The Madison enterprise-recorder

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Material Information

Title:
The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title:
Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title:
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Creation Date:
May 31, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note:
Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID:
UF00028405:00640

Related Items

Preceded by:
Enterprise-recorder


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Full Text

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Unknown owers bloom forth regally in the midst of trees to the east of my house. An army of dandelions falls into formation and salutes the few owers that rank high above them. How many times do we nd ourselves bowing and scraping to things that seem so elusive and seem to possess so much magic that we lose focus on what is really important? We dream of taking that vacation to far, far away' We dream of having that sports car that will be the envy of all of our friends. We dream of diamonds and Rolex watches and fancy clothes. Its nice to dream, but while we are feeding these dreams, are we starving our relationships with Jesus Christ and our families and friends? The Bible tells us that its more blessed to give than to receive (Acts 20:35) and everyone has at least one thing they can give and that gift is love. Give it out of a heart of selflessness to those people who are hard to love. It may be torture for you to do it. You may be persecuted for doing it. The people you give your love to may hurt you and make you regret ever giving the gift, but remember you are not doing it for yourself. Youre showing them true Christian love for themselves. In time, God will remember you and will bless you. Ive been writing this column for many years now. Granted, this was not all consecutive, but my rst column was in 1992 I believe, possibly the end of Maybe one day Ill look that up. I do remember the content, however. The rst one was without the cute little banner and entitled Trash Throws Trash and was about littering. The next week I had a banner and picture and name. That one was called Madison Sorries and was about the stagnation of smalltown America and fear of change. It received Honorable Mention for editorial columns from the Florida Press Association. No, I dont remember all of them, but you do remember the rst, and those that were signicant for some reason. I have a lot of them saved on the computer, many in les no longer readable, others are still in print. Maybe someday Ill put it all together. Maybe. Back in those days I was quite the political activist. Fresh out from war; young; ready to change the world. It is true that I may tend into the political from time to time now, but in my younger years I was much more political, and much less philosophical. I would tend to hope that is a sign of enlightenment, or at least maturity. Back then, I was in fact so politically prolic, and I would like to think so Southern in my wording, that I found myself on an ATF watch list. I am not being survivalist paranoid or megalomaniacal here. I dont assume this; I know it to be fact. I was, albeit accidentally, actually told of this by an ATF agent. So I do know the lists really exist, and that I was on one. After the Madison re of 1997, I and my father were also listed as possible suspects (by the feds, not the locals) due to some of these same columns and political viewpoints, and because Madisons re happened to be on the anniversary of Oklahoma City and Waco. All of this was pre9/11 so back then I wore it as much of a badge of honor as anything else. Back then there was no fear of the NSA or Homeland Security making me disappear into the night to be held indenitely like there exists today. (And before you say it, the fault is equally Bush AND Obama, but that is another column.) I am sure that one of the main reasons back then for my presence on their watch list was my outward opinions of things like Ruby Ridge and Waco. And even how they handled OKC. If you do not know the signicance of these terms, then you ar e probably too young to remember them. Ruby Ridge and Waco were two events in 1992 in which the FBI and ATF violated personal freedoms and killed innocent people. David Koresh (Waco) was assuredly a kookburger (thats an ofcial medical term), but Randy Weaver (Ruby Ridge) was not. But that is hardly the point. We have a right to be a kook-burger if we want as long as we do not harm others in our kook-burgerness. Randy Weaver was harming no one. He and his family were living in their home, on their land, in the middle of the Idaho mountains, minding their own affairs, and the FBI and ATF showed up at their house and started killing people. Its been over twelve years now since 9/11, nineteen since the OKC bombing, and almost twenty-two since Ruby Ridge. I have walked through the memorial for Oklahoma City and the one in NYC for 9/11. I have seen the lists of names. I have felt pain for people I never knew. There is no memorial for Ruby Ridge. Why is that? Is it because Randy Weavers wife was murdered by our government instead of by a terrorist? Were Ruby Ridge and Waco really less a tragedy because they were sanctioned by the government? That makes it okay? Have we really all accepted government control that much? I may not preach the same political activism that I once did. I think maybe the death and destruction Ive seen over the years have pacied me somewhat. Or maybe, just perhaps, (again, I would like to think) it is that I have moved ever so slightly towards enlightenment. But wrong is still wrong. Killing is still killing. Wrongful imprisonment is still wrongful imprisonment. Prejudice is still prejudice. Whether it is done by our honored government agencies, or our churches, or whomever. Hating the hater is still hating. Hating in the name of God, is still hating. Wrong is wrong. Think about it.Viewpoints & Opinions2 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 Conservative Corner Conservative CornerBy Nelson A. Pryor, Lee, Fl.Dear Editor,Irun Craftsman House Gallery & Caf here in St. Petersburg. As a small business owner Im proud to support my community and my country by paying my fair share in taxes. Its distressing to me that many of our countrys multinational giants dont feel the same way. Some dont pay any taxes, while others pay a fraction of them. How is it fair that the wealthiest corporations dont pay taxes while many small business owners on Main Street struggle to survive? I recently returned from a trip to our nations capitol where I joined small business owners from across the country to ask our elected leaders why only some businesses are expected to pay their fair share in taxes. I was pleased to speak with a number of our Florida representatives, including Congressman Patrick Murphy, Congresswoman Kathy Castor and aids of Senator Bill Nelson. I told them that whatever they think about taxes, there should not be loopholes that let large multinationals book their profits to tax havens like the Cayman Islands, where they pay no taxes. Its outrageous that there is a single building in the Cayman Islands that is home to nearly 19,000 corporations. We should be able to agree that all businesses large and small should compete on a level playing field. Tax haven loopholes cost an estimated $90 billion lost revenue each year, and every dollar corporations avoid in taxes means another dollar paid by someone like me. It also means more cuts to public programs and investments that help make America a good place to do business. Large multinationals get all the benefits of American infrastructure, security and education, but force the rest of us to foot the bill. No one least of all a wildly profitable company like GE should get a free ride. I hope that my representatives take what I said to heart. If they do, theyll soon have a chance to prove it as they consider renewing two offshore tax breaks: the active financing exception and controlled foreign corporation look through rule. These ridiculous loopholes will be gone from the tax code if Congress takes no action. I was disappointed to find out that the Senate Finance Committee where our own Senator Bill Nelson serves caved to special interest pressure by extending these loopholes. Even though the corporate lobbyists won the first round, our elected leaders can still stand up for small business owners. Our elected leaders should focus on a fixing the tax code so that small businesses dont face a competitive disadvantage. The tax dollars saved by closing offshore loopholes could be put to better use by reducing the deficit or more importantly investing in infrastructure and education, which is what truly makes America a good place to do business. Jeff Schorr is owner of Craftsman House Gallery & Caf in St. PetersburgOffshore Loopholes Unfair To Small Businesses Letter To The Editor Jacobs Ladder Jacob BembryColumnist Something To Think AboutBy Harvey Greene Harvey GreeneGuest Columnist Blooms And Dandelions Ruby Ridge Still Remembered Read Jacobs blog at www.jacobbembry.com. His book, Higher Call, is available in Kindle format at www.amazon.com or in paperback at www.amazon.com, www.bn.com and www.booksamillion.com or by sending $10 plus $3.99 shipping and handling to Jacob Bembry, P.O. Box 9334, Lee, FL 32059. Contact him at jacobbembry@hotmail.com. Liberals Aim For State Control THE REPUBLICAN CLUB OF MADISON COUNTY Meets June 9 at 12:00 noon at Shelby's Restaurant SPEAKER GEORGE WEBB OF TRI-COUNTY ELEC. SUBJECT SMART METERS EVERYONE WELCOME Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee MadisonRepublican@embarqmail.com Agroup called the Democracy Alliance, since 2005, has raised $500 million to fund groups affecting State and Federal elections. Thats a lot of money! Yet, the Alliance has gone, heretofore, unnoticed. Not any more. In a front page story in the Washington Post, of May 5, 2014, the group held a Chicago conclave of big spenders, was outed. The group of wealthy liberal donors who helped bankroll major advocacy groups on the left is developing a new big money strategy that could boost state-level Democratic candidates and mobilize core party voters. The plan, crafted at a four day Chicago money raiser, by a group of about 100 donors, includes the usual suspects, such as George Soros and San Francisco venture capitalist Rob McKay. They want a stronger hand in the redrawing of district lines for state legislatures and the U. S. House. The effort reects a sense among many top donors on the left that Democrats missed opportunities in 2010 to shape the redistricting process and contain the tea party wave that helped propel Republican majorities around the country. In Chicago, Alliance partners pledged to give about $30 million this year to 20 endorsed liberal groups. The donor group consists of think tanks and activist groups. The focus on ground-level politics would mark a new emphasis for the Democracy Alliance, whose members have helped nance inuential national liberal groups such as Media Matters for America, the media watchdog group; America Votes, which coordinates the efforts of allied interest groups; and Catalist, which provides voter data. The Center for American Progress, now 10 years old, has emerged as one of Washingtons powerhouse think tanks, serving as an intellectual engine for the liberal movement and the Obama White House. The alliances new president, Gara LaMarche, is pushing the group to take a fresh look at its overarching strategy as part of a regular threeyear review of the organizations that it recommends for funding. Early ideas that have garnered support to state-level donor groups, voting rights projects and organizations working to rally the rising American electorate, LaMarche said. Its becoming increasingly clear that mobilization and engagement of women, Latinos, African Americans and young people is the way to win elections, he said, and theres a strong desire to invest more heavily in those communities. While maintaining a low public prole, the alliance plays an inuential role as the lefts central money hub, attracting political donors interested in more than simply making campaign contributions. Last weeks meeting at the RitzCarlton in Chicago drew an array of Democratic powerbrokers eager to inuence the donor thinking, including White House senior advisor Valerie Jarrett, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka and Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards. This years alliance partners pledged to give about $30 million to 20 liberal groups endorsed by the group, a slight boost over the amount pledged for the same organizations last year. After long operating under the radar, the alliance may now be forced to come out of the shadows. Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper. All submitted letters must be 600 words or less

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Around 1861, just in time for the Civil War, Samuel and Mary Martha Tittle Agner moved into Madison County. Samuel and Mary settled six miles Northeast of Madison, near present day County Road 254, and they brought all eight of their children. They moved from Greenwood County, South Carolina. Samuel was around 40 years old, and Mary was around 35 years old. Shortly after he arrived, Samuel served as a private in the Confederate Army, from 1862-1865; he served in Captain John Westcoats Company of Madison County, which was Company I, 10thRegiment, Florida Infantry. Wounded in the left foot in 1864, he was hospitalized and rendered unt for manual labor. In 1884, Samuel was granted a land patent of 80 acres of land; the family had lived on the land already for seven years. The eight children of Samuel and Mary Martha were: 1. Margaret J. Maggie (1848-1930) who taught school in various locations throughout the county: Pine Hill, Friendship Academy, New Prospect, Suwannee River, Midway, and West Farm. 2. Samuel M. (1853-1930s) married rst Mary M. Jenkins; his second wife was Lenore M. Nora Parker; his last wife was L.C. Bass. Samuel and his rst wife, Mary Jenkins, had seven children: Mary Belle Agner, (1874-1941) who married Henry Raines and lived near Pine Grove Baptist Church; a son who died in infancy; Anna Agner, who married W. L. Lamb and who lived in Live Oak; W. Eddie Agner (1879-?) who married Cordelia Lanier; John Oscar (1882-1960s) married Lizzie Martin and settled in Taylor County; an infant son, Perry, who was born and died in 1884; and Colina Lena (1888-?) who married a Mr. Knowles and settled in Avon Park. Three children were born to Samuel and his second wife, Nora: Ernest (1895-?); a daughter Talmadge (1898?); and Leslie (1900-?). Samuel M. and his second wife Nora Parker received 160 acres of a land patent in 1896. 3.Thomas Sloan (1854-1925) married Laura Lollie Belle Sealey; his second wife was Rosa Lou Stokes. Thomas Sloan and his wife, Lollie had one son, Thomas Cecil (1887-?) With his second wife, Rosa Lee Stokes, ve children were born: Samuel Geiger (1894-1973); Mollie (1897-1899); Josie (1899-?) married Dewitt Fortner and had four children; James Marshall (1903-1904); and Teddy Alice (1905-?) who married a Mr. Brown. Thomas and his family lived a short while in Madison County, then in Lowndes County, then in Suwannee County. 4. Ann M. Alice 1856-? Married Joseph A. Ambrose; her family farmed in Columbia and probably Suwannee Counties. 5. John Lewis married Barbara Isabelle Stephens and raised their family in Madison. 6. Sarah Sally (1859-1908) married John Francis Frank Webb; their family ended up in Live Oak. 7. Lucy (1862) died as a child. 8. Martha S. Mattie (1868-1947) married Henry May. When she died, Mattie was living on land homesteaded by her father. You may recognize some of the descendents of John Lewis (18571929) and Barbara Isabel Stephens. They farmed land adjoining Dusty Miller Road, and Agner descendants today live in the same spot. John and Barbara had seven children, and three of their children raised families in the county. Many of their grandchildren still live in the county. John Quincy Agner, (1888-1970) lived in Madison and farmed; he never married. Samuel Hugh lived from 1892-1911. Helen Douglas married Moses Fligh; the couple owned a grocery store in Jacksonville and had no children; Edith Isabel married Jesse Alonzo Summers and lived in Providence with their six children. John Lewis and Barbara Stephens daughter Nina married Berry Martin Williams. They lived on the land patented to Samuel Agner. Their two daughters were Annie Barbara Bobbie who married Gordon Stanton Martin Sr., and lived in Jacksonville; and Dorothy Elizabeth Dot who married Daniel Marvin Reeves and lived in Madison County. John Lewis and Barbaras son, Willie James (1896-1977) married Fannie Lou Pulliam and the couple had 13 children, raised in Madison County: 1. William Alexander, who married Birdie Marie Burnett from Tennessee and lived in Tennessee; 2. James Carroll married Coantha Kitty Cole, raised four children in Madison, farmed, and was a Nazarene minister; 3. Raymond Lewis who died as a young child. 4. Joe Dean, married Arldine Reaves, farmed, drove a school bus, and had ve children; Joes second wife was Helen Carroll Mills, and his third wife was Angelus Miller; 5. Mildred Davis Agner worked for many years in Dr. Bibbs ofce; 6. Wesley Cole Agner, married Mary Alice Sawyer; Cole farmed and drove a school bus; he and his wife had six children. 7. John Pendleton and Verdie Mae Fouraker had ve children. 8. Robert Quincy Agner married Joyce V. Price from Kentucky; he pastored churches in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and in Madison. The couple had three children. 9. Arthur Paul taught school many years in Colorado and some years in Georgia. 10. Shellie Mae Agner married rst Dean Archie Rees and lived in Indiana. The couple had three children. Shellie next married Arthur Art Duran and they had two children in Colorado. 11. Samuel Hugh married Mary Ella Williams and worked mostly as a contractor and carpenter. Samuel and Mary Ella had three children. His second wife was Carolyn Jones LaPoint; and his third was Janice Drawdy Ritchea. 12, Barbara Joyce married Johnnie Lewis Williams, Sr. they had four children. 13. Walter Parrish was the last child of Willie James and Fannie Lou. John and Barbaras son, Carradine Dean (1898-1981) and Silviria Clide Stewart farmed all of their lives in Madison County and had 10 children. 1. Carradine C.D. who married Joyce Ann Smith. 2. Virginia Nell, who married Marjell Otis Dobbs. 3. Viria Susan married Manzie Wallace Acey Wall. 4. Baby Agner lived only a few hours. 5. Nancy Elizabeth Agner married Theodore Ted LeRoy Martone; she died in Cleveland, Ohio. 6. Jimmie Martin married Bonnie Nadine Smith 7. William Quincy died at age two. 8. Hilda Mae Agner married James Jimmy Tillis Dixon. 9. Dianna Lois married Allen Wayne Rehberg; and 10. Lewis Michael Dale married Cassandra Jane Browne. Lots of descendants of Samuel and Mary Martha Agners son, John Lewis, and his wife Barbara Isabel Stephens, remain to this day in Madison, some still farming original family land from the 1870s. Willie James and Fannie Pulliam and their 13 children, and Carradine and Silviria Clide Stewart and their 10 children have made lasting imprints in Madison County. Farmers, solid citizens, community minded people, and in general, ne folks. Members of the Agner clan have enriched the lives of everyone who came in contact with them for quite a few years. Some information for this article was gleaned from Madison County Florida Family History Book, published by the Madison County Genealogical Society. The articles of Robert Q. Agner were invaluable. Our society welcomes your input and invites you to join our organization. We meet on the second Thursday monthly, except during summer months, in the Madison Public Library from 6 to 7 p.m. Annual dues are $25. To add comments to our articles or to submit your own sketch on your ancestor, contact us at Madison County Genealogy Society, P.O. Box 136, Madison, Fl. 32341. Or contact us by email at mcgenealogysociety@live.com. If you would like for us to write an article featuring your ancestor, please contact us by mail or email. Around Madison County4 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 ObituariesWedding AnnouncementJoseph Donel OdomJoseph Joe Donel Odom, 81, died Sunday, May 25, at Madison County Memorial Hospital. Funeral services were held Thursday, May 29, at 11 a.m., at Beggs Funeral Home with burial at Lee Memorial Cemetery. Visitation was held Wednesday, May 28, from 5 7 p.m., at Beggs Funeral Home. He was born in Madison County, where he lived all his life. He was a Supervisor at St. Regis Paper Company before retiring and was a member of Hopewell Baptist Church. He is survived by two sons: Charles Allen Odom of Crawfordville and Ricky Donald Odom of Lee; two brothers: Sammy Odom of Adel, Ga., and Willie Odom of Madison; one sister: Lila L. Webb of Madison; nine grandchildren and five great grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his first wife: Loyett Harrison Odom and his second wife, Beverly Smith Odom; one son: Jimmy Dale Odom; four brothers: Walt, James, Leonard and Hollis; and two sisters: Agnes and Mary Jane, and his parents Randle and Mary Ellen Odom. Beggs Funeral Homes is in charge of arrangements (850) 9732258. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting their website at www.beggsfuneral.com. Deanna Felicia PayneDeanna Felicia Payne went to be with Jesus on Monday, May 26. She was born on October 1, 1960 in Jacksonville. She has lived in Live Oak, Lee and Lake City. She was currently living in Madison. Deanna is survived by four sons: Seyavash Mesry and wife Lisa of Atlanta; John David Rutherford and wife Amber and their daughter Madalynn of Live Oak; Cole Matthew Rutherford of MacClenny; and Daniel Lee Rutherford of Atlanta. She is also survived by her mother: Patsy Dryden Welch of Madison; her sister: Ginger Ann Payne and Jamie Porter and their daughter, Madison Marie Porter of West Palm Beach; her sister: Cassandra Kay Nipper of Kotzebue, Alaska and her children Jessica, Luke, MyKayla, Sophia and Alexandria, all of Alaska and Mike Grossman of Korea; her brother: John Paul James Payne and his wife Joanna of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands; and her other brother: Ronald Ervin Payne, Jr., and wife Debbie and their children: Lisa and husband, Nate and their son Drake; Jeremiah and his daughter, Ainsley; and Matthew and Sarah all of Okeechobee; and Ronald Ervin Payne, III and wife Jessica and their son Trenton of Mayo. She is survived by a special person in her life, her grandmother, Pauline Dryden, 95, of Madison. She is survived by hundreds of other relatives, cousins, aunts and uncles of several generations and a host of friends. Deanna is predeceased by her father, Ronald Ervin Payne, Sr.; her grandfather, William Quinton Dryden and grandmother Mildred Rowell Payne. Deanna loved her family and friends and would give you the shirt off her back. She was passionate about her love of God, studying The Word and singing praises to God. She was always cleaning and making the yard and owers pretty. Deanna was very talented and gifted. Her creative, artistic nature was expressed through everything she did: paintings, writings, owers, pottery, gardens and interior decorating. We will greatly miss the shimmering glow of her glory. And when the Chief Sheppard shall appear, ye shall receive a crown of glory that fadeth not away. 1 Peter 5:4 Deanna was loved by her family, friends and all who met her. She will be cherished and missed by all. Mr. and Mrs. Ronnie Ragans and Mr. and Mrs. Walter McCullough of Madison are pleased to announce the engagement of Lauren Marianne Ragans to Thomas Walter McCullough. The wedding is planned for Saturday, June 14 at 4:30 p.m., at the Madison First Baptist Church with a reception to follow in the Fellowship Hall. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mary Floyd of Fort White, the late Edward Floyd and the late Cecil and Katie Ragans of Madison. Lauren graduated from Florida State University with a Bachelors Degree in Sociology in 2007 and is currently pursuing a Masters Degree in Higher Education from Valdosta State University. She is currently employed by Florida Gateway College in Lake City as Academic Advisor/Recruiter for Nursing and Health Sciences. The future groom is the grandson of Frances Browning of Madison, the late Robert Browning, Gean McCullough of Madison and the late Aubrey McCullough. Tom graduated from the University of Central Florida with a Bachelors Degree in Hospitality Management in 2005 and then from North Florida Community Colleges Educator Preparatory Institute in 2007. He is currently employed by the Bacon County School District in Alma, Ga., as a Middle School Special Education Teacher and Assistant Athletic Coach for football, baseball and wrestling. Only out of town invitations are being sent. All friends and family of the couple locally are invited to attend. Ragans/McCullough Dorothy Lucille PridgeonDorothy Lucille Pridgeon, 89, passed away Tuesday, May 27, in Madison. Ms. Dorothy was born in Atlanta, Ga., on October 22, 1924 where she lived her formative years. She lived most of her adult life in Madison. She enjoyed singing, music, rose gardening, bowling, sewing, cooking, reading her Bible and watching the Braves play, but most of all being with her family. Ms. Dorothy was the daughter of Carl Chamlee and Dora Bell Spencer Chamlee. She was a wonderful mother to two daughters: Karen Simmons (Lynn), Donna Wyche (Darlene Williams) and one son, David Pridgeon (deceased). Ms. Dorothy was the sister to seven siblings. She has three living brothers: Billy Chamlee (Edith), Doug Chamlee (Betty) and Wayne Chamlee (Ruth). She was a loving grandmother of six grandchildren and great grandmother of thirteen great grandchildren. Ms. Dorothys services will be held at Oakridge Cemetery in Madison, at 11 a.m., on Saturday, May 31. Family members will be received from 9-9:30 a.m., and friends from 9:30-10:45 a.m., at Faith Baptist Church in Madison, 1135 E US 90, Madison, Fl. Pioneers Of Madison CountySAMUEL AGNER

