The Madison enterprise-recorder

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Material Information

Title:
The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title:
Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title:
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Creation Date:
May 31, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note:
Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID:
UF00028405:00639

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By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.The First Lady of Florida, Ann Scott, visited Pinetta Elementary School Monday, May 12, as part of the Florida Department of Educations Just Read, Florida! reading program. Mrs. Scott is well known for her advocacy of literature and encouraging children to read, especially during the summer months when school is out and in 2012 she partnered with the Just Read Florida! Summer Literacy Adventure that challenged students to read and participate in a contest of sorts between schools. Studies have consistently shown that students who read throughout the year are able to retain their knowledge and continue to learn. Mrs. Scott knows this first hand and has said, as a child, she waited for school to be over so that she could spend her summers at the library. Literacy experts and educators agree, children of all ages need to be read to and need to talk about the books they have read. Reading over the summer helps students maintain reading skills, improve reading fluency and provides opportunity to learn new vocabulary and concepts. Our 149thYear, Number 37 Since 1865, Telling It Like It Is And Defending The Peasant's Right To Know Index1 Section, 16 Pages Local WeatherViewpoints 2 Around Madison 3-5 20thOf May Jubilation 6-9Memorial Day 11 Relay For Life 12-13 Classieds/Legals 15Friday, May 23, 2014Madison, Florida Madison Woman Struck And Killed By VehicleBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.Avehicle traveling on State Road 53 North, just north of Duval Pond Road, struck and killed a local Madison woman on Wednesday, May 21 at 7:25 p.m. According to the Florida Highway Patrol report, Eric Ottey Hammond, Jr., 54, of Madison, was traveling south on SR 53 when he traveled onto the west shoulder and struck Gloria Jean Christian, 38, who was walking south on the west shoulder of SR 53 at the intersection of Duval Pond Road. After colliding with the pedestrian, Hammond corrected back onto the roadway and traveled in a southeasterly direction across both south and north bound lanes and onto the east shoulder. Christian came to a nal rest on the west shoulder of SR 53. Charges against Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Emerald Greene, May 21, 2014 Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Emerald Greene, May 21, 2014Valdosta Addresses County Commission About Their Sewage PlantBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Representatives from the city of Valdosta, including City Manager Larry Hanson, Utilities Director Henry Hicks, and Stormwater Utilities Director Emily Davenport, addressed the Madison County Commission at their last meeting to discuss the recent ooding at Valdosta's sewage plant, the effect it had on the Withlacoochee River and on Madison whichGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 14, 2014Valdosta Stormwater Utilities Director Emily Davenport and Valdosta Utilities Director Henry Hicks address the Madison County Commission and answer questions to explain what Valdosta has been doing and what it plans to do in the future to mitigate ooding issues at its sewage plant. Not pictured: Valdosta City Manager Larry Hanson, who gave the rst part of the presentation, but had to leave early to get to a regional ood board meeting in Tifton, Ga. See Valdosta Explains On Page 3 City Of Madison Faces Hard Choices In FutureBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.We have to have priorities established and expectations lowered, City Manager Tim Bennett told the City Council members after their May meeting. We have some high expectations of how the city should look, but we'll have to make some heavy decisions. His remarks were in reference to the city's extremely tight budget and meagre revSee Hard Choices On Page 3 Health Department Testing Water Until The End Of MayBecause of the excessive rainfall and ooding throughout the county in recent weeks, Governor Rick Scott has issued an emergency order allowing free water testing until the end of the month. Madison County Health Department is offering free testing of well water samples through Flowers Lab on 812 SW Harvey Greene Drive from now until the end of the month. For those residents whose homes and wells have been ooded, or who have noticed a change in the appearance or taste of their water since the widespread ooding, it may be a good idea to have their water checked. Residents will rst need to obtain a sterile water bottle from Flowers Lab to collect their sample, and then drop that sample off at Flowers. They must be sure to inform the lab that the sample is being taken due to the recent ooding event so that Flowers will know to send the invoice to the Madison County Health Department. If contamination is found, it is often a simple matter to disinfect the well, but in some cases, a damaged well might need repairs. To make sure the water you are drinking is safe, the Department recommends having your water periodically tested for bacteria.See Testing On Page 3 Floridas First Lady Ann Scott Visits PinettaSee First Lady On Page 3Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 12, 2014Gail Washingtons rst grade class enjoyed hearing the book, Each Kindness read to them by Floridas First Lady. Students in the front row, left to right, are: Luke Washington, Lizeth Bartolo, Anthony Schreiber, Maddox Scanlan, Lydia Barnes, Alexcia Fifa, Kelsea Miller, Aden Angeles and Lane Keeling. Standing in the back row, left to right, are: Aurora Russell, Chloe Durst, Justin Hasty, First Lady Ann Scott, Ms. Gail Washington, Charles Ballenger, Jallene Cooks, Tavorris Robinson and Kristian Gianino. Standing in the back row is Pinetta Elementary Principal, Beth Moore. 20thOf May Celebration See Pages 6-9 Over 40 Local Pictures Inside!

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Memorial weekend is here and it marks the beginning of the summer season of backyard grilling. Meals cooked outdoors always increase during the summer months and the variety of food people put on the grill seems to be expanding. With all of the food preparation in summer temperatures, you need to be aware of safe food handling practices. Backyard chefs dont think about it, but each year outbreaks of food poisoning increase during the summer months. Bacteria that causes food poisoning are invisible, odorless and tasteless; summer temperatures only increase the potential population explosion. Since it is not appetizing to think about food invaders like E. coli, clostridium perfringens or salmonella, using safe food handling methods will drastically reduce your chances of exposing your family and friends to food borne illness. First, marinate meats in a glass dish in the refrigerator, not the kitchen countertop. If you plan to use some of the marinade for basting or a dip, reserve a portion before you put raw meat into it. Bacteria from raw meat will contaminate the liquid and it should be discarded after the marinating time is over. Coals should be very hot before food is placed on the grill for cooking. A hot grill will assure that food is cooked at a high enough temperature to destroy bacteria. It takes 30 minutes or longer before coals are hot enough; they should appear to have a light coating of ash for the highest temperature. Meat should be thoroughly cooked. The best way to check for doneness is to use a meat thermometer. Whole cuts of beef, steaks and roasts should be cooked to an internal temperature of 145F, while ground meat needs to reach an internal temperature of 160F. Poultry needs to reach an internal temperature of 165F. Be sure the thermometer is inserted in the eshy part of the meat and not touching bone. If you dont have a thermometer, visually check by cutting into the meat to be sure the juices are clear and not pink in color. To avoid are-ups and charred food, remove visible fat from meat. Temperatures for cooking pork have changed in recent years; USDA now recommends a cooking temperature of 145F with a resting time of three minutes. Research showed the internal temperature continues to rise during the resting time and reaches 160F. Put cooked foods on a clean plate that hasnt been used to hold raw meat or poultry. Cooking food destroys bacteria, but if you put it back on the same plate, you just exposed it to bacteria again. Food safety experts call this cross contamination and it is sure to cause food borne illness. Perishable foods need to be served hot off the grill. USDA recommends food should be at room temperature no more than two hours. If you are eating outdoors, keep in mind warm temperatures reduce that time to one hour. Leftovers should be promptly divided in to small containers and placed in the refrigerator. Simple changes in the way you prepare and serve your backyard barbeque will greatly reduce your risk for food borne illness. For more information on food safety, contact the Madison County Extension Service Ofce The University of Florida Extension Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution. Somewhere, raindrops fall softly on sidewalks, as anxious children peer through windows at the clouds and bemoan the loss of their warm spring morning. A day that could have been spent outside is instead spent indoors. They still realize though that tomorrow will come and bring hope. A couple of hours and the shower is gone and the children run along to play games and sing enchanted songs. Somewhere, raindrops pound the very inside of a mans soul. He looks at the clouds and bemoans his eeting life. A life that could have been spent with family was spent in hours of endless work and frustration. He has no hope. The sun will not return later today or tomorrow and if it does, it will only bring oppressive heat, which will wither any rose of joy. There are no enchanting songs sending their sounds from within his heart. This man doesnt realize that there is hope. There can be joy. There can be salvation. He has a life boat that he can board, but no one has told him about Jesus. Do you have any friends who need to know about the Lord? Share the love of Jesus Christ today. Viewpoints & Opinions2 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Conservative Corner Conservative CornerBy Nelson A. Pryor, Lee, Fl. Jacobs Ladder Jacob BembryColumnist Diann DouglasGuest ColumnistMadison County Extension Service Raindrops On Sidewalks Read Jacobs blog at www.jacobbembry.com. His book, Higher Call, is available in Kindle format at www.amazon.com or in paperback at www.amazon.com, www.bn.com and www.booksamillion.com or by sending $10 plus $3.99 shipping and handling to Jacob Bembry, P.O. Box 9334, Lee, FL 32059. Contact him at jacobbembry@hotmail.com. Memorial Weekend Starts Grilling Season Arms Cache In Texas Likely Kept By The CIA THE MADISON COUNTY REPUBLICAN EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Will meet at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, May 27, at the Madison Library ALL Republicans Welcome Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee MadisonRepublican@embarqmail.com This is the headline of a New York Times story, for May 5, 2014. Many of us have wondered where all this acknowledged ammo, that Homeland Security, and even the Social Security Administration, has been stored. This top secret location now appears to be outed. About three years ago, it became public that the C.I.A. had some kind of secret location at Camp Stanley, an Army weapons depot just north of San Antonio and the former Kelly Air Force Base, though its purpose was unclear. And now, a retired C.I.A. analyst, Allen Thomson, has assembled a mosaic of documentation suggesting that it is most likely the home of the famous Midwest Depot. In December, he quietly posted his research, which he has updated several times with additional clues, on the website of the Federation of American Scientists. Allen Thomson, in an email exchange with the NY Times, argued that the Midwest Depots history should be scrutinized. I have worried about the extent to which the U. S. has spread small arms around over the decades to various parties it supported, he said. Such weapons are pretty durable and, after the cause du jour passed, where did they go? To be a little dramatic about it, how many of those AK-47s and RPG-7s we see Islamists waving around today passed through the Midwest Depot on their way to freedom ghters in past decades?" Spokesmen for the Pentagon and the C.I.A. declined to comment. A public affairs ofcer for Camp Stanley said its mission was to be a weapons storage and testing facility for the military. In passing references scattered through once-classied documents and cryptic public comments by former intelligence ofcials, the weapons storage facility, is always referred to as Midwest Depot, but the bland code name belies the role it has played to support some of the C.I.A.s most storied operations. There is no outward indication of what would be one of the C.I.As three known facilities in these united States, along with its headquarters in Langley, Va., and Camp Perry, a military base near Williamsburg, Va., known by its code name, The Farm, that is believed to be used for training. The article reports that Joel Shipp, son of one of the C.I.A. ofcials who had lived at Camp Stanley, called the camp a secret base which had been used for illegal arms running and chemical weapons storage. Camp Stanley has recently undergone a building boom of new warehouses. A March 2010 solicitation for environmental cleanup emphasized that workers needed security clearances. The installation stores large quantities of arms and ammunition and has sensitive missions, thus access to the installation and security clearance requirements for long term personnel are much more restrictive than most military installations, it read. Just last July, according to another document Mr. Thomson spotted, the Army sought to purchase two million rounds of ammunition of the caliber that ts AK-47 ries, which American soldiers do not use. The delivery address: Camp Stanley. Pictures From The Past Larry Roffe Checking Under The Hood At His Gas Station Photo Courtesy Of State Archives Of Florida, Florida Memory, http://oridamemory.com/items/show/133120 taken 19--

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sits downstream, and the steps Valdosta is taking to mitigate future incidents. With slide presentations that included aerial photos of the ooded plant from this year and from 2009, Hanson stated that Madison sits at the bottom of a 1500 square mile ood basin. This is a regional watershed issue, not issues caused by our city, said Hanson. We're impacted by rainfall as far north as Cordele. Even so, Hanson explained that Valdosta has not been simply standing by and allowing events to unfold, but has been actively taking steps to try to mitigate the situation. After the 2009 ood, the city tried to go through FEMA to get funding to move the plant. FEMA denied their request three times, a process that took three years. Each time, FEMA wanted more or different information, or wanted something changed in the proposal. The third time, FEMA sent in its own engineers, and then still denied the request. It was a frustrating time for the city management, because only after FEMA had denied them for the third time could they begin taking any steps to address the issue themselves. In the meantime, they discovered that FEMA's oodplain maps, which showed the present plant located outside the oodplain zone, were outdated. New maps show that the 500-year oodplain boundary actually runs right through the middle of the plant. Currently, the city of Valdosta is operating under a consent order to make improvements to the existing plant and has begun work on a $56 million project to relocate the plant in ve years' time. The site for the new plant is several miles to the west, where the ground is approximately 70 feet higher. At the current plant, the wastewater main line has been moved further away from the river. The city is also upgrading its stormwater runoff system, replacing outdated manholes at the rate of 30 a year. So far they have replaced nearly 500. They have also replaced eight lift stations and are rehabbing four more. The upgrading and improvement at the present plant will keep it in compliance and keep it working as it is supposed to, and the upgraded and replaced pieces of equipment are items that can be picked up and relocated to the new plant as soon as it is completed. The city is also constantly sampling water around the plant, and the usual ndings show that, except under extraordinary circumstances like ood events, river water downstream of the plant was actually lower in contaminants than water from upstream. There were also other sources of daily pollution that included animal droppings from wildlife, domestic animals and livestock, urban runoff, agricultural runoff, construction sites and failing septic systems. The Valdosta ofcials encouraged everyone who is interested to visit their website at http://www.valdosta.com/utilities and take a look at what is happening and what is being done. While there, website visitors can also sign up for the enews feature if they wish and receive email updates that will keep them informed of ongoing developments.From Page One Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 The MadisonEnterprise-RecorderSince 1865 -Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity.The Madison The Madison Enterprise-Recorder Enterprise-RecorderMadison Recorder established 1865 New Enterprise established 1901 Consolidated June 25, 1908 Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post Ofce 32340. Publication No. 177.400. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison Enterprise-Recorder P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.P.O. Box 772 Madison, FL 32341 1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32340 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 greenepub@greenepublishing.com www.greenepublishing.com 2013FCCLA Fundraiser This WeekendBy Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.The Madison County High School FCCLA (Family, Career and Community Leaders of America) will be holding a carwash for donations this weekend at the Madison County Community Bank from 8 a.m. until noon. They will also be selling rafe tickets for a $100 Busy Bee card. The group is raising funds in order for members, Magan Jennings, Lizzy Frakes and Bianca Serrano to attend the National Conference in San Antonio, Texas this summer. These three students qualied to compete at nationals and will be attending to represent Madison County High School and Florida FCCLA in their respective competitions. These three young ladies need your help to get there, so please come out, get your car washed and support these students as they strive to reach their goal. First Lady Cont. From Page 1During her visit to Pinetta, the First Lady visited two classrooms, Missy Cherrys third grade and Gail Washingtons rst grade. While in the classrooms, she read to students, making it a point to discuss the books while reading and afterwards, allowed the students to ask questions of a more personal nature. She talked openly to them about her life as First Lady and even showed pictures of her family, including grandkids and her yellow Lab Tally. After students asked her a myriad of questions about herself, what her favorite color was (green) and some of her favorite things to do (taking long walks), the First Lady turned the tables on students and asked them some of the things they liked to do when not in school. This proved to be the funniest part of the question and answer session in Mrs. Washingtons classroom as the rst graders caught her off guard with answers of, be lazy and I like to chase our goats around and push my brother down in goat poop. After calm was restored, Mrs. Scotts time at the school was over and she walked down the corridors, where students lined the halls, reaching their hands out to give the First Lady high ves. As she left, the First Lady of Florida reminded them how important it was to continue their reading throughout the summer break. For school-aged children, Kindergarten through 12thgrade, Floridas Department of Education has a suggested summer reading list. You can nd the list atwww.justreadfamilies.org/ SummerReadingList.pdf.To nd out more about the statewide reading initiative go to www.justreadorida.com.To nd out more about First Lady Ann Scott, visitwww.gov.com/followann-scott.Photo SubmittedMissy Cherrys third grade class was Mrs. Scotts rst classroom to visit at the school. Taking a moment to pose with the First Lady of Florida, front row, from left to right, are: Amber Thompkins, Lovely Irvine, Lauren Sherrill (bending over), Tsadi Irvine, Mason Good, Raul Duarte-Santiago, Marissa Scanlan and Harley Rogers. In the middle row, left to right, are: Lucy Cherry, Tramiya Bea, Abby Washington, Stephanie Hasty, Ivelisse Lee, ANesha Robinson, Jack Agee, Dexter White, Peyton Justus and Andrew Pepera. In the back row, left to right, are: Ms. Missy Cherry, First Lady Ann Scott and Principal Beth Moore. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 12, 2014The First Lady of Florida, Ann Scott, gives students at Pinetta Elementary high-ves as she exitsthe school. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 12, 2014The students in Ms. Washingtons class had a lot of questions for Mrs. Scott during their reading time with her. Valdosta Explains Cont. From Page 1Photo SubmittedOne of several dramatic slides shows the 2009 ood. Valdosta began to seek funding for relocating the plant, which experienced complete loss of function for nine days and was not fully operational again for a month. The 2014 ood waters did not rise as high and did not reach the plant. Hard Choices Cont. From Page 1 Testing Cont. From Page 1For questions of more information, contact William Gibson at (850) 973-5000, ext. 132, or email William Gibson at William.Gibson@health.gov. For directions to the Flowers Chemical Laboratories, call (850) 973-6878.enue sources that would mean heaving to choose between having the city look nice, as in clean, attractive and well-keptup, versus letting some of those appearance/cosmetic issues go and focusing on what is strictly necessary to keep the city running while still safeguarding the health and well-being of its citizens. The city has had to back away from demolition of dilapidated structures and go with just putting liens on them. With the issues of much needed sidewalks in some neighborhoods, using MCI labor would save money, but it would take a lot longer to complete the projects than with using city crews, since MCI workers have scheduling constraints. Bennett predicted that council members would soon start getting calls from constituents about the conditions of sidewalks, roads and so forth. Councilman Jim Catron stated that part of what the council was looking at were necessities and immediate needs like wastewater and ooding services, things that had already gotten the city in trouble with some penalties from the Department of Environmental Protection. Bennett conrmed that the city had two nes from DEP coming its way in the near future, nes that were the direct result of failing infrastructure several months ago. The core of the city, its infrastructure, is 100 years old, he reminded the council. It is brick and clay. And it is deteriorating. Every week, there seems to be a wastewater problem due to infrastructure, he added. We're drawing down our Enterprise funds to pay for general operations of the city. It was, he told them, a perfect storm of public safety, pensions and infrastructure problems that was causing the city to cannibalize itself, eating away at the Enterprise funds instead of reinvesting in them. We'll quit spending money wherever we can quit spending money, he said. Be prepared for the phone calls. There were questions about whether problems such as, for example, a vacant house with an overgrown yard would be considered a cosmetic issue or a public safety issue. What if it began harboring snakes and rats? Such issues would have to be considered on a case-by-case basis, with the crucial test being: was it indeed a true threat to public health and safety. On top of that, hurricane season was fast approaching, with all of its public safety issues. Councilwoman Rayne Cooks said that they were working with agencies to try to get the TIF (Tax Increment Financing) district extended all the way to the city limits to help with the infrastructure problem, but it can't be done right away, she said. It'll take time. In the mean time, it was going to be hard choices and careful planning, and as Councilman Jim Catron noted, A need for us to look at planning for multiple years (in the future).

