglyceride levels, low levels of good cholesterol, higher fasting blood glucose levels and high systolic blood pressure. Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in both adults and children, but experts say the rise in childhood obesity levels is expected to lead to long-term health problems unless it is addressed. "In my daily practice, I am seeing many children who are getting diseases which were earlier seen only in adults, primarily because of obesity, said pediatric endocrinologist Archana Dayal Arya of Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, who co-authored the study. It is shocking to see children as young as six years with diseases like hypertension, diabetes mellitus and abnormalities in the lipid profile. In this study we found 350 children suffering from hypertension. The results suggest that doctors should use waist circumference as a gauge as to whether to screen kids for metabolic issues, researchers said, in hopes that early detection helps prevent more serious health problems. Recession May Have Worsened Obesity Story Submitted According to a report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the Great Recession that began in 2008 may have worsened obesity rates in developed nations, including some groups in the United States. The organization is composed mostly of wealthy nations, such as the U.S. and European countries. But their relative prosperity didn't keep obesity from spreading during a time of profound economic turmoil. According to researchers, the downturn likely led to consumers turning from healthy but expensive foods (such as fresh fruits and vegetables) to cheap and unhealthy options. "The economic crisis is likely to have contributed to further growth in obesity," the group wrote in the report. This effect was most noticeable in countries that fared the worse during the recession. But even in countries that did relatively well, atrisk groups such as women and the poor were still more likely to become obese. There were some glimmers of good news in the report, however. Over the past half-decade, the increase of obesity has slowed down in the most developed countries. Canada, South Korea and Italy, for example, have seen little change. Australia, France and Switzerland, on the other hand, have faced up to three percent annual increases. Obesity presents severe public health challenges. Without changing course, more and more people in countries around the world will be dealing with cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. And the myriad costs associated with these conditions hit government health care plans, local economies and individuals alike. The OCED stressed the need for governments to promote healthy eating habits. It said that carefully targeted taxes on certain foods and drinks could play a role as well. Whatever course countries decide on, it said, they need to play a role in keeping their citizens at healthy weights. "The economic crisis may have contributed to a further growth in obesity, but most governments need to do more to stop this rising tide," said Michele Cecchini, an OECD health policy analyst.

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Dear Inquiring, If your mom is dealing with a variety of health problems and is taking multiple medications, a visit to a geriatrician may be just the antidote to help get her back on track. Heres a breakdown of the different types of health conditions geriatricians treat and some tips to help you locate one in your area. Geriatric Doctors For starters, its important to know that geriatricians are family practices or internal medicine physicians that have had additional specialized training to manage the unique and, oftentimes, multiple health concerns of older adults. Just as a pediatrician specializes in caring for children, a geriatrician is trained to provide care for seniors, usually over age 65. While most doctors, and even general practitioners, are trained to focus on a persons particular illness or disease, geriatricians are trained to look at all aspects that can affect elderly patients not just the physical symptoms. They also often work with a team of other health care professionals like geriatric-trained nurses, rehabilitation therapists, nutritionists, social workers and psychiatrists to provide care. And, they will coordinate treatments among a patients specialists. Patients who can benefit from seeing a geriatrician are elderly seniors with multiple health and age-related problems such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, confusion and memory problems, Parkinsons and Alzheimers disease, diabetes, hypertension, depression, respiratory problems, osteoporosis, arthritis, chronic pain, mobility issues, incontinence, vision and hearing impairment, and trouble with balance and falls. Geriatricians are also particularly adept at tackling medication problems. Because many seniors, like your mom, take multiple medications at the same time for various health conditions, and because aging bodies often absorb and metabolize drugs differently than younger adults, unique side effects and drug interactions are not uncommon. A geriatrician will evaluate and monitor your moms medications to be sure they are not affecting her in a harmful way. Geriatricians can also help their patients and families determine their long-term care needs, like how long they can remain in their own homes safely without assistance, and what type of services may be necessary when they do need some extra help. But not all seniors need to see a geriatrician. Seniors who have few health problems are just fine seeing their primary care physician. Find a Geriatrician Unfortunately, theres a shortage of geriatricians in the U.S., so depending on where you live, finding one may be challenging. To locate one in your area, visit the American Board of Family Medicine website at theabfm.org where you can do a search online. Or use Medicares online Physician Compare tool. Just go to medicare.gov/physiciancompare and type in your zip code, or city and state, then type in Geriatric Medicine in the What are you searching for? box. You can also get this information by calling Medicare at 800-633-4227. Keep in mind, though, that locating a geriatrician doesnt guarantee your mom will be accepted as a patient. Many doctors already have a full patient roster and dont accept any new patients. Youll need to call the individual doctors office to find out. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy Senior book. Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, July 11, 2014 9B 2014 Health & Wellness Savvy Senior When To See A Geriatrician Dear Savvy Senior, What kinds of health problems do geriatricians treat? My mother, whos 80, takes several different medications for various health problems but hasnt been feeling herself lately. Im wondering if she would benefit by seeing a geriatrician in place of her regular family doctor. Inquiring Daughter

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10B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, July 11, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness Depression And Suicide In Old Age By Krisha McCoy, MS Medically reviewed by Pat F. Bass III, MD, MPH The challenges people face as they enter old age may contribute to seniors' increased risk of depression and suicide, say researchers who have studied the issue. Depression is thought to be the major risk factor for most suicide deaths, and older people are at particularly high risk of developing depression. Unfortunately, depression often goes undiagnosed and untreated in older adults, and untreated depression can lead to suicide. A number of other age-related factors may also contribute to higher rates of suicide among seniors, including: Sleep problems. Studies have shown that seniors who commit suicide tend to have poorer sleep quality than those who don't. Possession of firearms. Firearms are the most common method older people use to commit suicide, so the risk of suicide is greater for seniors who have access to guns. Limited social support. Many seniors experience feelings of isolation, and people who feel socially isolated and lonely are more likely to experience depression and commit suicide. Spending time with family and friends can help. Deteriorating health. Seniors who feel that their health is poor, those who are experiencing chronic pain, and those who have been diagnosed with a serious illness are at an increased risk of suicide. Major life changes. Going through a major life event, such as retirement or the death of a loved one, increases the risk of suicide. Suicide Risk Factors for Seniors While older people make fewer suicide attempts than younger people, they have a higher rate of suicide completion. In fact, people over age 65 only make up 12 percent of the population, but they account for 16 percent of all suicide deaths, according to the most recent data available. Certain ethnic groups are more likely to commit suicide, with whites, Asians and Pacific Islanders at higher risk than Hispanics and AfricanAmericans. In addition, men are more than five times more likely than women to commit suicide in old age. Elderly white men are the most likely, with those aged 85 or older having the highest suicide risk of all. Suicide Prevention for Seniors The best way to spot depression and prevent suicide is to spot suicidal risk factors early on. It's normal to feel sadness and grief when you experience a loss, for example, but if your blue mood just won't go away, you may be depressed. Signs of depression may include: Persistent sadness, feelings of emptiness and anxiety Hopeless or pessimistic attitude Guilt Feelings of helplessness or worthlessness Irritable mood Lack of interest in activities you used to enjoy Fatigue Trouble with memory or concentrating Changes in sleep Changes in appetite Thoughts of death or suicide Pain or other symptoms that cant be explained by a medical condition If you or someone you know is having thoughts of death or suicide, it's critical to get help immediately. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255) operates a 24-hour confidential suicide hotline. If you are concerned that you might be depressed or at an increased risk of suicide, talk with your doctor. Depression is a medical condition that can be treated, and antidepressants, psychotherapy, or a combination can help you feel better.

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2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, July 11, 2014 11B

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12B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, July 11, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness

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PAGE 14

Its barely summer yet but my mind wanders back to a fall evening in 1980. The dying embers of burning leaves, sticks and Spanish moss still ll the Southern air with a smoky aroma. Every once in a while, you will hear acorns in the re pop. The sky darkens and you head inside the white frame house that is your home to eat a supper of your mamas homemade hamburgers and French fries. Afterwards, you head into your bedroom and turn the radio to Gulf 104, which was the agship of the Seminole Radio Network back then, to listen to the pre-game show. Gene Deckerhoffs voice comes clear across the air waves, along with the voice of Coach Pete. Bill Peterson, the FSU football coach in the 1960s, had a style of speech known as Petersonisms named after him. You guys line up alphabetically by height. You guys pair up in groups of three, then line up in a circle. A genius of a football coach but FSUs own Yogi Berra of linguists. Deckerhoff and Peterson discuss the matchup between number two Pittsburgh, quarterbacked by Dan Marino, with a great linebacker in the running for the Heisman trophy named Hugh Green, and number ve Florida State, quarterbacked by Rick Stockstill, and featuring a nose guard in the running for the Heisman trophy named Ron Simmons. Green nished number two in the balloting that year and Simmons number nine. It was won by George Rogers of South Carolina, who FSU defeated that season 28-7, despite a brilliant 80-yard touchdown run by Rogers. The Seminoles dominated the game against Pitt with placekicker Bill Kapece kicking an FSU record at the time of ve eld goals and punter Rohn Stark keeping Dan Marino and company deep in their own territory for most of the night. When the dust settles, FSU walks away with a 36-22 win on their way to a rematch in the Orange Bowl with the Oklahoma Sooners. I thank God for the memories of great football games, even some that FSU (which I would eventually graduate from) lost. One of the purest art forms that can be watched is a great football game. Its lled with edge of the seat action, tension and suspense. There is beauty in the action and pageantry on the eld and in the stands with the cheerleaders, bands and fans. Lets set aside bitter rivalries for a minute and lets just pause and thank God for the upcoming fall and for the chances we get to cheer for our favorite teams, whether they be Seminoles, Gators or Bulldogs. There are certain points in a young boys life that makes him feel grown up whether he really is or not. One of these points, at least in the old days, was assuredly that day when he graduates from tricycle to bicycle. Mine was that for more than one reason. I assume that I was awarded my rst bicycle complete with training wheels on my birthday or Christmas, I know not which, but the weekend thereafter I went to my grandparents house. I was so proud to show off my new bicycle. Now for those of you mature enough (lets not use old; lets call it mature enough) to remember Harvey Greene, Sr. you know that he had all the shyness, tact and discretion of say, a rusty barb wire fence. (Glad I didnt inherit any of that.) If he felt something, he said it. And however it initially formed in his mind was the exact way that it came out of his mouth. When I arrived at their house that weekend, full of pride and grown-up-ness, the rst words from my grandfathers mouth was, Its got sissy wheels on it. Aint no grandson of mine gonna ride a bike with sissy wheels. And much to the disdain of both me and my grandmother, he commenced to remove the training wheels from my bike. I was crying; my grandmother was fussing; and my grandfather was ignoring us both. His only words heard over the sounds of his wrench were, Aint no grandson of mine gonna ride with sissy wheels. His task completed, he gave me back my bicycle, sans training wheels. I was still crying and saying that I couldnt ride it like that. His reply was simple, Well, lets x that. The next few hours are a blur in my memory today. But what I do remember was me and my grandfather in the long driveway in front of his house. I would go a few feet and fall down. He would pick me up, somewhat dust me off, but not really, and put me back on the bike. Time and again, I would cry that I couldnt ride it without the training wheels. Each time, he would ignore my pleas, put me back on the bike, and push me off. Over and over push, fall down, pick up, push, fall down, pick up, push. Rinse and repeat. I dont know how long we were out there, it seemed forever to a small child, but at some point I no longer fell when he pushed me. I had learned how to ride a bike. I know not what work he was ignoring that day, but his sole focus seemed to be me. He stayed by my side for as long as it took me to accomplish the task, always right there to pick me up and put me back on the bike. That day he was my Grandfather and nothing else. So many times in life we are presented with trials and tribulations that seem daunting and beyond our ability to overcome. Ill always wonder if what really bothered him was the sissy wheels themselves, or the fact that I said I couldnt ride without them. But whatever it was, he showed me that things can be overcome with the right attitude and perseverance. And sometimes the caring hands of someone who is willing to spend a little of their time to pick you up and push you forward. Think about it.Viewpoints & Opinions2A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Conservative Corner Conservative CornerBy Nelson A. Pryor, Lee, Fl. Jacobs Ladder Jacob BembryColumnist Madison County Extension Service Something To Think AboutBy Harvey Greene Harvey GreeneGuest Columnist Lets CheerSummer is in full swing and while we have to put up with the heat, it is also the beginning of watermelon season. Currently you will find an abundance of melons in the store and at road side stands. What better way to cool off during the heat of summer than to eat a slice of watermelon. Sweet to taste, a watermelon is packed with vitamins, minerals and healthy-enhancing phytochemicals. According to the National Watermelon Promotion Board, watermelon contains 15 to 20 mg. of lycopene, the cancer-fighting phytochemical abundant in red fruit and vegetables. You may be surprised to learn this amount of lycopene is higher than any other fresh produce. Other nutrients include vitamin A, and C, potassium and fiber. Another major health benefit it that watermelons are low in calories, a two cup serving is only 80 calories. Since these melons are 92 percent water, it is also a great snack to help keep your body hydrated during the warm summer weather. Florida is among the top producing states, in a good year, the sunshine state can grow around 800,000 melons. A watermelon vine can grow to up to six to eight feet within a month, producing a crop within 90 days. Watermelon rinds are hard, but very fragile, requiring melons to be handpicked. But, the melon you get at the road side stand or the grocery store is well worth the effort. There is a watermelon for any size household, consumers have a wide variety of choice in todays market. In the U.S. about 50 varieties of watermelon grow; some are large in size, up to 30 pounds, while others can be as small as one pound. Some produce dark seeds and others are seedless. How do you pick a ripe melon? Choose a firm, symmetrical watermelon that is free of bruises, cuts and dents. A ripe melon should feel heavy for its size; the underbelly should have a creamy spot of yellow. Watermelons will not continue to ripen much after being picked. A food safety concern is to wash the outside of a watermelon with soap and water before cutting it to prevent dirt from getting into the edible fruit. For more information on food, nutrition and safety contact the Madison County Extension Service. The University of Florida Extension/IFAS Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution. Officer Friendly, In A Tank? War Gear Flows To Local Police During the Obama administration, according to Pentagon data, police departments have received tens of thousands of machine guns; nearly 200,000 ammunition magazines; thousands of pieces of camouage and night-vision equipment; and hundreds of silencers, armored cars and aircraft. This is a front page story in the June 9, 2014 New York Times. The article goes on and says: The equipment has been added to the armories of police departments that already look and act like military units. Police SWAT teams are now deployed tens of thousands of times each year, increasingly for routine jobs. Masked, heavily armed police ofcers in Louisiana raided a nightclub in 2006 as part of a liquor inspection. In Florida in 2010, ofcers in SWAT gear and with guns drawn carried out raids on barbershops that mostly led only to charges of barbering without a license. When the militarys mine-resistant trucks began arriving in large numbers last year, Neenah, Wisconsin, and places like it, were plunged into the middle of a debate over whether the post-9/11 era had obscured the lines between soldier and police ofcer. It just seems like ramping up a police department for a problem we dont have, said Shay Korittnig, a father of two who spoke against getting the armored truck at a recent public meeting in Neenah. This is not what I was looking for when I moved here, that my children would view their local police ofcer as an M-16-toting, SWAT-apparelwearing ofcer. A quiet city of about 25,000 people, Neenah has a violent crime rate that is far below the national average. Neenah has not had a homicide in more than ve years. Somebody has to be the rst person to say Why are we doing this? said William Pollnow Jr., a Neenah city councilman who opposed getting the new police truck. Police departments, though, are adding more repower and military gear than ever. Some, especially in larger cities, have used federal grant money to buy armored cars and other tactical gear. And the free surplus program remains a favorite of many police chiefs who say they could otherwise not afford such equipment. The number of SWAT teams has skyrocketed since the 1980s, according to studies by Peter B. Kraska, an Eastern Kentucky University professor who has been researching the issue for decades. The ubiquity of SWAT teams has changed not only the way ofcers look, but also the way departments view themselves. Recruiting videos feature clips of ofcers storming into homes with smoke grenades and ring automatic weapons. Not everyone agrees that there is a need for such vehicles. Ronald E. Teachman, the police chief in South Bend, Indiana, said he decided not to request a mine-resistant vehicle for his city. I go to schools, he said. But I bring Green Eggs and Ham. Some ofcials are reconsidering their eagerness to take the gear. Last year, the sheriffs ofce in Oxford County, Maine, told county ofcials that it wanted a mineresistant vehicle. County commissioners approved the request, but recently rescinded it. Scott Cole, the county administrator, said some people expressed concerns about the truck. The Republican Club of Madison County meets July 14, 2014 at 12:00 noon at Shelbys Restaurant Everyone Welcome Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive CommitteeRec.madison@yahoo.com Summer Is Watermelon Season Diann DouglasGuest Columnist Sissy Wheels

PAGE 15

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>#>=2A9>91===A9>#9 ,).(%>%,*=%:=>#=:%*'$ #,(=(%:=.9>(E=,*=,A*$ >E=.9,.9>E=*=.9>(E ,*=.9%B>=.9,.9>E )*%*"=>#>=>#=,A*>E C%((=#B=>,="A9=,A> #,C=>#%:=C,A(=> >#=A*%*"1 4t>8:=",%*"=>,= >%)$,*:A)%*"=C#>$ B9=C=,5=:%=#%"$ .*1==4A9=:>=,.>%,*=%: >,=(>=>#=D.9>:=,) %*=*=>((=A:=C#>=Cnnnrftbr\033nntt$!)-46("**.% !)-47(-%)&$*'!)-47(.$.)-47(*+!)! )-47(/+)-47()!1.)-47(.*)-47(!'*-%)-46()-47($-)-47(/-! .$!)-168(,* )-168(.*)-168(!)-168('*&! )-168(*"")-168(/).%')-168(#!*'*#%-.-)-168())-168( !.!,(%)!)-168(0$!.$!,)-168(*,)-168()*.)-168(.$! #,*/) )-28(%-)-28(-.'!)-28(!)*/#$)-28("*,)-28(,* )-28(,!+%,)-28(!""*,.0 &) 0t"$ $)]TJ -0.024 Tc 0.479 -1.2 Td [((&( $)1()]TJ -0.025 Tc 8 0 0 10.7472 154.284 524.1445 Tm [(*%( $\026 ")1(f#0t+( $\002\023#%! $0! $\023+))]TJ 0.479 -1.2 Td [(\b%"%$ 0 (%-,)]TJ 0.479 -1.2 Td [(t%%! $ 0f"%))(. 0'+ ,"$*) 0+)* *+* %$) 0 *)\002\017)+()0t$\023 /) 0r())1()1(& ) 0r"&+"\t%%! $)]TJ 0.479 -1.2 Td [(r $*) 0r"&+" r%+)%"\r $*) 0n* ")1(n($ $\r%-)1(%)1(b+ ")]TJ T* [(\025)\027%+(\020-$)]TJ -0 -1.2 Td [(*()1(,$)]TJ -0 -1.2 Td [(#%!( nb\006fnf b f\004\002bn t\002b rf FLORIDA COOKIN \001b 1$\020\007\016 $2\001t $%-%$".)Tj 0 Tc 13.795 0 0 18.5322 311.6589 497.6366 Tm (f)2( )2( )1(tf\b\003f\016)1(rbf)1(nr\016)1(rrrr n\004)1( bn)1(\020)1(\000)1(\016\013r \023%#"&b\024'!$)#'&\006\000ft\000tn\020\000\007

