The Madison enterprise-recorder

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Material Information

Title:
The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title:
Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title:
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Creation Date:
May 31, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note:
Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID:
UF00028405:00636

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Our 149th Year, Number 36 Since 1865, Telling It Like It Is And Defending The Peasant's Right To Know Index1 Section, 12 Pages Local WeatherViewpoints 2 Obituaries 4 Around Madison 3-7 School 8-9Police Week 10 Classieds/Legals 11Friday, May 16, 2014Madison, Florida D a n c e R e c i t a l T h i s W e e k e n d By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.Beckys Dance Steps Studio is having its 38thAnnual dance recital on Saturday, May 17 at 1 p.m., and 7 p.m. The theme is Just Dance. Admission is $6 for adults and $4 for children under 12. The 20thOf May Jubilee Celebration Is This WeekendBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. The 20thof May Jubilee Celebration will take place Friday, May 16 with a Fish Fry Tiki Luau at Madison County Recreation Facility on Highway 360 behind the old Madison Middle School. The event will begin at 5 p.m., and tickets are $6. The 20thof May Jubilee Celebration starts Saturday, May 17 with a parade at 9 a.m., down Martin Luther King, Jr., Drive with FSU Seminole and Madison native Jacobbi McDaniel as the Grand Marshall. At 11 a.m., the Gospel Celebration and Entertainment Showcase at the Madison County Recreational Facility on Highway 360 behind the Madison Middle School. There will also be a motorcycle and car show, a cake auction, vendor booths and more. For more information on these events, contact Dereal Alexander (bike show) 4646178, Willie McGhee (car show) 673-1023, Vicki McQuay (gospel show) 973-2252 or Leon Arnold (sporting events) 973-7193. Contacts can also be reached via Facebook.Madison County Preparedness Expo Is ComingBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. The 2ndMadison County Preparedness Expo will be Tuesday, May 20 at 6 p.m., to 8 p.m., at the Van H. Priest Auditorium. Event speakers are: Florida Division of Emergency Management, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tri County and Florida Forest Service. Exhibitors include Duke Energy, American Red Cross, E.M.S., Chamber of Commerce and many more. This event is free to the public and is sponsored by Madison County Emergency Management and NFCC. For more information, call (850) 9733698.L e e T o w n C o u n c i l T o I n t e r v i e w T w o T o w n M a n a g e r C a n d i d a t e s By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. The Lee Town Council held a special meeting and workshop, Tuesday, May 13. At the workshop, the town council reviewed eight applications for the Town Manager position. The town council narrowed it down to two candidates, Jennifer R. Wallace and Christine A. Donaldson. The interviews will take place, Monday, May 19 at 6 p.m. At the special meeting, the town council discussed their action on the water use permit for JJJ & T Family Limited Partnership. Town Manager Danny Plain had a meeting with the Suwannee River Water Management District staff about the water use permit concerning 2,400 acres on the East and West side of State Road 53. According to Plain, the water use permit is proposing to construct 12 agriculture irrigation wells and attached pivot irrigation systems. The water would be used for corn, carrots, peanuts and rye. I nally got them (SRWMD) to admit that if you look at their permit it is not a 3.7 million gallon a day withdrawal, its actually 21 million gallons a day, said Plain. What they do is, you take the 3.7 million and multiply it by 365 and thats what they cannot go over in a year. Plain explained that it would only be an estimated 70-day period that the water would be used since they are growing crops. The permits allows for a yearly amount of 1.369 billion gallons of water to be withdrawn. A meeting with the Suwannee River Water Management District staff is set for Monday, May 19 at 7 p.m. According to Scot Copeland, Town of Lees attorney, he led a motion to remove the permit request from the agenda of the SRWMD meeting on May 13. Lee now has until after the June meeting to pursue an administrative hearing should the town council decide to pursue one. The town council agreed for the Florida Rural Water Association to conduct tests to gather information as to whether the water use permit will affect the water in the Lee wells. The Lee Town Council voted to accept the FDOT Resolution and Trafc Signal Maintenance Agreement. In 2010, they had agreed to maintain the trafc signal. With this new agreement, the FDOT would be raising what they pay the town for maintenance. If the town council did not sign the new agreement, they would still be responsible for the maintenance due to the 2010 agreement. In other related news, Plain had previously tried to get the FDOT to install a trafc signal ver-F D L E A r r e s t s M C H S B a n d D i r e c t o r O n S e x u a l B a t t e r y C h a r g e s The Florida Department of Law Enforcement Tallahassee Regional Operations Center, on Wednesday, May 14, arrested Geoffrey Walter Hill, 42, on one count of sexual battery by person in custodial authority. FDLE agents began investigating Hill after receiving a complaint from an individual alleging to have been sexually abused by Hill. Hill is a band instructor at Madison County High School and was suspended by the Madison County School District Superintendent upon his arrest. Hill was booked into the Madison County Jail on $250,000 bond. This case will be prosecuted by the Office of the State Attorney, Third Judicial Circuit. As of press time on Thursday, May 15, Hill remained in the Madison County Jail. Agents believe there may be additional unidentified victims. Anyone with information about this case or Geoffrey Walter Hill is urged to contact the FDLE Live Oak Field Office at (386) 330-2840.Geoffrey Hill GreenvilleWastewaterPlant Is A Concern; Other Big Budget Issues LoomBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.In a discussion of big-ticket budget items looming on the horizon, Public Works Director J.C. Fead and Town Consultant Jim Parrish outlined for the Greenville Town Council the possibility that the city's aging wastewater plant could possibly fail catastrophically and put the town in a very dangerous situation as far as health and safety issues. Calling the plant a duct-tape, rubber band and baling wire operation, Parrish commended Fead and the entire Public Works department for doing such an outstanding job of keeping the aging facility running, and running so well. Fead added that he no longer had a backup motor for one of the main lift stations in the operation, and that lift station had to be kept running. He was looking into prices for a replacement motor to have on backup, and council members conrmed that they had already approved the purchase of a back-up at the previous meeting. The wastewater facility has had numerous problems, and spot repairs have been done, but the entire plant desperately needs an overhaul and upgrade. However, there is not enough money in the town's budget to undertake such a massive project. Amounts of at least one million dol-See Budget Issues On Page 3 MCHS Student Accepted As UF Preferred Walk OnBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. Vincent Dimenna, MCHS senior, has been accepted as a preferred walk on at the University of Florida. Dimenna has a 3.0 GPA and has already been accepted at Florida. He will begin training with the UF football team June 24. He was voted Most Valuable Player at the Friday Night Lights event at UF in July 2013 but was injured soon after and was unable to play his senior year. He started playing varsity in the 9thgrade. He plays offensive center and defensive tackle. He plans to become an anesthesiologist at UF. He will soon become a CNA. after taking the medical program at MCHS. He plans to work at Shands Hospital on the off-season as a CNA. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie Box, May 14, 2014Vincent Dimenna, with his parents, accepts the offer to become a preferred walk on for the University of Florida football team. See Lee Town Meeting On Page 3

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Celebrating 100 years, the National Extension Service was established by the Smith-Lever Act of 1914. This legislation created an educational outreach of the landgrant university system. Fifty years earlier, the Morrill Act of 1862 had established a university system throughout the United States to educate citizens in agriculture, home economics, mechanical arts and other practical applications. This university system, unique to America brought the opportunity for higher education vocational skills to all citizens. By the turn of the century these state universities were educating students and producing research. In 1906, George Washington Carver, known for his plant research, especially peanuts, invented a mobile teaching unit. His movable school, funded by a New York financier, left Tuskegee Institute and traveled throughout Alabama demonstrating improved farming practices. Another early pioneer, Seaman Knapp, of the US Department of Agriculture worked with farmers to set up farm demonstrations. In Florida, outreach work started with a Farmers Institutes and short courses hosted on the campuses of UF and FAMU. Although early leaders in the land grant system had been creative with demonstrations and traveling exhibits, it was not enough to extend the practical education into communities. In 1914, after five years of debate, two legislators introduced bills to create an Extension service. Asbury F. Lever of South Carolina introduced a bill to the House of Representatives. At the same time, Hoke Smith of Georgia introduced a similar bill in the Senate. In short, the Smith-Lever Act was passed mandating the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the land-grant university system to work together to create the national Extension system. The proposed system would have three distinct levels. A county agent system was established with primary control at the state level with aid from the USDA. Over the next several years, states established the Cooperative Extension System with agriculture, home demonstrations programs and agriculture clubs, later renamed 4H. The first major challenge Extension faced was during World War I. To meet war time needs, through education, wheat acreage was increased from 47 million acres in 1913 to 74 acres in 1919. In addition to farm production, Extension addressed conserving perishable products by canning, drying and preserving. Likewise, during the Great Depression creative programs emphasized farm management practices and helped establish selling cooperative. At the same time, extension home economists taught families nutrition, canning surplus foods, home gardening, home poultry production and sewing. Over the years, Extension has played a major role in bringing the University to the local communities, teaching topics based on identified needs, translating research and putting it into practice to improve agriculture production and sustainability. Family and consumer programs have empowered residents to make informed decisions, improving their health and well-being. 4-H helps youth develop life skills and knowledge to become productive citizens as they grow into adulthood. UF/IFAS Extension has improved the lives of Floridians in many ways. If youve learned how to choose healthier foods, conserve water, save money, participated in a farm tour, attended 4-H camp or started a garden, chances are you learned it from Extension. We, the faculty, staff and volunteers of UF/IFAS Extension in Madison County, are proud of our accomplishments on the 100thanniversary, and we look continuously toward the future, finding solutions to the challenges we Floridians will face in the future, sharing them to make life healthier and more prosperous for you. The University of Florida Extension Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution. Memories are painted on my mind like the fresh white paint that Mr. Harry Gillespie would use to paint the house I grew up in, over in Monticello every other year. The fresh smell of the paint remains in my mind as it seemed to clean everything like the bleach my mama used to wash clothes. Rooms would be painted. The outside of the house would be painted and the porch and its posts would be painted. It gave a feeling of newness to the old house that no longer stands there. Different rooms had different colors. My bedroom (shared with my brother) had blue paint. The kitchen had yellow paint. My parents bedroom was an off white or beige, as was the living room. The laundry room and bathroom, it seems, changed colors. Sometimes, they would be a mint green. At other times, a yellow or dusty rose color. Like the paint changed colors, I notice that my attitudes about some things have changed also. As I was growing up, I had an intense love for sports. I still like sports but do not go crazy over them like I used to. I used to be a diehard Dodgers fan and Los Angeles Rams fan. Through the years, my love for them died. Did it die hard or did it just slip quietly away? I dont really remember. I do still love Florida State Seminoles sports though. I keep learning how to handle different situations and different life experiences. I have to hold on to Gods hand so many times when I am hurt or distraught over a situation at home, at work or with a friend and sometimes with an enemy. I try to live peaceably with all men as the Bible instructs me, but when I see things that I know are wrong, I am probably too rash and quick to rush to judgment. As the old childrens song goes, Gods still working on me. He knows what He wants me to be. I know that when Hes through with me at the end of my life, I will be like that old house in Monticello that Mr. Gillespie painted. I will have a fresh coat of paint and be all clean and sparkling like brand new. Viewpoints & Opinions2 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 Conservative Corner Conservative CornerBy Nelson A. Pryor, Lee, Fl. Jacobs Ladder Jacob BembryColumnist Diann DouglasGuest ColumnistM a d i s o n C o u n t y E x t e n s i o n S e r v i c e F r e s h P a i n t Read Jacobs blog at www.jacobbembry.com. His book, Higher Call, is available in Kindle format at www.amazon.com or in paperback at www.amazon.com, www.bn.com and www.booksamillion.com or by sending $10 plus $3.99 shipping and handling to Jacob Bembry, P.O. Box 9334, Lee, FL 32059. Contact him at jacobbembry@hotmail.com. Extension Service Celebrates 100thAnniversary STORMING THE CITADEL THE MADISON COUNTY REPUBLICAN EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Will meet at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, May 27, at the Madison Library ALL Republicans Welcome Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee MadisonRepublican@embarqmail.com How much money will it take? Tim Gill wants to know. And so does the Human Rights Campaign. Both are trying to split the Southern social conservatives from the states business establishment and working to elect pro-homosexual lawmakers. The April 28, 2014 New York Times ran the story of the attack on the South. Mr. Gill is spending more than $300 million of his own fortune on homosexual causes. The Human Rights Campaign is spending another $8.5 million. The playbook, to take over the South, has already been written, by Tim Gill. Colorado was his test case. Mr. Gill, a Denver software mogul, set up his own foundation, and an afliated political advocacy group, Gill Action Fund. Two decades ago, Gill set out to change Colorado. At the time, the State was dominated by Conservatives, the home base of prominent evangelical and conservative groups like Focus on the Family. Mr. Gill poured millions of dollars into educational initiatives and liberal nonprot groups. Today, Liberals control both houses of the legislature and the governors ofce. Civil unions were approved in 2013, and now the push is on, for full marriage rights for homosexuals. This month, at a conference to be called: OutGiving, hundreds of the countrys leading homosexual donors are scheduled to meet to lay out their attack on the South. To be called: Project one America, the initial effort has already seen the hiring of 20 people to take over the South. Mindful of cultural differences, the Washington-based Human Rights Campaign is seeking to adept to the rural South, as it cultivates ties to local church leaders, N.A.C.P. ofcials and educators. That includes holding meetings at local Wafe Houses-but not on Wednesday nights, when many people are in church. The movement will rst underwrite polling, research, then lobbying and recruiting donors for existing state organizations. In some southern states, organizations like the Human Rights Campaign, the American Civil Liberties Union and groups Mr. Gill helps fund plan to lobby for nondiscrimination ordinances in housing and employment and for legislation allowing homosexual couples to adopt. In other States, they are building new grass-roots organizations and pushing for the election of openly homosexual ofcials where there are none. In a nod to the dominant political culture in the South, the effort will rely heavily on outreach to Republicans and clergy, as well as to AfricanAmerican civil rights organizations. Those involved in the planning described it as the biggest realignment of homosexual rights activism in a decade, one that will shift the movements focus into territory where there is almost no unied network of support. Field Ofces will be soon opened in Mississippi, Alabama and Arkansas. Other ofces are planned in an effort to build stronger ties to schools, religious institutions and cultural leaders. Mr. Gill, in his NYTimes interview, says the purpose of this months OutGiving conference, is to try to persuade others to join the less glamorous state level advocacy effort, before a mid-term election cycle begins to consume a lot of activists time and money. Whats In A License Plate?A p p a r e n t l y A L o t I t S e e m s Whats in a license plate? It depends on whom you ask, but for some, it appears that a license plate can be a calling card for tourism, with Florida at the top of the list. A survey of 2,000 drivers from across the country by CarInsurance.com as to which state license plates were most appealing and which least, put Wyomings cowboy on a bucking bronco and Hawaiis colorful rainbow at the top of the list. The survey found that women overwhelmingly liked Hawaiis rainbow design and that men did so also, although the latter much preferred Wyomings cowboy. At the very bottom of the list was Delaware, whose license plate features gold lettering on a blue eld absent any images. The top l0 most attractive plates, in order of preference are: Wyoming, Hawaii, Utah, Alabama, Oregon, Maine, South Carolina, Florida, Georgia and Oklahoma. The 10 least attractive, also in order of preference are: Vermont, Massachusetts, District of Columbia, Montana, New York, Virginia, Alaska, Michigan, Arkansas and Delaware. The report notes that cheap, fast printing on vinyl has largely replaced prisonstamped metal in most states license plates, allowing for a profusion of afnity plates that states and organizations use to raise funds for a variety of causes. Numerous as afnity plates have become, however, its the no-cost, standard state plate that prevail among drivers. The best license plates represent calling cards for states, the report notes. In fact, 13 percent of respondents reportedly said a plate had inspired a vacation or relocation, citing Florida most often. The other plates that successfully encouraged vacations or relocations were Georgia, California, Hawaii and Alaska. Respondents also chose their favorite license plate slogans. The top ve were: Alabama, Sweet Home Alabama; New Hampshire, Live Free or Die; Hawaii, Aloha State; Alaska, The Last Frontier; and Florida, Sunshine State. Respondents strongly disliked plates with only a Web address, such as Californias dmv.ca.gov; and plates with slogans, with the District of Columbias Taxation Without Representation slogan as the most disliked. Lastly, respondents were asked about the possibility of using special license plates to easily identify certain classes of drivers. The survey found 49.4 percent would support license plates identifying drivers older than 70; 57.9 percent would support license plates identifying novice drivers; 59.8 percent would support license plates identifying those convicted of texting while driving and 69.1 percent would support license plates identifying those convicted of a DUI. The full article and survey results can be found athttp://www.carinsurance.com/Articles/favorite-license-plates.aspx. P e t O f T h e W e e k Meet Sophie! This sweet, yellow lab mix was homeless, but thanks to good Samaritans, has been fed and taken to the vet, where she has been spayed and given all her shots, making her ready for adoption. While she has been at her fosters home, she has proven herself to be very friendly with their three-year-old daughter, a one-year-old Yorkie and numerous cats/adults. Shes a little shy upon meeting someone new but warms up quickly. Sophie is about 1 year old and weighs around 60 pounds. If you are looking for a friend who is playful and loving, and does well with children and other dogs/cats, Sophie might just be the girl for you. If you would like more information, or would like to meet Sophie, contact Hunter Greene at (850) 419-6280.

