The Madison enterprise-recorder

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Material Information

Title:
The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title:
Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title:
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Creation Date:
May 31, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note:
Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID:
UF00028405:00642

Related Items

Preceded by:
Enterprise-recorder


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Full Text

PAGE 1

r b f t t t b f r n n & C / & + > 9 = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = @ 8 A + = f & 9 + = = = = = ? % : = > $ 8 6 9 = E = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = ) # = E = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = $ ) = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = G / 8 > 9 = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = . ) 9 9 & 9 < # ) 9 = @ % ? ) > $ = = ) ) + 9 9 = = = = = = = > & + = t n t t r b f f n n n t n r b t r r E = t 9 9 & = 2 = D r n t b t f f & 9 + = & 8 = 9 A = = ) A + > 8 & 8 = / 8 > + > = + = > $ = & B & 9 & + = 8 9 > 8 E = C 8 = ) ) = A > = > = $ A 9 = A ) ) E = + # A ) = & + = ) 9 = + = ? = = & + % C = 8 & B = > = / / 8 D & > ) E = @ ? G = / 2 2 = + + 9 E = t A + = . 2 $ = f & 9 + = & 8 = 9 A = $ & = 8 A = t 8 % + = + & 8 = > $ = 8 9 & + = ) + # = > = f & % 9 + = A + > E = A / 8 B & 9 8 = = ) > & + 9 = * E 8 2 = 8 & + # = > = $ & = t 8 + = 8 = $ = $ = 8 = = ) & > > ) = C $ & ) = + = > $ + = ) > = > = # ( = > = C 8 ( 2 = + = $ & 9 = C E = > = C 8 ( = $ = 8 ) & F = $ $ = 8 # > > + = $ & 9 = C 8 ( = ( E 9 = + = 8 > A 8 + $ 2 = b > = C 9 = > $ + = > $ > = $ = A + = $ & 9 = $ A 9 = + & 8 2 = $ 8 = C 8 = + = & + A 8 & 9 = 8 / 8 > 2 = $ = & 8 = & 9 9 > & ) ) = A + 8 = & + B 9 > & # > & + = E = > $ = > > = & 8 = f 8 % 9 $ ) ) = A > = $ & = t 8 + = 9 & = > $ = & 8 = C 9 = + > 9 A 9 / & & A 9 2 b r f b r r # & 0 + ) & ' & 2 ) $ + + ! % ' % % 0 & $ ) % ( $ + $ 0 + ) 0 % % 0 ) * + & r & + 0 ( ) ) $ + & b t b n f n & + ! * ) & & + ) + ) + 2 ) + % % 0 & $ ) 3 * / + & b t b n f n ( & $ & & + + ! * % $ + & + + ) + ) + ) ' $ + / ( + ) + 2 ) & / + & r f f r E = t 9 9 & = 2 = D r n t b t f 8 = 8 ) ) = & + > ( = 8 + & 9 + = 8 & E t A + = ; = > = @ G = / 2 2 = + C 9 = 9 A 8 # = & + = > $ C > 8 2 8 & + # = > = > $ f & 9 + = ) & = / 8 > % + > = 8 / 8 > = t + > $ + t 9 = n ) ) E = = / 8 ( $ & 9 = , = $ B 8 ) > = A & % + = + = > $ = 9 $ A ) 8 = > $ = 8 C E = & + # = C 9 > > C 8 9 = > $ = C > 8 2 = $ + n ) ) E = C 9 = A + ) = > = 9 > 8 > > $ = B $ & ) = $ = / A > = & > = & + + A > 8 ) = + = > > / > = > / A 9 $ = > $ = B $ & ) = A / = > $ $ & ) ) = > C 8 = > $ = 8 C E 2 = $ = C & # $ > = C 9 = > A $ = 8 = n ) ) E = > = $ + ) A = > = > $ = 9 > / = 9 $ A ) % 8 = + = > $ = B $ & ) = 8 ) ) & + # = ( = > C 8 9 = > $ 8 & B 8 2 = $ = B $ & ) = 8 + & + > = > $ = ) ( = C $ + = > $ 8 & B 8 = C 9 = A + ) = > 9 > / = > $ = B $ & ) 2 = $ 8 + > = + = = > $ = B $ & ) A / = > = > $ = 8 & B 8 6 9 = 9 & 8 = C 9 = 9 A 8 # = & + > $ = C > 8 = > = ( = 8 + % & 9 2 = f = & = + > = 8 / 8 > + E = & + A 8 & 9 = > = > $ = > & = > $ = 8 9 $ 2 b t b n f n r b n t r r f E = E + > > = r 8 8 & 9 r n t b t f= C ) ) = t 9 = f 8 = / + E A / > = > $ = > C + = A + & ) + = > $ = / 8 # 8 9 9 = = & > 9 = % + + & ) = A & > = + = > $ = / % / 8 $ & + # = t A + = ? G ) & + = C $ + = > $ = A & > $ = > = = + & 9 $ = + > $ = 8 9 A ) > 9 = > A 8 + = & + = > > $ = ) 8 & = / 8 > + > = B + A 2 = b = > $ = > C + & 9 9 9 = > $ > = ) & + = & > A ) = ) 9 = A > = + = 8 B + A 9 $ 8 & + # = C & > $ = > $ = 9 > > + = $ B = 9 = + E = 9 = G b t r b r f b " r r # f ' $ $ % ' ) r % ( & 0 ( + + ) & $ $ & r & $ ) ) & 2 ) % & & + + + & 2 & & b r f b " r n r # & ) ) ( ( ) ) + & r & $ 0 b t 0 & + + $ & ) + # ) ( ) % * & + ' ) & 1 + 2 ) + ) ) ) * & ) & $ $ + + & n % + & + ) # & + + r + + r & $ * + ! + ( ( ) $ & ) + $ 0 b t & + & & & & ) & + + f f & # $ & + b % f f f t r f f f t b f t f t n f t n f t r E = E + > > = r 8 8 & 9 r n t b t f + B = f 8 8 & 9 9 8 & & + # $ 8 9 ) = 9 = + B + # ) & 9 > = 8 9 > = / % / 8 $ = > $ = 8 + B & ) ) C + = A + & ) = > = > $ & 8 f E = @ = > & + # = > = 9 ( / 8 & 9 9 & + = > = $ ) = > $ 8 9 > = B 8 = 3 f 8 $ = 8 = t % 9 A 9 3 = & + = C + > C + 8 + B & ) ) 2 = = $ = A + & ) n r b r f t b E = t 9 9 & = 2 = D r n t b t f A C + + = & B 8 > 8 = f + # % + > = & 9 > 8 & > 0 f 1 = B 8 + & + # 8 = $ = = > & + # t A + = G = > = = 2 2 = & + = 8 n E 9 = ) 2 = + = > $ = # + C 9 = > $ = C > 8 = A 9 = / 8 & > > $ > = t t t = = = & ) E = & % & > = 8 > + 8 9 $ & / = $ 9 = / % / ) & = 8 = 8 = > $ f 2 8 & + # = > = > $ > = / 8 > = 8 = % f = > $ = / 8 & > = 8 = > $ t t t = = = & ) E = & & > 8 > + 8 9 $ & / = & 9 = > = & 8 8 & # > : = 8 9 = C & > $ = + = B 8 % # = & ) E = > = = ? 2 & ) ) & + = # ) ) + 9 = C & > $ = @ & 8 8 & # > & + 9 = C ) ) 9 = + = @ + > 8 = / & B > 9 2 b t r f r t b r n f E = E + > > = r 8 8 & 9 r n t b t f& > $ = 9 $ ) A 9 > = 8 + > % ) E = A > = 8 > $ = E A + # = + 9 = & > 7 9 A > A ) = > $ > = + E = > $ = 8 = ) 8 E = > $ & + ( % & + # = A > = # > > & + # = 8 E > = # = ( = > = 9 $ ) 2 = C B 8 = 8 = > $ f & 9 + = A + > E = ) % $ ) = + = > $ 8 = 8 A # 8 B + > & + = ) & > & + + = & > 9 = 8 = / 8 > + 8 9 r = > $ = f & 9 + A + > E = $ 8 & 7 9 = > $ = n = 8 8 & > E = > $ f & 9 + = A + > E ) > $ = / 8 > + > = + > $ = f & 9 + = A + > E $ ) = & 9 > 8 & > = / ) + 9 8 = ) 8 E = A + 8 C E C & > $ = 9 ) & > & > > & + 9 = 8 & + & B & A ) = + > & + 9 8 = > $ = A # 2 = = @ G 4 ( = = $ ) = = > E b + = $ ) 5 = B + > = > r 7 9 = & > + 9 9 = + > 8 2 ) & > & + 9 / ( 9 / 8 9 + = t 8 E $ = 8 9 9 = > $ f & 9 + = A + > E = % & 9 9 & + = > = > $ & 8 = t A + = . > & + # = > = ) > = > $ = 8 ( + C = > $ > = / ) + 9 = C 8 > ( & + # = 9 $ / = 8 = > $ $ A # = B + > = C $ & $ = & 9 % > 8 & A > 9 = 8 = 9 $ ) 9 A / / ) & 9 = > = f & 9 + A + > 8 E = 9 $ ) = $ & ) % 8 + = + = # > 9 = > $ 8 E = > = # = ( = > 9 $ ) = C ) ) = / 8 / 8 2 = = 9 > = E 8 = : G G = / 8 % + > 9 = + = 9 > A + > 9 = > % > + = > $ = B + > = C $ & $ & + ) A = & + 8 > & + > $ 9 = + = 8 = $ > # 9 = 8 = B 8 E + = & + & > & + = > = > $ = 9 $ ) 9 A / / ) & 9 = 9 > = = C $ & $ C 8 = / A 8 $ 9 = ) ) ) E 2 = = 4 b = > $ & + ( = C = A # $ > A > = 8 7 9 = ) 9 > = E 8 5 9 & = E $ = C $ / 8 & 9 = > = $ B = = 8 8 = > & ) = 9 > 8 E A > = > $ = A / & + # B + > = 8 E = 8 = > $ + C 9 / / 8 = C & > $ & + = = C E 9 2 > E = > A + 2

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It’s National Dairy Month and the one thing you need to know is that you never outgrow your need for milk! Diary foods supply 75 percent of the calcium in the American diet; it is a nutrient that plays an important role in maintaining healthy bones and teeth as well as nerve transmission. Many nutrition experts agree that Americans do not get enough calcium in their diets. Children often prefer sodas and surveys show they begin to cut down on dairy foods by the age of 10, just when their calcium needs are increasing for the growth spurt in the teen years. Adults, on average only get half of their calcium needs each day. Calcium needs vary throughout our lifetime. Active teens need 1300 mg. of calcium which means eating four servings of calcium rich foods each day. Young children (under the age nine) and adults under 50 years of age need about three servings each day. For a number of years now, the recommendations for adults over 50 has increased to 1200 mg. of calcium each day. Bones tend to lose density as we age, so this age group’s recommended daily allowance of calcium is almost as great as the teenager. Researchers know these levels help reduce the risk of osteoporosis. If you are worried about the calories and fat in dairy foods, look again. There are so many low fat and fat free dairy foods on the market today, you have a large selection at the grocery store. To boost your calcium intake, try these suggestions from the National Dairy Council: Drink one or two 8 oz. glasses of skim milk each day. Use plain or vanilla yogurt in place of mayonnaise in recipes for potato salad and cole slaw. Make shakes and smoothies with skim milk or yogurt and fruit. Add powdered milk to foods you prepare – pudding, bread, muffins, and soup can get a calcium boost. A single tablespoon of nonfat powdered dry milk adds 52 mgs. of calcuim. Use buttermilk for mashed potatoes and baked goods – it's low in fat and adds flavor without calories. Top a salad with low fat cheese. Serve frozen yogurt for a refreshing dessert. For more information on food and nutrition, contact the Madison County Extension Service. The University of Florida Extension/IFAS – Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution On the day of Jan. 23, my father lay in a hospital bed, and I stood by it a great deal of the time. Johnny Carroll and Gene Clark, both friends of his, came to visit Daddy that day and they prayed with us for him. The nurse from Big Bend Hospice had been there earlier that day and checked his pulse and his breathing and they were strong at the time. He'd had a rough night and another Hospice nurse had to come and check on him. Daddy slept the whole time. I knew deep inside that he didn't have much longer with us. The doctor had told us the day before that he was in the end stages of leukemia and may have a few weeks left with us. He had set up an appointment for us to carry Daddy back to his ofce in Tallahassee that Friday for a blood transfusion. The nurse the night before had told me that Daddy could go at any time and we always needed to be with him. As I stood by his bed, and he slept, I prayed for him and I told him that I loved him more than he would ever know but if he needed to go, I understood. I saw him smile that smile that had won the hearts of his nurses at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. A few hours later, I was still standing by his bed. I noticed that his breathing was even shallower that it had been before. I called Big Bend Hospice and they sent another nurse. It didn't take her long to get there but when she did, she looked for a pulse and listened for the sound of his heart. She looked at me and said, “He's gone.” I tried to call and tell my sister Debbie but couldn't get her. I called my pastor and my Aunt Kathy. My Aunt Lucretia called me. I asked her to call my Aunt Nina. Within minutes, people began arriving at the house showing their love for me, Danny and Abbie and offering whatever kind of help they could give. That day was tragic, it being only two days after his birthday. His birthday had been when he was told he had chronic myologenous leukemia. I didn't know; he never really complained until the Friday before he had died and we took him to the ER then. While the day was tragic for me and my family, there is also hope in it. God had not allowed Daddy to suffer for long and when his race on earth was through, he was ushered into the presence of Jesus. That is the glorious day that we all look for. This Sunday, I will not get to see my daddy on Father's Day but while he was a great earthly father, he is celebrating in Heaven with the Greatest Father of them all. In my mind, I can see the smile Daddy has on his face now. Viewpoints & Opinions2A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 Jacobs Ladder Jacob BembryColumnist Diann DouglasGuest ColumnistMadison County Extension Service Fire Safety TipsBy Fire Chief Bruce Jordan The Greatest Father Read Jacob’s blog at www.jacobbembry.com His book, Higher Call is available in Kindle format at www.amazon.com or in paperback at www.amazon.com www.bn.com and www.booksamillion.com or by sending $10 plus $3.99 shipping and handling to Jacob Bembry, P.O. Box 9334, Lee, FL 32059. Contact him at jacobbembry@hotmail.com. Celebrate National Dairy Month Smoke Alarm Tips About 3,500 Americans die each year in fires and about 18,300 are injured. Many of them might be alive today if they had only learned what to do if there is a fire. Smoke alarms are primarily designed to alert you of a fire when you are sleeping. Most fire deaths are caused by smoke inhalation rather than being burned by fire. It is very important to have a working smoke alarm with a working battery in your home. If you have that, it greatly lowers your chances of dying in a fire. Follow these 10 easy tips on smoke alarms: 1. One of the best ways to protect yourself and your family is to have a working smoke alarm that can sound fast for both a fire that has flames, and a smoky fire that has fumes without flames. A “Dual Sensor Smoke Alarm” is the ideal smoke alarm to use in your home, but any smoke alarm is better than not having one. 2. Place a smoke alarm on the ceiling or high up on a wall of every level of your home and both inside and outside bedrooms. Children and older people can sleep though the loud sound of a smoke alarm! 3. If you keep your bedroom doors closed, place a smoke alarm on the ceiling of each bedroom. 4. Check smoke alarms monthly by pressing the test button. A single “chirp” sound means that the battery needs to be replaced. 5. Never takesmoke alarm batteries out to put into other items like games or remote controls. 6. Teach children what the smoke alarm sounds like and what to do when they hear the alarm sound. 7. If there is a fire, leave the home right away by crawling low under the smoke and never go back inside. Call 911 after you are outside the home unless you cannot get out. 8. If smoke from cooking makes the alarm sound, press the “hush” button, if your alarm has one. You can also turn on the kitchen fan, open a window, or wave a towel near the alarm until it stops making the sound. Move the alarm further away from the kitchen if you continue to have problems. Never take the battery out of the alarm. 9. Most alarms need a new battery at least once a year. Some smoke alarms have batteries that last for up to 10 years. If your smoke alarm is over 10 years old, replace it with a new alarm and a new battery. 10. If you rent, talk to your landlord about placing a working smoke alarm in your home. You still need to buy a new battery at least once a year for the alarm. Smoke Alarm Maintenance – Dust can sometimes cause false alarms; use a vacuum cleaner nozzle attachment to clean the dust off the outside of smoke alarms at least once a year. City of Madison Fire Rescue does not have smoke alarms to give out to citizens but we will be glad to either install or advise you where to install smoke alarms in your home or check the existing smoke alarms you already have in your home. Please feel free to call (850) 9735075 with any questions you may have about smoke alarms or to request assistance with smoke alarms. Any group(s) that would like to have someone come out and speak about smoke alarms or any other fire safety topics, please contact Chief Bruce Jordan (850) 973-5075 or email: bruce.jordan@cityofmadisonfl.com. Smoke Alarm Tips provided by www.usfa.fema.gov. Fire Chief Bruce Jordan Arizona Man Arrested For Shooting At Moon Man Assaulted After Talking In His Sleep Prison Inmate Gets Weed Delivery While On Roadside Work Crew An Arizona man arrested for unlawfully discharging a rearm told authorities that he was trying to shoot the moon. Prescott Valley police responded to the home after a woman reported that her boyfriend had red several shots from a handgun and still was armed last Friday night. Police in Montana say a woman kicked and struck her boyfriend with a shotgun because he said bad things about her in his sleep. Police tell the Bozeman Daily Chronicle that 24-year-old Sara Ann Bade of Willow Creek was arrested at her home at about 2 a.m. Monday. A state prison inmate is facing charges after receiving marijuana while on a roadside work crew, according to St. Lucie County Sheriff Mascara. Deputies say the prisoner was working on a roadside work crew north of Fort Pierce when someone driving a black Dodge Charger tossed him a small amount of marijuana beside the road.