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July 2 Jahlion Lamont Turnquest Writ of bodily attachment. Carlisha Rena Kimmons Battery on detention facility staff. Audrey Shantel Miller Violation of parole (circuit). Anthony James Hampton Corruption by threat against public servant and trespass property other than structure. July 3 Joseph James Salina, Jr. Possession of a controlled substance, driving under the inuence of alcohol or drugs, possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. Alyris Avis Matthew Possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. Elmo Copeland Violation of parole. Paula Kay Rodgers Out of county warrant. Tarachel Katrina James Criminal registration. Christopher Don Cheatum Out of county warrant. Marvin Prentiss Bass, Jr. Out of county warrant.July 4 Derrick Leon West Weekender. Orian Orente Freeman Out of county warrant. James Earl Hampton Weekender.July 5 Blain Albert Shonk, Jr. Criminal registration.July 6 George Wallace Haynes Battery on a law enforcement ofcer. Shea Marie McGlynn Violation of parole (circuit).July 7 Daniel Corry Rutter Burglary of dwelling and violation of parole (county). Garrison RyanRichard Cooke Violation of parole (circuit). Craig Lamar Solomon, Jr. Criminal registration. Jimmie Joe Ware Criminal registration. April Renee Williams Unemployment compensate/ fraud. July 8 Scott Cooley Failure to appear. Conor Brohnan Googan Reckless driving. Micory Andre Robinson Failure to appear. Jesus Sanchez Olmos Failure to appear for arraignment. Dayshon Jerel Cooley Violation of parole (circuit). Cody Laurance Cimiotta D.U.I. and D.U.I. property damage. Around Madison County4A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Information in the Jail Report is provided to Greene Publishing, Inc., by the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce. All people are considered innocent until proven guilty. Questions about people identied in the report should be directed to the MCSO at (850) 973-4001. ObituariesCommunity CalendarJuly 12 The Wash and Jerusha Johnson Family Reunion will be Saturday, July 12 at the Perry Womans Club, located at 502 N Jefferson Street, at 11 a.m. A covered dish lunch, paper products and ice will be furnished. Bring any family photos; old and recent. For more information, call Teresa Gipson at (850) 5845188.July 12 Clarkes Midway Mixed Farm is hosting an event called Agri-Tourism Fun in Madison County on Saturday, July 12, at 520 SE Midway Church Road in Lee. Hourly Walking Farm Tours and plenty of karaoke music are planned for this AgriTourism fun day from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Everyone is welcomed to attend and this will make a great day for families to enjoy fresh food. Clarkes Midway Mixed Farm is just three years old, producing and selling blueberries, tomatoes, okra, red potatoes, assorted peppers, acre peas, onions, corn, watermelon, cucumbers and a small quantity of herbs. There will be food vendors with curried goat and chicken, hot wings, barbecue chicken, sausage and pork, jerk pork, hot dogs, sh, corn ears, veggie or beef patties, sodas and bottled water. Craft vendors will be displaying their items for sale, too. Directions to the Lee farm coming from Madison are as follows: head south on Highway 53; go past I-10 about three miles to Midway Baptist Church. Make a left turn onto Midway Church Road. After the church, look for the next gate and sign that says Clarkes Midway Mixed Farm. For more information you may call Hubert Clarke at (850) 6738516.July 13-18 Cherry Lake United Methodist Church will be having their Vacation Bible School beginning Sunday, July 13, at 5 p.m. and continuing Monday through Thursday at 5:30-8:45 p.m., and ending Friday night at 7 p.m. The theme is Gods Backyard Bible Camp Under The Stars. There will be food, Bible study, crafts and recreation. Cherry Lake Baptist Church is located at 1308 NW CR 150 in Madison. For more information, contact Darlene Reaves at (850) 929-2159.July 14 A rst time homebuyer series begins Monday, July 14, at the Madison County Extension Service, starting at 6 p.m. It will continue on July 15, 21 and 22. Upon completion, participants will receive a certicate that can be used for the SHIP program and Rural Development home loans. To register, call 973-4138.July 19 Tryouts for a new 12U Travel Fastpitch Team will be held on Saturday, July 19, at the Madison Recreation Park. Tryouts will be conducted on Field 5 from 1-5 p.m. Players must have a love for the game, a team spirit attitude and commitment to the team. For more information, please call Benjie Dyal at (850) 869-0126. If no answer, please leave your name, player's name and phone number. You may also email at dyalbenjie@ymail.co m. Please help spread the word. Thank you!July 26 The MCHS Cowboys Football Golf Shootout will be held Saturday, July 26, at Madison Golf and Country Club, starting at 8 a.m. Entry fees are $200 per group or $50 per player and includes green and cart fees and lunch; fees are due by July 23. For more information or questions, contact Coach Ben White at (904) 2900413, (850) 973-5779 or ben.white@madisonmail.us.Jail Report Way Back When Way Back WhenJuly 8, 1949 The beautiful country home of Mr. and Mrs. E E Hadden was completely ruined by re together with the furnishings about 11:30 oclock Tuesday night. The re was seen by a passing motorist on the Valdosta highway who turned in the alarm when he got to Madison. Mrs. Thigpen, our Garbett Crossing correspondent, sends us this week report of the two colored men killed by lightning last Thursday afternoon while working with Mr. Lee Thigpen in the tobacco barn, also of two others being shocked, and of Mr. O L Scotts sister-in-laws being struck and burned by lightning, but recovering. Mr. and Mrs. Larry Cherry and son Jimmie of Lee spent the 4thof July holidays in Greensboro, Fla., visiting Rev H L Boyd and family. Two tobacco barns burned at Cherry Lake this week end. One, belonging to Glosson Shefeld, burned Saturday night and the other belonging to Benton Sale, burned Sunday afternoon. Both barns were full of tobacco.July 7, 1950 Little Sista Keyes had the misfortune Wednesday afternoon to break her right arm when she fell from a see-saw at her home on South Horry street. Mr. and Mrs. E E Alligood of Fitzgerald, Ga. announce the birth of a daughter, Earline, June 22. Mrs. Alligood is the former Miss Dot Beggs of Madison. H M Daniels of Ocoee, Fla. Was charged with reckless driving, Wednesday June 28, when the truck he was driving hit a Mercury, automobile, driven by Johnny H. Harris, of Madison, Fla., in a head-on collision in front of the Pine Grove Auto Court, shortly after noon. The Madison Twin Rivers league baseball team defeated Jasper here last Thursday afternoon eight to seven. The game was interrupted for quite a while by the rain.July 6, 1951 Mrs. V M Folsom and Miss Emma Jean Folsom entertained with a lovely party Tuesday morning honoring Miss Mabsie OSteen, popular bride elect. Francis Calvin Buchanan, son of Mr. and Mrs. R P Buchanan, has been promoted from Private to Private First Class, and has been transferred from Lackland Air Force Base San Antonio Texas to James Connally Air Force Base, Waco, Texas for twelve weeks training. Sunday afternoon, June 24, at 4:30 oclock in the Riverside Baptist church of Miami, Miss Beth Mathis only daughter of Mrs. John Edwin Mathis and the late Mr. Mathis of Lake City, became the bride of William Otis Bailey, son of Mrs. Cordie Webb Bailey of Gainesville and W C Bailey of Madison. Prof. and Mrs. Oscar A Beck, Jr., and two small sons, Douglas Allen, 9, and Stephen Philip, 3, are new residents here. M. Beck is the new principal at the Madison Elementary School. They are residing in the Hardee apartments. Have something you would like to add to the Community Calendar? Simply call Greene Publishing, Inc. at (850) 973-4141 or email your information to rose@greenepublishing.com Eustace Pinckney LandEustace P. Land, 78, of Lee, passed away on Tuesday, July 1. Eustace was born in Arlington, Va. on June 25, 1936. He served his country in the Korean War and was an electrician by trade. Eustace applied his technical and leadership skills as a Division Manager for a contractor in support of the Department of Defense. He enjoyed woodworking, riding motorcycles, hang gliding, camping and shing with his family. He enjoyed his retirement with Audrey, his church family and the community of Lee. Eustace is survived by his loving wife of 30 years, Audrey; his siblings: Tim Land and Patricia Harvey; his children: Helen Dolly (Ruby), George Land, Robert Land and Martin Land; stepchildren: I. Michele Ingley, Kevin Ingley and Debbie Mentor; and grandchildren: George Land, Rachel Land, William Dolly, David Longest, Brian Ingley, Deena Ingley, Zachary Mentor and Darby Mentor. A memorial service will be held Monday, July 21 at 2 p.m., at the Lee United Methodist Church in Lee. Condolences and memories can be shared with the family through Beggs Funeral Home at 235 NW Orange Avenue in Madison. In lieu of owers, please consider donations to the Lee United Methodist Church, Lee, Fl. 32059, or a charity of your choice. John Franklin WilliamsonJohn Franklin Frank Williamson, 66, of Madison, passed away Tuesday, July 8, at home after a lengthy illness. He was born January 31, 1948 in Madison, to the late Cecil and Edna Earl Hamrick Williamson. Mr. Williamson was a Vietnam War veteran, having served in the United States Army with the 101stAirborne Division. Afterwards, he worked with PCS in White Springs, as a heavy equipment operator until his retirement in 2012. He was a very active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He is survived by his wife of 42 years, Susie Williamson; two sons: Frankie (Rebekah) of Lee, and Justin of Tallahassee; a daughter, Kim Gurley (Rob) of Lee; and ve grandchildren: Chase and Maddie Gurley, Sadie Hare, Daniel Edwards and Lydia Williamson, all of Lee. He is also survived by a brother, J.C. Williamson of Lee, and a sister, Becky Wimberly of Mayo. Funeral services were held Thursday, July 10 at 11 a.m. at Beggs Funeral Home in Madison. Burial followed in Oak Ridge Cemetery. The family received friends at the funeral home on Wednesday, July 9 from 5 to 7 p.m. Wedding AnnouncementSmart-WagnerLinda Ann Smart and Thomas J. Wagner were married June 28, in Melrose, Fl., with Hilary Dickert, a close friend of the bride, officiating. The bride, the former Linda Anderson of Madison, was a graduate of Madison County High School and the University of Florida. She is currently in her final year of law school at Florida Coastal School of Law in Jacksonville, and is employed as a Litigation Coordinator at the Middleton Law Firm in Melrose, Fl. The groom is a graduate of Bradford County High School and has been employed as a CNC Programmer at Fabco Air, Inc. in Gainesville for the past 35 years. The brides parents are Mrs. Orvis L. Charlotte Cason, Jr. and Mr. Gerald L. Anderson, both of Madison. The grooms parents are Mrs. Rita Wagner and the late Mr. Maurice Wagner of Keystone Heights, Fl. The couple will reside in Melrose, Fl.

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 5A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Madison County Parks & RecreationWill Be Offering Adult Church League Softball This Summer. Games Will Be Played On Mondays And Tuesdays Starting July 14th. Teams May Sign Up At The Madison County Courthouse, Finance Recreation Complex, Monday Friday 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Teams May Also Sign Up At The Recreation Complex, Monday Friday 8 a.m. 3 p.m. The Fee For The League Will Be $300 Per Team. Age Limit To Play Is 16 Years Of Age. (Must Be 16 By The First Game.) Teams Must Have Two Females On The Field At All Times. League Rules And Team Roster Will Be Available At The Courthouse And The Recreation Complex. For More Information, Contact: Tommy Garner (850) 464-7221 Jim Bo Ratliff (850) 464-7072 Two-Day Sexual Violence Seminar At NFCC Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, June 11, 2014The trainers that discussed Enhancing Sexual Assault Investigations and Prosecutions through Sexual Assault Response Teams (SART) at NFCC are, left to right: Thomas McDevitt, Kim Nash, Jennifer Sommers andJohn Wilkinson.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, June 11, 2014The women that helped in bringing the two-day training to NFCC are, left to right: Olga Trujillo, founder of Olga Trujillo Consulting and the author of The Sum of My Parts; Madison County SART Coordinator Cherie Perry-Rowell; Nan L. Baughman, Outreach Counselor for Refuge House in Jefferson County; and Tallahassee Refuge House Inc. Ofce of Administration Assistant Director Emily Mitchem. By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.Refuge House and Florida Council Against Sexual Violence (FCASV) hosted a two-day training on Enhancing Sexual Assault Investigations and Prosecutions through Sexual Assault Response Teams (SART) and the training was conducted at North Florida Community College by AEquitas; a program of the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape. The training was provided by Olga Trujillo from Olga Trujillo Consulting. The training covered topics such as investigating and prosecuting the non-stranger rapist, coordinating a victim-centered community response, interviewing victims and dening vicarious trauma. A SART team is a community-wide multidisciplinary coordinating group that promotes a comprehensive response to sexual violence. Some of the members of the Madison SART that was able to attend the two-day training included City of Madison Police Department Sergeant Investigator James Roebuck, Communications Bureau Commander Lt. Terry Lenz, Warrant Ofcer and volunteer victim advocate Tammy Webb, Madison County Sheriffs Ofce PREA Coordinator Lt. Kathrine West and Billye Robinson, RN, SANE and an instructor for the Practical Nursing Program at NFCC. According to Madison County SART Coordinator Cherie Rowell, it was not just residents of North Florida that attended. Some came from Miami, Fort Walton Beach and Homestead to attend the two-day training. The four trainers that discussed the various topics were Thomas McDevitt, who retired as a 35-year veteran of the Philadelphia Police Department, including 17 years supervising sexual assault investigations; Kim Nash, who is part of a team of forensic nurses at Memorial Hospital in Colorado Springs, that provides forensic care to more than 1,600 patients per year who are victims of violence; Jennifer Sommers, who is a Special Assistant Attorney General at the New York State Attorney Generals Ofce; and John Wilkinson, who is an Attorney Advisor with AEquitas and presents on trial strategy, legal analysis and policy, and ethical issues related to violence against women at local, state, national and international levels. The team of trainers used information based on real cases. They showed videos of past court cases and interviews from the victim or survivor. Also shown were interviews of predators and a reenactment of a predator. The training taught the importance of each member of a SART, their role and how to work together, said Rowell. Question Of The WeekIf you could have a superpower, what would it be? Super (x-ray) vision, because it sounds like it could be fun. I would like to read peoples minds. People say TMI, but I like too much information sometimes, I wouldnt have to guess anymore. Knowledge is power. I would want to y. I could travel anywhere I wanted to go and at anytime. I could see the world. To be invisible; I could sneak up behind people and scare them and they wouldnt know who it was. Super strength, so I could deal with all the stress in the world. I would like to be invisible, that way I could hide from my girlfriendsand their husbands.Greene Publishing, Inc. All Photos By Rose Klein, July 7, 2014 Bozo Smith Greg Tillman Tracy Wallace Cindy Miles Uphold Jessenia Morales

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6A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 876227

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 7A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Recall Update Big Fireworks recalls Mock Sword Firework DevicesThe 4thof July may be over, but there are still some hazardous firework products out there. Fireworks by their very nature demand to be handled with care, either by professionals or knowledgeable adults. Children using firework should be taught the basics of fireworks safety and responsibility, and should always be closely supervised by adults. Even so, accidents can occur despite all the precautions if the product is faulty, as is the case with the Big Fireworks company's Big Sword device, a mock sword that is actually a handheld fountain emitting sparks from the sword tip. The blue and yellow sword has the Big Fireworks logo and the words Big Sword printed on the front. A yellow cardboard tag attached to the handle of the device has Big Sword and a caution statement printed on it. The sword measures 30 inches and has model number 3609 printed above the products barcode. The firm has received two reports of the fountain exploding while in use, but no injuries have been reported. The recall involves a little over 1,000 devices that were sold through Big Fireworks retailers and wholesale distributers from April June of 2014, for about $13. They were distributed by American Eagle, doing business as Big Fireworks, and imported from China. Consumers who purchased Big Sword devices should immediately stop using them and return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Contact Big Fireworks toll-free at (866) 5146225 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. CT Monday through Friday or online at www.bigfireworks.com. Click on the Recall tab at the bottom of the page for more information. Lions Club: Heaving A Sigh Of ReliefBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. With the 4thof July God and Country Celebration over, and rave reviews coming in from members of the community, the Lions Club members can finally let out a big sigh of relief. It's over for another year. It was a great success, said Lions Club president Tim Dunn. The Fun Run and 5K run alone brought in an estimated $600-$700, and more businesses would like to help sponsor next year's run. The races were a first-time event for the God and Country Celebration, and their success guarantees they'll be back next year. An estimated 4000-5000 people attended the main event that evening around Lake Francis, enjoying the live entertainment on the stage. Lion Club member Christy Roebuck, who oversaw the early morning Fun Run and 5K Run, then returned that afternoon to work the main event, acknowledged that the event itself and everything leading up to it was a lot of work. But it was well worth it, she added. The work for the Lion's Club members continued for several hours after the concluding fireworks show, getting everything packed up, moved out and cleaned up. Jay Lee, past president, agreed that the monumental task had been worth the months of effort and planning, with everyone working together with sponsors as well as numerous volunteers from the community to put on a great entertainment lineup and a $15,000 fireworks display at the end. What we do together as a club collectively is wonderful, he said of the event which is also a major fundraiser for the club. And then, turning around and putting it back into the community in the form of scholarships and eyeglasses. Now there's time to relax a little and start planning for next year.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 8, 2014Lions Club president Tim Dunn (standing at podium) delivers good news of the positive feedback from the God and Country Celebration to a round of applause from members at their rst regular Tuesday club meeting since the 4thof July event. OOPS....Newspaper Bloopers