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May 14 Geoffrey Walter Hill Sexual battery.May 15 Edward Obediah Dupree Disorderly intoxication. Michael E. Gravel Criminal registration. Heather Nicole Benge Possession of marijuana less than 20 grams and possession of drug paraphernalia. May 16 Jonathan Shane Penny Possession of drug/canabanoid and possession of drug paraphernalia. Heidi Jane Hopson Possession of drug/canabanoid and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bryan Keith Cotrell Criminal registration. Vincent Alexander Battery domestic violence, possession of a controlled substance less than 20 grams and possession of drug paraphernalia. Jimmie Lee Davis Jr. Battery DV 3rdweekend. Maurice Germaine Bennett DUI. Marshall Windell Straws Violation of parole.May 17 Wally R. Walters Possession of drug equipment and possession of marijuana less than 20 grams. James Benjamin Ware Criminal mischief. Craig Lamar Solomon Jr. Aggravated assault with deadly weapon and disorderly intoxication. Jimmie Lee Bryant Trespass of occupied structure or conveyance. Deborice Latrall Harris Violation of parole and out of county. Leon Gallon Battery Domestic Violence.May 18 Essie Mae Johnson Domestic Violence Battery. Jerry Jerrod Harris Violation of parole (circuit). Frederick Coleman Williams Expired drivers license more than four months. Edgar Lewis Thomas Fleeing/attempting to elude a police officer and must have motorcycle endorsement.May 19 Robert Carter Jr. Aggravated stalking. Derreick Jeremiah Fead Violation of parole (county).May 20 Jason Paul Madison Criminal registration. Bernard Lashawn Brinson Criminal registration. Damon Desean Phillips Burglary of conveyance. Renee Lea Yates Fraud/impersonate/display anothers drivers license and possession of drug equipment.Around Madison County4 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Information in the Jail Report is provided to Greene Publishing, Inc., by the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce. All people are considered innocent until proven guilty. Questions about people identied in the report should be directed to the MCSO at (850) 973-4001. ObituariesCommunity CalendarMay 23 The JV and Varsity MCHS Cheerleaders are hosting a fundraiser to help them raise money to attend Fellowship of Christian Athletes Cheerleading Camp this summer. They are selling 6 pounds of Boston Butts or smoked ham and ve pounds of smoked sausage or ribs for $25 each. They will be cooked and ready for pick-up Friday, May 23 from 2:00-3:30 at the Madison County Courthouse. For more information or to place an order, call or text Ruth Ann Latner at (850) 464-0236 or email at ruth.latner@madisonmail.us, or see any MCHS cheerleader.May 24 Ebenezer Methodist Church will be holding their annual Homecoming, Saturday and Sunday, May 24 and 25, starting Saturday night at 7 p.m. with singing and ending with lemonade and cookies. The fellowship continues Sunday morning at 11 a.m. with two memorial tributes, followed by speaker Jenny Andrews of Madison. Dinner will be served outdoors immediately following the service. May 24 The Madison County Chapter of Charmettes, Inc. will host their rst Mother/Son Dance on Saturday, May 24 at Madison County Recreational Center from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. This occasion will be a catalyst in supporting Mother/Son relationships in an atmosphere of delightful entertainment and a plethora of delectable dainties. The event is open to mothers and sons of all ages. You may contact Cheryl Clemons at (850) 9482071, Shirley K. Bareld at (850) 9732063 or Annie Jo Martin at (850) 209-6042 for more information regarding donations and tickets.May 24 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, at 1374 West Base Street, is having an International Luncheon, Saturday, May 24, from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. The luncheon will be hosted by the Relief Society, a Latter Day Saints women's organization, dedicated to compassionate service to those in the community who need a helping hand. Members of the society will prepare dishes from countries where they have been on missions, or from their own cultural background, providing the event with a truly international avor. The Relief Society would like to invite other women in the community, who are also interested in helping others, to come on out and get involved. Saturday's International Luncheon is an opportunity for them to learn what the Relief Society is all about as they share good food and fellowship, and listen to speakers from Latter Day Saints churches in Tallahassee. For more information on the International Luncheon, the Relief Society, or directions to the church, contact Beth Brinson at (850) 556-6474.May 25 Ochlawilla Baptist Church, located on 1315 Ochlawilla Road in Quitman, Georgia is hosting their annual homecoming on Sunday, May 25. Services will begin at 10:30 a.m. followed with a covered dish luncheon at 12:30 p.m. Everyone is invited to come and enjoy a day of singing and fellowship.May 25 Pallbearer Lodge #4 will hold a fundraiser program on Sunday, May 25, at 11 a.m. at Jeslamb A.M.E. Church. The speaker will be Minister Lindsey Fudge. Please come and help us celebrate this special occasion, Sister Lula Roundtree, Secretary; Brother Kerry Townsend, President; Reverend Debra Warner, Pastor. For more information, contact Eula Donaldson at (850) 510-4822.May 25 Mt. Nebo Baptist Church of Greenville will be observing their annual Dual Day Program. You are cordially invited to attend one or both services. The rst service is at 11 a.m. with speaker Judy Hill. The second service will be at 2 p.m. and service will be rendered by Pineview Freewill Baptist Church out of Quitman, Ga. Dinner will be served.May 26 Monday, May 26 at 11 a.m., The Sunshine Ladies are going to Denny's, off of I-10, for their monthly luncheon. All ladies are invited to join. There are no dues, just bring lunch money. Bring your friends and bring quarters if you want a chance at the door prize and above all bring your best happy face. We will be waiting on you. May 31 Pinetta Elementary School will be holding a talent show and silent auction in their gym, Saturday, May 31 at 2 p.m. Doors open at 1 p.m. to browse auction items that will include class art projects, themed baskets (spa, beach, sports, etc.) and more. Concessions of sodas, cotton candy, popcorn and pickles will be for sale. Everyone is invited to attend.July 26 The MCHS Cowboys Football Golf Shootout will be held Saturday, July 26, at Madison Golf and Country Club, starting at 8 a.m. Entry fees are $200 per group or $50 per player and includes green and cart fees and lunch; fees are due by July 23. For more information or questions, contact Coach Ben White at (904) 290-0413, (850) 9735779 or ben.white@madisonmail.us. Charles Delahunt, 47, died Monday, May 19, in an auto accident in Taylor County. He was the son of the late Billy Jim and Frances K. Delahunt. He worked with Amtec Less Lethal Ammunition Factory in Perry. He is survived by two brothers: Billy Delahunt (Michelle) of Jacksonville and Daniel Delahunt of Greenville; two nephews: Billy, III and Jason Delahunt; one great niece, Olivia Delahunt and his companion, Janet Jackson. A Memorial Service will be held Saturday, May 31 at 1 p.m., at Evergreen Cemetery in Greenville. Beggs Funeral Home in Madison Chapel is in charge of arrangements. (850)973-2258 or www.beggsfuneral.com. Way Back When Way Back WhenMay 20, 1949 Madison and Cherry Lake Boy Scouts picnicked at Blue Springs Sunday accompanied by Scout Master Ben Pel, and Field Scout Executive, John Henry Atkinson, of the Aucilla River District. The boys enjoyed the day swimming and in outdoor games. A picnic dinner was the highlight of the day. The Lee baseball team defeated the McAlpin team on the Lee eld this past Sunday 17 to 0. Next game on the Lee eld is May 29thwith Branford, which at present is in second place in the league standing. Floodwaters from a 12-inch cloud burst Tuesday at Ft. Worth, Texas left 13,200 persons homeless, four known drowned and three missing. The same day a tornado struck near Spur, Texas, killing at least two persons. Rev. Gray lled his regular appointment at Moseley Hall Sunday and was a dinner guest of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Andrews. May 26, 1950 Announcement was made Wednesday by Mr. L.R. Woodard that Saturday, May 27th, would end the Closing Out Sale of Woodwards Dept. Store. The remaining stock of goods and xtures have been sold and will be moved out next week. Awards day will be held Friday afternoon at 2:30 at Madison Elementary. At that time, the winners of the Field Day events will be presented their ribbons. Pupils who have had perfect attendance with no tardiness and those who have missed no more than ve days will receive recognition with certicates. Baccalaureate exercises for the 1950 graduation class of Madison High School will be held at 8:15 p.m., Sunday, May 28, at the First Methodist Church. A 1940 Ford Sedan loaded with 100 gallons of moonshine liquor in 20 ve gal. glass demijohns were captured about three miles west of Madison on Highway 90 by local ofcers, Sunday. The driver of the car, W W Green, of Thomasville, Ga., paid a ne of $500 assessed in court Monday, and the liquor and car were conscated. May 25, 1951 About one hundred and twentyve friends enjoyed the chicken pilau at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W N Blair, Sr., near Blue Springs Wednesday night, May 16, in honor of their son, Cpl. Wilson N. Blair, Jr., who is leaving soon for overseas duty. Oscar Cullifer, of Tallahassee, son of rev. and Mrs. J A Cullifer was pastor for several years, died Tuesday when the light plane he was piloting crashed while leading a searching party for a lost shing craft near the town of Medart on Floridas northwest Gulf Coast. Mr. and Mrs. James G Shefeld, of Cherry Lake, announce the birth of a daughter, Mary Frances, May 10that the Madison County hospital. Tallahassee, May 22 The House tonight passed and sent to the Senate a bill allowing Florida farmers to sell their own seed without being required to have a dealers license. Charles DelahuntJerry (Buddy) Hall, age 71, died suddenly on May 19, at Archibold Hospital in Thomasville, Ga. He was married to his wife Faye for 48 years. Funeral services will be Friday at 2 p.m., May 23, at Greenville Baptist Church with burial at Evergreen Cemetery in Greenville. Visitation was held Thursday evening from 5-7 p.m., at Beggs Funeral Home Madison. Jerry D. Buddy Hall is survived by; Linda Faye Ansley Hall Ronny Hall = Maygan Hall = Harlow & Julia Clay Hall Kendall Hall Jerry Hall = Joshua Hall Bobby & Judy Hall = Jennifer & Mike Beckham & Family Stacy Mote & Family Tommy & Debbie Hall = Jenna Hall Will & Amanda Hall & Family Poochie & Ricky Eastham = Chris Eastham & Sarah Peckom Candie & Matt Braswell, Wade & Alexis Chelsie & Kadence Eastham Dick & Wonnie Ansley = Renee & Kelly Lyle & Family Jodie & Mike Tyson & Family The late Louise OQuinn & Family The late Johnnie Carol Ansley Evans & Family The late Curtis Fuzzy Ansley & Family Jerry (Buddy) Hall Jail Report

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 5 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Title: Madison Fire Rescue Firefighter Hometown: High Springs, Fl. Why He Chose Firefighting: When I looked at the job, being able to help people and being able to use my physical ability to help people was exactly what I think I was made to do. So I looked into it more and I love it. Favorite Book: TheBible. I love Proverbs. I think it helps you to stay more honest and in good character. Favorite Quote: Trust in the Lord with all thine heart and lean not into unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge Him and He shall direct thy path. Favorite Song: The hymn, It Is Well With My Soul. Favorite Movie: Braveheart. Favorite TV Show: The Andy Griffith Show. Favorite Sport: UF Football. Hero: My parents. Hobbies: Hiking, fishing, swimming and wood burning. Sum Yourself Up: I like being athletic. Any day that I get to spend outside is a great day. I am not shy. I never meet a stranger. btnfntr btnfr tbtnbfrbtnbfnrbrnfnt No Photocopies Accepted Tickets are good for Saturday, June 7thonly Deadline To Enter June 3, 2014Name____________________________ ___________________________ Address__________________________ __________________________ Phone Number____________________ Fill out and return to Greene Publishing at P.O. Drawer 772 or 1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32341 Kiwanis Delivers Apples To TeachersBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.The apple has become an icon of not only teachers but their profession as well. A gift of an apple for a teacher has a long history and has come to symbolize, at the cultural level, appreciation for all they do. Kiwanis Clubs throughout the country recognize this, and their Apples For Teachers campaigns demonstrate that appreciation in a public way. Locally, the Kiwanis Club of Madison polished, labeled, packed and delivered several boxes of apples to each public school in the district, enough so that every faculty member and staff person at that school could have their very own apple of appreciation.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 15, 2014Kiwanis Club members get busy polishing and labeling individual apples for teachers in the Madison County School District (Food Giant provided the apples at a substantial discount). Starting at the left end of the table and going clockwise around it are: Linda Hesketh, Lucile Day, Roy Ellis, Deena Hames, Allen Cherry, Preston Matthews, James Ray, Jerome Wyche, Mike Von Stetina, JoAnne Von Stetina and Ruth Moore. There's Still Time To Win The Angel QuiltBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc. The Pine Tree Quilters will hold the drawing for their Angel quilt at their July meeting, so there is still a little time to purchase a $5 rafe ticket. The quilting group, which makes quilts to give away to those in need, is also offering two other beautiful quilts for sale, for suggested donations of $300 and $500. The quilts are on display at the United Methodist Cooperative Ministries Center at 135 NE Dill St., at the corner of Dill and the Valdosta Highway, near Hanson. For more information about where and how to buy your rafe tickets, or to nd out when you can go by and take a closer look at the two gorgeous quilts offered for sale, contact Deborah Brown at the Center at (850) 929-4938. All proceeds from the sale of the quilts and the rafe tickets go to charity projects of the Pine Tree Quilters and the United Methodist Cooperative Ministries.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 14, 2014The other quilt offered for sale has 20 squares and a suggested donation of $300. All three quilts are on display at the United Methodist Cooperative Ministries Center, (850) 929-4938.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 14, 2014One of the two beautiful quilts offered for sale, this one, composed of 56 colorful squares, has a suggested donation of $500. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 14, 2014The Angel Quilt, containing 35 squares with depictions of angels, is being rafed off by the Pine Tree Quilters. The drawing will held at their July meeting.