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June 4 Kyle Michael Bailey – Burglary to conveyance. David Duy Dao – Criminal registration. Arthur Anders Kverne – Criminal registration.June 6 Oscar Nerease Jones – Driving while license suspended or revoked (habitual). April Swilley Pollock – Dealing in stolen property. Saran Ashley Morgan – Burglary and grand theft. Ismael Ferniza – Introduction of contraband into state prison. Chelsea Lee Breeden – Out of county warrant. Jimmie Lee Davis Jr. – Weekend sentence. William Joseph Sutton – Possession of a controlled substance under 20 grams and possession of drug paraphernalia. June 8 Javen Jamal Butler – Possession of controlled substance. Renee Katrell Brown – Violation of parole (circuit) and grand theft 3rddegree.June 9 Quinn Maurice Henson – Out of county warrant. John Tigert Sewell Jr. – D.U.I.June 10 Raheen Alphonsa Foster – No valid driver’s license. Georgia Wright Hopson – Drug offender probation. Jerome Calvin Burton – Violation of parole. Sylvester David Robinson – Battery/ domestic violence. Around Madison County4A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 Information in the Jail Report is provided to Greene Publishing, Inc. by the Madison County Sheriff’s Ofce. All people are considered innocent until proven guilty. Questions about people identied in the report should be directed to the MCSO at (850) 973-4001. Obituary Community CalendarJune 13 Croft Ministries/Joyce Croft will present a free bean supper and gospel sing on Friday, June 13. The bean supper will start at 5 p.m., and will be held at the Gathering at Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park and Campground. The concert will start at 7 p.m., inside the Yogi Bear Jellystone Park Opry Hall. Performers will include the Sammy Glass family, New Tradition, Ken Williams, Joyce Croft and Amber Lee Abbott. Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park is located just south of Interstate 10, Exit 258 at 1039 SW Old St. Augustine Road.June 13 Tri-County Medical Center is hosting a tobacco quit program called “Tools to Quit” on Friday, June 13 from 2-4 p.m. The class is offered by Big Bend AHEC and will offer a trained facilitator to guide participants as they identify triggers, explain withdrawal symptoms, and brainstorm ways to cope with them. The program covers topics including addiction, withdrawal and medications that help, planning for the quit date, dealing with triggers, overcoming cravings and relapse prevention. This program offers free nicotine replacement therapy (while supplies last and if medically appropriate), educational materials, goodies for the quit day, and followup support. Tri-County Medical Center is located at 193 NW US 221 in Greenville. For more information, please call (850) 9482840.June 13 The Senior Citizens Council of Madison Advisory Council and Dr. Phillip Combs is sponsoring a Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser, Saturday, June 13, from 10 a.m., until 2 p.m., on the Madison County Courthouse lawn. The menu will include spaghetti, bread, salad, tea or lemonade. Delivery will be available with a minimum order of six dinners. Place your order today, by calling Rosa, Nadine or Lisa at (850) 973-4241.June 14 Chapel Road will be performing at a Benet Gospel Sing for Denise Ellison on Saturday, June 14, at 6 p.m. The event will take place at Midway Baptist Church, located at 338 SE Midway Church Road in Lee. For anyone unable to attend, an account has been set up at Madison County Community Bank under the name of Denise Phillips Ellison Benet. All donations are appreciated.June 16 The Brooks County Public Library in Quitman, Ga. invites children and families to come see Andy Offutt Irwin on Monday, June 16, for two oneman show extravaganzas. Irwin is an award-winning storyteller, humorist, singer, songwriter, musician, whistler and walking menagerie of sound effects and dialects. His rst show, a Summer Reading Show for children and families, will be at 10 a.m. His second show, “Sister True” is for grownups, but children are welcome, will be at 7 p.m. Brooks County Library is located at 404 Barwick Road in Quitman, Ga. For more information, please call (229) 2634412.June 17 A food preservation workshop will be held at the Madison County Extension Service, Tuesday, June 17. There will be a morning workshop at 9:30 a.m. and another one at 6 p.m. Food Preservation Basics will cover freezing, water bath and pressure canning. Learn the safe way to preserve your summer garden and get directions for USDA tested recipes. To register, call (850) 973-4138.June 21 The grand opening for the Madison County Opry Hall takes place on Saturday, June 21, with money being raised for Farm Share of Madison. There is no charge, but donations and a love offering will be accepted. Brenda McCormick will be selling tickets for $1 each for chances to win cakes and prizes. Gospel music starts at 6 p.m., and Country at 7 p.m. The Opry Hall is located in the old Madison House building, located at 799 SW Pinckney Street. Drinks, hotdogs and chips will be provided for donations. For Farm Share donations or more information, contact Chad McCormick, Farm Share manager, at (850) 464-6190. Jail Report Way Back When Way Back WhenJune 10, 1949 Bill Cooksey, Gene Hadden, Richard Plant, B.G. Wyche, Preston Greene, and Son Stokeley of Madison, John Kepple of Clewiston and Bob Quillen of Indianapolis, Ind., are leaving by motor Saturday for Fairbanks, Alaska. The local Chapter Order of Eastern Star will honor the Worthy Grand Matron of the Grand Chapter of Florida, Mrs. Florence Carter, of Milton, Fla., with a tea on the evening of Tuesday, June 14, in the Masonic Hall. Dozier J. Balloon, stewardsman, USN, son of Leona Balloon of Route 3, Madison, Fla., is serving abroad the Naval Amphibious Base, Little Creak, Va. Balloon, who entered the Naval service November 26, 1945, received his recruit training at the Naval Trainer Center, Bainbridge, Md. The following Madison County students received degrees at the University of Florida at Commencement exercises June 5 and 6: Charles Wendell Godwin, BAE; Warren T. Jarvis, BSF; Roy Bosworth Keyes, BAE; Richard Plant, BS; James D. Scruggs, BSF.June 9, 1950 On request of Lewis Hale, local patron of Enterprise, and on motion of S. P. Grifn, seconded by W B Ezell, the question of re-establishing Enterprise school came before the County School Board in its session Wednesday. Mr. Grifn made probably the greatest public utterance of his life in support of the motion. The School Board Wednesday, following recommendation by Superintendent Browning and approval of the Trustees, elected Prof. A. J. Hargrove as supervising principal of the Madison public schools. Mr. Hargrove was selected from a list of more than thirty applicants. The terric impact derailed the locomotive and destroyed the semitrailer and damaged the cab. The engine, going south, struck the truck, going west, and a few feet back of the cab. The driver was taken to the hospital in Madison suffering from shock but was not thought to be seriously injured. W G Stracener, editor of the Florida Baptist Witness, Jacksonville, Fla., pastor of First Baptist Church Madison from 1934-38 was awarded the Doctor of Divinity degree by John B Stetson University, Deland at its Commencement Exercises on June 5.June 8, 1951 The Graduating Class of Madison High School was honored with a lovely dance Wednesday night following the Commencement exercises. Hostesses were Mrs. A H Armstrong, Mrs. B N Gross, Mrs. J C Wells, Mrs. A S Vaughn, Mrs. Miller Buie, Mrs. Fred Duncan and Mrs. C W Cantey. Jody Tuten has been selected by the Greenville School Faculty to attend Boy’s State in Tallahassee this summer. This honor is given by the Madison County Legion post. Eighth grade citizenship medals were presented to Pete Driggers and Sue Braswell. Twin Jersey calves were born last week on the farm of A L McDaniels, near Lee. One is a heifer, one is a bull calf, both being normal size calves. J I Surles & Sons’ Store at 210 S. Range Street was robbed sometime last Friday night of about $35 in cash, as well as cigarettes and perhaps other items. The cash drawer was damaged by the robber in getting to the money. Just how the thief managed the affair was not known. However, it was easy to get in and out the upstairs, or he could have been locked up in the upstairs when the store closed Friday. Eugene Russell NewsomeEugene Russell Newsome, 96, died Monday, June 9, at Southern Living for Seniors. The funeral service was held Thursday, June 12, at 11 a.m., at Unity Baptist Church, with burial at Hanson Cemetery. Visitation was one-hour prior to the service from 10 – 11 a.m., at the church. He was born in Madison, where he lived all his life. He was a farmer and loved to sh and was an avid Seminole fan and served in the US Army. He was a member of Unity Baptist Church. He is survived by his wife, Lorene Rowe Newsome of Madison; one son, Rusty Newsome (Sarah) of Madison; one daughter, Peggy N. Harris of Madison; three grandchildren: Meghan Agner (Bo) of Madison, Blake Harris of Los Angeles, Calif., and Josh Newsome (Stacey) of Madison; and two great grandchildren: Gracelynn and Kailyn Newsome. He was preceded in death by his parents: J. Russell and Ruth Newsome and son-in-law, Sammy Harris; three sisters: Helen Spooner, Dorothy Daniel and Eloise Richardson; and two brothers: Homer Newsome and Donny Newsome. Beggs Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements (850) 9732258. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting our website at www.beggsfuneral.com. Bobbie Thomas Curry And Lewis Curry Celebrate 50 Years Mr. and Mrs. Curry will celebrate their 50thWedding Anniversary in June. Lewis and Bobbie (Thomas) were married in Madison on June 20, 1964. They brought to this union four children, Roderick Curry (deceased), Dr. Veronica Brown (Eric), Anthony Curry and Felicia Curry. They were also blessed with four grandchildren: Roderick Mungin, Kimberly Curry, Bri’Anni Glee and Polynesha Curry. Thank You We, the family of Quincy Thomas, would like to express our appreciation to everyone for the kindness shown to us during our time of sorrow. The cards, owers, calls, visits, food and prayers were truly a blessing. We want to thank the staff at Madison County Memorial Hospital for their care and concern during our time there. May God bless you all. Vonnie and Wally Davis Roy and Cheryell Thomas The Grandchildren of thePicturesPast State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://oridamemory.com/items/show/64585View of Madison storefronts in 1974.

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Written by the Madison Genealogy SocietyFor over 180 years, the Cone Family has been planted in Madison County soil, in the Greenville area. Fountain Hayne Cone born around 1803 in Craven, N.C. migrated through South Carolina, where he met his wife Anna and where his first son, Edward was born. He arrived sometime before 1833; records show that Fountain voted in the 1833 election. Fountain was here before Florida became a state in 1845 and probably just after Madison became a county in 1827. Several more children: Jane, William, Fountain, Jr. and Queen Ann were all born in the county. Fountain served in four different militias, as a private, sergeant and as a captain. Anna died sometime between 1860 and 1868, and is said to be buried in New Hope Cemetery. Fountain then remarried Zilpha, who was around 43 years his junior and had six more children: Frances, Zylpha, John J., Amanda, Henry and Robert. A little while after Fountain arrived, his younger brother, Spencer, born around 1805 also in Craven, North Carolina, arrived in the Greenville area, by way of Georgia, where he married his wife Rebecca and had the following children: William H., Mary, Sarah, and Spencer. Nancy and Florida A. were born in Madison County. Spencer may have had a second and third wife: Bertha, born in Georgia, and Tabitha, also born in Georgia. Both Fountain and Spencer were counted in the 1840, 1850, 1860 and 1870 censuses. Fountain also lived to be counted in the 1880 census, where he was listed as 77 years old and feeble. In 1850, Jesse Cone, also born in North Carolina, was in Jefferson County. According to one source, Jesse, born in 1813, was the half brother of Fountain and Spencer. Jesse was married to Adeline and living with the couple was Fereby Cone, age 75, possibly Jesse’s mother. By 1860, Jesse and Adeline also had several children in Jefferson County. Fountain’s first three sons stayed in the Greenville area and raised their families. The three sons of Anna and Fountain were: Edward, William, and Fountain H. Jr. Edward married late, at age 42, to Jemima Gill, and had the following children: Queen M., Alford M. and Blanch G. William married Zilly and had Anna and Sarah F. His second wife was June. William had two more daughters: Flory E. and Martha L. Fountain Hayne, Jr. married Emily Shephard and had the following children: M. Ann, Jane and Dora. A 10-yearold boy, Benjamin, was listed in the 1870 census after the other younger girls, so possibly Benjamin was not a son or was the son of Emily only. While married to his second wife, Lydia Willis, Fountain, Jr. had the following children: Sumpter Roscoe, Ollie Mae, Blanch A. and William Dewey. Fountain’s sons from his second marriage were John J., Henry and Robert. John J. married Missouri and lived locally. Henry married Lottie first and then Quincy and had Amanda and Anna. Henry also lived in the Greenville area. We’re not sure how long or where Robert lived. Fountain had quite a few granddaughters and the following grandsons, who mostly were loyal Greenville citizens: Alfred Morris (son of Edward Calvin); and Sumpter Roscoe and William Dewey, (sons of Fountain, Jr.) Alfred Morris, who was born in 1880, married Gussie Letchworth and had the following children: John C., Thomas J., Grover Cleveland, Walter M., Woodrow Wilson, Irene, Nellie Mae, Alfred Morris Jr., Gussie, Edward Calvin and Margaret Corrine. Finally, there were some boys in the family. Sumpter Roscoe married Nellie and defected to the Asheville area of Jefferson County, which is only a few miles from the Hamburg area where some of the Cones lived. He had the following children: Fountain B., William T. and Sumpter L. William Dewey wound up in Jacksonville, married to Sarah B., and had a son, Admiral. He was later married to Belle and had Malcolm, Helen, Alvin, Mary and Betty. Spencer Cone, Fountain Sr.’s brother, had two sons, William H. and Spencer, Jr. William H. married Elizabeth and had Lydian, Sherman W., John, James T., Amanda and Feriba. Spencer, Jr. married Elizabeth and had Nancy, Henry W., Frances, Josephine and Salety. Spencer, Sr. also had quite a few granddaughters and the following grandsons: Sherman W., John, and James T (sons of William H); and Henry W., (son of Spencer, Jr.). Sherman W. married Jamimey and had Ella, Minnie, William H. and James E. Sherman raised his family in Greenville. We are uncertain if John and James T. grew up and raised families. Henry W. married Lottie and had Eulus O’Quinn. He also married Quincy and had Amanda and Annie. Henry W. also raised his family in Greenville. So, if you’ve ever known any Cones by the names of Fountain, Spencer, William, Henry, Edward, Alfred, Sherman, Sumpter or by any other name in the Greenville area, you can be sure they are descended from either Fountain or Spencer Cone, and you can be sure that they have come from good, hardy people who have farmed our land, supported this county, and remained loyal to Madison County for over 180 years. Congratulate the next Cone you meet! The Madison County Genealogical Society welcomes your input and invites you to join our organization. We meet on the second Thursday monthly, except during summer months, in the Madison Public Library from 6 to 7 PM. Annual dues are $25. To add comments to our articles or to submit your own sketch on your ancestor, contact us at Madison County Genealogy Society, P.O. Box 136, Madison, FL 32341. Or contact us by email at mcgenealo gysociety@live.com If you would like for us to write an article featuring your ancestor, please contact us by mail or email.Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 5A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 No Photocopies Accepted  Tickets are good during July, one visit only  Deadline To Enter is June 26, 2014Name____________________________ ___________________________ Address__________________________ __________________________ Phone Number____________________ Fill out and return to Greene Publishing at P.O. Drawer 772 or 1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32341 Tp : Madison Fire Rescue Firefighter Hometown: Queens, N.Y. Why He Chose Firefighting: Ive always had an interest in it.Ž He had a friend who was involved in firefighting and helped him figure out how to get involved. Favorite Book: Animal Farm,Ž by George Orwell. Favorite Quote: Know is not enough, we must apply. Willing is not enough, we must do,Ž by Bruce Lee. Favorite Movie: The Usual Suspects.Ž Favorite TV Show: The Walking Dead,Ž and Game of Thrones.Ž Favorite Sport: He loves soccer but does not have a favorite team. His favorite baseball team is the New York Giants. Hero: My mom because she is the hardest working person I know.Ž Hobbies: Fishing, being on the water and at the beach.Ž Sum Yourself Up: Hardworking and outgoing.Ž Pioneers Of Madison County Fountain Hayne And Spencer Cone

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6A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014

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By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.The Police Explorers is a program that allows groups of young men and women to explore what it means to be a police officer and whether it is what they see in their future as a career. The children must be 14years-old to 20-yearsold to participate in the program. The Police Explorers program at the City of Madison Police Department meet every Monday at 7 p.m. Sergeant Chris Cooks and Officer Travis Johnson are the Police Explorer’s advisors but it was City of Madison Police Chief Gary Calhoun’s daughter, Rebecca Calhoun, who was the force behind starting the Police Explorers. Prior to moving to Madison, she was in a Police Explorers program. At the time that her family moved, she had four more years that she could be involved in the program. She has now retired from the Police Explorers but is still committed to the program. She is currently enrolled at Valdosta State University but comes down to Madison whenever she can to help. The program currently has twelve explorers. The program will teach Explorers how to handle situations such as how to make a traffic stop, clear a building and how to communicate with Communications in law enforcement codes. The Explorers are also able to get hands-on experience by participating in a ride-along and helping out at city events such as the Fourth of July celebration. Jacob Briggs, 15, is a sergeant in the Police Explorers. He has been a member for over a year. He joined Police Explorers because he wants to be a police officer and do his part for his community. “It’s gave me a hands-on experience,” said Briggs. “They show you what they really do and it helped me see that it’s the career for me.” Aylin Torralbas, 15, is currently the only girl in the program. She has been in the program for almost a year. She wanted to see what Police Explorers was and to be involved in her community. Torralbas had certain expectations for the Police Explorers program when she started but she said it is better than she expected. She now wants to become a police officer and a flight attendant. Terron Harry, 16, has been involved in Police Explorers for four weeks. With family members involved in the Madison County Sheriff’s Office and his father a correctional officer; he wanted to experience the law enforcement field. He is now determined that becoming a police officer is what he wants as a career. Harry’s favorite part of the Police Explorers program is “riding around with a good group of people who are willing to help you and getting to know what it is like in the field.” If anyone is interested in joining, call the City of Madison Police Station at (850) 973-5077 or email mpdexplorers650@gma il.com for more information.Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 7A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014Police Explorers Program Is Educating Future Law Enforcement OfficersGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie Box, June 9, 2014The Police Explorers practice traf“c stops before taking a moment to pose in front of a City of Madison Police car. The Police Explorers, left to right in the back row are: Of“cer Travis Johnson, Police Explorers Advisor; Terron Harry, Donte Fulmer, Levi Carter, Brailey Sparksm, Jaquez Wri ght and Sergeant Chris Cooks, Police Explorers Advisor. The Police Explorers, left to right in the front row are: William Buchanan, Jacob Briggs, Leshun West, Aylin Torralbas and Rebecca Calhoun. A Spoonful Of Heavens Grand Opening Is TodayBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. ASpoonful of Heaven is having its Grand Opening, Friday, June 13 from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. The restaurant will be serving homemade soul food for breakfast and lunch for dine in or take out. The menu for breakfast will include eggs, grits, bacon, salmon balls, French toast and pancakes. Everyday the lunch will include a meat, two sides, cornbread, a drink and dessert. There will be two meat choices everyday and fried chicken will be a staple and there will also be seven sides to choose from. The normal hours for A Spoonful of Heaven will be Tuesday – Saturday from 6 a.m. until 3 p.m. The restaurant is located at 291 SW Dade Street in Madison and can be contacted by phone at (850) 464-6226. M y t h : S o c i a l S e c u r i t y w i l l p r o v i d e m o s t o f t h e i n c o m e y o u n e e d i n r e t i r e m e n t Fact: Its likely that Social Security will provide a smaller portion of retirement income than you expect. Theres no doubt about it--Social Security is an important source of retirement income for most Americans. According to the Social Security Administration, more than nine out of ten individuals age 65 and older receive Social Security benefits. No matter what the future holds for Social Security, focus on saving as much for retirement as possible. You can do so by contributing to taxdeferred vehicles such as IRAs, 401(k)s, and other employer-sponsored plans, and by investing in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. When combined with your future Social Security benefits, your retirement savings and pension benefits can help ensure that youll have enough income to see you through retirement. M yt h : S o c i a l S e c u r i t y i s o n l y a r e t i r e m e n t p r o g r a m Fact: Social Security also offers disability and survivors benefits. With all the focus on retirement benefits, its easy to overlook the fact that Social Security also offers protection against long-term disability. And when you receive retirement or disability benefits, your family members may be eligible to receive benefits, too. Another valuable source of support for your family is Social Security survivors insurance. If you were to die, certain members of your family, including your spouse, children, and dependent parents, may be eligible for monthly survivors benefits that can help replace lost income. M y t h : I f y o u e a r n m o n e y a f t e r y o u r e t i r e y o u  l l l o s e y o u r S o c i a l S e c u r i t y b e n e f i t Fact: Money you earn after you retire will only affect your Social Security benefit if youre under full retirement age. Once you reach full retirement age, you can earn as much as you want without affecting your Social Security retirement benefit. But if youre under full retirement age, any income that you earn may affect the amount of benefit you receive: €If youre under full retirement age, $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $2 you earn above a certain annual limit. For 2014, that limit is $15,480. €In the year you reach full retirement age, $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $3 you earn above a certain annual limit until the month you reach full retirement age. If you reach full retirement age in 2014, that limit is $41,400. M y t h : S o c i a l S e c u r i t y b e n e f i t s a r e n o t t a x a b l e. Fact: You may have to pay taxes on your Social Security benefits if you have other income. If the only income you had during the year was Social Security income, then your benefit generally isnt taxable. But if you earned income during the year (either from a job or from selfemployment) or had substantial investment income, then you might have to pay federal income tax on a portion of your benefit. Stacy Bush, President Bush Wealth Management The Bush Wealth Advantage M y t h s a n d F a c t s a b o u t S o c i a l S e c u r i t y Our column, The Bush Wealth AdvantageŽ is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. Stacy Bush has practiced independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.com Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 871857