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This article is a reprint of the story that originally ran in the July 9, 2014 Madison County Carrier. James Glasers name was incorrectly misspelled as Glacer. This writer apologizes for the mistake. By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.James Glaser is an artist who lived in a log cabin in the woods of Minnesota. Wanda Violet is a Director of Product Development and Curriculum Writer for a company based out of Atlanta, and was living in Tallahassee. They are now husband and wife and live in Madison County off of Colin Kelly Highway, where Glaser has carved out his own private park and art studio, while Violet telecommutes to her job in Tallahassee. Glaser and Violet have a modern love story; they met on an online dating site, married in Georgia in 2008 at a wedding and dinner attended by their adult children and by 2009, the couple had moved to Madison and now express how happy they are to be part of the Madison community. After living in Tallahassee, Glaser began to miss his woods and the couple began searching for a new residence. They spoke to several realtors, but were unable to find their holy grail, until when out driving one day, they stumbled upon a Fifth Saturday Celebration in Madison. Violet says Glaser was smitten with the celebration, Mrs. Leslies 10-layer cakes and the town. Glaser and Violet found realtors, Lynette Sirmon and Ben Jones, who they described as sweet and very helpful, and the first agents who seemed intent on helping the couple find their dream home. Their house search ended with the Cason home on Dusty Miller Avenue and after moving in, the extremely creative couple began making the house their own. While Violet concentrated on work, the inside of the home and planting flowers, Glaser began carving out the yard and creating wood structures all over the propertys landscape. He made paths through the acreage, tearing at vines and shrubs until the property more resembles a park as opposed to the wooded lot that previously accompanied the home. With the help of new friends such as TC Hudson, Dwayne Mitchell and Randy Funk, he built a two-story tree house, a potting shed for his gardening habit and a large shop where he can wile away the hours creating his art. One of the discoveries Glaser made while developing his backyard park, along with a fig tree and Tung Oil tree, was a sculpture made from rebar that was bent and twisted to resemble what we agreed looked like an insect, a grasshopper or praying mantis maybe. Both Glaser and Violet would like to meet the artist and be able to place a plaque beside the fun piece bearing the creators name, but need help from the community in order to identify this person. When Glaser is not working in the yard, he is working in his shop, creating beautiful works of art with wood. It is said that in times of great catastrophe or impending doom, ones eyes tend to open up and suddenly see and appreciate the small details of life around them; this is exactly how James Glasers passion for creating art from wood began. While sitting in a bunker during a rocket attack in Dung Ha, South Vietnam, the young marine, while waiting for the rockets to find their target, noticed someone had taken the time to carefully construct the wooden joint and crafted two, 2-inch square pegs and pounded them into round holes, serving to hold the bunker together securely. This appreciation of craftsmanship started Glaser thinking about building with wood and after returning to the states, he attended a fine arts program at a university where he was allowed to use their woodworking shop at will. From there, he moved to Northern Minnesota and continued to work with wood, refining and honing his skills. Since 1972, James Glaser has shown his work through exhibits in Minnesota, Arizona, Chicago, Ontario, Washington D.C., California and recently Tallahassee. After moving to Madison, he now limits his shows to Invitational Art Shows, allowing him to focus less time on showing and more time on creating. He built his studio according to his needs, with good lighting and ventilation and large windows, which allows him a great view of the environment around him; his park, the woods and the occasional passing wildlife. Glaser can now take a break and walk to his garden where he can weed and water or walk to the house and visit with Violet. Glaser also makes beautiful cutting boards for the kitchen and those can be seen in town at The Country Store on Range Street, at Tupelos in Monticello or LeMoyne Art Center in Tallahassee. To learn more about James Glaser, or to see his art, you can go to his website at www.jamesglaserstudios.com or call (850) 973-8813 to make an appointment. And if you go to see Glaser-Violet Park or Glasers studio, dont forget to check out and cast your opinion on the mystery sculpture.Around Madison County8A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Storm coming? Were ready.Report an outage: Get preparation tips: Duke Energy Storm re eW m or t S .yda re re ?gni com m itara ep pr et g s o thgi r l uoy y h ltcax w e onk yg er n E ek Du848. 28 2.008u n ot a ropeR .e mor nd a spi t on i etf m a rot s rae r y etf r a ae n y n s a mrot r s o e f raper o pw t o y h ms ae t e ns opse r mrot s t er px e syc r. ettiwter t p eG58:egatu .mrot r s pee d k n ms/moc:spi ion t tar pa e c.ygrene-e uk d erEn ekuD mrot s / /s mo mrotSyg ere Energy Storm Duk Unknown Sculpture Leads To Local Artist Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 27, 2014James Glaser stands beside one of his art pieces that hang inside his and Violets home.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 27, 2014Jim Glaser and Wanda Violet stand beside some of the trees that make up the tree house, built by Glaser and friends who live in Madison County.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 27, 2014The tree house, built on the couples property, is two stories tall and includes a handmade stairway and stained glass for the window on the top level.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 27, 2014Glaser built his studio and personalized it to accommodate the creating and housing of his art pieces he coaxes from wood.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 27, 2014When creating paths in their expansive yard, this whimsical sculpture was found. Husband and Wife team, Glaser and Violet, purchased their home containing the sculpture, from the Casons who lived on Dusty Miller Avenue. The new owners are hoping someone can help them locate the artist who made the sculpture so they can place a nameplate beside the fun art.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 27, 2014Glaser is an avid gardener and landscape designer and has designed everything on his property, including this potting shed, which houses all of his gardening supplies.

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 9A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Enter for a chance to win FREE TICKETS to No Photocopies Accepted Tickets are good until August 4, 2014 Deadline To Enter is July 22, 2014 Winners will be announced July 23, 2014 Name____________________________ ___________________________ Address__________________________ __________________________ Phone Number____________________ Fill out and return to Greene Publishing, Inc. at P.O. Drawer 772 or 1695 S. S.R. 53 Madison Fl, 32340 You Could Spend Your Final Days Of Summer At Wild Adventures! And The Winners Are... It is that easy! Simply look for the cutout. Fill it out. Mail it in. And you could be a WINNER!Greene Publishing, Inc. Gives Away Wild Adventures Splash Island Tickets Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, June 30, 2014(Shown left) Cedric Jones stands beside his grandmother, Robin Demps, who won ticket to Wild Adventures Splash Island.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, July 7, 2014Faith Taggart is standing in front of her father, Mike Taggart, holding her tickets to Wild Adventures Splash Island.Greene Publshing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 27, 2014Wanda Violet is one of the winners of tickets to Wild Adventures Splash Island.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, July 8, 2014Gwendolyn Mixson is all smiles as one of the winners for tickets to Wild Adventures Splash Island.Madison C.I. Canine Team Receives Award Photo SubmittedThe Canine Team who received Medals of Valor are (left to right): Sgt. Ben Pike, Ofcer Donnie Bass, Ofcer Justin Surles, Ofcer Jonathan Richardson, Ofcer Darren Rye and Sgt. Todd Richardson. Story SubmittedCongratulations to the Canine Team at Madison Correctional Institution for receiving Medals of Valor for bravery in performance of their duties in helping apprehend an armed suspect in conjunction with the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce. The award was voted on by Region II Administrative staff with input from Wardens and local authorities throughout the region which consists of 21 counties in the northeast sector of Florida. Greenville Resident Attends Girls State Photo SubmittedKelsi Reams and other girls that attended Girls State at Florida State University hung out as they toured Tallahassee and attended classes.By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.Kelsi Reams, 17, is a senior at Aucilla Christian Academy and she attended Girls State on Wednesday, June 25 until Thursday, July 3 at Florida State University as a delegate of Greenville through the American Legion Auxiliary in Greenville. She is the daughter of Kathy and Joe Reams. While she attended, she was elected as a lobbyist for her county. She was able to meet and talk with lobbyists, the Chief Speaker of the House and tour the old Capital. Reams attended classes that taught about the government. The students also separated into two parties: Nationalist and Federalist. The students created rallying chants for their party. Reams favorite part of the week was meeting with many different young ladies from all over Florida and listening to their different beliefs and ideas. At Aucilla Christian Academy, she is a member of Living Waters, FCA and a yearbook staff member. She is also Co-Captain of the Varsity Cheerleading squad. She has raised over $2,500 in ongoing research for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation since 2004 selling hot chocolate in her hometown of Greenville. Her sister, Abby, was diagnosed with the disease in 2003 and Reams wanted to do her part to help raise money for Abby and others living with Cystic Fibrosis. She is an active member of Greenville Baptist Church where she helps teach music during the Wednesday night Community Kids Program. Reams loves spending time with her family and friends. When she is not attending school, she enjoys writing, reading, singing, swimming and listening to music. She would like to pursue a career in journalism, where she would be able to interview people and hear their ideas and beliefs. As far as college goes, she is still deciding whether to attend Florida State University or Flagler College. Kelsi Reams

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Story SubmittedWhen one has lived in a county for a few years, he can sense which folks have been around for a long time. Maybe one knows longtime residents because their name is common. It could be that those who have lived in Madison for years have lots of aunts and uncles and cousins. The stories of early days long-term residents tell are a clue. Or maybe one can tell because the folks who have been around so long seem to feel a pride or an ownership in their county. But there is something even deeper that runs in long term residents that the rest of us see. There is a confidence that Madison is their home; it has been, and it will be their home. Born in South Carolina, Daniel Burnett and his wife Hannah Gornto came to Madison before Florida was a state, around 1840. He is listed in the 1840 census, along with his son, James Burnett. Daniel arrived in Madison County after a stopover in Bulloch County, Ga., where he had received land in the 1805 Georgia Land Lottery. Daniel and his family settled around the Cherry Lake and Hamburg areas and have lived in this area for many generations. Second Generation Daniel and Hannah had three children: Mary, born around 1806 and married William Knight; Daniel, born in 1817, and died 1903 married first Martha Ann P. Sever and then Francis T. Grambling; James was born between 1810-1820 and married Sarah Jane Guiton. Third Generation/Daniel Daniel and Martha P. Sever had seven children: Peyton Pierce, Capers Peter, Daniel William, James T., David Felix, Mary S. and Elizabeth Maude. Daniel and Frances Terrell Gramling had six more children: Margaret B., Emma D., John, Samuel Henry, Nancy C. and Marshal O. Daniel and his wives lived in the Madison and Hamburg areas their whole lives, and at least three of their sons married and also raised their families in the Madison/Hamburg area. Third Generation/James James and his wife, Sarah Jane Guiton had five children: William, Thomas, Nancy Nelly, James, and Samuel J. At least two of their sons raised families in Madison. Fourth Generation/Daniel From Daniel and Martha Severs family, David Felix married Rebecca Jane Paul; they lived in Madison, Hamburg and Cherry Lake. Their children were Rosella, Alonzo J., Daniel Felix, George Paul, Lewis Washington, Mary Agnes and Louis. Daniel and Marthas son, Daniel William married Mary Elizabeth Morrow and had the following children: Madge E., Martha Elizabeth, James Daniel, William H., Capel Pellar, Samuel Felix, SP., Mary Frances C., and Mazzey. Daniel and Mary Elizabeth raised their family in Madison, Hamburg and Cherry Lake. From Daniel and his second wife, Frances Terrell Gramling, Samuel Henry married Carrie L. Wilson and had the following children: Carl Washington, George Forest and Samuel Paul. Samuel and Carrie lived in the Madison area. Fourth Generation/James James and Sarah Jane Guitons son William married Sarah Elizabeth Dansby, and had the following children: William Shelton Shelt and Daniel Bryan. James died at age 26 as result of wounds in the Civil War. He died in a hospital in Richmond, Va. James and Sarah Janes son, Samuel J. married Martha Burnett and had the following children: William Jackson, Henry, Samuel, Jobe, Martha A., and Rose Ann. If youve managed to make it to the end of this article, whether you are a Burnett, a kin, or an obsessive article reader, you may have seen some familiar namesDaniel, Samuel and William Burnetts abounded. You will pr obably be even more familiar with some of the fifth generation Burnetts. Fifth Generation/ Daniel Children of George Forest Burnett, who married Martha Church Croom were Mary Martha, George Forest, Jr., and Carlton Croom. Fifth Generation/James Children of William Shelt and Ella Jane Loper were William A., Councel Moye and Joseph Russell. Children of Shelt and his second wife, Rhoda Henderson were Rosa Lee, Eva Mae, Kathleen, Ruby E. Katie, Minnie Belle and Mary Helen. Thank you, Burnetts, for being here so long and for taking such good care of our county. We love you. Part of the information in this article was provided by Sandra Norris in articles in The Madison County Florida Family History Book. In addition, information was used that came from several Burnett Family Trees on Ancestry.com. The Madison County Genealogical Society welcomes your input and invites you to join our organization. We meet on the second Thursday monthly, except during summer months, in the Madison Public Library from 6 to 7 p.m. Annual dues are $25. To add comments or corrections to our articles or to submit your own sketch on your ancestor, contact us at Madison County Genealogy Society, P.O. Box 136, Madison, FL 32341. Or contact us by email at mcgenealogysociety@live.com. If you would like for us to write an article featuring your ancestor, please contact us by mail or email.Around Madison County10A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Pioneers Of Madison County DANIEL BURNETT want investing made easy? Larry DiPietro is an experienced financial advisor committed to helping clients achieve a more secure financial future. His comprehensive planning combined with his experience with wealth management, retirement, education and insurance strategies can help you achieve your financial goals. Call Larry today to find out how his experience and consultative approach can help you! larry.dipietro@investnancial.com 343 West Base St. l Madison 850.402.8028Larry DiPietro, Financial AdvisorRegistered Representative, INVEST Financial CorporationINVEST Financial Corporation is not afliated with Capital City Banc Investments. INVEST Financial Corporation, member FINRA/SIPC, and its afliated insurance agencies offer securities, advisory services and certain insurance products. Products are: 04/15 116288 Pictures Of The Past State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory,http://oridamemory.com/items/show/133469Minnie Lee Greene Burnett stands between 2 unidentied women in 1928

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www.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11A

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc. In a child's transition to middle and high school, there are challenges and pitfalls along the way, but until recently, there was little organized instruction for him or her on how to deal with these challenges, and it was hard to nd all the information needed in one place. As students become older, they are expected to learn and begin using critical life skills they will need later in life. They are expected to begin setting goals for themselves, and have workable plans for achieving them. They need to know how to set boundaries for themselves and for other people, and learn refusal strategies for unhealthy choices. Peer pressure is a powerful thing and many teenagers have a hard time saying no to harmful or unhealthy choices. But where do they go to learn these critical life skills? Project SOS (Strengthening Our Students, Empowering Parents) is a program that emphasizes these three critical life skills ,students and their parents will need to stay on course, as they transition to middle and high school. Pam Mullarkey, a former school board member and educator, addressed the school board about bringing the program to Madison. She had just come from meetings with several surrounding districts, who were all on board with the program. The program was free, but it could accommodate only 15,000 students. The course, which could be a DVD series for counties that had already set their curriculum for the year, or a semester-length curriculum that could be tted in a P.E. class, H.O.P.E. class or an activity period manual for instructors and workbooks for students. In addition to teaching the three critical life skills, there were also ve supplemental teachings that included 1) Media Inuence, 2) Healthy and Unhealthy Relationships, 3) The Effects of Sex which will be for high school only, 4) Substance Abuse, 5) Self-Harm, Bullying and Suicide. The segment on Media Inuence includes the social media, Mullarkey told the board. We talk about the good, the bad and the ugly, she said, all the ways in which using the social media could be both good and harmful. The board voted to include the program in the 2014-2015 school year. For more information about the SOS program, contact Marshae Best at marshae@projectsos.comor visit the website http://projectsos.com/.School12A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 New Program Teaches Students Life SkillsPhoto SubmittedIt's that time of year again summer vacation for most of us, but for the Madison County High School student athletes and Booster Club, it's time to gear up for the 2014-15 football season. The Cowboys and their families and friends are selling football cards around town for $10 each to raise money for football camp this summer and equipment they'll need when they take to the gridiron in September. The cards have the 2014-15 MCHS football schedule on one side and on the other, a list of nearly 20 area businesses offering discounts to cardholders, and are valid for over a year all the way through September 30, 2015. MCHS Boosters And Athletes Selling Football Cards Madison County High School Will Start New Season With New ScoreboardBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc. When the Madison County High School Cowboys take on their opponents at their first home game of the 20142015 school year, it will be with a brand new digital score board overlooking Boot Hill Stadium. The old score board is showing its age in the form of requiring frequent repairs, usually before every game, Madison County School Superintendent Doug Brown had said several weeks ago, when he first proposed replacing it with an updated, state-of-the-art digital model. Since the board dominates the field, Brown felt that it was a big part of the overall impression visitors would get, not only of the school's athletic facilities, but the high school itself, the entire school district and even Madison County as a whole. A run-down board with frequently burned out or improperly working lights pr obably wasn't helping in that regard. For some visitors, Boot Hill Stadium might be all they ever see of the county. After considering the matter and looking at several bids, the school board chose the ElectroMech Company to provide and install the new board for about $38,000. It sounds like a lot of money, even with help from the MCHS Booster Club, but Brown stated that this particular model comes bordered with spaces for ads: two large ones across the top and the bottom, and four smaller spaces down each side, all of which can be sold to sponsors for advertising. With the revenue from ad spaces, the sign could pay for itself within the first year. After that, any additional revenues would also come back to the school. I am 110 percent committed to getting it all back through ad revenue, said Brown. Kenny Hall made the motion to approve the new scoreboard, with the understanding that all the proceeds will come back to the school. The board approved the new scoreboard unanimously.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 8, 2014Slated for replacement: When the Cowboys take on the Tampa Catholic High School Crusaders Aug. 29, this old score board will be gone from Boot Hill Stadium. The Madison County School Board recently approved a state-ofthe-art digital scoreboard with spaces for ads from 10 sponsors. Superintendent Doug Brown expects that the new scoreboard will pay for itself within the rst year. FEED TIMESHow to use: The major and minor feeding times for each day are listed below. The major feeding times are the best for the sportsman and last about 2 hours, the minor feeding times can also have good success, but last only about 1 hour. Good luck and be careful out there. Major feed times are marked by an asterisk (*) The Week Of July 11 July 17, 2014 Friday July 11 5:55 AM *12:10 AM 6:20 PM Saturday July 12 *12:40 AM 6:55 AM *1:10 PM 7:20 PM Sunday July 13 *1:30 AM 7:50 AM *2:20 PM 8:30 PM Monday July 14 *2:45 AM 8:55 AM *3:10 PM 9:30 PM Tuesday July 15 *3:45 AM 10:00 AM *4:20 PM 10:30 PM Wednesday July 16 *4:40 AM 10:50 AM *5:10 PM 11:30 PM Thursday July 17 *5:45 AM 11:55 AM *6:10 PM