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From Page One Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 World NewsBy Rose Klein The MadisonEnterprise-Recorder PublisherEmerald GreenePath of Faith WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris, Rose Klein, Jessie BoxGraphic DesignersTori Self, Hunter GreeneAdvertising Sales RepresentativeJeanette DunnBookkeeperBrooke KinsleyClassified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classieds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Wednesday at 3 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included)Since 1865 -Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity.The Madison The Madison Enterprise-Recorder Enterprise-RecorderMadison Recorder established 1865 New Enterprise established 1901 Consolidated June 25, 1908 Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post Ofce 32340. Publication No. 177.400. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison Enterprise-Recorder, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.P.O. Box 772 Madison, FL 32341 1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32340 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 greenepub@greenepublishing.com www.greenepublishing.com 2013M a n A r r i v e s A t P o l i c e S t a t i o n D r u n k T o R e p o r t A c c i d e n t In Baton Rouge, La., a 31-year-old man was arrested after allegedly driving himself to the Baton Rouge police troops ofce to le an accident report while drunk. Patrick Ruffner called the station to report the accident and troopers instructed him to come in. After arriving, a trooper at the station smelled Ruffner and had him take a sobriety test. After performing poorly on the test Ruffner admitted he had been drinking before the accident and was arrested on suspicion of driving while intoxicated and driving with a suspended license.S a t a n i c B l a c k M a s s T o B e H e l d A t H a r v a r d In Cambridge, Mass., a satanic black mass will be held at Harvard, despite objections from religious and education leaders. Harvard President Drew Faust called the event agrantly disrespectful and inammatory but said the organizers have the right to proceed. The Catholic Church condemned the mass and the Archdiocese of Boston will hold a holy hour in response to the planned event. The satanic ceremony is being organized by the Harvard Extension Cultural Studies Club and the Satanic Temple and is scheduled to take place at an on-campus bar. The awed assumption seems to be because Satan is the representation of evil incarnate for some faiths, that Satanists are part of a hate group and their practice devoted toward denigrating Catholicism, said a spokesman from the Harvard Cultural Studies Club. At least 500 people have signed a petition calling for the black mass to be cancelled.C u s t o m e r S t a b s E m p l o y e e F o r H a v i n g T h e W r o n g V i b e In Mount Vernon, Wash., a customer who was having issues with Wal-Marts self-service check out, stabbed a female employee who came to help because she didnt like her vibe. When Nancy Reed was informed her credit card had been denied she became upset and began accusing the maa of kidnapping her grandchild. The 60-year-old then stabbed the WalMart employee with a pair of scissors and was also able to grab and rip out a handful of hair from another employee. While police were en route to the store the woman began, dancing around and lifting up her dress. Its unclear how Reed will be charged due to her apparent mental health issues. Budget Issues Cont. From Page 1 Lee Town Meeting Cont. From Page 1 City of Madison Issues Proclamations Honoring Two Greenville NativesBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc. There were discussions of tight budgets, warnings of tough times ahead and hints of hard choices looming in the future, but it wasn't all gloom and doom as the Madison City Commissioners took a few moments to honor two very extraordinary gentlemen that Madisonians could all be very proud of indeed. Mayor Judy Townsend read aloud the two proclamations and signed official copies naming May 17, 2014 as Jacobbi McDaniel Day, and May 25, 2014 as "David Thomas Thigpen Day. Jacobbi McDaniel, a native of Greenville and a graduate of Madison County High School, went on to play defensive tackle with the FSU Seminoles, helping them win the 2014 BCS National Championship Game. He is widely regarding by ESPN and others as one of the top defensive tackles in college football, an achievement requiring not only great natural talent, but also an outstanding spirit of dedication, enthusiasm and hard work, of which McDaniel is a striking example. On the day named in his honor, McDaniel will return to Madison to be the Grand Marshall of the 20thof May Jubilee Celebration parade down Martin Luther King St., beginning at 9 a.m. David Thomas Thigpen, another native of Greenville, is a man who felt called by the Lord to enter the ministry when he was still a teenager, and has been a minister of the gospel ever since, for over 50 years. In August of 1980, he founded the Bible Deliverance Church, where he has pastored his flock for the past 34 years, leading by example of compassion, feeding the hungry, clothing the poor and providing shelter for the homeless. He has forever left his mark on the county by enriching the lives of those around him through his guidance, leadership and compassion, Mayor Townsend read from the proclamation. Moments later, she signed it, officially naming May 25, 2014 in his honor. lars, if not more, have been mentioned in the past. The options include applying for a CBDG grant, which takes time (and grant approval is not guaranteed), applying for a loan through the USDA or EPA, or applying for a bank loan. A loan would mean that work could begin as soon as the loan was approved and the money made available, but it would have to be paid back with interest. That would mean raising water rates by as much as $10-$12 a month, in a town where many residents are elderly, live below the poverty line, or both. It was something that needed to be addressed some time in the near future. If the plant were to fail rst before anything was done, it would take at least a year of construction before the town would have an operational wastewater system again. Parrish urged council members to begin thinking about their options and which direction they wanted to go. Another area of concern is payment for the landll groundwater testing. For the last ve years, a grant has covered the $20,000-a-year tab for the twice-annual water-testing mandated by the EPA, but that will soon run out and a new grant was not approved. Parrish said he could reapply for another grant in the next grant cycle the following year, but there would still be an interim not covered by grant money. Council member Calvin Malone asked if it were possible to renegotiate the fees for the testing; Parrish thought that he could quite possibly talk the EPA into less testing activity. There were 12 testing wells on that one ve-acre site, and the reports had always been good. The landll closed over 20 years ago, and the EPA requires groundwater testing for 30 years after such a closure. The town faces at least another 10 years or so of water testing, and will have to come up with ways to pay.sus the caution light that they already have, but Lee did not meet the requirements for a traffic signal. The Lee Town Council was able to meet with Bill Steves, the managing engineer for the new sewer system in Lee. Steves retired from Reynolds, Smith and Hills but stayed on as the managing engineer for the sewer project in Lee. The town council had an issue with Work Order #3 where Steves requested five cleanouts of the sewer lines. The council did not want to do five clean-outs if one would not help the issue. Steves explained that becasue the project is under CDBG Economic Development Project Grant he ordered five so he would not have to have the budget adjusted after each clean-out. According to Steves, there is not enough flow to keep the system operating properly. To be honest, Madison is the culprit because they have not maintained their system like it should have been maintained, said Steves. There are not enough flows in our system to keep a scouring velocities in there so until there are enough flows, the City is going to have to keep cleaning the force main out to keep it functioning. According to Steves, Lee has a joint participation agreement with the City of Madison that specifically tells Madison it is their issue to maintain the line from the water tower on Dale Leslie Drive towards Madison.

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Asearch of The White Pages over the internet yields 61 Pickles/Pickels in Madison County and 26 in Taylor County. Where did they come from? Likely someplace in Georgia; and before Georgia, the Pickles moved from South Carolina. Michael Pickels was born in Georgia and arrived with Jacob and Elizabeth Pickels, who were probably his parents, in the 1830s. Jacob and Elizabeth were born in South Carolina. Michael and Jacob were counted in the 1840 census as heads of households. There were two people, including Michael, in his household: Michael, whose age was between 20 and 29, and a female between the age of 20 and 29, who was probably his wife, Dicy Carolyn West. Jacobs household included three people: Jacob, whose age was between 40 and 49; a female, probably Jacobs wife Elizabeth, who was between 30 and 39; and one male, maybe another son, who was between 10 and 14 years old. True Florida Pioneers, the Pickles family meets the denition of the Florida State Genealogical Society as a family who settled in Florida before Florida became a state, in 1845. Michael and Dicy Carolyn West were married on Oct 1, 1840; census records indicate that Dicy was born in South Carolina. They had ten children: Elizabeth; Jacob, who married Julia; Mary Polly, who married Ephraim Bass; Robert A., who married Sarah Bass; Julia Ann; William Roeann (Bill) who married Cornelia Murphy; Sarah (Sally); James Piney, who married Eliza Coker; John Berry, who married Nancy Elizabeth (Lizzie) Pinkard; and Levi. On July 10, 1844, Michael received a land grant of 40 acres in the Hopewell area from the Federal Land Grant ofce in Tallahassee. He voted in the 1845 Florida statehood election. And he served in Captain Livingstons Company, Taylors Battalion, Middle Florida Mounted Volunteers in the 1838 Indian Wars. Michael and Dicys six sons left quite a few descendents, many who still call Madison and Taylor County home. Their oldest son, Jacob, shows up in Louisiana in 1880, married to Ellen. Their second son, Robert A. and his wife Sarah Bass were counted in the 1910 census in the Mosely Hall area, with nine children: Rosa Ella; Alexander (18711925); John S. (1873-1920); Millidge (1878); Stella Irene; Sally; Mattie E.; Tesey; and Mamie. Michael and Dicys third son, William Roeann, (Bill), and his wife, Cornelia Murphy, had the following children: Radford; Hosannah, (18801960); Eliza (1882); James Avery (1883-1965); William Jr. (1885); Georgia Ann (1887-1967); and Delila (18951928). The fourth son, James Piney and his wife Eliza Coker had the following children: Mary Frances, William Michael, Henrietta, Jack, John Olen; Dellar; Roberta; and James Sidney Sid. John Berry, Michael and Dicys fth son, and Nancy Elizabeth Pinkard had the following children: Albert Earnest (1888); Robert Lee (1891-1956); James Russell (18931951); Randall P. (1899); Wilford (1901); George (1903-1979); and Alma (1908). After Jim died in 1925 Liza went to live with her daughter Dellar Hunter in Perry. When a girl during the Civil War the Yankee Soldiers came by and asked her about her brothers. Her reply was that she didnt know but if she did she wouldnt tell them. Her house was burned during the war. Liza lived to be 101. Were not sure what happened to Levy, the sixth son. He is four years old in the 1860 census, but we dont see him after that. Why are some families, all with the same ancestor, Michael Pickles, known as Pickles and some as Pickels? Apparently the census takers in different years spelled Pickles in different ways, causing some of the Pickles branches to be Pickels and some to be Pickles. Many of the Pickles/Pickels families lived in the San Pedro and Mosely Hall area of the county and many are buried in the San Pedro Cemetery. Many family members have been active in the New Home Baptist Church We see that all of the local Pickels/Pickles came from Michael and his wife Dicy Carolyn West, who pioneered in Madison County in the 1830s and who raised six sons and four daughters. Four of the sons, Robert A., William Roeann, James Piney, and John Berry seemed to have remained in Madison and themselves raised large families. These four sons of Michael and Dicy who lived in Madison County and raised large families left a large legacy of Pickles/Pickels descendents, many of whom live here today. In addition, the daughters and daughters-in law connect the Pickles/Pickels families with numerous other Madison pioneer families, such as the Cokers, Basses, Pinkards, Williams, Holtons, Albrittons, Murphys, Hunters, Tutens, Cruces, Newsomes, Lambs and Burnetts. Michael and Dicy Pickles have left a proud legacy of hardy, industrious, family-oriented, good solid citizens. Michael and Dicys family has enriched Madison County for over 180 years. Some information for this article was gleaned from Madison County Florida Family History Book, published by the Madison County Genealogical Society. Our society welcomes your input and invites you to join our organization. We meet on the second Thursday monthly, except during summer months, in the Madison Public Library from 6 to 7 p.m. Annual dues are $25. To add comments to our articles or to submit your own sketch on your ancestor, contact us at Madison County Genealogy Society, P.O. Box 136, Madison, FL 32341. Or contact us by email at mcgenealogysociety@live.com. If you would like for us to write an article featuring your ancestor, please contact us by mail or email.Around Madison County4 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 Community CalendarMay 16 The Madison Boys Choir will be holding a fish fry on the Courthouse lawn from 11 a.m. until all the fish are gone. They'll be serving up fish, chips and coleslaw at $6 a plate. Come on by, grab a plate and help them with their fundraiser for travel and other expenses for future performances.May 16 The 20thof May Jubilee Celebration is holding a Fish Fry Tiki Luau at the Madison County Recreation Facility on Highway 360 behind the old Madison Middle School. Tickets are $6, and the fun begins at 5 p.m. with a festive atmosphere and fish fried to perfection. Come on out, bring your family and friends, and spend a fun Friday evening together.May 17 Bike Night Madison returns Saturday, May 17, in the WinnDixie Parking lot next to Ken's Barbecue. Hosted by the Blue Knights Law Enforcement Motorcycle Club, the event begins at 5:30 p.m. and lasts until...well, whenever it's over. Come on out and join other motorcycle enthusiasts from North Florida and South Georgia for motorcycle display, conversation and fellowship. For more information, contact John Pulliam at (850) 6731152 or Mike Register at (850) 971-5398. You can also visit their website at www.blueknightsga15.com.May 17 Saturday is by far the biggest day for The 20thof May Jubilee Celebration, starting with a 9 a.m. parade down Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive, featuring FSU Seminole and Madison native Jacobbi McDaniel as the Grand Marshall. At 11 a.m., enjoy the Gospel Celebration and Entertainment Showcase at the Madison County Recreational Facility on Highway 360 behind the Madison Middle School, along with a motorcycle and car show, a cake auction, vendor booths and more. For more information on these events, contact Dereal Alexander (bike show) 464-6178, Willie McGhee (car show) 673-1023, Vicki McQuay (gospel show) 973-2252 or Leon Arnold (sporting events) 973-7193. Contacts can also be reached via Facebook.May 17 Former NFL football player and Madison resident, Jesse Solomon, will be hosting the Jesse Solomon Youth Football Camp, Saturday, May 17, at Madison Lanier Field. The event is open to children 4ththru 10thgrades. Registration starts at 11 a.m. with camp starting at noon and lasting until 4 p.m. Parents can also register their child online at www.usafootball.com /fun, click on Clinics, and then select Jesse Solomon Youth Football Camp.May 17 The Madison County Sheriffs Office and Madison County Sheriff, Ben Stewart is hosting a 5 Stand Skeet Shoot on Saturday, May 17, to benefit the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches. The skeet shoot will be at Honey Lake Plantations Sport Shooting Multiplex with an entry fee of $50. There will be two events: one at 9 a.m. and another at 1 p.m. To reserve shooting time, RSVP to the Madison County Sheriffs Office at (850) 973-4151. The Madison County Sheriffs Office is now selling raffle tickets for a Beretta Silver Pigeon1, over and under 12 Gauge 28-inch barrel shotgun, hard case and five different chokes. Tickets are $10 each, with only 400 tickets available. The drawing will take place on Saturday, May 17, at the Honey Lake 5 Stand Skeet Shoot. The winner needs not be present to win.May 18 New Home Baptist Church is having Homecoming this Sunday, May 18. The service begins at 10:30 a.m. with special singing by the Purvis Brothers of Monticello. The guest speaker will be former pastor, Rev. John Dorman. A covered-dish dinner will follow the service. The pastor and congregation would like to invite everyone to attend. New Home Baptist Church is located at 1100 SW Moseley Hall Road. For more information, please call the church at (850) 9734965.May 18 The Junior Auxiliary is hosting a Mother-Daughter tea, Sunday, May 18, from 3-4 p.m. and invites mothers and daughters of all ages for tea and refreshments at the Womens Club. Attire is dressy-casual and hats are encouraged. Tickets for reservation can be picked up at Madison County Community Bank. For more information contact Jamie Andrews at (850) 6737803.May 19 May is National Osteoporosis Month, a time to learn about the disease and how to prevent it. The Madison County Extension Service and the Madison County Health Department will be presenting a program, Catch the Silent Thief, on Monday, May 19, at 10 a.m. and again at 6 p.m. at the Madison County Extension Office. Learn about the steps you can take to prevent and delay bone loss. The workshop will highlight healthy eating habits, working with your health care provider and simple exercises to build strong bones. To register, call the Extension office at 973-4138.May 19 The 4thannual B.F. Killingsworth Gator Golf Classic will be held Monday, May 19 at the Madison County Country Club, located at 445 SW Country Club Rd. Spots are still available with tee times at 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. All proceeds from the tournament will go towards the Madison County Gator Club Scholarship fund. For more information contact Stefanie Thomas at (850) 4641177. T h a n k Y o u The family of the late Mrs. Oretha Davis wish to express their heartfelt gratitude for all acts of kindness shown during the illness and passing of our loved one. In however you played a part, your many thoughtful deeds are very much appreciated. Thank you again for your prayers and support. May God continue to bless and keep you. The family of Mrs. Oretha Barfield Davis Way Back When Way Back WhenMay 13, 1949 Dr. A F Harrison was elected President and Dr. M. E. Buchwald was elected sec.-treas., of the Madison County Medical Society last week. Miss Martha Cave was crowned Queen of the May Friday afternoon at the annual May Fete sponsored by the Madison Womans Club in the Court House park. Miss Cave is a member of the senior class of Madison High School and was chosen Queen by a popularity vote. Tommy Beggs, son of Mr. and Mrs. T J Beggs, Jr., reigned with the Queen as King consort. He is also a member of the senior class. Adeline Johnson, one of the oldest citizens of the Pinetta community, died April 19, 1949. Funeral services were held at Mt. Zion church near Cherry Lake, April 24. The deceased was the mother of nine children. As far as is known Adeline was 90 years old. She has spent her entire life in the Pinetta community.May 19, 1950 Piggly Wiggly prices of the week (prices good thru Saturday, May 20): Del Monte Yellow Cling Peaches, 19 cents per can; Fresh Florida Corn, 25 cents for four ears; Prime Rib Roast per pound, 69 cents; Brisket Stew per pound; 35 cents; and hamburger meet per pound; 55 cents. The May Day program held last week at the school was a gala affair and one of the outstanding events of the year in which every student of the school took an active part. There was a large audience. Court Jesters, Brenn Clayton and Edwin Fender, made way for the royal carriage and procession to enter the court. Miss Frances Dugan was crowned and reigned Queen of May, with Sidney Bass as May King with many attendants. Heavy hail fell in several sections of Madison County Wednesday. Tobacco was badly damaged in the Cherry Lake and Harmony sections. A 4-acre patch of Jim Surles was riddled by the hail stones which were said to be as big as good-sized marbles. Jack Lamb of the Hopewell section also reported heavy hail in this section.May 18, 1951 The Board of Public Instruction of Madison County has elected Mr. Oscar A. Beck, Jr., as Principal of the Madison Elementary School. He will succeed Mr. J. Donald DeLong, who recently resigned to accept a position elsewhere. Mrs. J A Dickens was elected president of the Junior Womans Club at the annual ofcers banquet Tuesday night in the club house. Other ofcers chosen were Mrs. J L Studstill Jr., 1stvice president; Mrs. Bob Browning, 2ndvice president; Mrs. Henry Dickinson, treasurer; Mrs. E P sanders, Jr., Cor. Sec.; Mrs. Claymore Schnitker, rec. sec.; and Mrs. W B Clark, parliamentarian. With U.S. 1stCavalry Division on Korean Battlefront-Master Sergeant Stanley E. Goodman, husband of Mrs. Juanita Goodman, Greenville, Florida, has been awarded the Combat Infantry mans Badge in Korea while serving as an Infantry man with the 7thCavalry regiment. P i o n e e r s O f M a d i s o n C o u n t y Where Did All Those Pickels/Pickles Come From? James P and Liza Coker Pickels