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8A €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 Happy Father’s Day SERVING UP REAL FOOD FOR REAL PEOPLE Hwy 53 & I-10 (850) 973-3115Open 24 hrsOpen 24 hrs Please Join Us For Fathers Day C e l e b r a t i n g O v e r 2 5 Y e a r s I n B u s i n e s s S e r v i n g T h e T r u c k e r s O f A m e r i c a C e l e b r a t i n g O v e r 2 5 Y e a r s I n B u s i n e s s S e r v i n g T h e T r u c k e r s O f A m e r i c a SERVING UP REAL FOOD FOR REAL PEOPLE C o m f o r t F o o d Z o n e @ I 1 0 & E x i t 2 6 2On Site Repair Shop(850) 971-5100Grill(850) 971-4240 Treat Dad On His Special Day! We Have All The Fixins For Your Fathers Day Barbeque Proud To Serve You With The BEST Meat In Town! 6868 US Hwy 129 Live Oak, Fl 32364 (386) 330-2488 VISIT US TO FIND THE PERFECT GIFT FOR DAD! GIFT CARDS ALSO AVAILABLE! Remembering PapaBy Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Whenever I tell people I’m adopted, they usually want to hear my story, and I usually don’t mind sharing. My sister and I were adoptive when I was around five years old; my adopted father was in his early 50s at that time. I wonder now how he did it. I think of where I am in my life and try to imagine taking on a young child and doing all the things it takes to raise one today. Adopting a child of five would mean school, clothes, toys, lots of teaching and socializing, morals and values, activities, proper nutrition (no bowls of cereal five nights in a row), lack of sleep, late night homework, monitoring (TV, friends, computer), church, sports, pets (which is fine by me), kid-friendly vacations, and the list goes on until the child of five turns 18, or graduates from college or until they decide they can (and want to) leave the nest. At 50 years of age, most people are dreaming of a second chapter in their life, a new career, going back to school, traveling...but instead of those, or other choices, viewed as personal enrichment, my Papa chose adoption, and all that comes with it. He had never had children of his own and everything mentioned above was totally new to him. He learned as we grew, as most parents do. As bad as I hate to admit it, I didn’t make it easy on him. I was a total “Daddy’s girl” (my sister and cousins would say “spoiled.”) Little did he know that giving in to my every whim and desire while I was a child, would make it hard on him after I reached teenager status. I look back now and cringe when I think of how much harder his life became because of what he called my “antics.” After my Mother died, Papa eventually began to try and start a new life, and being around 19, I was navigating mine. Through my 20s we were like ships in the night, seeing each other in passing, but every once in a while, stopping to make contact. When I married at 28 years of age, I knew my Papa was beginning to have health problems. He was living alone and after I lived with my newly wed husband for only one year, Papa’s health had degenerated to the point of us all moving in together. Taking care of my father for the next 11 years was one of the hardest things I have ever had to do. I took on tasks I never thought I would and we classically switched caregiving roles. Being my Papa’s caregiver forced me to have a different relationship with him. Instead of him helping me, I was helping him...to the doctor, fix his meals, bathe, dress and whatever else he needed done. He went from a walker to a wheelchair, and went from being my father to being like my child. On his 92ndbirthday, I took him to eat at one of his favorite restaurants; a catfish place in Jacksonville, Arkansas called the Crooked Hook. Two weeks later, in our house, I was holding his hand while he slept in his bed with me lying in a recliner beside him. I listened to his struggle to breathe, just him, and me, and in the early morning hours, my Papa died. After people hear my story on the events surrounding my adoption (and that’s for another time) I often hear, “Do you know who your ‘real’ dad is?” My answer is simple...Yes, I do. Happy Father’s Day Papa. I miss you. Photo SubmittedI share a light moment with my Papa on my wedding day. One year later, I would “nd him on the living room ”oor of his house, unable to stand.Photo SubmittedPapa, long before he was my father, sometime around the early 1940s.Photo SubmittedAs a family, we went on many fun camping trips. This picture shows us at Lake Catherine in Arkansas. Papa is holding on to my ”oat and beside me, on the left, is my sister Kathy.Photo SubmittedMe and my Papa on his 92ndbirthday.

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 9A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 6868 US Hwy 129 Live Oak, Fl 32364 (386) 330-2488 RESPECT & HONOR THE RED, WHITE & BLUE! Town Of Greenville “Forever in Peace May She Wave.” Tommy HardeeMadison County Supervisor of Elections Shes The Emblem Of The Land We Love.Ž Bart AlfordSchool Board Member, District 5 Shes The Emblem Of The Home Of The Brave.Ž Beggs Funeral HomeSince 1886 Beggs Funeral HomeMadison Chapel 235 NW Orange Avenue Madison, Florida 32340 (850) 973-2258 Beggs Funeral HomePerry Chapel 201 West Main Street Perry, Florida 32348 (850) 838-2929 The Home Of The Free & The BraveŽ City Of MadisonShe Is The Emblem Of The Home Of The Free.Ž SERVING UP REAL FOOD FOR REAL PEOPLE Hwy 53 & I-10 (850) 973-3115Open 24 hrsOpen 24 hrs We Salute Ole Glory!Ž C e l e b r a t i n g O v e r 2 5 Y e a r s I n B u s i n e s s S e r v i n g T h e T r u c k e r s O f A m e r i c a C e l e b r a t i n g O v e r 2 5 Y e a r s I n B u s i n e s s S e r v i n g T h e T r u c k e r s O f A m e r i c a SERVING UP REAL FOOD FOR REAL PEOPLE C o m f o r t F o o d Z o n e @ I 1 0 & E x i t 2 6 2On Site Repair Shop(850) 971-5100Grill(850) 971-4240 Shes A High Flying Flag!Ž 1405 N Lee St. Valdosta, Ga. (229) 245-8300H o m e t o w n P r o u d !Shes A Grand Ole Flag!Ž Honor Our flag! Flag Day Is SaturdayBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc. “That the ag of the United States shall be of thirteen stripes of alternate red and white, with a union of thirteen stars of white in a blue eld, representing the new constellation.” June 14, 1777, the Second Continental Congress. “The ag is how America signs her name.” The Betsy Ross Home Page at http://www.ushistory.org/Betsy/With those few words, the very rst American Flag was adopted by a resolution passed by the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777. There were several variations on the arrangement of the stars (circles, ovals, rows, or even in the shape of a bigger star) and the stars themselves were often depicted as eight-pointed rather than ve pointed during the nal years of the 1700s, and on into the 1800s (for a more in-depth discussion of this as well as examples of historical images of the American Flag from this period, see http://www.vexman.net/13stars/ ). This was the case both shortly after the original adoption and later as the nation expanded into new territory, but the 13 red and white stripes remained, with a star added to the canton as each new state joined the union. The new American ag was rst carried into battle Sept. 11, 1778 in the Battle of Brandywine during the American Revolution. It was rst saluted by foreign naval vessels Feb. 14, 1778 when an American ship arrived in a French port. It rst ew over foreign territory in 1778 in Nassau, where American troops captured a British fort. In 1916 President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation ofcially establishing June 14 as Flag Day. In August of 1949, Congress established National Flag Day, but did not make it a federal holiday. It is at the President's discretion to ofcially proclaim the observance. On June 14, 1937, Pennsylvania became the rst (and only state so far) to celebrate it as an ofcial state holiday, with most communities celebrating the entire week preceding the holiday as Flag Week. Not surprisingly, the annual celebrations are a huge affair in Philadelphia, the seat of the Continental Congress, centered around the historical home of Betsy Ross and many other historical sites of the American Revolution. Many other American cities and community organization have also recognized the signicance of June 14, with Flag Day observances and ceremonies that predate the 1949 National Flag Day Act by several decades. In Madison County, the American Legion Post #224 at Cherry Lake is holding a Flag Retirement Ceremony on the shore of Cherry Lake, beginning at 5:30 p.m., on Saturday. Several ags that are no longer serviceable will be burned in a patriotic and dignied manner. Anyone who would like to attend is invited to do so. The Post members ask only that everyone please show the proper respect during the evening ceremony that will bring Flag Day for Madison County to a tting and proper close. Photo SubmittedThe Betsy Ross House in Philadelphia “gures prominently in that city's Flag Day celebrations. Here in Madison, Flag Day will be observed with a Flag Retirement ceremony at Cherry Lake, beginning at 5:30 p.m. Learn To Fold A Flag Properly Ame r ican F l a g s Th r ou g hout Histo ry

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By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Madison County Central School has taken on another rst for the school, with their inaugural drama production, "Another Cinderella." The play was directed by MCCS 6thgrade Science teacher, Elizabeth Hodge, who will return to the school next year to participate in another MCCS rst, student drama courses. Mrs. Hodge says she did a lot of acting during her high school years and has been exposed to many literary works that helped her to cultivate an interest in writing. She believes drama allows exposure to other cultures and will give students more insight on communication and problem solving skills. Hodge wrote all of the school play's narrations, the play's welcome and developed the program. Students were asked to assist with costumes, props, make-up and all other aspects of the production. Hodge says she asked them "to make it their own" and that they did an excellent job with that task.School10A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 Make 2014the year you change your lif e CLASSES IN MADISON STARTJUNE 30Bachelors Degree Programs € Business Administration with specialization in Management € Computer Information Systems € Criminal Justice € Elementary Education € Health Care Management € Human Services € Psychology Full-time students may be eligible for the Florida Resident Access Grant (FRAG) Approved for VA Bene“ts/GI Bill Classes now forming in Madison(850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu What you need for where youre going Now offering The Doctorate of Business Administration (Online and On Campus) ou need for wher What y e y ou need for wher e going r  ou ee egr re s D  achelor B dministration A usiness € B Classes ograms r ro ee P dministration Classes dministration A usiness € B with specialization in anagement M nformation € Computer I ystems S ustice riminal J € C ducation lementary E € E anagement e M ealth Car € H dministrationClasses S une 30 J with specialization in nformation ducation anagement N The D ing Classes t tar S une 30 fer w of o N octorate of The D ervices uman S € H chology sy € P ull-time students may F be eligible for the esident ida R lor F G) rant (FRA G ervices ull-time students may be eligible for the ccess A esident The D usiness B nline and O (O octorate of The D dministration A usiness ampus) n C nline and O V ed for v o ppr ro A ill ene“ts/GI B B w for Classes no adison in Mwww A VA ming w for (850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu.saintleo.edu/mp www (850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu.saintleo.edu/mp Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 4, 2014The outstanding cast of Another Cinderella, made up of 6th through 8th grade students, takes a well deserved bow.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 4, 2014The plays director, 6thgrade Science teacher Elizabeth Hodge, holds up ”owers given to her by Dr. Willie Miles, school principal. Mrs. Hodge received six roses and said that number was perfect, because after keeping one for her, the other “ve would go to the people who helped the play be the success that it was. Those she dedicated the ”owers to were: Lakeesha Wallace (7th grade Language Arts teacher); Tracey Pickles (a super substitute teacherŽ); Jennifer Stanley (media assistance and stage); Valerie Thomas (ESE Middle Grades teacher and show choir) and Gary Gazlay (Music teacher who provided music for the play).Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 4, 2014The “tting of the shoe on Cinderella had a humorous take on the original story in the play presented by the MCCS cast members. From left to right, are: Zytavious Gee-Washington (Tom); Alea Roberson (The Stepmother); Niesha Davis (Lola/Stepsister); Haley Crosby (So“a/Stepsister-in back) and Cailyn Johnson (Cinderella-seated).MCCS Presents First Drama Production:Another Cinderella

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SportsMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 11A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 FEED TIMESHow to use: The major and minor feeding times for each day are listed below. The major feeding times are the best for the sportsman and last about 2 hours, the minor feeding times can also have good success, but last only about 1 hour. Good luck and be careful out there. Major feed times are marked by an asterisk (*) The Week Of June 13 June 19, 2014 Friday June 13 *12:55 AM 7:10 AM *1:20 PM 7:30 PM Saturday June 14 *1:50 AM 8:10 AM *2:35 PM 8:50 PM Sunday June 15 *3:00 AM 9:10 AM *3:30 PM 9:45 PM Monday June 16 *4:10 AM 10:20 AM *4:30 PM 10:50 PM Tuesday June 17 *5:10 AM 11:20 AM *5:40 PM 11:55 PM Wednesday June 18 *6:10 AM 12:20 AM *6:30 PM Thursday June 19 12:45 AM *7:10 AM 1:10 PM *7:30 PM Photo Submitted Pictured, from left to right are the Cheerleading award winners: Victoria Brock, Most Valuable Cheerleader; Christina Reams, Most Valuable Cheerleader; Lauren Demott, Best All-Around and Ashley Hebert, Coaches Award. Photo SubmittedPictured left to right are the 2014 Softball awards: Kelly Horne received the Most Valuable Player award. Whitney Stevens recei ved the Pitching Award. Elizabeth Hightower received the Offensive Player of the Year. Taylor Copeland received the Defensive Player of the Year. Payal Chau dhari received the Lady Warrior Award.The 2014 Aucilla Sports Banquet Is A Success Photo SubmittedReceiving the girls basketball awards were, left to right: Lauren Demott, Warrior Award; Marisa Duber, Leadership Award; Whitne y Stevens, Shooter Award; Kinzi Mattingly, Game Changer Award and Kayla Knecht, Floor General Award. Photo SubmittedThe Athlete of the Year awards went to Whitney Stevens and Brandon Holm.Photo SubmittedThe Academic Athletes of the Year were Whitney Stevens with a grade point average of 3.9 and Braden Mattingly, with a grade point average of 3.545

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE WANTED FOR RENT HELP WANTED www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . LEGAL 12A € Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, June 13, 2014 AUCTION I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).3/26 rtn, n/cPageant and Prom Dresses For Sale: Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, ”owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful ”owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 Leave a message. Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBecome A Certied Nursing Assistant Quest Training offers a nurse top CNA prep class. No GED required if age 18. Professional training site, high pass rates. Now accepting students for July classes. 386-362-1065.6/4 6/25, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Our newspaper of“ce is seeking an outstanding individual to join our sales team. Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a good personality and LOVE to talk on the telephone? If you are a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, have a friendly can-doattitude, a great work ethic, are organized, and self-motivated then this job might be just for you. Valid Drivers License a must! Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper of“ce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.Too Much Junk? … Do you have a garage or barn or attic full of junk and want it clean? Granddads barn that needs to be cleaned or removed? Let us make you an offer on it all … And we clean it up at the same time. Call 850-973-7916 and leave a message.2/26 rtn, n/c We want your Ghosts!! We are collecting YOUR stories of Ghosts, Goblins, Spooks, Specters, Aliens, Haunted Houses, Paranormal Events, Angels, and any other Supernatural Tales from Madison County and surrounding counties. We want personal experiences, legends, and family traditions. Call 850-973-7916 and leave a message.2/26 rtn, n/c A few chickens and a rooster for my yard. (850) 661-6868.4/9 rtn, n/c LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com5/7 rtn, c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12'x18' building with 6' porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/cAUCTION SATURDAY JUNE 14 AT 6:30PM. MADISON AUCTION HOUSE. 1693 SW MOSELEY HALL RD (CR360) 850 973-1444. LAST AUCTION FOR THE SUMMER. SELLING ITEMS FOR HOME, YARD AND SHOP. SAVE OVER STORE PRICES. 10% BUYERS PREMIUM. MC, VISA, DISCOVER, DEBIT CARDS, CHECKS AND CASH ACCEPTED. AU3968 Brandon Mugge Auctioneer, AB2490 LAST AUCTION FOR THE SUMMER. SELLING ITEMS FOR HOME, YARD AND SHOP. SAVE OVER STORE PRICES. 10% BUYERS PREMIUM. MC, VISA, DISCOVER, DEBIT CARDS, CHECKS AND CASH ACCEPTED. AU3968 Brandon Mugge Auctioneer, AB2490.6/4, 6/11, pdSatellite Techs Needed Must have van/truck and basic tools. Will train. Send resume to oridatotalcom@verizon.net6/4, 6/11, pd Advent Christian Village Current JOBS Line Advertisement call 658-5627 or visit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week Be Your Best Among The Best! Administrative Assistant FT position for experienced administrative assistant / of“ce manager in long-term care setting to coordinate daily tasks, manage patient cash accounts, and other duties. Must be patient & courteous, detail oriented, pro“cient in MS Of“ce Suite & Internet, organized, professional, and have strong customer service & communication skills, including proper phone etiquette. HSD or equivalent required. AA degree or of“ce admin certi“cate preferred. Prior relevant experience required. Prior supervisory experience a plus. FT positions include competitive compensation, paid time off, & access to onsite daycare and “tness facilities. Apply in person at Personnel Of“ce Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE / Drug-Free Workplace / Criminal background checks required.6/4, 6/11, cTechnology (CEHRT) Instructor wanted at North Florida Community College, Madison FL. See www.nfcc.edu for details.6/4 6/18, c PART TIME SYSTEM OPERATOR Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an opening for a part time system operator in our Madison Of“ce. The candidate must be able to demonstrate excellent working knowledge of computers, outstanding customer service skills, the ability to effectively multitask, and must be able to communicate well using a two way radio and telephone. The ideal candidate must have the ability to remain calm while making quick pro“cient decisions in a number of different circumstances including power restoration and emergency situations. The candidate will be assigned two twelve hour shifts during the weekend. Occasionally the candidate will be required to provide additional support during extended power outage events. Tri-County is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and Drug Free Workplace (DFWP). Please submit a resume and completed Tri-County Electric Application for Employment form, which is available at any TCEC of“ce or online at www.tcec.com before June 18, 2014 to: Stephanie Carroll Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. 2862 West US 90 Madison, FL 32340.6/4, 6/11, c 2 Bdrm/ 1 Bth, 28 acres, outbuildings and storage, NE Madison County3 Bdrm/ 1 Bth, 5 acres, multiple barns, Sampala area, $59,9003 Bdrm/ 1.5 Bth, all fenced, brick, storage $95,000 4 Bdrm, pool, pasture, 55 acres $575,000 3 Bdrm, pool, pasture, 85.82 acres3 Bdrm, brick, close to town, $69,900 ML Farm Systems Inc., Iowa Falls, IA, seeks 16 temporary farm laborers from 07/08/14 to 01/15/15, for the construction of livestock buildings near Leipsic, OH. For the building and repairing livestock buildings. Placing concrete for walls and sidewalks, building and repairing damaged walls and trusses, repairing and installing curtains; installing feed tanks, feeder and feed lines. Tin sheeting walls, install doors, caulk structures, and clean site. 3 month experience of livestock equipment installation/repair required. Must be able to lift and carry 75lbs, 75yds.Wage is $11.63/hr. ML Farm Systems Inc. 07/08/14 to 01/15/15. Tools, supplies, and equipment provided by employer at no cost to employee. Housing provided at no cost to all workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the work day. Transportation and subsistence expenses to worksite will be paid by employer. Apply at Florida's Department of Economic Opportunity or contact the state workforce agent at 107 East Madison St., Tallahassee, FL 32399 (850) 921-3466 using job order number 27869676/11, pd Funny Newspaper Classied AdsFor Sale: One pair hardly used dentures. Only 2 teeth missing. $100 OBO. Call Ira 878-XXXX Wanted: Somebody to go back in time with me. This is not a joke. P.O. Box 322 XXXXXX, Ca. Youll get paid after we get back. Must bring your own weapons. Safety not guaranteed. I have only done this once before. Full Size Mattress. Royal Tonic, 20 year warranty. Like new. Slight urine smell. $40. (818) 222-XXXX June 4 6/6, 6/13