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SchoolMadison Enterprise-Recorder 13A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Students Recognized For Purr-fect FCAT Scores By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc. The room was packed with proud parents and students at the July 1 School Board meeting, and Superintendent Doug Brown opened the meeting with a few words of praise for 10 students in the Madison school district who made perfect scores on one or more sections of the FCAT test. Seven of the students and their families were present, as Brown called them up one by one, congratulated them and presented them with certificates, signed by Gov. Rick Scott, recognizing their achievement. The seven children recognized at the meeting included Camryn Alderman, with a perfect score in reading; Mattie Barnes for a perfect score in math; Halie Wetherington, with a perfect score in reading; Montoya Brown, with a perfect score in reading; Justin Barnett, with a perfect score in math; Matthew Gassler, with perfect scores in both reading and math; and Tanner Renfroe, with a perfect score in math. Three other children not present also made perfect scores and will be receiving certificates: Kaitlyn Farnell, reading; Drew French, reading; and Ethan Myers, math. Congratulations to all 10 students for their achievements.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 1, 2014Camryn Alderman ReadingGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 1, 2014Mattie Barnes MathGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 1, 2014Halie Wetherington ReadingGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 1, 2014Montoya Brown ReadingGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 1, 2014Justin Barnett MathGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 1, 2014Matthew Gassler Reading and MathGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 1, 2014Tanner Renfroe Math

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE WANTED FOR RENT HELP WANTEDwww.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . .14A Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, July 11, 2014 FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 7/7/2014 THROUGH 7/13/2014I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).3/26 rtn, n/cPageant and Prom Dresses For Sale:Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 Leave a message. Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Our newspaper ofce is seeking an outstanding individual to join our sales team. Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a good personality and LOVE to talk on the telephone? If you are a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, have a friendly can-doattitude, a great work ethic, are organized, and self-motivated then this job might be just for you. Valid Drivers License a must! Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper ofce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison. A few chickens and a rooster for my yard. (850) 661-6868.4/9 rtn, n/c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12x18 building with 6 porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/c Spacious 3bd/2ba + 85 acres!This 4bd/3ba brick home has stocked ponds + 98 acres!Well-built 3bd/2.5ba brick home waits for you. Charming 3bd/2ba brick home This pretty 3bd/2ba has a new roof and lake accessLovely 3bd/2ba home has cathedral ceilings REAL ESTATE Wanted I have dozens of properties I want to sell in Madison. Call Steve at (850) 464-2500. Do not apply if you are not a hard worker and cannot return phone calls.7/4, 7/9, pdGordon Tractor Inc. has a position open for a full time Bookkeeper. You may pick up an application or drop off your resume at 491 SW Range Avenue, Madison.7/9 rtn, cNorth Florida Community College, Madison FL., has the following positions available: DIR of Business & Tech Services; Recruiter; Learning Specialist, Communications Specialist. See www.nfcc.edu for details7/9 7/23, c Adoption ADOPTloving married couple seeks to adopt, will be hands on mom and dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592, Adam Sklar #0150789. Education TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASS'T CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY. Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709. Help Wanted Want a Career Operating Heavy Equipment? Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. "Hands On Training" & Certications Offered. National Average 18-22 Hourly! Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benets Eligible! 1-866-362-6497. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualied students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769. Real Estate NC Mountains near Lake Lure. New log cabin on 1.59 acres, huge covered porches, vaulted ceilings, EZ to nish, $74,900, add'l acreage available. 828-286-1666. NOW HIRING! FloridaCall for Shift Availability(12 hours shifts on Saturday & Sunday for RNS & LPNs) Referral/Sign-on bonusfor employees and new hires.Full Time RNs/LPNsEmployee Bonus = $1000 after 3 months $250, after 6 months $250, after one year $500 New Hire Bonus = $500 after 3 months $250, after 6 months $250Any questions contact Human ResourcesAD/GW

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www.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder 15A All Legals are posted on line at www.greenepublishing.com All local legals are also published at www.oridapublicnotices.com ----Legals---7/4, 7/11July 4, 2014 7/11, 7/18 7/11, 7/18 BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY www.peacockslandscaping.com (850) 464-1484 Madison, Fl. 32340 sailpeacock@gmail.com Irrigation Landscaping 7/11, 7/18

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16A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014



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Health Health And AndWellness Wellness Guide Guide M M a a d d i i s s o o n n E E n n t t e e r r p p r r i i s s e e R R e e c c o o r r d d e e r r S S e e c c t t i i o o n n B B J J u u l l y y 1 1 1 1 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 4 4

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2014 Health & Wellness 2B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, July 11, 2014 Gov. Rick Scott Signs Charlotte's Web Legislation By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. Charlotte's Web the title of a popular children's book by E.B. White, is now also the name of a strain of medical marijuana developed in 2011. It is lower in tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the substance that produces the “high”) than other strains of marijuana and higher in cannabidiol (CBD, the medicinal use element). The harvested plant is processed to extract an oil known as Realm Oil or Alepsia. It is this extract that is used for medicinal purposes. The name Charlotte's Web was chosen in recognition of Charlotte Fiji, a little girl diagnosed with Dravet syndrome (also known by its longer clinical name of severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy or SMEI) at age two. She was reported to suffer an average of 300 grand mal seizures a week, until she began treatment with medical marijuana, with the extract solution given to her in an olive oil base. It resulted in an immediate and dramatic improvement. Eventually, her seizures were down to two or three per month. When her story aired in CNN in 2011 and other news/documentary shows, it was described as the one that “was changing medical marijuana laws across the country.” Gov. Rick Scott recently signed legislation into law that recognizes the use of medical marijuana for a short list of illnesses, including childhood epilepsy, glaucoma, and side effects from treatments for cancer and HIV. “As a father and grandfather, you never want to see kids suffer,” said Scott. “The approval of Charlotte’s Web will ensure that children in Florida who suffer from seizures and other debilitating illnesses will have the medication needed to improve their quality of life. I am proud to stand today with families who deserve the ability to provide their children with the best treatment available.”

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, July 11, 2014 € 3B 2014 Health & Wellness Madison Countys Infant Mortality Rates Low In 2013 By Jessie R. Box Greene Publishing, Inc. The Healthy Start Coalition of Jefferson, Madison and Taylor Counties, Inc., hosted a “State of the Infant,” presentation on Wednesday, June 25 at the Madison County Public Library. The presentation discussed the statistics surrounding the infants in Madison County. Madison County’s number of babies born has dropped from the 212 in 2012 to a total of 205 babies in 2013. Madison County had no infant deaths during 2013, which is when the child takes its first breath to before the child turns one year old. Madison County had the worst rate in the state for the three-year rolling rate for 20102012 with nine deaths. There were only two fetal deaths reported in 2013. Madison had been the worst in the state with seven fetal deaths for the threeyear rolling rate for 2010-2012. There is one issue that Madison County is currently facing concerning the babies and that is their birth weights. Madison currently has the highest in the State of Florida for low birth weight. In 2013, there were 84 babies that were born weighing below five and a half pounds. Healthy Start Coalition Executive Director Donna Hagan discussed several underlying issues that could be a cause for the low birth weights: obesity, pregnancy intervals and lack of a support system. Hagan discussed obesity as a potential cause for the low birth rate in Madison, however, according to the state’s three-year rolling rate for 20112013, Madison actually has a lower percentage of obese mothers during pregnancy than the state. The intervals between pregnancies were also story cont. on page 4B

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discussed as a cause for low birth weight. The recommended interval of time between pregnancies is 18 months. In Madison County 35.4 percent of the pregnancies were not adequately spaced. A woman’s body needs time to recover before becoming pregnant again, however, some Madi son County residents are becoming pregnant again within months after the initial delivery. An emerging societal trend is to not marry and this could potentially cause the mother of a newborn to have a lack of support t o help during pregnancy and with the child after delivery. Madison County is the fourth highest in the state for unwed mothers, with 61.1 percent of th e births to unwed women. Another issue that Florida faces is repeat teen births. Madison County currently has the lowest rate of repeat births to teens, ages 15-19 in the state. Healthy Start Coalition has been able to help the teenagers set goals and provide a good life for both teens and their children 2014 Health & Wellness 4B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, July 11, 2014 William R. Howard, M.D.Board CertifiedDermatologistSpecializing In The Diagnosis And Treatment Of Skin CancerNew Patients Welcome(229) 247-25952704 N or th O a k St B-2 € V aldo st a, GA 31602 Infant Mortality Continued From Page 3B Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box June 25, 2014Healthy Start Coalition Executive Director Donna Hagan (far left) honored (left to right) Michelle Stout, Nita Mitchell and Tangela Knight with flowers for all the work they do for the citizens of Madison County at the Healthy Start Coalition of Madison.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, July 11, 2014 € 5B 2014 Health & Wellness Gov. Scott Funds Cancer And Alzheimers Disease Research By Jessie R. Box Greene Publishing, Inc. During the month of June, Governor Rick Scott signed numerous bills into law. He signed House Bill 709, 711 and 5230 into law on Wednesday, June 18, that will fund new research for cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. The National Cancer Institute estimates that approximately 40.8 percent of men and women will be diagnosed with some form of cancer at some point during their lifetime. The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America estimates that as many as 5.1 million Americans may currently have Alzheimer's disease. House Bill 709 and House Bill 711 creates a new Alzheimer Disease research program and addresses the needs of people with Alzheimer’s and their families that care for them. House Bill 709 and House Bill 711 establishes the Ed and Ethel Moore Alzheimer’s Disease Research Program to fund research leading to the prevention of, or a cure for, Alzheimer’s. An Alzheimer's Disease Research Grant Advisory Board will allocate research grants through a peerreviewed, competitive process that will identify and fund the best proposals to expand Alzheimer research in Florida. Researchers at any university or research institute in the state are eligible to apply. This legislation also requires the Division of Emergency Management to develop and maintain a Special Needs Shelter registration program to provide shelter and services to individuals with Alzheimer’s disease in emergency situations. It also requires the Department of Elder Affairs to provide incentive based funding for memory disorder clinics. House Bill 5203 establishes the Florida Consortium of National Cancer Institute Centers Program at the Department of Health. The Consortium is designed to enhance the quality and competitiveness of cancer care and research in this state. The Consortium will annually allocate $60 million to help Florida’s Cancer Centers meet the rigorous scientific and research criteria required for the NCI designation. The Consortium will allocate these funds through a competitive formula factoring in metrics for cancer care, research and training. An additional investment of $20 million for peer-reviewed research grant funding was included in the It’s Your Money Tax Cut Budget. Florida’s cancer research and collaboration system already includes projects funded by the peerreviewed William G. “Bill” Bankhead, Jr. and David Coley Cancer Research Program, and the James and Esther King Biomedical Research Program, both of which were established by the Florida Legislature.

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6B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, July 11, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness By Ron Pollack Hepatitis C is a disease that is caused by a virus that affects the liver. Even though the disease often doesn’t produce symptoms, it can seriously damage the liver and can be fatal. An estimated 3.2 million Americans have Hepatitis C. Older people are more likely to have been exposed to Hepatitis C, but many older Americans are not aware that they need to be tested for it. A December 2013 report found that Hepatitis C infections are concentrated in the Baby Boomers generation. In one major study of people with the virus, 75 percent of the patients were born between 1945 and 1964. What is Hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus, which is spread primarily through contact with the blood of an infected person. Hepatitis C ranges in severity from a mild illness that lasts a few weeks (referred to as an “acute” infection) to a serious, lifelong illness that can destroy the liver (referred to as a “chronic” infection). Most people with Hepatitis C do not have any immediate symptoms. However, 75 to 85 percent of people who are infected eventually develop a chronic infection. Chronic Hepatitis C is a serious disease that can result in long-term health problems, including liver damage, liver failure, liver cancer and even death. It is the leading cause of cirrhosis of the liver (liver scarring) and liver cancer and is the most common reason for liver transplants in the United States. Approximately 15,000 people die every year from Hepatitis C-related liver disease. What are the symptoms of chronic Hepatitis C? Most people with chronic Hepatitis C do not have any symptoms, and they may not have symptoms until years later when they develop liver problems. In people with no symptoms, Hepatitis C is often detected during routine blood tests to measure liver function. Infected people who do develop symptoms may experience the following: fatigue, joint pain, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fever, dark urine, light-colored stools or yellowish eyes and skin, called jaundice. Can a person spread Hepatitis C without having symptoms? Yes. Most people who are infected with Hepatitis C do not know they are infected because they do not look or feel sick. An infected person with no symptoms can spread the virus to others. Any activity that exchanges blood between two people can put a person at risk for exposure. Before 1992, Hepatitis C was commonly spread through blood transfusions and organ transplants. Widespread screening of the U.S. blood supply for Hepatitis C began in 1992. Should I be tested for Hepatitis C? Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Preventive Services Task Force recommend screening for the Hepatitis C virus for people born between 1945 and 1964. Talk to your doctor about being tested for Hepatitis C if any of these apply to you:  You were born between 1945 and 1964  You were treated for a blood clotting problem before 1987  You received a blood transfusion or organ transplant before July 1992  You are on long-term hemodialysis treatment  You have abnormal liver tests or liver disease  You work in health care or public safety and were exposed to blood through a needle stick or other sharp object injury  You have HIV  You engaged in sex Hepatitis C: Older Americans Are At Risk story cont. on page 8B

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2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, July 11, 2014 € 7B

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2014 Health & Wellness 8B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, July 11, 2014 Hepatitis C Cont. From Page 6B that could have caused bleeding.  You are a current or former injection drug user, even if you injected only one time or many years ago Can Hepatitis C be treated successfully? Yes. In about 25 percent of people, an acute infection clears up on its own without treatment. However, if acute hepatitis C is diagnosed, treatment reduces the risk that it will become a chronic infection. There are several medications that treat chronic Hepatitis C, including new treatments that appear to be more effective and have fewer side effects than previous options. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) keeps a list of approved treatments online at http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ByAudience/ ForPatientAdvocates/ucm151494.htm However, treatment can be expensive. Clinical trials of new drug treatments may also be available. Hepatitis C and the Affordable Care Act Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, hundreds of thousands of people with Hepatitis C have new access to treatment.  All insurance must provide free screening for Hepatitis C for anyone born between 1945 and 1964.  People with Hepatitis C cannot be turned down for insurance or discriminated against by an insurance company.  Limits on out-of-pocket costs will make expensive treatment more affordable. Belly Fat Linked To Metabolic Diseases In Kids Story Submitted While doctors have long used abdominal fat as a predictor for the risk of metabolic diseases in adults, the same holds true for kids, according to the results of a new study. The study from researchers in India suggests that doctors are seeing the same types of health problems in children as they do in adults who carry too much abdominal fat, including metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. As part of the study, researchers looked at 10,842 kids from five cities in India and found that the more abdominal fat a child carried, the more likely the child also suffered from metabolic syndrome, defined as having three or more markers including high triglyceride levels, low levels of good cholesterol, higher fasting blood glucose levels and high systolic blood pressure. Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in both adults and children, but experts say the rise in childhood obesity levels is expected to lead to long-term health problems unless it is addressed. "In my daily practice, I am seeing many children who are getting diseases which were earlier seen only in adults, primarily because of obesity,” said pediatric endocrinologist Archana Dayal Arya of Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, who co-authored the study. “It is shocking to see children as young as six years with diseases like hypertension, diabetes mellitus and abnormalities in the lipid profile. In this study we found 350 children suffering from hypertension.” The results suggest that doctors should use waist circumference as a gauge as to whether to screen kids for metabolic issues, researchers said, in hopes that early detection helps prevent more serious health problems. Recession May Have Worsened Obesity Story Submitted According to a report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the Great Recession that began in 2008 may have worsened obesity rates in developed nations, including some groups in the United States. The organization is composed mostly of wealthy nations, such as the U.S. and European countries. But their relative prosperity didn't keep obesity from spreading during a time of profound economic turmoil. According to researchers, the downturn likely led to consumers turning from healthy but expensive foods (such as fresh fruits and vegetables) to cheap and unhealthy options. "The economic crisis is likely to have contributed to further growth in obesity," the group wrote in the report. This effect was most noticeable in countries that fared the worse during the recession. But even in countries that did relatively well, atrisk groups such as women and the poor were still more likely to become obese. There were some glimmers of good news in the report, however. Over the past half-decade, the increase of obesity has slowed down in the most developed countries. Canada, South Korea and Italy, for example, have seen little change. Australia, France and Switzerland, on the other hand, have faced up to three percent annual increases. Obesity presents severe public health challenges. Without changing course, more and more people in countries around the world will be dealing with cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. And the myriad costs associated with these conditions hit government health care plans, local economies and individuals alike. The OCED stressed the need for governments to promote healthy eating habits. It said that carefully targeted taxes on certain foods and drinks could play a role as well. Whatever course countries decide on, it said, they need to play a role in keeping their citizens at healthy weights. "The economic crisis may have contributed to a further growth in obesity, but most governments need to do more to stop this rising tide," said Michele Cecchini, an OECD health policy analyst.