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20thOf May Jubilee6 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Planning on working during retirement? If so, youre not alone. An increasing number of employees nearing retirement plan to work at least some period of time during their retirement years. Why work during retirement? Obviously, if you work during retirement, youll be earning money and relying less on your retirement savings--leaving more to potentially grow for the future and making your savings last longer. If you continue to work, you may also have access to affordable health care, as more and more employers are offering this important benefit to part-time employees. But there are also non-economic reasons for working during retirement. Many retirees work for personal fulfillment--to stay mentally and physically active, to enjoy the social benefits of working, and to try their hand at something new--the reasons are as varied as the number of retirees. How working affects Social Security If you work after you start receiving Social Security retirement benefits, your earnings may affect the amount of your benefit check. Your monthly benefit is based on your lifetime earnings. When you become entitled to retirement benefits at age 62, the Social Security Administration calculates your primary insurance amount (PIA), upon which your retirement benefit will be based. Your PIA is recalculated annually if you have any new earnings that might increase your benefit. So if you continue to work after you start receiving retirement benefits, these earnings may increase your PIA and thus your future Social Security retirement benefit. But working may also cause a reduction in your current benefit. If youve reached full retirement age (66 to 67, depending on when you were born), you dont need to worry about this-you can earn as much as you want without affecting your Social Security retirement benefit. If you havent yet reached full retirement age, $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $2 you earn over the annual earnings limit ($15,480 in 2014). A special rule applies in your first year of Social Security retirement-youll get your full benefit for any month you earn less than one-twelfth of the annual earnings limit, regardless of how much you earn during the entire year. A higher earnings limit applies in the year you reach full retirement age. If you earn more than this higher limit ($41,400 in 2014), $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $3 you earn over that amount, until the month you reach full retirement age--then youll get your full benefit no matter how much you earn. (If your current benefit is reduced because of excess earnings, you may be entitled to an upward adjustment in your benefit once you reach full retirement age.) Not all income reduces your Social Security benefit. In general, Social Security only takes into account wages youve earned as an employee, net earnings from selfemployment and other types of work-related income, such as bonuses, commissions, and fees. Pensions, annuities, IRA distributions, and investment income wont reduce your benefit. One last important point to consider: in general, your Social Security benefit wont be subject to federal income tax if thats the only income you receive during the year. But if you work during retirement (or receive any other taxable income or taxexempt interest), a portion of your benefit may become taxable. IRS Publication 915 has a worksheet that can help you determine whether any part of your Social Security benefit is subject to federal income tax. Stacy Bush, President Bush Wealth Management The Bush Wealth Advantage Social Security and Working in Retirement Our column, The Bush Wealth Advantage is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. Stacy Bush has practiced independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.com Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provid e specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 869133 Kevisa Moore Is Miss 20thOf May 2014 Story SubmittedOn Thursday, May 15, the 20thof May Pageant Committee crowned their new Queen, Kevisa Moore, the daughter of Felisha Hall, as the new Miss 20thof May 2014. A sophomore at Madison County High School, Moore is part of the cheerleading squad and the track team, and she also plays basketball. All the contestants, Moore, First Runner-up Tyaunie Richardson, Natasha Burnett and Sarah Jackson, did a wonderful job. The Pageant Committee would like to thank everyone who attended and/or participated in the pageant: Madison Florist for donating the beautiful ower arrangements; Evelyn Butler for supplying the light refreshments; MCHS for the decorations which were beautifully arranged by Malisha Wilson and Pageant Co-chairperson Tanya Butler and all the parents, family and friends who supported this event. Each year, the committee welcomes young women to participate in the pageant, and each year, people of the community come together and help make it possible. Since being crowned Thursday evening, Queen Kevisa Moore has served as the spokesperson for the 20thof May Jubilee Celebration festivities and will appear at other community events from now until she crowns next years new Queen in 2015. Then, just prior to her graduation from high school, she will be presented with her $500 scholarship check. Congratulations Kevisa Moore, Miss 20thof May 2014.Photo SubmittedLooking radiant in their beautiful evening gowns, the contestants participating in the Miss 20thof May Pageant are (left to right): Natasha Burnett, Kevisa Moore (Miss 20thof May), Tyaunie Richardson (First Runner-up) and Sarah Jackson. Photo SubmittedIt was a tough decision, but the Pageant Committee selected Miss Kevisa Moore as the New Miss 20thof May for 2014 and Tyaunie Richardson as the First Runner-up. Jesse W. Solomon Park Holds Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 16, 2014Mayor Judy Townsend joined Jesse Solomon in cutting the ribbon to ofcially open the communitys newest park. Family and friends surround Solomon during the ribbon cutting.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 16, 2014The days ceremonies also included a proclamation from Mayor Judy Townsend, ofcially declaring a Jacobbi McDaniel Day. His mother, Darlann Choice, received the plaque in place of her son. In the picture, from left to right, are: Mayor Judy Townsend, Darlann Choice and Jesse Solomon.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 16, 2014(Shown right) Shytrinnity Jones enjoys a dinner of fried chicken, hot dogs and all the sides, served at the park following the ceremony.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 16, 2014The Mt. Zion AME Church Choir sang two beautiful and soulful songs during the ceremony. Choir members from left to right are: Reverend Margie Evans, Ben Sampson, LaKay Evans, Timothy McCray, Jerome Wyche and Veveda Vellamy.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 16, 2014Jesse Solomon (shown left), the parks namesake, gave a very eloquent speech before participating in the ribbon cutting for the park. He spoke of his past, his days in the NFL and shared with the congregation, his emotions and his Mothers sacrices she made for him and his siblings while growing up in Madison. After the heartfelt recognition about his Mom, Solomon reverted back to a lighter mood and gained laughs from the crowd, when he reminisced about his high school buddies, the funk brothers. The speech ended with Solomon giving thanks to Madison and the community.

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20th Of May JubileeMadison Enterprise-Recorder 7 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Jesse Solomon Youth Football Camp A Success Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014The Jesse Solomon Youth Football Camp was a huge success last Saturday, May 17. The Jesse Solomon football camp was made up of 51 kids and 10 coaches, which made for a very informative and fun football event. By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. Former NFL player and Madison resident Jesse Solomon hosted the Jesse Solomon Youth Football Camp, Saturday, May 17 at the City of Madison Lanier Field from noon to 4 p.m. There were 51 children in attendance and 10 coaches. The coaches included John Harris, a former Minnesota Viking; Cletis Jones, a former New England Patriot; Lenny Chavers, former FSU Seminole; Eddie Johnson, former Eastern Kentucky University; Ricky Lee, Gerald Lattimore, Terry Johnson, Michael Blue, Greg Ray and Jesse Solomon. The children were taught basic instructions of the game and different techniques such as defensive drills and tackling. The coaches talked to the children about the importance of education. At the end of the clinic, the children were divided into two teams and played ag football to show off all that they had learned. Jesse Solomon said the children were so enthusiastic about the clinic and wondered if they could do it again next weekend.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014The guys had to get down and dirty during this practice drill, as they were instructed to move right, left, forward and back every time the whistle was blown.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014Group two was assigned to some tackling drills during the football camp. The coach shows the kids the correct way to tackle a player. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014(Shown left) At the blow of the whistle, the kids practice their tackling techniques on each other.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014It takes blood, tears and sweat, said one of the Jesse Solomon football camp coaches. What a great pep talk the kids received by telling them they have to work hard on the eld and off the eld in order for their dreams to come true.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014During football camp, the kids even got to practice how to run the ball and get past their opponent.

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8 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 The 20thof May Jubilee CelebrationBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.The 20thof May Jubilee Celebration was a success this past weekend. It all started Thursday, May 15 with the 2014 Miss 20thof May Pageant at the Madison County Recreation Facility. Kevisa Moore was crowned the 2014 Miss 20thof May. The 20thof May Jubilee Celebration held a Fish Fry Tiki Luau on Friday, May 16 at the Madison County Recreation Facility on Highway 360 behind the old Madison Middle School, where people were able to enjoy sh fried to perfection. The 20thof May Jubilee Celebration portion on Saturday, May 17, kicked off with a parade down Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive with FSU Seminole and Madison native, Jacobbi McDaniel as the Grand Marshall. But the fun did not stop there. There was vendors set up on Arnold Street selling all kinds of wonderful treats, including, pizza, corn on the cob and snow cones. Other entertainment at the 20thof May Jubilee Celebration included the Gospel Celebration, an Entertainment Showcase and a motorcycle and car show. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014City Commissioner District 4, Marcus Hawkins, and his family were enjoying some great food during the celebration this past Saturday. Pictured with Hawkins are: Montrell Hawkins, Carolyn Johnson, MJ Hawkins, Maliyah Hawkins and Cayden McDaniel.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014Miss 20thof May and her runner up were enjoying themselves during the 20thof May festivities. Pictured from left to right are: Tyaunie Richardson, 20thof May runner-up and Kevisa Moore, Miss 20thof May 2014.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014The 20thof May celebration was full of vendors, food and activities for everyone to enjoy. Enjoying the festivities are: Komesha Collins, KaSiah Collins, Matesha Brown, MaLeah Brown, KeMerial Pratt, Jontavious Pratt and AhSyriah Collins. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014Jessica Solomon, a past 20th of May Queen, was all smiles during the parade. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014Morgan Whetsel, 2014 Moon Pie Princess, waves to the crowd during the 20thof May parade.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Sandys Country Buffet Tuesday Saturday: 6:30 A.M. 9:00 P .M. Sunday: 11:00 A.M. 3:00 P .M. 850-997-20221050 North Jefferson Street Monticello, FL 32344 Sandy & SolomonSEAFOOD MARKET Located At1015 N. Jefferson St. Monticello, FL 32344850-997-7300 Tuesday Saturday10:00 A.M. 7:00 P.M.No order too small or TOO BIG Check us out for all your event needs Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014The parade was full of royalty as the young girls waved to the crowd while traveling down Martin Luther King Drive. The 20thof May Jubilee CelebrationGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014Motorcycles were everywhere during the big celebration. Not only were the motorcycles part of the parade, but they were also part of a motorcycle show after the parade was over.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014A group of children and adults were walking for a great cause during the parade last Saturday. A couple of Justins Journey supporters stop for a brief second for a picture. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014A pick-up load full of children and adults were supporting their church, Mt. Nebo AME Church, during the 20thof May celebration.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014Jacobbi McDaniel was the Grand Marshall for the 20thof May celebration that was held this past Saturday, May 17.

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10 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 866466

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Memorial Day A Day Of Remembrance By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.While Veteran's Day in November celebrates the service of all American veterans who have served their country in the armed forces, Memorial Day specically honors those who have died while serving in the military. Memorial Day, celebrated every year on the nal Monday of May, had its beginnings in the years after the Civil War. The estimated number of Civil War casualties ranges from 618,000 to 700,000 more than the country's losses in any war in its history, from the American Revolution through Vietnam. According to the U.S. Census of 1860, the population just before the war broke out was only 31,443,321. Thus, it was pr obably difcult to nd a family on either side of the war who did not suffer loss of one or more family members, many of whom had to be buried where they died in the days before embalming, in graves hundreds of miles from their homes. With such devastating losses on both sides, leaving even greater numbers of bereaved loved ones behind to come to terms with their grief, memorializing those who had fallen in battle took on added cultural importance. In many places, where losses were heavy, entire communities were in mourning. The practice of decorating soldiers' graves with owers is an ancient custom, spanning centuries and continents; it had continued in the New World, before and during the Civil War, but the sheer number of soldiers' deaths made the practice more frequent, more visible and more public, so that historical accounts began taking notice. Women in Savannah, Ga., decorated the graves of Confederate soldiers in 1862. The following year, in Gettysburg, Penn., there was a cemetery dedication and commemoration at the gravesites of dead soldiers. Boalsburg, Penn., claims to be the birthplace of Memorial Day due to local historians' account of ladies decorating soldiers' graves there on July 4, 1864. Years later, this would be called the First Decoration Day. On April 25, 1866, the women of Columbus, MS., laid owers on the graves of both Union and Confederate solders buried in their cemetery. The rst widely-publicized Memorial Day-type observance was in Charleston, S.C., on May 1, 1865, a May Day ceremony organized by black residents of Charleston, who landscaped and built an enclosure for the graves of Union soldiers. In Waterloo, New York, on May 5, 1866, Civil War hero Gen. John B. Murray and other surviving veterans marched to three local cemeteries and decorated the graves of soldiers. According to local folklore, when Gen. John A. Logan learned of this, he issued Logan's Order in 1868 calling for a national, annual Decoration Day observance, patterned after a Confederate Memorial Day custom that had already become established in several Southern states. The rst national Decoration Day was observed nationwide Saturday, May 30, 1868. That year, Decoration Day events were observed in 183 cemeteries in 27 states. The following year, 336 cemeteries held decoration ceremonies. By 1890, every Northern state had made Decoration Day an ofcial state holiday, with memorial events sponsored by the Women's Relief Corps, and the Women's Auxiliary of the Grand Army of the Republic. Over the years, the U.S. established 73 national cemeteries (the most famous being the ones at Gettysburg and Arlington) where many soldiers' remains were relocated, and the focus shifted from honoring the Civil War dead to honoring all American veterans who died in service to their country. Over time, the name Decoration Day gradually changed to Memorial Day, a change that accelerated after WWII. In 1967, federal law ofcially adopted the name Memorial Day. In 1968, Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which moved four holidays, including Memorial Day, from their traditional dates to Mondays, in order to create three-day weekends. There was some resistance by several states, but after several years, all 50 states had adopted the last Monday in May as Memorial Day. Today, Memorial Day is a day set aside to honor those who died in service to their country, a day celebrated with patriotic parades and ceremonies. All over the country, volunteer and civic groups visit cemeteries and place ags on the graves of veterans from all wars. On this day, the American ag is raised to the top of the staff, then lowered to half-staff in memory of the more than one million veterans who have died while serving. It remains at half-staff until noon, when it is raised again to the top of the staff for the remainder of the day. In Madison, the traditional Memorial Day service will be held May 26 at Four Freedoms Park, under the gazebo, beginning at 11 a.m. Members of the community are invited to attend, honoring those who died to protect those very freedoms which the park itself is named after, freedoms articulated by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1941 Freedom from Want, Freedom from Fear, Freedom of Worship and Freedom of Speech.