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www.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 13A All Legals are posted on line at www.greenepublishing.com All local legals are also published at www.oridapublicnotices.com Deadline for Legals! Every Monday and Wednesday 3 p.m. ----Legals---6/6, 6/13 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014-46-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF NORMAN AIKENS, Deceased. The administration of the estate of NORMAN AIKENS, deceased, File Number 2014-46-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for MADISON, County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is PO BOX 237, Madison, Florida 32341. The Name and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must “le their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must “le their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of “rst publication of this Notice is June 6 2014. Personal Representative: Attorney for Personal Representative: NORMA AIKENS Sally Jean Roberts c/o Sally Jean Roberts, Florida Bar No. 102816, PO Box 2026, Perry, FL 32348 PO Box 2026, Perry, FL 32348 Telephone 850-838-72726/6, 6/13 NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING CITY COMMISSION MADISON, FLORIDA A special meeting of the City Commission, Madison, Florida will be held Tuesday, June 24, 2014 at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall. The purpose of the meeting is: (1)Presentation on Water/Wastewater Impact Fee Schedule (2)First Reading on Proposed Ordinance No. 2014-4 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MADISON IMPOSING A TEMPORARY MORATORIUM ON IMPACT FEES FOR WATER AND WASTEWATER; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE (3)Update on the Citys Community Development Block Grant (4)Award Bids on the Citys Community Development Block Grant Any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter considered of such meeting will need a record of the proceedings, and that for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based.6/13 NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF RESOLUTIONS VACATING AND ABANDONING CERTAIN ROADS Pursuant to Sections 336.09 and 336.10, Florida Statutes, the Board of County Commissioners of Madison County, Florida, hereby gives notice that it has adopted Madison County Resolution No. 2014-06-11, vacating and abandoning certain roads located in the northeast quadrant, Madison County, Florida. Said roads are more speci“cally described as follows: UNOPENED ALLEY: The entire 30’ unopened alley that runs east and west from Yellow Pine Avenue to Jack Street between part of original Lot 31 and Lots 115116, as shown on the Yellow Pine Heights Subdivision Re-plat dated 1962, Public Records of Madison County, Florida. JACK STREET: The entire portion of Jack Street that runs north and south, from the unopened alley detailed above, to the south property line of origin al Lot 30, also known as, Parcel ID 4780-000000, and which lies between the original Lots 30 and 31 to the west and Parcel ID 4744-000-000 to the east, as shown on the Yellow Pine Heights Subdivision Re-plat dated 1962, Public Records of Madison County, Florida. YOU WILL PLEASE BE GOVERNED ACCORDINGLY. Dated this 11th day of June 2014. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Allen Cherry, County Coordinator. 6/13

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Around Madison County14A €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 www.morrells.com Just in time for Our Manufacturers will be here giving HUGE FACTORY DISCOUNTS on all of our furniture!Everything in our top quality Swiss Grill lineup until Fathers Day! Receive Is Dad a Grillmaster? One Day Only! Dont Miss Out! Farm Credit Invests in Florida Youth with FFA DonationFlorida’s three Farm Credit associations have joined forces to contribute $50,000 toward the new Florida FFA headquarters building in Gainesville to benet the next generation in agriculture. The building will provide a permanent home for Florida FFA headquarters with funding opportunities open to FFA members, industry supporters, local FFA chapters and other interested parties. "We are extremely pleased that Farm Credit has taken this bold step in securing its future and the future of nearly 17,000 FFA members by investing in the Building Our Legacy Campaign," said Gary Bartley, Executive Director of the Florida FFA Foundation. “As an agricultural lending cooperative, we believe FFA is training our next generation of agricultural leaders today and we want to help foster the close relationship we have maintained over the years,” said Rick Bitner, President and CEO of Farm Credit of Northwest Florida. “This contribution is tangible evidence of Farm Credit’s continued commitment to cultivating Florida’s young, beginning and small farmers. FFA is one of our country’s premier training grounds, utilizing agriculture as a teaching tool to develop this nation’s leaders of tomorrow,” said Richard Terry, Chairman of the Board of Farm Credit of Northwest Florida. The new building is located on the campus of Florida Farm Bureau in Gainesville, and the design allows for several meeting rooms, state ofcer living quarters, a board room and ofce space. The National FFA Organization (previously known as Future Farmers of America) has more than 587,000 student members preparing for more than 300,000 exciting careers in agriculture, agribusiness and related industries. The FFA mission is to prepare students for successful careers and a lifetime of informed choices in global agriculture, food, ber and natural resources. The three Farm Credit associations in Florida are part of the nationwide Farm Credit System created in 1916 to serve American farmers, ranchers, growers and rural homeowners. Farm Credit members share in their Association’s prots through a patronage refund program. Since 1988, the refunds for Florida Farm Credit associations are approaching $500 million, and have signicantly lowered members’ overall borrowing costs. Youth Explosion At Pineland Missionary Baptist ChurchThe Gospel Express radio broadcast along with the Lady Gospel of Praise, The Gospel Composer and Pineland Missionary Baptist Church are excited to bring Youth Explosion June 20 and June 21at 7 p.m., to the Pineland Church. Pineland Missionary Baptist Church is located at 205 SE Old County Camp Road in Madison. We invite all youth directors, youth ministries, young people and the young at heart to come get CRUNKED for Jesus like never before. All aboard the church vans, cars and buses, press your way. Young people you don’t want to miss this great time! We will have special surprises for you there. Our children are facing many different tactics from the enemy. We want to equip them to know with whom and how to win. Only with Jesus can they be on a winning team. IN IT TO WIN IT! is our theme this year with dynamic guest youth ministers Evangelist Kenyatta Wallace of Emanuel Tabernacle in Atlanta, Ga., Minister John Davis of Faith Builders International of Melbourne, and motivation, testimonies and entertainment from gospel recording artist Kent Osbourne of Generation Changers Ministry of Melbourne. See website information at kentosbourne.com He has performed as special guest of the Hallelujah Festival sponsored by Mrs. Barbara Moore and Mrs. Lillie Graham. Many young people were motivated and greatly inspired to live for Christ by Kent’s performance and testimonies. He even performed last minute for the boys unable to attend the festival at Greenville Hills. He is very much at home here with strong family roots in Madison County. The Brevard County Sheriff’s Dept. has awarded Kent for outstanding community service Ministry all during the year with PAL (Police Athletic League). Come everybody get CRUNKED for Jesus. We are IN IT TO WIN IT! For more information contact Kenny and Dianne Davis at (850) 4646538. Photo SubmittedKent Osbourne Motivational SpeakerPhoto SubmittedDesmond Roberson EmceePhoto SubmittedKenyatta Wallace Evangelist

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Health Health And AndWellness Wellness Guide Guide M M a a d d i i s s o o n n E E n n t t e e r r p p r r i i s s e e R R e e c c o o r r d d e e r r S S e e c c t t i i o o n n B B J J u u n n e e 1 1 3 3 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 4 4

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By Jessie R. Box Greene Publishing, Inc. Junior Auxiliary of Madison member Christi Minor along with her daughter, Emily Minor and Kim Whigham visited Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center with some furry visitors. Barney, a Labrador retriever; Katie, a Scottish Terrier and Dora, a miniature pincher visited with the seniors to provide pet therapy. “We just know that it brings joy to them,” said Christi Minor. “They really miss their animals.” Minor expressed that the experience was rewarding and the residents loved the visit. The residents would touch the pets and not want to let them go. “We at the Center feel very privileged and hope to see Emily, Christi, Kim and these wonderful new friends again very soon,” said Diana Maurice, LPN, Admissions/PR at Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center. 2014 Health & Wellness 2B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, June 13, 2014 Madison Health And Rehabilitation Center Welcomed Furry Guests Photo SubmittedMadison Health and Rehabilitation Center resident Gerry Agius is petting Barney, the Labrador retriever. Photo SubmittedResidents of Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center, left to right, are Sarah Street, Rosemary Parker, Dorothy Twitty and Exie Paul. These four ladies enjoy spending time with Barney, the Labrador retriever, handled by Christi Minor. Christi's daughter, Emily Minor is holding Katie, the Scottish Terrier.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, June 13, 2014 € 3B 2014 Health & Wellness Madison Health And Rehabilitation Center Host Volunteer Banquet Photo SubmittedThe volunteers at the banquet are shown, back row, left to right: Norman Bush and Pat Bush of Pine Grove Baptist Church, Peggy Scruggs, Carolyn Blount and Charlotte Hollingsworth of Grace Presbyterian Church, Debra Bass, Margaret Taylor and Linda Gray of New Testament Christian Center, James Robinson of Evergreen Missionary Baptist, Frankie Anderson of Madison Church of God and Margie Hughes. Front row, left to right are: Linda Gibson, Louise and Robert Smith of Grace Presbyterian Church, Sharon Lee Dawkins of Madison H&R, Edna Ealy of New Beginnings Church, Barbara Davis of Mount Nebo Church and Jeanette Roberts of First Baptist of Lee. On the floor in the front is: Pastor Toney Hill of Greenville Baptist Church. By Jessie R. Box Greene Publishing, Inc. Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center held a Volunteer Banquet to thank the volunteers for their dedication to the center. Debra Bass has been part of a group that goes to Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center to sing for the residents and host a devotional service. The group is comprised of members from Madison Church of God, Lee First Baptist Church and Hopewell Baptist Church. Bass expressed that the banquet was well appreciated. “We don’t do it for pats on the back but it is nice when someone shows appreciation to us.” Barbara Davis volunteers at Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center to be of service to someone else. She enjoys working with the residents and will read books to them, help with nail care and provide hand massages. Norman Bush volunteers at Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center with fellow members from Pine Grove Baptist Church. The group will have 30 minutes of singing and then a devotional service with a Bible reading with the residents. “We try to make ourselves available to any residents who want a visit,” said Bush. Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center would also like to thank their speakers VeEtta Hagan and resident, Jean McCormick who shared thoughts from the heart.

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2014 Health & Wellness 4B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, June 13, 2014 Tri-County Medical Center Hosts Tools to QuitŽ Tobacco Program Tri-County Medical Center is hosting a tobacco quit program called “Tools to Quit” on Friday, June 13 from 2-4 p.m. The class is offered by Big Bend AHEC and will offer a trained facilitator to guide participants as they identify triggers, explain withdrawal symptoms and brainstorm ways to cope with them. The program covers topics including addiction, withdrawal and medications that help, planning for the quit date, dealing with triggers, overcoming cravings and relapse prevention. The Tools to Quit Program is a two hour seminar where participants learn how to develop a successful quit plan. This program offers free nicotine replacement therapy (while supplies last and if medically appropriate), educational materials, goodies for their quit day and follow-up support. Tri-County Medical Center is located at 193 NW US 221 in Greenville. For more information about Tri-County, their services, or to schedule an appointment, please call (850) 948-2840.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, June 13, 2014 € 5B 2014 Health & Wellness Health Equity Commission To Discuss Health Disparities In County By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. The Health Equity Commission is presenting “Madison County State of the Infant” Wednesday, June 25, at 9:30 a.m., in the Madison Public Library meeting room. The presentation will discuss health data collected in Madison County over the last several years, look at several significant disparities in statistics gathered from both white and black patients and look for feedback from community leaders and concerned citizens. The overall racial makeup of Madison County, based on 2012 figures, is 7,530 (38.9 percent) black and 11,448 (59.1 percent) white. A look a some of the health statistic numbers for the county reveals that:  33.1 percent of the black residents live below the poverty line, versus 13.6 percent of whites, for a ratio of 2.4 to 1.  While the number of births (2010-2012) to single mothers aged 15-19 is slightly higher for black women (34) than for white women (29), in the 20-54 age group, the numbers go to 202 births to single black women, versus 111 for single white women.  A little over 34 percent of unwed black mothers were obese at time the pregnancy occurred, versus slightly more than 21 percent of unwed white mothers.  When it comes to death from coronary heart disease, the rate (adjust for age and percentage of population) in the black community is almost twice that of the white community.  The rate of death from prostate cancer (adjusted for age and percentage of population) for black men is almost twice that of white men.  The death rate from diabetes (adjusted for age and percentage of population) for blacks is over three times that for whites. Health officials, community leaders and concerned residents are invited to attend and provide feedback into what they believe contributes to the underlying causes (poverty, education, diet, medical services, etc.). Feedback is essential to devising strategies for overcoming such obstacles and closing the gap.

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6B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, June 13, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness

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Photo SubmittedThe Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center employees who dressed for Hawaiian Day, pictured from left to right are: Summer Cr oft, RPT; Kristen Tuten, DON; Keely Lago, LPN; Emma Collins, Business Office Manager; Lindsey Jones, RN, ADON; Diane Webb, RN, BSN; Sharon LeeDawkins, Activities Director; David Bandy, PT; Jean Carroll, SS; and Patty Hamilton, Occupational Therapist. Submitted by Diana Maurice Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center Every year in the month of May, Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center celebrates Older American's Month by arranging special activities for the employees and seniors of the Center. National Nurses and Certified Nursing Assistant week is also celebrated at the Center during the month so fun can be enjoyed by all. Monday, May 12, was labeled "Hawaiian" day so the employees dressed up in the traditional grass skirts and floral head dress as punch and goodies were served by the therapy team. Big Bend Hospice joined in the fun by serving ice cream social sundaes and root beer floats later in the afternoon. Everyone watched as several employees competed in what turned out to be outrageously funny wheel chair races. Tuesday was deemed "Disney" day so many dressed up like Disney Characters and surprised us all with their excellent costumes. We learned that you are never too old to love Disney! Wednesday’s theme was "Mexican" day and was celebrated by Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center taking residents to Madison's Rancho Grande restaurant for lunch. Later, the residents had a Mexican Fiesta and were treated to a vast array of oldies and soft rock tunes performed by professional music artist, David Carty, who sang and played the keyboard. His voice and playing were fantastic! Friday’s theme was "Sports" day with everyone wearing their favorite team shirts and had a cookout with good old hamburgers, baked beans and brownies. Diane Webb and Billy Blue were our chefs for the day and did an awesome job! The residents went to a bowling tournament at Capital Lanes in Tallahassee. "Cowboy" day was celebrated during the week as well and let's just say that this little Texan doesn't even own a pair of boots or a cowboy shirt and boy did I hear about that! Tha t just gave me another reason to go shopping! Lookout guys, cause I'll be ready when next Older American's Month rolls around! Happy Trails to ya! 2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, June 13, 2014 € 7B Madison Health And Rehabilitation Center Celebrated Older American’s Month Photo SubmittedThe Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center employees who found their cowboy selves are back row, left to right: Diane Webb, RN, BSN; Summer Croft, RPT; and Sharon Lee-Dawkins, Activities Director. Front row: David Bandy, P.T. Manager; Jean Carroll, Social Services; Rose White, Head of Housekeeping; JoAnn Gnewuch, Facility Administrator; and Patty Hamilton, Occupational Therapist.

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2014 Health & Wellness 8B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, June 13, 2014 Why are Eye Exams Important? Regardless of your age or physical health, it's important to have regular eye exams. During a complete eye exam, your eye doctor will not only determine your prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses, but will also check your eyes for common eye diseases, assess how your eyes work together as a team and evaluate your eyes as an indicator of your overall health. Who should get their eyes examined? Eye examinations are an important part of health maintenance for everyone. Adults should have their eyes tested to keep their prescriptions current and to check for early signs of eye disease. For children, eye exams can play an important role in normal development. Vision is closely linked to the learning process. Children who have trouble seeing or interpreting what they see will often have trouble with their schoolwork. Many times, children will not complain of vision problems simply because they don't know what "normal" vision looks like. If your child performs poorly at school or exhibits a reading or learning problem, be sure to schedule an eye examination to rule out an underlying visual cause. What is the eye doctor checking for? In addition to evaluating whether you have nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism, your eye doctor will check your eyes for eye diseases and other problems that could lead to vision loss. Here are some examples of the conditions that your eye doctor will be looking for: Amblyopia: This occurs when the eyes are misaligned or when one eye has a much different prescription than the other. The brain will "shut off" the image from the turned or blurry eye. If left untreated, amblyopia can stunt the visual development of the affected eye, resulting in permanent vision impairment. Amblyopia is often treated by patching the stronger eye for periods of time. Strabismus: Strabismus is defined as crossed or turned eyes. Your eye doctor will check your eyes' alignment to be sure that they are working together. Strabismus causes problems with depth perception and can lead to amblyopia. Eye Diseases: Many eye diseases, such as glaucoma and diabetic eye disease, have no obvious symptoms in their early stages. Your eye doctor will check the health of your eyes inside and out for signs of early problems. In most cases, early detection and treatment of eye diseases can help reduce your risk for permanent vision loss. Other Diseases: Your eye doctor can detect early signs of some systemic conditions and diseases by looking at your eye's blood vessels, retina and so forth. They may be able to tell you if you are developing high blood pressure, high cholesterol or other problems. For example, diabetes can cause small blood vessel leaks or bleeding in the eye, as well as swelling of the macula (the most sensitive part of the retina), which can lead to vision loss. It's estimated that one-third of Americans who have diabetes don't know it; your eye doctor may detect the disease before your primary care physician does, especially if you're overdue for a physical. What's the difference between a vision screening and a complete eye exam? Vision screenings are general eye tests that are meant to help identify people who are at risk for vision problems. Screenings include brief vision tests performed by a school nurse, pediatrician or volunteers. The eye test you take when you get your driver's license renewed is another example of a vision screening. A vision screening can indicate that you need to get an eye exam, but it does not serve as a substitute for a comprehensive eye exam. A comprehensive eye examination is performed by an eye doctor and will involve careful testing of all aspects of your vision. Based upon the results of your exam, your doctor will then recommend a treatment plan for your individual needs. Remember, only an eye doctor can provide a comprehensive eye exam. Most family physicians and pediatricians are not fully trained to do this, and studies have shown that they can miss important vision problems that require treatment. Treatment plans can include eyeglasses or contact lenses, eye exercises or surgery for muscle problems, medical treatment for eye disease or simply a recommendation that you have your eyes examined again in a specified period of time. No matter who you are, regular eye exams are important for seeing more clearly, learning more easily and preserving your vision for life.