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 5 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 btnfntr btnfr tbtnbfrbtnbfnrbrnfnt No Photocopies Accepted Tickets are good for Saturday, June 7thonly Deadline To Enter June 3, 2014Name____________________________ ___________________________ Address__________________________ __________________________ Phone Number____________________ Fill out and return to Greene Publishing at P.O. Drawer 772 or 1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32341 5K/Fun Run Preregistration Date (June 4) Approaching FastBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Attention runners! Lace up those running shoes and dash over to your computer to preregister for the Lions Club 4thof July 5K and Fun Run, a new addition to the 4thof July God and Country Celebration. Come on out and be a part of the inaugural race. The deadline for pre-registration (June 4) is fast approaching, but if you hurry, you can still beat it. Go to the madisonlionclub.com website and click on thof July Information, and then click on Race Entry Form. The entry fee for the 5K Run is $25; by registering early, you save $5 and guarantee that you'll get a teeshirt. You can also register the morning of the race in front of Madison Sporting Goods and Pawn, but the entry fee by then will be $30. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m., and whether or not you get a shirt depends on how early you get in line (by then, the shirts will be on a rst-come, rst served basis). The race starts at 8:30 a.m., with medals for rst, second and third place winners. There will also be a Kids Fun Run, which is free, unless you want a tee shirt; if so, there is a $10 fee to cover the cost of the shirt. Parents are encouraged to pre-register their kids for the Fun Run by the June 4 deadline to guarantee that they'll get a shirt. They can also register the morning of the race for free if they don't want a shirt. Registration is at 7:30 a.m., again, in front of Madison Sporting Goods and Pawn, sponsor of both the 5K and the Fun Run. The race starts at 8 a.m., and there will be medals for rst, second and third place winners.Madison County Featured In Tallahassee AreaMagazineBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Cindy Vees, Executive Director of the Madison County Chamber of Commerce, brought out copies of the Madison County Business Journal 2014 to distribute to the Madison City Council at their May meeting. Vees had prevailed upon Rowland Publishing of Tallahassee to do the business journal for Madison after seeing a similar project the company had done for Jackson County last year. The Journal, which features stories on Honey Lake, county government figures, the new hospital and the economic development and tourism aspects of Madison County, will be inserted into copies of Rowland Publishing's 850 Magazine, with a circulation of approximately 18,000. It is direct-mailed to business, political and community leaders throughout the 18 counties in the 850 area code, as well as to all 160 Florida legislators. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 12, 2014Cindy Vees, of the Madison County Chamber of Commerce, hands out copies of the Madison County Business Journal to council members. Seated at the council table are (left to right): Marcus Hawkins (District 4) and Rayne Cooks (District 5). Nurses Visit Rotary By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.LPNs Deborah Buie and Chelsea Doty paid a visit to the Rotary Club of Madison to help their nursing team with its chosen community project: soliciting cans of Ensure or donations of Ensure for Madison patients in hospice care. I was surprised by the scope of Big Bend Hospice, said Buie, particularly the number of patients hospice served in Madison County. She was also shocked to discover that cans of Ensure were not covered by Medicare. For some patients, especially those who have G.I. tubes, or who simply can't tolerate solid food anymore, a can of Ensure is their meal. Also, since many people in Madison are below the poverty line, many hospice patients and their families may not have the extra money to buy Ensure. The ve person team, consisting of Buie, Doty, Deborah Kinsey, Chelsea Musgrove and Lilly Eckles, have been soliciting cans of Ensure and donations to buy Ensure for the local Big Bend Hospice in Madison County. For more information about their project and how you or your group can help, contact Buie at (850) 673-8335. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 21, 2014LPN Deborah Buie speaks to the Rotary Club of Madison about the Ensure project. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 21, 2014Teammates Chelsea Doty and Deborah Buie display the Rotary Medal they received in appreciation for their presentation at the Madison Rotary Club, where several members made donations.Senior Citizens Counsel Seeks Donations Concord Baptist Annual Fishing Contest This WeekendBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. The Concord Baptist Annual Fishing Contest will be Saturday, May 31 starting at 6 a.m. The weigh in is set for 5 p.m., and the sh fry will begin at 6 p.m. The contest is in memory of Mrs. Bessie Burkett. The entry fee is $20 for adults 16 and up. Te entry fee for ages 12 to 15 are $10 and $5 for ages 11 and under. Adults can save $5 by signing up before Saturday. You can sh where you want. Be sure the sh are all legal. In order to compete in the biggest bass contest, it is an additional $10 and to enter the biggest brim contest or catsh contest it is an additional $5 each. The prize for the biggest bass winner is already at $500. The biggest brim prize is at $50 and the biggest catsh is at $50. For more information, contact Jamie Ford at (229) 559-6564. By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.The Senior Citizens Center, located on SW Harvey Greene Drive in Madison, is busy with activity, and OAA Coordinator/Activities Director, Cheryl Scovel says the busy seniors who attend the center could use a little help in the way of donations for their altruistic projects. A group of arts and crafters who visit the center have just nished a project for the nursing center, Lake Park of Madison, where they sewed lap mats for the residents. The next project they are undertaking is for the soon-to-open youth ranch here in Madison. The talented seniors have taken on the project of making twinsize quilts for all the kids coming to the ranch, and hope to have them completed for the kids when they arrive, sometime in August. But, the center has more volunteers than they have materials to make the quilts and have decided to seek help from the community. The center previously had two sewing machines, but donated one of them to the Greenville Senior Center because, they didnt have even one, says Scovel. This has left the Madison center with only one machine to work with and they could use another for their upcoming quilting project. Also needed is fabric of any kind, thread, batting, yarn and any other sewing or quilting supplies someone would like to donate. For the seniors who dont craft, there is a need for a treadmill in their tness room. The center was able to purchase four pieces of exercise equipment by using grant monies, but those who use the tness room have expressed desire for the treadmill. There is also limited outside seating for when the weather is nice or for someone to just sit and rest if needed. Scovel says a park bench would be benecial and would t perfectly underneath a covered area in front of the building, nestled in among owers planted there. If anyone is interested in helping the Senior Citizens Center with these, or other donations, call Cheryl Scovel at (850) 973-4241.

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Around Madison County6 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 Planning on working during retirement? If so, youre not alone. An increasing number of employees nearing retirement plan to work at least some period of time during their retirement years. Why work during retirement? Obviously, if you work during retirement, youll be earning money and relying less on your retirement savings--leaving more to potentially grow for the future and making your savings last longer. If you continue to work, you may also have access to affordable health care, as more and more employers are offering this important benefit to part-time employees. But there are also non-economic reasons for working during retirement. Many retirees work for personal fulfillment--to stay mentally and physically active, to enjoy the social benefits of working, and to try their hand at something new--the reasons are as varied as the number of retirees. How working affects Social Security If you work after you start receiving Social Security retirement benefits, your earnings may affect the amount of your benefit check. Your monthly benefit is based on your lifetime earnings. When you become entitled to retirement benefits at age 62, the Social Security Administration calculates your primary insurance amount (PIA), upon which your retirement benefit will be based. Your PIA is recalculated annually if you have any new earnings that might increase your benefit. So if you continue to work after you start receiving retirement benefits, these earnings may increase your PIA and thus your future Social Security retirement benefit. But working may also cause a reduction in your current benefit. If youve reached full retirement age (66 to 67, depending on when you were born), you dont need to worry about this-you can earn as much as you want without affecting your Social Security retirement benefit. If you havent yet reached full retirement age, $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $2 you earn over the annual earnings limit ($15,480 in 2014). A special rule applies in your first year of Social Security retirement-youll get your full benefit for any month you earn less than one-twelfth of the annual earnings limit, regardless of how much you earn during the entire year. A higher earnings limit applies in the year you reach full retirement age. If you earn more than this higher limit ($41,400 in 2014), $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $3 you earn over that amount, until the month you reach full retirement age--then youll get your full benefit no matter how much you earn. (If your current benefit is reduced because of excess earnings, you may be entitled to an upward adjustment in your benefit once you reach full retirement age.) Not all income reduces your Social Security benefit. In general, Social Security only takes into account wages youve earned as an employee, net earnings from selfemployment and other types of work-related income, such as bonuses, commissions, and fees. Pensions, annuities, IRA distributions, and investment income wont reduce your benefit. One last important point to consider: in general, your Social Security benefit wont be subject to federal income tax if thats the only income you receive during the year. But if you work during retirement (or receive any other taxable income or taxexempt interest), a portion of your benefit may become taxable. IRS Publication 915 has a worksheet that can help you determine whether any part of your Social Security benefit is subject to federal income tax. Stacy Bush, President Bush Wealth Management The Bush Wealth Advantage Social Security and Working in Retirement Our column, The Bush Wealth Advantage is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. Stacy Bush has practiced independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.com Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 869133 That's Entertainment! Mainstage At Lions' Club 4thOf July Looking For PerformersDo you sing, dance, do gymnastics, acrobatics, or magic tricks, or have a comedy routine that keeps your friends in stitches? The Lions Club is looking for talented folks with family-friendly entertainment acts for the stage portion of its 4thof July God and Country Celebration at Lake Frances. Go to the website madisonlionclub.com, click on th of July Information and then click on entertainment tab. Fill out the application and be sure to send an email to president@madisolionclub.com BEFORE June 20, 2014. That's the deadline for either auditioning in person or sending a demo of your act via CD or DVD. All performers who have applied and auditioned will be notied by June 27th. Then, show up and sing, dance, or whatever you do to wow an audience. That's entertainment. The Tomato Man By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Donald Johnson, proclaimed Tomato Man, along with wife Jackie, have already been busy bees in their summer garden this year. The Johnsons garden has eggplant, peppers, okra, cucumbers and green beans (they have already begun canning), but it is Johnsons tomatoes that cause him to get excited. Planted in his four lengthy rows of tomatoes are Celebrities, Better Boys, Early Girls, romas, beefsteak, cherry and grape tomatoes. Johnson says they planted their garden sometime before Good Friday and his tomatoes now stand taller than his 5 height and are full of green globes, just waiting to ripen. The tomatoes are growing so fast the two are using fence posts and rope to keep them tied up, on almost a daily basis. Short of chest pounding, Johnson said he wanted to issue a challenge to Madison gardeners to see if anyone could outgrow him. When asked what he used for fertilizer, he said, Cant do that, going to keep it a secret. The only thing he would divulge is that he purchased his bedding plants at Studstill Lumber. Jackie says she is having a good time canning and said they will use this method for preserving some of their tomato crop. Johnson added there would also be plenty of eating and giving away of the summertime fruit. If you grow tomatoes, nd Donald Johnson and take his challenge, or try to pry his tomato-growing secret out of his tightly sealed lips. If you arent one to growyour-own, hopefully youll be on the receiving end of his tomato give-aways. I envision a BLT in this reporters futureand that is more than a hint Mr. Tomato Man. Photos SubmittedDonald Johnson stakes up his tomatoes that are growing taller than his 5 frame. Inset: Donald Johnson proudly standing by his product. Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches Announces Appointment Of Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart As Chairman Of The Board Of DirectorsSubmitted by the Madison County Sheriffs OfficeFlorida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc., President Roger Bouchard announces the appointment of Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart as Chairman of the Youth Ranches Board of Directors. Sheriff Stewart has been engaged and involved with the Youth Ranches for several years. They are honored to have Sheriff Stewart as Chairman. The mission of the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches is to prevent delinquency and develop strong, lawful, resilient and productive citizens who will make a positive contribution to our communities for years to come. This year the Youth Ranches will serve over 5,000 needy boys and girls. This charitable, non-profit childcare agency was founded by the Florida Sheriffs Association and operates four residential campuses and two camping facilities. Additionally, it provides communitybased services and family counseling to as many of Floridas neglected, troubled children as funds will permit. The organization is funded primarily through charitable donations from its generous donors. The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc., is nationally accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Services for Families and Children, Inc., and the American Camp Association. For more information, please visit www.youthranches.org or contact your local Sheriff. Photo SubmittedOutgoing President Sumter County Sheriff Bill Farmer (left) passes the gavel to Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart (right). Gloria Jean ChristianAfundraiser is underway for the late Gloria Jean Christian, a 38-year-old woman who was struck and killed by a vehicle on May 21. Christian left behind seven children: two 21-year-olds and one each ages 20, 16, 10, six, and one 3-month-old. An account has been set up under her name that the Madison County Community Bank; funds will go directly to the Cook and Cooper Funeral Home, in charge of arrangements for the family. Any funds leftover will go in a trust fund for the children.Fundraiser