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By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.F. or the third year in a row, Debra McGrew visited the Woman's Club of Madison to speak for Refuge House, a place of safety for women eeing from violent relationships. And for the third year in a row, she introduced a speaker who was a survivor of domestic violence. This year, the survivor, not only of domestic violence, but of child sexual assault as well, is also the Madison County SART (Sexual Assault Response Team) Coordinator. Cherie Rowell described a childhood of living all over the state, following her father's work in the construction business. Both her parents came from large families that included ministers, law enforcement ofcers and business partners, but in spite of having law enforcement ofcers in the family, child sexual assault was something that just wasn't talked about among family members. The man who assaulted Rowell as a child was a close friend of her family's, so she remained silent about it for years. When she was older, she met one of her dad's employees and immediately fell in love. He was a charmer who could fool a lot of people who didn't really know him, and the two were soon married and had a son and a daughter. However, the charmer turned out to be extremely jealous, and one of the worst beatings she ever endured at his hands was because she had spoken to another man. She would learn later that constant accusations of indelity were a common means of control for many abusive men. Constant accusations keep the accused offbalance and paralyzed with fear of another beating. The charmer was someone who hurled emotional and verbal abuse at her. Even though her parents has raised her to be a strong person, she took it because, You'll agree with anything they say just to get them out of your face. And while a woman is desperately agreeing with and enduring all this invective just to keep the peace, doubts begin creeping in and eating away at the soul, eroding ones sense of self-worth. The charmer Rowell had fallen in love with was also someone who used, abused and sold drugs, and forced her to lie to the welfare ofce about their income so they would qualify for assistance. Whenever she wanted to get out of the situation and leave, he would remind her that she had just committed welfare fraud and would go to jail. It was a danged-ifyou-do-danged-if-youdon't situation that many women in dangerous, violent relationships know all too well. Leave me and you'll go to jail is only one of many variations that include leave me and you'll lose the kids...leave me and (ll in the blank)...leave me and I'll kill you... There were similar no-win dilemmas, where no matter what she did, it would be wrong. He wouldn't show up to pick her up from work, but catching a ride home with someone else wasn't the best idea. She lived three miles from work, and her only other choice was to walk. Sometimes she asked a female coworker for a ride, but the woman often refused; once in a while she would agree but tell Rowell, You'll have to walk home from my house. Rowell learned later that this woman was also in a controlling, abusive relationship, where giving rides to coworkers wasn't the best idea. By then, her closest family members were four and a half hours away. She nally realized she had to leave, after a neighbor lady stopped to chat with her while she was sporting a black eye and playing with her children in the front yard, and remarked that, Your little girl is so pretty...what happens when she grows up and thinks that's love? What happens when your son grows up and thinks that's how love is expressed? Those words haunted her until she realized she had to leave. Later, she would learn that the neighbor woman was speaking from experience, having been married to a law enforcement ofcer, an abuser, but someone who was looked upon as a respectable part of the community. This neighbor woman had to nd the courage to stand up for herself and leave, an act that empowered her to reach out to another women she saw struggling. And a woman who sees someone else who has stood up for herself and gotten out of an abusive relationship will be empowered to do the same. Sometimes women who leave a nice home for a shelter that isn't so nice will often have doubts about depriving their children. What if my kids go hungry? What if they never again have decent clothes to wear? The women struggle to do the right thing for their children, weighing the desire to provide them with nicer material things versus the need to leave. Often, women won't leave just for themselves; not until they reach the tipping point where they realize that their children will grow up to regard abuse as normal. Please think about that when you gather up clothes to donate to the shelter, said Rowell. Shelters are grateful for whatever they get, but think about including the nicer things, too...not just the stuff you wouldn't wear. Rowell found her courage to leave because a neighbor reached out to her and made her realize what staying would do to her children when they grew up. She had to face the fear of going to prison. She had to face admitting to her parents that they had been right about the man she wanted to marry; they had seen things that she hadn't been able to because she was swept off her feet and madly in love. And she had to face dealing with some very strong emotions. Although she is no longer with her ex-husband, I still love him and I still have a place for him in my heart, she said. That's something people don't understand. This man was the father of her children, and the emotions, although changed, couldn't be simply switched off. Cherie Rowell has been the SART Coordinator for Madison County since December 2013, delivering the message of empowerment, and the news that there is Refuge House, a place of safety for those who make the decision to ee. She has given several presentations already and is available to speak to church groups, community groups or civic clubs to get the message out to many women who still need to hear. Refuge House, Inc. can be reached by phone at (850) 973-4144; by fax at (850) 973-9108; or through the 24-Hour Hotline at (800) 5001119. Rowell can be reached by email atcrowell@refugehouse.com. Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 5 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 Title: Madison Fire Rescue Firefighter Hometown: Miami, Fl. Why He Chose Firefighting: He was in class one day when he asked himself, why was he there. He soon decided to go to firefighter school. Favorite Book: James and the Giant Peach, by Roald Dahl. Favorite Quote: Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us, by Marianne Williamson. Favorite Music: House music. Favorite Movies: Sandlot and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Favorite TV Channels: Food Network, HGTV and the Discovery Channel. Favorite Sport: MMA Hero: God and myself. I have taught myself a lot. Hobbies: Kayaking, mountain biking and working out. Sum Yourself Up: Fearless and very confident. New Home Baptist Homecoming Is Sunday, May 18New Home Baptist Church will be having Homecoming this Sunday, May 18. The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., with special singing by the Purvis Brothers of Monticello. The guest speaker will be former pastor, Rev. John Dorman. A covered-dish dinner will follow the service. New Home Baptist Churchs pastor and congregation would like to invite everyone to attend. The church is located at 1100 SW Moseley Hall Road. For more information, please call the church at (850) 973-4965. Madison County SART Coordinator Addresses Woman's Club Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 8, 2014Debra McGrew, left, of Refuge House, makes her third appearance in as many years at the Woman's Club, this time to introduce Madison County's new SART Coordinator, Cherie Rowell.

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By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Achild ID Program and Fundraiser, held by the Masons of Madison and Greenville, was very successful says Mason, John Sirman. The ID program was a free service offered to help parents and law enforcement in the event a child becomes missing or abducted. Families eating at the Pizza Hut on Base Street in Madison were able to donate to the Masons by using a voucher when paying for their bill, with those donations contributing to ID Programs in the future. Interested diners with young children were able to have their child participate in the program before leaving the restaurant. Parents who used the program were given a mini-DVD that had their childs ngerprints, height, voice recognition, prole photos and a video of the child walking, all taken while at Pizza Hut. They also received a DNA kit, where parents could store blood, DNA and hair samples of their children. These images and samples could be disseminated across the state and to the National Law Enforcement Network very quickly, increasing the probability of a child being found if they were to go missing. A total of 26 children were signed up for the program and the total amount earned through the voucher program came to $126 that will go towards purchasing new and up-todate equipment for future ID programs. Around Madison County6 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 H a p p y M o t h e r s D a y T r i b u t e T o M a t i l d a T h o m a s Story Submitted By Dr. Barbara ThomasReddick And ChildrenIwould like to talk about a woman that I believe has journeyed life in a unique, nurturing and loving manner. She was married twice and out of the two marriages, conceived 13 children. She worked hard throughout her life so that her family could eat, have shelter and receive their education. While raising her children, her routine nor lifestyle ever changed and there were usually no drastic unexpected changes for us as how things would ow throughout the course of the week. Here is how it was: We all knew that Monday through Friday we were to rise and shine to prepare for school everyday. Education was always a must and without hesitation we knew it. On Saturdays, we would be cleaning our rooms, washing clothes, cleaning the house and after that yes, we would have free time to play. But before the break of the evening we knew that once every two weeks, we would shampoo our hair, preparing for Sunday church that occurred every week. Mom always woke us up early Sunday morning with the aroma of grits, eggs, bacon or sausages, pork and beans and toast. We all knew then it was time to get ready for church. She held true to us attending church school on Sunday and also believed in us having family devotion every Sunday; that is where we learned to pray, read scriptures and truly understand family time. Oh yea, the routine was always consistent and persistent. She made sure all the girls hair would be ironed and with ponytails. We were dressed with air, which of course included our patent leather black shoes, before walking up the road to attend church. Even after our father passed, Mom always remained in congruent with her beliefs and determination of making sure we were the best that we could be. Mom had that special drive within her and a nurturing spirit for us to be successful. Although my dad passed when our baby sister was only four months old, Mom knew that somehow and someway, she must continue to strive towards the nish line. The nish line meaning, to whatever cost, with a house full of children, I must nish well. My Mother, Mrs. Matilda Thomas, is now 83 years old and is sometimes mowing her own yard, tending to her chickens, gardening, washing her clothes, cleaning and cooking. Mom is still kicking it around the house. My Mothers Mom is still living and is 97-years-old and in a good frame of mind. For me, I am her daughter, Dr. Barbara Thomas-Reddick and I would like to say that my Mother is considered to me, among other Moms, The Virtuous Woman. I would like to say, Happy Mothers Day to her and to all the mothers around the world. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Dr. Barbara Thomas-Reddick (inset), daughter of Matilda Thomas of Greenville, gives a heartfelt tribute to her Mother for Mothers Day. S 5 d n a t S t e e k S o o h S t t o $50 e May 17, 2014 ntry fee Event On $50 erepts egtar 25 thi wd5 StaneEvent On ntry fee $50 e desInclun lu,om amegaug 12 ,rteoo shr ds anzeir proo d,hc n! eromt TnEve owt T me: 9:0Ti 00:21 to am0me: 9:0gistrareorF T m p me: 1:0Timationorfd inantiongistra -973-4151troppu Sruo yr fouk YonahT 0:04m to p0me: 1:0ct:ntaco 4151t m p0 The Late Mrs. Wilma Dickey To Be Honored May 20thAs The Unsung HeroStory SubmittedThe Madison County 20thof May Unsung Hero Committee is proud to have the opportunity to honor the Late Mrs. Wilma Dickey as this years honoree. This committee was organized by the Late Mr. Howard Waring. Mr. Waring wanted to show that slavery was wrong. As a white Christian, he pondered how Christians allowed this ungodly cruelty to happen to humans in a religious nation. Mr. Waring wanted to show his Christian love to mankind by erecting a monument to honor the Unsung Heroes in Madison County. On Tuesday, May 20, at the Four Freedoms Park in Madison, on the corner of Range and Marion at 5 p.m. The committee will honor the Late Mrs. Wilma Dickey known to many of the youth in Madison as the shot nurse. Mrs. Dickey was a prisoner of war; while in captivity she cared for the servicemen. Mr. Charlie Dickey Sr., who was also a prisoner of war, fell in love and married Wilma after they were released from prison. They were the parents of three children, two sons: Charlie; Roy and one daughter; Wilma Rea and nurtured grand and great grandchildren. Mrs. Dickey was employed by Madison County Health Department as a nurse and served the entire outlying communities. Mrs. Dickey often spoke of one of the saddest experiences as a nurse was when she and a Black nurse from Jacksonville stopped to have a cup of coffee in the back of a restaurant and was refused service in Madison. She thought that since the nurse had traveled to Madison to help the poor people of Madison with their health problems, that they could have coffee and discuss some of the health problems that were prevalent in the community. Mrs. Dickey was a true Christian who lived the life as Jesus would like us to live. Forgive and move on with the mission to help our fellowman. She was a faithful member of Lee United Methodist Church, she served as President of the Madison County Extension Home Economic Advisory Council, she assisted with the Madison County Health Fairs and she helped with the Middle School Healthy Heart Program, making youth become aware of keeping a Health Heart. Mrs. Dickey was one of a kind and NEVER, NEVER, complained about a task. The speaker for this occasion will be Dr. Thomas Haynes, a Professor at Florida A&M University, a native son of Madison County. The public is cordially invited to attend and celebrate this event. A wreath will be laid at the Unsung Hero Monument by the Dickey Family. Lion's Club 4thOf July Celebration Will Get Off To A Running Start By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Year after year, the Lions Club 4thof July God and Country Celebration just keeps getting bigger and better, and this year for the rst time, the day starts out early in the morning with a race two races to be exact, a 5K Run and a Fun Run, sponsored by the Madison Sporting Goods and Pawn Store. Pre-registration for both begins at 7:30 a.m., in front of Madison Sporting Goods, where both races will begin. The Fun Run begins at 8 a.m., and the 5K begins at 8:30. Participants can also go online at the www.madisonlionclub.com website and pre-register there. The 5K Run fee is $30, and includes a tee-shirt, but if you register early and reserve your tee-shirt now (before June 1), you pay only $25. Registration for the Fun Run is free, unless you want a tee-shirt; in that case, the fee will be $10 to cover the cost of the shirt. Register before the June 1stdeadline to guarantee that you'll get one. The online website is also where vendors can sign up and reserve their booth spots. The fee is $35 for a 12 by 12 booth and $65 for a 12 by 24 booth. Vendors are encouraged to go online as soon as possible and download the applications to reserve a good spot...they're going fast. The God and Country Celebration committee is also looking for entertainment acts for the main stage from 6 p.m., until time for the reworks. If you can sing, dance, play an instrument, do a gymnastic or acrobatic routine to music (or without music), do magic tricks, ventriloquism, stand-up comedy, slapstick comedy, or any other family-appropriate, crowd-pleasing entertainment, go to the same website, download an application and send a demo tape or DVD to the committee, or arrange for an audition. If you have friends with stage presence who like to entertain crowds, get the word out to them...the Lions Club Entertainment Committee would like to have a variety of talent on the main stage this year.Masonic Child ID Program Successful Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Hunter Greene, May 6, 2014David Jarvis assists Elijah McNealy, age four, with ngerprinting at the Masons ID Program held on May 6.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Hunter Greene, May 6, 2014Dylan Agner, age nine, has his height checked as part of the ID program held at the Pizza Hut in Madison. Photo Submitted

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By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Read United is a community volunteer effort, organized by a womens leadership initiative of United Way of the Big Bend that strives to help children develop vital language skills while enriching lives and enhancing social skills. As a volunteer, Read United is a positive way to make an impact in the community, and this year in Madison over 200 books were distributed by 14 local volunteers to New Millennium Charter, Pinetta Elementary, Greenville Elementary, Lee Elementary and Madison Central Schools. First grade students from the above schools enjoyed a break in their day as volunteers from the Madison County community went into classrooms, handing out books for students to take home. Volunteers also took time to read a chosen book to the class, creating student discussion as they read. Lynne Sapp, a rst grade teacher at Lee Elementary, said her students were so excited to get new books that after going to recess they read them on the teeter-totter! To nd out more about the United Way of the Big Bends Read United or other early education efforts, contact them at www.uwbb.org or like them on Facebook.Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 7 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 Community Volunteers Read United In Madison CountyGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 6, 2014Nestl Water employees, in the back row, left to right: Shenna Edmonds, Tony Lightfoot and Chrissy Pierre-Louis volunteered to read to Cindy Vegas rst grade class at MCCS on May 6. Students show off their books, distributed by the United Way, after being read to by the three volunteers. In the front row, left to right are: JaMeisa Ray, Stephen Martinez, Amy Lawrence, Saige Salmons, Wendy Perez, Travis Lee, Jaidyn Wesley and Brenden Lee. Students in the back row, left to right are: Rihanna Williams, Jalizya Turner, Jamarcus Smith, Mariah Ware, Johnae Stephens, Jason McDaniel and Flora West.Photo SubmittedRead Uniteds celebrity reader this year was Property Appraiser Leigh Bareld. She is pictured as she reads to an attentive rst grade class at Pinetta Elementary School.Photo SubmittedLynne Sapps rst grade students were so excited about their new books they didnt put them down, even for recess.Photo SubmittedMelissa Gamalero volunteered her time to read to rst graders at the New Millennium Charter School, here in Madison.