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Dear Unfit, More than 25 years of research has shown that walking may be the single best exercise you can do to improve your health. It burns calories (about 100 for every mile you walk) which will help you lose weight, it builds endurance, enhances muscle tone and it doesn’t pound your joints. It also helps improve or prevent many agerelated health problems including high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, osteoporosis and dementia. But walking is not only good for what ails you. It’s also one of the easiest and most convenient exercises you can do, and is completely free. All you need is a good pair of walking shoes that fit well and a little desire. Here are a few tips to help you get started. Start walking: Start out slow if you need to. For many people this means head out the door, walk for 10 minutes, and walk back. Do it every day for a week. If that seems easy, add five minutes to your walks next week and keep adding five minutes until you are walking as long as you desire. It’s also a smart idea to start and finish your walk with a few simple warm up and cool down stretches. Stretching will make you feel better and help prevent injury. How far: Any walking is better than none, but most fitness professionals recommend walking about 30 minutes, five days a week. Research has shown that the 30 minutes can be broken up throughout the day – 10 minutes here, 10 minutes there. Or, for optimal health benefits aim for 10,000 steps per day, which is the equivalent of about five miles. How fast: The right walking speed depends on your fitness level. Ideally you should walk at a brisk pace that has you breathing heavily, but you are still able to carry on a conversation. Staying Motivated While starting a walking program takes initiative, sticking with it takes commitment. Here are some tips to help you stay motivated: Find some walking buddies: They can provide motivation and support along with companionship and security. Use a pedometer: These nifty little gadgets – available in sporting goods stores for around $25 – measure how far you’ve walked in steps and miles, providing motivation by spurring you to meet a particular goal and showing you if you’ve met it. Or, if you’re a smartphone user, consider downloading a pedometer app like accupedo.com or runtastic.com Join a walking club: To find one in your community call your local medical center, mall, health clubs, YMCA, running shoe stores or Area Agency on Aging to see if they sponsor or know of any clubs or groups. Or try the American Volkssport Association ( ava.org ) and American Heart Association Walking Club ( mywalkingclub.org ), which let you search for non-competitive walking clubs in your area, or start one. Keep a journal: Use it to keep track of your walking minutes, steps, or mileage and total it up at the end of each week to see how you’re progressing. Get a dog: Studies have shown that dog owners are much more likely to take regular walks than non-dog owners. Listen to music: An iPod or MP3 player can also make a nice walking companion. Check out walk.jog.fm to find great walking songs that will match your pace. Have a backup plan: If bad weather, allergies or other factors limit your outdoor walking have a backup plan like walking at your local mall, buying a home treadmill or joining a health club. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book. Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, June 13, 2014 € 9B 2014 Health & Wellness Savvy Senior Walk Your Way To Better Health Dear Savvy Senior, Can you give me some tips on starting a walking program? I need to lose weight and get my blood pressure under control, but I hate to exercise. Unfit at 59

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10B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, June 13, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness

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For people with diabetes, it's easy to get caught up in the day-to-day management of the disease. Regular monitoring of blood sugar levels, injections or pumping insulin and diet management takes serious time and effort. No wonder why people with diabetes (PWD) may feel overwhelmed when it comes to taking regular tests. It's important to step back regularly to see how overall health is faring since diabetes is a systemic disease. It can affect nearly every part of ones body. Before diving into the list of tests, people with diabetes need to understand what these tests mean and identify their target results with their healthcare professional. Here is a list of the most critical tests with standards set by the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association: Hemoglobin A1C This is the test everyone talks about, for a good reason. An A1C lets you know what your average blood sugar is for the past two to three months. Never mind the daily fluctuations -the A1C gives you the broadest overall picture. This is important because your overall health will be determined by your long-term management. So if your A1C is low and consistent, you know you're doing a good job, even if you sometimes have challenges in your daily management. If your A1C swings around, or goes high, you know that you'll need to tweak your treatment plan. What's a good A1C? According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetics should aim for a seven percent or below. According to the American Society of Endocrinologists, you should aim for a 6.5 or below. Some doctors urge even lower numbers; A1Cs for non-diabetics are generally below six percent. Unlike the other blood tests listed here, you'll want to have an A1C performed four times a year. Lipid panel This is another crucial test for people with diabetes, for the simple reason that cardiovascular issues (heart attacks and strokes) are the most serious potential side effects of the disease. Other complications can cause serious problems, yes, but a healthy heart is of critical importance. That being said, cholesterol is a complex topic. Many books have been written on the topic, and there is medical disagreement about how to interpret the results. Here's a quick summary of the current thinking. A cholesterol test is really measuring several different components of blood fats, and they have different levels of importance. Take the overall cholesterol, which is usually the largest number you'll see. This number is actually of little importance on its own because it includes both "good" and "bad" cholesterol. "Bad" cholesterol is called LDL (or low-density lipoprotein) and doctors will want to generally keep it below 100. That being said, there are different kinds of LDL particles, some of which are more harmful than others. The "good" cholesterol is called HDL (or highdensity lipoprotein), and doctors generally want to keep it above 40. Again, though, it seems as though there are also different kinds of HDL particles, some of which are more beneficial than others. People with diabetes will also be tested for triglycerides, which are yet another kind of blood fat. Doctors will want that number to be below 150. Doctors pay different attention to these numbers. They often focus on LDL cholesterol because they have effective dr ugs (statins) that can r eliably reduce it. That being said, evidence exists that HDL and triglycerides are more powerful predictors of cardiovascular issues. Raising HDL levels usually takes regular exercise, weight loss and dietary change. Cholesterol levels don't fluctuate in the way that A1C levels do (unless one dramatically changes their diet), they will be tested less frequently. People with diabetes will generally get one test a year, unless their doctor wants to keep a closer watch on the levels. Kidney tests There are two important tests diabetics must have regularly to measure kidney function. This is crucial because kidney disease (and potential failure) is one of the most serious potential diabetic side effects. The best-known of these is the microalbumin test. This looks for protein in your urine. High blood sugars can damage the tiny, delicate blood vessels in the kidneys, causing trace amounts of protein to leak into the urine. Over time, if not addressed, this damage can progress to fullblown kidney failure and dialysis. Doctors will also want to test blood creatinine levels. This number indicates how effectively the kidneys are filtering waste products. Taken with the microalbumin test, the doctor should be able to get a good idea of ones overall kidney health. Of all diabetic complications, kidney problems have been one of the most effectively prevented and reduced. In part, this is because ACE inhibitors, a common blood pressure medication, help prevent kidney damage. Even if you don't have kidney problems (or high blood pressure, for that matter), your doctor may want you to start an ACE inhibitor for just this reason. Blood pressure Ones blood pressure is checked at every doctor's' visit, and that's as it should be. The test is quick and easy to perform and it gives you immediate results. It's another test that gives you insight into cardiovascular health, so one needs to pay attention to the elevated numbers. In general, doctors will diagnose high blood pressure if the readings are above 140 systolic (the top number) and 90 diastolic (the bottom number). For most people, the numbers should be closer to 120/80. Diabetes can raise blood pressure and there are generally no symptoms if you're suffering from elevated levels blood pressure. There are cheap and effective drugs for lowering blood pressure. Doctors will prob ably want a person with diabetes on medication, even if ones numbers are borderline or mildly elevated. Foot exam At least twice a year, people with diabetes should also have a foot exam. Their doctor will look at their feet carefully to make sure you don't have any ulcers or abrasions. These can be especially risky for people with diabetes with impaired circulation. Doctors will also check the pulse in the feet, another measure of the circulation in the extremities. Finally, ones health care provider will likely test how sensitive their feet are, usually with a small plastic thread called a monofilament. This can help diagnose impaired sensation. If one is diagnosed with foot problems, their doctor may recommend special shoes to reduce pressure on sensitive spots. Medication can also be prescribed if one is suffering from pain caused by nerve damage. Dilated eye exam People with diabetes need to go to an eye doctor for this exam. An eye exam looks specifically for the retinal damage that can be caused by high blood sugars. Surgery to seal off leaking blood vessels may be needed to preserve and protect ones vision. The good news about eye complications is that they tend to be one of the earliest signs of poorly controlled diabetes. Good glycemic control has been shown to stop these problems and sometimes even reverse them. Why bother with these tests? Going through this list of tests seems daunting. It makes having diabetes seem like a parade of drudgery, of constant trips to the doctor. And people with diabetes will tell you-that's definitely an aspect of managing the disease. It's not fun, and it can be nerve-wracking to wait for ones results. But the good news embedded in this list of tests is that nearly any problem that is detect can be addressed. If issues are found early, simple and effective treatments exist. Even moderate to severe complications and problems can often be treated and resolved. 2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, June 13, 2014 € 11B Eight Heath Tests That Are A Must For People With Diabetes

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12B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, June 13, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness



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Its National Dairy Month and the one thing you need to know is that you never outgrow your need for milk! Diary foods supply 75 percent of the calcium in the American diet; it is a nutrient that plays an important role in maintaining healthy bones and teeth as well as nerve transmission. Many nutrition experts agree that Americans do not get enough calcium in their diets. Children often prefer sodas and surveys show they begin to cut down on dairy foods by the age of 10, just when their calcium needs are increasing for the growth spurt in the teen years. Adults, on average only get half of their calcium needs each day. Calcium needs vary throughout our lifetime. Active teens need 1300 mg. of calcium which means eating four servings of calcium rich foods each day. Young children (under the age nine) and adults under 50 years of age need about three servings each day. For a number of years now, the recommendations for adults over 50 has increased to 1200 mg. of calcium each day. Bones tend to lose density as we age, so this age groups recommended daily allowance of calcium is almost as great as the teenager. Researchers know these levels help reduce the risk of osteoporosis. If you are worried about the calories and fat in dairy foods, look again. There are so many low fat and fat free dairy foods on the market today, you have a large selection at the grocery store. To boost your calcium intake, try these suggestions from the National Dairy Council: Drink one or two 8 oz. glasses of skim milk each day. Use plain or vanilla yogurt in place of mayonnaise in recipes for potato salad and cole slaw. Make shakes and smoothies with skim milk or yogurt and fruit. Add powdered milk to foods you prepare pudding, bread, muffins, and soup can get a calcium boost. A single tablespoon of nonfat powdered dry milk adds 52 mgs. of calcuim. Use buttermilk for mashed potatoes and baked goods it's low in fat and adds flavor without calories. Top a salad with low fat cheese. Serve frozen yogurt for a refreshing dessert. For more information on food and nutrition, contact the Madison County Extension Service. The University of Florida Extension/IFAS Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution On the day of Jan. 23, my father lay in a hospital bed, and I stood by it a great deal of the time. Johnny Carroll and Gene Clark, both friends of his, came to visit Daddy that day and they prayed with us for him. The nurse from Big Bend Hospice had been there earlier that day and checked his pulse and his breathing and they were strong at the time. He'd had a rough night and another Hospice nurse had to come and check on him. Daddy slept the whole time. I knew deep inside that he didn't have much longer with us. The doctor had told us the day before that he was in the end stages of leukemia and may have a few weeks left with us. He had set up an appointment for us to carry Daddy back to his ofce in Tallahassee that Friday for a blood transfusion. The nurse the night before had told me that Daddy could go at any time and we always needed to be with him. As I stood by his bed, and he slept, I prayed for him and I told him that I loved him more than he would ever know but if he needed to go, I understood. I saw him smile that smile that had won the hearts of his nurses at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. A few hours later, I was still standing by his bed. I noticed that his breathing was even shallower that it had been before. I called Big Bend Hospice and they sent another nurse. It didn't take her long to get there but when she did, she looked for a pulse and listened for the sound of his heart. She looked at me and said, He's gone. I tried to call and tell my sister Debbie but couldn't get her. I called my pastor and my Aunt Kathy. My Aunt Lucretia called me. I asked her to call my Aunt Nina. Within minutes, people began arriving at the house showing their love for me, Danny and Abbie and offering whatever kind of help they could give. That day was tragic, it being only two days after his birthday. His birthday had been when he was told he had chronic myologenous leukemia. I didn't know; he never really complained until the Friday before he had died and we took him to the ER then. While the day was tragic for me and my family, there is also hope in it. God had not allowed Daddy to suffer for long and when his race on earth was through, he was ushered into the presence of Jesus. That is the glorious day that we all look for. This Sunday, I will not get to see my daddy on Father's Day but while he was a great earthly father, he is celebrating in Heaven with the Greatest Father of them all. In my mind, I can see the smile Daddy has on his face now. Viewpoints & Opinions2A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 Jacobs Ladder Jacob BembryColumnist Diann DouglasGuest ColumnistMadison County Extension Service Fire Safety TipsBy Fire Chief Bruce Jordan The Greatest Father Read Jacobs blog at www.jacobbembry.com. His book, Higher Call, is available in Kindle format at www.amazon.com or in paperback at www.amazon.com, www.bn.com and www.booksamillion.com or by sending $10 plus $3.99 shipping and handling to Jacob Bembry, P.O. Box 9334, Lee, FL 32059. Contact him at jacobbembry@hotmail.com. Celebrate National Dairy Month Smoke Alarm Tips About 3,500 Americans die each year in fires and about 18,300 are injured. Many of them might be alive today if they had only learned what to do if there is a fire. Smoke alarms are primarily designed to alert you of a fire when you are sleeping. Most fire deaths are caused by smoke inhalation rather than being burned by fire. It is very important to have a working smoke alarm with a working battery in your home. If you have that, it greatly lowers your chances of dying in a fire. Follow these 10 easy tips on smoke alarms: 1. One of the best ways to protect yourself and your family is to have a working smoke alarm that can sound fast for both a fire that has flames, and a smoky fire that has fumes without flames. A Dual Sensor Smoke Alarm is the ideal smoke alarm to use in your home, but any smoke alarm is better than not having one. 2. Place a smoke alarm on the ceiling or high up on a wall of every level of your home and both inside and outside bedrooms. Children and older people can sleep though the loud sound of a smoke alarm! 3. If you keep your bedroom doors closed, place a smoke alarm on the ceiling of each bedroom. 4. Check smoke alarms monthly by pressing the test button. A single chirp sound means that the battery needs to be replaced. 5. Never takesmoke alarm batteries out to put into other items like games or remote controls. 6. Teach children what the smoke alarm sounds like and what to do when they hear the alarm sound. 7. If there is a fire, leave the home right away by crawling low under the smoke and never go back inside. Call 911 after you are outside the home unless you cannot get out. 8. If smoke from cooking makes the alarm sound, press the hush button, if your alarm has one. You can also turn on the kitchen fan, open a window, or wave a towel near the alarm until it stops making the sound. Move the alarm further away from the kitchen if you continue to have problems. Never take the battery out of the alarm. 9. Most alarms need a new battery at least once a year. Some smoke alarms have batteries that last for up to 10 years. If your smoke alarm is over 10 years old, replace it with a new alarm and a new battery. 10. If you rent, talk to your landlord about placing a working smoke alarm in your home. You still need to buy a new battery at least once a year for the alarm. Smoke Alarm Maintenance Dust can sometimes cause false alarms; use a vacuum cleaner nozzle attachment to clean the dust off the outside of smoke alarms at least once a year. City of Madison Fire Rescue does not have smoke alarms to give out to citizens but we will be glad to either install or advise you where to install smoke alarms in your home or check the existing smoke alarms you already have in your home. Please feel free to call (850) 9735075 with any questions you may have about smoke alarms or to request assistance with smoke alarms. Any group(s) that would like to have someone come out and speak about smoke alarms or any other fire safety topics, please contact Chief Bruce Jordan (850) 973-5075 or email: bruce.jordan@cityofmadisonfl.com. Smoke Alarm Tips provided by www.usfa.fema.gov. Fire Chief Bruce Jordan Arizona Man Arrested For Shooting At Moon Man Assaulted After Talking In His Sleep Prison Inmate Gets Weed Delivery While On Roadside Work Crew An Arizona man arrested for unlawfully discharging a rearm told authorities that he was trying to shoot the moon. Prescott Valley police responded to the home after a woman reported that her boyfriend had red several shots from a handgun and still was armed last Friday night. Police in Montana say a woman kicked and struck her boyfriend with a shotgun because he said bad things about her in his sleep. Police tell the Bozeman Daily Chronicle that 24-year-old Sara Ann Bade of Willow Creek was arrested at her home at about 2 a.m. Monday. A state prison inmate is facing charges after receiving marijuana while on a roadside work crew, according to St. Lucie County Sheriff Mascara. Deputies say the prisoner was working on a roadside work crew north of Fort Pierce when someone driving a black Dodge Charger tossed him a small amount of marijuana beside the road.

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June 4 Kyle Michael Bailey Burglary to conveyance. David Duy Dao Criminal registration. Arthur Anders Kverne Criminal registration.June 6 Oscar Nerease Jones Driving while license suspended or revoked (habitual). April Swilley Pollock Dealing in stolen property. Saran Ashley Morgan Burglary and grand theft. Ismael Ferniza Introduction of contraband into state prison. Chelsea Lee Breeden Out of county warrant. Jimmie Lee Davis Jr. Weekend sentence. William Joseph Sutton Possession of a controlled substance under 20 grams and possession of drug paraphernalia. June 8 Javen Jamal Butler Possession of controlled substance. Renee Katrell Brown Violation of parole (circuit) and grand theft 3rddegree.June 9 Quinn Maurice Henson Out of county warrant. John Tigert Sewell Jr. D.U.I.June 10 Raheen Alphonsa Foster No valid drivers license. Georgia Wright Hopson Drug offender probation. Jerome Calvin Burton Violation of parole. Sylvester David Robinson Battery/ domestic violence. Around Madison County4A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 Information in the Jail Report is provided to Greene Publishing, Inc., by the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce. All people are considered innocent until proven guilty. Questions about people identied in the report should be directed to the MCSO at (850) 973-4001. ObituaryCommunity CalendarJune 13 Croft Ministries/Joyce Croft will present a free bean supper and gospel sing on Friday, June 13. The bean supper will start at 5 p.m., and will be held at the Gathering at Yogi Bears Jellystone Park and Campground. The concert will start at 7 p.m., inside the Yogi Bear Jellystone Park Opry Hall. Performers will include the Sammy Glass family, New Tradition, Ken Williams, Joyce Croft and Amber Lee Abbott. Yogi Bears Jellystone Park is located just south of Interstate 10, Exit 258 at 1039 SW Old St. Augustine Road.June 13 Tri-County Medical Center is hosting a tobacco quit program called Tools to Quit on Friday, June 13 from 2-4 p.m. The class is offered by Big Bend AHEC and will offer a trained facilitator to guide participants as they identify triggers, explain withdrawal symptoms, and brainstorm ways to cope with them. The program covers topics including addiction, withdrawal and medications that help, planning for the quit date, dealing with triggers, overcoming cravings and relapse prevention. This program offers free nicotine replacement therapy (while supplies last and if medically appropriate), educational materials, goodies for the quit day, and followup support. Tri-County Medical Center is located at 193 NW US 221 in Greenville. For more information, please call (850) 9482840.June 13 The Senior Citizens Council of Madison Advisory Council and Dr. Phillip Combs is sponsoring a Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser, Saturday, June 13, from 10 a.m., until 2 p.m., on the Madison County Courthouse lawn. The menu will include spaghetti, bread, salad, tea or lemonade. Delivery will be available with a minimum order of six dinners. Place your order today, by calling Rosa, Nadine or Lisa at (850) 973-4241.June 14 Chapel Road will be performing at a Benet Gospel Sing for Denise Ellison on Saturday, June 14, at 6 p.m. The event will take place at Midway Baptist Church, located at 338 SE Midway Church Road in Lee. For anyone unable to attend, an account has been set up at Madison County Community Bank under the name of Denise Phillips Ellison Benet. All donations are appreciated.June 16 The Brooks County Public Library in Quitman, Ga. invites children and families to come see Andy Offutt Irwin on Monday, June 16, for two oneman show extravaganzas. Irwin is an award-winning storyteller, humorist, singer, songwriter, musician, whistler and walking menagerie of sound effects and dialects. His rst show, a Summer Reading Show for children and families, will be at 10 a.m. His second show, Sister True is for grownups, but children are welcome, will be at 7 p.m. Brooks County Library is located at 404 Barwick Road in Quitman, Ga. For more information, please call (229) 2634412.June 17 A food preservation workshop will be held at the Madison County Extension Service, Tuesday, June 17. There will be a morning workshop at 9:30 a.m. and another one at 6 p.m. Food Preservation Basics will cover freezing, water bath and pressure canning. Learn the safe way to preserve your summer garden and get directions for USDA tested recipes. To register, call (850) 973-4138.June 21 The grand opening for the Madison County Opry Hall takes place on Saturday, June 21, with money being raised for Farm Share of Madison. There is no charge, but donations and a love offering will be accepted. Brenda McCormick will be selling tickets for $1 each for chances to win cakes and prizes. Gospel music starts at 6 p.m., and Country at 7 p.m. The Opry Hall is located in the old Madison House building, located at 799 SW Pinckney Street. Drinks, hotdogs and chips will be provided for donations. For Farm Share donations or more information, contact Chad McCormick, Farm Share manager, at (850) 464-6190.Jail Report Way Back When Way Back WhenJune 10, 1949 Bill Cooksey, Gene Hadden, Richard Plant, B.G. Wyche, Preston Greene, and Son Stokeley of Madison, John Kepple of Clewiston and Bob Quillen of Indianapolis, Ind., are leaving by motor Saturday for Fairbanks, Alaska. The local Chapter Order of Eastern Star will honor the Worthy Grand Matron of the Grand Chapter of Florida, Mrs. Florence Carter, of Milton, Fla., with a tea on the evening of Tuesday, June 14, in the Masonic Hall. Dozier J. Balloon, stewardsman, USN, son of Leona Balloon of Route 3, Madison, Fla., is serving abroad the Naval Amphibious Base, Little Creak, Va. Balloon, who entered the Naval service November 26, 1945, received his recruit training at the Naval Trainer Center, Bainbridge, Md. The following Madison County students received degrees at the University of Florida at Commencement exercises June 5 and 6: Charles Wendell Godwin, BAE; Warren T. Jarvis, BSF; Roy Bosworth Keyes, BAE; Richard Plant, BS; James D. Scruggs, BSF.June 9, 1950 On request of Lewis Hale, local patron of Enterprise, and on motion of S. P. Grifn, seconded by W B Ezell, the question of re-establishing Enterprise school came before the County School Board in its session Wednesday. Mr. Grifn made probably the greatest public utterance of his life in support of the motion. The School Board Wednesday, following recommendation by Superintendent Browning and approval of the Trustees, elected Prof. A. J. Hargrove as supervising principal of the Madison public schools. Mr. Hargrove was selected from a list of more than thirty applicants. The terric impact derailed the locomotive and destroyed the semitrailer and damaged the cab. The engine, going south, struck the truck, going west, and a few feet back of the cab. The driver was taken to the hospital in Madison suffering from shock but was not thought to be seriously injured. W G Stracener, editor of the Florida Baptist Witness, Jacksonville, Fla., pastor of First Baptist Church Madison from 1934-38 was awarded the Doctor of Divinity degree by John B Stetson University, Deland at its Commencement Exercises on June 5.June 8, 1951 The Graduating Class of Madison High School was honored with a lovely dance Wednesday night following the Commencement exercises. Hostesses were Mrs. A H Armstrong, Mrs. B N Gross, Mrs. J C Wells, Mrs. A S Vaughn, Mrs. Miller Buie, Mrs. Fred Duncan and Mrs. C W Cantey. Jody Tuten has been selected by the Greenville School Faculty to attend Boys State in Tallahassee this summer. This honor is given by the Madison County Legion post. Eighth grade citizenship medals were presented to Pete Driggers and Sue Braswell. Twin Jersey calves were born last week on the farm of A L McDaniels, near Lee. One is a heifer, one is a bull calf, both being normal size calves. J I Surles & Sons Store at 210 S. Range Street was robbed sometime last Friday night of about $35 in cash, as well as cigarettes and perhaps other items. The cash drawer was damaged by the robber in getting to the money. Just how the thief managed the affair was not known. However, it was easy to get in and out the upstairs, or he could have been locked up in the upstairs when the store closed Friday. Eugene Russell NewsomeEugene Russell Newsome, 96, died Monday, June 9, at Southern Living for Seniors. The funeral service was held Thursday, June 12, at 11 a.m., at Unity Baptist Church, with burial at Hanson Cemetery. Visitation was one-hour prior to the service from 10 11 a.m., at the church. He was born in Madison, where he lived all his life. He was a farmer and loved to sh and was an avid Seminole fan and served in the US Army. He was a member of Unity Baptist Church. He is survived by his wife, Lorene Rowe Newsome of Madison; one son, Rusty Newsome (Sarah) of Madison; one daughter, Peggy N. Harris of Madison; three grandchildren: Meghan Agner (Bo) of Madison, Blake Harris of Los Angeles, Calif., and Josh Newsome (Stacey) of Madison; and two great grandchildren: Gracelynn and Kailyn Newsome. He was preceded in death by his parents: J. Russell and Ruth Newsome and son-in-law, Sammy Harris; three sisters: Helen Spooner, Dorothy Daniel and Eloise Richardson; and two brothers: Homer Newsome and Donny Newsome. Beggs Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements (850) 9732258. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting our website at www.beggsfuneral.com. Bobbie Thomas Curry And Lewis Curry Celebrate 50 Years Mr. and Mrs. Curry will celebrate their 50thWedding Anniversary in June. Lewis and Bobbie (Thomas) were married in Madison on June 20, 1964. They brought to this union four children, Roderick Curry (deceased), Dr. Veronica Brown (Eric), Anthony Curry and Felicia Curry. They were also blessed with four grandchildren: Roderick Mungin, Kimberly Curry, BriAnni Glee and Polynesha Curry. Thank YouWe, the family of Quincy Thomas, would like to express our appreciation to everyone for the kindness shown to us during our time of sorrow. The cards, owers, calls, visits, food and prayers were truly a blessing. We want to thank the staff at Madison County Memorial Hospital for their care and concern during our time there. May God bless you all. Vonnie and Wally Davis Roy and Cheryell Thomas The Grandchildren of thePicturesPast State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://oridamemory.com/items/show/64585View of Madison storefronts in 1974.