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By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.Jared Dewey started working for the Madison County Sheriffs Office on May 1. This is not Deweys first law enforcement job, though. He has been in law enforcement for 12 years and prior to moving to the Madison County Sheriffs Office, he worked for the City of Madison Police Department for a year and a half. Its something that Ive always wanted to do, said Dewey. I wanted to help people and help the community. Deweys hometown is Lake City and he has been married for seven years. He describes himself as a laid back and easygoing person. When Dewey is not working, he loves to hunt and compete in shooting contests. His favorite television shows are crime shows. He particularly likes the shows on the ID Channel, which features various real crime shows. In the future, Dewey would like to get into the K-9 unit. He developed an interest in the K-9 unit when he was given a K9 dog as a pet.Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 7 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 Jared Dewey Joins The Madison County Sheriffs Ofce Rotary Presents Check To Take Stock In Children Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 28, 2014Clerk of Court Tim Sanders (right) accepts a check on behalf of Madison Take Stock in Children from the Madison Rotary Club, presented by the Rotary president Wayne Conger (left). Sanders spoke of having attended the Baccalaureate services for MCHS a few days earlier where he saw 15 Take Stock in Children students ready to graduate. Over the years, TSIC has helped over 1000 children with mentoring and college scholarships; currently, the program is serving 60 children and is looking for mentors for each of them. For more information about the Madison TSIC program, or to volunteer as a mentor, contact (850) 973-2184.FIZZ...BOOM...READ!Madison County Public Libraries Offer Fun Summer Reading ProgramsBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Anna Moo, an awardwinning singer-songwriter and recording artist for children and families, is rumored to dress up like a cow for her entertaining sessions that mix songs, storytelling and educational material for children of all ages. During the month of June, she will be making the rounds of Madison's three public libraries to help kick off their summer reading program, FIZZ...BOOM...READ! On Monday, June 23, you can catch her at the Lee Public Library from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, June 25, she'll be at the Greenville Public Library from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. From there, she'll be heading for Madison on Friday, June 27 from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. That's just the beginning. From June 30 through Aug. 9, the three public libraries will have a regular schedule of weekly events, as part of the larger Florida Library Youth Program, encouraging children and teens to read, use library resources and develop a love of reading through fun literary experiences. Lee Public Library (850) 971-5665 Beginning Monday, June 30, and every Monday after that until the ofcial end of the summer reading program (the week of Aug. 9), it's the FIZZ...BOOM...READ! event, from 10:30 11:30 a.m., followed that afternoon by Spark a Reaction! Teens, from 2 3 p.m. Every Wednesday (starting July 2), it's an hour of afternoon fun with Game Days, from 3 4 p.m. Every Friday (starting July 11 the library will be closed Friday, July 4) it's Eco-Science Fun Days from 2 3 p.m., with Barbara Hines of the Florida Public Archeology Network. Madison Public Library (850) 973-6814 Every Tuesday, beginning Tuesday, July 1, it's the FIZZ...BOOM...READ! event, from 10:30 11:30 a.m., followed by Spark a Reaction! Teens, every Tuesday afternoon from 2 3 p.m. Every Thursday, (starting July 3), it's Little Explorers Preschool Storytime from 10:30 11:30 a.m. Thursday afternoons are also Eco Science Fun Days, from 2 3:30 p.m. Greenville Public Library (850) 948-2529 Every Wednesday, beginning Wednesday, July 2, It's the FIZZ...BOOM...READ! event, from 10:30 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays are also Eco-Science Fun Days, from 2:30 3:30 p.m. Every Thursday (starting July 3), it's Spark a Reaction! Teens, from 2 3 p.m. Have a simply fantastic FIZZ...BOOM...READ! summer.

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School8 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014MCCS Report CardsThe Madison County Central School wants to let parents know that report cards will be sent home with students on their last day of school, Wednesday, June 4. They would also like to wish all future students and returning students a fun and safe summer. Go Broncos! Pinetta Elementary School To Hold Inaugural Talent Show & Silent AuctionBy Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Pinetta Elementary School will be holding an inaugural Talent Show and Silent Auction, Saturday, May 31 at the school. Doors for the auction will open at 1 p.m., to allow viewing and bidding of items. The Talent Show begins at 2 p.m., and will feature 24 students who will perform a variety of talents that is sure to entertain. Items available at the auction will include artwork each class has created, showcasing students unique talents and creativity. All art projects are framed and available in the front office for viewing. There is also themed goodie baskets to be auctioned off with over $500 in gift certificates, gift cards and donated items from local businesses. Some of the baskets include themes such as: All About Sports, Family Movie Night, The Master Chef, Chocolate Delight, Let Summer Begin, Gardening 101, Mommys Day at the Spa, Daddys Gone Fishing and Splish Splash Baby Bath. Pinetta Elementary is located at 135 Empress Tree Avenue, off of Hwy. 145 N. Darla Carver, PTO President, says this is one show you dont want to miss. You can call her for more information at (850) 673-1480. Dr. Ray Bellamy Visits JMPHSStory SubmittedDr. Ray Bellamy, a practicing orthopedic surgeon in Tallahassee, part-time faculty member of the FSU College of Medicine, avid tennis player, member of the Tallahassee Scientific Society, former member of the Florida Environmental Commission and active member and Climate Leader of the Climate Reality Project, visited the James Madison Preparatory High School on Friday, May 16. The Climate Reality Project takes a deeper look at the science, impacts and solutions surrounding the issue of climate change, and trained presenters like Bellamy visit community groups, civic groups, neighborhood gatherings, schools, and other groups to discuss the subject. At JMPHS, where Alan Androski's physical science class has been studying sources of energy, along with Dr. Bellamy's visit, they were able to see how their studies could be applied to the real world. Bellamy's presentation tied into the curriculum by discussing sources of energy and the increasing demands for energy required by the planet as the population increases, as well as the impacts those demands have on the planet, as seen by evidence of climate changes. In the future, the need for conservation will become more and more important, and people should be aware of the effects they can have by practicing even simple conservation efforts starting with turning off more lights. Other points in his presentation included the fact that the cost of solar energy systems keeps getting lower and lower, so that in the future, more people might be able to choose and afford more renewable energy sources such as solar.Photo SubmittedDr. Ray Bellamy talks to Alan Androski's physical science class at James Madison Preparatory High School about energy sources.Photo SubmittedOne of Dr. Ray Bellamy's concerns is the effect an increasing population will have on the planet, with increasing demands for energy.

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.For the kids, it was way cool. For many adults over a certain age, it was where was all this cool stuff when I was in school? Lee Elementary School had a eld day for its students, with colorful fun and games at several tness stations around the playground. There were all the classics, including sack races and tug-ofwar, as well as several games that involved getting wet and blasting each other with giant water guns. On a day with midsummer-like temperatures in the forecast, it was a perfect day to get wet, run around and have fun, while volunteers like Sydney Hardin, Chris Sapp and several others kept the children's water bottles lled so they could stay hydrated on the inside as well as the outside. The Rotary Club of Madison was also there, with its Purple Pinkie Project, to raise funds for PolioPlus, part of a global effort to eradicate polio from the face of the planet. Groups of children stopped by, and those who had permission slips from their parents could donate a dollar and have a pinkie dyed purple. A few donated two dollars, to have two of their ngers purpled. Who knew school could be so cool?Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9Schoolwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 FEED TIMESHow to use: The major and minor feeding times for each day are listed below. The major feeding times are the best for the sportsman and last about 2 hours, the minor feeding times can also have good success, but last only about 1 hour. Good luck and be careful out there. Major feed times are marked by an asterisk (*) The Week Of May 30 June 5, 2014 Friday May 30 *2:10 AM 8:30 AM *2:30 PM 8:50 PM Saturday May 31 *3:00 AM 9:10 AM *3:30 PM 9:40 PM Sunday June 1 *3:55 AM 10:10 AM *4:20 PM 10:30 PM Monday June 2 *4:45 AM 10:55 AM *5:10 PM 11:20 PM Tuesday June 3 *5:30 AM 11:45 AM *5:55 PM Wednesday June 4 12:10 AM 6:20 AM 12:30 PM *6:40 PM Thursday June 5 12:55 AM *7:10 AM 1:20 PM *7:30 PM 21STANNUAL WELLBORN BLUEBERRY FESTIVAL June 7, 2014 RAIN DATE JUNE 8THNo Admission Fee Andrews Square in Downtown Wellborn, Florida Saturday 7 a.m. 5 p.m. Come join us for a fun-filled day of Blueberry Treats & Entertainment Arts & Crafts, Food Vendors, Country Store selling all things blueberry Live Entertainment, Childrens Amusements Blueberry Pancake Breakfast, Parade Hosted By The Wellborn Community Association, Inc., A Non-Profit 501(C)(3) Corporation FOR INFORMATION, SCHEDULE AND DIRECTIONS, visit www.wellborncommunityassociation.com, call 386-963-1157, or e-mail: wendellsnowden@prodigy.net Serving Our Neighbors For Over 50 Years Competitive Rates Online BankingINTEREST CHECKINGSAVINGS MONEY MARKETBUSINESS CHECKING CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSITIRA 424 West Base Street P.O. Box 267 Madison, Florida 32340 Phone: 850.973.2600 www.csbdirect.com LOBBY HOURS Mon. Thurs. 9 am 4 pm Friday 9 am 5 pm DRIVE THRU HOURS Mon. Fri. 8:30 am 5 pm Friday 8:30 am 5 pm Lee Elementary Has Field DayGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 23, 2014The Rotary Club of Madison sets up under the picnic area at Lee Elementary for their Purple Pinkie Project. First row, left to right are: Janna Bars and Chad Arnold. Second row, left to right are: Jim Catron, Pete Bucher and Ed Meggs. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 23, 2014Ready. Set. GO! The tricycle races were popular, but it wasn't as easy as it looked, riding over grass.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 23, 2014Another fun game was trying to catch sopping wet foam balls with buttery nets.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 23, 2014In the foreground, two teams battle each other in a tug-of-war, while in the background, another group makes waves with a colorful parachute.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 23, 2014Isaac Collins, six, shows off two purple ngers at the Rotary Purple Pinkie station.

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Education is one of the most important aspects of boating and shing safely and responsibly. Knowing the ins and outs of your boat, how to navigate waterways, how to read a nautical chart and how to operate a VHF radio are just a few important things to learn before going out on the water. Every state has its own boating safety requirements and/or guidelines, but regardless of rules and regulations, successfully completing a boating class increases your water safety and boating skills. Sometimes it even qualies you for a discount on your insurance. Know The Parts Of Your Boat Boats come in many styles and shapes, but the names of the different parts remain consistent. Every boat operator should know the following terms and denitions. Beam: Maximum width of a vessel. Gunwale: Upper edge of a vessel's side. Hull: Body of a vessel. Keel: Main centerline of a vessel, or the extension of the hull that increases stability. Propeller: Rotates and powers vessel forward or backward. Draft: Depth of water needed to oat a vessel. Freeboard: Distance from water to lowest point of boat where water could come aboard. Starboard: Right side of a vessel. All-Round White Light: Indicates rear of a vessel. Stern: Rear of a vessel. Cleat: Metal tting on which a rope can be fastened. Port: Left side of a vessel. Red and Green Sidelights: Directional indicators on front of a vessel. Bow: Front of a vessel.10 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 Enjoy & Be Safe! Madison County School Board MemberDistrict 5Enjoy This Week With Family & Friends! Open 24/7 Visit Us Before Or After Your Day On The Water! Be Safe! Karen Wieland, Kimberly Fields, Christina Hester, Christie Bradfield, Brittany Keen And Melissa Reader Tommy HardeeMadison County Supervisor of ElectionsEnjoy Our Florida Waters With Family & Friends Be Safe! Visit Us For All Your Fishing & Boating Needs! Proud To Serve You With The BEST Meat In Town! National Fishing And Boating WeekNational Fishing and Boating Week, a national celebration of shing and boating, takes place the rst week of June every year. This year its June 1-8. It highlights the importance of recreational boating and shing in enhancing people's quality of life and preserving our country's natural beauty. It also is when most states offer their Free Fishing Days. Why Go Boating and Fishing? Boating and shing are fun, stress-relieving activities. Here are just a few reasons why you should get out on the water: De-stress: Boating is ranked as one of the top three of all stress-relieving activities. Connect with Nature: 90 percent of Americans live within an hour of navigable water. Help Conserve: The funds from your shing licenses and boat registrations go towards the conservation of our natural aquatic areas. Free Fishing Days During National Fishing and Boating Week, most states offer free shing days. These are days where anglers are allowed to sh on public bodies of water without a shing license. Free shing days are a perfect opportunity for beginners to try out shing for the rst time. If you already have a shing license, consider taking a friend or family member who has never been shing out on the water for the day. Free shing days in Florida are: June 7 & 8 Saltwater June 14 & 15 Freshwater Make sure to get out and enjoy these days! Mentor or Teach Someone New to Fish Did you know that one of the main reasons people dont go shing or boating is because no one has invited them? For a newcomer, shing can feel like an intimidating activity without an experienced guide, but you can help change this. During National Fishing and Boating Week, or the next time you go shing, take someone new: a child, a relative or a friend. How to Celebrate National Fishing and Boating Week The best way to celebrate National Fishing and Boating Week is to get out on the water! Fun, stress-relieving activities, shing and boating are some of the best ways to unwind. Learn to Fish: Get your kids out there! Fishing with kids is a great way to connect with them and to experience the outdoors together. Spend time teaching your children the joys of shing and boating. Kids enjoy feeling included, and what better way to instill some responsibility in your children. Depending on their age, give them small things for which they are responsible, such as ensuring that everyone has a personal oatation device or teaching them to coil a line. Being on the water provides an excellent opportunity to teach kids about their environment, and boating, shing and safety skills. Try to incorporate these teachings into fun activities and gradually introduce your kids to new things as they are ready. Tips for Fishing with Kids Avoid the kids stuff An ultra-light spinning or spin casting rod and reel combo is usually easier for kids to use. Small hooks = big catches Avoid hooks larger than size 10 (hook sizes run backwards size 12 is smaller than size 10). Fish wont readily take large hooks unless they are feeding voraciously. Lighten up your line A light line will do the job, prefer ably 6-pound test line or less. Bag the big bobbers Bobbers (or oats) are used to suspend your bait in the water and alert you when to set the hooks. The harder the bobber is to pull under, the harder it will be to hook a sh. Small oats will help convince the sh to take your tasty bait and run. Slip bobbers work well for kids. Slip bobber rigs cut down on the amount of line needed at the end of the rod and are easier to cast. Small ice shing bobbers can provide a light touch any time of year. Great big gobs of worms wont do Theres no need to use whole whopping-big, writhing night crawlers on your hook. Keep the bait approximately the size of your hook. Livebait such as worms, bee moths or crickets work best. Cut the bait to t your hook.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014