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School8 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 As the cost of a college educat ion continues to climb, many grandparents are stepping in to help. This trend is expected to accelerate as baby boomers, many of whom went to college, become grandparents and start gifting whats predicted to be trillions of dollars over the coming decades. Helping to pay for a grandchilds college education can bring great personal satisfaction and is a smart way for grandparents to pass on wealth without having to pay gift and estate taxes. So what are some ways to accomplish this goal? Outright cash gifts A common way for grandparents to help grandchildren with college costs is to make an outright gift of cash or securities. But this method has a couple of drawbacks. A gift of more than the annual federal gift tax exclusion amount--$14,000 for individual gifts and $28,000 for gifts made by a married couple--might have gift tax and generation-skipping transfer (GST) tax consequences (GST tax is an additional gift tax imposed on gifts made to someone who is more than one generation below you). Another drawback is that a cash gift to a student will be considered untaxed income by the federal governments aid application, the FAFSA, and student income is assessed at a rate of 50%, which can impact financial aid eligibility. One workaround is for the grandparent to give the cash gift to the parent instead of the grandchild, because gifts to parents do not need to be reported as income on the FAFSA. Another solution is to wait until your grandchild graduates college and then give a cash gift that can be used to pay off school loans. Yet another option is to pay the college directly. 529 plans A 529 plan can be an excellent way for grandparents to contribute to a grandchilds college education, while simultaneously paying down their own estate. Contributions to a 529 plan grow tax deferred, and withdrawals used for the beneficiarys qualified education expenses are completely tax free at the federal level (and generally at the state level too). There are two types of 529 plans: college savings plans and prepaid tuition plans. College savings plans are individual investment-type accounts offered by nearly all states and managed by financial institutions. Funds can be used at any accredited college in the United States or abroad. Prepaid tuition plans allow prepayment of tuition at todays prices for the limited group of colleges--typically in-state public colleges--that participate in the plan. Grandparents can open a 529 account and name a grandchild as beneficiary (only one person can be listed as account owner, though) or they can contribute to an already existing 529 account. Grandparents can contribute a lump sum to a grandchilds 529 account, or they can contribute smaller, regular amounts. Regarding lump-sum gifts, a big advantage of 529 plans is that under special rules unique to 529 plans, individuals can make a single lump-sum gift to a 529 plan of up to $70,000 ($140,000 for joint gifts by married couples) and avoid federal gift tax. To do so, a special election must be made to treat the gift as if it were made in equal installments over a five-year period, and no additional gifts can be made to the beneficiary during this time. Stacy Bush, President Bush Wealth Management The Bush Wealth Advantage How Grandparents Can Help with College Costs Our column, The Bush Wealth Advantage is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. Stacy Bush has practiced independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.com Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 867685 Madison County High School High Tech Holds Annual Kickoff Photo SubmittedMadison County High School High Tech members gather at Shelby's Restaurant for their annual kickoff. Left to right are: HSHT Co-Director Mike Radel, Theo Brown, Imani Roberson, HSHT Director Deborah Simmons, Jazmyne Arnold, Aubrey Johnson, Dwayne Carter, Tyesha Nicholson, MyAsia Arnold and Deshaun Dansey. Story Submitted The Madison County High School High Tech held its annual kickoff at Shelbys Restaurant on April 15. The High School High Tech theme was Student Success through STEMS (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). There were 35 guests in attendance, from members, teachers, friends and parents. Director of Madison County HSHT (High School High Tech), Deborah Simmons, welcomed guests and discussed the achievements of students over the past year, depicted on poster board displays. The dinner invocation was given by High School High Tech student Aubrey Johnson. The guest speaker, Gladney Cherry, ESE Madison County School District, gave a PowerPoint presentation of famous people who had disabilities. Ms. Allison Chase, The Able Trust State Director, discussed High School High Techs within the state of Florida. The evening culminated with HSHT Awards Recognition Program to its HSHT members. The Florida High School High Tech Program (HSHT) encourages students to explore the STEM careers (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) -and there is no better time than now to do just that! The National Science Foundation has predicted that by 2021, 80 percent of jobs will require some level of math, science or technology skills. HSHT program coordinators hold high expectations of their students. The Able Trust, also known as the Florida Endowment Foundation for Vocational Rehabilitation, is a 501(c)(3) public-private partnership foundation established by the Florida Legislature in 1990. Its mission is to be a key leader in providing Floridians with disabilities opportunities for successful employment. Since its establishment, The Able Trust has awarded more than $31 million throughout Florida, enabling approximately 2,000 Florida citizens with disabilities to enter the workforce each year. The Able Trust youth programs provide career development and transition to almost 2,000 students with disabilities annually, helping to reduce the dropout rate and prepare young adults for life beyond high school. MCHS SkillsUSA Went to State ConferencePhoto SubmittedThe MCHS SkillsUSA members pose for a picture while at the State Conference in Pensacola. Left to right in the bottom row: Kaitlyn Farnell, Sunni Mays, Kayla Joseph, Sarah Kauffman, Tyler Burnett, Camryn Alderman, Zack Sprenkle, Bethany Greenwood, Myasia Arnold, Faith Siplin and Ashton Pickels. Left to right in the middle row: Sk illsUSA AdvisorPaige Thomas, Hunter Burt and Jacob Moore. Left to right on the top row: Jarrett Briggs and Houston Wagner.By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.The Madison County High School SkillsUSA club recently went to Pensacola for State Leadership and Skills Conference. MCHS Biotechnology and Biology teacher, Paige Thomas, took 15 students to the State Competition. SkillsUSA is a national organization that strives to help prepare students in technical skilled and service occupations. Students Faith Siplin and Sunni Mays came back with the gold and silver medal, respectively, for the Biotechnology competition. In this competition, the students had to take a test on biotechnology, perform an electrophoresis lab, which deals with D.N.A. and write a lab report on their ndings. SkillsUSA also presented a community service project for the students of MCHS and others in Region 2 to build 15 picnic tables that will be distributed throughout Pensacola. Thomas won State Rookie Advisor of the Year at the State competition. I felt honored because this was the largest year for rookies, said Thomas. Photo SubmittedFaith Siplin (left) and Sunni Mays (right) participated in the Biotechnology competition at the SkillsUSA State Conference. Siplin won Gold and Mays won Silver. MCHS Art Teacher Inspired By StudentsBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing Inc.Donn Smith has been a teacher at Madison County High School for 10 years and he has been teaching art for nine years. He teaches drawing and ceramics and he is also the yearbook advisor. He moved to Madison in the 8thgrade and was the second class to graduate from Madison County High School. I actually prefer drawing by a long shot because I am really bad at ceramics but I have students who are really good at it, said Smith. I get so many kids who are really good at ceramics and I take credit for teaching them but really I just say heres the stuff and here is kind of how you do it and they take off and do amazing things. Smith nds gurative drawings fascinating and that is what he is drawn to draw. He nds that his work is better since working with the students. He is bouncing ideas off of them which inspires his artwork. When Smith is not working he is painting, drawing, working with computer programs or reading comics. He enjoys reading The Walking Dead comics as well as watching the television show. Donn Smith

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SchoolMadison Enterprise-Recorder 9 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 NFCC Recognizes College Employees For Professional Achievement And Years Of ServiceStory SubmittedNorth Florida Community College employees gathered in the courtyard of the NFCC Walter L. Bishop Administration Building for its annual Courtyard Party on April 22. The gathering honors all NFCC employees for their contributions to the college, recognizes NFCCs Above and Beyond award recipients and honors employees for years of service to NFCC. Two NFCC employees were selected to receive NFCCs Above and Beyond Award for 2013-2014 Jennifer Page of Madison County and Hansel Nelson of Jefferson County. Page is the Coordinator of NFCCs new Academic Success Center. The Academic Success Center offers NFCC students one-on-one tutoring assistance, organized group study sessions, workshops, study skills trainings, academic coaching, webresources, and other help and support necessary to ensure successful completion of studies and programs. Nelson is the Supervisor of Grounds at NFCC and goes above and beyond to keep the NFCC campus looking its best throughout the year. The Above and Beyond awards are given each year to NFCC employees, staff and faculty members, who go above the call of their regular jobs to assist students, to assist their colleagues or to benet the college. Thirteen employees received service awards from NFCC recognizing years of service ranging from ve years to 35 years. They are: 35 Years: Edna Ealy (Madison County) 30 Years: Dr. Sharon Erle (Leon County) 25 Years: Sarah Newsome (Madison County) 20 Years: Dr. Barbara McCauley (Madison County), Mary Anne Wheeler (Madison County) and Bobby Scott (Lowndes County, Ga.) 15 Years: Linda Brown (Madison County), Neil Smith (Madison County) and Bill Hunter (Hamilton County) 10 Years: Efrain Bonilla (Lake City/Columbia County) and Hansel Nelson (Jefferson County) 5 Years: David Paulk II (Madison County) and Dr. Michael Stine (Jefferson County) Thirteen employees received special recognition for professional achievement. Certicates were given in honor of employees completing degrees, publishing works, and/or serving on state and national boards among other things. Those honored include Madison County residents Brandi Browning, Rose Knox, Billye Robinson, Kim Scarboro, Della Webb and Margaret Wilkerson; Dr. Sharon Erle of Leon County; Dr. Miryam Espinosa of Lowndes County, Ga.; Bonnie Littleeld, Dr. Michael Stine and Susan Taylor of Jefferson County; and Ansley Simmons of Cairo, Ga. Dr. Guenter Maresch (Jefferson County) was recognized as NFCC's 2014 Teacher of the Year; he was nominated for this honor by the Presidents Committee on Teaching Excellence at NFCC. Congratulations to all. For more information contact the Ofce of College Advancement at (850) 9731653 or email news@nfcc.edu. Photo SubmittedNFCC employees recognized for years of service are shown from left to right: Mary Anne Wheeler (20 years); Sarah Newsome (25 years); Hansel Nelson (10 years); Bill Hunter (15 years); Bobby Scott (20 years); and David Paulk II (5 years).Photo SubmittedNFCC employees recognized for years of service are, left to right: Dr. Sharon Erle (30 years); Efrain Bonilla (10 years); and Neil Smith (15 years).Photo SubmittedNFCC employees recognized for professional achievement are, left to right: Bonnie Littleeld, Dr. Guenter Maresch, Susan Taylor, Della Webb and Dr. Sharon Erle.Photo Submitted(Shown left) NFCCs 2014 Above and Beyond Award recipients are Hansel Nelson(left) and Jennifer Page (right).Photo Submitted(Shown right) NFCC employees recognized for professional achievement are, left to right: Brandi Browning and Billye Robinson.

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Chief Deputy Epp Richardson Captain David Harper Law Enforcement Bureau Captain Walter R. Smith Chief Jail Administrator Captain Mark Joost Evidence-Training Lieutenant William Sircy Investigations Lieutenant Randy Jansch Patrol Lieutenant Latricia Davis Corrections/Classications Lieutenant Kathrine West Corrections/Security Sergeant Maurice Alexander SRO Corporal Kevin Anderson Patrol/Canine Sergeant Christopher Andrews Investigations Sergeant Bobby Boatwright Investigations/Canine Shelia Combs Victim Advocate Nancy H Curl Administrative Assistant/Finance-HR Deputy John Deming Civil/Court Services Sergeant Esther DeMotsis Investigations Sergeant Arthur Deno Patrol Deputy Tracy Dowdy -Patrol Deputy David Eastabrooks -Patrol Corporal Josh Harris SRO Sergeant Bill Hart Civil/Court Services Sergeant Doug Haskell Investigations Deputy David Jarvis Part time Deputy /Court Services Sergeant Brad Johnson Patrol Deputy Michael Keith Kirkland Patrol Sergeant Richard Klein Investigations Deputy Joseph Knight Patrol Corporal Jarrod Lauth Patrol/Canine Deputy Odell Livingston Patrol Sergeant Michael Maurice Patrol Deputy Edwin McMullen Patrol Corporal David Myers Patrol Deputy Chris O'Brian Patrol/Canine Corporal Kevin Odom Patrol Sergeant Dennis Pitts Patrol Deputy Eugene Pride Part-Time Deputy/Court Services Sgt. Sharon Shadrick Investigations Corporal Kevin Stout Patrol Sue Tuten Administrative Assistant/Civil Tammy Webb Administrative Assistant/Warrant/Records Corporal Alan Whigham Civil/Court Services Deputy Jason Whiteld Trafc10 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 Reggie Alexander Andrew Brooks Chris Cooks David Spicer Ben Ebberson Tammy Fletcher Eric Gilbert Marcus Holbrook Travis Johnson Anthony Land Ben Mabry Willie McGhee James Roebuck Jeff Rosenberg Joseph Smith Gary CalhounNational Police Week: Honoring Our Law Enforcement OfcersChief of Police Gary Calhoun and the City of Madison Police Department Sheriff Benjamin StewartSheriff Ben Stewart and the Madison County Deputies .

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE WANTED FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED Buy, Sell or Trade In The ClassiedsCall 973-4141 Call 973-4141O n e M a n s J u n k I s A n o t h e r M a n s T r e a s u r e www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . L E G A L Friday, May 16, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11 Check us out on-line www.greenepublishing.com FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 5/12/2014 THROUGH 5/18/2014I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).3/26 rtn, n/c Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBe A CNA Would you like to work as a nursing assistant? Become a CNA. Quest Training offers a nurse taught, 40 hr. prep class. No GED required if age 18 yr. Day and Evening classes. 386-362-1065.5/7 5/28, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/cCDL Class A Driver Needed 2 years veried experience. Runs mostly SE extended area. Good 2 year MVR. Blue Cross and blue shield health insurance offered. (850) 929-2279.4/11 rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes. Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Our newspaper ofce is seeking an outstanding individual to join our sales team. Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a good personality and LOVE to talk on the telephone? If you are a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, have a friendly can-doattitude, a great work ethic, are organized, and self-motivated then this job might be just for you. Valid Drivers License a must! Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper ofce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.Too Much Junk? Do you have a garage or barn or attic full of junk and want it clean? Granddads barn that needs to be cleaned or removed? Let us make you an offer on it all And we clean it up at the same time. Call 850-973-7916 and leave a message.2/26 rtn, n/c We want your Ghosts!! We are collecting YOUR stories of Ghosts, Goblins, Spooks, Specters, Aliens, Haunted Houses, Paranormal Events, Angels, and any other Supernatural Tales from Madison County and surrounding counties. We want personal experiences, legends, and family traditions. Call 850-973-7916 and leave a message.2/26 rtn, n/c Set of four (4) Weld (Mountain Crusher) billet aluminum wheels 8 lug with bolt on center caps. Fits Dodge or Chevy. $200 OBO. Call (229) 460-5296.3/26 rtn, n/c A few chickens and a rooster for my yard. (850) 661-6868.4/9 rtn, n/c LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com5/7 rtn, c 4 BR, 2 BA House With replace, large yard and no pets. Near Blue Springs. $700 month, $700 security. 1 year lease. (850) 274-5805 or (907) 230-4705.5/7 rtn, cFULL TIME COMMUNITY RELATIONS SPECIALIST Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an opening for a full-time Community Relations Specialist in our Madison Ofce. The candidate is required to have a high school diploma or equivalent and three to ve years of related experience. A Bachelor Degree in communications, marketing, public relations or business highly desirable. The ideal candidate should have outstanding people skills, excellent oral and written communication skills, effective working knowledge of marketing techniques, and the ability to plan, organize and facilitate time sensitive projects. The Cooperative offers competitive salary and benets. Tri-County is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and Drug Free Work Place (DFWP). Please send resume and completed Tri-County Employment Application Form, which is available at any TCEC ofce or online at www.tcec.com, before May 30, 2014 to: Stephanie Carroll Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. 2862 West US 90 Madison, FL 32340.5/7, 5/14, cLake Park of Madison CNA Fulltime Contact Kim Browning HR or Connie Walker DON 850-973-8277.5/14, 5/21, c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12x18 building with 6 porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/c Adoption Devoted, Affectionate, Professional couple will help you, unconditionally love. Hands on with your baby. Maintain contact. Allowed expenses paid. Doug & Liz 866-777-9344 Susan StockmanFL #0342521. Are you pregnant? A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592. Adam Sklar #0150789. Business Opportunities OWN YOUR own Medical Alert Company. Be the 1st and Only Distributor in your area! Unlimited $ return. Small investment required. Call toll free 1-844-225-1200. Educational Services AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualied students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-741-9260 www.FixJets.com. Help Wanted Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. COLONIAL LIFE is seeking B2B sales reps. Commissions average $56K+/yr. Training & leads. Sales experience required, LA&H license preferred. Call Jessica at 904-562-9527. 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964. ATTN: Drivers! $$$ Top Pay $$$ Be a Name, Not a Number Quality Home Time! BCBS + Pet & Rider Orientation Sign On Bonus CDL-A Req 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com. Miscellaneous Miss Sunshine Pop Star Music Pageant. Hey Girls! Here's Your Chance Win $5,000 Cash, a Recording Contract, and Many More Prizes! 18+ Only Call (904) 246-8222 CypressRecords.com. NOTICE: The District School Board of Madison County, Florida, will hold a public hearing on Tuesday June 17, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. The meeting will be held in the School Board Meeting Room of the Superintendents Ofce 210 N.E. Duval Avenue, Madison, FL. Approval of: Revisions to Policy 6.30 Professional Ethics & Revisions to 2014-2015 Code of Student Conduct. The proposed document may be viewed at the School Board Ofce, 210 NE Duval Ave, Madison, Fl. Statutory Authority: 120.54, 1001.43 F.S. IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD, WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS MEETING OR HEARING, HE/SHE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, HE/SHE MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.5/16

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12 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 All prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or Valdosta dealerships. All prices good through May 17, 2014 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Truck prices include $500 rebate when financed with Chrysler Capital. $500 Conquest Rebate to customer who own a competitive brand truck. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. MPG per factory window sticker.888-304-2277801 E. SCREVEN ST QUITMAN, GA888-463-68314164 N. VALDOSTA RD. VALDOSTA, GA229-263-7561 8640 HWY 84 WESTAll prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles are located at our Quitman dealership. Vehicle prices include Trade-In & GM Loyalty Rebate (owners of 1999 or newer GM vehicles. All prices good through May 17, 2014 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. 862480 Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2013 Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2014BORN 1914 YOU LEARN A LOT IN 100 YEARS... NEVER FORGET WHERE YOU CAME FROM2014 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN 2014 DODGE DURANGO 2014 DODGE CHALLENGER 2014 DODGE CHARGER 27 MPG 25 MPG 25 MPG 27 MPG Q1400602013 DODGE DART V130392 34 MPG Q140042 V1404492014 DODGE AVENGER 30 MPG Q140111 PURCHASE ANY VEHICLE & RECEIVE A WORLD FAMOUS ROCKER TO ENJOY THE GREAT SPRING WEATHER! 2014 JEEP CHEROKEE Q140290 2014 RAM 1500 2014 JEEP COMPASS V140314V140068 26 MPG 2014 DODGE JOURNEY 2014 RAM 2500 4 DOOR 4X4 HEAVY DUTYV1402842014 JEEP PATRIOTV140072 2014 CHEVY CRUZE LT1.4L ECOTEC MOTORCHEVY MYLINK W/7 TOUCH SCREENREAR VIEW CAMERAREMOTE START 2014 CHEVY SONIC LT 2014 CHEVY EQUINOX 32 MPG (PER WINDOW STICKER) BLUE TOOTH WIRELESSUSB PORT, 2.4L SIDI SIRIUS/MP3 PLAYER 2014 CHEVY MALIBUC140133 2014 CHEVY CAMARO 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DOOR LTC1400662014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DOOR LT 4X4 2015 SILVERADO 2500 HEAVY DUTY 4 DR 4X4 ALL-STAR EDITION 5.3L V8, 18 ALUM WHEELS REAR CAMERA, REMOTE START, NAVI & MORE! MSRP: $41,725 DISC. $7,732 ALL-STAR EDITION 18 ALUM WHEELS REAR CAMERA, REMOTE START & MORE! MSRP: $37,120 DISC. $7,132C140154 2014 SILVERADO 1500 C140162 C150006 Purchase any vehicle & receive a World Famous Rocker to enjoy the Great Spring Weather! ALL NEW ALL NEW 2015 CHEVY TAHOE 12 TO CHOOSE FROMEverybody Knows Chevys Cost Less In Quitman! 2014 RAM 1500 4 DOOR Q140103 Q140312 V140369 2014 RAM 1500 LARAMIE 4 DOOR Q140138