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Written by the Madison Genealogy SocietyFor over 180 years, the Cone Family has been planted in Madison County soil, in the Greenville area. Fountain Hayne Cone, born around 1803 in Craven, N.C. migrated through South Carolina, where he met his wife Anna and where his first son, Edward was born. He arrived sometime before 1833; records show that Fountain voted in the 1833 election. Fountain was here before Florida became a state in 1845 and probably just after Madison became a county in 1827. Several more children: Jane, William, Fountain, Jr. and Queen Ann were all born in the county. Fountain served in four different militias, as a private, sergeant and as a captain. Anna died sometime between 1860 and 1868, and is said to be buried in New Hope Cemetery. Fountain then remarried Zilpha, who was around 43 years his junior and had six more children: Frances, Zylpha, John J., Amanda, Henry and Robert. A little while after Fountain arrived, his younger brother, Spencer, born around 1805 also in Craven, North Carolina, arrived in the Greenville area, by way of Georgia, where he married his wife Rebecca and had the following children: William H., Mary, Sarah, and Spencer. Nancy and Florida A. were born in Madison County. Spencer may have had a second and third wife: Bertha, born in Georgia, and Tabitha, also born in Georgia. Both Fountain and Spencer were counted in the 1840, 1850, 1860 and 1870 censuses. Fountain also lived to be counted in the 1880 census, where he was listed as 77 years old and feeble. In 1850, Jesse Cone, also born in North Carolina, was in Jefferson County. According to one source, Jesse, born in 1813, was the half brother of Fountain and Spencer. Jesse was married to Adeline and living with the couple was Fereby Cone, age 75, possibly Jesses mother. By 1860, Jesse and Adeline also had several children in Jefferson County. Fountains first three sons stayed in the Greenville area and raised their families. The three sons of Anna and Fountain were: Edward, William, and Fountain H. Jr. Edward married late, at age 42, to Jemima Gill, and had the following children: Queen M., Alford M. and Blanch G. William married Zilly and had Anna and Sarah F. His second wife was June. William had two more daughters: Flory E. and Martha L. Fountain Hayne, Jr. married Emily Shephard and had the following children: M. Ann, Jane and Dora. A 10-yearold boy, Benjamin, was listed in the 1870 census after the other younger girls, so possibly Benjamin was not a son or was the son of Emily only. While married to his second wife, Lydia Willis, Fountain, Jr. had the following children: Sumpter Roscoe, Ollie Mae, Blanch A. and William Dewey. Fountains sons from his second marriage were John J., Henry and Robert. John J. married Missouri and lived locally. Henry married Lottie first and then Quincy and had Amanda and Anna. Henry also lived in the Greenville area. Were not sure how long or where Robert lived. Fountain had quite a few granddaughters and the following grandsons, who mostly were loyal Greenville citizens: Alfred Morris (son of Edward Calvin); and Sumpter Roscoe and William Dewey, (sons of Fountain, Jr.) Alfred Morris, who was born in 1880, married Gussie Letchworth and had the following children: John C., Thomas J., Grover Cleveland, Walter M., Woodrow Wilson, Irene, Nellie Mae, Alfred Morris Jr., Gussie, Edward Calvin and Margaret Corrine. Finally, there were some boys in the family. Sumpter Roscoe married Nellie and defected to the Asheville area of Jefferson County, which is only a few miles from the Hamburg area where some of the Cones lived. He had the following children: Fountain B., William T. and Sumpter L. William Dewey wound up in Jacksonville, married to Sarah B., and had a son, Admiral. He was later married to Belle and had Malcolm, Helen, Alvin, Mary and Betty. Spencer Cone, Fountain Sr.s brother, had two sons, William H. and Spencer, Jr. William H. married Elizabeth and had Lydian, Sherman W., John, James T., Amanda and Feriba. Spencer, Jr. married Elizabeth and had Nancy, Henry W., Frances, Josephine and Salety. Spencer, Sr. also had quite a few granddaughters and the following grandsons: Sherman W., John, and James T (sons of William H); and Henry W., (son of Spencer, Jr.). Sherman W. married Jamimey and had Ella, Minnie, William H. and James E. Sherman raised his family in Greenville. We are uncertain if John and James T. grew up and raised families. Henry W. married Lottie and had Eulus OQuinn. He also married Quincy and had Amanda and Annie. Henry W. also raised his family in Greenville. So, if youve ever known any Cones by the names of Fountain, Spencer, William, Henry, Edward, Alfred, Sherman, Sumpter or by any other name in the Greenville area, you can be sure they are descended from either Fountain or Spencer Cone, and you can be sure that they have come from good, hardy people who have farmed our land, supported this county, and remained loyal to Madison County for over 180 years. Congratulate the next Cone you meet! The Madison County Genealogical Society welcomes your input and invites you to join our organization. We meet on the second Thursday monthly, except during summer months, in the Madison Public Library from 6 to 7 PM. Annual dues are $25. To add comments to our articles or to submit your own sketch on your ancestor, contact us at Madison County Genealogy Society, P.O. Box 136, Madison, FL 32341. Or contact us by email at mcgenealo gysociety@live.com If you would like for us to write an article featuring your ancestor, please contact us by mail or email.Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 5A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 btnbtfr b btn fbtnftbr b No Photocopies Accepted Tickets are good during July, one visit only Deadline To Enter is June 26, 2014Name____________________________ ___________________________ Address__________________________ __________________________ Phone Number____________________ Fill out and return to Greene Publishing at P.O. Drawer 772 or 1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32341 btn frttrb ttn brt rrtff f rr r Tp : Madison Fire Rescue Firefighter Hometown: Queens, N.Y. Why He Chose Firefighting: Ive always had an interest in it. He had a friend who was involved in firefighting and helped him figure out how to get involved. Favorite Book: Animal Farm, by George Orwell. Favorite Quote: Know is not enough, we must apply. Willing is not enough, we must do, by Bruce Lee. Favorite Movie: The Usual Suspects. Favorite TV Show: The Walking Dead, and Game of Thrones. Favorite Sport: He loves soccer but does not have a favorite team. His favorite baseball team is the New York Giants. Hero: My mom because she is the hardest working person I know. Hobbies: Fishing, being on the water and at the beach. Sum Yourself Up: Hardworking and outgoing. Pioneers Of Madison County Fountain Hayne And Spencer Cone

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6A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014

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By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.The Police Explorers is a program that allows groups of young men and women to explore what it means to be a police officer and whether it is what they see in their future as a career. The children must be 14years-old to 20-yearsold to participate in the program. The Police Explorers program at the City of Madison Police Department meet every Monday at 7 p.m. Sergeant Chris Cooks and Officer Travis Johnson are the Police Explorers advisors but it was City of Madison Police Chief Gary Calhouns daughter, Rebecca Calhoun, who was the force behind starting the Police Explorers. Prior to moving to Madison, she was in a Police Explorers program. At the time that her family moved, she had four more years that she could be involved in the program. She has now retired from the Police Explorers but is still committed to the program. She is currently enrolled at Valdosta State University but comes down to Madison whenever she can to help. The program currently has twelve explorers. The program will teach Explorers how to handle situations such as how to make a traffic stop, clear a building and how to communicate with Communications in law enforcement codes. The Explorers are also able to get hands-on experience by participating in a ride-along and helping out at city events such as the Fourth of July celebration. Jacob Briggs, 15, is a sergeant in the Police Explorers. He has been a member for over a year. He joined Police Explorers because he wants to be a police officer and do his part for his community. Its gave me a hands-on experience, said Briggs. They show you what they really do and it helped me see that its the career for me. Aylin Torralbas, 15, is currently the only girl in the program. She has been in the program for almost a year. She wanted to see what Police Explorers was and to be involved in her community. Torralbas had certain expectations for the Police Explorers program when she started but she said it is better than she expected. She now wants to become a police officer and a flight attendant. Terron Harry, 16, has been involved in Police Explorers for four weeks. With family members involved in the Madison County Sheriffs Office and his father a correctional officer; he wanted to experience the law enforcement field. He is now determined that becoming a police officer is what he wants as a career. Harrys favorite part of the Police Explorers program is riding around with a good group of people who are willing to help you and getting to know what it is like in the field. If anyone is interested in joining, call the City of Madison Police Station at (850) 973-5077 or email mpdexplorers650@gma il.com for more information.Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 7A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014Police Explorers Program Is Educating Future Law Enforcement OfficersGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie Box, June 9, 2014The Police Explorers practice trafc stops before taking a moment to pose in front of a City of Madison Police car. The Police Explorers, left to right in the back row are: Ofcer Travis Johnson, Police Explorers Advisor; Terron Harry, Donte Fulmer, Levi Carter, Brailey Sparksm, Jaquez Wri ght and Sergeant Chris Cooks, Police Explorers Advisor. The Police Explorers, left to right in the front row are: William Buchanan, Jacob Briggs, Leshun West, Aylin Torralbas and Rebecca Calhoun. A Spoonful Of Heavens Grand Opening Is TodayBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. ASpoonful of Heaven is having its Grand Opening, Friday, June 13 from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. The restaurant will be serving homemade soul food for breakfast and lunch for dine in or take out. The menu for breakfast will include eggs, grits, bacon, salmon balls, French toast and pancakes. Everyday the lunch will include a meat, two sides, cornbread, a drink and dessert. There will be two meat choices everyday and fried chicken will be a staple and there will also be seven sides to choose from. The normal hours for A Spoonful of Heaven will be Tuesday Saturday from 6 a.m. until 3 p.m. The restaurant is located at 291 SW Dade Street in Madison and can be contacted by phone at (850) 464-6226. Myth: Social Security will provide most of the income you need in retirement. Fact: Its likely that Social Security will provide a smaller portion of retirement income than you expect. Theres no doubt about it--Social Security is an important source of retirement income for most Americans. According to the Social Security Administration, more than nine out of ten individuals age 65 and older receive Social Security benefits. No matter what the future holds for Social Security, focus on saving as much for retirement as possible. You can do so by contributing to taxdeferred vehicles such as IRAs, 401(k)s, and other employer-sponsored plans, and by investing in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. When combined with your future Social Security benefits, your retirement savings and pension benefits can help ensure that youll have enough income to see you through retirement. My th: Social Security is only a retirement program. Fact: Social Security also offers disability and survivors benefits. With all the focus on retirement benefits, its easy to overlook the fact that Social Security also offers protection against long-term disability. And when you receive retirement or disability benefits, your family members may be eligible to receive benefits, too. Another valuable source of support for your family is Social Security survivors insurance. If you were to die, certain members of your family, including your spouse, children, and dependent parents, may be eligible for monthly survivors benefits that can help replace lost income. Myth: If you earn money after you retire, youll lose your Social Security benefit. Fact: Money you earn after you retire will only affect your Social Security benefit if youre under full retirement age. Once you reach full retirement age, you can earn as much as you want without affecting your Social Security retirement benefit. But if youre under full retirement age, any income that you earn may affect the amount of benefit you receive: If youre under full retirement age, $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $2 you earn above a certain annual limit. For 2014, that limit is $15,480. In the year you reach full retirement age, $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $3 you earn above a certain annual limit until the month you reach full retirement age. If you reach full retirement age in 2014, that limit is $41,400. Myth: Social Security benefits are not taxable Fact: You may have to pay taxes on your Social Security benefits if you have other income. If the only income you had during the year was Social Security income, then your benefit generally isnt taxable. But if you earned income during the year (either from a job or from selfemployment) or had substantial investment income, then you might have to pay federal income tax on a portion of your benefit. Stacy Bush, President Bush Wealth Management The Bush Wealth Advantage Myths and Facts about Social Security Our column, The Bush Wealth Advantage is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. Stacy Bush has practiced independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.com Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 871857

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8A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 Happy Fathers Day SERVING UP REAL FOOD FOR REAL PEOPLE Hwy 53 & I-10 (850) 973-3115Open 24 hrsOpen 24 hrsPlease Join Us For Fathers DayCelebrating Over 25 Years In Bus iness Serving The Truc kers Of America Celebrating Over 25 Years In Business Serving The Truckers Of America SERVING UP REAL FOOD FOR REAL PEOPLEComfort Food Zone @ I-10 & Exit 262On Site Repair Shop (850) 971-5100Grill (850) 971-4240 Treat Dad On His Special Day! We Have All The Fixins For Your Fathers Day Barbeque Proud To Serve You With The BEST Meat In Town! 6868 US Hwy 129 Live Oak, Fl 32364 (386) 330-2488VISIT US TO FIND THE PERFECT GIFT FOR DAD! GIFT CARDS ALSO AVAILABLE! Remembering PapaBy Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Whenever I tell people Im adopted, they usually want to hear my story, and I usually dont mind sharing. My sister and I were adoptive when I was around five years old; my adopted father was in his early 50s at that time. I wonder now how he did it. I think of where I am in my life and try to imagine taking on a young child and doing all the things it takes to raise one today. Adopting a child of five would mean school, clothes, toys, lots of teaching and socializing, morals and values, activities, proper nutrition (no bowls of cereal five nights in a row), lack of sleep, late night homework, monitoring (TV, friends, computer), church, sports, pets (which is fine by me), kid-friendly vacations, and the list goes on until the child of five turns 18, or graduates from college or until they decide they can (and want to) leave the nest. At 50 years of age, most people are dreaming of a second chapter in their life, a new career, going back to school, traveling...but instead of those, or other choices, viewed as personal enrichment, my Papa chose adoption, and all that comes with it. He had never had children of his own and everything mentioned above was totally new to him. He learned as we grew, as most parents do. As bad as I hate to admit it, I didnt make it easy on him. I was a total Daddys girl (my sister and cousins would say spoiled.) Little did he know that giving in to my every whim and desire while I was a child, would make it hard on him after I reached teenager status. I look back now and cringe when I think of how much harder his life became because of what he called my antics. After my Mother died, Papa eventually began to try and start a new life, and being around 19, I was navigating mine. Through my 20s we were like ships in the night, seeing each other in passing, but every once in a while, stopping to make contact. When I married at 28 years of age, I knew my Papa was beginning to have health problems. He was living alone and after I lived with my newly wed husband for only one year, Papas health had degenerated to the point of us all moving in together. Taking care of my father for the next 11 years was one of the hardest things I have ever had to do. I took on tasks I never thought I would and we classically switched caregiving roles. Being my Papas caregiver forced me to have a different relationship with him. Instead of him helping me, I was helping him...to the doctor, fix his meals, bathe, dress and whatever else he needed done. He went from a walker to a wheelchair, and went from being my father to being like my child. On his 92ndbirthday, I took him to eat at one of his favorite restaurants; a catfish place in Jacksonville, Arkansas called the Crooked Hook. Two weeks later, in our house, I was holding his hand while he slept in his bed with me lying in a recliner beside him. I listened to his struggle to breathe, just him, and me, and in the early morning hours, my Papa died. After people hear my story on the events surrounding my adoption (and thats for another time) I often hear, Do you know who your real dad is? My answer is simple...Yes, I do. Happy Fathers Day Papa. I miss you. Photo SubmittedI share a light moment with my Papa on my wedding day. One year later, I would nd him on the living room oor of his house, unable to stand.Photo SubmittedPapa, long before he was my father, sometime around the early 1940s.Photo SubmittedAs a family, we went on many fun camping trips. This picture shows us at Lake Catherine in Arkansas. Papa is holding on to my oat and beside me, on the left, is my sister Kathy.Photo SubmittedMe and my Papa on his 92ndbirthday.