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Story SubmittedIn honor of World No Tobacco Day, Florida Department of Health Madison is commemorating the important progress made in the ght against tobacco while also shedding light on the latest facts released this year about tobacco use and its deadly consequences. Each day more than 4,000 youth try smoking for the rst time, said Leila Rykard, LPN, HSPS. An additional 1,000 more kids become regular daily smokers. Earlier this year, the U.S. Surgeon General released a report highlighting 50 years of progress in tobacco control since the rst report on smoking and health was published in 1964. Despite this progress, tobacco use remains the leading preventable cause of death and disease. The new report also added several health effects to the long list of cigarette smokings serious consequences. The report concluded that smoking causes liver and colorectal cancer, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunction, ectopic pregnancies, impaired fertility, cleft lip and cleft palates in babies of women who smoke during early pregnancy, age-related macular degeneration, and immune system weakness. These are the latest facts in the ght against tobacco: Tobaccos Deadly Toll Tobacco has killed more than 20 million people prematurely since the rst surgeon generals report in 1964. Every day, about 1,300 people in the U.S. die because of smoking. Two and half million of those deaths have been among nonsmokers who died from diseases caused by exposure to secondhand smoke. If current smoking rates continue, 5.6 million U.S. children alive today who are younger than 18 years of age will die prematurely as a result of smoking. The estimated economic costs attributable to smoking and exposure to tobacco smoke continue to increase and now approach $300 billion annually in the U.S. Direct medical costs are at least $130 billion and productivity losses of more than $150 billion a year. Tobacco Controls Progress In 2012, the smoking rate for adults in Florida was 17.7 percent, which is below the national average of 19.6 percent. Since 2007, 93,400 Floridians have successfully quit tobacco using one of Tobacco Free Floridas 3 Free and Easy Ways to Quit services. In 2003, under the Florida Clean Indoor Air Act (FCIAA), the states indoor workplaces went smoke-free, with few exceptions. Floridas high school smoking rate reached an all-time low of 8.6 percent in 2013, one of the lowest high school smoking rates in the country and far below the national average. Floridas reduction in smokers has helped the state save more than $4.2 billion in personal health care costs since the inception of the Tobacco Free Florida program in 2007. Tobacco is exacting a tremendous toll on our society, yet, I am encouraged by the progress made throughout the state and in Madison, said Tobacco Free Florida Bureau Chief Shannon Hughes. An estimated eight million American lives were potentially saved since the publication of that rst surgeon generals report in 1964. Today in Florida, we are implementing a nationally renowned program Tobacco Free Florida that is saving lives and saving the state millions of dollars. Every year, on May 31, the World Health Organization (WHO) and tobacco control advocates around the globe mark World No Tobacco Day, highlighting the health risks associated with tobacco use and advocating for effective policies to reduce tobacco consumption. ABOUT TOBACCO FREE FLORIDA Tobacco Free Florida is a statewide cessation and prevention campaign funded by Floridas tobacco settlement fund. Tobacco Free Florida is managed by the Florida Department of Health, specically the Bureau of Tobacco Free Florida. Smokers and smokeless tobacco users interested in quitting are encouraged to use one of the 3 Free and Easy Ways to Quit. To learn about Tobacco Free Florida and the states free cessation resources, visit www.tobaccofreeorida.com or follow the campaign on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TobaccoFreeFlorida or Twitter at www.twitter.com/tobaccofreea.Health12 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 CALL ME TODAY FOR M ORE INFORMATION. Great rates no worries*1.60 % APY*48 month CD Nate C Cruce, Agent State Farm Agent 378 E Base Street Madison, FL 32340 Bus: 850-973-6641 *Up to FDIC insured limits. Annual Percentage Yields as of 05/28/14. Advertised rates are subject to change at the Bank's discretion. The minimum balance required to earn the stated APY is $500 (rates apply to deposits less than $100,000). A penalty may be imposed for withdrawls prior to maturity.2.05 % APY*60 month CD D 48 month CY.60 % AP1 Y.05 % AP2 * entgm Aare FtatS entg, Aeuce C CrtaN g.ul thinautifs a be It n e a soo u ch o p y le e ht m eL of e at citre C d re usni-CIDF kna m B ra e F tat m S or t f isopeD.wor y g eno r m uo ch y ta d w na ghbor ood n ei ith a g o Bank w. RO Y F A AY DO E TL M LAC ON I T A AT M OR FN I E OR MD 60 month CY.05 % AP2 3 7. 821001 a m B ra e F tatSposed f y be imy mapenalt etra ed APY is $500 ( tathe sn taro et he Bank's discr t te aghano ct tjece subs aretra Annual P ed limits o FDIC insur p t*U : 850-973-6641 Bus FL 32340 Madison teertse S 378 E Ba g L I notgnimool B .B.S. F kn.yiturto maior tls prwhdraitor wposed f ,000 han $100 ss t o deposits le y ts apple eqe r The minimum balanc ionte he Bank's discr erdv. A s of 05/28/14 lds ae Yiegaentcer. Annual P A) eduireq isedt Madison Florida Department Of Health Wants You To Know The Facts In The Fight Against Tobacco-World No Tobacco Day is May 31-

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTEDwww.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . LEGALS -Friday, May 30, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13 FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 5/26/2014 THROUGH 6/1/2014I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).3/26 rtn, n/c Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBe A CNA Would you like to work as a nursing assistant? Become a CNA. Quest Training offers a nurse taught, 40 hr. prep class. No GED required if age 18 yr. Day and Evening classes. 386-362-1065.5/7 5/28, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/cCDL Class A Driver Needed 2 years veried experience. Runs mostly SE extended area. Good 2 year MVR. Blue Cross and blue shield health insurance offered. (850) 929-2279.4/11 rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com5/7 rtn, c 4 BR, 2 BA House With replace, large yard and no pets. Near Blue Springs. $700 month, $700 security. 1 year lease. (850) 274-5805 or (907) 230-4705.5/7 rtn, c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12x18 building with 6 porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/cAutomation and Production Technology (APT) Instructor wanted at North Florida Community College, Madison FL. See www.nfcc.edu for details.5/21, 5/28, cDrivers, CDL-A: Home EVERY Weekend! ALL Loaded/Empty Miles Paid! Dedicated Southeast! Or Lease: No Money Down, No Credit Check. 1-888-880-5916.5/28, pdLP Driver Requirements: CDL License with Tanker and Hazmat Endorsement. Experience is a plus. Apply in person with resume at 208 West Screven St. Quitman, Ga. 31643.5/28, cAdoption Are you pregnant? A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1 (855) 985-4592. Adam Sklar #0150789. Auctions Auction-Waterfront Home, Lake Eufaula, 217 Cypress Cove Drive, Eufaula, Al, 5 Bedroom-4Bath, Executive, Great views. June 10, 1 p.m. Details, pictures GTAuctions.com, 205.326.0833 Granger, Thagard & Assoc,Inc. Jack F Granger, #873. Education TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASS'T CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY. Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709. Help Wanted Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Experienced Team, Solo, Recent Grad & Student Drivers needed for dedicated run in your area! Ask about our sign-on bonus and guaranteed hometime! Call 866-414-3402. Real Estate Western NC New cabin on 2.51ac. w/2bdr, loft, large deck, covered porch, fpl, minutes from the lake $139,900. Call 828-286-1666. 42.9 acres, hunting camp, $49,90020 acres near Eridu, pasture/field $40,0002.98 acres, all huge pines Lee, Fl $14,000 1 acre on paved road, Pinetta, $12,000 Mobile home community, 1/2 acre, $9900 Lee, flWater, septic, power, drive way $8995.00 Country Kitchen rd 5/23, 5/30 5/30, 6/6 5/30, 6/6 NOTICE OF PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE BY THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE GREENVILLE, FLORIDA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that proposed Ordinance No. 2014-01, bearing title as follows, will be considered Monday, June 9, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. at City Hall, Greenville, Florida. ORDINANCE NO. 235 AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE IMPOSING A TEMPORARY MORATORIUM ON IMPACT FEES FOR WATER AND WASTEWATER; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. A copy of the proposed Ordinance is available for public inspection at City Hall, Greenville, Florida during regular business hours. At the meeting, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City, the person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. TOWN OF GREENVILLE, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Kimberly Reams Town Clerk5/30 NOW HIRING! FloridaCall for Shift Availability(12 hours shifts on Saturday & Sunday for RNS & LPNs) Referral/Sign-on bonusfor employees and new hires.Full Time RNs/LPNsEmployee Bonus = $1000 after 3 months $250, after 6 months $250, after one year $500 New Hire Bonus = $500 after 3 months $250, after 6 months $250Any questions contact Human ResourcesAD/GW FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922

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14 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014



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( % t' % ( % b t t t b f r n n $ # & t r b f ) G 2 0 ) B = A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A D < 0 E A f ) = 0 A A A A A A A A A A A C ( > 0 0 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A ( / ) = ) & A A 0 B ) & A + A A A 1 K B A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A 1 D = = ) # = @ & = A A A A A A A A A 1 Cf % * & $ # f $ % n n n f t n r f b n r t f r t r f t b f n r r b r A < = ) B G = A = 0 B B G ) A G ) G + ) & A 0 A f < B ) E B < A n ) & A t < 5 A < ) F = 0 E B A 0 A < 0 0 + I B < B A 0 A B E < I f I A D % A B A 2 2 < 0 H ) ( B I A 1 1 A 2 5 5 F ) 0 A f ) 1 / A G = A B < = 2 0 < B A B 0 B A f ) = 0 A 0 E B I f 0 < ) A 0 = 2 ) B B < ) & A A G = A = E ( = 6 E B I A B < = 2 0 < B B 0 A , = = A f 0 < ( ) A 0 = 2 ) B A F ) A ) " ) & B 5 0 E < A E + 0 G = E B = A 2 2 < 0 B A F ) B ) A 0 A 0 0 B A = 0 A B I 2 A 0 A B < ( B ) 0 A = E 5 A A = E = ( 2 B A < ) = E ) B ) ) A B A B ) = B ) 5 A A , = = A 0 ( ) A 2 < B B A 0 " ) ( < A G = A = + A B 0 A + 0 A f ) A E 2 0 A < ( < ) F A B A f 5 A A A 0 " ) ( < A = B B A A G = A B 0 A B + A A ) A B A 0 " ) ( < : = A 0 2 ) ) 0 A 2 2 < = B 5 A & B 5 A t = A 0 ( E + A B < F A B 0 A f B < A B A F ) B ) A G = B < = 2 0 < B A ) A A B ( B 2 B A B 0 A & B < A 0 < ) 0 < B ) 0 5 A F ) B ) A ) = A H ( 2 B A B 0 A + A A E , < 0 F < I A A = 0 E A < = A = 0 0 A < 0 A B ' 0 = 2 ) B 5 A A A ) F = B ) ( & B ) 0 A ) = A = B ) , A 0 & 0 ) & 5 I 0 A G ) B A ) 0 < ( B ) 0 A < & < ) & A B ) = ) ) B A ) = A = + A B 0 , A B A ) B I A 0 A f ) ( = 0 A 0 ) A 2 < B B 3 $ K 4 A / > C ( $ K > > 5 t b n t t f f r b I A I B B A r 0 < < ) = r r r t n b. A A B B < A B A f I A D > A 0 " A ) , A < ( = ) & A ) = A 2 0 = ) B ) 0 A B A f ) = 0 A 0 E B I ) & A 0 0 A A B A A = 2 ) A B ) & A B B = A F ) & A B A f ) = 0 A 0 E B I A 0 0 A 0 < F 0 B A % @ 1 A B 0 A 2 B A ) = A < = ) & B ) 0 5 ) , A B A A ) < B 0 < A B A f A G = A < < = B ( A f I A 1 % A D K 1 % A A < & A G ) B A = H E A B B < I 0 A A ) 0 < A ) A E = B 0 ) A E B 0 < ) B I 5 A A A G A I = A B ( < A f I A D D A A G = A < ( < < = B A 0 A A = 0 A < & 0 A = H E A B B < I A 0 A A ) 0 < A ) A E = B 0 ) A E B 0 < ( ) B I 5 0 0 A 0 < A < A B B A & A = B A B 0 A ) = = B ) & A F 0 B A = I ) & A B B A = A 0 2 2 0 = A B < = ) & B ) 0 A E = A ) , A = 0 E A F A A # < 5 8 b ; A B ) < A 0 A 0 E < A ) < A ) & A F ) B ) ) J A B < E B ) J A A B A A A E = B A < = ) & 9 = A < 5 A A 8 A = 0 E A F A A # < 5 9 ) , A G 0 = A ) A G = A = B A B A $ K K K K K A 0 0 E B A 0 A f I A D C 5 A A A ) F = B ) & B ) 0 A 0 A ) = A = A ) = E < < B I A 0 & 0 ) & 5 r b n t r n r r n r f f n t r f ' / ) + / + & # & # * + ) + & ) % & % / b t & + ) % % b / ) & # & % ) / / b & + * ) $ * % % % * ) + 1 & ) & $ + & % + / + / & % ) + ' / & ) & % ) # / & $ # / % ) % b n t n n f t r t t n r r r t n r r b & % + $ & & # & ) $ # & / % / # # ) + ) % + + % & + * & & # / ) + + & % # & % & + & ) / $ + % ) % + % % + & f ) & % ) % + ) + 1 & ) % % ' # + & % & ' ) + & % & % # & + & & # & ) $ $ ) + % % ) & ) ) / ) & ) & ) / % + $ + % + # + ) # ) & & # & ) $ + % & # + + % % + * % + ( + 0 % + ) / + % + / + n + & & # & ) # & # & & ) & ) % + ) $ % ) & + & & # / ) % & # ) % + & ) + & + % $ % + % ) & ) % & + + ) + + + # # # & % ) ) + & 0 % & $ & % + & 0 # # ) & f n r b r t I A t = = ) A 5 A 0 H r r r t n B A B A = 2 ) B ) & A 0 f 0 I f I A 1 / A B A A 0 G 0 E ) A 0 F < = G ) B A < 2 < = B B ) F = < 0 A E G . A ) F < B < A f & B ) = B < ) B A 3 f 4 0 E B A B ) < A 0 < = G ) B A B A G B < A E = 2 < ) B A 2 2 ) A 0 < A I t t t A A A ) I A ) ) B ( A < B < = ) 2 5 A < G < A = F < A 0 ( < A A < = ) B = B B A B B A B B ) & 5 A 0 < ) & A B 0 A B f A = B " A < 2 0 < B B ) = A G B < A E = A 2 < ) B G ) , A A ) < < ) & B ) & A 1 A / K ? < = A 0 < A ) B < 0 < @ < I A 2 E B = @ < I A 0 < 0 < @ < < 0 B = A 2 E B = @ < I A . E < 0 B B ) 0 A < 0 2 = 5 A A ) A 0 < B B A B A A 0 G 0 E ) A G B A ( < = = A ) = A 0 G A B A ) < ( < ) & B ) 0 A = I = B A G ) , " B A B A G B < A ) : = A G , = 5 A 0 < ) & A B 0 A < ( < A G + A 5 5 A ( ) 0 < A I < 0 0 & ) = B A 0 < E G . A ) F < A ( B < A f & B A ) = ( B < ) B A B A 2 < ) B 2 2 ) B A = A & < B 0 A < 2 0 = ) B ) 0 A B A G ) B ( < G A 2 0 ) B = A 0 < A G , = B 0 G < = A B A ) B < ) 0 < 0 A B A 2 < 0 B A A = B A B 0 A < 0 F A , B A A & E = A < 0 B ) < A B < A 2 ) F 0 B A ) < < ) ( & B ) 0 A = I = B 5 8 A B A G , B B A & 0 = A ) A 0 = = B A B 0 B A 0 G A 0 A A ) = 0 = B < E B A ) B A G ) , A 2 E 2 A B A ) B = A E , A ( 2 ) B I A 0 < A A E < A 0 0 E < = A A G B < A F = G ) , A A B + A B A B B ) A B 0 A = A ) A B < A ) = I A 2 0 = = ) A ) B < < ( 9 A H 2 ) G + A 0 E B A B 2 < 0 = = A 0 A B < ) ( ) & A ) A B A G A G , G ) , A ) B < < A G ) B : = A G B < A F = 5 G + A = 0 A ( B ) 0 A B B A f = A A G 0 < + ) & G ) B A 2 0 2 A < 0 A B 0 < ) A E < A B < = = 0 ) B ) 0 A B 0 A B < ( ) A G B A G 0 E A 0 = ) < A ) B < < ( A B A B B A 2 0 ) B 5 8 0 E A . 0 B A < ) , B A G , = A E B ) A A G B < E = A 2 < ) B A ) = A ) = = E A B B A ) = A A < ) = + A B I 3 2 < ) B A 2 2 ) B 4 A < B + ) & 9 A = ) A G + 5 8 I A . 0 B A ) B < ( < A G ) B A B A ( & A E = A 0 A G B < A = 0 B I A < A ) F = B ) & A B 0 I A ) A B A G , = A ) A B I A B E < A B 0 A A 2 0 2 : = A G , = < A " B A B I A ( 0 B A E = A B 5 9 0 < ) & A B 0 A B & A A B B A G = 2 A ) A A f ) ( = 0 A < < ) < A 0 A f < 1 D A 0 < A G B < A 2 < ) B A 0 < t t t A A A ) I A ) ) B ( A < B < = ) 2 5 A b B A = B B ( A B B A B A F < & ) I A E = A G 0 E A C 5 / > 1 D A ) , ) 0 A & , 0 = A B A H ) E A ( E A G ) B < G A G ) , A 1 % % / 5 % / A ) , ) 0 A & ( 0 = 5 G + A ) 0 < B A A 0 G A 0 E ) B B A f A 0 F < A ( 0 B A B A 0 E B A B 0 , 0 G A 2 2 ) B = 0 E & A , 0 B ) 0 A 0 < A 1 A ) A 1 K A < 0 E & B A I < 5 8 b A 2 A 0 < A B 0 G A 0 A A E = G A ) B A 0 = A ) B < < G B A ) = A B A 2 < 0 = = A 3 0 < 0 F < ) & 4 9 A = ) ) < I A & < A < 0 E 2 C A 0 E ) A f < 5 8 ) , A G A 0 A A 0 B ( B A G B < A B 0 G 7 A B G ) , A B I A 0 A 0 < A E = 7 B A A G A B , A 0 E < 2 0 2 7 9 A 8 = B A = = E < E G . A ) F < A ( B < A f & B A ) = ( B < ) B A ) = A F < I 0 < A G ) B A I 0 E < G B < A = I = B 9 A = ) B F A f ) . ) = A ) < ( B 0 < A 0 A 0 F < . B " ) < = A A 0 E ) ( B ) 0 = 5 A 8 A F A ) + ( G ) = A ) F = B B = A G ) B A B B 0 G A 0 A 5 A A G B B 0 A 2 < 0 B B A B 0 = A ) ( F = B B = 5 A : < A 0 B & 0 ) & A B 0 A B + A B ) 0 A B 0 < A B 0 = A ) F = B ( B = A B 0 A < A I 0 E < < = ) B = A B 0 A < A 0 E < < = ) B = A G 0 A ) F A ) B A 0 G A 0 A A 0 < 0 E B = ) A B A 0 G A 0 5 A < A < 2 < 0 = = = A B B A B A 0 ( ) B ) 0 A 0 A B A 2 < ) B = 2 + = A B 0 A ) B ) & B ) 0 5 b A B < : = A A E . B ) ) ( 2 B A " B A B A B B 2 2 ) B A E = B A ) B ) ( & B 5 A I A E = B A B + 0 < < B ) F A 0 E < = A 0 B ) 0 5 9 0 E ) A < = ) B 0 E & A f r ) 0 = A ) < I A & < A 0 B H 2 < = = A ) = B < E = B A B 0 ( G < = A B A f 5 f ) . ) = A H 2 < = = B B A B 0 A < A B A ) = ( B < E = B A = A ) E B A A = = E < A B A 0 G A 0 E ) A B B A B f A G 0 E A A 0 0 ( ) = A B 0 A F A A ) F = B ( B A < 5 A 8 E B A A = 0 0 I A ) A A B < E = B A ( 0 E B A G ) B A = 0 0 I A b B < E = B A A G A A & B 0 E B A 0 A I 0 E < A G I 9 A = ) f r ) 0 = 5 A 8 r 0 A 0 A E = E 2 A < A < A F ) ) 0 E = 2 0 2 A G A 0 : B A G B B 0 A = B 0 2 A B A 0 2 < B ) 0 5 A G B A B 0 A 2 < 0 B B A 0 E < ) B ) J = A A G A ( 0 B A 0 A B B A ) A ) B ) & ( B ) 0 5 A A A 0 I ) A A B < E = B A 0 E B A = 0 G A A B < E = B A I 0 E 5 9 A E G . ) F < A B < A f & ( B A ) = B < ) B A 0 F < ( ) & A 0 < A G ) , A B A 0 t E A 1 K A B 0 A ) A 0 ) = = E ) & A B A G B < A E = 2 < ) B A B 0 A t t t A A ) I A ) ) B A < B ( < = ) 2 5 A f ) . ) = A B 0 B A A 0 G A 0 E ) B B A A G 0 E A 0 F I , A 0 A B ) < A 0 < = B 0 A B A 0 < 5 A A 0 G A 0 E ) A G ) , F A D 1 A I = A B < A B f A B ) & A B 0 ) A ) A B I A G B A B 0 2 E < = E A A ) ) = B < ( B ) F A < ) & 5 f ) = 0 : = A ) B I f & < A ) A . B B = 0 A B B A B 0 A B ( ) & A B 0 A ) = B A A < 0 E B A B A ) = = E 5 A ) B I A 0 A f ) = 0 A G ) , A B ) & A G ) B A 0 < ) ( A E < A B < A = = 0 ( ) B ) 0 A B 0 A I J G B A " B A B A ) < < ) & ( B ) 0 A = I = B A G ) , A F 0 A f ) = 0 : = A G B < = I = B 5 A r ) # & ( & n $ " ( # ' # t r f t r b f ) = B < ) B A % A ) B I 0 ) = = ) 0 ( < A f < E = G + ) = A G ) , A 0 = B A 0 E ) B I A B ) & < 0 A $ C K A B 0 A ? C K A 2 5 5 0 A f 0 I A t E A D 5 A A A 0 B ) 0 A 0 A B B ) & A ) = A 1 % ? A 0 E B ( = B A E + < A B < B A ) B A < ) B A 1 1 A E ) ) & < A + A < = 5 A < ) B A 1 1 A E ) ) & A ) = B A 0 A 0 # A 0 A B E G . A ) F < A 0 ( 0 ) A 0 E ) A b 5 ) = B < ) B A % A ) = A 0 ( 2 < ) = A 0 A 5 5 A / K A = B 3 = A B < B 4 A ) A B 0 < B A B 0 A A A 0 E B I 2 A 0 A ) A B 0 E B A A < 0 A B B 0 A $ C A 0 E B A 3 0 E B E F A B < B 4 A ) A B G = B A B 0 A 0 E B = B A I < F E A ) A B A = B 5 ) = A = B ) 0 A 0 A B A ) B I G ) , A A B A ) A < A 0 " 0 E = A B A B A 0 E ) B I B ) & 5 8 b A 0 E < & A F < I ( 0 A B 0 A 0 A 0 E B A = < A I 0 E < A 0 < = A B 0 A = A 0 G A G ) & B A 0 , B ) F I A G 0 < + B 0 A + A f ) = 0 A B = B A ) B A A 9 A = ) G + ) = 5 = ) B = A A E = ) ( = = A 0 G < = A < 0 A B ) B I : = A 0 B < A 0 E < A F 0 B ) & ) = B < ) B = A < A G 0 A B 0 B B 5 A A ) < A 0 ( B = A A 0 < = G ) , A A 2 < 0 F ) A B 0 B ) < A < = 2 B ) F A ) B Ib f f n r f & $ # & # n % t r f t r b f r n rf ) = 0 0 E B I < ) " A B G < B A < 2 0 < B = A B B A 0 f 0 I A f I A D ? A B A $ D K 2 5 5 A 2 E B ) = A 0 A B f ) = 0 A 0 E B I A < ( ) " : = A # A = B 0 2 2 A A F ( ) A < ) F A I A t = 0 G < A f 0 0 < A 0 A f ) (b f f n t n r f & % & & ) b b t r f t r b f r n rf ) = 0 0 E B I < ) " A B G < B A < 2 0 < B = B B A 0 A < ) I A f I A D C B A > $ ? A 2 5 5 A 2 E B ) = G < A ) = 2 B A B 0 1 C > $ > A = B A A / K A ) A < ( & < = A B 0 A A = B 0 A G 0 G < 5 A 2 0 A < < ) F ,b f f f f f f n r f r & / t f n r b t r f t r b f r n rf ) = 0 0 E B I < ) " A B G < B A < 2 0 < B = B B A 0 A E I A f I A D $ B A D % $ A 5 5 A A 2 E B I A 0 B A f ) = 0 A 0 E B I < ) " : = A # A G = A 0 < 0 E B ) A 2 B < 0 A = 0 E B ( 0 E A 0 A B B A 0 A $ Cb f f t f n r f & /