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Dear Inquiring, If your mom is dealing with a variety of health problems and is taking multiple medications, a visit to a geriatrician may be just the antidote to help get her back on track. Here’s a breakdown of the different types of health conditions geriatricians treat and some tips to help you locate one in your area. Geriatric Doctors For starters, it’s important to know that geriatricians are family practices or internal medicine physicians that have had additional specialized training to manage the unique and, oftentimes, multiple health concerns of older adults. Just as a pediatrician specializes in caring for children, a geriatrician is trained to provide care for seniors, usually over age 65. While most doctors, and even general practitioners, are trained to focus on a person’s particular illness or disease, geriatricians are trained to look at all aspects that can affect elderly patients – not just the physical symptoms. They also often work with a team of other health care professionals like geriatric-trained nurses, rehabilitation therapists, nutritionists, social workers and psychiatrists to provide care. And, they will coordinate treatments among a patient’s specialists. Patients who can benefit from seeing a geriatrician are elderly seniors with multiple health and age-related problems such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, confusion and memory problems, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, hypertension, depression, respiratory problems, osteoporosis, arthritis, chronic pain, mobility issues, incontinence, vision and hearing impairment, and trouble with balance and falls. Geriatricians are also particularly adept at tackling medication problems. Because many seniors, like your mom, take multiple medications at the same time for various health conditions, and because aging bodies often absorb and metabolize drugs differently than younger adults, unique side effects and drug interactions are not uncommon. A geriatrician will evaluate and monitor your mom’s medications to be sure they are not affecting her in a harmful way. Geriatricians can also help their patients and families determine their long-term care needs, like how long they can remain in their own homes safely without assistance, and what type of services may be necessary when they do need some extra help. But not all seniors need to see a geriatrician. Seniors who have few health problems are just fine seeing their primary care physician. Find a Geriatrician Unfortunately, there’s a shortage of geriatricians in the U.S., so depending on where you live, finding one may be challenging. To locate one in your area, visit the American Board of Family Medicine website at theabfm.org where you can do a search online. Or use Medicare’s online Physician Compare tool. Just go to medicare.gov/physiciancompare and type in your zip code, or city and state, then type in “Geriatric Medicine” in the “What are you searching for?” box. You can also get this information by calling Medicare at 800-633-4227. Keep in mind, though, that locating a geriatrician doesn’t guarantee your mom will be accepted as a patient. Many doctors already have a full patient roster and don’t accept any new patients. You’ll need to call the individual doctor’s office to find out. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book. Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, July 11, 2014 € 9B 2014 Health & Wellness Savvy Senior When To See A Geriatrician Dear Savvy Senior, What kinds of health problems do geriatricians treat? My mother, who’s 80, takes several different medications for various health problems but hasn’t been feeling herself lately. I’m wondering if she would benefit by seeing a geriatrician in place of her regular family doctor. Inquiring Daughter

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10B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, July 11, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness Depression And Suicide In Old Age By Krisha McCoy, MS Medically reviewed by Pat F. Bass III, MD, MPH The challenges people face as they enter old age may contribute to seniors' increased risk of depression and suicide, say researchers who have studied the issue. Depression is thought to be the major risk factor for most suicide deaths, and older people are at particularly high risk of developing depression. Unfortunately, depression often goes undiagnosed and untreated in older adults, and untreated depression can lead to suicide. A number of other age-related factors may also contribute to higher rates of suicide among seniors, including:  Sleep problems. Studies have shown that seniors who commit suicide tend to have poorer sleep quality than those who don't.  Possession of firearms Firearms are the most common method older people use to commit suicide, so the risk of suicide is greater for seniors who have access to guns.  Limited social support. Many seniors experience feelings of isolation, and people who feel socially isolated and lonely are more likely to experience depression and commit suicide. Spending time with family and friends can help.  Deteriorating health. Seniors who feel that their health is poor, those who are experiencing chronic pain, and those who have been diagnosed with a serious illness are at an increased risk of suicide.  Major life changes. Going through a major life event, such as retirement or the death of a loved one, increases the risk of suicide. Suicide Risk Factors for Seniors While older people make fewer suicide attempts than younger people, they have a higher rate of suicide completion. In fact, people over age 65 only make up 12 percent of the population, but they account for 16 percent of all suicide deaths, according to the most recent data available. Certain ethnic groups are more likely to commit suicide, with whites, Asians and Pacific Islanders at higher risk than Hispanics and AfricanAmericans. In addition, men are more than five times more likely than women to commit suicide in old age. Elderly white men are the most likely, with those aged 85 or older having the highest suicide risk of all. Suicide Prevention for Seniors The best way to spot depression and prevent suicide is to spot suicidal risk factors early on. It's normal to feel sadness and grief when you experience a loss, for example, but if your blue mood just won't go away, you may be depressed. Signs of depression may include:  Persistent sadness, feelings of emptiness and anxiety  Hopeless or pessimistic attitude  Guilt  Feelings of helplessness or worthlessness  Irritable mood  Lack of interest in activities you used to enjoy  Fatigue  Trouble with memory or concentrating  Changes in sleep  Changes in appetite  Thoughts of death or suicide  Pain or other symptoms that can’t be explained by a medical condition If you or someone you know is having thoughts of death or suicide, it's critical to get help immediately. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255) operates a 24-hour confidential suicide hotline. If you are concerned that you might be depressed or at an increased risk of suicide, talk with your doctor. Depression is a medical condition that can be treated, and antidepressants, psychotherapy, or a combination can help you feel better.

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2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, July 11, 2014 € 11B

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12B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, July 11, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness

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It’s barely summer yet but my mind wanders back to a fall evening in 1980. The dying embers of burning leaves, sticks and Spanish moss still ll the Southern air with a smoky aroma. Every once in a while, you will hear acorns in the re pop. The sky darkens and you head inside the white frame house that is your home to eat a supper of your mama’s homemade hamburgers and French fries. Afterwards, you head into your bedroom and turn the radio to Gulf 104, which was the agship of the Seminole Radio Network back then, to listen to the pre-game show. Gene Deckerhoff’s voice comes clear across the air waves, along with the voice of “Coach Pete.” Bill Peterson, the FSU football coach in the 1960s, had a style of speech known as Petersonisms named after him. “You guys line up alphabetically by height.” “You guys pair up in groups of three, then line up in a circle.” A genius of a football coach but FSU’s own Yogi Berra of linguists. Deckerhoff and Peterson discuss the matchup between number two Pittsburgh, quarterbacked by Dan Marino, with a great linebacker in the running for the Heisman trophy named Hugh Green, and number ve Florida State, quarterbacked by Rick Stockstill, and featuring a nose guard in the running for the Heisman trophy named Ron Simmons. Green nished number two in the balloting that year and Simmons number nine. It was won by George Rogers of South Carolina, who FSU defeated that season 28-7, despite a brilliant 80-yard touchdown run by Rogers. The Seminoles dominated the game against Pitt with placekicker Bill Kapece kicking an FSU record at the time of ve eld goals and punter Rohn Stark keeping Dan Marino and company deep in their own territory for most of the night. When the dust settles, FSU walks away with a 36-22 win on their way to a rematch in the Orange Bowl with the Oklahoma Sooners. I thank God for the memories of great football games, even some that FSU (which I would eventually graduate from) lost. One of the purest art forms that can be watched is a great football game. It’s lled with edge of the seat action, tension and suspense. There is beauty in the action and pageantry on the eld and in the stands with the cheerleaders, bands and fans. Let’s set aside bitter rivalries for a minute and let’s just pause and thank God for the upcoming fall and for the chances we get to cheer for our favorite teams, whether they be Seminoles, Gators or Bulldogs. There are certain points in a young boy’s life that makes him feel “grown up” whether he really is or not. One of these points, at least in the old days, was assuredly that day when he graduates from tricycle to bicycle. Mine was that for more than one reason. I assume that I was awarded my rst bicycle complete with training wheels on my birthday or Christmas, I know not which, but the weekend thereafter I went to my grandparents’ house. I was so proud to show off my new bicycle. Now for those of you mature enough (let’s not use “old”; let’s call it ‘mature enough’) to remember Harvey Greene, Sr. you know that he had all the shyness, tact and discretion of… say, a rusty barb wire fence. (Glad I didn’t inherit any of that.) If he felt something, he said it. And however it initially formed in his mind was the exact way that it came out of his mouth. When I arrived at their house that weekend, full of pride and grown-up-ness, the rst words from my grandfather’s mouth was, “It’s got sissy wheels on it. Ain’t no grandson of mine gonna ride a bike with sissy wheels.” And much to the disdain of both me and my grandmother, he commenced to remove the training wheels from my bike. I was crying; my grandmother was fussing; and my grandfather was ignoring us both. His only words heard over the sounds of his wrench were, “Ain’t no grandson of mine gonna ride with sissy wheels.” His task completed, he gave me back my bicycle, sans training wheels. I was still crying and saying that I couldn’t ride it like that. His reply was simple, “Well, let’s x that.” The next few hours are a blur in my memory today. But what I do remember was me and my grandfather in the long driveway in front of his house. I would go a few feet and fall down. He would pick me up, somewhat dust me off, but not really, and put me back on the bike. Time and again, I would cry that I couldn’t ride it without the training wheels. Each time, he would ignore my pleas, put me back on the bike, and push me off. Over and over – push, fall down, pick up, push, fall down, pick up, push. Rinse and repeat. I don’t know how long we were out there, it seemed forever to a small child, but at some point I no longer fell when he pushed me. I had learned how to ride a bike. I know not what work he was ignoring that day, but his sole focus seemed to be me. He stayed by my side for as long as it took me to accomplish the task, always right there to pick me up and put me back on the bike. That day he was my Grandfather and nothing else. So many times in life we are presented with trials and tribulations that seem daunting and beyond our ability to overcome. I’ll always wonder if what really bothered him was the ‘sissy wheels’ themselves, or the fact that I said I couldn’t ride without them. But whatever it was, he showed me that things can be overcome with the right attitude and perseverance. And sometimes the caring hands of someone who is willing to spend a little of their time to pick you up and push you forward. Think about it.Viewpoints & Opinions2A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Conservative Corner Conservative Corner By Nelson A. Pryor, Lee, Fl. Jacobs Ladder Jacob BembryColumnist Madison County Extension Service Something To Think AboutBy Harvey Greene Harvey GreeneGuest Columnist Lets CheerSummer is in full swing and while we have to put up with the heat, it is also the beginning of watermelon season. Currently you will find an abundance of melons in the store and at road side stands. What better way to cool off during the heat of summer than to eat a slice of watermelon. Sweet to taste, a watermelon is packed with vitamins, minerals and healthy-enhancing phytochemicals. According to the National Watermelon Promotion Board, watermelon contains 15 to 20 mg. of lycopene, the cancer-fighting phytochemical abundant in red fruit and vegetables. You may be surprised to learn this amount of lycopene is higher than any other fresh produce. Other nutrients include vitamin A, and C, potassium and fiber. Another major health benefit it that watermelons are low in calories, a two cup serving is only 80 calories. Since these melons are 92 percent water, it is also a great snack to help keep your body hydrated during the warm summer weather. Florida is among the top producing states, in a good year, the sunshine state can grow around 800,000 melons. A watermelon vine can grow to up to six to eight feet within a month, producing a crop within 90 days. Watermelon rinds are hard, but very fragile, requiring melons to be handpicked. But, the melon you get at the road side stand or the grocery store is well worth the effort. There is a watermelon for any size household, consumers have a wide variety of choice in today’s market. In the U.S. about 50 varieties of watermelon grow; some are large in size, up to 30 pounds, while others can be as small as one pound. Some produce dark seeds and others are seedless. How do you pick a ripe melon? Choose a firm, symmetrical watermelon that is free of bruises, cuts and dents. A ripe melon should feel heavy for its size; the underbelly should have a creamy spot of yellow. Watermelons will not continue to ripen much after being picked. A food safety concern is to wash the outside of a watermelon with soap and water before cutting it to prevent dirt from getting into the edible fruit. For more information on food, nutrition and safety contact the Madison County Extension Service. The University of Florida Extension/IFAS – Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution. Officer Friendly, In A Tank? War Gear Flows To Local Police During the Obama administration, according to Pentagon data, police departments have received tens of thousands of machine guns; nearly 200,000 ammunition magazines; thousands of pieces of camouage and night-vision equipment; and hundreds of silencers, armored cars and aircraft. This is a front page story in the June 9, 2014 New York Times. The article goes on and says: “The equipment has been added to the armories of police departments that already look and act like military units. Police SWAT teams are now deployed tens of thousands of times each year, increasingly for routine jobs. Masked, heavily armed police ofcers in Louisiana raided a nightclub in 2006 as part of a liquor inspection. In Florida in 2010, ofcers in SWAT gear and with guns drawn carried out raids on barbershops that mostly led only to charges of “barbering without a license.” When the military’s mine-resistant trucks began arriving in large numbers last year, Neenah, Wisconsin, and places like it, were plunged into the middle of a debate over whether the post-9/11 era had obscured the lines between soldier and police ofcer. “It just seems like ramping up a police department for a problem we don’t have,” said Shay Korittnig, a father of two who spoke against getting the armored truck at a recent public meeting in Neenah. “This is not what I was looking for when I moved here, that my children would view their local police ofcer as an M-16-toting, SWAT-apparelwearing ofcer.” A quiet city of about 25,000 people, Neenah has a violent crime rate that is far below the national average. Neenah has not had a homicide in more than ve years. “Somebody has to be the rst person to say ‘Why are we doing this?’” said William Pollnow Jr., a Neenah city councilman who opposed getting the new police truck. Police departments, though, are adding more repower and military gear than ever. Some, especially in larger cities, have used federal grant money to buy armored cars and other tactical gear. And the free surplus program remains a favorite of many police chiefs who say they could otherwise not afford such equipment. The number of SWAT teams has skyrocketed since the 1980s, according to studies by Peter B. Kraska, an Eastern Kentucky University professor who has been researching the issue for decades. The ubiquity of SWAT teams has changed not only the way ofcers look, but also the way departments view themselves. Recruiting videos feature clips of ofcers storming into homes with smoke grenades and ring automatic weapons. Not everyone agrees that there is a need for such vehicles. Ronald E. Teachman, the police chief in South Bend, Indiana, said he decided not to request a mine-resistant vehicle for his city. “I go to schools,” he said. “But I bring ‘Green Eggs and Ham.’” Some ofcials are reconsidering their eagerness to take the gear. Last year, the sheriff’s ofce in Oxford County, Maine, told county ofcials that it wanted a mineresistant vehicle. County commissioners approved the request, but recently rescinded it. Scott Cole, the county administrator, said some people expressed concerns about the truck. The Republican Club of Madison County meets July 14, 2014 at 12:00 noon at Shelby’s Restaurant Everyone Welcome Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive CommitteeRec.madison@yahoo.com Summer Is Watermelon Season Diann DouglasGuest Columnist Sissy Wheels