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12 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014Relay For Life 2014 Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014The survivor lap at Relay is a joyful event that kicks off the evenings festivities. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Desmond Roberson, Pineland Missionary Baptist Churchs Minister of Music, sings with his enthusiastic back-up singers: Taylor Vickers (left), Malia Roberson (center) and Lamarya Roberson (far right). Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Tim Dunn and team named their tent (which won the award for Best Campsite) after a Clint Eastwood movie, with a slight change, The Good, the Bad and Cancer is Ugly. Dunn is shown with a poster board image of Eastwood where people could take selfies with the cardboard image. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Sheila Samuels (center) is anked in support during the survivor/caregiver lap. Supporting her are fellow members from Nebo Church, Rick Pearson on the left and Chris Cooks on the right.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Deloris Washington, a cancer survivor is supported by her granddaughter, Lillie Neely (center) and on right, Susan Neely, daughter of Deloris. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Robert Thigpen, who has been undergoing treatment for renal cell carcinoma, is surrounded by his family at Relay, who are supporting him through sales of Pray for Robert t-shirts, sold at the Busy Bee in town. In the front row, from left to right, are: Charles Ballenger, Hayden Ballenger, Robert Sealey (survivor), Meranda Mani, Kaitlyn Hutchinson, Dorothy Dempsey, Devan Dempsey and Kayla Sealey. In the middle row, from left to right, are: Charlene Medders, Kaitlin Gibson, Merritt Medders, Ameila Kent, Kyle Sealey, Amanda Ballenger, Cassidy Ballenger, Linda Kent, Ashley Hutchinson, Amanda Sealey, Hagan Hutchinson, Megan Thigpen, Charlotte Thigpen, Diane Dempsey and Jordan Thig pen. In the back row, from left to right, are: Dalton Tulk, Dylan Thigpen and Edward Hutchinson.

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Relay For Life 2014Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014The Tri County Relay Team serves up hungry Relay participants 50s style at Willies Diner. The team, from left to right, are: Carl Hackle, Jeff Brewer, Steve Walden, Allen Welch, Stephanie Carroll, Kisha Tolar, David Allen, Tamara Ashley, Rusty Smith, Carol Timmons, Kyle King, Trey Barrs and George Webb. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014The dancers in this classical performance dened beauty and grace in motion. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Jalexis Porter, Bria Arnold and Kamia Dopson makes up the ministry team of the Inspire Praise Dancers. The ministry is under the direction of Tammy Roberson at Pineland Missionary Baptist Church. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014The Relay event made this performance of Hope a tting choice for the evening. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Two sweet girls, Malia Roberson (left) and Kysiser Thomas (right), take time to ash heart signs for the camera before continuing to clap with the music being played on stage the night of Relay. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Cat Maultsby who is a cancer survivor is pushed in the survivor/caregiver lap by her grandfather, John Maultsby, also a cancer survivor. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014The Relays theme this year was, The Stars Come Out at Night, and teams all named themselves after movies. Team Color Purples tent was well decorated and supported. Team members for the Color Purple tent, from left to right, are: Eva Stevens, Sheila Samuels, Olivia Mitchell, J oshua Johnson, Franeka Sharpe, Chad Mitchell, Nita Mitchell, Kosha Gamble, Shawn Gallon, Vicki Johnson, Jordan Johnson and Latresa Humphrey (kneeling).

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Around Madison County14 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Ochlawilla Baptist Church To Hold Homecoming Celebration Sunday, May 25Ochlawilla Baptist Church, located on 1315 Ochlawilla Road in Quitman, Georgia will host their annual homecoming on Sunday, May 25. Services will begin at 10:30 a.m., with a covered dish luncheon at 12:30 p.m. Everyone is invited to come and enjoy a day of singing and fellowship. Ebenezer Homecoming Set For May 25By Ginger JarvisAh, the cooling breeze from a funeralhome fan! Ah, the icker of gas lamps from wall sconces! Ah, the thrill of voices lifted in old-fashioned song! Ah, the delights of dinner spread invitingly under shady oak trees! All these and more are facets of the annual Homecoming at old Ebenezer Methodist Church off Little Cat Road. This years event is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday, May 24 and 25, with an hour of singing from the Cokesbury Hymnal on Saturday night beginning about 7 p.m., closing with lemonade and cookies under the trees. The fellowship continues on Sunday morning with a service beginning at 11 a.m. Gene Gaston will conduct a memorial to the late Frances Sanders, whose family has been part of Ebenezer for many years. Gaston will also lead a memorial tribute to fallen members of the military. The featured speaker for the morning will be Jenny Andrews of Madison, whose family has also been involved in Ebenezer for years. The morning service will culminate with folks gathered under the trees for dinner on the grounds. Lawn chairs and picnic blankets are very much in order, and sharing family news is mandatory. Bring you own insect repellent; funeral home fans are provided. The singing and the Sunday service are open to anyone who longs for a taste of worship the oldfashioned way. To arrive at Ebenezer, take Hwy. 53 (Cherry Lake Road), north out of Madison; turn right onto Hwy. 146 (Little Cat Road); at 8.5 miles, turn left onto Bobwhite Terrace; at the fork, go left; at the next turn, go right, and youll see the white country church among the huge trees. Feel free to join the crowd touring the historic cemetery and singing the old songs. You will be welcomed.

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTEDwww.greenepublishing.com PERSONAL SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . LEGALS -Friday, May 23, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder 15 FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 5/19/2014 THROUGH 5/25/2014I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).3/26 rtn, n/c Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBe A CNA Would you like to work as a nursing assistant? Become a CNA. Quest Training offers a nurse taught, 40 hr. prep class. No GED required if age 18 yr. Day and Evening classes. 386-362-1065.5/7 5/28, pdCDL Class A Driver Needed 2 years veried experience. Runs mostly SE extended area. Good 2 year MVR. Blue Cross and blue shield health insurance offered. (850) 929-2279.4/11 rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com5/7 rtn, c 4 BR, 2 BA House With replace, large yard and no pets. Near Blue Springs. $700 month, $700 security. 1 year lease. (850) 274-5805 or (907) 230-4705.5/7 rtn, cLake Park of Madison CNA Fulltime Contact Kim Browning HR or Connie Walker DON 850-973-8277.5/14, 5/21, c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12x18 building with 6 porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/c Donations appreciated to get house out of foreclosure. Please donate by making a check out to Bank of America for Kevin Payne. His house is in foreclosure because his wife moved out in April of last year due to mental problems. Then his job cut back on hours and he only could work four days a week. Between his job and his wife, he got behind on house payments. It will take $7,000 to get his house out of foreclosure. Please call him at (850) 948-6974.5/21, pdAutomation and Production Technology (APT) Instructor wanted at North Florida Community College, Madison FL. See www.nfcc.edu for details.5/21, 5/28, c MIG Welders Needed Must have High School diploma or equivalent, the ability to read and understand CAD sketches, also able to read a tape measure to the 1/16th, and you will be required to pass an onsite weld test. You Must have a minimum of two years welding experience or a graduate of a certied welding program, along with no previous employment history with Big Top Mfg. Must pass weld test on-site. Starting Wednesday, 5/21/14 at 8 a.m. Apply in person at Big Top Mfg. 3255 North Hwy 19. We will only accept ten qualied applications. EEO/AA/m/f/vets/disabled5/21, cVinyl Fabrication Operator Needed Must be able to read a tape measure to 1/4th inch. This job requires heavy lifting, reading sketches, and working with machines. There is only one (1) position available, we will only accept the rst ve (5) qualied applications. Starting Wednesday, 5/21/14 at 8 a.m. Must apply in person at Big Top Mfg. 3255 North US 19 Perry, FL EEO/AA/m/f/vets/disabled5/21, cAdoption Devoted, Affectionate, Professional couple will help you, unconditionally love. Hands on with your baby. Maintain contact. Allowed expenses paid. Doug & Liz 866-777-9344 Susan StockmanFL #0342521. Auctions Bank Owned Auction160+/1 Acres Divided of Higher Elevation Pasture & Timber Land with Beautiful Views for Miles in Clyde, NC, Haywood County. Saturday, May 31st at 11am. Auction At Haywood County Fairgrounds, Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. ironhorseauction.com 800-997-2248. NCAL3936. Educational Services AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualied students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-741-9260 www.FixJets.com. Help Wanted Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm l oaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964. Are you pregnant? A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592. Adam Sklar#0150789. AVERITT EXPRESS New Pay Increase For Regional Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, Post-Training Pay Increase for Students! (Depending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benets. CDL-A req. 888-362-8608 Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer Females, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Experienced Team, Solo, Recent Grad & Student Drivers needed for dedicated run in your area! Ask about our sign-on bonus and guaranteed hometime! Call 866-414-3402. 5/23, 5/30 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CITY OF MADISON LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS BY THE PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD OF CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF THE CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161 through 163.3248, Florida Statutes, as amended, and the City of Madison Land Development Regulations, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Land Development Regulations, objections, recommendations and comments concerning the amendment, as described below, will be heard by the Planning and Zoning Board of the City of Madison, Florida, serving also as the Local Planning Agency of the City of Madison, Florida, at a public hearing on June 5, 2014 at 4:45 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the City Commission Meeting Room, City Hall located at 321 Southwest Rutledge Street, Madison, Florida. LDR 14-01, an application by Davis Marketing Group, LLC, to amend the Ofcial Zoning Atlas of the Land Development Regulations by changing the zoning district from RESIDENTIAL, MULTIPLE FAMILY (R-2) to COMMERCIAL, GENERAL (C-2) on property described, as follows: A parcel of land lying within Section 28, Township 1 North, Range 9 East, Madison County Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: Commence at the Southeast corner of Southwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 28; thence North 346.00 feet; thence West 27.00 feet to the Westerly right-of-way line of Georgetown Road; thence West 110.00 feet; thence North 100.00 feet; thence East 10.00 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence North 00'22" West 116.35 feet to the Southerly right-ofway line of Martin Luther King Jr. Drive (County Road 360A); thence Northeasterly, along the Southerly right-of-way line of said Martin Luther King Jr. Drive (County Road 360A) on a curve to the left 134.18 feet to the Westerly right-of-way line of said Georgetown Road; thence South, along the Westerly right-of-way line of said Georgetown Road 204.70 feet; thence West 110.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing 0.36 acre, more or less. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future date. Any interested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the public hearing and that no further notice concerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above referenced public hearing. At the aforementioned public hearing, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the amendment. Copies of the amendment are available for public inspection at the Ofce of the Director of Community Development, City Hall located at 321 Southwest Rutledge Street, Madison, Florida, during regular business hours. All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with disabilities requesting reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact 352.463.3169 (Voice & TDD) or via Florida Relay Service 800.955.8771.5/23 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CITY OF MADISON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY THE PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD OF CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF THE CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161 through 163.3248, Florida Statutes, as amended, and the City of Madison Land Development Regulations, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Land Development Regulations, objections, recommendations and comments concerning the amendment, as described below, will be heard by the Planning and Zoning Board of the City of Madison, Florida, serving also as the Local Planning Agency of the City of Madison, Florida, at a public hearing on June 5, 2014 at 4:45 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the City Commission Meeting Room, City Hall located at 321 Southwest Rutledge Street, Madison, Florida. CPA 14-01, an application by Davis Marketing Group, LLC, to amend the Future Land Use Plan Map of the Comprehensive Plan, by changing the future land use classication from RESIDENTIAL, MEDIUM DENSITY (less than or equal to 8 dwelling units per acre) to COMMERCIAL on property described, as follows: A parcel of land lying within Section 28, Township 1 North, Range 9 East, Madison County Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: Commence at the Southeast corner of Southwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 28; thence North 346.00 feet; thence West 27.00 feet to the Westerly right-of-way line of Georgetown Road; thence West 110.00 feet; thence North 100.00 feet; thence East 10.00 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence North 00'22" West 116.35 feet to the Southerly right-ofway line of Martin Luther King Jr. Drive (County Road 360A); thence Northeasterly, along the Southerly right-of-way line of said Martin Luther King Jr. Drive (County Road 360A) on a curve to the left 134.18 feet to the Westerly right-of-way line of said Georgetown Road; thence South, along the Westerly right-of-way line of said Georgetown Road 204.70 feet; thence West 110.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing 0.36 acre, more or less. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future date. Any interested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the public hearing and that no further notice concerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above referenced public hearing. At the aforementioned public hearing, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the amendment. Copies of the amendment are available for public inspection at the Ofce of the Director of Community Development, City Hall located at 321 Southwest Rutledge Street, Madison, Florida, during regular business hours. All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with disabilities requesting reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact 352.463.3169 (Voice & TDD) or via Florida Relay Service 800.955.8771.5/23

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16Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 All prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or Valdosta dealerships. All prices good through May 24, 2014 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Truck prices include $500 rebate when financed with Chrysler Capital. $500 Conquest Rebate to customer who own a competitive brand truck. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. MPG per factory window sticker.888-304-2277801 E. SCREVEN ST QUITMAN, GA888-463-68314164 N. VALDOSTA RD. VALDOSTA, GA229-263-7561 8640 HWY 84 WESTAll prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles are located at our Quitman dealership. Vehicle prices include Trade-In & GM Loyalty Rebate (owners of 1999 or newer GM vehicles. All prices good through May 24, 2014 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. 862483 BORN 1914 YOU LEARN A LOT IN 100 YEARS... NEVER FORGET WHERE YOU CAME FROM2014 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN 2014 DODGE DURANGO 2014 DODGE CHALLENGER 2014 DODGE CHARGER 27 MPG 25 MPG 25 MPG 27 MPG Q1400602013 DODGE DART V130392 34 MPG Q140042 V1404492014 DODGE AVENGER 30 MPG Q140111 PURCHASE ANY VEHICLE & RECEIVE A WORLD FAMOUS ROCKER TO ENJOY THE GREAT SPRING WEATHER! 2014 JEEP CHEROKEE Q140290 2014 RAM 1500 2014 JEEP COMPASS V140314V140068 26 MPG 2014 DODGE JOURNEY 2014 RAM 2500 4 DOOR 4X4 HEAVY DUTYV1402842014 JEEP PATRIOTV140072 2014 CHEVY CRUZE LT1.4L ECOTEC MOTORCHEVY MYLINK W/7 TOUCH SCREENREAR VIEW CAMERAREMOTE START 2014 CHEVY SONIC LT 2014 CHEVY EQUINOX 32 MPG (PER WINDOW STICKER) BLUE TOOTH WIRELESSUSB PORT, 2.4L SIDI SIRIUS/MP3 PLAYER 2014 CHEVY MALIBUC140133 2014 CHEVY CAMARO 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DOOR L TC1400662014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DOOR L T 4X4 2015 SILVERADO 2500 HEA VY DUTY 4 DR 4X4 ALL-STAR EDITION 5.3L V8, 18 ALUM WHEELS REAR CAMERA, REMOTE START, NAVI & MORE! MSRP: $41,725 DISC. $7,732 ALL-STAR EDITION 18 ALUM WHEELS REAR CAMERA, REMOTE START & MORE! MSRP: $37,120 DISC. $7,132C140154 2014 SILVERADO 1500 C140162 C150006 Purchase any vehicle & receive a World Famous Rocker to enjoy the Great Spring Weather! ALL NEW ALL NEW 2015 CHEVY TAHOE 12 TO CHOOSE FROMEverybody Knows Chevys Cost Less In Quitman! 2014 RAM 1500 4 DOOR Q140103 Q140312 V140369 2014 RAM 1500 LARAMIE 4 DOOR Q140138 Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2013 Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2014