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Unknown owers bloom forth regally in the midst of trees to the east of my house. An army of dandelions falls into formation and salutes the few owers that rank high above them. How many times do we nd ourselves bowing and scraping to things that seem so elusive and seem to possess so much magic that we lose focus on what is really important? We dream of taking that vacation to far, far away' We dream of having that sports car that will be the envy of all of our friends. We dream of diamonds and Rolex watches and fancy clothes. It's nice to dream, but while we are feeding these dreams, are we starving our relationships with Jesus Christ and our families and friends? The Bible tells us that it's more blessed to give than to receive (Acts 20:35) and everyone has at least one thing they can give and that gift is love. Give it out of a heart of selflessness to those people who are hard to love. It may be torture for you to do it. You may be persecuted for doing it. The people you give your love to may hurt you and make you regret ever giving the gift, but remember you are not doing it for yourself. You're showing them true Christian love for themselves. In time, God will remember you and will bless you. I've been writing this column for many years now. Granted, this was not all consecutive, but my rst column was in 1992 I believe, possibly the end of '91. Maybe one day I'll look that up. I do remember the content, however. The rst one was without the cute little banner and entitled "Trash Throws Trash" and was about littering. The next week I had a banner and picture and name. That one was called "Madison Sorries" and was about the stagnation of smalltown America and fear of change. It received Honorable Mention for editorial columns from the Florida Press Association. No, I don't remember all of them, but you do remember the rst, and those that were signicant for some reason. I have a lot of them saved on the computer, many in les no longer readable, others are still in print. Maybe someday I'll put it all together. Maybe. Back in those days I was quite the political activist. Fresh out from war; young; ready to change the world. It is true that I may tend into the political from time to time now, but in my younger years I was much more political, and much less philosophical. I would tend to hope that is a sign of enlightenment, or at least maturity. Back then, I was in fact so politically prolic, and I would like to think so Southern in my wording, that I found myself on an ATF watch list. I am not being survivalist paranoid or megalomaniacal here. I don't assume this; I know it to be fact. I was, albeit accidentally, actually told of this by an ATF agent. So I do know "the lists" really exist, and that I was on one. After the Madison re of 1997, I and my father were also listed as possible suspects (by the feds, not the locals) due to some of these same columns and political viewpoints, and because Madison's re happened to be on the anniversary of Oklahoma City and Waco. All of this was pre9/11 so back then I wore it as much of a badge of honor as anything else. Back then there was no fear of the NSA or Homeland Security making me disappear into the night to be held indenitely like there exists today. (And before you say it, the fault is equally Bush AND Obama, but that is another column.) I am sure that one of the main reasons back then for my presence on their watch list was my outward opinions of things like Ruby Ridge and Waco. And even how they handled OKC. If you do not know the signicance of these terms, then you ar e probably too young to remember them. Ruby Ridge and Waco were two events in 1992 in which the FBI and ATF violated personal freedoms and killed innocent people. David Koresh (Waco) was assuredly a kookburger (that's an ofcial medical term), but Randy Weaver (Ruby Ridge) was not. But that is hardly the point. We have a right to be a kook-burger if we want as long as we do not harm others in our kook-burgerness. Randy Weaver was harming no one. He and his family were living in their home, on their land, in the middle of the Idaho mountains, minding their own affairs, and the FBI and ATF showed up at their house and started killing people. It's been over twelve years now since 9/11, nineteen since the OKC bombing, and almost twenty-two since Ruby Ridge. I have walked through the memorial for Oklahoma City and the one in NYC for 9/11. I have seen the lists of names. I have felt pain for people I never knew. There is no memorial for Ruby Ridge. Why is that? Is it because Randy Weaver's wife was murdered by our government instead of by a terrorist? Were Ruby Ridge and Waco really less a tragedy because they were sanctioned by the government? That makes it okay? Have we really all accepted government control that much? I may not preach the same political activism that I once did. I think maybe the death and destruction I've seen over the years have pacied me somewhat. Or maybe, just perhaps, (again, I would like to think) it is that I have moved ever so slightly towards enlightenment. But wrong is still wrong. Killing is still killing. Wrongful imprisonment is still wrongful imprisonment. Prejudice is still prejudice. Whether it is done by our honored government agencies, or our churches, or whomever. Hating the hater is still hating. Hating in the name of God, is still hating. Wrong is wrong. Think about it.Viewpoints & Opinions2 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 Conservative Corner Conservative Corner By Nelson A. Pryor, Lee, Fl.Dear Editor,Irun Craftsman House Gallery & CafŽ here in St. Petersburg. As a small business owner I'm proud to support my community and my country by paying my fair share in taxes. It's distressing to me that many of our country's multinational giants don't feel the same way. Some don't pay any taxes, while others pay a fraction of them. How is it fair that the wealthiest corporations don't pay taxes while many small business owners on Main Street struggle to survive? I recently returned from a trip to our nation's capitol where I joined small business owners from across the country to ask our elected leaders why only some businesses are expected to pay their fair share in taxes. I was pleased to speak with a number of our Florida representatives, including Congressman Patrick Murphy, Congresswoman Kathy Castor and aids of Senator Bill Nelson. I told them that whatever they think about taxes, there should not be loopholes that let large multinationals book their profits to tax havens like the Cayman Islands, where they pay no taxes. It's outrageous that there is a single building in the Cayman Islands that is home to nearly 19,000 "corporations." We should be able to agree that all businesses large and small should compete on a level playing field. Tax haven loopholes cost an estimated $90 billion lost revenue each year, and every dollar corporations avoid in taxes means another dollar paid by someone like me. It also means more cuts to public programs and investments that help make America a good place to do business. Large multinationals get all the benefits of American infrastructure, security and education, but force the rest of us to foot the bill. No one least of all a wildly profitable company like GE should get a free ride. I hope that my representatives take what I said to heart. If they do, they'll soon have a chance to prove it as they consider renewing two offshore tax breaks: the "active financing exception" and "controlled foreign corporation look through rule." These ridiculous loopholes will be gone from the tax code if Congress takes no action. I was disappointed to find out that the Senate Finance Committee where our own Senator Bill Nelson serves caved to special interest pressure by extending these loopholes. Even though the corporate lobbyists won the first round, our elected leaders can still stand up for small business owners. Our elected leaders should focus on a fixing the tax code so that small businesses don't face a competitive disadvantage. The tax dollars saved by closing offshore loopholes could be put to better use by reducing the deficit or more importantly investing in infrastructure and education, which is what truly makes America a good place to do business. Jeff Schorr is owner of Craftsman House Gallery & Caf in St. PetersburgOffshore Loopholes Unfair To Small Businesses Letter To The Editor Jacobs Ladder Jacob BembryColumnist Something To Think AboutBy Harvey Greene Harvey GreeneGuest Columnist Blooms And Dandelions Ruby Ridge Still Remembered Read Jacob's blog at www.jacobbembry.com His book, Higher Call is available in Kindle format at www.amazon.com or in paperback at www.amazon.com www.bn.com and www.booksamillion.com or by sending $10 plus $3.99 shipping and handling to Jacob Bembry, P.O. Box 9334, Lee, FL 32059. Contact him at jacobbembry@hotmail.com. Liberals Aim For State Control THE REPUBLICAN CLUB OF MADISON COUNTY Meets June 9 at 12:00 noon at Shelby's Restaurant SPEAKER GEORGE WEBB OF TRI-COUNTY ELEC. SUBJECT SMART METERS EVERYONE WELCOME Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee MadisonRepublican@embarqmail.com Agroup called the Democracy Alliance, since 2005, has raised $500 million to fund groups affecting State and Federal elections. That's a lot of money! Yet, the Alliance has gone, heretofore, unnoticed. Not any more. In a front page story in the Washington Post, of May 5, 2014, the group held a Chicago conclave of big spenders, was outed. The group of wealthy liberal donors who helped bankroll major advocacy groups on the left is developing a new big money strategy that could boost state-level Democratic candidates and mobilize core party voters. The plan, crafted at a four day Chicago money raiser, by a group of about 100 donors, includes the usual suspects, such as George Soros and San Francisco venture capitalist Rob McKay. They want a stronger hand in the redrawing of district lines for state legislatures and the U. S. House. The effort reects a sense among many top donors on the left that Democrats missed opportunities in 2010 to shape the redistricting process and contain the tea party wave that helped propel Republican majorities around the country. In Chicago, Alliance partners pledged to give about $30 million this year to 20 endorsed liberal groups. The donor group consists of think tanks and activist groups. The focus on ground-level politics would mark a new emphasis for the Democracy Alliance, whose members have helped nance inuential national liberal groups such as Media Matters for America, the media watchdog group; America Votes, which coordinates the efforts of allied interest groups; and Catalist, which provides voter data. The Center for American Progress, now 10 years old, has emerged as one of Washington's powerhouse think tanks, serving as an intellectual engine for the liberal movement and the Obama White House. The alliance's new president, Gara LaMarche, is pushing the group to take a "fresh look" at its overarching strategy as part of a regular threeyear review of the organizations that it recommends for funding. Early ideas that have garnered support to state-level donor groups, voting rights projects and organizations working to rally "the rising American electorate," LaMarche said. "It's becoming increasingly clear that mobilization and engagement of women, Latinos, African Americans and young people is the way to win elections," he said, "and there's a strong desire to invest more heavily in those communities." While maintaining a low public prole, the alliance plays an inuential role as the left's central money hub, attracting political donors interested in more than simply making campaign contributions. Last week's meeting at the RitzCarlton in Chicago drew an array of Democratic powerbrokers eager to inuence the donor' thinking, including White House senior advisor Valerie Jarrett, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka and Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards. This year's alliance partners pledged to give about $30 million to 20 liberal groups endorsed by the group, a slight boost over the amount pledged for the same organizations last year. After long operating under the radar, the alliance may now be forced to come out of the shadows. Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper. All submitted letters must be 600 words or less