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t r f f r n t f b f t r r t b n b f t f f f n f t n b 7 $ + + ( & ( 2 + ( $ ( 2 ( 1 5 ( 2 ' $ 1 2 6 # ( 2 $ & 0 ( 2 6 8 b f t b f t f f f n f f f f n f t f r n b t n $ 1 2 + ( 1 $ # r n n r n f n $ 1 2 + ( 1 $ # 1 + ( # 2 $ # 3 $ n r 3 + ( 1 $ # 5 $ $ + 6 6 0 $ $ $ 3 + ( 1 ( & n n b # ( 1 b b t $ 0 ( # ( + 1 / 1 2 & $ 2 # ( 1 . 1 2 % 9 $ b b t 3 + ( 2 ( . f f t $ # # # 0 $ 1 1 & $ 1 2 n t f r r n f n n b t n 0 5 $ 0 f f # ( 1 b b t f f ( 1 $ 5 1 / / $ 0 0 $ 1 $ 0 4 $ 1 2 $ 0 ( & 2 2 0 $ ) $ 2 6 # 4 $ 0 2 ( 1 $ $ 2 $ 5 1 2 2 $ 0 0 1 3 1 0 ( / 2 ( 1 2 2 ( 2 $ / ( ( . % 2 $ & $ $ 2 5 ( + + 2 $ % 0 2 $ $ 1 2 ( 2 $ 0 $ 1 2 % 2 $ 3 2 6 # 0 2 $ 5 $ 0 1 % 2 ( 1 $ 5 1 / / $ 0 # 2 ( 4 $ 1 2 ( & 2 $ 6 # 4 $ 0 2 ( 1 $ $ 2 1 3 ( 2 2 $ # + + / 2 1 & ( 4 $ 2 0 $ $ $ 3 + ( 1 ( & % 0 / 3 + ( 2 ( ( 2 ( 1 $ 5 1 / / $ 0 3 1 2 $ / ( $ # 3 / + 2 $ 0 2 2 1 % 0 2 $ # 2 $ 2 $ 6 0 $ # 0 / / $ # % % 0 $ $ $ 3 + ( 1 ( & 5 ( + + 2 $ 0 $ 1 / 1 ( + $ % 0 / 2 1 $ 6 # 1 ( # # $ # + ( $ 1 r r b 3 % ) t b t n f / $ t 3 % ) t b t n r t n n 3 1 r t n b # ! ) + / # ! ) + / % $ % ) # ( 0 0 0 # ! ) + / % $ % ) # ( ) = ( % B 9 : b 9 = C = E # % ( = 9 % B % t = 9 t = b E A 9 = t $ # = @ + $ E 9 $ ( = # C $ = 9 % A = C : # B % = % * : % : > > > 9 > % : = = C : = # 9 = C E = > = = $ % > ) > = C % > # = # 9 > 9 = C # = # 9 A # > 9 = % = > # > : # = C : = % = > = ) = ( % > > ( = 9 ( E 1 = 4 t = C : = > > # = : > ( % # > = % = b E $ A 9 = = t = C : = = > # # = C % > # = ) E = I = t = > ( = # % ) = 6 t = > # % > # = E 7 : = # 9 1 7 = t # 9 = > # = E = 9 E % * = t = C : = : > % ( ( = 9 % B % A : = t = C : = > 9 E % > = = = : > = > = : > : ( E = = A ( ( = = > # 9 = C % > # A > = ( % > 9 5 = : % = 9 % A C # = ( % B 9 = : % D $ A = : B $ A % ) 9 = r 9 % = 9 C C # % ( = : # = C : = 9 % B % > # 9 A # = b E A 9 1 A 9 ( E 7 : = I = ( E 9 C = : % = # = ( > 9 > > E = # ( ( : : 1 = 4 # # = = A ( = = ) % ( > 9 > % : = > # > = % = > , = # 9 = 9 > # C E = A > = : # = C : = ( > = 9 > # = > # 9 A # > # ) 1 = = > # = : # # = = % = = = : % 6 t = > # % = > # = E = % : = % ) E = > = ( 1 7 = t = > ( = # 9 > = A > = > # = E = = # 9 # : > = = & A : > = > 9 % = > = # 9 = ( ) 1 5 = A 9 $ ( E = = > # = E = 9 > # = % = & A : > = 1 t > D % > = r E : = = : # A A 9 = = > 9 t = = A > E ( 1 = = 9 % = ) C : = 9 9 : > = > 9 = $ 9 : = 9 : = > = ( ( = 9 % = = % = = # > = 9 1 = # * = A > E = 9 > 1 = 9 > % = 9 9 % B = > > # = B # % ( = = : ( E 9 9 ( ( = # = A = = ( = % = > # = B # % ( > # > = ( = % = > = @ ? 9 : = C # = ) $ : A 9 = C % > # = = # # ( = > # 9 ) ) > 9 1 9 > % = ( : = A = = = : ( % = % : % > # = B # % ( = = : % > # = : ) ( ( = C : = : > % % 1 = # % # ( E = % > D % > 9 9 ( ( = > ( = 9 > % > # > = 4 > # = = 9 B # % ) = > = ( ( 7 : = > = A E : ) = 9 1 5 = % ) ( > 9 ( = > , = > # = % > = A : > E = = < G $ E 9 $ ( = 9 9 ( ( = C : # 9 = C % > # = % ) ( 9 A ( > E = = 9 % B % A 9 = > # = % A 1 4 9 = A > 5 = > = 9 : = C 9 : = t = 9 , ) t = f = ( 1 9 : = = n ) : 9 9 E = ( ( = + C # = > # % 9 = > = A : # 4 9 = A > 5 = > 9 . = > # ) = % = > # % 9 9 , ) 1 = > 9 = 9 9 % B $ % = # ) = > # = 9 $ 9 E 7 : = C 9 = ( ( ( E > > = E = > # % 9 = A 9 $ E 9 $ ( = A : : % = ( A > 9 = 9 ( : % = # 9 9 ) = > # = > # 9 , ) C # 9 = > # E = # = ( > # 9 = ( ( = E 1 = A 9 % = > # ( ( = 9 : = 9 9 E > ( = ( % = 4 # = > 9 ) = = ) E = # A : A = 6 A : = C = ( > = # 9 % = > # = > # 9 , ) = ( ( E = : = t = ( > = # 9 = A > = : # = C : = E 1 = # : # = : C = ) E = # A : * = : # = 9 1 = t = > # 9 = A > = = > # = $ 9 , ) = = C = : # 7 : % = ) E = ( % B % = 9 , ) = t = 7 > = > = A > 1 = # 7 : > = A : = > 9 . = % = A 9 9 , ) 1 = = & A : > = # 9 = A > = = A 9 = # A : 1 = 7 > = C = C # > = > , 1 5 = % ) ( = > 9 ( 9 : = > , = > # = > A = 9 9 % B ( = > = > # 9 9 E 7 : = # ) 1 = # 9 9 E 7 : = : A 9 : 9 > # : = > = > # % 9 # : = = ( : = A : # = C % ( ( = = 2 A 9 $ > % = 9 = > = ( : > = G E : 1 f n r b r > = = = 9 = C % C > = = = 9 , ) 1 = # A > E = C : = ( = > = ( $ ( > = B % = 2 A % ( E = % > % E = = & A B $ % ( = : A : > 1 = # A > E = % > 9 B % C = > # & A B % ( = % = > # = 9 : $ = = = 9 > = ( 9 = > # = ( > % = > # = : > ( = ) = $ : ( : = : = C ( ( = : = > # % > % > E = = > C = ) 9 = & A $ B % ( = : A : > : = % $ B ( B 1 = # = A > E = C : > = > = = > 9 % ( = % = 9 E = C , = 9 C # 9 = > # = : > ( = ) : ( : = C 9 = # % % : % = = % ( ( C : ( = C % > # = 9 A : # 1 > 9 = 9 B 9 % > # = : > ( = ) = $ : ( : = > # = A > E = ( > $ = > # = > # 9 = > C = : A : $ > : = = 9 9 : > = ( ( > # 9 = & A B % ( : 1 = A 9 % : > = 9 9 : > = % > 9 B % C : C % > # = 9 > : = A 9 % : = 9 : > = > # A > E = C : = ( = > = $ > % = = : : % = 9 ) ( ( = > # 9 = : A : > : = # C $ B 9 = # = : A : > = $ % = : > ( % = > # A 9 9 E 1 = # = A 9 9 E C : = > = 9 B 9 1 # = > # 9 = & A B % ( : 9 = ? $ E 9 $ ( = n : # A % ( ( % ) : = $ E 9 $ ( > # E = t B 9 E = = $ E 9 $ ( = ( B % = r E : n 9 1 = ( ( = > # 9 = C 9 # 9 = C % > # = A 9 ( 9 E > = = : > 9 A > A 9 = 9 = > # > 1 b r C 8 9 = C 5 = : % = : # , ( = 9 = ) ) $ 9 = * E = b ( ( = > # = ) : > = B ( = % # % : = . : % > % = = > # = = C # : = > # > = > # = 9 , : ( = = A ( ( = > # = : > = = 9 = % % B % A ( : % 9 > % 1 = = b = C : = ( 9 = A > # % : = % > > % = > = > = . 9 B = . ( E $ % = 9 = > # = 9 > = : E % = > # > = 4 t 8 B ) = > # > = ) % : > = 9 = = t C 8 > = ) = > # > = ) % : > % 1 1 1 > # : = 9 > : = # B = ( > 9 B ( % = ( ( = B 9 = 9 = 8 > % B % > % : 1 8 b C = ) A # = 8 9 : : % ( = B ( $ ) > 8 = = C = 3 5 # = = = 9 > = % % 9 ( E = C 9 : : = = % : : = 9 9 9 A > = 9 9 ) : = % : = = : % D $ E 9 = 9 > = 9 9 ) = A = > # 9 A # > # = 1 1 = 9 > ) > = = A > % > # > = 9 B % : = 9 = ) % = = 9 $ ( > = : A . 9 > = > % B % > % : = : % = > # ( = ) % ( = : # , ( = : > A > : = > = > = ) 9 = 9 % 9 A : = = B A 9 : C 9 = % 9 : = > # % 9 = 9 A $ > % = 9 > : = 9 ) = # % # = : # , ( = = 9 $ 9 = > # ) = 9 = : A : : = % = ( ( 1 ) = = > # = > # % : = ( % : > = % = > # = 9 $ : = . ( % > % = % ( A = > A > 9 % ) > 9 % = : A ) ) 9 = 9 9 ) : = ( $ ( = ) A : = B % : % > : = 9 : : % ( = $ B ( ) > = > 9 % % = = 9 > = ) % ( E = A > 9 # = = 9 9 ) : 1 = = r % ( ( : C > = 9 ) % : : % = > = . ( E = 9 = > # ) > % > % B = 9 > = : E % = > # > = % > C A ( 8 > = : > = > # = % : > 9 % > = E = ) E > # > = > # = > 9 B ( % = C A ( = = ) % % ) ( : % : > % = = = C = : > A > = ( > 9 % : = > = = = > # > = > # = > % B % > % : C A ( = ) = > = r % : = % : > = : # , ( = 9 : * ( = # B % = > = > 9 B ( 1 9 = ) ) 9 = 9 > = ( 9 = : A > = = 9 : * ( = % = % > ( : : 9 , ) : = > = ) = 9 ) ) $ > % : = = D 9 : : = 9 = A > 4 : = ) E = ( = % = = A > = = > # ( : : 9 , ) = > ( ( % = > # 9 : = C # > = > , 1 5 = = 9 = ) ) 9 = 9 = % ( : : = # C = ) E = > % B % > % : = > # = : > A $ > : = C A ( = = D > = > = 9 > % % $ > = % 1 4 # > B 9 = A 9 = D 9 % = # : = C % > # = 9 > : = % = > # = : > = t 8 ) = > = > = : % > = = = ( > = ) E = C : > 5 = : % = # , ( = A 9 % > $ > = A = 9 C 1 = = 4 ( ( = > # : = 9 > : 9 = : % = > = # = > # % * = ( 9 % 1 = f > = A : = : # C = E A = > # > C = = # ( = 9 > : = B 9 E = C ( ( 1 5 = = $ ) % % = B 9 E = > # > = > # = 9 > C : = B 9 E = ) > % > % B = = > # > = > # 9 C : = ( : : = > # = = G = 9 > = # > # = % : > 9 % > = C A ( = > = % > = # = A 9 > # = 9 = > = . 9 B = > # = . ( % > % 1 = = 9 = % ( : = ) = > # = ) > % > = = : = A > = > # = ) > % = % = 9 = ( = = : 1 > # 9 = 9 > = > # > = C : = > = % $ 9 > ( E = = > # = = A > = ) = A = % % : A : : % = A : = = > # 9 = C = $ : % > % : = > # = % : > 9 % > = ) % # > = = > = $ B 9 > % F = 9 A # > = A > = : B 9 ( = = > # : ) = > # ) : 1 = = 9 C = 9 % : = > # > ) = > # > = # = C 9 % > > = > # = 9 , : ( C # % # = # = ( ( = 4 A > : > % 5 = : E $ % = > # > = = > # = = t = 9 > : = > # : > > = C 9 = > # = r % : = 9 , : ( # = 9 = A ) 9 = 1 4 = C % ( ( = = > # = 9 % # > = > # % = ) = : A 9 = > # : = 9 = 9 9 > ( E = # $ ( 5 = : % = 9 C 1 = = 4 H > = % : = A 9 = ) 9 ( ( % > % = > = = > # = : > = C = = 9 A 9 = % : 1 5 4 t 8 B = # = = A : ( = = 8 9 : $ : % ( = B ( ) > 8 5 = : % = b ( ( 1 = = 4 t A : : = ( ( : = 8 > = C = # C = > > 9 % = > # 9 : = E ) 9 1 5 4 r % : = % : = = % : ( > = 9 5 : % = r % ( ( : 1 = = 4 = ( > = = > # 9 : = 8 > ) = 9 ) = ( ( : = = A > % 1 5 b ( ( = D 9 : : = 9 A : > 9 > % = > # > > # = % : > 9 % > = 9 % B : = A > = = ) % ( ( % ( ( 9 : = = E 9 = % = 9 > = ) E = = E > 4 C = 8 > = B = > = = 9 9 = / 9 $ 9 : : % ( 0 = A > = = % > 1 5 4 # > = A 9 = : A 9 = / 9 C 0 = : % = % : > 9 A 5 = # = > % A 1 = = 4 = 8 > = 9 ( % B > # = : > = A > = C = = ( 9 = 9 ) = % > 1 = = t ) E = = ( $ : # % = A > = C # 9 = C : > 9 A " ( = % : = % 9 9 > = 9 : > = : = 9 1 = = = ( = C % > # = = ( > = % : = C # = 8 > = # B = 9 > : = 9 % * = ( 9 % = C % > # = > # ) 1 5 t > = C : = = = > # > = > # 9 : = % > # : = 9 : = # = > = ( ( 1 = = 4 # ( $ E = 8 > = 9 ( = = , = > # 9 1 = = t 8 ) > % 9 = = : % = 9 > : = > # > = 8 > = > % > = = C # 9 = > # = 9 A 9 = ) > : = > # 9 = = C # 9 = > # = 9 A 9 = ) > : > # = 9 = % : = % = > # = ( : : 9 , ) 1 5 # , ( = 9 = ) ) 9 = > > b = ( : = D 9 : : = 9 A : > 9 > % > # > = > # = E A 9 = 9 : = C 9 8 > = > $ > % = > # = % = = 4 # : $ 5 = ( 9 $ % = > # E = 1 4 t 8 ( ( = > = > # % : = 9 > = A > = t 8 ( ( = C > # % 5 = : % = b ( ( = C # = > # ) = > # = ) > % = > = . 9 B = B 9 $ > % F % = 9 = > # = > # 9 = t = : % > % : = 9 $ 2 A % 9 1 = = b = : = > # = ) > % * = > # = 9 = B > = A * % ) A : ( E = > : : = % > 1 n A : > = 9 = > # = ) > % = $ & A 9 = # % 9 ( E = n : # = : : : : $ ) > = , 9 % > 9 = 9 = > # = : # , ( % : > 9 % > = : = > = 9 : : = > # = 9 C % > # = = ( = > # > = > # = ) ) 9 : = 9 $ : % 9 = % > : = : % > % = = > # = = 9 > 1 = = 4 r % : = # : = ( C E : = = > # = 9 % 5 = : # = : % 1 = = 4 # = . 9 > A $ % > E = 9 = 9 = A 9 = : > A > : = E = > # % : 9 > = % : = : ) > # % = > # > = A 9 = A % $ = A : ( 9 : = 8 > = # B 1 = = t = 8 > : = # C = C = = % = , = : % t r b r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b C B 9 = % > 8 : = > , 9 A : = > = > = ( C % > # = # B E = 2 A % ) > % = > # 9 = A > % ( = > # E = C C # > = % = E > # % = % : = A $ 9 > # = ( ( = > # > = ( $ ( : = 9 > # 1 = = # % C > : = > = > = ( % ( D 9 > : = > = ) = A > = % : > = > # = 9 = C % > # 9 9 = > = ) = : A 9 = > # # ( = % : 8 > = : % > > % = = > , = = B = % " 9 = B 9 ( C 1 = t = % > = > A 9 : = A > = > # # ( = 8 > = = ( ( = > # > % : = > : : = A > = % $ ( A = 9 9 A > % = > # 9 = 9 = # B % = % > = = % = A ( $ $ : = > # = C E : ; : ) = : A " : > = 9 % = A > = B = = 9 % C A ( = # B = > = 9 : > = : ) > # % 1 = = r C # % ( > > 9 E = ) ) E = B : : A " : > = > # > = > # = A $ > E = # = C % > # = % > : = % : A 9 $ = 9 9 % 9 = > = : = % > # 9 = C : = E = # ( = > # > A ( = = % = 9 ) > # > = 2 A 9 > 9 1 = = = A 9 > # 9 ) ( % > % = % : = > # = : % $ # ( = ( % : = 9 > ( E = = A $ > E = 9 9 > E = = 9 > ( E = 9 % B > = 9 9 > E ) % = > # > = > # = A > E C % ( ( = # B = > = A 9 = A > # C = > # % : = C A ( = > > # = A % 1 4 t > 8 : = % = > = > % ) $ : A ) % = C # > $ B 9 = C = 5 = : % = # % $ 1 = = 4 A 9 = : > = > % = % : > = ( > = > # = D 9 > : = ) % = = > ( ( = A : = C # > = C n n n r f t b r n n t t $ * 0 % % ) & $ $ + ) / + ) 1 . % 2 $ / $ * & " / ) % # # % ) ! ( % ) 0 $ $ ) . $ # / ) % ! ) / # $ , + % " ) (& $0t+( $ t%%! $ 0f"%))(. 0'+ ,"$*) )* *+* %$)0 0r 0r%%! $ r $*) 0r"&+" r%"\r $*) 0nn($ b+ ($ ( b rf F L O R I D A C O O K I N b 2t $%-%$".)Tj13.795 0 0 13.795 311.6589 370.4307 Tm0 Tc<01>Tj22.991 0 0 22.991 318.236 363.5307 Tm-0.05 Tc<0605>TjET/GS1 gsBT/F17 1 Tf7.664 0 0 7.664 267.666 328.4977 Tm0 0 0 1 k0.001 Tc[(f nr