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Our 149th Year, Number 36 Since 1865, T elling It Like It Is And Defending The Peasant's Right T o Know Index 1 Section, 12 Pages Local Weather Viewpoints 2 Obituaries 4 Around Madison 3-7 School 8-9Police Week 10 Classieds/Legals 11Friday, May 16, 2014Madison, Florida Dance Recital This WeekendBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.Becky's Dance Steps Studio is having its 38thAnnual dance recital on Saturday, May 17 at 1 p.m., and 7 p.m. The theme is "Just Dance." Admission is $6 for adults and $4 for children under 12. The 20thOf May Jubilee Celebration Is This WeekendBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. The 20thof May Jubilee Celebration will take place Friday, May 16 with a Fish Fry Tiki Luau at Madison County Recreation Facility on Highway 360 behind the old Madison Middle School. The event will begin at 5 p.m., and tickets are $6. The 20thof May Jubilee Celebration starts Saturday, May 17 with a parade at 9 a.m., down Martin Luther King, Jr., Drive with FSU Seminole and Madison native Jacobbi McDaniel as the Grand Marshall. At 11 a.m., the Gospel Celebration and Entertainment Showcase at the Madison County Recreational Facility on Highway 360 behind the Madison Middle School. There will also be a motorcycle and car show, a cake auction, vendor booths and more. For more information on these events, contact Dereal Alexander (bike show) 4646178, Willie McGhee (car show) 673-1023, Vicki McQuay (gospel show) 973-2252 or Leon Arnold (sporting events) 973-7193. Contacts can also be reached via Facebook.Madison County Preparedness Expo Is ComingBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. The 2ndMadison County Preparedness Expo will be Tuesday, May 20 at 6 p.m., to 8 p.m., at the Van H. Priest Auditorium. Event speakers are: Florida Division of Emergency Management, National Weather Service, Salvation Army, Tri County and Florida Forest Service. Exhibitors include Duke Energy, American Red Cross, E.M.S., Chamber of Commerce and many more. This event is free to the public and is sponsored by Madison County Emergency Management and NFCC. For more information, call (850) 9733698.L ee T ow n Cou ncil T o I nte rv ie w T wo T ow n M ana g e r C andidatesBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. The Lee Town Council held a special meeting and workshop, Tuesday, May 13. At the workshop, the town council reviewed eight applications for the Town Manager position. The town council narrowed it down to two candidates, Jennifer R. Wallace and Christine A. Donaldson. The interviews will take place, Monday, May 19 at 6 p.m. At the special meeting, the town council discussed their action on the water use permit for JJJ & T Family Limited Partnership. Town Manager Danny Plain had a meeting with the Suwannee River Water Management District staff about the water use permit concerning 2,400 acres on the East and West side of State Road 53. According to Plain, the water use permit is proposing to construct 12 agriculture irrigation wells and attached pivot irrigation systems. The water would be used for corn, carrots, peanuts and rye. "I nally got them (SRWMD) to admit that if you look at their permit it is not a 3.7 million gallon a day withdrawal, its actually 21 million gallons a day," said Plain. "What they do is, you take the 3.7 million and multiply it by 365 and that's what they cannot go over in a year." Plain explained that it would only be an estimated 70-day period that the water would be used since they are growing crops. The permits allows for a yearly amount of 1.369 billion gallons of water to be withdrawn. A meeting with the Suwannee River Water Management District staff is set for Monday, May 19 at 7 p.m. According to Scot Copeland, Town of Lee's attorney, he led a motion to remove the permit request from the agenda of the SRWMD meeting on May 13. Lee now has until after the June meeting to pursue an administrative hearing should the town council decide to pursue one. The town council agreed for the Florida Rural Water Association to conduct tests to gather information as to whether the water use permit will affect the water in the Lee wells. The Lee Town Council voted to accept the FDOT Resolution and Trafc Signal Maintenance Agreement. In 2010, they had agreed to maintain the trafc signal. With this new agreement, the FDOT would be raising what they pay the town for maintenance. If the town council did not sign the new agreement, they would still be responsible for the maintenance due to the 2010 agreement. In other related news, Plain had previously tried to get the FDOT to install a trafc signal ver-FDLE Arrests MCHS Band Director On Sexual Battery ChargesThe Florida Department of Law Enforcement Tallahassee Regional Operations Center, on Wednesday, May 14, arrested Geoffrey Walter Hill, 42, on one count of sexual battery by person in custodial authority. FDLE agents began investigating Hill after receiving a complaint from an individual alleging to have been sexually abused by Hill. Hill is a band instructor at Madison County High School and was suspended by the Madison County School District Superintendent upon his arrest. Hill was booked into the Madison County Jail on $250,000 bond. This case will be prosecuted by the Office of the State Attorney, Third Judicial Circuit. As of press time on Thursday, May 15, Hill remained in the Madison County Jail. Agents believe there may be additional unidentified victims. Anyone with information about this case or Geoffrey Walter Hill is urged to contact the FDLE Live Oak Field Office at (386) 330-2840.Geoffrey Hill GreenvilleWastewaterPlant Is A Concern; Other Big Budget Issues LoomBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.In a discussion of big-ticket budget items looming on the horizon, Public Works Director J.C. Fead and Town Consultant Jim Parrish outlined for the Greenville Town Council the possibility that the city's aging wastewater plant could possibly fail catastrophically and put the town in a very dangerous situation as far as health and safety issues. Calling the plant a "duct-tape, rubber band and baling wire operation," Parrish commended Fead and the entire Public Works department for doing such an outstanding job of keeping the aging facility running, and running so well. Fead added that he no longer had a backup motor for one of the main lift stations in the operation, and that lift station had to be kept running. He was looking into prices for a replacement motor to have on backup, and council members conrmed that they had already approved the purchase of a back-up at the previous meeting. The wastewater facility has had numerous problems, and spot repairs have been done, but the entire plant desperately needs an overhaul and upgrade. However, there is not enough money in the town's budget to undertake such a massive project. Amounts of at least one million dol-See Budget Issues On Page 3 MCHS Student Accepted As UF Preferred Walk OnBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. Vincent Dimenna, MCHS senior, has been accepted as a preferred walk on at the University of Florida. Dimenna has a 3.0 GPA and has already been accepted at Florida. He will begin training with the UF football team June 24. He was voted Most Valuable Player at the Friday Night Lights event at UF in July 2013 but was injured soon after and was unable to play his senior year. He started playing varsity in the 9thgrade. He plays offensive center and defensive tackle. He plans to become an anesthesiologist at UF. He will soon become a CNA. after taking the medical program at MCHS. He plans to work at Shands Hospital on the off-season as a CNA. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie Box, May 14, 2014Vincent Dimenna, with his parents, accepts the offer to become a preferred walk on for the University of Florida football team. See Lee Town Meeting On Page 3

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Celebrating 100 years, the National Extension Service was established by the Smith-Lever Act of 1914. This legislation created an educational outreach of the landgrant university system. Fifty years earlier, the Morrill Act of 1862 had established a university system throughout the United States to educate citizens in agriculture, home economics, mechanical arts and other practical applications. This university system, unique to America brought the opportunity for higher education vocational skills to all citizens. By the turn of the century these state universities were educating students and producing research. In 1906, George Washington Carver, known for his plant research, especially peanuts, invented a mobile teaching unit. His movable school, funded by a New York financier, left Tuskegee Institute and traveled throughout Alabama demonstrating improved farming practices. Another early pioneer, Seaman Knapp, of the US Department of Agriculture worked with farmers to set up farm demonstrations. In Florida, outreach work started with a Farmers’ Institutes and short courses hosted on the campuses of UF and FAMU. Although early leaders in the land grant system had been creative with demonstrations and traveling exhibits, it was not enough to extend the practical education into communities. In 1914, after five years of debate, two legislators introduced bills to create an Extension service. Asbury F. Lever of South Carolina introduced a bill to the House of Representatives. At the same time, Hoke Smith of Georgia introduced a similar bill in the Senate. In short, the Smith-Lever Act was passed mandating the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the land-grant university system to work together to create the national Extension system. The proposed system would have three distinct levels. A county agent system was established with primary control at the state level with aid from the USDA. Over the next several years, states established the Cooperative Extension System with agriculture, home demonstrations programs and agriculture clubs, later renamed 4H. The first major challenge Extension faced was during World War I. To meet war time needs, through education, wheat acreage was increased from 47 million acres in 1913 to 74 acres in 1919. In addition to farm production, Extension addressed conserving perishable products by canning, drying and preserving. Likewise, during the Great Depression creative programs emphasized farm management practices and helped establish selling cooperative. At the same time, extension home economists taught families nutrition, canning surplus foods, home gardening, home poultry production and sewing. Over the years, Extension has played a major role in bringing the University to the local communities, teaching topics based on identified needs, translating research and putting it into practice to improve agriculture production and sustainability. Family and consumer programs have empowered residents to make informed decisions, improving their health and well-being. 4-H helps youth develop life skills and knowledge to become productive citizens as they grow into adulthood. UF/IFAS Extension has improved the lives of Floridians in many ways. If you’ve learned how to choose healthier foods, conserve water, save money, participated in a farm tour, attended 4-H camp or started a garden, chances are you learned it from Extension. We, the faculty, staff and volunteers of UF/IFAS Extension in Madison County, are proud of our accomplishments on the 100thanniversary, and we look continuously toward the future, finding solutions to the challenges we Floridians will face in the future, sharing them to make life healthier and more prosperous for you. The University of Florida Extension – Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution. Memories are painted on my mind like the fresh white paint that Mr. Harry Gillespie would use to paint the house I grew up in, over in Monticello every other year. The fresh smell of the paint remains in my mind as it seemed to clean everything like the bleach my mama used to wash clothes. Rooms would be painted. The outside of the house would be painted and the porch and its posts would be painted. It gave a feeling of newness to the old house that no longer stands there. Different rooms had different colors. My bedroom (shared with my brother) had blue paint. The kitchen had yellow paint. My parent’s bedroom was an off white or beige, as was the living room. The laundry room and bathroom, it seems, changed colors. Sometimes, they would be a mint green. At other times, a yellow or dusty rose color. Like the paint changed colors, I notice that my attitudes about some things have changed also. As I was growing up, I had an intense love for sports. I still like sports but do not go crazy over them like I used to. I used to be a diehard Dodgers fan and Los Angeles Rams fan. Through the years, my love for them died. Did it die hard or did it just slip quietly away? I don’t really remember. I do still love Florida State Seminoles sports though. I keep learning how to handle different situations and different life experiences. I have to hold on to God’s hand so many times when I am hurt or distraught over a situation at home, at work or with a friend and sometimes with an enemy. I try to live peaceably with all men as the Bible instructs me, but when I see things that I know are wrong, I am probably too rash and quick to rush to judgment. As the old children’s song goes, “God’s still working on me.” He knows what He wants me to be. I know that when He’s through with me at the end of my life, I will be like that old house in Monticello that Mr. Gillespie painted. I will have a fresh coat of paint and be all clean and sparkling like brand new. Viewpoints & Opinions2 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 Conservative Corner Conservative Corner By Nelson A. Pryor, Lee, Fl. Jacobs Ladder Jacob BembryColumnist Diann DouglasGuest ColumnistMadison County Extension Service Fresh Paint Read Jacob’s blog at www.jacobbembry.com His book, Higher Call is available in Kindle format at www.amazon.com or in paperback at www.amazon.com www.bn.com and www.booksamillion.com or by sending $10 plus $3.99 shipping and handling to Jacob Bembry, P.O. Box 9334, Lee, FL 32059. Contact him at jacobbembry@hotmail.com. Extension Service Celebrates 100thAnniversary STORMING THE CITADEL THE MADISON COUNTY REPUBLICAN EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Will meet at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, May 27, at the Madison Library ALL Republicans Welcome Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee MadisonRepublican@embarqmail.com How much money will it take? Tim Gill wants to know. And so does the Human Rights Campaign. Both are trying to split the Southern social conservatives from the state’s business establishment and working to elect pro-homosexual lawmakers. The April 28, 2014 New York Times ran the story of the attack on the South. Mr. Gill is spending more than $300 million of his own fortune on homosexual causes. The Human Rights Campaign is spending another $8.5 million. The playbook, to take over the South, has already been written, by Tim Gill. Colorado was his test case. Mr. Gill, a Denver software mogul, set up his own foundation, and an afliated political advocacy group, Gill Action Fund. Two decades ago, Gill set out to change Colorado. At the time, the State was dominated by Conservatives, the home base of prominent evangelical and conservative groups like Focus on the Family Mr. Gill poured millions of dollars into educational initiatives and liberal nonprot groups. Today, Liberals control both houses of the legislature and the governor’s ofce. Civil unions were approved in 2013, and now the push is on, for full marriage rights for homosexuals. This month, at a conference to be called: OutGiving, hundreds of the country’s leading homosexual donors are scheduled to meet to lay out their attack on the South. To be called: Project one America, the initial effort has already seen the hiring of 20 people to take over the South. Mindful of cultural differences, the Washington-based Human Rights Campaign is seeking to adept to the rural South, as it cultivates ties to local church leaders, N.A.C.P. ofcials and educators. That includes holding meetings at local Wafe Houses-but not on Wednesday nights, when many people are in church. The movement will rst underwrite polling, research, then lobbying and recruiting donors for existing state organizations. In some southern states, organizations like the Human Rights Campaign, the American Civil Liberties Union and groups Mr. Gill helps fund plan to lobby for nondiscrimination ordinances in housing and employment and for legislation allowing homosexual couples to adopt. In other States, they are building new grass-roots organizations and pushing for the election of openly homosexual ofcials where there are none. In a nod to the dominant political culture in the South, the effort will rely heavily on outreach to Republicans and clergy, as well as to AfricanAmerican civil rights organizations. Those involved in the planning described it as the biggest realignment of homosexual rights activism in a decade, one that will shift the movement’s focus into territory where there is almost no unied network of support. Field Ofces will be soon opened in Mississippi, Alabama and Arkansas. Other ofces are planned in an effort to build stronger ties to schools, religious institutions and cultural leaders. Mr. Gill, in his NYTimes interview, says the purpose of this month’s OutGiving conference, is to try to persuade others to join the less glamorous state level advocacy effort, before a mid-term election cycle begins to consume a lot of activists’ time and money. Whats In A License Plate?-Apparently A Lot It SeemsWhat’s in a license plate? It depends on whom you ask, but for some, it appears that a license plate can be a calling card for tourism, with Florida at the top of the list. A survey of 2,000 drivers from across the country by CarInsurance.com as to which state license plates were most appealing and which least, put Wyoming’s cowboy on a bucking bronco and Hawaii’s colorful rainbow at the top of the list. The survey found that women overwhelmingly liked Hawaii’s rainbow design and that men did so also, although the latter much preferred Wyoming’s cowboy. At the very bottom of the list was Delaware, whose license plate features gold lettering on a blue eld absent any images. The top l0 most attractive plates, in order of preference are: Wyoming, Hawaii, Utah, Alabama, Oregon, Maine, South Carolina, Florida, Georgia and Oklahoma. The 10 least attractive, also in order of preference are: Vermont, Massachusetts, District of Columbia, Montana, New York, Virginia, Alaska, Michigan, Arkansas and Delaware. The report notes that cheap, fast printing on vinyl has largely replaced prisonstamped metal in most states’ license plates, allowing for a profusion of afnity plates that states and organizations use to raise funds for a variety of causes. Numerous as afnity plates have become, however, it’s the no-cost, standard state plate that prevail among drivers. The best license plates represent calling cards for states, the report notes. In fact, 13 percent of respondents reportedly said a plate had inspired a vacation or relocation, citing Florida most often. The other plates that successfully encouraged vacations or relocations were Georgia, California, Hawaii and Alaska. Respondents also chose their favorite license plate slogans. The top ve were: Alabama, “Sweet Home Alabama;” New Hampshire, “Live Free or Die;” Hawaii, “Aloha State;” Alaska, “The Last Frontier;” and Florida, “Sunshine State.” Respondents strongly disliked plates with only a Web address, such as California’s dmv.ca.gov ; and plates with slogans, with the District of Columbia’s “Taxation Without Representation” slogan as the most disliked. Lastly, respondents were asked about the possibility of using special license plates to easily identify certain classes of drivers. The survey found 49.4 percent would support license plates identifying drivers older than 70; 57.9 percent would support license plates identifying novice drivers; 59.8 percent would support license plates identifying those convicted of texting while driving and 69.1 percent would support license plates identifying those convicted of a DUI. The full article and survey results can be found athttp://www.carinsurance.com/Articles/favorite-license-plates.aspx. Pet Of The Week Meet Sophie! This sweet, yellow lab mix was homeless, but thanks to good Samaritans, has been fed and taken to the vet, where she has been spayed and given all her shots, making her ready for adoption. While she has been at her fosters home, she has proven herself to be very friendly with their three-year-old daughter, a one-year-old Yorkie and numerous cats/adults. Shes a little shy upon meeting someone new but warms up quickly. Sophie is about 1 year old and weighs around 60 pounds. If you are looking for a friend who is playful and loving, and does well with children and other dogs/cats, Sophie might just be the girl for you. If you would like more information, or would like to meet Sophie, contact Hunter Greene at (850) 419-6280.