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Around 1861, just in time for the Civil War, Samuel and Mary Martha Tittle Agner moved into Madison County. Samuel and Mary settled six miles Northeast of Madison, near present day County Road 254, and they brought all eight of their children. They moved from Greenwood County, South Carolina. Samuel was around 40 years old, and Mary was around 35 years old. Shortly after he arrived, Samuel served as a private in the Confederate Army, from 1862-1865; he served in Captain John Westcoat’s Company of Madison County, which was Company I, 10thRegiment, Florida Infantry. Wounded in the left foot in 1864, he was hospitalized and “rendered unt for manual labor.” In 1884, Samuel was granted a land patent of 80 acres of land; the family had lived on the land already for seven years. The eight children of Samuel and Mary Martha were: 1. Margaret J. “Maggie” (1848-1930) who taught school in various locations throughout the county: Pine Hill, Friendship Academy, New Prospect, Suwannee River, Midway, and West Farm. 2. Samuel M. (1853-1930’s) married rst Mary M. Jenkins; his second wife was Lenore M. “Nora” Parker; his last wife was L.C. Bass. Samuel and his rst wife, Mary Jenkins, had seven children: Mary Belle Agner, (1874-1941) who married Henry Raines and lived near Pine Grove Baptist Church; a son who died in infancy; Anna Agner, who married W. L. Lamb and who lived in Live Oak; W. Eddie Agner (1879-?) who married Cordelia Lanier; John Oscar (1882-1960’s) married Lizzie Martin and settled in Taylor County; an infant son, Perry, who was born and died in 1884; and Colina “Lena” (1888-?) who married a Mr. Knowles and settled in Avon Park. Three children were born to Samuel and his second wife, Nora: Ernest (1895-?); a daughter Talmadge (1898?); and Leslie (1900-?). Samuel M. and his second wife Nora Parker received 160 acres of a land patent in 1896. 3.Thomas Sloan (1854-1925) married Laura “Lollie” Belle Sealey; his second wife was Rosa Lou Stokes. Thomas Sloan and his wife, Lollie had one son, Thomas Cecil (1887-?) With his second wife, Rosa Lee Stokes, ve children were born: Samuel Geiger (1894-1973); Mollie (1897-1899); Josie (1899-?) married Dewitt Fortner and had four children; James Marshall (1903-1904); and Teddy Alice (1905-?) who married a Mr. Brown. Thomas and his family lived a short while in Madison County, then in Lowndes County, then in Suwannee County. 4. Ann M. Alice 1856-? Married Joseph A. Ambrose; her family farmed in Columbia and probably Suwannee Counties. 5. John Lewis married Barbara Isabelle Stephens and raised their family in Madison. 6. Sarah “Sally” (1859-1908) married John Francis “Frank” Webb; their family ended up in Live Oak. 7. Lucy (1862) died as a child. 8. Martha S. “Mattie” (1868-1947) married Henry May. When she died, Mattie was living on land homesteaded by her father. You may recognize some of the descendents of John Lewis (18571929) and Barbara Isabel Stephens. They farmed land adjoining Dusty Miller Road, and Agner descendants today live in the same spot. John and Barbara had seven children, and three of their children raised families in the county. Many of their grandchildren still live in the county. John Quincy Agner, (1888-1970) lived in Madison and farmed; he never married. Samuel Hugh lived from 1892-1911. Helen Douglas married Moses Fligh; the couple owned a grocery store in Jacksonville and had no children; Edith Isabel married Jesse Alonzo Summers and lived in Providence with their six children. John Lewis and Barbara Stephens’ daughter Nina married Berry Martin Williams. They lived on the land patented to Samuel Agner. Their two daughters were Annie Barbara “Bobbie” who married Gordon Stanton Martin Sr., and lived in Jacksonville; and Dorothy Elizabeth “Dot” who married Daniel Marvin Reeves and lived in Madison County. John Lewis and Barbara’s son, Willie James (1896-1977) married Fannie Lou Pulliam and the couple had 13 children, raised in Madison County: 1. William Alexander, who married Birdie Marie Burnett from Tennessee and lived in Tennessee; 2. James Carroll married Coantha “Kitty” Cole, raised four children in Madison, farmed, and was a Nazarene minister; 3. Raymond Lewis who died as a young child. 4. Joe Dean, married Arldine Reaves, farmed, drove a school bus, and had ve children; Joe’s second wife was Helen Carroll Mills, and his third wife was Angelus Miller; 5. Mildred Davis Agner worked for many years in Dr. Bibb’s ofce; 6. Wesley Cole Agner, married Mary Alice Sawyer; Cole farmed and drove a school bus; he and his wife had six children. 7. John Pendleton and Verdie Mae Fouraker had ve children. 8. Robert Quincy Agner married Joyce V. Price from Kentucky; he pastored churches in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and in Madison. The couple had three children. 9. Arthur Paul taught school many years in Colorado and some years in Georgia. 10. Shellie Mae Agner married rst Dean Archie Rees and lived in Indiana. The couple had three children. Shellie next married Arthur “Art” Duran and they had two children in Colorado. 11. Samuel Hugh married Mary Ella Williams and worked mostly as a contractor and carpenter. Samuel and Mary Ella had three children. His second wife was Carolyn Jones LaPoint; and his third was Janice Drawdy Ritchea. 12, Barbara Joyce married Johnnie Lewis Williams, Sr. they had four children. 13. Walter Parrish was the last child of Willie James and Fannie Lou. John and Barbara’s son, Carradine “Dean” (1898-1981) and Silviria Clide Stewart farmed all of their lives in Madison County and had 10 children. 1. Carradine “C.D.” who married Joyce Ann Smith. 2. Virginia Nell, who married Marjell Otis Dobbs. 3. Viria Susan married Manzie Wallace “Acey” Wall. 4. Baby Agner lived only a few hours. 5. Nancy Elizabeth Agner married Theodore “Ted” LeRoy Martone; she died in Cleveland, Ohio. 6. Jimmie Martin married Bonnie Nadine Smith 7. William Quincy died at age two. 8. Hilda Mae Agner married James “Jimmy” Tillis Dixon. 9. Dianna Lois married Allen Wayne Rehberg; and 10. Lewis Michael Dale married Cassandra Jane Browne. Lots of descendants of Samuel and Mary Martha Agner’s son, John Lewis, and his wife Barbara Isabel Stephens, remain to this day in Madison, some still farming original family land from the 1870’s. Willie James and Fannie Pulliam and their 13 children, and Carradine and Silviria Clide Stewart and their 10 children have made lasting imprints in Madison County. Farmers, solid citizens, community minded people, and in general, ne folks. Members of the Agner clan have enriched the lives of everyone who came in contact with them for quite a few years. Some information for this article was gleaned from Madison County Florida Family History Book, published by the Madison County Genealogical Society. The articles of Robert Q. Agner were invaluable. Our society welcomes your input and invites you to join our organization. We meet on the second Thursday monthly, except during summer months, in the Madison Public Library from 6 to 7 p.m. Annual dues are $25. To add comments to our articles or to submit your own sketch on your ancestor, contact us at Madison County Genealogy Society, P.O. Box 136, Madison, Fl. 32341. Or contact us by email at mcgenealogysociety@live.com If you would like for us to write an article featuring your ancestor, please contact us by mail or email. Around Madison County4 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 Obituaries Wedding AnnouncementJoseph Donel OdomJoseph “Joe” Donel Odom, 81, died Sunday, May 25, at Madison County Memorial Hospital. Funeral services were held Thursday, May 29, at 11 a.m., at Beggs Funeral Home with burial at Lee Memorial Cemetery. Visitation was held Wednesday, May 28, from 5 – 7 p.m., at Beggs Funeral Home. He was born in Madison County, where he lived all his life. He was a Supervisor at St. Regis Paper Company before retiring and was a member of Hopewell Baptist Church. He is survived by two sons: Charles Allen Odom of Crawfordville and Ricky Donald Odom of Lee; two brothers: Sammy Odom of Adel, Ga., and Willie Odom of Madison; one sister: Lila L. Webb of Madison; nine grandchildren and five great grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his first wife: Loyett Harrison Odom and his second wife, Beverly Smith Odom; one son: Jimmy Dale Odom; four brothers: Walt, James, Leonard and Hollis; and two sisters: Agnes and Mary Jane, and his parents Randle and Mary Ellen Odom. Beggs Funeral Homes is in charge of arrangements (850) 9732258. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting their website at www.beggsfuneral.com Deanna Felicia PayneDeanna Felicia Payne went to be with Jesus on Monday, May 26. She was born on October 1, 1960 in Jacksonville. She has lived in Live Oak, Lee and Lake City. She was currently living in Madison. Deanna is survived by four sons: Seyavash Mesry and wife Lisa of Atlanta; John David Rutherford and wife Amber and their daughter Madalynn of Live Oak; Cole Matthew Rutherford of MacClenny; and Daniel Lee Rutherford of Atlanta. She is also survived by her mother: Patsy Dryden Welch of Madison; her sister: Ginger Ann Payne and Jamie Porter and their daughter, Madison Marie Porter of West Palm Beach; her sister: Cassandra Kay Nipper of Kotzebue, Alaska and her children Jessica, Luke, MyKayla, Sophia and Alexandria, all of Alaska and Mike Grossman of Korea; her brother: John Paul James Payne and his wife Joanna of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands; and her other brother: Ronald Ervin Payne, Jr., and wife Debbie and their children: Lisa and husband, Nate and their son Drake; Jeremiah and his daughter, Ainsley; and Matthew and Sarah all of Okeechobee; and Ronald Ervin Payne, III and wife Jessica and their son Trenton of Mayo. She is survived by a special person in her life, her grandmother, Pauline Dryden, 95, of Madison. She is survived by hundreds of other relatives, cousins, aunts and uncles of several generations and a host of friends. Deanna is predeceased by her father, Ronald Ervin Payne, Sr.; her grandfather, William Quinton Dryden and grandmother Mildred Rowell Payne. Deanna loved her family and friends and would ‘give you the shirt off her back.’ She was passionate about her love of God, studying The Word and singing praises to God. She was always cleaning and making the yard and owers pretty. Deanna was very talented and gifted. Her creative, artistic nature was expressed through everything she did: paintings, writings, owers, pottery, gardens and interior decorating. We will greatly miss the shimmering glow of her glory. “And when the Chief Sheppard shall appear, ye shall receive a crown of glory that fadeth not away.” 1 Peter 5:4 Deanna was loved by her family, friends and all who met her. She will be cherished and missed by all. Mr. and Mrs. Ronnie Ragans and Mr. and Mrs. Walter McCullough of Madison are pleased to announce the engagement of Lauren Marianne Ragans to Thomas Walter McCullough. The wedding is planned for Saturday, June 14 at 4:30 p.m., at the Madison First Baptist Church with a reception to follow in the Fellowship Hall. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mary Floyd of Fort White, the late Edward Floyd and the late Cecil and Katie Ragans of Madison. Lauren graduated from Florida State University with a Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology in 2007 and is currently pursuing a Master’s Degree in Higher Education from Valdosta State University. She is currently employed by Florida Gateway College in Lake City as Academic Advisor/Recruiter for Nursing and Health Sciences. The future groom is the grandson of Frances Browning of Madison, the late Robert Browning, Gean McCullough of Madison and the late Aubrey McCullough. Tom graduated from the University of Central Florida with a Bachelor’s Degree in Hospitality Management in 2005 and then from North Florida Community College’s Educator Preparatory Institute in 2007. He is currently employed by the Bacon County School District in Alma, Ga., as a Middle School Special Education Teacher and Assistant Athletic Coach for football, baseball and wrestling. Only out of town invitations are being sent. All friends and family of the couple locally are invited to attend. Ragans/McCullough Dorothy Lucille PridgeonDorothy Lucille Pridgeon, 89, passed away Tuesday, May 27, in Madison. Ms. Dorothy was born in Atlanta, Ga., on October 22, 1924 where she lived her formative years. She lived most of her adult life in Madison. She enjoyed singing, music, rose gardening, bowling, sewing, cooking, reading her Bible and watching the Braves play, but most of all being with her family. Ms. Dorothy was the daughter of Carl Chamlee and Dora Bell Spencer Chamlee. She was a wonderful mother to two daughters: Karen Simmons (Lynn), Donna Wyche (Darlene Williams) and one son, David Pridgeon (deceased). Ms. Dorothy was the sister to seven siblings. She has three living brothers: Billy Chamlee (Edith), Doug Chamlee (Betty) and Wayne Chamlee (Ruth). She was a loving grandmother of six grandchildren and great grandmother of thirteen great grandchildren. Ms. Dorothy’s services will be held at Oakridge Cemetery in Madison, at 11 a.m., on Saturday, May 31. Family members will be received from 9-9:30 a.m., and friends from 9:30-10:45 a.m., at Faith Baptist Church in Madison, 1135 E US 90, Madison, Fl. Pioneers Of Madison CountySAMUEL AGNER