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July 2 Jahlion Lamont Turnquest – Writ of bodily attachment. Carlisha Rena Kimmons – Battery on detention facility staff. Audrey Shantel Miller – Violation of parole (circuit). Anthony James Hampton – Corruption by threat against public servant and trespass property other than structure. July 3 Joseph James Salina, Jr. – Possession of a controlled substance, driving under the inuence of alcohol or drugs, possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. Alyris Avis Matthew – Possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. Elmo Copeland – Violation of parole. Paula Kay Rodgers Out of county warrant. Tarachel Katrina James – Criminal registration. Christopher Don Cheatum – Out of county warrant. Marvin Prentiss Bass, Jr. Out of county warrant.July 4 Derrick Leon West – Weekender. Orian Orente Freeman – Out of county warrant. James Earl Hampton – Weekender.July 5 Blain Albert Shonk, Jr. – Criminal registration.July 6 George Wallace Haynes – Battery on a law enforcement ofcer. Shea Marie McGlynn – Violation of parole (circuit).July 7 Daniel Corry Rutter – Burglary of dwelling and violation of parole (county). Garrison RyanRichard Cooke – Violation of parole (circuit). Craig Lamar Solomon, Jr. – Criminal registration. Jimmie Joe Ware – Criminal registration. April Renee Williams – Unemployment compensate/ fraud. July 8 Scott Cooley – Failure to appear. Conor Brohnan Googan – Reckless driving. Micory Andre Robinson – Failure to appear. Jesus Sanchez Olmos – Failure to appear for arraignment. Dayshon Jerel Cooley –Violation of parole (circuit). Cody Laurance Cimiotta – D.U.I. and D.U.I. property damage. Around Madison County4A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Information in the Jail Report is provided to Greene Publishing, Inc. by the Madison County Sheriff’s Ofce. All people are considered innocent until proven guilty. Questions about people identied in the report should be directed to the MCSO at (850) 973-4001. Obituaries Community CalendarJuly 12 The Wash and Jerusha Johnson Family Reunion will be Saturday, July 12 at the Perry Woman’s Club, located at 502 N Jefferson Street, at 11 a.m. A covered dish lunch, paper products and ice will be furnished. Bring any family photos; old and recent. For more information, call Teresa Gipson at (850) 5845188.July 12 Clarke’s Midway Mixed Farm is hosting an event called Agri-Tourism Fun in Madison County on Saturday, July 12, at 520 SE Midway Church Road in Lee. Hourly Walking Farm Tours and plenty of karaoke music are planned for this AgriTourism fun day from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Everyone is welcomed to attend and this will make a great day for families to enjoy fresh food. Clarke’s Midway Mixed Farm is just three years old, producing and selling blueberries, tomatoes, okra, red potatoes, assorted peppers, acre peas, onions, corn, watermelon, cucumbers and a small quantity of herbs. There will be food vendors with curried goat and chicken, hot wings, barbecue chicken, sausage and pork, jerk pork, hot dogs, sh, corn ears, veggie or beef patties, sodas and bottled water. Craft vendors will be displaying their items for sale, too. Directions to the Lee farm coming from Madison are as follows: head south on Highway 53; go past I-10 about three miles to Midway Baptist Church. Make a left turn onto Midway Church Road. After the church, look for the next gate and sign that says Clarke’s Midway Mixed Farm. For more information you may call Hubert Clarke at (850) 6738516.July 13-18 Cherry Lake United Methodist Church will be having their Vacation Bible School beginning Sunday, July 13, at 5 p.m. and continuing Monday through Thursday at 5:30-8:45 p.m., and ending Friday night at 7 p.m. The theme is “God’s Backyard Bible Camp Under The Stars.” There will be food, Bible study, crafts and recreation. Cherry Lake Baptist Church is located at 1308 NW CR 150 in Madison. For more information, contact Darlene Reaves at (850) 929-2159.July 14 A rst time homebuyer series begins Monday, July 14, at the Madison County Extension Service, starting at 6 p.m. It will continue on July 15, 21 and 22. Upon completion, participants will receive a certicate that can be used for the SHIP program and Rural Development home loans. To register, call 973-4138.July 19 Tryouts for a new 12U Travel Fastpitch Team will be held on Saturday, July 19, at the Madison Recreation Park. Tryouts will be conducted on Field 5 from 1-5 p.m. Players must have a love for the game, a team spirit attitude and commitment to the team. For more information, please call Benjie Dyal at (850) 869-0126. If no answer, please leave your name, player's name and phone number. You may also email at dyalbenjie@ymail.co m Please help spread the word. Thank you!July 26 The MCHS Cowboy’s Football Golf Shootout will be held Saturday, July 26, at Madison Golf and Country Club, starting at 8 a.m. Entry fees are $200 per group or $50 per player and includes green and cart fees and lunch; fees are due by July 23. For more information or questions, contact Coach Ben White at (904) 2900413, (850) 973-5779 or ben.white@madisonmail.us. Jail Report Way Back When Way Back WhenJuly 8, 1949 The beautiful country home of Mr. and Mrs. E E Hadden was completely ruined by re together with the furnishings about 11:30 o’clock Tuesday night. The re was seen by a passing motorist on the Valdosta highway who turned in the alarm when he got to Madison. Mrs. Thigpen, our Garbett Crossing correspondent, sends us this week report of the two colored men killed by lightning last Thursday afternoon while working with Mr. Lee Thigpen in the tobacco barn, also of two others being shocked, and of Mr. O L Scotts sister-in-law’s being struck and burned by lightning, but recovering. Mr. and Mrs. Larry Cherry and son Jimmie of Lee spent the 4thof July holidays in Greensboro, Fla., visiting Rev H L Boyd and family. Two tobacco barns burned at Cherry Lake this week end. One, belonging to Glosson Shefeld, burned Saturday night and the other belonging to Benton Sale, burned Sunday afternoon. Both barns were full of tobacco.July 7, 1950 Little Sista Keyes had the misfortune Wednesday afternoon to break her right arm when she fell from a see-saw at her home on South Horry street. Mr. and Mrs. E E Alligood of Fitzgerald, Ga. announce the birth of a daughter, Earline, June 22. Mrs. Alligood is the former Miss Dot Beggs of Madison. H M Daniels of Ocoee, Fla. Was charged with reckless driving, Wednesday June 28, when the truck he was driving hit a Mercury, automobile, driven by Johnny H. Harris, of Madison, Fla., in a head-on collision in front of the Pine Grove Auto Court, shortly after noon. The Madison Twin Rivers league baseball team defeated Jasper here last Thursday afternoon eight to seven. The game was interrupted for quite a while by the rain.July 6, 1951 Mrs. V M Folsom and Miss Emma Jean Folsom entertained with a lovely party Tuesday morning honoring Miss Mabsie O’Steen, popular bride elect. Francis Calvin Buchanan, son of Mr. and Mrs. R P Buchanan, has been promoted from Private to Private First Class, and has been transferred from Lackland Air Force Base San Antonio Texas to James Connally Air Force Base, Waco, Texas for twelve weeks’ training. Sunday afternoon, June 24, at 4:30 o’clock in the Riverside Baptist church of Miami, Miss Beth Mathis only daughter of Mrs. John Edwin Mathis and the late Mr. Mathis of Lake City, became the bride of William Otis Bailey, son of Mrs. Cordie Webb Bailey of Gainesville and W C Bailey of Madison. Prof. and Mrs. Oscar A Beck, Jr., and two small sons, Douglas Allen, 9, and Stephen Philip, 3, are new residents here. M. Beck is the new principal at the Madison Elementary School. They are residing in the Hardee apartments. Have something you would like to add to the Community Calendar? Simply call Greene Publishing, Inc. at (850) 973-4141 or email your information to rose@greenepublishing.com Eustace Pinckney LandEustace P. Land, 78, of Lee, passed away on Tuesday, July 1. Eustace was born in Arlington, Va. on June 25, 1936. He served his country in the Korean War and was an electrician by trade. Eustace applied his technical and leadership skills as a Division Manager for a contractor in support of the Department of Defense. He enjoyed woodworking, riding motorcycles, hang gliding, camping and shing with his family. He enjoyed his retirement with Audrey, his church family and the community of Lee. Eustace is survived by his loving wife of 30 years, Audrey; his siblings: Tim Land and Patricia Harvey; his children: Helen Dolly (Ruby), George Land, Robert Land and Martin Land; stepchildren: I. Michele Ingley, Kevin Ingley and Debbie Mentor; and grandchildren: George Land, Rachel Land, William Dolly, David Longest, Brian Ingley, Deena Ingley, Zachary Mentor and Darby Mentor. A memorial service will be held Monday, July 21 at 2 p.m., at the Lee United Methodist Church in Lee. Condolences and memories can be shared with the family through Beggs Funeral Home at 235 NW Orange Avenue in Madison. In lieu of owers, please consider donations to the Lee United Methodist Church, Lee, Fl. 32059, or a charity of your choice. John Franklin WilliamsonJohn Franklin “Frank” Williamson, 66, of Madison, passed away Tuesday, July 8, at home after a lengthy illness. He was born January 31, 1948 in Madison, to the late Cecil and Edna Earl Hamrick Williamson. Mr. Williamson was a Vietnam War veteran, having served in the United States Army with the 101stAirborne Division. Afterwards, he worked with PCS in White Springs, as a heavy equipment operator until his retirement in 2012. He was a very active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He is survived by his wife of 42 years, Susie Williamson; two sons: Frankie (Rebekah) of Lee, and Justin of Tallahassee; a daughter, Kim Gurley (Rob) of Lee; and ve grandchildren: Chase and Maddie Gurley, Sadie Hare, Daniel Edwards and Lydia Williamson, all of Lee. He is also survived by a brother, J.C. Williamson of Lee, and a sister, Becky Wimberly of Mayo. Funeral services were held Thursday, July 10 at 11 a.m. at Beggs Funeral Home in Madison. Burial followed in Oak Ridge Cemetery. The family received friends at the funeral home on Wednesday, July 9 from 5 to 7 p.m. Wedding AnnouncementSmart-WagnerLinda Ann Smart and Thomas J. Wagner were married June 28, in Melrose, Fl., with Hilary Dickert, a close friend of the bride, officiating. The bride, the former Linda Anderson of Madison, was a graduate of Madison County High School and the University of Florida. She is currently in her final year of law school at Florida Coastal School of Law in Jacksonville, and is employed as a Litigation Coordinator at the Middleton Law Firm in Melrose, Fl. The groom is a graduate of Bradford County High School and has been employed as a CNC Programmer at Fabco Air, Inc. in Gainesville for the past 35 years. The bride’s parents are Mrs. Orvis L. “Charlotte” Cason, Jr. and Mr. Gerald L. Anderson, both of Madison. The groom’s parents are Mrs. Rita Wagner and the late Mr. Maurice Wagner of Keystone Heights, Fl. The couple will reside in Melrose, Fl.

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 5A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Madison County Parks & Recreation Will Be Offering Adult Church League Softball This Summer. Games Will Be Played On Mondays And Tuesdays Starting July 14th. Teams May Sign Up At The Madison County Courthouse, Finance Recreation Complex, Monday Friday 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Teams May Also Sign Up At The Recreation Complex, Monday Friday 8 a.m. 3 p.m. The Fee For The League Will Be $300 Per Team. Age Limit To Play Is 16 Years Of Age. (Must Be 16 By The First Game.) Teams Must Have Two Females On The Field At All Times. League Rules And Team Roster Will Be Available At The Courthouse And The Recreation Complex. For More Information, Contact: Tommy Garner (850) 464-7221 Jim Bo Ratliff (850) 464-7072 Two-Day Sexual Violence Seminar At NFCC Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, June 11, 2014The trainers that discussed Enhancing Sexual Assault Investigations and Prosecutions through Sexual Assault Response Teams (SART) at NFCC are, left to right: Thomas McDevitt, Kim Nash, Jennifer Sommers andJohn Wilkinson.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, June 11, 2014The women that helped in bringing the two-day training to NFCC are, left to right: Olga Trujillo, founder of Olga Trujillo Consulting and the author of The Sum of My Parts; Madison County SART Coordinator Cherie Perry-Rowell; Nan L. Baughman, Outreach Counselor for Refuge House in Jefferson County; and Tallahassee Refuge House Inc. Of“ce of Administration Assistant Director Emily Mitchem. By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.Refuge House and Florida Council Against Sexual Violence (FCASV) hosted a two-day training on Enhancing Sexual Assault Investigations and Prosecutions through Sexual Assault Response Teams (SART) and the training was conducted at North Florida Community College by AEquitas; a program of the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape. The training was provided by Olga Trujillo from Olga Trujillo Consulting. The training covered topics such as investigating and prosecuting the non-stranger rapist, coordinating a victim-centered community response, interviewing victims and dening vicarious trauma. A SART team is a community-wide multidisciplinary coordinating group that promotes a comprehensive response to sexual violence. Some of the members of the Madison SART that was able to attend the two-day training included City of Madison Police Department Sergeant Investigator James Roebuck, Communications Bureau Commander Lt. Terry Lenz, Warrant Ofcer and volunteer victim advocate Tammy Webb, Madison County Sheriff's Ofce PREA Coordinator Lt. Kathrine West and Billye Robinson, RN, SANE and an instructor for the Practical Nursing Program at NFCC. According to Madison County SART Coordinator Cherie Rowell, it was not just residents of North Florida that attended. Some came from Miami, Fort Walton Beach and Homestead to attend the two-day training. The four trainers that discussed the various topics were Thomas McDevitt, who retired as a 35-year veteran of the Philadelphia Police Department, including 17 years supervising sexual assault investigations; Kim Nash, who is part of a team of forensic nurses at Memorial Hospital in Colorado Springs, that provides forensic care to more than 1,600 patients per year who are victims of violence; Jennifer Sommers, who is a Special Assistant Attorney General at the New York State Attorney General's Ofce; and John Wilkinson, who is an Attorney Advisor with AEquitas and presents on trial strategy, legal analysis and policy, and ethical issues related to violence against women at local, state, national and international levels. The team of trainers used information based on real cases. They showed videos of past court cases and interviews from the victim or survivor. Also shown were interviews of predators and a reenactment of a predator. "The training taught the importance of each member of a SART, their role and how to work together," said Rowell. Question Of The WeekIf you could have a superpower, what would it be? Super (x-ray) vision, because it sounds like it could be fun. I would like to read peoples minds. People say TMI,Ž but I like too much information sometimes, I wouldnt have to guess anymore. Knowledge is power. I would want to ”y. I could travel anywhere I wanted to go and at anytime. I could see the world. To be invisible; I could sneak up behind people and scare them and they wouldnt know who it was. Super strength, so I could deal with all the stress in the world. I would like to be invisible, that way I could hide from my girlfriendsƒand their husbands.Greene Publishing, Inc. All Photos By Rose Klein, July 7, 2014 Bozo Smith Greg Tillman Tracy Wallace Cindy Miles Uphold Jessenia Morales

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6A €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 876227

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 7A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Recall Update Big Fireworks recalls Mock Sword Firework DevicesThe 4thof July may be over, but there are still some hazardous firework products out there. Fireworks by their very nature demand to be handled with care, either by professionals or knowledgeable adults. Children using firework should be taught the basics of fireworks safety and responsibility, and should always be closely supervised by adults. Even so, accidents can occur despite all the precautions if the product is faulty, as is the case with the Big Fireworks company's “Big Sword” device, a mock sword that is actually a handheld fountain emitting sparks from the sword tip. The blue and yellow sword has the Big Fireworks logo and the words “Big Sword” printed on the front. A yellow cardboard tag attached to the handle of the device has “Big Sword” and a caution statement printed on it. The sword measures 30 inches and has model number 3609 printed above the product’s barcode. The firm has received two reports of the fountain exploding while in use, but no injuries have been reported. The recall involves a little over 1,000 devices that were sold through Big Fireworks retailers and wholesale distributers from April – June of 2014, for about $13. They were distributed by American Eagle, doing business as Big Fireworks, and imported from China. Consumers who purchased Big Sword devices should immediately stop using them and return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Contact Big Fireworks toll-free at (866) 5146225 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. CT Monday through Friday or online at www.bigfireworks.com. Click on the Recall tab at the bottom of the page for more information. Lions Club: Heaving A Sigh Of ReliefBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. With the 4thof July God and Country Celebration over, and rave reviews coming in from members of the community, the Lions Club members can finally let out a big sigh of relief. It's over for another year. “It was a great success,” said Lions Club president Tim Dunn. The Fun Run and 5K run alone brought in an estimated $600-$700, and more businesses would like to help sponsor next year's run. The races were a first-time event for the God and Country Celebration, and their success guarantees they'll be back next year. An estimated 4000-5000 people attended the main event that evening around Lake Francis, enjoying the live entertainment on the stage. Lion Club member Christy Roebuck, who oversaw the early morning Fun Run and 5K Run, then returned that afternoon to work the main event, acknowledged that the event itself and everything leading up to it was a lot of work. “But it was well worth it,” she added. The work for the Lion's Club members continued for several hours after the concluding fireworks show, getting everything packed up, moved out and cleaned up. Jay Lee, past president, agreed that the monumental task had been worth the months of effort and planning, with everyone working together with sponsors as well as numerous volunteers from the community to put on a great entertainment lineup and a $15,000 fireworks display at the end. “What we do together as a club collectively is wonderful,” he said of the event which is also a major fundraiser for the club. “And then, turning around and putting it back into the community in the form of scholarships and eyeglasses.” Now there's time to relax a little and start planning for next year.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 8, 2014Lions Club president Tim Dunn (standing at podium) delivers good news of the positive feedback from the God and Country Celebration to a round of applause from members at their “rst regular Tuesday club meeting since the 4thof July event. OOPS....Newspaper Bloopers

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This article is a reprint of the story that originally ran in the July 9, 2014 Madison County Carrier. James Glaser’s name was incorrectly misspelled as Glacer. This writer apologizes for the mistake. By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.James Glaser is an artist who lived in a log cabin in the “woods” of Minnesota. Wanda Violet is a Director of Product Development and Curriculum Writer for a company based out of Atlanta, and was living in Tallahassee. They are now husband and wife and live in Madison County off of Colin Kelly Highway, where Glaser has carved out his own private park and art studio, while Violet telecommutes to her job in Tallahassee. Glaser and Violet have a modern love story; they met on an online dating site, married in Georgia in 2008 at a wedding and dinner attended by their adult children and by 2009, the couple had moved to Madison and now express how happy they are to be part of the Madison community. After living in Tallahassee, Glaser began to miss his woods and the couple began searching for a new residence. They spoke to several realtors, but were unable to find their “holy grail,” until when out driving one day, they stumbled upon a Fifth Saturday Celebration in Madison. Violet says Glaser was “smitten” with the celebration, Mrs. Leslie’s 10-layer cakes and the town. Glaser and Violet found realtors, Lynette Sirmon and Ben Jones, who they described as sweet and very helpful, and the first agents who seemed intent on helping the couple find their dream home. Their house search ended with the Cason home on Dusty Miller Avenue and after moving in, the extremely creative couple began making the house their own. While Violet concentrated on work, the inside of the home and planting flowers, Glaser began carving out the yard and creating wood structures all over the property’s landscape. He made paths through the acreage, tearing at vines and shrubs until the property more resembles a park as opposed to the wooded lot that previously accompanied the home. With the help of new friends such as TC Hudson, Dwayne Mitchell and Randy Funk, he built a two-story tree house, a potting shed for his gardening habit and a large shop where he can wile away the hours creating his art. One of the discoveries Glaser made while developing his backyard park, along with a fig tree and Tung Oil tree, was a sculpture made from rebar that was bent and twisted to resemble what we agreed looked like an insect, a grasshopper or praying mantis maybe. Both Glaser and Violet would like to meet the artist and be able to place a plaque beside the fun piece bearing the creator’s name, but need help from the community in order to identify this person. When Glaser is not working in the yard, he is working in his shop, creating beautiful works of art with wood. It is said that in times of great catastrophe or impending doom, ones eyes tend to open up and suddenly see and appreciate the small details of life around them; this is exactly how James Glaser’s passion for creating art from wood began. While sitting in a bunker during a rocket attack in Dung Ha, South Vietnam, the young marine, while waiting for the rockets to find their target, noticed someone had taken the time to carefully construct the wooden joint and crafted two, 2-inch square pegs and pounded them into round holes, serving to hold the bunker together securely. This appreciation of craftsmanship started Glaser thinking about building with wood and after returning to the states, he attended a fine arts program at a university where he was allowed to use their woodworking shop at will. From there, he moved to Northern Minnesota and continued to work with wood, refining and honing his skills. Since 1972, James Glaser has shown his work through exhibits in Minnesota, Arizona, Chicago, Ontario, Washington D.C., California and recently Tallahassee. After moving to Madison, he now limits his shows to Invitational Art Shows, allowing him to focus less time on showing and more time on creating. He built his studio according to his needs, with good lighting and ventilation and large windows, which allows him a great view of the environment around him; his park, the woods and the occasional passing wildlife. Glaser can now take a break and walk to his garden where he can weed and water or walk to the house and visit with Violet. Glaser also makes beautiful cutting boards for the kitchen and those can be seen in town at The Country Store on Range Street, at Tupelo’s in Monticello or LeMoyne Art Center in Tallahassee. To learn more about James Glaser, or to see his art, you can go to his website at www.jamesglaserstudios.com or call (850) 973-8813 to make an appointment. And if you go to see Glaser-Violet Park or Glaser’s studio, don’t forget to check out and cast your opinion on the mystery sculpture.Around Madison County8A €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Storm coming? Were ready.Report an outage: Get preparation tips: Duke Energy Storm re  e W m or t S y d a re re ? g n i com m i t a r a ep pr et g s o t h g i r l u o y y h l t c a x w e o n k y g er n E e k Du8 4 8 28 2 0 0 8u n o t a r o p e R e mor nd a s p i t on i e t f m a r o t s r a e r y e t f r a a e n … y n s a m r o t r s o e f r a p e r o p w t o y h ms a e t e ns o p s e r m r o t s t er p x e s  yc r. e t t i w te r t p e G5 8: e g a t u m r o t r s p e e d k n ms/ m o c: s p i ion t t a r pa e c y g r e n e e uk d er En e k u D m r o t s / /s m o m r o t S y g ere Energy Storm Duk Unknown Sculpture Leads To Local Artist Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 27, 2014James Glaser stands beside one of his art pieces that hang inside his and Violets home.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 27, 2014Jim Glaser and Wanda Violet stand beside some of the trees that make up the tree house, built by Glaser and friends who live in Madison County.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 27, 2014The tree house, built on the couples property, is two stories tall and includes a handmade stairway and stained glass for the window on the top level.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 27, 2014Glaser built his studio and personalized it to accommodate the creating and housing of his art pieces he coaxes from wood.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 27, 2014When creating paths in their expansive yard, this whimsical sculpture was found. Husband and Wife team, Glaser and Violet, purchased their home containing the sculpture, from the Casons who lived on Dusty Miller Avenue. The new owners are hoping someone can help them locate the artist who made the sculpture so they can place a nameplate beside the fun art.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 27, 2014Glaser is an avid gardener and landscape designer and has designed everything on his property, including this potting shed, which houses all of his gardening supplies.