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From Page One Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 3 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 World NewsBy Rose Klein The MadisonEnterprise-Recorder PublisherEmerald GreenePath of Faith WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris, Rose Klein, Jessie BoxGraphic DesignersTori Self, Hunter GreeneAdvertising Sales RepresentativeJeanette DunnBookkeeperBrooke KinsleyClassified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classi“eds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Wednesday at 3 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included)Since 1865 -Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity.ŽThe Madison The Madison Enterprise-Recorder Enterprise-RecorderMadison Recorder established 1865 New Enterprise established 1901 Consolidated June 25, 1908 Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post Of“ce 32340. Publication No. 177.400. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison Enterprise-Recorder P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.P.O. Box 772 € Madison, FL 32341 1695 South SR 53 € Madison, FL 32340 (850) 973-4141 € Fax: (850) 973-4121 greenepub@greenepublishing.com www.greenepublishing.com 2013Man Arrives At Police Station Drunk To Report AccidentIn Baton Rouge, La., a 31-year-old man was arrested after allegedly driving himself to the Baton Rouge police troop’s ofce to le an accident report while drunk. Patrick Ruffner called the station to report the accident and troopers instructed him to come in. After arriving, a trooper at the station smelled Ruffner and had him take a sobriety test. After performing poorly on the test Ruffner admitted he had been drinking before the accident and was arrested on suspicion of driving while intoxicated and driving with a suspended license.Satanic Black Mass To Be Held At HarvardIn Cambridge, Mass., a satanic black mass will be held at Harvard, despite objections from religious and education leaders. Harvard President Drew Faust called the event “agrantly disrespectful and inammatory” but said the organizers have the right to proceed. The Catholic Church condemned the mass and the Archdiocese of Boston will hold a holy hour in response to the planned event. The satanic ceremony is being organized by the Harvard Extension Cultural Studies Club and the Satanic Temple and is scheduled to take place at an on-campus bar. “The awed assumption seems to be because Satan is the representation of evil incarnate for some faiths, that Satanists are part of a hate group and their practice devoted toward denigrating Catholicism,” said a spokesman from the Harvard Cultural Studies Club. At least 500 people have signed a petition calling for the black mass to be cancelled.Customer Stabs Employee For Having The Wrong “Vibe”In Mount Vernon, Wash., a customer who was having issues with Wal-Mart’s self-service check out, stabbed a female employee who came to help because she didn’t like her “vibe.” When Nancy Reed was informed her credit card had been denied she became upset and began “accusing the maa of kidnapping her grandchild.” The 60-year-old then stabbed the WalMart employee with a pair of scissors and was also able to grab and rip out a handful of hair from another employee. While police were en route to the store the woman began, “dancing around and lifting up her dress.” It’s unclear how Reed will be charged due to her apparent mental health issues. Budget Issues Cont. From Page 1 Lee Town Meeting Cont. From Page 1 City of Madison Issues Proclamations Honoring Two Greenville NativesBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc. There were discussions of tight budgets, warnings of tough times ahead and hints of hard choices looming in the future, but it wasn't all gloom and doom as the Madison City Commissioners took a few moments to honor two very extraordinary gentlemen that Madisonians could all be very proud of indeed. Mayor Judy Townsend read aloud the two proclamations and signed official copies naming May 17, 2014 as “Jacobbi McDaniel Day,” and May 25, 2014 as "David Thomas Thigpen Day.” Jacobbi McDaniel, a native of Greenville and a graduate of Madison County High School, went on to play defensive tackle with the FSU Seminoles, helping them win the 2014 BCS National Championship Game. He is widely regarding by ESPN and others as one of the top defensive tackles in college football, an achievement requiring not only great natural talent, but also “an outstanding spirit of dedication, enthusiasm and hard work,” of which McDaniel is “a striking example.” On the day named in his honor, McDaniel will return to Madison to be the Grand Marshall of the 20thof May Jubilee Celebration parade down Martin Luther King St., beginning at 9 a.m. David Thomas Thigpen, another native of Greenville, is a man who felt called by the Lord to enter the ministry when he was still a teenager, and has been a minister of the gospel ever since, for over 50 years. In August of 1980, he founded the Bible Deliverance Church, where he has pastored his flock for the past 34 years, leading by example of compassion, feeding the hungry, clothing the poor and providing shelter for the homeless. “He has forever left his mark on the county by enriching the lives of those around him through his guidance, leadership and compassion,” Mayor Townsend read from the proclamation. Moments later, she signed it, officially naming May 25, 2014 in his honor. lars, if not more, have been mentioned in the past. The options include applying for a CBDG grant, which takes time (and grant approval is not guaranteed), applying for a loan through the USDA or EPA, or applying for a bank loan. A loan would mean that work could begin as soon as the loan was approved and the money made available, but it would have to be paid back with interest. That would mean raising water rates by as much as $10-$12 a month, in a town where many residents are elderly, live below the poverty line, or both. It was something that needed to be addressed some time in the near future. If the plant were to fail rst before anything was done, it would take at least a year of construction before the town would have an operational wastewater system again. Parrish urged council members to begin thinking about their options and which direction they wanted to go. Another area of concern is payment for the landll groundwater testing. For the last ve years, a grant has covered the $20,000-a-year tab for the twice-annual water-testing mandated by the EPA, but that will soon run out and a new grant was not approved. Parrish said he could reapply for another grant in the next grant cycle the following year, but there would still be an interim not covered by grant money. Council member Calvin Malone asked if it were possible to renegotiate the fees for the testing; Parrish thought that he could quite possibly talk the EPA into less testing activity. There were 12 testing wells on that one ve-acre site, and the reports had always been good. The landll closed over 20 years ago, and the EPA requires groundwater testing for 30 years after such a closure. The town faces at least another 10 years or so of water testing, and will have to come up with ways to pay.sus the caution light that they already have, but Lee did not meet the requirements for a traffic signal. The Lee Town Council was able to meet with Bill Steves, the managing engineer for the new sewer system in Lee. Steves retired from Reynolds, Smith and Hills but stayed on as the managing engineer for the sewer project in Lee. The town council had an issue with Work Order #3 where Steves requested five cleanouts of the sewer lines. The council did not want to do five clean-outs if one would not help the issue. Steves explained that becasue the project is under CDBG Economic Development Project Grant he ordered five so he would not have to have the budget adjusted after each clean-out. According to Steves, there is not enough flow to keep the system operating properly. “To be honest, Madison is the culprit because they have not maintained their system like it should have been maintained,” said Steves. “There are not enough flows in our system to keep a scouring velocities in there so until there are enough flows, the City is going to have to keep cleaning the force main out to keep it functioning.” According to Steves, Lee has a joint participation agreement with the City of Madison that specifically tells Madison it is their issue to maintain the line from the water tower on Dale Leslie Drive towards Madison.

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Asearch of The White Pages over the internet yields 61 Pickles/Pickels in Madison County and 26 in Taylor County. Where did they come from? Likely someplace in Georgia; and before Georgia, the Pickles moved from South Carolina. Michael Pickels was born in Georgia and arrived with Jacob and Elizabeth Pickels, who were probably his parents, in the 1830’s. Jacob and Elizabeth were born in South Carolina. Michael and Jacob were counted in the 1840 census as heads of households. There were two people, including Michael, in his household: Michael, whose age was between 20 and 29, and a female between the age of 20 and 29, who was probably his wife, Dicy Carolyn West. Jacob’s household included three people: Jacob, whose age was between 40 and 49; a female, probably Jacob’s wife Elizabeth, who was between 30 and 39; and one male, maybe another son, who was between 10 and 14 years old. True Florida Pioneers, the Pickles family meets the denition of the Florida State Genealogical Society as a family who settled in Florida before Florida became a state, in 1845. Michael and Dicy Carolyn West were married on Oct 1, 1840; census records indicate that Dicy was born in South Carolina. They had ten children: Elizabeth; Jacob, who married Julia; Mary Polly, who married Ephraim Bass; Robert A., who married Sarah Bass; Julia Ann; William Roeann (Bill) who married Cornelia Murphy; Sarah (Sally); James Piney, who married Eliza Coker; John Berry, who married Nancy Elizabeth (Lizzie) Pinkard; and Levi. On July 10, 1844, Michael received a land grant of 40 acres in the Hopewell area from the Federal Land Grant ofce in Tallahassee. He voted in the 1845 Florida statehood election. And he served in Captain Livingston’s Company, Taylor’s Battalion, Middle Florida Mounted Volunteers in the 1838 Indian Wars. Michael and Dicy’s six sons left quite a few descendents, many who still call Madison and Taylor County home. Their oldest son, Jacob, shows up in Louisiana in 1880, married to Ellen. Their second son, Robert A. and his wife Sarah Bass were counted in the 1910 census in the Mosely Hall area, with nine children: Rosa Ella; Alexander (18711925); John S. (1873-1920); Millidge (1878); Stella Irene; Sally; Mattie E.; Tesey; and Mamie. Michael and Dicy’s third son, William Roeann, (Bill), and his wife, Cornelia Murphy, had the following children: Radford; Hosannah, (18801960); Eliza (1882); James Avery (1883-1965); William Jr. (1885); Georgia Ann (1887-1967); and Delila (18951928). The fourth son, James Piney and his wife Eliza Coker had the following children: Mary Frances, William Michael, Henrietta, Jack, John “Olen”; Dellar; Roberta; and James Sidney “Sid.” John Berry, Michael and Dicy’s fth son, and Nancy Elizabeth Pinkard had the following children: Albert Earnest (1888); Robert Lee (1891-1956); James Russell (18931951); Randall P. (1899); Wilford (1901); George (1903-1979); and Alma (1908). After Jim died in 1925 Liza went to live with her daughter Dellar Hunter in Perry. When a girl during the Civil War the Yankee Soldiers came by and asked her about her brothers. Her reply was that she didn’t know but if she did she wouldn’t tell them. Her house was burned during the war. Liza lived to be 101. We’re not sure what happened to Levy, the sixth son. He is four years old in the 1860 census, but we don’t see him after that. Why are some families, all with the same ancestor, Michael Pickles, known as Pickles and some as Pickels? Apparently the census takers in different years spelled Pickles in different ways, causing some of the Pickles branches to be Pickels and some to be Pickles. Many of the Pickles/Pickels families lived in the San Pedro and Mosely Hall area of the county and many are buried in the San Pedro Cemetery. Many family members have been active in the New Home Baptist Church We see that all of the local Pickels/Pickles came from Michael and his wife Dicy Carolyn West, who pioneered in Madison County in the 1830’s and who raised six sons and four daughters. Four of the sons, Robert A., William Roeann, James Piney, and John Berry seemed to have remained in Madison and themselves raised large families. These four sons of Michael and Dicy who lived in Madison County and raised large families left a large legacy of Pickles/Pickels descendents, many of whom live here today. In addition, the daughters and daughters-in law connect the Pickles/Pickels families with numerous other Madison pioneer families, such as the Cokers, Basses, Pinkards, Williams, Holtons, Albrittons, Murphys, Hunters, Tutens, Cruces, Newsomes, Lambs and Burnetts. Michael and Dicy Pickles have left a proud legacy of hardy, industrious, family-oriented, good solid citizens. Michael and Dicy’s family has enriched Madison County for over 180 years. Some information for this article was gleaned from Madison County Florida Family History Book, published by the Madison County Genealogical Society. Our society welcomes your input and invites you to join our organization. We meet on the second Thursday monthly, except during summer months, in the Madison Public Library from 6 to 7 p.m. Annual dues are $25. To add comments to our articles or to submit your own sketch on your ancestor, contact us at Madison County Genealogy Society, P.O. Box 136, Madison, FL 32341. Or contact us by email at mcgenealogysociety@live.com If you would like for us to write an article featuring your ancestor, please contact us by mail or email.Around Madison County4 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 Community CalendarMay 16 The Madison Boys Choir will be holding a fish fry on the Courthouse lawn from 11 a.m. until all the fish are gone. They'll be serving up fish, chips and coleslaw at $6 a plate. Come on by, grab a plate and help them with their fundraiser for travel and other expenses for future performances.May 16 The 20thof May Jubilee Celebration is holding a Fish Fry Tiki Luau at the Madison County Recreation Facility on Highway 360 behind the old Madison Middle School. Tickets are $6, and the fun begins at 5 p.m. with a festive atmosphere and fish fried to perfection. Come on out, bring your family and friends, and spend a fun Friday evening together.May 17 Bike Night Madison returns Saturday, May 17, in the WinnDixie Parking lot next to Ken's Barbecue. Hosted by the Blue Knights Law Enforcement Motorcycle Club, the event begins at 5:30 p.m. and lasts until...well, whenever it's over. Come on out and join other motorcycle enthusiasts from North Florida and South Georgia for motorcycle display, conversation and fellowship. For more information, contact John Pulliam at (850) 6731152 or Mike Register at (850) 971-5398. You can also visit their website at www.blueknightsga15.com.May 17 Saturday is by far the biggest day for The 20thof May Jubilee Celebration, starting with a 9 a.m. parade down Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive, featuring FSU Seminole and Madison native Jacobbi McDaniel as the Grand Marshall. At 11 a.m., enjoy the Gospel Celebration and Entertainment Showcase at the Madison County Recreational Facility on Highway 360 behind the Madison Middle School, along with a motorcycle and car show, a cake auction, vendor booths and more. For more information on these events, contact Dereal Alexander (bike show) 464-6178, Willie McGhee (car show) 673-1023, Vicki McQuay (gospel show) 973-2252 or Leon Arnold (sporting events) 973-7193. Contacts can also be reached via Facebook.May 17 Former NFL football player and Madison resident, Jesse Solomon, will be hosting the Jesse Solomon Youth Football Camp, Saturday, May 17, at Madison Lanier Field. The event is open to children 4ththru 10thgrades. Registration starts at 11 a.m. with camp starting at noon and lasting until 4 p.m. Parents can also register their child online at www.usafootball.com /fun click on Clinics, and then select Jesse Solomon Youth Football Camp.May 17 The Madison County Sheriff’s Office and Madison County Sheriff, Ben Stewart is hosting a 5 Stand Skeet Shoot on Saturday, May 17, to benefit the Florida Sheriff’s Youth Ranches. The skeet shoot will be at Honey Lake Plantation’s Sport Shooting Multiplex with an entry fee of $50. There will be two events: one at 9 a.m. and another at 1 p.m. To reserve shooting time, RSVP to the Madison County Sheriff’s Office at (850) 973-4151. The Madison County Sheriff’s Office is now selling raffle tickets for a Beretta Silver Pigeon1, over and under 12 Gauge 28-inch barrel shotgun, hard case and five different chokes. Tickets are $10 each, with only 400 tickets available. The drawing will take place on Saturday, May 17, at the Honey Lake 5 Stand Skeet Shoot. The winner needs not be present to win.May 18 New Home Baptist Church is having Homecoming this Sunday, May 18. The service begins at 10:30 a.m. with special singing by the Purvis Brothers of Monticello. The guest speaker will be former pastor, Rev. John Dorman. A covered-dish dinner will follow the service. The pastor and congregation would like to invite everyone to attend. New Home Baptist Church is located at 1100 SW Moseley Hall Road. For more information, please call the church at (850) 9734965.May 18 The Junior Auxiliary is hosting a Mother-Daughter tea, Sunday, May 18, from 3-4 p.m. and invites mothers and daughters of all ages for tea and refreshments at the Women’s Club. Attire is dressy-casual and hats are encouraged. Tickets for reservation can be picked up at Madison County Community Bank. For more information contact Jamie Andrews at (850) 6737803.May 19 May is National Osteoporosis Month, a time to learn about the disease and how to prevent it. The Madison County Extension Service and the Madison County Health Department will be presenting a program, Catch the Silent Thief, on Monday, May 19, at 10 a.m. and again at 6 p.m. at the Madison County Extension Office. Learn about the steps you can take to prevent and delay bone loss. The workshop will highlight healthy eating habits, working with your health care provider and simple exercises to build strong bones. To register, call the Extension office at 973-4138.May 19 The 4thannual B.F. Killingsworth Gator Golf Classic will be held Monday, May 19 at the Madison County Country Club, located at 445 SW Country Club Rd. Spots are still available with tee times at 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. All proceeds from the tournament will go towards the Madison County Gator Club Scholarship fund. For more information contact Stefanie Thomas at (850) 4641177. Thank You! The family of the late Mrs. Oretha Davis wish to express their heartfelt gratitude for all acts of kindness shown during the illness and passing of our loved one. In however you played a part, your many thoughtful deeds are very much appreciated. Thank you again for your prayers and support. May God continue to bless and keep you. The family of Mrs. Oretha Barfield Davis Way Back When Way Back WhenMay 13, 1949 Dr. A F Harrison was elected President and Dr. M. E. Buchwald was elected sec.-treas., of the Madison County Medical Society last week. Miss Martha Cave was crowned Queen of the May Friday afternoon at the annual May Fete sponsored by the Madison Woman’s Club in the Court House park. Miss Cave is a member of the senior class of Madison High School and was chosen Queen by a popularity vote. Tommy Beggs, son of Mr. and Mrs. T J Beggs, Jr., reigned with the Queen as King consort. He is also a member of the senior class. Adeline Johnson, one of the oldest citizens of the Pinetta community, died April 19, 1949. Funeral services were held at Mt. Zion church near Cherry Lake, April 24. The deceased was the mother of nine children. As far as is known Adeline was 90 years old. She has spent her entire life in the Pinetta community.May 19, 1950 Piggly Wiggly prices of the week (prices good thru Saturday, May 20): Del Monte Yellow Cling Peaches, 19 cents per can; Fresh Florida Corn, 25 cents for four ears; Prime Rib Roast per pound, 69 cents; Brisket Stew per pound; 35 cents; and hamburger meet per pound; 55 cents. The May Day program held last week at the school was a gala affair and one of the outstanding events of the year in which every student of the school took an active part. There was a large audience. Court Jesters, Brenn Clayton and Edwin Fender, made way for the royal carriage and procession to enter the court. Miss Frances Dugan was crowned and reigned Queen of May, with Sidney Bass as May King with many attendants. Heavy hail fell in several sections of Madison County Wednesday. Tobacco was badly damaged in the Cherry Lake and Harmony sections. A 4-acre patch of Jim Surles was riddled by the hail stones which were said to be as big as good-sized marbles. Jack Lamb of the Hopewell section also reported heavy hail in this section.May 18, 1951 The Board of Public Instruction of Madison County has elected Mr. Oscar A. Beck, Jr., as Principal of the Madison Elementary School. He will succeed Mr. J. Donald DeLong, who recently resigned to accept a position elsewhere. Mrs. J A Dickens was elected president of the Junior Woman’s Club at the annual ofcers’ banquet Tuesday night in the club house. Other ofcers chosen were Mrs. J L Studstill Jr., 1stvice president; Mrs. Bob Browning, 2ndvice president; Mrs. Henry Dickinson, treasurer; Mrs. E P sanders, Jr., Cor. Sec.; Mrs. Claymore Schnitker, rec. sec.; and Mrs. W B Clark, parliamentarian. With U.S. 1stCavalry Division on Korean Battlefront-Master Sergeant Stanley E. Goodman, husband of Mrs. Juanita Goodman, Greenville, Florida, has been awarded the Combat Infantry man’s Badge in Korea while serving as an Infantry man with the 7thCavalry regiment. Pioneers Of Madison County Where Did All Those Pickels/Pickles Come From? James P and Liza Coker Pickels