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 5 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 No Photocopies Accepted  Tickets are good for Saturday, June 7thonly  Deadline To Enter June 3, 2014Name____________________________ ___________________________ Address__________________________ __________________________ Phone Number____________________ Fill out and return to Greene Publishing at P.O. Drawer 772 or 1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32341 5K/Fun Run Preregistration Date (June 4) Approaching FastBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Attention runners! Lace up those running shoes and dash over to your computer to preregister for the Lions Club 4thof July 5K and Fun Run, a new addition to the 4thof July God and Country Celebration. Come on out and be a part of the inaugural race. The deadline for pre-registration (June 4) is fast approaching, but if you hurry, you can still beat it. Go to the madisonlionclub.com website and click on “4thof July Information,” and then click on “Race Entry Form.” The entry fee for the 5K Run is $25; by registering early, you save $5 and guarantee that you'll get a teeshirt. You can also register the morning of the race in front of Madison Sporting Goods and Pawn, but the entry fee by then will be $30. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m., and whether or not you get a shirt depends on how early you get in line (by then, the shirts will be on a “rst-come, rst served” basis). The race starts at 8:30 a.m., with medals for rst, second and third place winners. There will also be a Kids Fun Run, which is free, unless you want a tee shirt; if so, there is a $10 fee to cover the cost of the shirt. Parents are encouraged to pre-register their kids for the Fun Run by the June 4 deadline to guarantee that they'll get a shirt. They can also register the morning of the race for free if they don't want a shirt. Registration is at 7:30 a.m., again, in front of Madison Sporting Goods and Pawn, sponsor of both the 5K and the Fun Run. The race starts at 8 a.m., and there will be medals for rst, second and third place winners.Madison County Featured In Tallahassee AreaMagazineBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Cindy Vees, Executive Director of the Madison County Chamber of Commerce, brought out copies of the Madison County Business Journal 2014 to distribute to the Madison City Council at their May meeting. Vees had prevailed upon Rowland Publishing of Tallahassee to do the business journal for Madison after seeing a similar project the company had done for Jackson County last year. The Journal, which features stories on Honey Lake, county government figures, the new hospital and the economic development and tourism aspects of Madison County, will be inserted into copies of Rowland Publishing's 850 Magazine with a circulation of approximately 18,000. It is direct-mailed to business, political and community leaders throughout the 18 counties in the 850 area code, as well as to all 160 Florida legislators. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 12, 2014Cindy Vees, of the Madison County Chamber of Commerce, hands out copies of the Madison County Business Journal to council members. Seated at the council table are (left to right): Marcus Hawkins (District 4) and Rayne Cooks (District 5). Nurses Visit Rotary By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.LPNs Deborah Buie and Chelsea Doty paid a visit to the Rotary Club of Madison to help their nursing team with its chosen community project: soliciting cans of Ensure or donations of Ensure for Madison patients in hospice care. “I was surprised by the scope of Big Bend Hospice,” said Buie, particularly the number of patients hospice served in Madison County. She was also shocked to discover that cans of Ensure were not covered by Medicare. For some patients, especially those who have G.I. tubes, or who simply can't tolerate solid food anymore, a can of Ensure is their meal. Also, since many people in Madison are below the poverty line, many hospice patients and their families may not have the extra money to buy Ensure. The ve person team, consisting of Buie, Doty, Deborah Kinsey, Chelsea Musgrove and Lilly Eckles, have been soliciting cans of Ensure and donations to buy Ensure for the local Big Bend Hospice in Madison County. For more information about their project and how you or your group can help, contact Buie at (850) 673-8335. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 21, 2014LPN Deborah Buie speaks to the Rotary Club of Madison about the Ensure project. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 21, 2014Teammates Chelsea Doty and Deborah Buie display the Rotary Medal they received in appreciation for their presentation at the Madison Rotary Club, where several members made donations.Senior Citizens Counsel Seeks Donations Concord Baptist Annual Fishing Contest This WeekendBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. The Concord Baptist Annual Fishing Contest will be Saturday, May 31 starting at 6 a.m. The weigh in is set for 5 p.m., and the sh fry will begin at 6 p.m. The contest is in memory of Mrs. Bessie Burkett. The entry fee is $20 for adults 16 and up. Te entry fee for ages 12 to 15 are $10 and $5 for ages 11 and under. Adults can save $5 by signing up before Saturday. You can sh where you want. Be sure the sh are all legal. In order to compete in the biggest bass contest, it is an additional $10 and to enter the biggest brim contest or catsh contest it is an additional $5 each. The prize for the biggest bass winner is already at $500. The biggest brim prize is at $50 and the biggest catsh is at $50. For more information, contact Jamie Ford at (229) 559-6564. By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.The Senior Citizens Center, located on SW Harvey Greene Drive in Madison, is busy with activity, and OAA Coordinator/Activities Director, Cheryl Scovel says the busy seniors who attend the center could use a little help in the way of donations for their altruistic projects. A group of arts and crafters who visit the center have just nished a project for the nursing center, Lake Park of Madison, where they sewed lap mats for the residents. The next project they are undertaking is for the soon-to-open youth ranch here in Madison. The talented seniors have taken on the project of making twinsize quilts for all the kids coming to the ranch, and hope to have them completed for the kids when they arrive, sometime in August. But, the center has more volunteers than they have materials to make the quilts and have decided to seek help from the community. The center previously had two sewing machines, but donated one of them to the Greenville Senior Center because, “they didn’t have even one,” says Scovel. This has left the Madison center with only one machine to work with and they could use another for their upcoming quilting project. Also needed is fabric of any kind, thread, batting, yarn and any other sewing or quilting supplies someone would like to donate. For the seniors who don’t craft, there is a need for a treadmill in their tness room. The center was able to purchase four pieces of exercise equipment by using grant monies, but those who use the tness room have expressed desire for the treadmill. There is also limited outside seating for when the weather is nice or for someone to just sit and rest if needed. Scovel says a park bench would be benecial and would t perfectly underneath a covered area in front of the building, nestled in among owers planted there. If anyone is interested in helping the Senior Citizens Center with these, or other donations, call Cheryl Scovel at (850) 973-4241.

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Around Madison County6 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 Planning on working during retirement? If so, youre not alone. An increasing number of employees nearing retirement plan to work at least some period of time during their retirement years. W h y w o r k d u r i n g r e t i r e m e n t ? Obviously, if you work during retirement, youll be earning money and relying less on your retirement savings--leaving more to potentially grow for the future and making your savings last longer. If you continue to work, you may also have access to affordable health care, as more and more employers are offering this important benefit to part-time employees. But there are also non-economic reasons for working during retirement. Many retirees work for personal fulfillment--to stay mentally and physically active, to enjoy the social benefits of working, and to try their hand at something new--the reasons are as varied as the number of retirees. H o w w o r k i n g a f f e c t s S o c i a l S e c u r i t y If you work after you start receiving Social Security retirement benefits, your earnings may affect the amount of your benefit check. Your monthly benefit is based on your lifetime earnings. When you become entitled to retirement benefits at age 62, the Social Security Administration calculates your primary insurance amount (PIA), upon which your retirement benefit will be based. Your PIA is recalculated annually if you have any new earnings that might increase your benefit. So if you continue to work after you start receiving retirement benefits, these earnings may increase your PIA and thus your future Social Security retirement benefit. But working may also cause a reduction in your current benefit. If youve reached full retirement age (66 to 67, depending on when you were born), you dont need to worry about this-you can earn as much as you want without affecting your Social Security retirement benefit. If you havent yet reached full retirement age, $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $2 you earn over the annual earnings limit ($15,480 in 2014). A special rule applies in your first year of Social Security retirement-youll get your full benefit for any month you earn less than one-twelfth of the annual earnings limit, regardless of how much you earn during the entire year. A higher earnings limit applies in the year you reach full retirement age. If you earn more than this higher limit ($41,400 in 2014), $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $3 you earn over that amount, until the month you reach full retirement age--then youll get your full benefit no matter how much you earn. (If your current benefit is reduced because of excess earnings, you may be entitled to an upward adjustment in your benefit once you reach full retirement age.) Not all income reduces your Social Security benefit. In general, Social Security only takes into account wages youve earned as an employee, net earnings from selfemployment and other types of work-related income, such as bonuses, commissions, and fees. Pensions, annuities, IRA distributions, and investment income wont reduce your benefit. One last important point to consider: in general, your Social Security benefit wont be subject to federal income tax if thats the only income you receive during the year. But if you work during retirement (or receive any other taxable income or taxexempt interest), a portion of your benefit may become taxable. IRS Publication 915 has a worksheet that can help you determine whether any part of your Social Security benefit is subject to federal income tax. Stacy Bush, President Bush Wealth Management The Bush Wealth Advantage S o c i a l S e c u r i t y a n d W o r k i n g i n R e t i r e m e n t Our column, The Bush Wealth AdvantageŽ is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. Stacy Bush has practiced independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.com Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 869133 That's Entertainment! Mainstage At Lions' Club 4thOf July Looking For PerformersDo you sing, dance, do gymnastics, acrobatics, or magic tricks, or have a comedy routine that keeps your friends in stitches? The Lions Club is looking for talented folks with family-friendly entertainment acts for the stage portion of its 4thof July God and Country Celebration at Lake Frances. Go to the website madisonlionclub.com click on “4th of July Information” and then click on entertainment tab. Fill out the application and be sure to send an email to president@madisolionclub.com BEFORE June 20, 2014. That's the deadline for either auditioning in person or sending a demo of your act via CD or DVD. All performers who have applied and auditioned will be notied by June 27th. Then, show up and sing, dance, or whatever you do to wow an audience. That's entertainment. The Tomato Man By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Donald Johnson, proclaimed “Tomato Man,” along with wife Jackie, have already been busy bees in their summer garden this year. The Johnson’s garden has eggplant, peppers, okra, cucumbers and green beans (they have already begun canning), but it is Johnson’s tomatoes that cause him to get excited. Planted in his four lengthy rows of tomatoes are Celebrities, Better Boys, Early Girls, romas, beefsteak, cherry and grape tomatoes. Johnson says they planted their garden sometime before Good Friday and his tomatoes now stand taller than his 5’5” height and are full of green globes, just waiting to ripen. The tomatoes are growing so fast the two are using fence posts and rope to keep them tied up, on almost a daily basis. Short of chest pounding, Johnson said he wanted to issue a challenge to Madison gardeners to see if “anyone could outgrow him.” When asked what he used for fertilizer, he said, “Can’t do that, going to keep it a secret.” The only thing he would divulge is that he purchased his bedding plants at Studstill Lumber. Jackie says she is having a good time canning and said they will use this method for preserving some of their tomato crop. Johnson added there would also be plenty of eating and giving away of the summertime fruit. If you grow tomatoes, nd Donald Johnson and take his challenge, or try to pry his tomato-growing secret out of his tightly sealed lips. If you aren’t one to growyour-own, hopefully you’ll be on the receiving end of his tomato give-aways. I envision a BLT in this reporter’s future…and that is more than a hint Mr. Tomato Man. Photos SubmittedDonald Johnson stakes up his tomatoes that are growing taller than his 55Ž frame. Inset: Donald Johnson proudly standing by his product. Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches Announces Appointment Of Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart As Chairman Of The Board Of DirectorsSubmitted by the Madison County Sheriff’s OfficeFlorida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc., President Roger Bouchard announces the appointment of Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart as Chairman of the Youth Ranches Board of Directors. Sheriff Stewart has been engaged and involved with the Youth Ranches for several years. They are honored to have Sheriff Stewart as Chairman. The mission of the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches is to prevent delinquency and develop strong, lawful, resilient and productive citizens who will make a positive contribution to our communities for years to come. This year the Youth Ranches will serve over 5,000 needy boys and girls. This charitable, non-profit childcare agency was founded by the Florida Sheriffs Association and operates four residential campuses and two camping facilities. Additionally, it provides communitybased services and family counseling to as many of Florida’s neglected, troubled children as funds will permit. The organization is funded primarily through charitable donations from its generous donors. The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc., is nationally accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Services for Families and Children, Inc., and the American Camp Association. For more information, please visit www.youthranches.org or contact your local Sheriff. Photo SubmittedOutgoing President Sumter County Sheriff Bill Farmer (left) passes the gavel to Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart (right). Gloria Jean ChristianAfundraiser is underway for the late Gloria Jean Christian, a 38-year-old woman who was struck and killed by a vehicle on May 21. Christian left behind seven children: two 21-year-olds and one each ages 20, 16, 10, six, and one 3-month-old. An account has been set up under her name that the Madison County Community Bank; funds will go directly to the Cook and Cooper Funeral Home, in charge of arrangements for the family. Any funds leftover will go in a trust fund for the children.Fundraiser

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By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.Jared Dewey started working for the Madison County Sheriff’s Office on May 1. This is not Dewey’s first law enforcement job, though. He has been in law enforcement for 12 years and prior to moving to the Madison County Sheriff’s Office, he worked for the City of Madison Police Department for a year and a half. “It’s something that I’ve always wanted to do,” said Dewey. “I wanted to help people and help the community.” Dewey’s hometown is Lake City and he has been married for seven years. He describes himself as a laid back and easygoing person. When Dewey is not working, he loves to hunt and compete in shooting contests. His favorite television shows are crime shows. He particularly likes the shows on the ID Channel, which features various real crime shows. In the future, Dewey would like to get into the K-9 unit. He developed an interest in the K-9 unit when he was given a K9 dog as a pet.Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 7 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 Jared Dewey Joins The Madison County Sheriff’s Ofce Rotary Presents Check To Take Stock In Children Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 28, 2014Clerk of Court Tim Sanders (right) accepts a check on behalf of Madison Take Stock in Children from the Madison Rotary Club, presented by the Rotary president Wayne Conger (left). Sanders spoke of having attended the Baccalaureate services for MCHS a few days earlier where he saw 15 Take Stock in Children students ready to graduate. Over the years, TSIC has helped over 1000 children with mentoring and college scholarships; currently, the program is serving 60 children and is looking for mentors for each of them. For more information about the Madison TSIC program, or to volunteer as a mentor, contact (850) 973-2184.FIZZ...BOOM...READ!Madison County Public Libraries Offer Fun Summer Reading ProgramsBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Anna Moo, an awardwinning singer-songwriter and recording artist for children and families, is rumored to dress up like a cow for her entertaining sessions that mix songs, storytelling and educational material for children of all ages. During the month of June, she will be making the rounds of Madison's three public libraries to help kick off their summer reading program, FIZZ...BOOM...READ On Monday, June 23, you can catch her at the Lee Public Library from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, June 25, she'll be at the Greenville Public Library from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. From there, she'll be heading for Madison on Friday, June 27 from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. That's just the beginning. From June 30 through Aug. 9, the three public libraries will have a regular schedule of weekly events, as part of the larger Florida Library Youth Program, encouraging children and teens to read, use library resources and develop a love of reading through fun literary experiences. Lee Public Library (850) 971-5665 Beginning Monday, June 30, and every Monday after that until the ofcial end of the summer reading program (the week of Aug. 9), it's the FIZZ...BOOM...READ! event, from 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., followed that afternoon by Spark a Reaction! Teens from 2 – 3 p.m. Every Wednesday (starting July 2), it's an hour of afternoon fun with Game Days from 3 – 4 p.m. Every Friday (starting July 11 – the library will be closed Friday, July 4) it's Eco-Science Fun Days from 2 – 3 p.m., with Barbara Hines of the Florida Public Archeology Network. Madison Public Library (850) 973-6814 Every Tuesday, beginning Tuesday, July 1, it's the FIZZ...BOOM...READ! event, from 10:30 – 11:30 a.m., followed by Spark a Reaction! Teens every Tuesday afternoon from 2 – 3 p.m. Every Thursday, (starting July 3), it's Little Explorers Preschool Storytime from 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Thursday afternoons are also Eco Science Fun Days from 2 – 3:30 p.m. Greenville Public Library (850) 948-2529 Every Wednesday, beginning Wednesday, July 2, It's the FIZZ...BOOM...READ! event, from 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays are also Eco-Science Fun Days from 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. Every Thursday (starting July 3), it's Spark a Reaction! Teens from 2 – 3 p.m. Have a simply fantastic FIZZ...BOOM...READ! summer.

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School8 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014MCCS Report CardsThe Madison County Central School wants to let parents know that report cards will be sent home with students on their last day of school, Wednesday, June 4. They would also like to wish all future students and returning students a fun and safe summer. Go Broncos! Pinetta Elementary School To Hold Inaugural Talent Show & Silent AuctionBy Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Pinetta Elementary School will be holding an inaugural Talent Show and Silent Auction, Saturday, May 31 at the school. Doors for the auction will open at 1 p.m., to allow viewing and bidding of items. The Talent Show begins at 2 p.m., and will feature 24 students who will perform a variety of talents that is sure to entertain. Items available at the auction will include artwork each class has created, showcasing student’s unique talents and creativity. All art projects are framed and available in the front office for viewing. There is also themed goodie baskets to be auctioned off with over $500 in gift certificates, gift cards and donated items from local businesses. Some of the baskets include themes such as: All About Sports, Family Movie Night, The Master Chef, Chocolate Delight, Let Summer Begin, Gardening 101, Mommy’s Day at the Spa, Daddy’s Gone Fishing and Splish Splash Baby Bath. Pinetta Elementary is located at 135 Empress Tree Avenue, off of Hwy. 145 N. Darla Carver, PTO President, says this is one show you don’t want to miss. You can call her for more information at (850) 673-1480. Dr. Ray Bellamy Visits JMPHSStory SubmittedDr. Ray Bellamy, a practicing orthopedic surgeon in Tallahassee, part-time faculty member of the FSU College of Medicine, avid tennis player, member of the Tallahassee Scientific Society, former member of the Florida Environmental Commission and active member and Climate Leader of the Climate Reality Project, visited the James Madison Preparatory High School on Friday, May 16. The Climate Reality Project takes a deeper look at the science, impacts and solutions surrounding the issue of climate change, and trained presenters like Bellamy visit community groups, civic groups, neighborhood gatherings, schools, and other groups to discuss the subject. At JMPHS, where Alan Androski's physical science class has been studying sources of energy, along with Dr. Bellamy's visit, they were able to see how their studies could be applied to the real world. Bellamy's presentation tied into the curriculum by discussing sources of energy and the increasing demands for energy required by the planet as the population increases, as well as the impacts those demands have on the planet, as seen by evidence of climate changes. In the future, the need for conservation will become more and more important, and people should be aware of the effects they can have by practicing even simple conservation efforts – starting with turning off more lights. Other points in his presentation included the fact that the cost of solar energy systems keeps getting lower and lower, so that in the future, more people might be able to choose and afford more renewable energy sources such as solar.Photo SubmittedDr. Ray Bellamy talks to Alan Androski's physical science class at James Madison Preparatory High School about energy sources.Photo SubmittedOne of Dr. Ray Bellamy's concerns is the effect an increasing population will have on the planet, with increasing demands for energy.