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By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.The First Lady of Florida, Ann Scott, visited Pinetta Elementary School Monday, May 12, as part of the Florida Department of Education’s Just Read, Florida! reading program. Mrs. Scott is well known for her advocacy of literature and encouraging children to read, especially during the summer months when school is out and in 2012 she partnered with the Just Read Florida! Summer Literacy Adventure that challenged students to read and participate in a contest of sorts between schools. Studies have consistently shown that students who read throughout the year are able to retain their knowledge and continue to learn. Mrs. Scott knows this first hand and has said, as a child, she waited for school to be over so that she could spend her summers at the library. Literacy experts and educators agree, children of all ages need to be read to and need to talk about the books they have read. Reading over the summer helps students maintain reading skills, improve reading fluency and provides opportunity to learn new vocabulary and concepts. Our 149thYear, Number 37 Since 1865, T elling It Like It Is And Defending The Peasant's Right T o Know Index 1 Section, 16 Pages Local Weather Viewpoints 2 Around Madison 3-5 20thOf May Jubilation 6-9Memorial Day 11 Relay For Life 12-13 Classieds/Legals 15Friday, May 23, 2014Madison, Florida Madison Woman Struck And Killed By VehicleBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.Avehicle traveling on State Road 53 North, just north of Duval Pond Road, struck and killed a local Madison woman on Wednesday, May 21 at 7:25 p.m. According to the Florida Highway Patrol report, Eric Ottey Hammond, Jr., 54, of Madison, was traveling south on SR 53 when he traveled onto the west shoulder and struck Gloria Jean Christian, 38, who was walking south on the west shoulder of SR 53 at the intersection of Duval Pond Road. After colliding with the pedestrian, Hammond corrected back onto the roadway and traveled in a southeasterly direction across both south and north bound lanes and onto the east shoulder. Christian came to a nal rest on the west shoulder of SR 53. Charges against Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Emerald Greene, May 21, 2014 Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Emerald Greene, May 21, 2014Valdosta Addresses County Commission About Their Sewage PlantBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Representatives from the city of Valdosta, including City Manager Larry Hanson, Utilities Director Henry Hicks, and Stormwater Utilities Director Emily Davenport, addressed the Madison County Commission at their last meeting to discuss the recent ooding at Valdosta's sewage plant, the effect it had on the Withlacoochee River and on Madison whichGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 14, 2014Valdosta Stormwater Utilities Director Emily Davenport and Valdosta Utilities Director Henry Hicks address the Madison County Commission and answer questions to explain what Valdosta has been doing and what it plans to do in the future to mitigate ”ooding issues at its sewage plant. Not pictured: Valdosta City Manager Larry Hanson, who gave the “rst part of the presentation, but had to leave early to get to a regional ”ood board meeting in Tifton, Ga. See Valdosta Explains On Page 3 City Of Madison Faces Hard Choices In FutureBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.We have to have priorities established and expectations lowered,” City Manager Tim Bennett told the City Council members after their May meeting. “We have some high expectations of how the city should look, but we'll have to make some heavy decisions.” His remarks were in reference to the city's extremely tight budget and meagre revSee Hard Choices On Page 3 Health Department Testing Water Until The End Of MayBecause of the excessive rainfall and ooding throughout the county in recent weeks, Governor Rick Scott has issued an emergency order allowing free water testing until the end of the month. Madison County Health Department is offering free testing of well water samples through Flowers Lab on 812 SW Harvey Greene Drive from now until the end of the month. For those residents whose homes and wells have been ooded, or who have noticed a change in the appearance or taste of their water since the widespread ooding, it may be a good idea to have their water checked. Residents will rst need to obtain a sterile water bottle from Flowers Lab to collect their sample, and then drop that sample off at Flowers. They must be sure to inform the lab that the sample is being taken due to the recent ooding event so that Flowers will know to send the invoice to the Madison County Health Department. If contamination is found, it is often a simple matter to disinfect the well, but in some cases, a damaged well might need repairs. To make sure the water you are drinking is safe, the Department recommends having your water periodically tested for bacteria.See Testing On Page 3 Florida’s First Lady Ann Scott Visits PinettaSee First Lady On Page 3Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 12, 2014Gail Washingtons “rst grade class enjoyed hearing the book, Each KindnessŽ read to them by Floridas First Lady. Students in the front row, left to right, are: Luke Washington, Lizeth Bartolo, Anthony Schreiber, Maddox Scanlan, Lydia Barnes, Alexcia Fif“a, Kelsea Miller, Aden Angeles and Lane Keeling. Standing in the back row, left to right, are: Aurora Russell, Chloe Durst, Justin Hasty, First Lady Ann Scott, Ms. Gail Washington, Charles Ballenger, Jallene Cooks, Tavorris Robinson and Kristian Gianino. Standing in the back row is Pinetta Elementary Principal, Beth Moore. 20thOf May Celebration See Pages 6-9 Over 40 Local Pictures Inside!

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Memorial weekend is here and it marks the beginning of the summer season of backyard grilling. Meals cooked outdoors always increase during the summer months and the variety of food people put on the grill seems to be expanding. With all of the food preparation in summer temperatures, you need to be aware of safe food handling practices. Backyard chefs don’t think about it, but each year outbreaks of food poisoning increase during the summer months. Bacteria that causes food poisoning are invisible, odorless and tasteless; summer temperatures only increase the potential population explosion. Since it is not appetizing to think about food invaders like E. coli, clostridium perfringens or salmonella, using safe food handling methods will drastically reduce your chances of exposing your family and friends to food borne illness. First, marinate meats in a glass dish in the refrigerator, not the kitchen countertop. If you plan to use some of the marinade for basting or a dip, reserve a portion before you put raw meat into it. Bacteria from raw meat will contaminate the liquid and it should be discarded after the marinating time is over. Coals should be very hot before food is placed on the grill for cooking. A hot grill will assure that food is cooked at a high enough temperature to destroy bacteria. It takes 30 minutes or longer before coals are hot enough; they should appear to have a light coating of ash for the highest temperature. Meat should be thoroughly cooked. The best way to check for doneness is to use a meat thermometer. Whole cuts of beef, steaks and roasts should be cooked to an internal temperature of 145F, while ground meat needs to reach an internal temperature of 160F. Poultry needs to reach an internal temperature of 165F. Be sure the thermometer is inserted in the eshy part of the meat and not touching bone. If you don’t have a thermometer, visually check by cutting into the meat to be sure the juices are clear and not pink in color. To avoid are-ups and charred food, remove visible fat from meat. Temperatures for cooking pork have changed in recent years; USDA now recommends a cooking temperature of 145F with a resting time of three minutes. Research showed the internal temperature continues to rise during the resting time and reaches 160F. Put cooked foods on a clean plate that hasn’t been used to hold raw meat or poultry. Cooking food destroys bacteria, but if you put it back on the same plate, you just exposed it to bacteria again. Food safety experts call this cross contamination and it is sure to cause food borne illness. Perishable foods need to be served hot off the grill. USDA recommends food should be at room temperature no more than two hours. If you are eating outdoors, keep in mind warm temperatures reduce that time to one hour. Leftovers should be promptly divided in to small containers and placed in the refrigerator. Simple changes in the way you prepare and serve your backyard barbeque will greatly reduce your risk for food borne illness. For more information on food safety, contact the Madison County Extension Service Ofce The University of Florida Extension – Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution. Somewhere, raindrops fall softly on sidewalks, as anxious children peer through windows at the clouds and bemoan the loss of their warm spring morning. A day that could have been spent outside is instead spent indoors. They still realize though that tomorrow will come and bring hope. A couple of hours and the shower is gone and the children run along to play games and sing enchanted songs. Somewhere, raindrops pound the very inside of a man’s soul. He looks at the clouds and bemoans his eeting life. A life that could have been spent with family was spent in hours of endless work and frustration. He has no hope. The sun will not return later today or tomorrow and if it does, it will only bring oppressive heat, which will wither any rose of joy. There are no enchanting songs sending their sounds from within his heart. This man doesn’t realize that there is hope. There can be joy. There can be salvation. He has a life boat that he can board, but no one has told him about Jesus. Do you have any friends who need to know about the Lord? Share the love of Jesus Christ today. Viewpoints & Opinions2 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Conservative Corner Conservative Corner By Nelson A. Pryor, Lee, Fl. Jacobs Ladder Jacob BembryColumnist Diann DouglasGuest ColumnistMadison County Extension Service Raindrops On Sidewalks Read Jacob’s blog at www.jacobbembry.com His book, Higher Call is available in Kindle format at www.amazon.com or in paperback at www.amazon.com www.bn.com and www.booksamillion.com or by sending $10 plus $3.99 shipping and handling to Jacob Bembry, P.O. Box 9334, Lee, FL 32059. Contact him at jacobbembry@hotmail.com. Memorial Weekend Starts Grilling Season Arms Cache In Texas Likely Kept By The CIA THE MADISON COUNTY REPUBLICAN EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Will meet at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, May 27, at the Madison Library ALL Republicans Welcome Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee MadisonRepublican@embarqmail.com This is the headline of a New York Times story, for May 5, 2014. Many of us have wondered where all this acknowledged ammo, that “Homeland Security,” and even the Social Security Administration, has been stored. This top secret location now appears to be outed. About three years ago, it became public that the C.I.A. had some kind of secret location at Camp Stanley, an Army weapons depot just north of San Antonio and the former Kelly Air Force Base, though its purpose was unclear. And now, a retired C.I.A. analyst, Allen Thomson, has assembled a mosaic of documentation suggesting that it is most likely the home of the famous “Midwest Depot.” In December, he quietly posted his research, which he has updated several times with additional clues, on the website of the Federation of American Scientists. Allen Thomson, in an email exchange with the NY Times argued that the Midwest Depot’s history should be scrutinized. “I have worried about the extent to which the U. S. has spread small arms around over the decades to various parties it supported,” he said. “Such weapons are pretty durable and, after the cause du jour passed, where did they go? To be a little dramatic about it, how many of those AK-47s and RPG-7s we see Islamists waving around today passed through the Midwest Depot on their way to freedom ghters in past decades?" Spokesmen for the Pentagon and the C.I.A. declined to comment. A public affairs ofcer for Camp Stanley said its mission was to be a weapons storage and testing facility for the military. In passing references scattered through once-classied documents and cryptic public comments by former intelligence ofcials, the weapons storage facility, is always referred to as “Midwest Depot,” but the bland code name belies the role it has played to support some of the C.I.A.’s most storied operations. There is no outward indication of what would be one of the C.I.A’s three known facilities in these united States, along with its headquarters in Langley, Va., and Camp Perry, a military base near Williamsburg, Va., known by its code name, “The Farm,” that is believed to be used for training. The article reports that Joel Shipp, son of one of the C.I.A. ofcials who had lived at Camp Stanley, called the camp “a secret base which had been used for illegal arms running and chemical weapons storage.” Camp Stanley has recently undergone a building boom of new warehouses. A March 2010 solicitation for environmental cleanup emphasized that workers needed security clearances. “The installation stores large quantities of arms and ammunition and has sensitive missions, thus access to the installation and security clearance requirements for long term personnel are much more restrictive than most military installations,” it read. Just last July, according to another document Mr. Thomson spotted, the Army sought to purchase two million rounds of ammunition of the caliber that ts AK-47 ries, which American soldiers do not use. The delivery address: Camp Stanley. Pictures From The Past Larry Roffe Checking Under The Hood At His Gas Station Photo Courtesy Of State Archives Of Florida, Florida Memory, http://oridamemory.com/items/show/133120 taken 19--

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sits downstream, and the steps Valdosta is taking to mitigate future incidents. With slide presentations that included aerial photos of the ooded plant from this year and from 2009, Hanson stated that Madison sits at the bottom of a 1500 square mile ood basin. "This is a regional watershed issue, not issues caused by our city," said Hanson. "We're impacted by rainfall as far north as Cordele." Even so, Hanson explained that Valdosta has not been simply standing by and allowing events to unfold, but has been actively taking steps to try to mitigate the situation. After the 2009 ood, the city tried to go through FEMA to get funding to move the plant. FEMA denied their request three times, a process that took three years. Each time, FEMA wanted more or different information, or wanted something changed in the proposal. The third time, FEMA sent in its own engineers, and then still denied the request. It was a frustrating time for the city management, because only after FEMA had denied them for the third time could they begin taking any steps to address the issue themselves. In the meantime, they discovered that FEMA's oodplain maps, which showed the present plant located outside the oodplain zone, were outdated. New maps show that the 500-year oodplain boundary actually runs right through the middle of the plant. Currently, the city of Valdosta is operating under a consent order to make improvements to the existing plant and has begun work on a $56 million project to relocate the plant in ve years' time. The site for the new plant is several miles to the west, where the ground is approximately 70 feet higher. At the current plant, the wastewater main line has been moved further away from the river. The city is also upgrading its stormwater runoff system, replacing outdated manholes at the rate of 30 a year. So far they have replaced nearly 500. They have also replaced eight lift stations and are rehabbing four more. The upgrading and improvement at the present plant will keep it in compliance and keep it working as it is supposed to, and the upgraded and replaced pieces of equipment are items that can be picked up and relocated to the new plant as soon as it is completed. The city is also constantly sampling water around the plant, and the usual ndings show that, except under extraordinary circumstances like ood events, river water downstream of the plant was actually lower in contaminants than water from upstream. There were also other sources of daily pollution that included animal droppings from wildlife, domestic animals and livestock, urban runoff, agricultural runoff, construction sites and failing septic systems. The Valdosta ofcials encouraged everyone who is interested to visit their website at http:// www.valdosta.com/utilities and take a look at what is happening and what is being done. While there, website visitors can also sign up for the enews feature if they wish and receive email updates that will keep them informed of ongoing developments.From Page One Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 3 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 The MadisonEnterprise-RecorderSince 1865 -Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity.ŽThe Madison The Madison Enterprise-Recorder Enterprise-RecorderMadison Recorder established 1865 New Enterprise established 1901 Consolidated June 25, 1908 Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post Of“ce 32340. Publication No. 177.400. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison Enterprise-Recorder P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.P.O. Box 772 € Madison, FL 32341 1695 South SR 53 € Madison, FL 32340 (850) 973-4141 € Fax: (850) 973-4121 greenepub@greenepublishing.com www.greenepublishing.com 2013FCCLA Fundraiser This WeekendBy Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.The Madison County High School FCCLA (Family, Career and Community Leaders of America) will be holding a carwash for donations this weekend at the Madison County Community Bank from 8 a.m. until noon. They will also be selling rafe tickets for a $100 Busy Bee card. The group is raising funds in order for members, Magan Jennings, Lizzy Frakes and Bianca Serrano to attend the National Conference in San Antonio, Texas this summer. These three students qualied to compete at nationals and will be attending to represent Madison County High School and Florida FCCLA in their respective competitions. These three young ladies need your help to get there, so please come out, get your car washed and support these students as they strive to reach their goal. First Lady Cont. From Page 1During her visit to Pinetta, the First Lady visited two classrooms, Missy Cherry's third grade and Gail Washington's rst grade. While in the classrooms, she read to students, making it a point to discuss the books while reading and afterwards, allowed the students to ask questions of a more personal nature. She talked openly to them about her life as First Lady and even showed pictures of her family, including grandkids and her yellow Lab Tally. After students asked her a myriad of questions about herself, what her favorite color was (green) and some of her favorite things to do (taking long walks), the First Lady turned the tables on students and asked them some of the things they liked to do when not in school. This proved to be the funniest part of the question and answer session in Mrs. Washington's classroom as the rst graders caught her off guard with answers of, "be lazy" and "I like to chase our goats around and push my brother down in goat poop." After calm was restored, Mrs. Scott's time at the school was over and she walked down the corridors, where students lined the halls, reaching their hands out to give the First Lady "high ves." As she left, the First Lady of Florida reminded them how important it was to continue their reading throughout the summer break. For school-aged children, Kindergarten through 12thgrade, Florida's Department of Education has a suggested summer reading list. You can nd the list atwww.justreadfamilies.org/ SummerReadingList.pdf.To nd out more about the statewide reading initiative go to www.justreadorida.com.To nd out more about First Lady Ann Scott, visitwww.gov.com/followann-scott.Photo SubmittedMissy Cherrys third grade class was Mrs. Scotts “rst classroom to visit at the school. Taking a moment to pose with the First Lady of Florida, front row, from left to right, are: Amber Thompkins, Lovely Irvine, Lauren Sherrill (bending over), Tsadi Irvine, Mason Good, Raul Duarte-Santiago, Marissa Scanlan and Harley Rogers. In the middle row, left to right, are: Lucy Cherry, Tramiya Bea, Abby Washington, Stephanie Hasty, Ivelisse Lee, ANesha Robinson, Jack Agee, Dexter White, Peyton Justus and Andrew Pepera. In the back row, left to right, are: Ms. Missy Cherry, First Lady Ann Scott and Principal Beth Moore. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 12, 2014The First Lady of Florida, Ann Scott, gives students at Pinetta Elementary high-“ves as she exitsthe school. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 12, 2014The students in Ms. Washingtons class had a lot of questions for Mrs. Scott during their reading time with her. Valdosta Explains Cont. From Page 1Photo SubmittedOne of several dramatic slides shows the 2009 ”ood. Valdosta began to seek funding for relocating the plant, which experienced complete loss of function for nine days and was not fully operational again for a month. The 2014 ”ood waters did not rise as high and did not reach the plant. Hard Choices Cont. From Page 1 Testing Cont. From Page 1For questions of more information, contact William Gibson at (850) 973-5000, ext. 132, or email William Gibson at William.Gibson@health.gov. For directions to the Flowers Chemical Laboratories, call (850) 973-6878.enue sources that would mean heaving to choose between having the city look "nice," as in clean, attractive and well-keptup, versus letting some of those appearance/cosmetic issues go and focusing on what is strictly necessary to keep the city running while still safeguarding the health and well-being of its citizens. The city has had to back away from demolition of dilapidated structures and go with just putting liens on them. With the issues of much needed sidewalks in some neighborhoods, using MCI labor would save money, but it would take a lot longer to complete the projects than with using city crews, since MCI workers have scheduling constraints. Bennett predicted that council members would soon start getting calls from constituents about the conditions of sidewalks, roads and so forth. Councilman Jim Catron stated that part of what the council was looking at were necessities and immediate needs like wastewater and ooding services, things that had already gotten the city in trouble with some penalties from the Department of Environmental Protection. Bennett conrmed that the city had two nes from DEP coming its way in the near future, nes that were the direct result of failing infrastructure several months ago. "The core of the city, its infrastructure, is 100 years old," he reminded the council. "It is brick and clay." And it is deteriorating. "Every week, there seems to be a wastewater problem due to infrastructure," he added. "We're drawing down our Enterprise funds to pay for general operations of the city." It was, he told them, a "perfect storm" of public safety, pensions and infrastructure problems that was causing the city to "cannibalize" itself, eating away at the Enterprise funds instead of reinvesting in them. "We'll quit spending money wherever we can quit spending money," he said. "Be prepared for the phone calls." There were questions about whether problems such as, for example, a vacant house with an overgrown yard would be considered a "cosmetic" issue or a "public safety" issue. What if it began harboring snakes and rats? Such issues would have to be considered on a case-by-case basis, with the crucial test being: was it indeed a true threat to public health and safety. On top of that, hurricane season was fast approaching, with all of its public safety issues. Councilwoman Rayne Cooks said that they were working with agencies to try to get the TIF (Tax Increment Financing) district extended all the way to the city limits to help with the infrastructure problem, "but it can't be done right away," she said. "It'll take time." In the mean time, it was going to be hard choices and careful planning, and as Councilman Jim Catron noted, "A need for us to look at planning for multiple years (in the future)."