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By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.F or the third year in a row, Debra McGrew visited the Woman's Club of Madison to speak for Refuge House, a place of safety for women eeing from violent relationships. And for the third year in a row, she introduced a speaker who was a survivor of domestic violence. This year, the survivor, not only of domestic violence, but of child sexual assault as well, is also the Madison County SART (Sexual Assault Response Team) Coordinator. Cherie Rowell described a childhood of living all over the state, following her father's work in the construction business. Both her parents came from large families that included ministers, law enforcement ofcers and business partners, but in spite of having law enforcement ofcers in the family, child sexual assault was something that just wasn't talked about among family members. The man who assaulted Rowell as a child was a close friend of her family's, so she remained silent about it for years. When she was older, she met one of her dad's employees and immediately fell in love. He was a “charmer” who could fool a lot of people who didn't really know him, and the two were soon married and had a son and a daughter. However, the charmer turned out to be extremely jealous, and one of the worst beatings she ever endured at his hands was because she had spoken to another man. She would learn later that constant accusations of indelity were a common means of control for many abusive men. Constant accusations keep the accused offbalance and paralyzed with fear of another beating. The charmer was someone who hurled emotional and verbal abuse at her. Even though her parents has raised her to be a strong person, she took it because, “You'll agree with anything they say just to get them out of your face.” And while a woman is desperately agreeing with and enduring all this invective just to keep the peace, doubts begin creeping in and eating away at the soul, eroding ones sense of self-worth. The charmer Rowell had fallen in love with was also someone who used, abused and sold drugs, and forced her to lie to the welfare ofce about their income so they would qualify for assistance. Whenever she wanted to get out of the situation and leave, he would remind her that she had just committed welfare fraud and would go to jail. It was a danged-ifyou-do-danged-if-youdon't situation that many women in dangerous, violent relationships know all too well. Leave me and you'll go to jail is only one of many variations that include leave me and you'll lose the kids...leave me and (ll in the blank)...leave me and I'll kill you... There were similar “no-win” dilemmas, where no matter what she did, it would be wrong. He wouldn't show up to pick her up from work, but catching a ride home with someone else “wasn't the best idea.” She lived three miles from work, and her only other choice was to walk. Sometimes she asked a female coworker for a ride, but the woman often refused; once in a while she would agree but tell Rowell, “You'll have to walk home from my house.” Rowell learned later that this woman was also in a controlling, abusive relationship, where giving rides to coworkers “wasn't the best idea.” By then, her closest family members were four and a half hours away. She nally realized she had to leave, after a neighbor lady stopped to chat with her while she was sporting a black eye and playing with her children in the front yard, and remarked that, “Your little girl is so pretty...what happens when she grows up and thinks that's love? What happens when your son grows up and thinks that's how love is expressed?” Those words haunted her until she realized she had to leave. Later, she would learn that the neighbor woman was speaking from experience, having been married to a law enforcement ofcer, an abuser, but someone who was looked upon as a respectable part of the community. This neighbor woman had to nd the courage to stand up for herself and leave, an act that empowered her to reach out to another women she saw struggling. And a woman who sees someone else who has stood up for herself and gotten out of an abusive relationship will be empowered to do the same. Sometimes women who leave a nice home for a shelter that isn't so nice will often have doubts about depriving their children. What if my kids go hungry? What if they never again have decent clothes to wear? The women struggle to do the right thing for their children, weighing the desire to provide them with nicer material things versus the need to leave. Often, women won't leave just for themselves; not until they reach the tipping point where they realize that their children will grow up to regard abuse as “normal.” “Please think about that when you gather up clothes to donate to the shelter,” said Rowell. “Shelters are grateful for whatever they get, but think about including the nicer things, too...not just the stuff you wouldn't wear.” Rowell found her courage to leave because a neighbor reached out to her and made her realize what staying would do to her children when they grew up. She had to face the fear of going to prison. She had to face admitting to her parents that they had been right about the man she wanted to marry; they had seen things that she hadn't been able to because she was swept off her feet and madly in love. And she had to face dealing with some very strong emotions. Although she is no longer with her ex-husband, “I still love him and I still have a place for him in my heart,” she said. “That's something people don't understand.” This man was the father of her children, and the emotions, although changed, couldn't be simply switched off. Cherie Rowell has been the SART Coordinator for Madison County since December 2013, delivering the message of empowerment, and the news that there is Refuge House, a place of safety for those who make the decision to ee. She has given several presentations already and is available to speak to church groups, community groups or civic clubs to get the message out to many women who still need to hear. Refuge House, Inc. can be reached by phone at (850) 973-4144; by fax at (850) 973-9108; or through the 24-Hour Hotline at (800) 5001119. Rowell can be reached by email atcrowell@refugehouse.com. Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 5 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 Title : Madison Fire Rescue Firefighter Hometown: Miami, Fl. Why He Chose Firefighting: He was in class one day when he asked himself, why was he there. He soon decided to go to firefighter school. Favorite Book:  James and the Giant Peach,Ž by Roald Dahl. Favorite Quote: Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us,Ž by Marianne Williamson. Favorite Music: House music. Favorite Movies: SandlotŽ and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.Ž Favorite TV Channels: Food Network, HGTV and the Discovery Channel. Favorite Sport: MMA Hero: God and myself. I have taught myself a lot.Ž Hobbies: Kayaking, mountain biking and working out. Sum Yourself Up: Fearless and very confident.Ž New Home Baptist Homecoming Is Sunday, May 18New Home Baptist Church will be having Homecoming this Sunday, May 18. The service will begin at 10:30 a.m., with special singing by the Purvis Brothers of Monticello. The guest speaker will be former pastor, Rev. John Dorman. A covered-dish dinner will follow the service. New Home Baptist Church’s pastor and congregation would like to invite everyone to attend. The church is located at 1100 SW Moseley Hall Road. For more information, please call the church at (850) 973-4965. Madison County SART Coordinator Addresses Woman's Club Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 8, 2014Debra McGrew, left, of Refuge House, makes her third appearance in as many years at the Woman's Club, this time to introduce Madison County's new SART Coordinator, Cherie Rowell.

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By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Achild ID Program and Fundraiser, held by the Masons of Madison and Greenville, was “very successful” says Mason, John Sirman. The ID program was a free service offered to help parents and law enforcement in the event a child becomes missing or abducted. Families eating at the Pizza Hut on Base Street in Madison were able to donate to the Masons by using a voucher when paying for their bill, with those donations contributing to ID Programs in the future. Interested diners with young children were able to have their child participate in the program before leaving the restaurant. Parents who used the program were given a mini-DVD that had their child’s ngerprints, height, voice recognition, prole photos and a video of the child walking, all taken while at Pizza Hut. They also received a DNA kit, where parents could store blood, DNA and hair samples of their children. These images and samples could be disseminated across the state and to the National Law Enforcement Network very quickly, increasing the probability of a child being found if they were to go missing. A total of 26 children were signed up for the program and the total amount earned through the voucher program came to $126 that will go towards purchasing new and up-todate equipment for future ID programs. Around Madison County6 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 Happy Mothers Day Tribute To Matilda ThomasStory Submitted By Dr. Barbara ThomasReddick And ChildrenIwould like to talk about a woman that I believe has journeyed life in a unique, nurturing and loving manner. She was married twice and out of the two marriages, conceived 13 children. She worked hard throughout her life so that her family could eat, have shelter and receive their education. While raising her children, her routine nor lifestyle ever changed and there were usually no drastic unexpected changes for us as how things would ow throughout the course of the week. Here is how it was: We all knew that Monday through Friday we were to rise and shine to prepare for school everyday. Education was always a must and without hesitation we knew it. On Saturdays, we would be cleaning our rooms, washing clothes, cleaning the house and after that yes, we would have free time to play. But before the break of the evening we knew that once every two weeks, we would shampoo our hair, preparing for Sunday church that occurred every week. Mom always woke us up early Sunday morning with the aroma of grits, eggs, bacon or sausages, pork and beans and toast. We all knew then it was time to get ready for church. She held true to us attending church school on Sunday and also believed in us having family devotion every Sunday; that is where we learned to pray, read scriptures and truly understand family time. Oh yea, the routine was always consistent and persistent. She made sure all the girls’ hair would be ironed and with ponytails. We were dressed with air, which of course included our patent leather black shoes, before walking up the road to attend church. Even after our father passed, Mom always remained in congruent with her beliefs and determination of making sure we were the best that we could be. Mom had that special drive within her and a nurturing spirit for us to be successful. Although my dad passed when our baby sister was only four months old, Mom knew that somehow and someway, she must continue to strive towards the nish line. The nish line meaning, to whatever cost, with a house full of children, “I must nish well.” My Mother, Mrs. Matilda Thomas, is now 83 years old and is sometimes mowing her own yard, tending to her chickens, gardening, washing her clothes, cleaning and cooking. Mom is still kicking it around the house. My Mother’s Mom is still living and is 97-years-old and in a good frame of mind. For me, I am her daughter, Dr. Barbara Thomas-Reddick and I would like to say that my Mother is considered to me, among other Moms, “The Virtuous Woman.” I would like to say, Happy Mother’s Day to her and to all the mothers around the world. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 9, 2014Dr. Barbara Thomas-Reddick (inset), daughter of Matilda Thomas of Greenville, gives a heartfelt tribute to her Mother for Mothers Day. S 5 d n a t S t e e k S o o h S t t o $50 e May 17, 2014 ntry fee Event On $50 er e p ts e g tar 25 th i w d 5 Stane Event On ntry fee $50 e des Inclun lu o m am e g au g 12 r te o o sh r d s an ze i r p r o o d h c n! e r o mt T n Eve o w t T me: 9:0 Ti 0 0 : 2 1 to am 0 me: 9:0gistra re or F T m pme: 1:0 Timation or f d in an tion gistra -973-4151t r o p p u S r u o y r fo u k Yo n a h T 0 :0 4 m to p 0 me: 1:0ct: nta co 4151t m p 0 The Late Mrs. Wilma Dickey To Be Honored May 20thAs The Unsung HeroStory SubmittedThe Madison County 20thof May Unsung Hero Committee is proud to have the opportunity to honor the Late Mrs. Wilma Dickey as this years’ honoree. This committee was organized by the Late Mr. Howard Waring. Mr. Waring wanted to show that slavery was wrong. As a white Christian, he pondered how Christians allowed this ungodly cruelty to happen to humans in a religious nation. Mr. Waring wanted to show his Christian love to mankind by erecting a monument to honor the Unsung Heroes in Madison County. On Tuesday, May 20, at the Four Freedoms Park in Madison, on the corner of Range and Marion at 5 p.m. The committee will honor the Late Mrs. Wilma Dickey known to many of the youth in Madison as the “shot nurse.” Mrs. Dickey was a prisoner of war; while in captivity she cared for the servicemen. Mr. Charlie Dickey Sr., who was also a prisoner of war, fell in love and married Wilma after they were released from prison. They were the parents of three children, two sons: Charlie; Roy and one daughter; Wilma Rea and nurtured grand and great grandchildren. Mrs. Dickey was employed by Madison County Health Department as a nurse and served the entire outlying communities. Mrs. Dickey often spoke of one of the saddest experiences as a nurse was when she and a Black nurse from Jacksonville stopped to have a cup of coffee in the back of a restaurant and was refused service in Madison. She thought that since the nurse had traveled to Madison to help the poor people of Madison with their health problems, that they could have coffee and discuss some of the health problems that were prevalent in the community. Mrs. Dickey was a true Christian who lived the life as Jesus would like us to live. Forgive and move on with the mission to help our fellowman. She was a faithful member of Lee United Methodist Church, she served as President of the Madison County Extension Home Economic Advisory Council, she assisted with the Madison County Health Fairs and she helped with the Middle School Healthy Heart Program, making youth become aware of keeping a Health Heart. Mrs. Dickey was one of a kind and NEVER, NEVER, complained about a task. The speaker for this occasion will be Dr. Thomas Haynes, a Professor at Florida A&M University, a native son of Madison County. The public is cordially invited to attend and celebrate this event. A wreath will be laid at the Unsung Hero Monument by the Dickey Family. Lion's Club 4thOf July Celebration Will Get Off T o A Running Start By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.Year after year, the Lions Club 4thof July God and Country Celebration just keeps getting bigger and better, and this year for the rst time, the day starts out early in the morning with a race – two races to be exact, a 5K Run and a Fun Run, sponsored by the Madison Sporting Goods and Pawn Store. Pre-registration for both begins at 7:30 a.m., in front of Madison Sporting Goods, where both races will begin. The Fun Run begins at 8 a.m., and the 5K begins at 8:30. Participants can also go online at the www.madisonlionclub.com website and pre-register there. The 5K Run fee is $30, and includes a tee-shirt, but if you register early and reserve your tee-shirt now (before June 1), you pay only $25. Registration for the Fun Run is free, unless you want a tee-shirt; in that case, the fee will be $10 to cover the cost of the shirt. Register before the June 1stdeadline to guarantee that you'll get one. The online website is also where vendors can sign up and reserve their booth spots. The fee is $35 for a 12 by 12 booth and $65 for a 12 by 24 booth. Vendors are encouraged to go online as soon as possible and download the applications to reserve a good spot...they're going fast. The God and Country Celebration committee is also looking for entertainment acts for the main stage from 6 p.m., until time for the reworks. If you can sing, dance, play an instrument, do a gymnastic or acrobatic routine to music (or without music), do magic tricks, ventriloquism, stand-up comedy, slapstick comedy, or any other family-appropriate, crowd-pleasing entertainment, go to the same website, download an application and send a demo tape or DVD to the committee, or arrange for an audition. If you have friends with stage presence who like to entertain crowds, get the word out to them...the Lions Club Entertainment Committee would like to have a variety of talent on the main stage this year.Masonic Child ID Program Successful Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Hunter Greene, May 6, 2014David Jarvis assists Elijah McNealy, age four, with “ngerprinting at the Masons ID Program held on May 6.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Hunter Greene, May 6, 2014Dylan Agner, age nine, has his height checked as part of the ID program held at the Pizza Hut in Madison. Photo Submitted

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By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Read United is a community volunteer effort, organized by a women’s leadership initiative of United Way of the Big Bend that strives to help children develop vital language skills while enriching lives and enhancing social skills. As a volunteer, Read United is a positive way to make an impact in the community, and this year in Madison over 200 books were distributed by 14 local volunteers to New Millennium Charter, Pinetta Elementary, Greenville Elementary, Lee Elementary and Madison Central Schools. First grade students from the above schools enjoyed a break in their day as volunteers from the Madison County community went into classrooms, handing out books for students to take home. Volunteers also took time to read a chosen book to the class, creating student discussion as they read. Lynne Sapp, a rst grade teacher at Lee Elementary, said her students were so excited to get new books that after going to recess “they read them on the teeter-totter!” To nd out more about the United Way of the Big Bend’s Read United or other early education efforts, contact them at www.uwbb.org or like them on Facebook.Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 7 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 Community Volunteers “Read United” In Madison CountyGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, May 6, 2014Nestl Water employees, in the back row, left to right: Shenna Edmonds, Tony Lightfoot and Chrissy Pierre-Louis volunteered to read to Cindy Vegas “rst grade class at MCCS on May 6. Students show off their books, distributed by the United Way, after being read to by the three voluntee rs. In the front row, left to right are: JaMeisa Ray, Stephen Martinez, Amy Lawrence, Saige Salmons, Wendy Perez, Travis Lee, Jaidyn Wesley and Brenden Lee. Students in the back row, left to right are: Rihanna Williams, Jalizya Turner, Jamarcus Smith, Mariah Ware, Johnae Stephens, Jason McDaniel and Flora West.Photo SubmittedRead Uniteds celebrityŽ reader this year was Property Appraiser Leigh Bar“eld. She is pictured as she reads to an attentive “rst grade class at Pinetta Elementary School.Photo SubmittedLynne Sapps “rst grade students were so excited about their new books they didnt put them down, even for recess.Photo SubmittedMelissa Gamalero volunteered her time to read to “rst graders at the New Millennium Charter School, here in Madison.

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School8 €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 As the cost of a college educat ion continues to climb, many grandparents are stepping in to help. This trend is expected to accelerate as baby boomers, many of whom went to college, become grandparents and start gifting whats predicted to be trillions of dollars over the coming decades. Helping to pay for a grandchilds college education can bring great personal satisfaction and is a smart way for grandparents to pass on wealth without having to pay gift and estate taxes. So what are some ways to accomplish this goal? Outright cash gifts A common way for grandparents to help grandchildren with college costs is to make an outright gift of cash or securities. But this method has a couple of drawbacks. A gift of more than the annual federal gift tax exclusion amount--$14,000 for individual gifts and $28,000 for gifts made by a married couple--might have gift tax and generation-skipping transfer (GST) tax consequences (GST tax is an additional gift tax imposed on gifts made to someone who is more than one generation below you). Another drawback is that a cash gift to a student will be considered untaxed income by the federal governments aid application, the FAFSA, and student income is assessed at a rate of 50%, which can impact financial aid eligibility. One workaround is for the grandparent to give the cash gift to the parent instead of the grandchild, because gifts to parents do not need to be reported as income on the FAFSA. Another solution is to wait until your grandchild graduates college and then give a cash gift that can be used to pay off school loans. Yet another option is to pay the college directly. 529 plans A 529 plan can be an excellent way for grandparents to contribute to a grandchilds college education, while simultaneously paying down their own estate. Contributions to a 529 plan grow tax deferred, and withdrawals used for the beneficiarys qualified education expenses are completely tax free at the federal level (and generally at the state level too). There are two types of 529 plans: college savings plans and prepaid tuition plans. College savings plans are individual investment-type accounts offered by nearly all states and managed by financial institutions. Funds can be used at any accredited college in the United States or abroad. Prepaid tuition plans allow prepayment of tuition at todays prices for the limited group of colleges--typically in-state public colleges--that participate in the plan. Grandparents can open a 529 account and name a grandchild as beneficiary (only one person can be listed as account owner, though) or they can contribute to an already existing 529 account. Grandparents can contribute a lump sum to a grandchilds 529 account, or they can contribute smaller, regular amounts. Regarding lump-sum gifts, a big advantage of 529 plans is that under special rules unique to 529 plans, individuals can make a single lump-sum gift to a 529 plan of up to $70,000 ($140,000 for joint gifts by married couples) and avoid federal gift tax. To do so, a special election must be made to treat the gift as if it were made in equal installments over a five-year period, and no additional gifts can be made to the beneficiary during this time. Stacy Bush, President Bush Wealth Management The Bush Wealth Advantage How Grandparents Can Help with College Costs Our column, The Bush Wealth AdvantageŽ is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. Stacy Bush has practiced independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.com Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provid e specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 867685 Madison County High School High Tech Holds Annual Kickoff Photo SubmittedMadison County High School High Tech members gather at Shelby's Restaurant for their annual kickoff. Left to right are: HSHT C o-Director Mike Radel, Theo Brown, Imani Roberson, HSHT Director Deborah Simmons, Jazmyne Arnold, Aubrey Johnson, Dwayne Carter, Tyesha Nicholson, MyAsia Arnold and Deshaun Dansey. Story Submitted The Madison County High School High Tech held its annual kickoff at Shelby’s Restaurant on April 15. The High School High Tech theme was “Student Success through STEMS” (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). There were 35 guests in attendance, from members, teachers, friends and parents. Director of Madison County HSHT (High School High Tech), Deborah Simmons, welcomed guests and discussed the achievements of students over the past year, depicted on poster board displays. The dinner invocation was given by High School High Tech student Aubrey Johnson. The guest speaker, Gladney Cherry, ESE Madison County School District, gave a PowerPoint presentation of famous people who had disabilities. Ms. Allison Chase, The Able Trust State Director, discussed High School High Techs within the state of Florida. The evening culminated with HSHT Awards Recognition Program to its HSHT members. The Florida High School High Tech Program (HSHT) encourages students to explore the STEM careers (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) -and there is no better time than now to do just that! The National Science Foundation has predicted that by 2021, 80 percent of jobs will require some level of math, science or technology skills. HSHT program coordinators hold high expectations of their students. The Able Trust, also known as the Florida Endowment Foundation for Vocational Rehabilitation, is a 501(c)(3) public-private partnership foundation established by the Florida Legislature in 1990. Its mission is to be a key leader in providing Floridians with disabilities opportunities for successful employment. Since its establishment, The Able Trust has awarded more than $31 million throughout Florida, enabling approximately 2,000 Florida citizens with disabilities to enter the workforce each year. The Able Trust youth programs provide career development and transition to almost 2,000 students with disabilities annually, helping to reduce the dropout rate and prepare young adults for life beyond high school. MCHS SkillsUSA Went to State ConferencePhoto SubmittedThe MCHS SkillsUSA members pose for a picture while at the State Conference in Pensacola. Left to right in the bottom row: Kaitlyn Farnell, Sunni Mays, Kayla Joseph, Sarah Kauffman, Tyler Burnett, Camryn Alderman, Zack Sprenkle, Bethany Greenwood, Myasia Arnold, Faith Siplin and Ashton Pickels. Left to right in the middle row: Sk illsUSA AdvisorPaige Thomas, Hunter Burt and Jacob Moore. Left to right on the top row: Jarrett Briggs and Houston Wagner.By Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc.The Madison County High School SkillsUSA club recently went to Pensacola for State Leadership and Skills Conference. MCHS Biotechnology and Biology teacher, Paige Thomas, took 15 students to the State Competition. SkillsUSA is a national organization that strives to help prepare students in technical skilled and service occupations. Students Faith Siplin and Sunni Mays came back with the gold and silver medal, respectively, for the Biotechnology competition. In this competition, the students had to take a test on biotechnology, perform an electrophoresis lab, which deals with D.N.A. and write a lab report on their ndings. SkillsUSA also presented a community service project for the students of MCHS and others in Region 2 to build 15 picnic tables that will be distributed throughout Pensacola. Thomas won State Rookie Advisor of the Year at the State competition. “I felt honored because this was the largest year for rookies,” said Thomas. Photo SubmittedFaith Siplin (left) and Sunni Mays (right) participated in the Biotechnology competition at the SkillsUSA State Conference. Siplin won Gold and Mays won Silver. MCHS Art Teacher Inspired By StudentsBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing Inc.Donn Smith has been a teacher at Madison County High School for 10 years and he has been teaching art for nine years. He teaches drawing and ceramics and he is also the yearbook advisor. He moved to Madison in the 8thgrade and was the second class to graduate from Madison County High School. “I actually prefer drawing by a long shot because I am really bad at ceramics but I have students who are really good at it,” said Smith. “I get so many kids who are really good at ceramics and I take credit for teaching them but really I just say here’s the stuff and here is kind of how you do it and they take off and do amazing things.” Smith nds gurative drawings fascinating and that is what he is drawn to draw. He nds that his work is better since working with the students. He is bouncing ideas off of them which inspires his artwork. When Smith is not working he is painting, drawing, working with computer programs or reading comics. He enjoys reading “The Walking Dead” comics as well as watching the television show. Donn Smith

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SchoolMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 9 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 NFCC Recognizes College Employees For Professional Achievement And Years Of ServiceStory SubmittedNorth Florida Community College employees gathered in the courtyard of the NFCC Walter L. Bishop Administration Building for its annual Courtyard Party on April 22. The gathering honors all NFCC employees for their contributions to the college, recognizes NFCC’s Above and Beyond award recipients and honors employees for years of service to NFCC. Two NFCC employees were selected to receive NFCC’s Above and Beyond Award for 2013-2014 – Jennifer Page of Madison County and Hansel Nelson of Jefferson County. Page is the Coordinator of NFCC’s new Academic Success Center. The Academic Success Center offers NFCC students one-on-one tutoring assistance, organized group study sessions, workshops, study skills trainings, academic coaching, webresources, and other help and support necessary to ensure successful completion of studies and programs. Nelson is the Supervisor of Grounds at NFCC and goes above and beyond to keep the NFCC campus looking its best throughout the year. The Above and Beyond awards are given each year to NFCC employees, staff and faculty members, who go above the call of their regular jobs to assist students, to assist their colleagues or to benet the college. Thirteen employees received service awards from NFCC recognizing years of service ranging from ve years to 35 years. They are: 35 Years: Edna Ealy (Madison County) 30 Years: Dr. Sharon Erle (Leon County) 25 Years: Sarah Newsome (Madison County) 20 Years: Dr. Barbara McCauley (Madison County), Mary Anne Wheeler (Madison County) and Bobby Scott (Lowndes County, Ga.) 15 Years: Linda Brown (Madison County), Neil Smith (Madison County) and Bill Hunter (Hamilton County) 10 Years: Efrain Bonilla (Lake City/Columbia County) and Hansel Nelson (Jefferson County) 5 Years: David Paulk II (Madison County) and Dr. Michael Stine (Jefferson County) Thirteen employees received special recognition for professional achievement. Certicates were given in honor of employees completing degrees, publishing works, and/or serving on state and national boards among other things. Those honored include Madison County residents Brandi Browning, Rose Knox, Billye Robinson, Kim Scarboro, Della Webb and Margaret Wilkerson; Dr. Sharon Erle of Leon County; Dr. Miryam Espinosa of Lowndes County, Ga.; Bonnie Littleeld, Dr. Michael Stine and Susan Taylor of Jefferson County; and Ansley Simmons of Cairo, Ga. Dr. Guenter Maresch (Jefferson County) was recognized as NFCC's 2014 Teacher of the Year; he was nominated for this honor by the President’s Committee on Teaching Excellence at NFCC. Congratulations to all. For more information contact the Ofce of College Advancement at (850) 9731653 or email news@nfcc.edu. Photo SubmittedNFCC employees recognized for years of service are shown from left to right: Mary Anne Wheeler (20 years); Sarah Newsome (25 ye ars); Hansel Nelson (10 years); Bill Hunter (15 years); Bobby Scott (20 years); and David Paulk II (5 years).Photo SubmittedNFCC employees recognized for years of service are, left to right: Dr. Sharon Erle (30 years); Efrain Bonilla (10 years); and Neil Smith (15 years).Photo SubmittedNFCC employees recognized for professional achievement are, left to right: Bonnie Little“eld, Dr. Guenter Maresch, Susan Taylor, Della Webb and Dr. Sharon Erle.Photo Submitted(Shown left) NFCCs 2014 Above and Beyond Award recipients are Hansel Nelson(left) and Jennifer Page (right).Photo Submitted(Shown right) NFCC employees recognized for professional achievement are, left to right: Brandi Browning and Billye Robinson.

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Chief Deputy Epp Richardson Captain David Harper Law Enforcement Bureau Captain Walter R. Smith Chief Jail Administrator Captain Mark Joost Evidence-Training Lieutenant William Sircy Investigations Lieutenant Randy Jansch Patrol Lieutenant Latricia Davis Corrections/Classications Lieutenant Kathrine West Corrections/Security Sergeant Maurice Alexander SRO Corporal Kevin Anderson Patrol/Canine Sergeant Christopher Andrews Investigations Sergeant Bobby Boatwright Investigations/Canine Shelia Combs Victim Advocate Nancy H Curl Administrative Assistant/Finance-HR Deputy John Deming Civil/Court Services Sergeant Esther DeMotsis Investigations Sergeant Arthur Deno Patrol Deputy Tracy Dowdy -Patrol Deputy David Eastabrooks -Patrol Corporal Josh Harris SRO Sergeant Bill Hart Civil/Court Services Sergeant Doug Haskell Investigations Deputy David Jarvis Part time Deputy /Court Services Sergeant Brad Johnson Patrol Deputy Michael Keith Kirkland Patrol Sergeant Richard Klein Investigations Deputy Joseph Knight Patrol Corporal Jarrod Lauth Patrol/Canine Deputy Odell Livingston Patrol Sergeant Michael Maurice Patrol Deputy Edwin McMullen Patrol Corporal David Myers Patrol Deputy Chris O'Brian Patrol/Canine Corporal Kevin Odom Patrol Sergeant Dennis Pitts Patrol Deputy Eugene Pride Part-Time Deputy/Court Services Sgt. Sharon Shadrick Investigations Corporal Kevin Stout Patrol Sue Tuten Administrative Assistant/Civil Tammy Webb Administrative Assistant/Warrant/Records Corporal Alan Whigham Civil/Court Services Deputy Jason Whiteld Trafc10 €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 Reggie Alexander Andrew Brooks Chris Cooks David Spicer Ben Ebberson Tammy Fletcher Eric GilbertMarcus Holbrook Travis Johnson Anthony Land Ben Mabry Willie McGheeJames Roebuck Jeff Rosenberg Joseph Smith Gary CalhounNational Police Week: Honoring Our Law Enforcement OfcersChief of Police Gary Calhoun and the City of Madison Police Department Sheriff Benjamin StewartSheriff Ben Stewart and the Madison County Deputies

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE WANTED FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED Buy, Sell or Trade In The ClassiedsCall 973-4141 Call 973-4141One Man’s Junk Is Another Man’s Treasure www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . LEGAL Friday, May 16, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 11 Check us out on-line www.greenepublishing.com FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 5/12/2014 THROUGH 5/18/2014 I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).3/26 rtn, n/c Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBe A CNA Would you like to work as a nursing assistant? Become a CNA. Quest Training offers a nurse taught, 40 hr. prep class. No GED required if age 18 yr. Day and Evening classes. 386-362-1065.5/7 5/28, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/cCDL Class A Driver Needed 2 years veri“ed experience. Runs mostly SE extended area. Good 2 year MVR. Blue Cross and blue shield health insurance offered. (850) 929-2279.4/11 rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Our newspaper of“ce is seeking an outstanding individual to join our sales team. Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a good personality and LOVE to talk on the telephone? If you are a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, have a friendly can-doattitude, a great work ethic, are organized, and self-motivated then this job might be just for you. Valid Drivers License a must! Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper of“ce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.Too Much Junk? … Do you have a garage or barn or attic full of junk and want it clean? Granddads barn that needs to be cleaned or removed? Let us make you an offer on it all … And we clean it up at the same time. Call 850-973-7916 and leave a message.2/26 rtn, n/c We want your Ghosts!! We are collecting YOUR stories of Ghosts, Goblins, Spooks, Specters, Aliens, Haunted Houses, Paranormal Events, Angels, and any other Supernatural Tales from Madison County and surrounding counties. We want personal experiences, legends, and family traditions. Call 850-973-7916 and leave a message.2/26 rtn, n/c Set of four (4) “Weld” (Mountain Crusher) billet aluminum wheels 8 lug with bolt on center caps. Fits Dodge or Chevy. $200 OBO. Call (229) 460-5296.3/26 rtn, n/c A few chickens and a rooster for my yard. (850) 661-6868.4/9 rtn, n/c LAND FOR SALE OWNER FINANCING 1/2 acre lots, $14,995 $1,995 down, $149 mo. City Water, Paved Roads Cleared, Underground Power DWMHs, Modular Homes Hwy 53 North 1/2 mile. Graceland Estates Call Chip Beggs 850-973-4116chipbeggs@embarqmail.com5/7 rtn, c 4 BR, 2 BA House With “replace, large yard and no pets. Near Blue Springs. $700 month, $700 security. 1 year lease. (850) 274-5805 or (907) 230-4705.5/7 rtn, cFULL TIME COMMUNITY RELATIONS SPECIALIST Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an opening for a full-time Community Relations Specialist in our Madison Of“ce. The candidate is required to have a high school diploma or equivalent and three to “ve years of related experience. A Bachelor Degree in communications, marketing, public relations or business highly desirable. The ideal candidate should have outstanding people skills, excellent oral and written communication skills, effective working knowledge of marketing techniques, and the ability to plan, organize and facilitate time sensitive projects. The Cooperative offers competitive salary and bene“ts. Tri-County is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and Drug Free Work Place (DFWP). Please send resume and completed Tri-County Employment Application Form, which is available at any TCEC of“ce or online at www.tcec.com before May 30, 2014 to: Stephanie Carroll Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. 2862 West US 90 Madison, FL 32340.5/7, 5/14, cLake Park of Madison CNA Fulltime Contact Kim Browning HR or Connie Walker DON 850-973-8277.5/14, 5/21, c Voice and beginning piano lessons being offered by Shelly Smith. $15 per half hour lesson. Please call (850) 464-7560 to sign up.5/14 rtn, n/cFort Madison SelfStorage on 53 South has 5x10, 10x10 and 10x20 units available. Call (850) 973-4004.5/14 rtn, n/c12’x18’ building with 6’ porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.5/14 rtn, n/c Adoption Devoted, Affectionate, Professional couple will help you, unconditionally love. Hands on with your baby. Maintain contact. Allowed expenses paid. Doug & Liz 866-777-9344 Susan StockmanFL #0342521. Are you pregnant? A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592. Adam Sklar #0150789. Business Opportunities OWN YOUR own Medical Alert Company. Be the 1st and Only Distributor in your area! Unlimited $ return. Small investment required. Call toll free 1-844-225-1200. Educational Services AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for quali“ed students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-741-9260 www.FixJets.com. Help Wanted Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Quali“ed drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. COLONIAL LIFE is seeking B2B sales reps. Commissions average $56K+/yr. Training & leads. Sales experience required, LA&H license preferred. Call Jessica at 904-562-9527. 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964. ATTN: Drivers! $$$ Top Pay $$$ Be a Name, Not a Number Quality Home Time! BCBS + Pet & Rider Orientation Sign On Bonus CDL-A Req 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com. Miscellaneous Miss Sunshine Pop Star Music Pageant. Hey Girls! Here's Your Chance Win $5,000 Cash, a Recording Contract, and Many More Prizes! 18+ Only Call (904) 246-8222 CypressRecords.com. NOTICE: The District School Board of Madison County, Florida, will hold a public hearing on Tuesday June 17, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. The meeting will be held in the School Board Meeting Room of the Superintendents Of“ce 210 N.E. Duval Avenue, Madison, FL. Approval of: Revisions to Policy 6.30 Professional Ethics & Revisions to 2014-2015 Code of Student Conduct. The proposed document may be viewed at the School Board Ofce, 210 NE Duval Ave, Madison, Fl. Statutory Authority: 120.54, 1001.43 F.S. IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD, WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS MEETING OR HEARING, HE/SHE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, HE/SHE MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.5/16

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12 € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 16, 2014 All prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or Valdosta dealerships. All prices good through May 17, 2014 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Truck prices include $500 rebate when fi nanced with Chrysler Capital. $500 Conquest Rebate to customer who own a competitive brand truck. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. MPG per factory window sticker.888-304-2277801 E. SCREVEN ST € QUITMAN, GA888-463-68314164 N. VALDOSTA RD. € VALDOSTA, GA229-263-7561 8640 HWY 84 WESTAll prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles are located at our Quitman dealership. Vehicle prices include Trade-In & GM Loyalty Rebate (owners of 1999 or newer GM vehicles. All prices good through May 17, 2014 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. 862480 Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2013 Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2014BORN 1914 YOU LEARN A LOT IN 100 YEARS... NEVER FORGET WHERE YOU CAME FROM 2014 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN 2014 DODGE DURANGO 2014 DODGE CHALLENGER 2014 DODGE CHARGER 27 MPG 25 MPG 25 MPG 27 MPG Q1400602013 DODGE DART V130392 34 MPG Q140042 V1404492014 DODGE AVENGER 30 MPG Q140111 PURCHASE ANY VEHICLE & RECEIVE A WORLD FAMOUS ROCKER TO ENJOY THE GREAT SPRING WEATHER! 2014 JEEP CHEROKEE Q140290 2014 RAM 1500 2014 JEEP COMPASS V140314V140068 26 MPG 2014 DODGE JOURNEY 2014 RAM 2500 4 DOOR 4X4 HEAVY DUTY V140284 2014 JEEP PATRIOTV140072 2014 CHEVY CRUZE LT1.4L ECOTEC MOTORCHEVY MYLINK W/7Ž TOUCH SCREENREAR VIEW CAMERAREMOTE START 2014 CHEVY SONIC LT 2014 CHEVY EQUINOX 32 MPG (PER WINDOW STICKER) BLUE TOOTH WIRELESSUSB PORT, 2.4L SIDI SIRIUS/MP3 PLAYER 2014 CHEVY MALIBUC140133 2014 CHEVY CAMARO 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DOOR LTC1400662014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DOOR LT 4X4 2015 SILVERADO 2500 HEAVY DUTY 4 DR 4X4 ALL-STAR EDITION 5.3L V8, 18 Ž ALUM WHEELS REAR CAMERA, REMOTE START, NAVI & MORE! MSRP: $41,725 DISC. $7,732 ALL-STAR EDITION 18 Ž ALUM WHEELS REAR CAMERA, REMOTE START & MORE! MSRP: $37,120 DISC. $7,132 C140154 2014 SILVERADO 1500 C140162 C150006 Purchase any vehicle & receive a World Famous Rocker to enjoy the Great Spring Weather! ALL NEW ALL NEW 2015 CHEVY TAHOE 12 TO CHOOSE FROM Everybody Knows Chevys Cost Less In Quitman! 2014 RAM 1500 4 DOOR Q140103 Q140312 V140369 2014 RAM 1500 LARAMIE 4 DOOR Q140138