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.For the kids, it was way cool. For many adults over a certain age, it was where was all this cool stuff when I was in school? Lee Elementary School had a eld day for its students, with colorful fun and games at several tness stations around the playground. There were all the classics, including sack races and tug-ofwar, as well as several games that involved getting wet and blasting each other with giant water guns. On a day with midsummer-like temperatures in the forecast, it was a perfect day to get wet, run around and have fun, while volunteers like Sydney Hardin, Chris Sapp and several others kept the children's water bottles lled so they could stay hydrated on the inside as well as the outside. The Rotary Club of Madison was also there, with its Purple Pinkie Project, to raise funds for PolioPlus, part of a global effort to eradicate polio from the face of the planet. Groups of children stopped by, and those who had permission slips from their parents could donate a dollar and have a pinkie dyed purple. A few donated two dollars, to have two of their ngers purpled. Who knew school could be so cool?Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 9Schoolwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 FEED TIMESHow to use: The major and minor feeding times for each day are listed below. The major feeding times are the best for the sportsman and last about 2 hours, the minor feeding times can also have good success, but last only about 1 hour. Good luck and be careful out there. Major feed times are marked by an asterisk (*) The Week Of May 30 June 5, 2014 Friday May 30 *2:10 AM 8:30 AM *2:30 PM 8:50 PM Saturday May 31 *3:00 AM 9:10 AM *3:30 PM 9:40 PM Sunday June 1 *3:55 AM 10:10 AM *4:20 PM 10:30 PM Monday June 2 *4:45 AM 10:55 AM *5:10 PM 11:20 PM Tuesday June 3 *5:30 AM 11:45 AM *5:55 PM Wednesday June 4 12:10 AM 6:20 AM 12:30 PM *6:40 PM Thursday June 5 12:55 AM *7:10 AM 1:20 PM *7:30 PM 21STANNUAL WELLBORN BLUEBERRY FESTIVAL June 7, 2014 RAIN DATE JUNE 8THNo Admission Fee Andrews Square in Downtown Wellborn, Florida Saturday 7 a.m. … 5 p.m. Come join us for a fun-filled day of Blueberry Treats & Entertainment Arts & Crafts, Food Vendors, Country Store selling all things blueberry Live Entertainment, Childrens Amusements Blueberry Pancake Breakfast, Parade Hosted By The Wellborn Community Association, Inc., A Non-Profit 501(C)(3) Corporation FOR INFORMATION, SCHEDULE AND DIRECTIONS, visit www.wellborncommunityassociation.com, call 386-963-1157, or e-mail: wendellsnowden@prodigy.net S e r v i n g O u r N e i g h b o r s F o r O v e r 5 0 Y e a r s Competitive Rates Online Banking I N T E R E S T C H E C K I N GS A V I N G S M O N E Y M A R K E TB U S I N E S S C H E C K I N G C E R T I F I C A T E O F D E P O S I TI R A 424 West Base Street P.O. Box 267 Madison, Florida 32340 Phone: 850.973.2600 www.csbdirect.com LOBBY HOURS Mon. Thurs. 9 am 4 pm Friday 9 am 5 pm DRIVE THRU HOURS Mon. Fri. 8:30 am 5 pm Friday 8:30 am 5 pm Lee Elementary Has Field DayGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 23, 2014The Rotary Club of Madison sets up under the picnic area at Lee Elementary for their Purple Pinkie Project. First row, left to right are: Janna Bars and Chad Arnold. Second row, left to right are: Jim Catron, Pete Bucher and Ed Meggs. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 23, 2014Ready. Set. GO! The tricycle races were popular, but it wasn't as easy as it looked, riding over grass.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 23, 2014Another fun game was trying to catch sopping wet foam balls with butter”y nets.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 23, 2014In the foreground, two teams battle each other in a tug-of-war, while in the background, another group makes waves with a colorful parachute.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 23, 2014Isaac Collins, six, shows off two purple “ngers at the Rotary Purple Pinkie station.

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Education is one of the most important aspects of boating and shing safely and responsibly. Knowing the ins and outs of your boat, how to navigate waterways, how to read a nautical chart and how to operate a VHF radio are just a few important things to learn before going out on the water. Every state has its own boating safety requirements and/or guidelines, but regardless of rules and regulations, successfully completing a boating class increases your water safety and boating skills. Sometimes it even qualies you for a discount on your insurance. Know The Parts Of Your Boat Boats come in many styles and shapes, but the names of the different parts remain consistent. Every boat operator should know the following terms and denitions. Beam: Maximum width of a vessel. Gunwale: Upper edge of a vessel's side. Hull: Body of a vessel. Keel: Main centerline of a vessel, or the extension of the hull that increases stability. Propeller: Rotates and powers vessel forward or backward. Draft: Depth of water needed to oat a vessel. Freeboard: Distance from water to lowest point of boat where water could come aboard. Starboard: Right side of a vessel. All-Round White Light: Indicates rear of a vessel. Stern: Rear of a vessel. Cleat: Metal tting on which a rope can be fastened. Port: Left side of a vessel. Red and Green Sidelights: Directional indicators on front of a vessel. Bow: Front of a vessel.10 €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 Enjoy & Be Safe! M a d i s o n C o u n t y S c h o o l B o a r d M e m b e rD i s t r i c t 5 E n j o y T h i s W e e k W i t h F a m i l y & F r i e n d s € Open 24/7 € Visit Us Before Or After Your Day On The Water! Be Safe! Karen Wieland, Kimberly Fields, Christina Hester, Christie Bradfield, Brittany Keen And Melissa Reader Tommy HardeeMadison County Supervisor of Elections Enjoy Our Florida Waters With Family & Friends Be Safe! Visit Us For All Your Fishing & Boating Needs! Proud To Serve You With The BEST Meat In Town! National Fishing And Boating WeekNational Fishing and Boating Week, a national celebration of shing and boating, takes place the rst week of June every year. This year it's June 1-8. It highlights the importance of recreational boating and shing in enhancing people's quality of life and preserving our country's natural beauty. It also is when most states offer their Free Fishing Days. Why Go Boating and Fishing? Boating and shing are fun, stress-relieving activities. Here are just a few reasons why you should get out on the water: De-stress: Boating is ranked as one of the top three of all stress-relieving activities. Connect with Nature: 90 percent of Americans live within an hour of navigable water. Help Conserve: The funds from your shing licenses and boat registrations go towards the conservation of our natural aquatic areas. Free Fishing Days During National Fishing and Boating Week, most states offer free shing days. These are days where anglers are allowed to sh on public bodies of water without a shing license. Free shing days are a perfect opportunity for beginners to try out shing for the rst time. If you already have a shing license, consider taking a friend or family member who has never been shing out on the water for the day. Free shing days in Florida are: June 7 & 8 Saltwater June 14 & 15 Freshwater Make sure to get out and enjoy these days! Mentor or Teach Someone New to Fish Did you know that one of the main reasons people don't go shing or boating is because no one has invited them? For a newcomer, shing can feel like an intimidating activity without an experienced guide, but you can help change this. During National Fishing and Boating Week, or the next time you go shing, take someone new: a child, a relative or a friend. How to Celebrate National Fishing and Boating Week The best way to celebrate National Fishing and Boating Week is to get out on the water! Fun, stress-relieving activities, shing and boating are some of the best ways to unwind. Learn to Fish: Get your kids out there! Fishing with kids is a great way to connect with them and to experience the outdoors together. Spend time teaching your children the joys of shing and boating. Kids enjoy feeling included, and what better way to instill some responsibility in your children. Depending on their age, give them small things for which they are responsible, such as ensuring that everyone has a personal oatation device or teaching them to coil a line. Being on the water provides an excellent opportunity to teach kids about their environment, and boating, shing and safety skills. Try to incorporate these teachings into fun activities and gradually introduce your kids to new things as they are ready. Tips for Fishing with Kids Avoid the kid's stuff An ultra-light spinning or spin casting rod and reel combo is usually easier for kids to use. Small hooks = big catches Avoid hooks larger than size 10 (hook sizes run backwards size 12 is smaller than size 10). Fish won't readily take large hooks unless they are feeding voraciously. Lighten up your line A light line will do the job, prefer ably 6-pound test line or less. Bag the big bobbers Bobbers (or oats) are used to suspend your bait in the water and alert you when to set the hooks. The harder the bobber is to pull under, the harder it will be to hook a sh. Small oats will help convince the sh to take your tasty bait and run. "Slip" bobbers work well for kids. Slip bobber rigs cut down on the amount of line needed at the end of the rod and are easier to cast. Small ice shing bobbers can provide a light touch any time of year. Great big gobs of worms won't do There's no need to use whole whopping-big, writhing night crawlers on your hook. Keep the bait approximately the size of your hook. Livebait such as worms, bee moths or crickets work best. Cut the bait to t your hook.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014

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Story SubmittedIn honor of World No Tobacco Day, Florida Department of Health Madison is commemorating the important progress made in the ght against tobacco while also shedding light on the latest facts released this year about tobacco use and its deadly consequences. "Each day more than 4,000 youth try smoking for the rst time," said Leila Rykard, LPN, HSPS. "An additional 1,000 more kids become regular daily smokers." Earlier this year, the U.S. Surgeon General released a report highlighting 50 years of progress in tobacco control since the rst report on smoking and health was published in 1964. Despite this progress, tobacco use remains the leading preventable cause of death and disease. The new report also added several health effects to the long list of cigarette smoking's serious consequences. The report concluded that smoking causes liver and colorectal cancer, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunction, ectopic pregnancies, impaired fertility, cleft lip and cleft palates in babies of women who smoke during early pregnancy, age-related macular degeneration, and immune system weakness. These are the latest facts in the ght against tobacco: Tobacco’s Deadly Toll Tobacco has killed more than 20 million people prematurely since the rst surgeon general's report in 1964. Every day, about 1,300 people in the U.S. die because of smoking. Two and half million of those deaths have been among nonsmokers who died from diseases caused by exposure to secondhand smoke. If current smoking rates continue, 5.6 million U.S. children alive today who are younger than 18 years of age will die prematurely as a result of smoking. The estimated economic costs attributable to smoking and exposure to tobacco smoke continue to increase and now approach $300 billion annually in the U.S. Direct medical costs are at least $130 billion and productivity losses of more than $150 billion a year. Tobacco Control’s Progress In 2012, the smoking rate for adults in Florida was 17.7 percent, which is below the national average of 19.6 percent. Since 2007, 93,400 Floridians have successfully quit tobacco using one of Tobacco Free Florida's 3 Free and Easy Ways to Quit services. In 2003, under the Florida Clean Indoor Air Act (FCIAA), the state's indoor workplaces went smoke-free, with few exceptions. Florida's high school smoking rate reached an all-time low of 8.6 percent in 2013, one of the lowest high school smoking rates in the country and far below the national average. Florida's reduction in smokers has helped the state save more than $4.2 billion in personal health care costs since the inception of the Tobacco Free Florida program in 2007. "Tobacco is exacting a tremendous toll on our society, yet, I am encouraged by the progress made throughout the state and in Madison," said Tobacco Free Florida Bureau Chief Shannon Hughes. "An estimated eight million American lives were potentially saved since the publication of that rst surgeon general's report in 1964. Today in Florida, we are implementing a nationally renowned program Tobacco Free Florida that is saving lives and saving the state millions of dollars." Every year, on May 31, the World Health Organization (WHO) and tobacco control advocates around the globe mark World No Tobacco Day, highlighting the health risks associated with tobacco use and advocating for effective policies to reduce tobacco consumption. ABOUT TOBACCO FREE FLORIDA Tobacco Free Florida is a statewide cessation and prevention campaign funded by Florida's tobacco settlement fund. Tobacco Free Florida is managed by the Florida Department of Health, specically the Bureau of Tobacco Free Florida. Smokers and smokeless tobacco users interested in quitting are encouraged to use one of the 3 Free and Easy Ways to Quit. To learn about Tobacco Free Florida and the state's free cessation resources, visit www.tobaccofreeorida.com or follow the campaign on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TobaccoFreeFlorida or Twitter at www.twitter.com/tobaccofreea.Health12 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014 CALL ME TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION. Great rates … no worries*1.60 % APY*48 month CD Nate C Cruce, Agent State Farm Agent 378 E Base Street Madison, FL 32340 Bus: 850-973-6641 *Up to FDIC insured limits. Annual Percentage Yields as of 05/28/14. Advertised rates are subject to change at the Bank's discretion. The minimum balance required to earn the stated APY is $500 (rates apply to deposits less than $100,000). A penalty may be imposed for withdrawls prior to maturity.2.05 % APY*60 month CD D 48 month CY .60 % AP 1 Y .05 % AP 2 * ent g m A ar e F t a t S ent g A e uc e C Cr t a N g. ul thin autif s a be  It n e a s o o u ch o p y l e e h t m e L of e at c “ i t r e C d re u s n i C I D F k n a m B r a e F t a t m S o r t f i s o p e D. w o r y g e n o r m u o ch y t a d w n a ghbor ood n ei ith a g o Bank w. R O Y F A AY D O E T L M L A C ON I T A AT M OR F N I E OR MD 60 month CY .05 % AP 2 3 7. 8 2 1 0 0 1 a m B r a e F t a t Sposed f y be im y ma penalt e t ra ed APY is $500 ( t a t he s n t ar o e t he Bank's discr t t e a g han o c t t jec e sub s ar e t ra Annual P ed limits o FDIC insur p t *U : 850-973-6641 Bus FL 32340 Madison t ee r t se S 378 E Ba g L I n o t g n i m o o l B B S F k n. y it ur t o ma ior t ls pr w hdra it or w posed f ,000 han $100 ss t o deposits le y t s appl e eq e r The minimum balanc ion t e he Bank's discr er dv A s of 05/28/14 lds a e Yie g a ent c er Annual P A ) ed uir eq ised t Madison Florida Department Of Health Wants You To Know The Facts In The Fight Against Tobacco-World No Tobacco Day is May 31-

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . LEGALS Friday, May 30, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 13 FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 5/26/2014 THROUGH 6/1/2014 I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).3/26 rtn, n/c Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBe A CNA Would you like to work as a nursing assistant? Become a CNA. Quest Training offers a nurse taught, 40 hr. prep class. No GED required if age 18 yr. Day and Evening classes. 386-362-1065.5/7 5/28, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/cCDL Class A Driver Needed 2 years veri“ed experience. Runs mostly SE extended area. Good 2 year MVR. Blue Cross and blue shield health insurance offered. (850) 929-2279.4/11 rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com5/7 rtn, c 4 BR, 2 BA House With “replace, large yard and no pets. Near Blue Springs. $700 month, $700 security. 1 year lease. (850) 274-5805 or (907) 230-4705.5/7 rtn, c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12’x18’ building with 6’ porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/cAutomation and Production Technology (APT) Instructor wanted at North Florida Community College, Madison FL. See www.nfcc.edu for details.5/21, 5/28, cDrivers, CDL-A: Home EVERY Weekend! ALL Loaded/Empty Miles Paid! Dedicated Southeast! Or Lease: No Money Down, No Credit Check. 1-888-880-5916.5/28, pdLP Driver Requirements: CDL License with Tanker and Hazmat Endorsement. Experience is a plus. Apply in person with resume at 208 West Screven St. Quitman, Ga. 31643.5/28, cAdoption Are you pregnant? A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1 (855) 985-4592. Adam Sklar #0150789. Auctions Auction-Waterfront Home, Lake Eufaula, 217 Cypress Cove Drive, Eufaula, Al, 5 Bedroom-4Bath, Executive, Great views. June 10, 1 p.m. Details, pictures GTAuctions.com 205.326.0833 Granger, Thagard & Assoc,Inc. Jack F Granger, #873. Education TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASS'T CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY. Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709. Help Wanted Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Quali“ed drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Experienced Team, Solo, Recent Grad & Student Drivers needed for dedicated run in your area! Ask about our sign-on bonus and guaranteed hometime! Call 866-414-3402. Real Estate Western NC New cabin on 2.51ac. w/2bdr, loft, large deck, covered porch, fpl, minutes from the lake $139,900. Call 828-286-1666. 42.9 acres, hunting camp, $49,90020 acres near Eridu, pasture/field $40,0002.98 acres, all huge pines Lee, Fl $14,000 1 acre on paved road, Pinetta, $12,000 Mobile home community, 1/2 acre, $9900 Lee, flWater, septic, power, drive way $8995.00 Country Kitchen rd 5/23, 5/30 5/30, 6/6 5/30, 6/6 NOTICE OF PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE BY THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE GREENVILLE, FLORIDA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that proposed Ordinance No. 2014-01, bearing title as follows, will be considered Monday, June 9, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. at City Hall, Greenville, Florida. ORDINANCE NO. 235 AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE IMPOSING A TEMPORARY MORATORIUM ON IMPACT FEES FOR WATER AND WASTEWATER; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. A copy of the proposed Ordinance is available for public inspection at City Hall, Greenville, Florida during regular business hours. At the meeting, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City, the person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. TOWN OF GREENVILLE, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Kimberly Reams Town Clerk5/30 NOW HIRING! Florida Call for Shift Availability(12 hours shifts on Saturday & Sunday for RNS & LPNs) Referral/Sign-on bonusfor employees and new hires.Full Time RNs/LPNsEmployee Bonus = $1000 after 3 months $250, after 6 months $250, after one year $500 New Hire Bonus = $500 after 3 months $250, after 6 months $250Any questions contact Human ResourcesAD/GW FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922

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14 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 30, 2014