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May 14 Geoffrey Walter Hill – Sexual battery.May 15 Edward Obediah Dupree – Disorderly intoxication. Michael E. Gravel – Criminal registration. Heather Nicole Benge – Possession of marijuana less than 20 grams and possession of drug paraphernalia. May 16 Jonathan Shane Penny – Possession of drug/canabanoid and possession of drug paraphernalia. Heidi Jane Hopson Possession of drug/canabanoid and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bryan Keith Cotrell – Criminal registration. Vincent Alexander – Battery domestic violence, possession of a controlled substance less than 20 grams and possession of drug paraphernalia. Jimmie Lee Davis Jr. – Battery DV 3rdweekend. Maurice Germaine Bennett – DUI. Marshall Windell Straws – Violation of parole.May 17 Wally R. Walters – Possession of drug equipment and possession of marijuana less than 20 grams. James Benjamin Ware – Criminal mischief. Craig Lamar Solomon Jr. – Aggravated assault with deadly weapon and disorderly intoxication. Jimmie Lee Bryant – Trespass of occupied structure or conveyance. Deborice Latrall Harris – Violation of parole and out of county. Leon Gallon – Battery Domestic Violence.May 18 Essie Mae Johnson – Domestic Violence Battery. Jerry Jerrod Harris – Violation of parole (circuit). Frederick Coleman Williams – Expired drivers license more than four months. Edgar Lewis Thomas – Fleeing/attempting to elude a police officer and must have motorcycle endorsement.May 19 Robert Carter Jr. – Aggravated stalking. Derreick Jeremiah Fead – Violation of parole (county).May 20 Jason Paul Madison – Criminal registration. Bernard Lashawn Brinson – Criminal registration. Damon Desean Phillips – Burglary of conveyance. Renee Lea Yates – Fraud/impersonate/display anothers drivers license and possession of drug equipment.Around Madison County4 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Information in the Jail Report is provided to Greene Publishing, Inc. by the Madison County Sheriff’s Ofce. All people are considered innocent until proven guilty. Questions about people identied in the report should be directed to the MCSO at (850) 973-4001. Obituaries Community CalendarMay 23 The JV and Varsity MCHS Cheerleaders are hosting a fundraiser to help them raise money to attend Fellowship of Christian Athletes Cheerleading Camp this summer. They are selling 6 pounds of Boston Butts or smoked ham and ve pounds of smoked sausage or ribs for $25 each. They will be cooked and ready for pick-up Friday, May 23 from 2:00-3:30 at the Madison County Courthouse. For more information or to place an order, call or text Ruth Ann Latner at (850) 464-0236 or email at ruth.latner@madisonmail.us or see any MCHS cheerleader.May 24 Ebenezer Methodist Church will be holding their annual Homecoming, Saturday and Sunday, May 24 and 25, starting Saturday night at 7 p.m. with singing and ending with lemonade and cookies. The fellowship continues Sunday morning at 11 a.m. with two memorial tributes, followed by speaker Jenny Andrews of Madison. Dinner will be served outdoors immediately following the service. May 24 The Madison County Chapter of Charmettes, Inc. will host their rst Mother/Son Dance on Saturday, May 24 at Madison County Recreational Center from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. This occasion will be a catalyst in supporting Mother/Son relationships in an atmosphere of delightful entertainment and a plethora of delectable dainties. The event is open to mothers and sons of all ages. You may contact Cheryl Clemons at (850) 9482071, Shirley K. Bareld at (850) 9732063 or Annie Jo Martin at (850) 209-6042 for more information regarding donations and tickets.May 24 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, at 1374 West Base Street, is having an “International Luncheon,” Saturday, May 24, from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. The luncheon will be hosted by the Relief Society, a Latter Day Saints women's organization, dedicated to compassionate service to those in the community who need a helping hand. Members of the society will prepare dishes from countries where they have been on missions, or from their own cultural background, providing the event with a truly international avor. The Relief Society would like to invite other women in the community, who are also interested in helping others, to come on out and get involved. Saturday's “International Luncheon” is an opportunity for them to learn what the Relief Society is all about as they share good food and fellowship, and listen to speakers from Latter Day Saints churches in Tallahassee. For more information on the International Luncheon, the Relief Society, or directions to the church, contact Beth Brinson at (850) 556-6474.May 25 Ochlawilla Baptist Church, located on 1315 Ochlawilla Road in Quitman, Georgia is hosting their annual homecoming on Sunday, May 25. Services will begin at 10:30 a.m. followed with a covered dish luncheon at 12:30 p.m. Everyone is invited to come and enjoy a day of singing and fellowship.May 25 Pallbearer Lodge #4 will hold a fundraiser program on Sunday, May 25, at 11 a.m. at Jeslamb A.M.E. Church. The speaker will be Minister Lindsey Fudge. Please come and help us celebrate this special occasion, Sister Lula Roundtree, Secretary; Brother Kerry Townsend, President; Reverend Debra Warner, Pastor. For more information, contact Eula Donaldson at (850) 510-4822.May 25 Mt. Nebo Baptist Church of Greenville will be observing their annual Dual Day Program. You are cordially invited to attend one or both services. The rst service is at 11 a.m. with speaker Judy Hill. The second service will be at 2 p.m. and service will be rendered by Pineview Freewill Baptist Church out of Quitman, Ga. Dinner will be served.May 26 Monday, May 26 at 11 a.m., The Sunshine Ladies are going to Denny's, off of I-10, for their monthly luncheon. All ladies are invited to join. There are no dues, just bring lunch money. Bring your friends and bring quarters if you want a chance at the door prize and above all bring your best happy face. We will be waiting on you. May 31 Pinetta Elementary School will be holding a talent show and silent auction in their gym, Saturday, May 31 at 2 p.m. Doors open at 1 p.m. to browse auction items that will include class art projects, themed baskets (spa, beach, sports, etc.) and more. Concessions of sodas, cotton candy, popcorn and pickles will be for sale. Everyone is invited to attend.July 26 The MCHS Cowboy’s Football Golf Shootout will be held Saturday, July 26, at Madison Golf and Country Club, starting at 8 a.m. Entry fees are $200 per group or $50 per player and includes green and cart fees and lunch; fees are due by July 23. For more information or questions, contact Coach Ben White at (904) 290-0413, (850) 9735779 or ben.white@madisonmail.us. Charles Delahunt, 47, died Monday, May 19, in an auto accident in Taylor County. He was the son of the late Billy Jim and Frances K. Delahunt. He worked with Amtec Less Lethal Ammunition Factory in Perry. He is survived by two brothers: Billy Delahunt (Michelle) of Jacksonville and Daniel Delahunt of Greenville; two nephews: Billy, III and Jason Delahunt; one great niece, Olivia Delahunt and his companion, Janet Jackson. A Memorial Service will be held Saturday, May 31 at 1 p.m., at Evergreen Cemetery in Greenville. Beggs Funeral Home in Madison Chapel is in charge of arrangements. (850)973-2258 or www.beggsfuneral.com. Way Back When Way Back WhenMay 20, 1949 Madison and Cherry Lake Boy Scouts picnicked at Blue Springs Sunday accompanied by Scout Master Ben Pel, and Field Scout Executive, John Henry Atkinson, of the Aucilla River District. The boys enjoyed the day swimming and in outdoor games. A picnic dinner was the highlight of the day. The Lee baseball team defeated the McAlpin team on the Lee eld this past Sunday 17 to 0. Next game on the Lee eld is May 29thwith Branford, which at present is in second place in the league standing. Floodwaters from a 12-inch cloud burst Tuesday at Ft. Worth, Texas left 13,200 persons homeless, four known drowned and three missing. The same day a tornado struck near Spur, Texas, killing at least two persons. Rev. Gray lled his regular appointment at Moseley Hall Sunday and was a dinner guest of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Andrews. May 26, 1950 Announcement was made Wednesday by Mr. L.R. Woodard that Saturday, May 27th, would end the Closing Out Sale of Woodward’s Dept. Store. The remaining stock of goods and xtures have been sold and will be moved out next week. Awards day will be held Friday afternoon at 2:30 at Madison Elementary. At that time, the winners of the Field Day events will be presented their ribbons. Pupils who have had perfect attendance with no tardiness and those who have missed no more than ve days will receive recognition with certicates. Baccalaureate exercises for the 1950 graduation class of Madison High School will be held at 8:15 p.m., Sunday, May 28, at the First Methodist Church. A 1940 Ford Sedan loaded with 100 gallons of moonshine liquor in 20 ve gal. glass demijohns were captured about three miles west of Madison on Highway 90 by local ofcers, Sunday. The driver of the car, W W Green, of Thomasville, Ga., paid a ne of $500 assessed in court Monday, and the liquor and car were conscated. May 25, 1951 About one hundred and twentyve friends enjoyed the chicken pilau at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W N Blair, Sr., near Blue Springs Wednesday night, May 16, in honor of their son, Cpl. Wilson N. Blair, Jr., who is leaving soon for overseas duty. Oscar Cullifer, of Tallahassee, son of rev. and Mrs. J A Cullifer was pastor for several years, died Tuesday when the light plane he was piloting crashed while leading a searching party for a lost shing craft near the town of Medart on Florida’s northwest Gulf Coast. Mr. and Mrs. James G Shefeld, of Cherry Lake, announce the birth of a daughter, Mary Frances, May 10that the Madison County hospital. Tallahassee, May 22 – The House tonight passed and sent to the Senate a bill allowing Florida farmers to sell their own seed without being required to have a dealer’s license. Charles DelahuntJerry (Buddy) Hall, age 71, died suddenly on May 19, at Archibold Hospital in Thomasville, Ga. He was married to his wife Faye for 48 years. Funeral services will be Friday at 2 p.m., May 23, at Greenville Baptist Church with burial at Evergreen Cemetery in Greenville. Visitation was held Thursday evening from 5-7 p.m., at Beggs Funeral Home Madison. Jerry D. “Buddy” Hall is survived by; Linda Faye Ansley Hall Ronny Hall = Maygan Hall = Harlow & Julia Clay Hall Kendall Hall Jerry Hall = Joshua Hall Bobby & Judy Hall = Jennifer & Mike Beckham & Family Stacy Mote & Family Tommy & Debbie Hall = Jenna Hall Will & Amanda Hall & Family Poochie & Ricky Eastham = Chris Eastham & Sarah Peckom Candie & Matt Braswell, Wade & Alexis Chelsie & Kadence Eastham Dick & Wonnie Ansley = Renee & Kelly Lyle & Family Jodie & Mike Tyson & Family The late Louise O’Quinn & Family The late Johnnie Carol Ansley Evans & Family The late Curtis “Fuzzy” Ansley & Family Jerry (Buddy) Hall Jail Report

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 5 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Title : Madison Fire Rescue Firefighter Hometown: High Springs, Fl. Why He Chose Firefighting: When I looked at the job, being able to help people and being able to use my physical ability to help people was exactly what I think I was made to do. So I looked into it more and I love it.Ž Favorite Book: TheBible. I love Proverbs. I think it helps you to stay more honest and in good character.Ž Favorite Quote: Trust in the Lord with all thine heart and lean not into unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge Him and He shall direct thy path.Ž Favorite Song: The hymn, It Is Well With My Soul.Ž Favorite Movie: Braveheart.Ž Favorite TV Show: The Andy Griffith Show.Ž Favorite Sport: UF Football. Hero: My parents. Hobbies: Hiking, fishing, swimming and wood burning. Sum Yourself Up: I like being athletic. Any day that I get to spend outside is a great day. I am not shy. I never meet a stranger.Ž No Photocopies Accepted  Tickets are good for Saturday, June 7thonly  Deadline To Enter June 3, 2014Name____________________________ ___________________________ Address__________________________ __________________________ Phone Number____________________ Fill out and return to Greene Publishing at P.O. Drawer 772 or 1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32341 Kiwanis Delivers Apples To TeachersBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.The apple has become an icon of not only teachers but their profession as well. A gift of an apple for a teacher has a long history and has come to symbolize, at the cultural level, appreciation for all they do. Kiwanis Clubs throughout the country recognize this, and their “Apples For Teachers” campaigns demonstrate that appreciation in a public way. Locally, the Kiwanis Club of Madison polished, labeled, packed and delivered several boxes of apples to each public school in the district, enough so that every faculty member and staff person at that school could have their very own apple of appreciation.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 15, 2014Kiwanis Club members get busy polishing and labeling individual apples for teachers in the Madison County School District (Food Giant provided the apples at a substantial discount). Starting at the left end of the table and going clockwise around it are: Linda Hesketh, Lucile Day, Roy Ellis, Deena Hames, Allen Cherry, Preston Matthews, James Ray, Jerome Wyche, Mike Von Stetina, JoAnne Von Stetina and Ruth Moore. There's Still Time To Win The Angel QuiltBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc. The Pine Tree Quilters will hold the drawing for their Angel quilt at their July meeting, so there is still a little time to purchase a $5 rafe ticket. The quilting group, which makes quilts to give away to those in need, is also offering two other beautiful quilts for sale, for suggested donations of $300 and $500. The quilts are on display at the United Methodist Cooperative Ministries Center at 135 NE Dill St., at the corner of Dill and the Valdosta Highway, near Hanson. For more information about where and how to buy your rafe tickets, or to nd out when you can go by and take a closer look at the two gorgeous quilts offered for sale, contact Deborah Brown at the Center at (850) 929-4938. All proceeds from the sale of the quilts and the rafe tickets go to charity projects of the Pine Tree Quilters and the United Methodist Cooperative Ministries.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 14, 2014The other quilt offered for sale has 20 squares and a suggested donation of $300. All three quilts are on display at the United Methodist Cooperative Ministries Center, (850) 929-4938.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 14, 2014One of the two beautiful quilts offered for sale, this one, composed of 56 colorful squares, has a suggested donation of $500. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 14, 2014The Angel Quilt, containing 35 squares with depictions of angels, is being raf”ed off by the Pine Tree Quilters. The drawing will held at their July meeting.

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20thOf May Jubilee6 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Planning on working during retirement? If so, youre not alone. An increasing number of employees nearing retirement plan to work at least some period of time during their retirement years. Why work during retirement? Obviously, if you work during retirement, youll be earning money and relying less on your retirement savings--leaving more to potentially grow for the future and making your savings last longer. If you continue to work, you may also have access to affordable health care, as more and more employers are offering this important benefit to part-time employees. But there are also non-economic reasons for working during retirement. Many retirees work for personal fulfillment--to stay mentally and physically active, to enjoy the social benefits of working, and to try their hand at something new--the reasons are as varied as the number of retirees. How working affects Social Security If you work after you start receiving Social Security retirement benefits, your earnings may affect the amount of your benefit check. Your monthly benefit is based on your lifetime earnings. When you become entitled to retirement benefits at age 62, the Social Security Administration calculates your primary insurance amount (PIA), upon which your retirement benefit will be based. Your PIA is recalculated annually if you have any new earnings that might increase your benefit. So if you continue to work after you start receiving retirement benefits, these earnings may increase your PIA and thus your future Social Security retirement benefit. But working may also cause a reduction in your current benefit. If youve reached full retirement age (66 to 67, depending on when you were born), you dont need to worry about this-you can earn as much as you want without affecting your Social Security retirement benefit. If you havent yet reached full retirement age, $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $2 you earn over the annual earnings limit ($15,480 in 2014). A special rule applies in your first year of Social Security retirement-youll get your full benefit for any month you earn less than one-twelfth of the annual earnings limit, regardless of how much you earn during the entire year. A higher earnings limit applies in the year you reach full retirement age. If you earn more than this higher limit ($41,400 in 2014), $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $3 you earn over that amount, until the month you reach full retirement age--then youll get your full benefit no matter how much you earn. (If your current benefit is reduced because of excess earnings, you may be entitled to an upward adjustment in your benefit once you reach full retirement age.) Not all income reduces your Social Security benefit. In general, Social Security only takes into account wages youve earned as an employee, net earnings from selfemployment and other types of work-related income, such as bonuses, commissions, and fees. Pensions, annuities, IRA distributions, and investment income wont reduce your benefit. One last important point to consider: in general, your Social Security benefit wont be subject to federal income tax if thats the only income you receive during the year. But if you work during retirement (or receive any other taxable income or taxexempt interest), a portion of your benefit may become taxable. IRS Publication 915 has a worksheet that can help you determine whether any part of your Social Security benefit is subject to federal income tax. Stacy Bush, President Bush Wealth Management The Bush Wealth Advantage Social Security and Working in Retirement Our column, The Bush Wealth AdvantageŽ is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. Stacy Bush has practiced independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.com Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provid e specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 869133 Kevisa Moore Is Miss 20thOf May 2014 Story SubmittedOn Thursday, May 15, the 20thof May Pageant Committee crowned their new Queen, Kevisa Moore, the daughter of Felisha Hall, as the new Miss 20thof May 2014. A sophomore at Madison County High School, Moore is part of the cheerleading squad and the track team, and she also plays basketball. All the contestants, Moore, First Runner-up Tyaunie Richardson, Natasha Burnett and Sarah Jackson, did a wonderful job. The Pageant Committee would like to thank everyone who attended and/or participated in the pageant: Madison Florist for donating the beautiful ower arrangements; Evelyn Butler for supplying the light refreshments; MCHS for the decorations which were beautifully arranged by Malisha Wilson and Pageant Co-chairperson Tanya Butler and all the parents, family and friends who supported this event. Each year, the committee welcomes young women to participate in the pageant, and each year, people of the community come together and help make it possible. Since being crowned Thursday evening, Queen Kevisa Moore has served as the spokesperson for the 20thof May Jubilee Celebration festivities and will appear at other community events from now until she crowns next year's new Queen in 2015. Then, just prior to her graduation from high school, she will be presented with her $500 scholarship check. Congratulations Kevisa Moore, Miss 20thof May 2014.Photo SubmittedLooking radiant in their beautiful evening gowns, the contestants participating in the Miss 20thof May Pageant are (left to right): Natasha Burnett, Kevisa Moore (Miss 20thof May), Tyaunie Richardson (First Runner-up) and Sarah Jackson. Photo SubmittedIt was a tough decision, but the Pageant Committee selected Miss Kevisa Moore as the New Miss 20thof May for 2014 and Tyaunie Richardson as the First Runner-up. Jesse W. Solomon Park Holds Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 16, 2014Mayor Judy Townsend joined Jesse Solomon in cutting the ribbon to of“cially open the communitys newest park. Family and friend s surround Solomon during the ribbon cutting.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 16, 2014The days ceremonies also included a proclamation from Mayor Judy Townsend, of“cially declaring a Jacobbi McDaniel Day. His mother, Darlann Choice, received the plaque in place of her son. In the picture, from left to right, are: Mayor Judy Townsend, Darlann Choice and Jesse Solomon.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 16, 2014(Shown right) Shytrinnity Jones enjoys a dinner of fried chicken, hot dogs and all the sides, served at the park following the ceremony.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 16, 2014The Mt. Zion AME Church Choir sang two beautiful and soulful songs during the ceremony. Choir members from left to right are: Reverend Margie Evans, Ben Sampson, LaKay Evans, Timothy McCray, Jerome Wyche and Veveda Vellamy.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 16, 2014Jesse Solomon (shown left), the parks namesake, gave a very eloquent speech before participating in the ribbon cutting for the park. He spoke of his past, his days in the NFL and shared with the congregation, his emotions and his Mothers sacri“ces she made for him and his siblings while growing up in Madison. After the heartfelt recognition about his Mom, Solomon reverted back to a lighter mood and gained laughs from the crowd, when he reminisced about his high school buddies, the funk brothers.Ž The speech ended with Solomon giving thanks to Madison and the community.

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20th Of May JubileeMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 7 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Jesse Solomon Youth Football Camp A Success Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014The Jesse Solomon Youth Football Camp was a huge success last Saturday, May 17. The Jesse Solomon football camp was made up of 51 kids and 10 coaches, which made for a very informative and fun football event. By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. Former NFL player and Madison resident Jesse Solomon hosted the Jesse Solomon Youth Football Camp, Saturday, May 17 at the City of Madison Lanier Field from noon to 4 p.m. There were 51 children in attendance and 10 coaches. The coaches included John Harris, a former Minnesota Viking; Cletis Jones, a former New England Patriot; Lenny Chavers, former FSU Seminole; Eddie Johnson, former Eastern Kentucky University; Ricky Lee, Gerald Lattimore, Terry Johnson, Michael Blue, Greg Ray and Jesse Solomon. The children were taught basic instructions of the game and different techniques such as defensive drills and tackling. The coaches talked to the children about the importance of education. At the end of the clinic, the children were divided into two teams and played ag football to show off all that they had learned. Jesse Solomon said the children were so enthusiastic about the clinic and wondered if they could do it again next weekend.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014The guys had to get down and dirty during this practice drill, as they were instructed to move right, left, forward and back every time the whistle was blown.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014Group two was assigned to some tackling drills during the football camp. The coach shows the kids the correct way to tackle a player. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014(Shown left) At the blow of the whistle, the kids practice their tackling techniques on each other.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014It takes blood, tears and sweat,Ž said one of the Jesse Solomon football camp coaches. What a great pep talk the kids received by telling them they have to work hard on the “eld and off the “eld in order for their dreams to come true.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014During football camp, the kids even got to practice how to run the ball and get past their opponent.

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8 €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 The 20thof May Jubilee CelebrationBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.The 20thof May Jubilee Celebration was a success this past weekend. It all started Thursday, May 15 with the 2014 Miss 20thof May Pageant at the Madison County Recreation Facility. Kevisa Moore was crowned the 2014 Miss 20thof May. The 20thof May Jubilee Celebration held a Fish Fry Tiki Luau on Friday, May 16 at the Madison County Recreation Facility on Highway 360 behind the old Madison Middle School, where people were able to enjoy sh fried to perfection. The 20thof May Jubilee Celebration portion on Saturday, May 17, kicked off with a parade down Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive with FSU Seminole and Madison native, Jacobbi McDaniel as the Grand Marshall. But the fun did not stop there. There was vendor's set up on Arnold Street selling all kinds of wonderful treats, including, pizza, corn on the cob and snow cones. Other entertainment at the 20thof May Jubilee Celebration included the Gospel Celebration, an Entertainment Showcase and a motorcycle and car show. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014City Commissioner District 4, Marcus Hawkins, and his family were enjoying some great food during the celebration this past Saturday. Pictured with Hawkins are: Montrell Hawkins, Carolyn Johnson, MJ Hawkins, Maliyah Hawkins and Cayden McDaniel.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014Miss 20thof May and her runner up were enjoying themselves during the 20thof May festivities. Pictured from left to right are: Tyaunie Richardson, 20thof May runner-up and Kevisa Moore, Miss 20thof May 2014.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014The 20thof May celebration was full of vendors, food and activities for everyone to enjoy. Enjoying the festivities are: Komesha Collins, KaSiah Collins, Matesha Brown, MaLeah Brown, KeMerial Pratt, Jontavious Pratt and AhSyriah Collins. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014Jessica Solomon, a past 20th of May Queen, was all smiles during the parade. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014Morgan Whetsel, 2014 Moon Pie Princess, waves to the crowd during the 20thof May parade.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 9 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Sandys Country Buffet Tuesday Saturday: 6:30 A.M. 9:00 P .M. Sunday: 11:00 A.M. 3:00 P .M. 8 5 0 9 9 7 2 0 2 21050 North Jefferson Street Monticello, FL 32344 Sandy & SolomonSEAFOOD MARKET Located At 1015 N. Jefferson St. Monticello, FL 32344850-997-7300 Tuesday Saturday10:00 A.M. 7:00 P.M.No order too small or TOO BIG Check us out for all your event needs Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014The parade was full of royalty as the young girls waved to the crowd while traveling down Martin Luther King Drive. The 20thof May Jubilee CelebrationGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014Motorcycles were everywhere during the big celebration. Not only were the motorcycles part of the parade, but they were also part of a motorcycle show after the parade was over.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014A group of children and adults were walking for a great cause during the parade last Saturday. A couple of Justins Journey supporters stop for a brief second for a picture. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014A pick-up load full of children and adults were supporting their church, Mt. Nebo AME Church, during the 20thof May celebration.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Cheltsie Kinsley, May 17, 2014Jacobbi McDaniel was the Grand Marshall for the 20thof May celebration that was held this past Saturday, May 17.

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10 €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 866466

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 11 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Memorial Day A Day Of Remembrance By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.While Veteran's Day in November celebrates the service of all American veterans who have served their country in the armed forces, Memorial Day specically honors those who have died while serving in the military. Memorial Day, celebrated every year on the nal Monday of May, had its beginnings in the years after the Civil War. The estimated number of Civil War casualties ranges from 618,000 to 700,000 – more than the country's losses in any war in its history, from the American Revolution through Vietnam. According to the U.S. Census of 1860, the population just before the war broke out was only 31,443,321. Thus, it was pr obably difcult to nd a family on either side of the war who did not suffer loss of one or more family members, many of whom had to be buried where they died in the days before embalming, in graves hundreds of miles from their homes. With such devastating losses on both sides, leaving even greater numbers of bereaved loved ones behind to come to terms with their grief, memorializing those who had fallen in battle took on added cultural importance. In many places, where losses were heavy, entire communities were in mourning. The practice of decorating soldiers' graves with owers is an ancient custom, spanning centuries and continents; it had continued in the New World, before and during the Civil War, but the sheer number of soldiers' deaths made the practice more frequent, more visible and more public, so that historical accounts began taking notice. Women in Savannah, Ga., decorated the graves of Confederate soldiers in 1862. The following year, in Gettysburg, Penn., there was a cemetery dedication and commemoration at the gravesites of dead soldiers. Boalsburg, Penn., claims to be the birthplace of Memorial Day due to local historians' account of ladies decorating soldiers' graves there on July 4, 1864. Years later, this would be called the “First Decoration Day.” On April 25, 1866, the women of Columbus, MS., laid owers on the graves of both Union and Confederate solders buried in their cemetery. The rst widely-publicized Memorial Day-type observance was in Charleston, S.C., on May 1, 1865, a May Day ceremony organized by black residents of Charleston, who landscaped and built an enclosure for the graves of Union soldiers. In Waterloo, New York, on May 5, 1866, Civil War hero Gen. John B. Murray and other surviving veterans marched to three local cemeteries and decorated the graves of soldiers. According to local folklore, when Gen. John A. Logan learned of this, he issued “Logan's Order” in 1868 calling for a national, annual “Decoration Day” observance, patterned after a “Confederate Memorial Day” custom that had already become established in several Southern states. The rst national Decoration Day was observed nationwide Saturday, May 30, 1868. That year, Decoration Day events were observed in 183 cemeteries in 27 states. The following year, 336 cemeteries held decoration ceremonies. By 1890, every Northern state had made “Decoration Day” an ofcial state holiday, with memorial events sponsored by the Women's Relief Corps, and the Women's Auxiliary of the Grand Army of the Republic. Over the years, the U.S. established 73 national cemeteries (the most famous being the ones at Gettysburg and Arlington) where many soldiers' remains were relocated, and the focus shifted from honoring the Civil War dead to honoring all American veterans who died in service to their country. Over time, the name “Decoration Day” gradually changed to “Memorial Day,” a change that accelerated after WWII. In 1967, federal law ofcially adopted the name “Memorial Day.” In 1968, Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which moved four holidays, including Memorial Day, from their traditional dates to Mondays, in order to create three-day weekends. There was some resistance by several states, but after several years, all 50 states had adopted the last Monday in May as Memorial Day. Today, Memorial Day is a day set aside to honor those who died in service to their country, a day celebrated with patriotic parades and ceremonies. All over the country, volunteer and civic groups visit cemeteries and place ags on the graves of veterans from all wars. On this day, the American ag is raised to the top of the staff, then lowered to half-staff in memory of the more than one million veterans who have died while serving. It remains at half-staff until noon, when it is raised again to the top of the staff for the remainder of the day. In Madison, the traditional Memorial Day service will be held May 26 at Four Freedoms Park, under the gazebo, beginning at 11 a.m. Members of the community are invited to attend, honoring those who died to protect those very freedoms which the park itself is named after, freedoms articulated by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1941– Freedom from Want, Freedom from Fear, Freedom of Worship and Freedom of Speech.

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12 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014Relay For Life 2014 Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014The survivor lap at Relay is a joyful event that kicks off the evenings festivities. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Desmond Roberson, Pineland Missionary Baptist Churchs Minister of Music, sings with his enthusiastic back-up singers: Taylor Vickers (left), Malia Roberson (center) and Lamarya Roberson (far right). Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Tim Dunn and team named their tent (which won the award for Best Campsite) after a Clint Eastwood movie, with a slight change, The Good, the Bad and Cancer is Ugly.Ž Dunn is shown with a poster board image of Eastwood where people could take selfiesŽ with the cardboard image. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Sheila Samuels (center) is ”anked in support during the survivor/caregiver lap. Supporting her are fellow members from Nebo Church, Rick Pearson on the left and Chris Cooks on the right.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Deloris Washington, a cancer survivor is supported by her granddaughter, Lillie Neely (center) and on right, Susan Neely, daughter of Deloris. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Robert Thigpen, who has been undergoing treatment for renal cell carcinoma, is surrounded by his family at Relay, who are suppo rting him through sales of Pray for RobertŽ t-shirts, sold at the Busy Bee in town. In the front row, from left to right, are: Charles Ballenger, Hayden Ballenger, Robert Sealey (survivor), Meranda Mani, Kaitlyn Hutchinson, Dorothy Dempsey, Devan Dempsey and Kayla Sealey. In the middle row, from left to right, are: Charlene Medders, Kaitlin Gibson, Merritt Medders, Ameila Kent, Kyle Sealey, Amanda Ballenger, Cassidy Ballenger, Linda Kent, Ashley Hutchinson, Amanda Sealey, Hagan Hutchinson, Megan Thigpen, Charlotte Thigpen, Diane Dempsey and Jordan Thig pen. In the back row, from left to right, are: Dalton Tulk, Dylan Thigpen and Edward Hutchinson.

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Relay For Life 2014Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 13 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014The Tri County Relay Team serves up hungry Relay participants 50s style at Willies Diner. The team, from left to right, are: C arl Hackle, Jeff Brewer, Steve Walden, Allen Welch, Stephanie Carroll, Kisha Tolar, David Allen, Tamara Ashley, Rusty Smith, Carol Timmons, Kyle King, Trey Ba rrs and George Webb. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014The dancers in this classical performance de“ned beauty and grace in motion. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Jalexis Porter, Bria Arnold and Kamia Dopson makes up the ministry team of the Inspire Praise Dancers. The ministry is under the direction of Tammy Roberson at Pineland Missionary Baptist Church. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014The Relay event made this performance of HopeŽ a “tting choice for the evening. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Two sweet girls, Malia Roberson (left) and Kysiser Thomas (right), take time to ”ash heart signs for the camera before continuing to clap with the music being played on stage the night of Relay. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Cat Maultsby who is a cancer survivor is pushed in the survivor/caregiver lap by her grandfather, John Maultsby, also a cancer survivor. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014The Relays theme this year was, The Stars Come Out at Night,Ž and teams all named themselves after movies. Team Color Purple s tent was well decorated and supported. Team members for the Color Purple tent, from left to right, are: Eva Stevens, Sheila Samuels, Olivia Mitchell, J oshua Johnson, Franeka Sharpe, Chad Mitchell, Nita Mitchell, Kosha Gamble, Shawn Gallon, Vicki Johnson, Jordan Johnson and Latresa Humphrey (kneeling).

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Around Madison County14€ Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 Ochlawilla Baptist Church To Hold Homecoming Celebration Sunday, May 25Ochlawilla Baptist Church, located on 1315 Ochlawilla Road in Quitman, Georgia will host their annual homecoming on Sunday, May 25. Services will begin at 10:30 a.m., with a covered dish luncheon at 12:30 p.m. Everyone is invited to come and enjoy a day of singing and fellowship. Ebenezer Homecoming Set For May 25By Ginger JarvisAh, the cooling breeze from a funeralhome fan! Ah, the icker of gas lamps from wall sconces! Ah, the thrill of voices lifted in old-fashioned song! Ah, the delights of dinner spread invitingly under shady oak trees! All these and more are facets of the annual Homecoming at old Ebenezer Methodist Church off Little Cat Road. This year's event is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday, May 24 and 25, with an hour of singing from the Cokesbury Hymnal on Saturday night beginning about 7 p.m., closing with lemonade and cookies under the trees. The fellowship continues on Sunday morning with a service beginning at 11 a.m. Gene Gaston will conduct a memorial to the late Frances Sanders, whose family has been part of Ebenezer for many years. Gaston will also lead a memorial tribute to fallen members of the military. The featured speaker for the morning will be Jenny Andrews of Madison, whose family has also been involved in Ebenezer for years. The morning service will culminate with folks gathered under the trees for dinner on the grounds. Lawn chairs and picnic blankets are very much in order, and sharing family news is mandatory. Bring you own insect repellent; funeral home fans are provided. The singing and the Sunday service are open to anyone who longs for a taste of worship the oldfashioned way. To arrive at Ebenezer, take Hwy. 53 (Cherry Lake Road), north out of Madison; turn right onto Hwy. 146 (Little Cat Road); at 8.5 miles, turn left onto Bobwhite Terrace; at the fork, go left; at the next turn, go right, and you'll see the white country church among the huge trees. Feel free to join the crowd touring the historic cemetery and singing the old songs. You will be welcomed.

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED www.greenepublishing.com PERSONAL SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . LEGALS Friday, May 23, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 15 FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 5/19/2014 THROUGH 5/25/2014 I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).3/26 rtn, n/c Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBe A CNA Would you like to work as a nursing assistant? Become a CNA. Quest Training offers a nurse taught, 40 hr. prep class. No GED required if age 18 yr. Day and Evening classes. 386-362-1065.5/7 5/28, pdCDL Class A Driver Needed 2 years veri“ed experience. Runs mostly SE extended area. Good 2 year MVR. Blue Cross and blue shield health insurance offered. (850) 929-2279.4/11 rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com5/7 rtn, c 4 BR, 2 BA House With “replace, large yard and no pets. Near Blue Springs. $700 month, $700 security. 1 year lease. (850) 274-5805 or (907) 230-4705.5/7 rtn, cLake Park of Madison CNA Fulltime Contact Kim Browning HR or Connie Walker DON 850-973-8277.5/14, 5/21, c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12’x18’ building with 6’ porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/c Donations appreciated to get house out of foreclosure. Please donate by making a check out to Bank of America for Kevin Payne. His house is in foreclosure because his wife moved out in April of last year due to mental problems. Then his job cut back on hours and he only could work four days a week. Between his job and his wife, he got behind on house payments. It will take $7,000 to get his house out of foreclosure. Please call him at (850) 948-6974.5/21, pdAutomation and Production Technology (APT) Instructor wanted at North Florida Community College, Madison FL. See www.nfcc.edu for details.5/21, 5/28, c MIG Welders Needed Must have High School diploma or equivalent, the ability to read and understand CAD sketches, also able to read a tape measure to the 1/16th, and you will be required to pass an onsite weld test. You Must have a minimum of two years welding experience or a graduate of a certi“ed welding program, along with no previous employment history with Big Top Mfg. Must pass weld test on-site. Starting Wednesday, 5/21/14 at 8 a.m. Apply in person at Big Top Mfg. 3255 North Hwy 19. We will only accept ten quali“ed applications. EEO/AA/m/f/vets/disabled5/21, cVinyl Fabrication Operator Needed Must be able to read a tape measure to 1/4th inch. This job requires heavy lifting, reading sketches, and working with machines. There is only one (1) position available, we will only accept the “rst “ve (5) quali“ed applications. Starting Wednesday, 5/21/14 at 8 a.m. Must apply in person at Big Top Mfg. 3255 North US 19 Perry, FL EEO/AA/m/f/vets/disabled5/21, cAdoption Devoted, Affectionate, Professional couple will help you, unconditionally love. Hands on with your baby. Maintain contact. Allowed expenses paid. Doug & Liz 866-777-9344 Susan StockmanFL #0342521. Auctions Bank Owned Auction160+/1 Acres Divided of Higher Elevation Pasture & Timber Land with Beautiful Views for Miles in Clyde, NC, Haywood County. Saturday, May 31st at 11am. Auction At Haywood County Fairgrounds, Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. ironhorseauction.com 800-997-2248. NCAL3936. Educational Services AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for quali“ed students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-741-9260 www.FixJets.com. Help Wanted Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm l oaded. $1000 sign on to Quali“ed drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964. Are you pregnant? A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592. Adam Sklar#0150789. AVERITT EXPRESS New Pay Increase For Regional Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, Post-Training Pay Increase for Students! (Depending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Bene“ts. CDL-A req. 888-362-8608 Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer Females, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Experienced Team, Solo, Recent Grad & Student Drivers needed for dedicated run in your area! Ask about our sign-on bonus and guaranteed hometime! Call 866-414-3402. 5/23, 5/30 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CITY OF MADISON LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS BY THE PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD OF CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF THE CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161 through 163.3248, Florida Statutes, as amended, and the City of Madison Land Development Regulations, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Land Development Regulations, objections, recommendations and comments concerning the amendment, as described below, will be heard by the Planning and Zoning Board of the City of Madison, Florida, serving also as the Local Planning Agency of the City of Madison, Florida, at a public hearing on June 5, 2014 at 4:45 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the City Commission Meeting Room, City Hall located at 321 Southwest Rutledge Street, Madison, Florida. LDR 14-01, an application by Davis Marketing Group, LLC, to amend the Of“cial Zoning Atlas of the Land Development Regulations by changing the zoning district from RESIDENTIAL, MULTIPLE FAMILY (R-2) to COMMERCIAL, GENERAL (C-2) on property described, as follows: A parcel of land lying within Section 28, Township 1 North, Range 9 East, Madison County Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: Commence at the Southeast corner of Southwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 28; thence North 346.00 feet; thence West 27.00 feet to the Westerly right-of-way line of Georgetown Road; thence West 110.00 feet; thence North 100.00 feet; thence East 10.00 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence North 0037'22" West 116.35 feet to the Southerly right-ofway line of Martin Luther King Jr. Drive (County Road 360A); thence Northeasterly, along the Southerly right-of-way line of said Martin Luther King Jr. Drive (County Road 360A) on a curve to the left 134.18 feet to the Westerly right-of-way line of said Georgetown Road; thence South, along the Westerly right-of-way line of said Georgetown Road 204.70 feet; thence West 110.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing 0.36 acre, more or less. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future date. Any interested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the public hearing and that no further notice concerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above referenced public hearing. At the aforementioned public hearing, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the amendment. Copies of the amendment are available for public inspection at the Of“ce of the Director of Community Development, City Hall located at 321 Southwest Rutledge Street, Madison, Florida, during regular business hours. All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with disabilities requesting reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact 352.463.3169 (Voice & TDD) or via Florida Relay Service 800.955.8771.5/23 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CITY OF MADISON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY THE PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD OF CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF THE CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to Sections 163.3161 through 163.3248, Florida Statutes, as amended, and the City of Madison Land Development Regulations, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Land Development Regulations, objections, recommendations and comments concerning the amendment, as described below, will be heard by the Planning and Zoning Board of the City of Madison, Florida, serving also as the Local Planning Agency of the City of Madison, Florida, at a public hearing on June 5, 2014 at 4:45 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the City Commission Meeting Room, City Hall located at 321 Southwest Rutledge Street, Madison, Florida. CPA 14-01, an application by Davis Marketing Group, LLC, to amend the Future Land Use Plan Map of the Comprehensive Plan, by changing the future land use classi“cation from RESIDENTIAL, MEDIUM DENSITY (less than or equal to 8 dwelling units per acre) to COMMERCIAL on property described, as follows: A parcel of land lying within Section 28, Township 1 North, Range 9 East, Madison County Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: Commence at the Southeast corner of Southwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 28; thence North 346.00 feet; thence West 27.00 feet to the Westerly right-of-way line of Georgetown Road; thence West 110.00 feet; thence North 100.00 feet; thence East 10.00 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence North 0037'22" West 116.35 feet to the Southerly right-ofway line of Martin Luther King Jr. Drive (County Road 360A); thence Northeasterly, along the Southerly right-of-way line of said Martin Luther King Jr. Drive (County Road 360A) on a curve to the left 134.18 feet to the Westerly right-of-way line of said Georgetown Road; thence South, along the Westerly right-of-way line of said Georgetown Road 204.70 feet; thence West 110.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing 0.36 acre, more or less. The public hearing may be continued to one or more future date. Any interested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the public hearing and that no further notice concerning the matter will be published, unless said continuation exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above referenced public hearing. At the aforementioned public hearing, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the amendment. Copies of the amendment are available for public inspection at the Of“ce of the Director of Community Development, City Hall located at 321 Southwest Rutledge Street, Madison, Florida, during regular business hours. All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above referenced public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with disabilities requesting reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact 352.463.3169 (Voice & TDD) or via Florida Relay Service 800.955.8771.5/23

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16Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 23, 2014 All prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or Valdosta dealerships. All prices good through May 24, 2014 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Truck prices include $500 rebate when fi nanced with Chrysler Capital. $500 Conquest Rebate to customer who own a competitive brand truck. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. MPG per factory window sticker.888-304-2277801 E. SCREVEN ST € QUITMAN, GA888-463-68314164 N. VALDOSTA RD. € VALDOSTA, GA229-263-7561 8640 HWY 84 WESTAll prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles are located at our Quitman dealership. Vehicle prices include Trade-In & GM Loyalty Rebate (owners of 1999 or newer GM vehicles. All prices good through May 24, 2014 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. 862483 BORN 1914 YOU LEARN A LOT IN 100 YEARS... NEVER FORGET WHERE YOU CAME FROM 2014 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN 2014 DODGE DURANGO 2014 DODGE CHALLENGER 2014 DODGE CHARGER 27 MPG 25 MPG 25 MPG 27 MPG Q1400602013 DODGE DART V130392 34 MPG Q140042 V1404492014 DODGE AVENGER 30 MPG Q140111 PURCHASE ANY VEHICLE & RECEIVE A WORLD FAMOUS ROCKER TO ENJOY THE GREAT SPRING WEATHER! 2014 JEEP CHEROKEE Q140290 2014 RAM 1500 2014 JEEP COMPASS V140314V140068 26 MPG 2014 DODGE JOURNEY 2014 RAM 2500 4 DOOR 4X4 HEAVY DUTY V140284 2014 JEEP PATRIOTV140072 2014 CHEVY CRUZE LT1.4L ECOTEC MOTORCHEVY MYLINK W/7Ž TOUCH SCREENREAR VIEW CAMERAREMOTE START 2014 CHEVY SONIC LT 2014 CHEVY EQUINOX 32 MPG (PER WINDOW STICKER) BLUE TOOTH WIRELESSUSB PORT, 2.4L SIDI SIRIUS/MP3 PLAYER 2014 CHEVY MALIBUC140133 2014 CHEVY CAMARO 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DOOR LTC1400662014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DOOR LT 4X4 2015 SILVERADO 2500 HEAVY DUTY 4 DR 4X4 ALL-STAR EDITION 5.3L V8, 18 Ž ALUM WHEELS REAR CAMERA, REMOTE START, NAVI & MORE! MSRP: $41,725 DISC. $7,732 ALL-STAR EDITION 18 Ž ALUM WHEELS REAR CAMERA, REMOTE START & MORE! MSRP: $37,120 DISC. $7,132 C140154 2014 SILVERADO 1500 C140162 C150006 Purchase any vehicle & receive a World Famous Rocker to enjoy the Great Spring Weather! ALL NEW ALL NEW 2015 CHEVY TAHOE 12 TO CHOOSE FROM Everybody Knows Chevys Cost Less In Quitman! 2014 RAM 1500 4 DOOR Q140103 Q140312 V140369 2014 RAM 1500 LARAMIE 4 DOOR Q140138 Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2013 Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2014