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 9A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 6868 US Hwy 129 Live Oak, Fl 32364 (386) 330-2488 RESPECT & HONOR THE RED, WHITE & BLUE! Town Of GreenvilleForever in Peace May She Wave. Tommy HardeeMadison County Supervisor of Elections Shes The Emblem Of The Land We Love. Bart AlfordSchool Board Member, District 5 Shes The Emblem Of The Home Of The Brave. Beggs Funeral HomeSince 1886 Beggs Funeral HomeMadison Chapel 235 NW Orange Avenue Madison, Florida 32340 (850) 973-2258 Beggs Funeral HomePerry Chapel 201 West Main Street Perry, Florida 32348 (850) 838-2929 The Home Of The Free & The Brave City Of MadisonShe Is The Emblem Of The Home Of The Free. SERVING UP REAL FOOD FOR REAL PEOPLE Hwy 53 & I-10 (850) 973-3115Open 24 hrsOpen 24 hrsWe Salute Ole Glory!Celebrating Over 25 Years In Business Serving The Truckers Of America Celebrating Over 25 Years In Business Serving The Truckers Of America SERVING UP REAL FOOD FOR REAL PEOPLEComfort Food Zone @ I-10 & Exit 262On Site Repair Shop (850) 971-5100Grill (850) 971-4240 Shes A High Flying Flag! 1405 N Lee St. Valdosta, Ga. (229) 245-8300Hometown Proud!Shes A Grand Ole Flag! Honor Our flag! Flag Day Is SaturdayBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc. That the ag of the United States shall be of thirteen stripes of alternate red and white, with a union of thirteen stars of white in a blue eld, representing the new constellation. June 14, 1777, the Second Continental Congress. The ag is how America signs her name. The Betsy Ross Home Page at http://www.ushistory.org/Betsy/With those few words, the very rst American Flag was adopted by a resolution passed by the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777. There were several variations on the arrangement of the stars (circles, ovals, rows, or even in the shape of a bigger star) and the stars themselves were often depicted as eight-pointed rather than ve pointed during the nal years of the 1700s, and on into the 1800s (for a more in-depth discussion of this as well as examples of historical images of the American Flag from this period, see http://www.vexman.net/13stars/ ). This was the case both shortly after the original adoption and later as the nation expanded into new territory, but the 13 red and white stripes remained, with a star added to the canton as each new state joined the union. The new American ag was rst carried into battle Sept. 11, 1778 in the Battle of Brandywine during the American Revolution. It was rst saluted by foreign naval vessels Feb. 14, 1778 when an American ship arrived in a French port. It rst ew over foreign territory in 1778 in Nassau, where American troops captured a British fort. In 1916 President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation ofcially establishing June 14 as Flag Day. In August of 1949, Congress established National Flag Day, but did not make it a federal holiday. It is at the President's discretion to ofcially proclaim the observance. On June 14, 1937, Pennsylvania became the rst (and only state so far) to celebrate it as an ofcial state holiday, with most communities celebrating the entire week preceding the holiday as Flag Week. Not surprisingly, the annual celebrations are a huge affair in Philadelphia, the seat of the Continental Congress, centered around the historical home of Betsy Ross and many other historical sites of the American Revolution. Many other American cities and community organization have also recognized the signicance of June 14, with Flag Day observances and ceremonies that predate the 1949 National Flag Day Act by several decades. In Madison County, the American Legion Post #224 at Cherry Lake is holding a Flag Retirement Ceremony on the shore of Cherry Lake, beginning at 5:30 p.m., on Saturday. Several ags that are no longer serviceable will be burned in a patriotic and dignied manner. Anyone who would like to attend is invited to do so. The Post members ask only that everyone please show the proper respect during the evening ceremony that will bring Flag Day for Madison County to a tting and proper close. Photo SubmittedThe Betsy Ross House in Philadelphia gures prominently in that city's Flag Day celebrations. Here in Madison, Flag Day will be observed with a Flag Retirement ceremony at Cherry Lake, beginning at 5:30 p.m. Learn To Fold A Flag Properly Amer ican F l a g s Thr ou ghout History

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By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Madison County Central School has taken on another rst for the school, with their inaugural drama production, "Another Cinderella." The play was directed by MCCS 6thgrade Science teacher, Elizabeth Hodge, who will return to the school next year to participate in another MCCS rst, student drama courses. Mrs. Hodge says she did a lot of acting during her high school years and has been exposed to many literary works that helped her to cultivate an interest in writing. She believes drama allows exposure to other cultures and will give students more insight on communication and problem solving skills. Hodge wrote all of the school play's narrations, the plays welcome and developed the program. Students were asked to assist with costumes, props, make-up and all other aspects of the production. Hodge says she asked them "to make it their own and that they did an excellent job with that task.School10A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 Make 2014the year you change your life CLASSES IN MADISON STARTJUNE 30Bachelors Degree Programs Business Administration with specialization in Management Computer Information Systems Criminal Justice Elementary Education Health Care Management Human Services Psychology Full-time students may be eligible for the Florida Resident Access Grant (FRAG) Approved for VA Benets/GI Bill Classes now forming in Madison(850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu What you need for where youre going Now offering The Doctorate of Business Administration (Online and On Campus) ou need for wher What y e y ou need for wher e going r ou ee egr re s D achelor B dministration A usiness B Classes ograms r ro ee P dministration Classes dministration A usiness B with specialization in anagement M nformation Computer I ystems S ustice riminal J C ducation lementary E E anagement e M ealth Car H dministrationClasses S une 30J with specialization in nformation ducation anagement N The D ing Classes ttarS une 30 fer w of o N octorate of The D ervices uman S H chology sy P ull-time students may F be eligible for the esident ida R lor F G) rant (FRA G ervices ull-time students may be eligible for the ccess A esident The D usiness B nline and O (O octorate of The D dministration A usiness ampus) n C nline and O V ed for v o ppr ro A ill enets/GI B B w for Classes no adison in Mwww A VA ming w for (850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu.saintleo.edu/mp www (850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu.saintleo.edu/mp Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 4, 2014The outstanding cast of Another Cinderella, made up of 6th through 8th grade students, takes a well deserved bow.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 4, 2014The plays director, 6thgrade Science teacher Elizabeth Hodge, holds up owers given to her by Dr. Willie Miles, school principal. Mrs. Hodge received six roses and said that number was perfect, because after keeping one for her, the other ve would go to the people who helped the play be the success that it was. Those she dedicated the owers to were: Lakeesha Wallace (7th grade Language Arts teacher); Tracey Pickles (a super substitute teacher); Jennifer Stanley (media assistance and stage); Valerie Thomas (ESE Middle Grades teacher and show choir) and Gary Gazlay (Music teacher who provided music for the play).Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, June 4, 2014The tting of the shoe on Cinderella had a humorous take on the original story in the play presented by the MCCS cast members. From left to right, are: Zytavious Gee-Washington (Tom); Alea Roberson (The Stepmother); Niesha Davis (Lola/Stepsister); Haley Crosby (Soa/Stepsister-in back) and Cailyn Johnson (Cinderella-seated).MCCS Presents First Drama Production:Another Cinderella

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SportsMadison Enterprise-Recorder 11A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 FEED TIMESHow to use: The major and minor feeding times for each day are listed below. The major feeding times are the best for the sportsman and last about 2 hours, the minor feeding times can also have good success, but last only about 1 hour. Good luck and be careful out there. Major feed times are marked by an asterisk (*) The Week Of June 13 June 19, 2014 Friday June 13 *12:55 AM 7:10 AM *1:20 PM 7:30 PM Saturday June 14 *1:50 AM 8:10 AM *2:35 PM 8:50 PM Sunday June 15 *3:00 AM 9:10 AM *3:30 PM 9:45 PM Monday June 16 *4:10 AM 10:20 AM *4:30 PM 10:50 PM Tuesday June 17 *5:10 AM 11:20 AM *5:40 PM 11:55 PM Wednesday June 18 *6:10 AM 12:20 AM *6:30 PM Thursday June 19 12:45 AM *7:10 AM 1:10 PM *7:30 PM Photo Submitted Pictured, from left to right are the Cheerleading award winners: Victoria Brock, Most Valuable Cheerleader; Christina Reams, Most Valuable Cheerleader; Lauren Demott, Best All-Around and Ashley Hebert, Coaches Award. Photo SubmittedPictured left to right are the 2014 Softball awards: Kelly Horne received the Most Valuable Player award. Whitney Stevens recei ved the Pitching Award. Elizabeth Hightower received the Offensive Player of the Year. Taylor Copeland received the Defensive Player of the Year. Payal Chaudhari received the Lady Warrior Award.The 2014 Aucilla Sports Banquet Is A Success Photo SubmittedReceiving the girls basketball awards were, left to right: Lauren Demott, Warrior Award; Marisa Duber, Leadership Award; Whitne y Stevens, Shooter Award; Kinzi Mattingly, Game Changer Award and Kayla Knecht, Floor General Award. Photo SubmittedThe Athlete of the Year awards went to Whitney Stevens and Brandon Holm.Photo SubmittedThe Academic Athletes of the Year were Whitney Stevens with a grade point average of 3.9 and Braden Mattingly, with a grade point average of 3.545

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE WANTED FOR RENT HELP WANTEDwww.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . LEGAL -12A Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, June 13, 2014 AUCTIONI am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).3/26 rtn, n/cPageant and Prom Dresses For Sale: Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 Leave a message. Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBecome A Certied Nursing Assistant Quest Training offers a nurse top CNA prep class. No GED required if age 18. Professional training site, high pass rates. Now accepting students for July classes. 386-362-1065.6/4 6/25, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes. Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Our newspaper ofce is seeking an outstanding individual to join our sales team. Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a good personality and LOVE to talk on the telephone? If you are a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, have a friendly can-doattitude, a great work ethic, are organized, and self-motivated then this job might be just for you. Valid Drivers License a must! Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper ofce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.Too Much Junk? Do you have a garage or barn or attic full of junk and want it clean? Granddads barn that needs to be cleaned or removed? Let us make you an offer on it all And we clean it up at the same time. Call 850-973-7916 and leave a message.2/26 rtn, n/c We want your Ghosts!! We are collecting YOUR stories of Ghosts, Goblins, Spooks, Specters, Aliens, Haunted Houses, Paranormal Events, Angels, and any other Supernatural Tales from Madison County and surrounding counties. We want personal experiences, legends, and family traditions. Call 850-973-7916 and leave a message.2/26 rtn, n/c A few chickens and a rooster for my yard. (850) 661-6868.4/9 rtn, n/c LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com5/7 rtn, c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12x18 building with 6 porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/cAUCTION SATURDAY JUNE 14 AT 6:30PM. MADISON AUCTION HOUSE. 1693 SW MOSELEY HALL RD (CR360) 850 973-1444. LAST AUCTION FOR THE SUMMER. SELLING ITEMS FOR HOME, YARD AND SHOP. SAVE OVER STORE PRICES. 10% BUYERS PREMIUM. MC, VISA, DISCOVER, DEBIT CARDS, CHECKS AND CASH ACCEPTED. AU3968 Brandon Mugge Auctioneer, AB2490 LAST AUCTION FOR THE SUMMER. SELLING ITEMS FOR HOME, YARD AND SHOP. SAVE OVER STORE PRICES. 10% BUYERS PREMIUM. MC, VISA, DISCOVER, DEBIT CARDS, CHECKS AND CASH ACCEPTED. AU3968 Brandon Mugge Auctioneer, AB2490.6/4, 6/11, pdSatellite Techs Needed Must have van/truck and basic tools. Will train. Send resume to oridatotalcom@verizon.net6/4, 6/11, pd Advent Christian Village Current JOBS Line Advertisement call 658-5627 or visit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week Be Your Best Among The Best! Administrative Assistant FT position for experienced administrative assistant / ofce manager in long-term care setting to coordinate daily tasks, manage patient cash accounts, and other duties. Must be patient & courteous, detail oriented, procient in MS Ofce Suite & Internet, organized, professional, and have strong customer service & communication skills, including proper phone etiquette. HSD or equivalent required. AA degree or ofce admin certicate preferred. Prior relevant experience required. Prior supervisory experience a plus. FT positions include competitive compensation, paid time off, & access to onsite daycare and tness facilities. Apply in person at Personnel Ofce Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE / Drug-Free Workplace / Criminal background checks required.6/4, 6/11, cTechnology (CEHRT) Instructor wanted at North Florida Community College, Madison FL. See www.nfcc.edu for details.6/4 6/18, c PART TIME SYSTEM OPERATOR Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an opening for a part time system operator in our Madison Ofce. The candidate must be able to demonstrate excellent working knowledge of computers, outstanding customer service skills, the ability to effectively multitask, and must be able to communicate well using a two way radio and telephone. The ideal candidate must have the ability to remain calm while making quick procient decisions in a number of different circumstances including power restoration and emergency situations. The candidate will be assigned two twelve hour shifts during the weekend. Occasionally the candidate will be required to provide additional support during extended power outage events. Tri-County is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and Drug Free Workplace (DFWP). Please submit a resume and completed Tri-County Electric Application for Employment form, which is available at any TCEC ofce or online at www.tcec.com, before June 18, 2014 to: Stephanie Carroll Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. 2862 West US 90 Madison, FL 32340.6/4, 6/11, c 2 Bdrm/ 1 Bth, 28 acres, outbuildings and storage, NE Madison County3 Bdrm/ 1 Bth, 5 acres, multiple barns, Sampala area, $59,9003 Bdrm/ 1.5 Bth, all fenced, brick, storage $95,000 4 Bdrm, pool, pasture, 55 acres $575,000 3 Bdrm, pool, pasture, 85.82 acres3 Bdrm, brick, close to town, $69,900 ML Farm Systems Inc., Iowa Falls, IA, seeks 16 temporary farm laborers from 07/08/14 to 01/15/15, for the construction of livestock buildings near Leipsic, OH. For the building and repairing livestock buildings. Placing concrete for walls and sidewalks, building and repairing damaged walls and trusses, repairing and installing curtains; installing feed tanks, feeder and feed lines. Tin sheeting walls, install doors, caulk structures, and clean site. 3 month experience of livestock equipment installation/repair required. Must be able to lift and carry 75lbs, 75yds.Wage is $11.63/hr. ML Farm Systems Inc. 07/08/14 to 01/15/15. Tools, supplies, and equipment provided by employer at no cost to employee. Housing provided at no cost to all workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the work day. Transportation and subsistence expenses to worksite will be paid by employer. Apply at Florida's Department of Economic Opportunity or contact the state workforce agent at 107 East Madison St., Tallahassee, FL 32399 (850) 921-3466 using job order number 27869676/11, pd Funny Newspaper Classied AdsFor Sale: One pair hardly used dentures. Only 2 teeth missing. $100 OBO. Call Ira 878-XXXX Wanted: Somebody to go back in time with me. This is not a joke. P.O. Box 322 XXXXXX, Ca. Youll get paid after we get back. Must bring your own weapons. Safety not guaranteed. I have only done this once before. Full Size Mattress. Royal Tonic, 20 year warranty. Like new. Slight urine smell. $40. (818) 222-XXXX June 4 6/6, 6/13

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www.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A All Legals are posted on line at www.greenepublishing.com All local legals are also published at www.oridapublicnotices.com Deadline for Legals! Every Monday and Wednesday 3 p.m. ----Legals---6/6, 6/13 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014-46-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF NORMAN AIKENS, Deceased. The administration of the estate of NORMAN AIKENS, deceased, File Number 2014-46-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for MADISON, County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is PO BOX 237, Madison, Florida 32341. The Name and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must le their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must le their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of rst publication of this Notice is June 6 2014. Personal Representative: Attorney for Personal Representative: NORMA AIKENS Sally Jean Roberts c/o Sally Jean Roberts, Florida Bar No. 102816, PO Box 2026, Perry, FL 32348 PO Box 2026, Perry, FL 32348 Telephone 850-838-72726/6, 6/13 NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING CITY COMMISSION MADISON, FLORIDA A special meeting of the City Commission, Madison, Florida will be held Tuesday, June 24, 2014 at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall. The purpose of the meeting is: (1)Presentation on Water/Wastewater Impact Fee Schedule (2)First Reading on Proposed Ordinance No. 2014-4 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MADISON IMPOSING A TEMPORARY MORATORIUM ON IMPACT FEES FOR WATER AND WASTEWATER; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE (3)Update on the Citys Community Development Block Grant (4)Award Bids on the Citys Community Development Block Grant Any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter considered of such meeting will need a record of the proceedings, and that for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based.6/13 NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF RESOLUTIONS VACATING AND ABANDONING CERTAIN ROADS Pursuant to Sections 336.09 and 336.10, Florida Statutes, the Board of County Commissioners of Madison County, Florida, hereby gives notice that it has adopted Madison County Resolution No. 2014-06-11, vacating and abandoning certain roads located in the northeast quadrant, Madison County, Florida. Said roads are more specically described as follows: UNOPENED ALLEY: The entire 30 unopened alley that runs east and west from Yellow Pine Avenue to Jack Street between part of original Lot 31 and Lots 115116, as shown on the Yellow Pine Heights Subdivision Re-plat dated 1962, Public Records of Madison County, Florida. JACK STREET: The entire portion of Jack Street that runs north and south, from the unopened alley detailed above, to the south property line of origin al Lot 30, also known as, Parcel ID 4780-000000, and which lies between the original Lots 30 and 31 to the west and Parcel ID 4744-000-000 to the east, as shown on the Yellow Pine Heights Subdivision Re-plat dated 1962, Public Records of Madison County, Florida. YOU WILL PLEASE BE GOVERNED ACCORDINGLY. Dated this 11th day of June 2014. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Allen Cherry, County Coordinator. 6/13

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Around Madison County14A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, June 13, 2014 www.morrells.com Just in time for Our Manufacturers will be here giving HUGE FACTORY DISCOUNTS on all of our furniture!Everything in our top quality Swiss Grill lineup until Fathers Day! Receive Is Dad a Grillmaster? One Day Only! Dont Miss Out! Farm Credit Invests in Florida Youth with FFA DonationFloridas three Farm Credit associations have joined forces to contribute $50,000 toward the new Florida FFA headquarters building in Gainesville to benet the next generation in agriculture. The building will provide a permanent home for Florida FFA headquarters with funding opportunities open to FFA members, industry supporters, local FFA chapters and other interested parties. "We are extremely pleased that Farm Credit has taken this bold step in securing its future and the future of nearly 17,000 FFA members by investing in the Building Our Legacy Campaign," said Gary Bartley, Executive Director of the Florida FFA Foundation. As an agricultural lending cooperative, we believe FFA is training our next generation of agricultural leaders today and we want to help foster the close relationship we have maintained over the years, said Rick Bitner, President and CEO of Farm Credit of Northwest Florida. This contribution is tangible evidence of Farm Credits continued commitment to cultivating Floridas young, beginning and small farmers. FFA is one of our countrys premier training grounds, utilizing agriculture as a teaching tool to develop this nations leaders of tomorrow, said Richard Terry, Chairman of the Board of Farm Credit of Northwest Florida. The new building is located on the campus of Florida Farm Bureau in Gainesville, and the design allows for several meeting rooms, state ofcer living quarters, a board room and ofce space. The National FFA Organization (previously known as Future Farmers of America) has more than 587,000 student members preparing for more than 300,000 exciting careers in agriculture, agribusiness and related industries. The FFA mission is to prepare students for successful careers and a lifetime of informed choices in global agriculture, food, ber and natural resources. The three Farm Credit associations in Florida are part of the nationwide Farm Credit System created in 1916 to serve American farmers, ranchers, growers and rural homeowners. Farm Credit members share in their Associations prots through a patronage refund program. Since 1988, the refunds for Florida Farm Credit associations are approaching $500 million, and have signicantly lowered members overall borrowing costs. Youth Explosion At Pineland Missionary Baptist ChurchThe Gospel Express radio broadcast along with the Lady Gospel of Praise, The Gospel Composer and Pineland Missionary Baptist Church are excited to bring Youth Explosion June 20 and June 21at 7 p.m., to the Pineland Church. Pineland Missionary Baptist Church is located at 205 SE Old County Camp Road in Madison. We invite all youth directors, youth ministries, young people and the young at heart to come get CRUNKED for Jesus like never before. All aboard the church vans, cars and buses, press your way. Young people you dont want to miss this great time! We will have special surprises for you there. Our children are facing many different tactics from the enemy. We want to equip them to know with whom and how to win. Only with Jesus can they be on a winning team. IN IT TO WIN IT! is our theme this year with dynamic guest youth ministers Evangelist Kenyatta Wallace of Emanuel Tabernacle in Atlanta, Ga., Minister John Davis of Faith Builders International of Melbourne, and motivation, testimonies and entertainment from gospel recording artist Kent Osbourne of Generation Changers Ministry of Melbourne. See website information at kentosbourne.com. He has performed as special guest of the Hallelujah Festival sponsored by Mrs. Barbara Moore and Mrs. Lillie Graham. Many young people were motivated and greatly inspired to live for Christ by Kents performance and testimonies. He even performed last minute for the boys unable to attend the festival at Greenville Hills. He is very much at home here with strong family roots in Madison County. The Brevard County Sheriffs Dept. has awarded Kent for outstanding community service Ministry all during the year with PAL (Police Athletic League). Come everybody get CRUNKED for Jesus. We are IN IT TO WIN IT! For more information contact Kenny and Dianne Davis at (850) 4646538. Photo SubmittedKent Osbourne Motivational SpeakerPhoto SubmittedDesmond Roberson EmceePhoto SubmittedKenyatta Wallace Evangelist