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 9A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Enter for a chance to win FREE TICKETS to € No Photocopies Accepted € Tickets are good until August 4, 2014 € € Deadline To Enter is July 22, 2014 € Winners will be announced July 23, 2014 €Name____________________________ ___________________________ Address__________________________ __________________________ Phone Number____________________ Fill out and return to Greene Publishing, Inc. at P.O. Drawer 772 or 1695 S. S.R. 53 Madison Fl, 32340 You Could Spend Your Final Days Of Summer At Wild Adventures! And The Winners Are... It is that easy! Simply look for the cutout. Fill it out. Mail it in. And you could be a WINNER! Greene Publishing, Inc. Gives Away Wild Adventures Splash Island Tickets Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, June 30, 2014(Shown left) Cedric Jones stands beside his grandmother, Robin Demps, who won ticket to Wild Adventures Splash Island.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, July 7, 2014Faith Taggart is standing in front of her father, Mike Taggart, holding her tickets to Wild Adventures Splash Island.Greene Publshing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 27, 2014Wanda Violet is one of the winners of tickets to Wild Adventures Splash Island.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, July 8, 2014Gwendolyn Mixson is all smiles as one of the winners for tickets to Wild Adventures Splash Island.Madison C.I. Canine Team Receives Award Photo SubmittedThe Canine Team who received Medals of Valor are (left to right): Sgt. Ben Pike, Of“cer Donnie Bass, Of“cer Justin Surles, Of“cer Jonathan Richardson, Of“cer Darren Rye and Sgt. Todd Richardson. Story SubmittedCongratulations to the Canine Team at Madison Correctional Institution for receiving Medals of Valor for bravery in performance of their duties in helping apprehend an armed suspect in conjunction with the Madison County Sheriff’s Ofce. The award was voted on by Region II Administrative staff with input from Wardens and local authorities throughout the region which consists of 21 counties in the northeast sector of Florida. Greenville Resident Attends Girls State Photo SubmittedKelsi Reams and other girls that attended Girls State at Florida State University hung out as they toured Tallahassee and atten ded classes.By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.Kelsi Reams, 17, is a senior at Aucilla Christian Academy and she attended Girls State on Wednesday, June 25 until Thursday, July 3 at Florida State University as a delegate of Greenville through the American Legion Auxiliary in Greenville. She is the daughter of Kathy and Joe Reams. While she attended, she was elected as a lobbyist for her county. She was able to meet and talk with lobbyists, the Chief Speaker of the House and tour the old Capital. Reams attended classes that taught about the government. The students also separated into two parties: Nationalist and Federalist. The students created rallying chants for their party. Reams favorite part of the week was meeting with many different young ladies from all over Florida and listening to their different beliefs and ideas. At Aucilla Christian Academy, she is a member of Living Waters, FCA and a yearbook staff member. She is also Co-Captain of the Varsity Cheerleading squad. She has raised over $2,500 in ongoing research for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation since 2004 selling hot chocolate in her hometown of Greenville. Her sister, Abby, was diagnosed with the disease in 2003 and Reams wanted to do her part to help raise money for Abby and others living with Cystic Fibrosis. She is an active member of Greenville Baptist Church where she helps teach music during the Wednesday night Community Kids Program. Reams loves spending time with her family and friends. When she is not attending school, she enjoys writing, reading, singing, swimming and listening to music. She would like to pursue a career in journalism, where she would be able to interview people and hear their ideas and beliefs. As far as college goes, she is still deciding whether to attend Florida State University or Flagler College. Kelsi Reams

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Story SubmittedWhen one has lived in a county for a few years, he can sense which folks have been around for a long time. Maybe one knows longtime residents because their name is common. It could be that those who have lived in Madison for years have lots of aunts and uncles and cousins. The stories of early days long-term residents tell are a clue. Or maybe one can tell because the folks who have been around so long seem to feel a pride or an ownership in their county. But there is something even deeper that runs in long term residents that the rest of us see. There is a confidence that Madison is their home; it has been, and it will be their home. Born in South Carolina, Daniel Burnett and his wife Hannah Gornto came to Madison before Florida was a state, around 1840. He is listed in the 1840 census, along with his son, James Burnett. Daniel arrived in Madison County after a stopover in Bulloch County, Ga., where he had received land in the 1805 Georgia Land Lottery. Daniel and his family settled around the Cherry Lake and Hamburg areas and have lived in this area for many generations. Second Generation Daniel and Hannah had three children: Mary, born around 1806 and married William Knight; Daniel, born in 1817, and died 1903 married first Martha Ann P. Sever and then Francis T. Grambling; James was born between 1810-1820 and married Sarah Jane Guiton. Third Generation/Daniel Daniel and Martha P. Sever had seven children: Peyton Pierce, Capers Peter, Daniel William, James T., David Felix, Mary S. and Elizabeth Maude. Daniel and Frances Terrell Gramling had six more children: Margaret B., Emma D., John, Samuel Henry, Nancy C. and Marshal O. Daniel and his wives lived in the Madison and Hamburg areas their whole lives, and at least three of their sons married and also raised their families in the Madison/Hamburg area. Third Generation/James James and his wife, Sarah Jane Guiton had five children: William, Thomas, Nancy Nelly, James, and Samuel J. At least two of their sons raised families in Madison. Fourth Generation/Daniel From Daniel and Martha Sever’s family, David Felix married Rebecca Jane Paul; they lived in Madison, Hamburg and Cherry Lake. Their children were Rosella, Alonzo J., Daniel Felix, George Paul, Lewis Washington, Mary Agnes and Louis. Daniel and Martha’s son, Daniel William married Mary Elizabeth Morrow and had the following children: Madge E., Martha Elizabeth, James Daniel, William H., Capel Pellar, Samuel Felix, SP., Mary Frances C., and Mazzey. Daniel and Mary Elizabeth raised their family in Madison, Hamburg and Cherry Lake. From Daniel and his second wife, Frances Terrell Gramling, Samuel Henry married Carrie L. Wilson and had the following children: Carl Washington, George Forest and Samuel Paul. Samuel and Carrie lived in the Madison area. Fourth Generation/James James and Sarah Jane Guiton’s son William married Sarah Elizabeth Dansby, and had the following children: William Shelton “Shelt” and Daniel Bryan. James died at age 26 as result of wounds in the Civil War. He died in a hospital in Richmond, Va. James and Sarah Jane’s son, Samuel J. married Martha Burnett and had the following children: William Jackson, Henry, Samuel, Jobe, Martha A., and Rose Ann. If you’ve managed to make it to the end of this article, whether you are a Burnett, a kin, or an obsessive article reader, you may have seen some familiar names—Daniel, Samuel and William Burnetts abounded. You will pr obably be even more familiar with some of the fifth generation Burnetts. Fifth Generation/ Daniel Children of George Forest Burnett, who married Martha Church Croom were Mary Martha, George Forest, Jr., and Carlton Croom. Fifth Generation/James Children of William “Shelt” and Ella Jane Loper were William A., Councel Moye and Joseph Russell. Children of “Shelt” and his second wife, Rhoda Henderson were Rosa Lee, Eva Mae, Kathleen, Ruby E. Katie, Minnie Belle and Mary Helen. Thank you, Burnetts, for being here so long and for taking such good care of our county. We love you. Part of the information in this article was provided by Sandra Norris in articles in The Madison County Florida Family History Book. In addition, information was used that came from several Burnett Family Trees on Ancestry.com. The Madison County Genealogical Society welcomes your input and invites you to join our organization. We meet on the second Thursday monthly, except during summer months, in the Madison Public Library from 6 to 7 p.m. Annual dues are $25. To add comments or corrections to our articles or to submit your own sketch on your ancestor, contact us at Madison County Genealogy Society, P.O. Box 136, Madison, FL 32341. Or contact us by email at mcgenealogysociety@live.com. If you would like for us to write an article featuring your ancestor, please contact us by mail or email.Around Madison County10A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Pioneers Of Madison County DANIEL BURNETT want investing made easy? Larry DiPietro is an experienced financial advisor committed to helping clients achieve a more secure financial future. His comprehensive planning combined with his experience with wealth management, retirement, education and insurance strategies can help you achieve your financial goals. Call Larry today to find out how his experience and consultative approach can help you! larry.dipietro@invest“nancial.com 343 West Base St. l Madison 850.402.8028Larry DiPietro, Financial AdvisorRegistered Representative, INVEST Financial CorporationINVEST Financial Corporation is not af“liated with Capital City Banc Investments. INVEST Financial Corporation, member FINRA/SIPC, and its af“liated insura nce agencies offer securities, advisory services and certain insurance products. Products are: 04/15 … 116288 Pictures Of The Past State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory,http://oridamemory.com/items/show/133469Minnie Lee Greene Burnett stands between 2 unidenti“ed women in 1928

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www.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 11A

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc. In a child's transition to middle and high school, there are challenges and pitfalls along the way, but until recently, there was little organized instruction for him or her on how to deal with these challenges, and it was hard to nd all the information needed in one place. As students become older, they are expected to learn and begin using critical life skills they will need later in life. They are expected to begin setting goals for themselves, and have workable plans for achieving them. They need to know how to set boundaries for themselves and for other people, and learn "refusal strategies" for unhealthy choices. Peer pressure is a powerful thing and many teenagers have a hard time saying no to harmful or unhealthy choices. But where do they go to learn these critical life skills? Project SOS (Strengthening Our Students, Empowering Parents) is a program that emphasizes these three critical life skills ,students and their parents will need to stay on course, as they transition to middle and high school. Pam Mullarkey, a former school board member and educator, addressed the school board about bringing the program to Madison. She had just come from meetings with several surrounding districts, who were all on board with the program. The program was free, but it could accommodate only 15,000 students. The course, which could be a DVD series for counties that had already set their curriculum for the year, or a semester-length curriculum that could be tted in a P.E. class, H.O.P.E. class or an activity period manual for instructors and workbooks for students. In addition to teaching the three critical life skills, there were also ve supplemental teachings that included 1) Media Inuence, 2) Healthy and Unhealthy Relationships, 3) The Effects of Sex which will be for high school only, 4) Substance Abuse, 5) Self-Harm, Bullying and Suicide. The segment on Media Inuence includes the social media, Mullarkey told the board. "We talk about the good, the bad and the ugly," she said, all the ways in which using the social media could be both good and harmful. The board voted to include the program in the 2014-2015 school year. For more information about the SOS program, contact Marshae Best at marshae@projectsos.comor visit the website http://projectsos.com/.School12A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 New Program Teaches Students Life SkillsPhoto SubmittedIt's that time of year again … summer vacation for most of us, but for the Madison County High School student athletes and Booster Club, it's time to gear up for the 2014-15 football season. The Cowboys and their families and friends are selling football cards around town for $10 each to raise money for football camp this summer and equipment they'll need when they take to the gridiron in September. The cards have the 2014-15 MCHS football schedule on one side and on the other, a list of nearly 20 area businesses offering discounts to cardholders, and are valid for over a year … all the way through September 30, 2015. MCHS Boosters And Athletes Selling Football Cards Madison County High School Will Start New Season With New ScoreboardBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc. When the Madison County High School Cowboys take on their opponents at their first home game of the 20142015 school year, it will be with a brand new digital score board overlooking Boot Hill Stadium. The old score board is showing its age in the form of requiring frequent repairs, usually before every game, Madison County School Superintendent Doug Brown had said several weeks ago, when he first proposed replacing it with an updated, state-of-the-art digital model. Since the board dominates the field, Brown felt that it was a big part of the overall impression visitors would get, not only of the school's athletic facilities, but the high school itself, the entire school district and even Madison County as a whole. A run-down board with frequently burned out or improperly working lights pr obably wasn't helping in that regard. For some visitors, Boot Hill Stadium might be all they ever see of the county. After considering the matter and looking at several bids, the school board chose the ElectroMech Company to provide and install the new board for about $38,000. It sounds like a lot of money, even with help from the MCHS Booster Club, but Brown stated that this particular model comes bordered with spaces for ads: two large ones across the top and the bottom, and four smaller spaces down each side, all of which can be sold to sponsors for advertising. With the revenue from ad spaces, the sign could pay for itself within the first year. After that, any additional revenues would also come back to the school. "I am 110 percent committed to getting it all back through ad revenue," said Brown. Kenny Hall made the motion to approve the new scoreboard, "with the understanding that all the proceeds will come back to the school." The board approved the new scoreboard unanimously. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 8, 2014Slated for replacement: When the Cowboys take on the Tampa Catholic High School Crusaders Aug. 29, this old score board will be gone from Boot Hill Stadium. The Madison County School Board recently approved a state-ofthe-art digital scoreboard with spaces for ads from 10 sponsors. Superintendent Doug Brown expects that the new scoreboard will pay for itself within the “rst year. FEED TIMESHow to use: The major and minor feeding times for each day are listed below. The major feeding times are the best for the sportsman and last about 2 hours, the minor feeding times can also have good success, but last only about 1 hour. Good luck and be careful out there. Major feed times are marked by an asterisk (*) The Week Of July 11 July 17, 2014 Friday July 11 5:55 AM *12:10 AM 6:20 PM Saturday July 12 *12:40 AM 6:55 AM *1:10 PM 7:20 PM Sunday July 13 *1:30 AM 7:50 AM *2:20 PM 8:30 PM Monday July 14 *2:45 AM 8:55 AM *3:10 PM 9:30 PM Tuesday July 15 *3:45 AM 10:00 AM *4:20 PM 10:30 PM Wednesday July 16 *4:40 AM 10:50 AM *5:10 PM 11:30 PM Thursday July 17 *5:45 AM 11:55 AM *6:10 PM

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SchoolMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 13A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Students Recognized For Purr-fect FCAT Scores By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc. The room was packed with proud parents and students at the July 1 School Board meeting, and Superintendent Doug Brown opened the meeting with a few words of praise for 10 students in the Madison school district who made perfect scores on one or more sections of the FCAT test. Seven of the students and their families were present, as Brown called them up one by one, congratulated them and presented them with certificates, signed by Gov. Rick Scott, recognizing their achievement. The seven children recognized at the meeting included Camryn Alderman, with a perfect score in reading; Mattie Barnes for a perfect score in math; Halie Wetherington, with a perfect score in reading; Montoya Brown, with a perfect score in reading; Justin Barnett, with a perfect score in math; Matthew Gassler, with perfect scores in both reading and math; and Tanner Renfroe, with a perfect score in math. Three other children not present also made perfect scores and will be receiving certificates: Kaitlyn Farnell, reading; Drew French, reading; and Ethan Myers, math. Congratulations to all 10 students for their achievements.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 1, 2014Camryn Alderman ReadingGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 1, 2014Mattie Barnes MathGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 1, 2014Halie Wetherington ReadingGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 1, 2014Montoya Brown ReadingGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 1, 2014Justin Barnett MathGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 1, 2014Matthew Gassler … Reading and MathGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, July 1, 2014Tanner Renfroe Math

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE WANTED FOR RENT HELP WANTED www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . .14A € Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, July 11, 2014 FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 7/7/2014 THROUGH 7/13/2014 I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).3/26 rtn, n/cPageant and Prom Dresses For Sale:Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ”ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, ”owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful ”owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 Leave a message. Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Our newspaper of“ce is seeking an outstanding individual to join our sales team. Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a good personality and LOVE to talk on the telephone? If you are a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, have a friendly can-doattitude, a great work ethic, are organized, and self-motivated then this job might be just for you. Valid Drivers License a must! Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper of“ce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison. A few chickens and a rooster for my yard. (850) 661-6868.4/9 rtn, n/c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12x18 building with 6 porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/c Spacious 3bd/2ba + 85 acres!This 4bd/3ba brick home has stocked ponds + 98 acres!Well-built 3bd/2.5ba brick home waits for you. Charming 3bd/2ba brick home This pretty 3bd/2ba has a new roof and lake accessLovely 3bd/2ba home has cathedral ceilings REAL ESTATE Wanted I have dozens of properties I want to sell in Madison. Call Steve at (850) 464-2500. Do not apply if you are not a hard worker and cannot return phone calls.7/4, 7/9, pdGordon Tractor Inc. has a position open for a full time Bookkeeper. You may pick up an application or drop off your resume at 491 SW Range Avenue, Madison.7/9 rtn, cNorth Florida Community College, Madison FL., has the following positions available: DIR of Business & Tech Services; Recruiter; Learning Specialist, Communications Specialist. See www.nfcc.edu for details7/9 7/23, c Adoption ADOPTloving married couple seeks to adopt, will be hands on mom and dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592, Adam Sklar #0150789. Education TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASS'T CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY. Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709. Help Wanted Want a Career Operating Heavy Equipment? Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. "Hands On Training" & Certi“cations Offered. National Average 18-22 Hourly! Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Bene“ts Eligible! 1-866-362-6497. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Quali“ed drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for quali“ed students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769. Real Estate NC Mountains near Lake Lure. New log cabin on 1.59 acres, huge covered porches, vaulted ceilings, EZ to “nish, $74,900, add'l acreage available. 828-286-1666. NOW HIRING! Florida Call for Shift Availability(12 hours shifts on Saturday & Sunday for RNS & LPNs) Referral/Sign-on bonusfor employees and new hires.Full Time RNs/LPNsEmployee Bonus = $1000 after 3 months $250, after 6 months $250, after one year $500 New Hire Bonus = $500 after 3 months $250, after 6 months $250Any questions contact Human ResourcesAD/GW

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www.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 15A All Legals are posted on line at www.greenepublishing.com All local legals are also published at www.”oridapublicnotices.com ----Legals---7/4, 7/11July 4, 2014 7/11, 7/18 7/11, 7/18 B U S I N E S S C A R D D I R E C T O R Y www.peacockslandscaping.com€ (850) 464-1484 € € Madison, Fl. 32340 € € sailpeacock@gmail.com € IrrigationLandscaping 7/11, 7/18

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16A €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, July 11, 2014