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Health Health And AndWellness Wellness Guide Guide M M a a d d i i s s o o n n E E n n t t e e r r p p r r i i s s e e R R e e c c o o r r d d e e r r S S e e c c t t i i o o n n B B J J u u n n e e 1 1 3 3 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 4 4

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By Jessie R. Box Greene Publishing, Inc. Junior Auxiliary of Madison member Christi Minor along with her daughter, Emily Minor and Kim Whigham visited Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center with some furry visitors. Barney, a Labrador retriever; Katie, a Scottish Terrier and Dora, a miniature pincher visited with the seniors to provide pet therapy. We just know that it brings joy to them, said Christi Minor. They really miss their animals. Minor expressed that the experience was rewarding and the residents loved the visit. The residents would touch the pets and not want to let them go. We at the Center feel very privileged and hope to see Emily, Christi, Kim and these wonderful new friends again very soon, said Diana Maurice, LPN, Admissions/PR at Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center. 2014 Health & Wellness 2B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, June 13, 2014 Madison Health And Rehabilitation Center Welcomed Furry Guests Photo SubmittedMadison Health and Rehabilitation Center resident Gerry Agius is petting Barney, the Labrador retriever. Photo SubmittedResidents of Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center, left to right, are Sarah Street, Rosemary Parker, Dorothy Twitty and Exie Paul. These four ladies enjoy spending time with Barney, the Labrador retriever, handled by Christi Minor. Christi's daughter, Emily Minor is holding Katie, the Scottish Terrier.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, June 13, 2014 3B 2014 Health & Wellness Madison Health And Rehabilitation Center Host Volunteer Banquet Photo SubmittedThe volunteers at the banquet are shown, back row, left to right: Norman Bush and Pat Bush of Pine Grove Baptist Church, Peggy Scruggs, Carolyn Blount and Charlotte Hollingsworth of Grace Presbyterian Church, Debra Bass, Margaret Taylor and Linda Gray of New Testament Christian Center, James Robinson of Evergreen Missionary Baptist, Frankie Anderson of Madison Church of God and Margie Hughes. Front row, left to right are: Linda Gibson, Louise and Robert Smith of Grace Presbyterian Church, Sharon Lee Dawkins of Madison H&R, Edna Ealy of New Beginnings Church, Barbara Davis of Mount Nebo Church and Jeanette Roberts of First Baptist of Lee. On the floor in the front is: Pastor Toney Hill of Greenville Baptist Church. By Jessie R. Box Greene Publishing, Inc. Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center held a Volunteer Banquet to thank the volunteers for their dedication to the center. Debra Bass has been part of a group that goes to Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center to sing for the residents and host a devotional service. The group is comprised of members from Madison Church of God, Lee First Baptist Church and Hopewell Baptist Church. Bass expressed that the banquet was well appreciated. We dont do it for pats on the back but it is nice when someone shows appreciation to us. Barbara Davis volunteers at Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center to be of service to someone else. She enjoys working with the residents and will read books to them, help with nail care and provide hand massages. Norman Bush volunteers at Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center with fellow members from Pine Grove Baptist Church. The group will have 30 minutes of singing and then a devotional service with a Bible reading with the residents. We try to make ourselves available to any residents who want a visit, said Bush. Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center would also like to thank their speakers VeEtta Hagan and resident, Jean McCormick who shared thoughts from the heart.

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2014 Health & Wellness 4B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, June 13, 2014 Tri-County Medical Center Hosts Tools to Quit Tobacco Program Tri-County Medical Center is hosting a tobacco quit program called Tools to Quit on Friday, June 13 from 2-4 p.m. The class is offered by Big Bend AHEC and will offer a trained facilitator to guide participants as they identify triggers, explain withdrawal symptoms and brainstorm ways to cope with them. The program covers topics including addiction, withdrawal and medications that help, planning for the quit date, dealing with triggers, overcoming cravings and relapse prevention. The Tools to Quit Program is a two hour seminar where participants learn how to develop a successful quit plan. This program offers free nicotine replacement therapy (while supplies last and if medically appropriate), educational materials, goodies for their quit day and follow-up support. Tri-County Medical Center is located at 193 NW US 221 in Greenville. For more information about Tri-County, their services, or to schedule an appointment, please call (850) 948-2840.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, June 13, 2014 5B 2014 Health & Wellness Health Equity Commission To Discuss Health Disparities In County By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. The Health Equity Commission is presenting Madison County State of the Infant Wednesday, June 25, at 9:30 a.m., in the Madison Public Library meeting room. The presentation will discuss health data collected in Madison County over the last several years, look at several significant disparities in statistics gathered from both white and black patients and look for feedback from community leaders and concerned citizens. The overall racial makeup of Madison County, based on 2012 figures, is 7,530 (38.9 percent) black and 11,448 (59.1 percent) white. A look a some of the health statistic numbers for the county reveals that: 33.1 percent of the black residents live below the poverty line, versus 13.6 percent of whites, for a ratio of 2.4 to 1. While the number of births (2010-2012) to single mothers aged 15-19 is slightly higher for black women (34) than for white women (29), in the 20-54 age group, the numbers go to 202 births to single black women, versus 111 for single white women. A little over 34 percent of unwed black mothers were obese at time the pregnancy occurred, versus slightly more than 21 percent of unwed white mothers. When it comes to death from coronary heart disease, the rate (adjust for age and percentage of population) in the black community is almost twice that of the white community. The rate of death from prostate cancer (adjusted for age and percentage of population) for black men is almost twice that of white men. The death rate from diabetes (adjusted for age and percentage of population) for blacks is over three times that for whites. Health officials, community leaders and concerned residents are invited to attend and provide feedback into what they believe contributes to the underlying causes (poverty, education, diet, medical services, etc.). Feedback is essential to devising strategies for overcoming such obstacles and closing the gap.

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6B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, June 13, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness

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Photo SubmittedThe Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center employees who dressed for Hawaiian Day, pictured from left to right are: Summer Croft, RPT; Kristen Tuten, DON; Keely Lago, LPN; Emma Collins, Business Office Manager; Lindsey Jones, RN, ADON; Diane Webb, RN, BSN; Sharon LeeDawkins, Activities Director; David Bandy, PT; Jean Carroll, SS; and Patty Hamilton, Occupational Therapist. Submitted by Diana Maurice Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center Every year in the month of May, Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center celebrates Older American's Month by arranging special activities for the employees and seniors of the Center. National Nurses and Certified Nursing Assistant week is also celebrated at the Center during the month so fun can be enjoyed by all. Monday, May 12, was labeled "Hawaiian" day so the employees dressed up in the traditional grass skirts and floral head dress as punch and goodies were served by the therapy team. Big Bend Hospice joined in the fun by serving ice cream social sundaes and root beer floats later in the afternoon. Everyone watched as several employees competed in what turned out to be outrageously funny wheel chair races. Tuesday was deemed "Disney" day so many dressed up like Disney Characters and surprised us all with their excellent costumes. We learned that you are never too old to love Disney! Wednesdays theme was "Mexican" day and was celebrated by Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center taking residents to Madison's Rancho Grande restaurant for lunch. Later, the residents had a Mexican Fiesta and were treated to a vast array of oldies and soft rock tunes performed by professional music artist, David Carty, who sang and played the keyboard. His voice and playing were fantastic! Fridays theme was "Sports" day with everyone wearing their favorite team shirts and had a cookout with good old hamburgers, baked beans and brownies. Diane Webb and Billy Blue were our chefs for the day and did an awesome job! The residents went to a bowling tournament at Capital Lanes in Tallahassee. "Cowboy" day was celebrated during the week as well and let's just say that this little Texan doesn't even own a pair of boots or a cowboy shirt and boy did I hear about that! That just gave me another reason to go shopping! Lookout guys, cause I'll be ready when next Older American's Month rolls around! Happy Trails to ya! 2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, June 13, 2014 7B Madison Health And Rehabilitation Center Celebrated Older Americans Month Photo SubmittedThe Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center employees who found their cowboy selves are back row, left to right: Diane Webb, RN, BSN; Summer Croft, RPT; and Sharon Lee-Dawkins, Activities Director. Front row: David Bandy, P.T. Manager; Jean Carroll, Social Services; Rose White, Head of Housekeeping; JoAnn Gnewuch, Facility Administrator; and Patty Hamilton, Occupational Therapist.

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2014 Health & Wellness 8B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, June 13, 2014 Why are Eye Exams Important? Regardless of your age or physical health, it's important to have regular eye exams. During a complete eye exam, your eye doctor will not only determine your prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses, but will also check your eyes for common eye diseases, assess how your eyes work together as a team and evaluate your eyes as an indicator of your overall health. Who should get their eyes examined? Eye examinations are an important part of health maintenance for everyone. Adults should have their eyes tested to keep their prescriptions current and to check for early signs of eye disease. For children, eye exams can play an important role in normal development. Vision is closely linked to the learning process. Children who have trouble seeing or interpreting what they see will often have trouble with their schoolwork. Many times, children will not complain of vision problems simply because they don't know what "normal" vision looks like. If your child performs poorly at school or exhibits a reading or learning problem, be sure to schedule an eye examination to rule out an underlying visual cause. What is the eye doctor checking for? In addition to evaluating whether you have nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism, your eye doctor will check your eyes for eye diseases and other problems that could lead to vision loss. Here are some examples of the conditions that your eye doctor will be looking for: Amblyopia: This occurs when the eyes are misaligned or when one eye has a much different prescription than the other. The brain will "shut off" the image from the turned or blurry eye. If left untreated, amblyopia can stunt the visual development of the affected eye, resulting in permanent vision impairment. Amblyopia is often treated by patching the stronger eye for periods of time. Strabismus: Strabismus is defined as crossed or turned eyes. Your eye doctor will check your eyes' alignment to be sure that they are working together. Strabismus causes problems with depth perception and can lead to amblyopia. Eye Diseases: Many eye diseases, such as glaucoma and diabetic eye disease, have no obvious symptoms in their early stages. Your eye doctor will check the health of your eyes inside and out for signs of early problems. In most cases, early detection and treatment of eye diseases can help reduce your risk for permanent vision loss. Other Diseases: Your eye doctor can detect early signs of some systemic conditions and diseases by looking at your eye's blood vessels, retina and so forth. They may be able to tell you if you are developing high blood pressure, high cholesterol or other problems. For example, diabetes can cause small blood vessel leaks or bleeding in the eye, as well as swelling of the macula (the most sensitive part of the retina), which can lead to vision loss. It's estimated that one-third of Americans who have diabetes don't know it; your eye doctor may detect the disease before your primary care physician does, especially if you're overdue for a physical. What's the difference between a vision screening and a complete eye exam? Vision screenings are general eye tests that are meant to help identify people who are at risk for vision problems. Screenings include brief vision tests performed by a school nurse, pediatrician or volunteers. The eye test you take when you get your driver's license renewed is another example of a vision screening. A vision screening can indicate that you need to get an eye exam, but it does not serve as a substitute for a comprehensive eye exam. A comprehensive eye examination is performed by an eye doctor and will involve careful testing of all aspects of your vision. Based upon the results of your exam, your doctor will then recommend a treatment plan for your individual needs. Remember, only an eye doctor can provide a comprehensive eye exam. Most family physicians and pediatricians are not fully trained to do this, and studies have shown that they can miss important vision problems that require treatment. Treatment plans can include eyeglasses or contact lenses, eye exercises or surgery for muscle problems, medical treatment for eye disease or simply a recommendation that you have your eyes examined again in a specified period of time. No matter who you are, regular eye exams are important for seeing more clearly, learning more easily and preserving your vision for life.

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Dear Unfit, More than 25 years of research has shown that walking may be the single best exercise you can do to improve your health. It burns calories (about 100 for every mile you walk) which will help you lose weight, it builds endurance, enhances muscle tone and it doesnt pound your joints. It also helps improve or prevent many agerelated health problems including high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, osteoporosis and dementia. But walking is not only good for what ails you. Its also one of the easiest and most convenient exercises you can do, and is completely free. All you need is a good pair of walking shoes that fit well and a little desire. Here are a few tips to help you get started. Start walking: Start out slow if you need to. For many people this means head out the door, walk for 10 minutes, and walk back. Do it every day for a week. If that seems easy, add five minutes to your walks next week and keep adding five minutes until you are walking as long as you desire. Its also a smart idea to start and finish your walk with a few simple warm up and cool down stretches. Stretching will make you feel better and help prevent injury. How far: Any walking is better than none, but most fitness professionals recommend walking about 30 minutes, five days a week. Research has shown that the 30 minutes can be broken up throughout the day 10 minutes here, 10 minutes there. Or, for optimal health benefits aim for 10,000 steps per day, which is the equivalent of about five miles. How fast: The right walking speed depends on your fitness level. Ideally you should walk at a brisk pace that has you breathing heavily, but you are still able to carry on a conversation. Staying Motivated While starting a walking program takes initiative, sticking with it takes commitment. Here are some tips to help you stay motivated: Find some walking buddies: They can provide motivation and support along with companionship and security. Use a pedometer: These nifty little gadgets available in sporting goods stores for around $25 measure how far youve walked in steps and miles, providing motivation by spurring you to meet a particular goal and showing you if youve met it. Or, if youre a smartphone user, consider downloading a pedometer app like accupedo.com or runtastic.com. Join a walking club: To find one in your community call your local medical center, mall, health clubs, YMCA, running shoe stores or Area Agency on Aging to see if they sponsor or know of any clubs or groups. Or try the American Volkssport Association (ava.org) and American Heart Association Walking Club ( mywalkingclub.org), which let you search for non-competitive walking clubs in your area, or start one. Keep a journal: Use it to keep track of your walking minutes, steps, or mileage and total it up at the end of each week to see how youre progressing. Get a dog: Studies have shown that dog owners are much more likely to take regular walks than non-dog owners. Listen to music: An iPod or MP3 player can also make a nice walking companion. Check out walk.jog.fm to find great walking songs that will match your pace. Have a backup plan: If bad weather, allergies or other factors limit your outdoor walking have a backup plan like walking at your local mall, buying a home treadmill or joining a health club. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy Senior book. Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, June 13, 2014 9B 2014 Health & Wellness Savvy Senior Walk Your Way To Better Health Dear Savvy Senior, Can you give me some tips on starting a walking program? I need to lose weight and get my blood pressure under control, but I hate to exercise. Unfit at 59

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10B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, June 13, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness

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For people with diabetes, it's easy to get caught up in the day-to-day management of the disease. Regular monitoring of blood sugar levels, injections or pumping insulin and diet management takes serious time and effort. No wonder why people with diabetes (PWD) may feel overwhelmed when it comes to taking regular tests. It's important to step back regularly to see how overall health is faring since diabetes is a systemic disease. It can affect nearly every part of ones body. Before diving into the list of tests, people with diabetes need to understand what these tests mean and identify their target results with their healthcare professional. Here is a list of the most critical tests with standards set by the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association: Hemoglobin A1C This is the test everyone talks about, for a good reason. An A1C lets you know what your average blood sugar is for the past two to three months. Never mind the daily fluctuations -the A1C gives you the broadest overall picture. This is important because your overall health will be determined by your long-term management. So if your A1C is low and consistent, you know you're doing a good job, even if you sometimes have challenges in your daily management. If your A1C swings around, or goes high, you know that you'll need to tweak your treatment plan. What's a good A1C? According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetics should aim for a seven percent or below. According to the American Society of Endocrinologists, you should aim for a 6.5 or below. Some doctors urge even lower numbers; A1Cs for non-diabetics are generally below six percent. Unlike the other blood tests listed here, you'll want to have an A1C performed four times a year. Lipid panel This is another crucial test for people with diabetes, for the simple reason that cardiovascular issues (heart attacks and strokes) are the most serious potential side effects of the disease. Other complications can cause serious problems, yes, but a healthy heart is of critical importance. That being said, cholesterol is a complex topic. Many books have been written on the topic, and there is medical disagreement about how to interpret the results. Here's a quick summary of the current thinking. A cholesterol test is really measuring several different components of blood fats, and they have different levels of importance. Take the overall cholesterol, which is usually the largest number you'll see. This number is actually of little importance on its own because it includes both "good" and "bad" cholesterol. "Bad" cholesterol is called LDL (or low-density lipoprotein) and doctors will want to generally keep it below 100. That being said, there are different kinds of LDL particles, some of which are more harmful than others. The "good" cholesterol is called HDL (or highdensity lipoprotein), and doctors generally want to keep it above 40. Again, though, it seems as though there are also different kinds of HDL particles, some of which are more beneficial than others. People with diabetes will also be tested for triglycerides, which are yet another kind of blood fat. Doctors will want that number to be below 150. Doctors pay different attention to these numbers. They often focus on LDL cholesterol because they have effective dr ugs (statins) that can r eliably reduce it. That being said, evidence exists that HDL and triglycerides are more powerful predictors of cardiovascular issues. Raising HDL levels usually takes regular exercise, weight loss and dietary change. Cholesterol levels don't fluctuate in the way that A1C levels do (unless one dramatically changes their diet), they will be tested less frequently. People with diabetes will generally get one test a year, unless their doctor wants to keep a closer watch on the levels. Kidney tests There are two important tests diabetics must have regularly to measure kidney function. This is crucial because kidney disease (and potential failure) is one of the most serious potential diabetic side effects. The best-known of these is the microalbumin test. This looks for protein in your urine. High blood sugars can damage the tiny, delicate blood vessels in the kidneys, causing trace amounts of protein to leak into the urine. Over time, if not addressed, this damage can progress to fullblown kidney failure and dialysis. Doctors will also want to test blood creatinine levels. This number indicates how effectively the kidneys are filtering waste products. Taken with the microalbumin test, the doctor should be able to get a good idea of ones overall kidney health. Of all diabetic complications, kidney problems have been one of the most effectively prevented and reduced. In part, this is because ACE inhibitors, a common blood pressure medication, help prevent kidney damage. Even if you don't have kidney problems (or high blood pressure, for that matter), your doctor may want you to start an ACE inhibitor for just this reason. Blood pressure Ones blood pressure is checked at every doctor's' visit, and that's as it should be. The test is quick and easy to perform and it gives you immediate results. It's another test that gives you insight into cardiovascular health, so one needs to pay attention to the elevated numbers. In general, doctors will diagnose high blood pressure if the readings are above 140 systolic (the top number) and 90 diastolic (the bottom number). For most people, the numbers should be closer to 120/80. Diabetes can raise blood pressure and there are generally no symptoms if you're suffering from elevated levels blood pressure. There are cheap and effective drugs for lowering blood pressure. Doctors will prob ably want a person with diabetes on medication, even if ones numbers are borderline or mildly elevated. Foot exam At least twice a year, people with diabetes should also have a foot exam. Their doctor will look at their feet carefully to make sure you don't have any ulcers or abrasions. These can be especially risky for people with diabetes with impaired circulation. Doctors will also check the pulse in the feet, another measure of the circulation in the extremities. Finally, ones health care provider will likely test how sensitive their feet are, usually with a small plastic thread called a monofilament. This can help diagnose impaired sensation. If one is diagnosed with foot problems, their doctor may recommend special shoes to reduce pressure on sensitive spots. Medication can also be prescribed if one is suffering from pain caused by nerve damage. Dilated eye exam People with diabetes need to go to an eye doctor for this exam. An eye exam looks specifically for the retinal damage that can be caused by high blood sugars. Surgery to seal off leaking blood vessels may be needed to preserve and protect ones vision. The good news about eye complications is that they tend to be one of the earliest signs of poorly controlled diabetes. Good glycemic control has been shown to stop these problems and sometimes even reverse them. Why bother with these tests? Going through this list of tests seems daunting. It makes having diabetes seem like a parade of drudgery, of constant trips to the doctor. And people with diabetes will tell you-that's definitely an aspect of managing the disease. It's not fun, and it can be nerve-wracking to wait for ones results. But the good news embedded in this list of tests is that nearly any problem that is detect can be addressed. If issues are found early, simple and effective treatments exist. Even moderate to severe complications and problems can often be treated and resolved. 2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, June 13, 2014 11B Eight Heath Tests That Are A Must For People With Diabetes

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12B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, June 13, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness