The Madison enterprise-recorder

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Material Information

Title:
The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title:
Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title:
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Creation Date:
May 31, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note:
Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID:
UF00028405:00631

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Enterprise-recorder


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By Bryant ThigpenCourtesy of The Suwannee DemocratALive Oak man walked out of a Suwannee County courtroom Thursday evening a free man after being on trial for two counts of capital rst degree murder. It took a jury nearly seven hours to render a verdict in the case of State of Florida versus Marcus Nathaniel Cole. The 12 member panel found Cole not guilty on both counts. Following the reading of the verdict, family members of the two brothers that were shot and killed by Cole were emotionally vocal to both jury and Cole. Cole, 41, was hosting a party and cookout at his home on 225thRoad on Jan. 26, 2013. At approximately 10 p.m., six of the partygoers got into a ght, according to reports from the Suwannee County Sheriff’s Ofce. Shortly after the ght had broken up, Cole went into his home and retrieved a 30.06 rie and shot and killed Mike Williams, 46, and his brother, Abram Williams, 41. Mike and Abram Williams were the sons of Kenny Williams, who grew up in Lee. The brothers were also kin to a host of other relatives in the Madison County community. Third Judicial Circuit Assistant State Attorney Craig Jacobsen and John Weed represented the state of Florida. Attorneys John Hendrick, David Valin and Jonathan Austin of the Third Judicial Circuit Public Defenders Ofce, represented Marcus Cole. Day 1 March 25 Day one began with opening statements from Jacobsen and Hendrick. The state then called Sharmee “Greer” Williams, who was married to Abe Williams at the time of the shooting, as their rst witness. According to Sharmee Williams, Karen Thompson, who was in charge of the cooking for the party, invited Sharmee and her husband to come over, and said it was OK for friend, David Fillyaw and Abe’s brother, Michael Williams, who was with them, to come along. On the stand, Sharmee testied everyone in the vehicle had been at a previous party where alcoholic beverages were involved, and stated she had roughly eight to nine beers at that party. Sharmee stated she met Marcus Cole through Karen at a previous cookout. Her recollection of the night was they arrived at the Cole residence around 9:30-10 p.m. She observed people drinking upon their arrival. Sharmee said a ght broke out and she did not know why, but she observed Marcus and David ghting. She said she then told her husband, Abe Williams, “Let’s get out of here.” She said when she got into a truck, Abe was there and Mike was following behind. She said they were going to leave when Mike Williams got into the truck. Abe Williams was sitting in the driver’s seat and Sharmee was in the passenger seat. She testied she watched her brother-in-law Mike Williams fall to the ground. While sitting in the truck, Abe looked over at her and reportedly said, “What the (censored),” and that’s when she said Abe Williams was shot in the head by Marcus. Abe was transported to a Gainesville hospital, but she did not get to ride with him in the ambulance. Abe later died from his injuries. The state called William Cimiotta as their second witness, who was reportedly living at the Cole residence at the time of the shooting along with his wife, Kayla. Marcus was his step-father at that time. William Cimiotta testied to being at the party for the entire evening and said there was beer, vodka and marijuana at the party. He said he and Kayla had not been drinking. William Cimiotta said those that arrived at the party had appeared to have been drinking. William Cimiotta said Mike Williams said some inappropriate things to his mother which caused things to escalate. A ght broke out, and he said Marcus later appeared to have grease on him. William Cimiotta reportedly told Marcus to go inside and clean off and he did so. While Marcus was inside the mobile home, William Cimiotta said he attempted to break up the ght. He testied the ght soon ended. Karen was attending to Josh White who had been cut, and Marcus was still in the home at that time. He said three people were getting in their vehicle and were getting ready to leave. Abe and Sharmee were in the vehicle and Mike was walking toward the vehicle. He said he then saw Marcus with the rie and tried snatching the gun away from him but was not successful. William Cimiotta said he told him, “We can do this another way.” William Cimiotta recalled Marcus then saying a few words to him before pulling the trigger. William Cimiotta said Marcus then went back in the front door after he shot the two victims. He testied he Our 149th Year, Number 31www.greenepublishing.com Since 1865, T elling It Lie It Is And Defending The Peasant's Right T o Know Index 2 Sections, 26 Pages Local Weather Viewpoints 2A Around Madison 3-6A, 10-11A Health 7A Outdoors 8AVisit St. Augustine 9A Classieds 12A Legals 13A Health Guide Section BFriday, April 11, 2014Madison, Florida Georgia Johnson, New Centenarian,Ž Is Honored With Resolution Georgia Johnson, (ne Hudson), born and raised in Madison County, recently celebrated her 100thbirthday (March 29, 2014) with friends and family. In her honor, the County Commission drafted Resolution No. 2014-04-09A, in recognition of “a life well-lived and worthy of an expression of appreciation for her contributions to Madison County and the people that reside in it.” A longtime member of Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church, she married another lifelong Madison resident, William Johnson, Jr., and they were blessed with six children, 14 grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Shown below, left to right, County Commission Chair Justin Hamrick presents the newly-signed resolution, a way of saying “thank you” and a gesture of admiration, respect and appreciation, to two of her family members, son-in-law George Jesse Anderson and daughter Pauline Miller. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, April 9, 2014 Madison County Memorial Hospital Name Not ChangingBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. Madison County Memorial Hospital name will not change when moved to the new building. Several months ago, it was decided that the name would change to Faith Community Hospital at Madison. “After receiving input from several members of our community and from the Madison County Board of County Commissioners, our hospital board met and conferred and decided that in the best interest of continuity and preserving history, the name of the new hospital would continue toSee MCMH On Page 3A Williams Brothers Killer Found Not GuiltySee Not Guilty On Page 3ACounty To Keep In-Town Shuttle Rolling Another YearBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.During a recent trip to Winn-Dixie, County Commissioner Ronnie Moore, who also serves on the Transportation Disadvantaged Committee, decided on that location to take a ride on Big Bend Transit's InTown Shuttle and talk to some of the people who use the service and see how they would be affected if the bus were no longer available. The shuttle has suf-See Shuttle On Page 3A Mobile Office To Be In Madison Monday, April 14Astaff member from Senator Marco Rubio’s ofce will be available on Monday, April 14, from 10 a.m. until noon at the Madison County Courthouse, Room 110, to meet one-on-one with citizens needing assistance in dealing with a federal agency. For more information, call (850) 599-9100. Madison County Building Department Issued 59 PermitsBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. The March permit report for Madison County Building Department shows that there was a total of 59 permits issued. New residential construction had two permits issued. For the two new residential construction permits, the total valuation of construction was $500,122 and the total square feet of living area was 9,692. There were no commercial projects for March. The electrical permits were the highest of permits issued with 19 in total. Mechanical per-See Permits On Page 3A Ready For The Big ShowGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, April 9, 2014Getting ready for their Palm Sunday weekend concerts, the Madison Boys Choir tries out the stage at the RATT Pact Theater where the shows will be presented this weekend, Friday evening, April 11, at 7 p.m., Saturday afternoon April 12 at 3 p.m., and again that evening at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 each. Contact Tim Dunn at (850) 973-6665.

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When I was a wee little tot – I’m not exactly sure but probably no more than five or eight – my grandmother had a chicken pen and coup behind her house. Come to think of it, I don’t know if I can remember a time that there was not a chicken pen of some version on that farm, either at my grandmother’s house or down at the barn. But when I was really young, it was behind my grandmother’s house, along with a pear tree, a fig tree and two cumquat trees, all of which I loved to pick and eat. But I digress. This story is not about pears, figs or cumquats. It is about chickens and eggs. As I said above, at the time of this story’s origin, I must have been about five or so, no more than eight. My grandmother had gone out back to the pen to gather the eggs, and I had bounded with her. This was probably not my first time doing this, because I don’t remember there being anything special in the beginning, and of course it was certainly not my last trip to the chicken pen. But assuredly it was one of my most important. As I was walking around the pen, holding the basket for my grandmother like the big little boy I was, I tripped on something and fell. I do not remember what made me fall now, and I am sure it is not really the important part. But trip and fall I did. Basket, eggs and Harvey all went flying and tumbling into the dirt and mud of the chicken pen. I skinned my knees and elbows, and spilt my basket. The chickens immediately rushed in and began pecking at the broken egg matter on the ground. I don’t know for sure, of course, but I suppose that is one thing that chickens live for – to frighten young egg stealers. Well, frighten me they did. Today I am not sure what made me cry more, the bruises and scrapes, or the broken eggs, or the fear of all the chickens around me pecking at everything. Some things from this event I no longer remember. But some things I very much remember. I remember sitting and crying. I remember a strong pair of hands lifting me up and standing me back onto my feet. I remember looking up into the eyes of my father, and beside him over his shoulder, my grandfather. I do not remember them being in the pen originally, but I remember looking up at those two men who were looking back at me. And as my father’s strong pair of hands placed the little boy back on his feet, and dusted him off, I remember my father’s words. “Son,” his voice both kind and stern, both velvet and steel. “In this life as you grow up, there will be lots of times when you trip and fall. And things will break. And there will be people who will rush at you while you are down, and it will scare you. It isn’t bad to fall. We all fall down sometimes. What matters is that you don’t let it scare you, and that you get back up. Do you understand?” I nodded, sniffling back the tears. I am not sure how much I really understood then or not. But I wanted to. “Good. How about you and your grandmother get the rest of the eggs then, huh?” I remember my grandfather patting my father on the back and looking up into his eyes with a certain look on his face. That look meant nothing to me then of course. But since then I have felt that same look on my own face, directed at each of my children, whether they were present or not, when something I heard or saw or read showed them to be the adult I had hoped they would become. They have each received it more than once. I know that look now. But I have always remembered my father’s words from that day. It doesn’t matter that we fall down. It doesn’t matter that falling down may hurt. We all fall down sometimes. And there are always people that will rush in to peck at us while we are down. None of that matters, because no matter what we do, sooner or later it will happen, and prob ably more than once. What matters is that we get back up. Think about it.Have you ever felt like you have poured your heart and soul into your job or into your family and friends but felt like they don't appreciate you? Well, you're in good company. Around 2,000 years ago, not just any ordinary man rode into Jerusalem, as the crowds threw palm fronds and their clothes down in front of him. The man was not riding on just any ordinary animal. He was riding on a donkey that had not yet been broke. The crowd was ecstatic as it screamed, “Hosanna,” proclaiming that the Messiah had come. How many times have you felt like this, riding high like you had the world by the reins? Those times are much more memorable than the times when you feel abused, neglected or hurt by your comrades. I know I cherish my victories a lot more than my defeats. Jesus Christ rode into Jerusalem on that Palm Sunday. By Friday, he would be hanging on a cross, after being beaten, scourged and spat upon by people who may have been in the crowd, cheering his entry into Jerusalem. He had been betrayed by one of the people closest to Him, sold out for money. No matter how bad our suffering and complaining about lack of appreciation may be, it can be nothing compared to what Christ went through. He had performed miracles, He had raised the dead, yet His followers had turned from Him. Don't you know that hurt? When I am hurt by someone I feel the closest to, I try and remember what Christ had to go through. Many times, I fail to do that and get hurt even more. I am sorry that Christ had to suffer such shame and such pain and that I was responsible for it, too, with my sins. They may have come 2,000 years later, but Christ knew what He was doing and who He was doing it for. He was doing it for me and for you and whosoever will turn from His sins. Do you know Christ as your Savior? If you do, are you living for Him? Are you telling others of His amazing saving love. If not, begin doing it today. April is National Financial Literacy Month, a designation passed by the U.S. House of Representatives to raise public awareness about the importance of nancial education. Everyday Americans make nancial decisions that affect our long term nancial stability. According to supporters of the resolution, nancial literacy is an issue that demands our attention because many Americans are not adequately managing their nances for education, healthcare and retirement. According to national surveys, the savings rate is low, while Americans owe over $850 billion in credit card debt. To complicate matters, while the mortgage industry is slowly coming out of a crisis, foreclosures are still high. All of these issues increase the need for consumer knowledge of money and nance. Education is the key to help move Americans toward improved spending and saving habits and raise the level of money invested in retirement plans. And, it is never too early to encourage long-term savings for future goals. According to the National Endowment for Financial Education, surveys show as few as ten hours of education can inuence the practices and nancial knowledge of young people. Some good news on the educational front, during this legislative session, a bill passed requiring a course in nancial education for all high school students in the state of Florida. This is a major step in the right direction, however, nancial education should be an integral component of the entire educational system, Pre-K through the 12thgrade. Financial literacy needs to start early in a child’s life. Early decisions about how to spend an allowance gives a child practice in decision making skills. Parents can help kids practice the concepts of planned spending and saving for a future purchase, a simple piggy bank can be the rst step. All consumers, regardless of age, need to understand the decision making process of spending, saving and wise use of credit. As consumers, adults need to sharpen their shopping skills and learn all they can about managing money and making sound nancial decisions. To learn more about managing money, contact the Madison County Extension ofce. We have consumer information to help you get organized and headed down the path of nancial stability.The University of Florida Extension/Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution.Viewpoints & Opinions2A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Read Jacob’s blog at www.jacobbembry.com His book, Higher Call is available in Kindle format at www.amazon.com or in paperback at www.amazon.com www.bn.com and www.booksamillion.com or by sending $10 plus $3.99 shipping and handling to Jacob Bembry, P.O. Box 9334, Lee, FL 32059. Contact him at jacobbembry@hotmail.com. Madison County Extension Service Jacobs Ladder Jacob BembryColumnist Conservative Corner Conservative Corner By Nelson A. Pryor Diann DouglasGuest Columnist Something To Think AboutBy Harvey Greene Harvey GreeneGuest Columnist Water rarely flows in one of the streambeds it really seems to be a little more than a small ditch-that Dean Lemke points out to a visitor on his 800-acre farm in Dows, Iowa. “I wouldn’t even call it a stream,” he said. “There is only water flow in it when it rains.” Mr. Lemke is a former Iowa state governmental official who supervised water-quality programs. He is also a fifth-generation farmer who grows corn and soybeans on his acreage, about 75 miles north of Des Moines, and he has never worried that the government would be concerned about that small ditch. But that will soon change. The Environmental Protection Agency is set to issue regulations that farmers like Mr. Lemke say may require them to get permits for work for which they have long been exempt. Pending the text of the EPA rules, farmers face a power grab of unknown proportions, that could stifle economic growth and intrude on property owners’ rights. Farmers are expecting fees for environmental assessments and to get permits just to till the soil near gullies, ditches, low spots or dry streambeds where water only collects or flows when it rains. The strangers on your land authorize permits for any activity, like farming or construction, that creates a discharge into a body of water covered under the Clean Water Act or affects the health of it, like filling in a wetland or blocking a stream. The proposed regulations have also raised concerns among industries beyond agriculture, and objections have been filed by several groups. To coordinate the opposition efforts, the New York Times of March 3, reports opposition groups joining forces with the American Farm Bureau Federation to create the Water Advocacy Coalition to lobby against increased environmental regulation. In a letter last month to the White House and members of Congress, the coalition said the agency’s decision to move forward on the new rules failed to comply with regulatory requirements and relied on a flawed economic analysis concerning its effect on industry. The coalition also said the scientific report the agency and the Army Corps of Engineers relied on to justify the new rules had not been reviewed by other scientists. Several members of Congress have also weighed in. Representative Bill Shuster, a Pennsylvania Republican and chairman of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, said in a March 6 letter to the White House and Gina McCarthy, the EPA administrator, that the new water regulations were part of a “pattern of an imperial presidency that seeks to use brute force and executive action while ignoring Congress.” Representative Lamar Smith, a Texas Republican, said the regulations “could be the largest expansion of EPA regulatory authority ever.” Mr. Lemke is most concerned about planting seasons, with seasons delayed while the agency goes through the lengthy process to decide if a permit is needed to plow or plant near those usually dry water beds. He is not optimistic. The Unappreciated Strangers On Your Land THE MADISON COUNTY REPUBLICAN CLUB OF MADISON COUNTY Meets April 14, at 12 noon at Shelby’s Restaurant. Speaker, Tommy Hardee, Supervisor Of ElectionsEVERYONE WELCOMEPaid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee MadisonRepublican@embarqmail.com Chickens And Eggs It’s Financial Literacy Month HEY! WE’RE ON FACEBOOK!Check us out and become a fan of our page![ Greene Publishing, Inc. ]It’s never been easier to share your local news with friends and family!

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fered cutbacks in funding as grants have expired, and has already cut back its hours of operation to save money, operating only during hours of peak use. “We have a diverse group of people less fortunate, in that they are without transportation,” Moore told fellow commissioners. Among those he spoke to was an 80-year-old lady who schedules all of her doctor appointments on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, because those are the days that the shuttle operates, and another elderly gentleman who was grocery shopping for his wife at home. “It's needed,” he said. “And I think it's a big plus if we can fund it." It would ll a needed gap in the social services area for county residents without any other means to get to grocery stores, doctor's ofces, or even to work. Moore had been working with the City Commission to see if the city would be able to put up half the funds needed, but since the city could not make that commitment, Moore recommended that the county kick in the entire $10,000 necessary before the June 1 deadline, in order to keep the shuttle running for another year. The County Commission agreed, and approved the measure to continue funding the shuttle for one more year. The money would come from the County's Fiscally Constrained Fund.didn’t feel threatened by those who were leaving. Jacobsen asked William Cimiotta if the Williams’ were leaving quietly, he replied, “Yes, sir.” The state called their third witness, Stacy Cole, ex-wife of Marcus Cole, and mother of William Cimiotta. At the time of the shooting, Stacy said she was working at the Econo Lodge at night as an auditor. Stacy said Mike Williams had made inappropriate comments to her. Marcus then reportedly told her to go inside the mobile home. She later saw Marcus inside the home and he told her to call 911 when he had grease splashed on his face. She later called 911 again, this time not instructed by Marcus. Stacy said Sharmee was sitting inside a maroon truck when she proceeded to go behind it to get the license plate number. She said at that time, Mike Williams had already been shot. She testied Marcus was standing on the second step of the home’s entrance steps when the second bullet was red. Two 911 calls that were made were then played for the jury to hear. “They were attempting to leave,” Stacy said. Stacy said she uncovered the weapon laying on the couch when she went searching for it. The state then called their fourth witness, Kayla Cimiotta. At the time of the incident and trial, Cimiotta was married to William Cimiotta. Kayla said she was inside the mobile home with William Cimiotta and Stacy when they heard a big bang. They went outside and discovered Marcus had grease on him and there was ghting. Kayla said William Cimiotta was pulling everybody off when Joshua White told Karen Thompson he got stabbed. She said David Fillyaw was the only person she saw with a knife. David was later arrested for aggravated battery with a deadly weapon. Kayla said she had asked the guests to leave and they were leaving in a “calmly way.” She then said William Cimiotta tried to stop him by standing in front of him trying to get the gun away. The state then called Sgt. Jake Greene of the Suwannee County Sheriff’s Ofce. Greene was the rst responder on the scene. Greene said he was approached by three individuals who informed him Marcus was the man who shot the victims. Greene then approached Marcus and checked on injured individuals. Greene was on the scene when crime scene analysts from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement arrived. The state then called Cpl. Brian Barrs of the SCSO. Barrs testied when he arrived on the scene, Marcus was standing by a deputy’s car. When he saw a substance dripping from Marcus, he asked an EMT personnel what the liquid was. Barrs said Marcus, who was standing close by, spontaneously said, “They threw grease on me. I had to shoot them.” Barrs said Marcus was never asked anything directly regarding the substance. The state then called their seventh witness, Investigator Jeff Cameron of the SCSO. Cameron also testied on the second day of trial. Cameron said when he arrived on the scene, he had no communication with Marcus since he was in the back of a patrol car. Later at the Suwannee County Jail during the booking process, Cameron said he read Marcus his Miranda Rights, which he waived, but said he wasn’t talking until he talked with an attorney. However, Cameron said Marcus was making spontaneous statements such as, “They threw grease on me. I had to shoot.” Cameron also testied that he did not see blisters or red marks on Marcus at the time of booking that he could have sustained from hot grease and did not see any evidence that Marcus was in pain. He said Marcus was not admitted to the hospital or treated for injuries the night of the shooting. Day 2 March 26 On the second day of trial, the state called their nal witness, Stacy Simmons, medical examiner of Jacksonville. Simmons performed the autopsies on Abe and Mike Williams, and said autopsies are generally performed when there is a “traumatic death or drug overdose.” Following her examinations, Simmons determined and testied to the cause of death. Simmons said Abe Williams died as a result of a gunshot wound to the head and Mike Williams died as a result of a gunshot wound to the chest. Simmons said the manner of death for both individuals was determined to be a homicide, which she dened as a “killing of one person by another person.” The state then rested. Defense calls their witnesses The defense then called Karen Thompson to the stand. Karen, who was reportedly dating Joshua White at that time, said she had known Marcus for approximately ve years. Karen said she was cooking at the party when the guests arrived at the Cole residence. She said she knew Abe and Sharmee Williams, who she invited, but she didn’t know Mike Williams or David Fillyaw prior to that day. Karen said she went inside and when she came back out, there was ghting going on. When Marcus passed by her, Karen testied he said, “They burnt me. They threw grease on me.” Karen said the ght continued when Cole went inside. She cared for Joshua White after he sustained an injury. “I thought Josh was going to die,” Karen said. “The scene was very chaotic.” Karen testied she heard a gunshot, but did not know who was shooting. She said she then saw Marcus holding a gun. The defense then called Joshua White. Joshua testied he was fearful of his life after being cut on his upper back while helping Marcus, who he said was laying on the ground getting beaten. “I was down on the bottom of the pile. When I managed to get out, I felt a burning sensation,” Joshua said. “My ngers actually went into my neck.” At that point, White said the guests were still ghting. “It looked like they had no will of stopping,” he said. Marcus Cole takes the stand The defense then called Marcus Cole to the stand as their nal witness. Marcus was living at the residence on 225thRoad with his wife Stacy; her son, William Cimiotta, and his wife, Kayla. Marcus said he and Stacy had been married two years prior to the event. Marcus said the occasion of the family get-together was to eat meat from a hog killed the previous day. He said Josh and Karen had a 400 pound boar hog that had escaped the pen. “It was night time, it was raining. They called me up because they don’t own a gun, to come and shoot it. So, I got a gun, a 30-06 ... I shot it,” Marcus said. Marcus said they packed the meat on ice and then had it processed the next day. Marcus said as a payment, Karen brought some ribs and a shoulder over and said they wanted to have a cookout. “I said we could cook it at my house. We agreed to have some shrimp and oysters and fried dill pickles,” Marcus said. Marcus said the 3006 gun previously belonged to his dad who passed away, and was given to him by his step-mom. Marcus recalled when he got off work on Jan. 26, the day of the party, he stopped by a convenience store and got a 12 pack of beer and a bag of ice and went home. Later, folks who he described as “close friends” arrived around 6 p.m. and began cooking. Marcus said the radio was loud and everyone was “happy.” Around 10 p.m., Abe and Sharmee Williams arrived at the party along with Mike Williams and David Fillyaw, who he said was acting somewhat aggressive. “They all had a beer in their hand,” Marcus said. Later, Marcus said they were making rude comments to his wife and to Karen. That’s when Marcus said he asked the ladies to go into the home. Marcus said when he told Abe and his company to leave, they just laughed. Marcus testied he asked them to leave on four different occasions. “(Abe) said he wasn’t going anywhere, so I went into the house and told my wife to call 911,” Marcus said. “They were just trying to make us ght. They should have left when I asked them.” Marcus said they attacked him when he made it clear he didn’t want them at his home anymore. When punches were exchanged, Marcus said Abe Williams kicked him in the knees to make him fall to the ground. He said they aggressively continued to punch and kick him while he was down on the ground. Marcus testied that Mike Williams picked up a pot full of hot grease which had been used for cooking and threw it at him, burning his upper body. “I thought I was going to be blind and not have a face,” Marcus said. “I started screaming and saying I couldn’t see.” Marcus said he felt like it was an attempt to kill him. Later, he witnessed Joshua White, his best friend, he said, bleeding from a cut which he believed to be life threatening. “I thought he was going to bleed to death,” Marcus said. “I was horried.” Marcus continued, “Each ght was getting more and more aggressive.” “I felt like I had to go get my gun to protect my loved ones. They almost killed me and Josh is bleeding to death,” Marcus said. When he returned outside from getting the rearm, Marcus said he stood between the aggressors and his loved ones. Marcus said he was unsure if Abe Williams had a weapon in the truck. He also said he was unsure if Mike Williams had a weapon on him, but stated he had not seen one during this incident. Marcus said Mike Williams was coming at him and he took action to protect himself. “I did not have a choice,” Marcus said. “I’m still horried. That’s a feeling you don’t want to feel. It hasn’t changed over the 14 months.” Day 3 March 27 Day three began with closing statements by Marcus Cole’s attorney and the state. The jury was then sent into deliberation at 2:20 p.m. At approximately 9:15 p.m., the jury rendered a verdict of not guilty of two counts of capital rst degree murder. From Page One Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 3A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 The MadisonEnterprise-Recorder PublisherEmerald GreenePath of Faith WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris Rose Klein Jessie BoxGraphic DesignerTori Self Hunter GreeneAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette DunnBookkeeperBrooke KinsleyClassified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classi“eds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Wednesday at 3 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included)Since 1865 -Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity.ŽThe Madison The Madison Enterprise-Recorder Enterprise-RecorderMadison Recorder established 1865 New Enterprise established 1901 Consolidated June 25, 1908 Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post Of“ce 32340. Publication No. 177.400. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison Enterprise-Recorder P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.P.O. Box 772 € Madison, FL 32341 1695 South SR 53 € Madison, FL 32340 (850) 973-4141 € Fax: (850) 973-4121 greenepub@greenepublishing.com www.greenepublishing.com 2013 Not Guilty Cont. From Page 1A Permits Cont. From Page 1Amits came in second with a total of 11 permits issued. Mobile home or modular set up permits had seven issued. Fire safety and renovations or remodeling had four permits issued each. Other permit category such as demolition had four permits issued. Mobile Homes permits were issued three times. Plumbing and buildings permits, such as barns or storage, each had two permits issued. Roofing permits had one permit issued. The total of fees collected for March was $9,489.75 be Madison County Memorial Hospital,” said Ted Ensminger, HCAHPS Coordinator and Director of Marketing at Madison County Memorial Hospital. “This decision also supports the three key values of the hospital: Faith, Family and History.” The new Madison County Memorial Hospital building is expected to be ready to begin transferring patients from the old building on August 1. The building still has some items that must be finished before it is ready. The ceiling and flooring is not installed completely yet. MCMH Cont. From Page 1A Shuttle Cont. From Page 1A

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Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Bryan and Mr. Rocky Duncan Sr. of Colquitt, Ga. would like to announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Tomi Lynn Heard to Mr. Ronnie Gene Thompson Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Ronnie Thompson Sr. of Madison. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher Shefeld of Colquitt, Ga. and Mr. and Mrs. Grover Duncan of Colquitt, Ga. and the late Mr. and Mrs. Bennie Bryan of Colquitt, Ga. Tomi Lynn is currently employed at Dee's gift store in Colquitt, Ga. The groom elect is the grandson of Mrs. Guilda Swain and the late Mr. C.W. Swain of Sale City, Ga. and Mrs. Vivian Thompson and the late Mr. Ronald Thompson of Sale City, Ga. Ronnie is currently employed with Peanuts in Colquitt, Ga. The wedding will be May 10th, at 7 p.m. at The Long Branch Lodge in Colquitt, Ga. All friends and family are invited, as no invitations will be sent. Around Madison County4A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Obituaries Norma Jean Townsend Hendry, 78, of Madison, passed away Tuesday, April 8, at her home. Funeral Services were held at 11 a.m. Thursday, April 10, at Beggs Funeral Home, Madison Chapel, with burial at Oak Ridge Cemetery. The family received friends from 57 p.m. Wednesday, April 9, at Beggs Funeral Home. She was born in Madison County on November 5, 1935 to the late Jim and Daisy Townsend. She graduated from Madison High School in 1953. She worked for the City of Madison as the City Clerk for 17 years. Later, she was the owner of The Rosery Florist, along with her late husband, Edwin Hendry, for 25 years. Norma Jean played a major role in the development and establishing the Senior Citizens Council of Madison County and served as the rst director. She was a charter and active member of Unity Baptist Church. After her retirement in 1999, she devoted her time to cooking for her family, her church family and sharing the bounty of her kitchen with many families whom she knew. She is survived by two sons: Troy Hendry (Jenny) of Madison, and Todd Hendry of St. Augustine; two grandchildren; Sara Whitaker (Kyle) of Madison, and Andrew Hendry (ancŽ, Magan Taylor) of Madison; one great grandson; Asher Whitaker, as well as many nephews and nieces and friend, Betty DeLaughter of Madison. She was preceded in death by husband, James Edwin Hendry of 57 years; parents, Jim and Daisy Townsend; four brothers and three sisters. She was the youngest and last surviving child of the Townsend family. Beggs Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements: (850) 973-2258. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting the website www.beggsfuneral.com.Norma Jean Townsend Hendry Helen Glean PearsonHelen Glean Pearson was born on July 7, 1939. She was called home on April 6, surrounded by family and friends. Her wake will be on Friday, April 11, at Cooks and Coopers Funeral Home at 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. This event is open to the public. Funeral services will follow on Saturday, April 12, at noon at New Life Christian International Ministries. Cooks and Coopers Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements: (850) 973-6666. Wedding Announcement Paris Blair BassParis Blair Bass left this world for a better place on Sunday, April 6. Her viewing was held Thursday, April 10, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Beggs Funeral Home in Madison. Graveside service will be held at a later date at San Pedro Cemetery in Madison. She is survived by her daughter; Paula Bass and four granddaughters; Shyanne, Kindall, Keriston and Karindall Williamson; three brothers; Eddie Blair, Allen Blair and Mike Blair; one sister; Heidi Blair. She was preceded in death by her father and mother; Rodger and Dot O'Quinn Blair and brother; Mark Blair. Beggs Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements: (850) 973-2258. THANK YOU! The Healthy Start Coalition of Jefferson, Madison and Taylor Counties, Inc. would like to thank the Pine Tree Craft N' Quilters for donating 36 beautiful handmade quilts for our Moms and their babies! A special thank you to the following: Sandra Bass, Ruth Bishop, Deborah Brown, Beth Dees, Mary Dees, Hilda Dixon, Nell Dobbs, Linda Doud, Louanna Forness, Sarah Freytag, Elizabeth Gant, Geraldine Harden, Sally Hubbard, Millie Leonardson, Gean McCullough, Jeanette Mitchell, Effie Pate, Irene Rowell, Betty Sirman, Louise Strickland, Karen Sutton, Helen Whitten, Ila Willis and Lenora Zipperer. June Elizabeth Nipper Townsend MorrisJune Elizabeth Nipper Townsend Morris, 83, of Mason, Ohio, passed away Sunday, April 6, of renal failure. She was born April 13, 1930 in Miami, to the late William Jackson and Della Lorena Adams Nipper. The Nipper family moved to Cherry Lake Farms when June was five years old. She graduated from Madison High School in 1948. She was preceded in death by her husband, Jim Allen Townsend, Jr. of four months, son Jim Allen Townsend, III, two sisters: Vera Nipper Hart and Odessa Nipper Brown and brother Don E. Nipper. She was also the former wife of the late Phillip Gail Morris for 16 years. She is survived and was the beloved mother of Phillip Gail (Debi) of San Diego, Calif., Nancy Odom (James) of Murrieta, Calif., Cindy Weeks (Scott) of Pensacola, Gabrielle Morris of Paso Robles, Calif., and Karma Decker (Jeffrey) of Mason, Ohio. She is also survived by 19 grandchildren, 31 great-grandchildren, sister Barbara Milton of Live Oak, and many nieces and nephews. The family will receive friends on Tuesday, April 15th, from 2 p.m. until time for funeral services at 3 p.m. at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1374 W Base St., Madison, followed by Interment at Pinegrove Cemetery. Condolences may be sent to junem413@gmail.com Beggs Funeral Home, in Madison, is in charge of arrangements: (850) 973-2258. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, April 2, 2014Wendi Webb was one of the winners for the Wild Adventure's Splash Island give-a-way, that Greene Publishing advertised and promoted. She is holding her grandson Trent. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, April 2, 2014Leola Arnold was also a Greene Publishing/Wild Adventures ticket winner. Greene Publishing's Wild Adventures Ticket WinnersHeard-Thompson Announce Engagement

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.As she begins her presentation at the Madison Rotary Club, Wanda Hodnett of A Woman's Pregnancy Center prefaces it with the story of Norma McCorvey, the young woman who became the Jane Roe of Roe Vs. Wade and then had a change of heart. An icon of the pro-choice movement, she joined the pro-life group, “Operation Rescue,” after it moved in next door to the abortion clinic where she had been working. As a result, she became a surprise champion of the prolife movement, making headlines with her dramatic reversal. Ironically, McCorvey never had the abortion; by the time the law was passed, it was too late. Forty years after Roe Vs. Wade abortion is legal in all states, but Hodnett reported that nationally, abortion rates had dropped 12 percent in 2013, and some abortion clinics had closed down as the pro-life movement has gained traction. However, her primary focus was A Woman's Pregnancy Center of Madison, 345 NW Marion St., and the alternative it offers women who find themselves pregnant and alone, with nowhere else to turn. Located near the new hospital, A Woman's Pregnancy Center is an entity she described as a Christian ministry that receives no state or federal money, relying instead on donations (all gifts are tax-deductible) and three major fundraisers per year: the “Celebration of Life Banquet” at Divine Events in the fall; the “Walk For Life” in the spring, which raises money through sponsors; and the “Baby Bottle Ministry,” where people take baby bottles home with them, fill them with loose change and bring them back. “Churches do this a lot,” said Hodnett of the Baby Bottle Ministry. Typically, they will pass out the baby bottles to congregations on Mother's Day and collect them on Father's Day. Because the Center accepts no federal or state money, “We can share the love of Christ with people, and all our services are free.” The Center offers pregnancy tests and ultrasounds, encouraging its clients to be under the care of a doctor for any further medical services they will likely need. The Center's services are mostly counseling the abortion-minded “in the love of Jesus,” showing instructional videos on parenting and providing some of the material things the young women will need, from the 20thweek of their pregnancy through the first six months of their baby's life. “We try to find out what kind of support system she has and whether or not she's being abused, but many of our clients are church-goers,” said Hodnett. Whoever they may be, they are all received with love. “So many of these girls need to be shown that they are loved and that God loves them unconditionally.” One of the first things a young woman will be given after coming to the Center is a hand-crocheted baby blanket made by volunteers. Other items might include diapers and baby clothes, depending on the need. When it comes to larger items, clients are put on a list until the needed items can be found. For instance, if she needs a baby bed but cannot afford one, the Center can put the word out through its network of volunteers for anybody with a baby bed to donate. After the baby is born, the Center staff gives the mother a “Shower in a Bag” with all new stuff that every newborn needs. Many of the young women who come to the Center have never even heard of a “baby shower” before. Additionally, every baby receives a child's Bible. The Center accepts donations of money, time and baby items (including clothing, diapers and furniture). Donations come from churches and civic clubs holding diaper drives and delivering stacks of diapers, from businesses, or from members of the community, such as women who donate baby things their own children have outgrown. By offering an alternative to abortion, A Woman's Pregnancy Center has saved 99 babies in the past four years, Hodnett told the audience, and spared the young mothers the after-affects of the procedure. “Just because you have an abortion, it doesn't mean you aren't a mother or father,” she said. “You're the mother or father of a deceased baby.” Even though abortion is currently legal in all states, there is a national effort underway to pass a new law requiring an ultrasound before an abortion can be performed. After seeing the ultrasound image, Hodnett explained, many young women change their minds and continue their pregnancies. “A Woman's Pregnancy Center is a wideopen mission,” she said. “Where Christ can be shared, and is being shared.”Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 5A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Family Bake Sale To Benet Jefferson Couple Affected By CancerBy Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Family members will be holding a bake sale for Charles and Ann Savage this Friday, Saturday and Sunday, April 11-13, to assist the couple with medical bills and supplies. Charles has been diagnosed with prostate cancer and will be undergoing radiation treatment beginning Monday, April 14 at the Tallahassee Memorial Cancer Center. Treatments will be at the Tallahassee Memorial Cancer Center, making it difcult for the couple, as they do not own transportation. Sales of baked goods or donations will go towards paying for transportation through Big Bend as well as Charles’ bills and medical supplies. The bake sale will be held at the Country Yard Flea Market located on Hwy 19 South. Baked goods will be sold Friday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. until all baked goods are gone. For more information or donations, call Ann at (850) 408-9365.Wanda Hodnett Of A Woman's Pregnancy Center Addresses Rotary Club Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, April 2, 2014Wanda Hodnett speaks at the Rotary Club on behalf of A Woman's Pregnancy Center of Madison. Recall Updates Tyson Products Tyson is recalling over 75,000 pounds of chicken nuggets after the company received reports of mouth injuries to customers who ate the product. USDA's report said small pieces of plastic broken off a product scraper inside a blending machine were responsible for the injuries. The recall affects 20-lb bags of Spare Time Fully Cooked Nugget-Shaped Breast Pattie Fritters (pkg. numbers 0264SDL0315 through-19, and 0474SDL0311 through-14.) Also affected are 5-lb bags of Tyson Fully Cooked White Meat Chicken Nuggets with use by dates of Jan. 26, 2015 or Feb. 16, 2015 (pkg. Numbers 0264SDL0315 through -19 and 0474SDL0311 through-14). For questions regarding the recall, contact Tyson Foods Consumer Services at 1-866-328-3156.Sprouts Farmers Market Sprouts Farmers Market is recalling peppercorns sold under the names Sprout, Frontier and Simply Organic, for possible salmonella poisoning. The spice comes in 2.12 ounce cans with an expiration date of October 2016, lot numbers 3256, 3246, 3221 and 3262. If you purchased any of these products, do not use them: return them to the place of purchase for a refund. The deadline to file your taxes for 2013 is April 15th, 2014. Aside from April 15th being the last day to file your taxes, it is also the deadline for IRA contributions. If you plan to file an extension, remember that your IRA contribution deadline will not be extended. So, do dont delay in getting these done! As I see it, there are a few things to consider about IRA contributions: €Contributing to an IRA lets you invest money that can grow tax-deferred or tax-free. You may even be eligible for a tax deduction! €With tax benefits, money can grow even faster than in accounts without benefits. €For most people, Social Security will not provide enough money for a comfortable retirement. Investing in an IRA, particularly every year over a long period of time, can play a major role in making retirement more enjoyable. Roth IRAs „ Powerful Planning Tools for All Generations If the current income restrictions associated with Roth IRAs prevent you from using one for your own planning purposes, consider taking steps to ensure that your children or other younger family members establish and fund a Roth IRA of their own. Roth IRAs offer ample tax benefits for retirement „ particularly for younger investors. Yet perhaps the more long lasting benefit of the Roth IRA can be realized when it is used as a wealth transfer mechanism. Roth IRAs for Minors One of the main contributors to successful retirement planning is time „ the more of it you have, the better the result. For this reason alone, setting up a Roth IRA for a child can be one of your best long-term planning strategies. When investment compounding has upwards of 50 years to run its course, even a relatively modest savings rate can produce substantial wealth. There is no minimum age requirement for opening a Roth IRA, and many IRA providers will accept accounts for minors. In most cases, the only real issue is whether the child has taxable earned income. Fortunately there is no requirement that the same earned incomeŽ is the money that funds the IRA. If your child earned income from a summer or part-time job, but then spent it, there is no restriction on using money provided by parents to establish and fund the IRA account. You can contribute up to $5,500 to a Roth IRA in 2013 as long as your child earned at least that much. However, contributions cannot exceed your childs income for the year. Contributions to a Roth IRA are not tax deductible, but earnings are never taxed provided your child meets the distribution requirements „ chief among them waiting until at least 59 1‡2 before tapping the account Wealth Transfer with a Roth IRA As effective a retirement planning tool as a Roth IRA can be, its greatest strength may be its potential as a wealth transfer instrument. Unlike traditional IRAs, minimum distributions are not required from Roth IRAs once the owner reaches age 70 1‡2 Therefore a child theoretically could have held a Roth IRA his or her entire life never having tapped into it and then pass it on to his or her beneficiaries upon death. At this point the account would fall under the same minimum withdrawal rules that pertain to traditional IRAs. However, beneficiaries may choose to string out those withdrawals over many years, continuing to earn tax-free income on the remaining account balance. The hidden value of the Roth IRA is its exceptional growth potential. If heirs decide to spend or withdraw Roth IRA assets immediately upon inheritance, the Roths strategic value as a wealth transfer tool is lost. If however, they choose to let the Roth IRA continue to grow and only withdraw what is required by law each year, the true power of the Roth IRA can be realized.Stacy Bush, PresidentBush Wealth ManagementThe Bush Wealth Advantage Our column, The Bush Wealth AdvantageŽ is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. Stacy Bush has practiced independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.comSecurities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 862109

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By Jessie R. Box Greene Publishing, Inc. Parents as you are watching your children play contact sports, pay attention to the cuts or abrasions they may receive. According to the Mayo Clinic website, staph infections are caused by staphylococcus bacteria, a type of germ commonly found on a person’s skin or in the nose. The bacteria can get under a person’s skin through a break in the skin. “Normal, healthy people who maintain good hygiene do not get staph infections that often,” said Harvey Greene, P.A.-C at Family Health Center in Madison. According to the Mayo Clinic, common types of staph infections are boils, impetigo and cellulitis. Boils are pockets of pus that develops in a hair follicle or oil gland. Impetigo is a contagious rash that occurs mostly in young children. Cellulitis is an infection of the deeper layers of skin and causes skin redness and swelling on the surface of the skin. Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome affects mostly newborns and the symptoms include fever, rash and blisters. According to Greene, staph infections are less communicable than the common cold and he explains that it is because everyone has staph bacteria on their skin. The bacteria helps ght off other bacteria. Treatment of staph infections is case by case due to methicillim-resistant staphylococcus aureus or MRSA, a stain of staph infection that resists certain antibiotics. Before treatment, it must be determined which antibiotic will kill the infection. According to Mayo Clinic, less than 10 percent of today’s staph infections can be cured with penicillin and half are resistant to cephalosporin and nafcillin. Greene warned that if you think you have a staph infection, then have your physician look at it. “Earlier treatment is easier treatment,” said Greene.Around Madison County6A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Way Back When Way Back WhenApril 8, 1949 Arthur Clark Smith, of Tallahassee, was elected principal of the Pinetta School for the 1949-1950 term at a meeting of the County Board of Education Wednesday. Mr. Smith is working on his Master of Arts Degree at Florida State University and will finish his course this summer. He is a native of Virginia and received his early education at Abingdon, Va. He is married and has three children. Little Ella Mae Rogers of Boyd celebrated her 7thbirthday a few days ago with a party given in her honor by her mother, Mrs. David Rogers. There were 21 guests. Miss Elizabeth Brannen helped her mother with the children. Ella Mae received many nice gifts. The Legislature is meeting again this week in what many consider an important session. Governor Warren and others say that the state is facing a crisis, with forty to fifty million dollars more budgeted than that for which revenue is in sight. New taxes will be proposed by the Governor and reiteration of his opposition to the sales tax will be made. Mr. and Mrs. W M Burton expect to leave this week, driving to San Francisco from where they will embark for Guam, April 20, by steamer. Mr. Burton will be connected with the U.S. Engineering Department. April 14, 1950 Many friends and relatives gathered at Mrs. J G Thigpen’s Sunday night to celebrate Mrs. Florence Thigpen’s eighty-fifth birthday. A number of gifts were presented to her, with wishes for many more birthdays yet. The students and teachers of Lee School enjoyed the Easter Recess, which extended from April 6 to April 11. Every one attended one or more Easter egg hunts. The separate rooms at school had their egg hunts and picnics, which are a tradition of the school. Fire caused from a spark falling on the shingles burned a considerable hole in the roof of Mary Tillman’s home in West Madison Friday. Effective work of the Fire Department saved the home. Presbyterian children were entertained at their annual egg hunt Saturday afternoon on the church lawn. Quite a large number enjoyed the affair. Ice cream was served after the eggs were found. Prizewinners were Harriet Gandy, Billie Bryant, Joy Harris, Beverly Gibson, Gayle Coffee and Phillip Ragans. April 13, 1951 John L. Marker, age 29, of Greenville, is in the local hospital with shoulder and back injuries and cuts on the face, and Harrison Williams, 60, also of Greenville, a rider in Mr. Marker’s car, with a severely cut foot, as the result of an automobile accident about 1:15 p.m. Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Horace Bailey, Madison Route 3, announce the birth of a son, April 10. Susan Selman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Buford Selman was honored with a lovely birthday Thursday afternoon on the occasion of her second birthday anniversary. The Intentional baseball league composed of Pinetta, Fla., and the following Georgia Teams: Glenn, Stockton, Eastside Valdosta, Lakeland, and Homerville, opens for the season Sunday, April 15. Games will be played each Sunday afternoon during the season. Glenn will play Pinetta in Pinetta this Sunday afternoon at three o’clock. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, April 9, 2014Desmond Roberson and Daniel Graham, guests at the 55 Plus Club, spoke brie”y about the Madison Boy's Choir Palm Sunday Concert program at the RATT Pact Theater, Friday evening, April 11 at 7 p.m., Saturday afternoon, April 12, at 3 p.m., and Saturday evening, April 12, at 7 p.m. One of the main questions from the audience was Where do we get tickets?Ž The answer, contact Deborah Brown at (850) 929-4938, or Tim Dunn, who is in the phone book. If enough tickets are sold, the choir will schedule a second matinee performance on Palm Sunday afternoon, April 13, at 3 p.m. After their appearance at 55 Plus, Roberson, Graham and the choir were scheduled to begin rehearsing in the theater building, in readiness for the upcoming concert.Daniel Graham, Desmond Roberson Drop In At 55 Plus ClubParents Pay Attention For Staph Infections

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Dear Savvy Senior, What can you tell me about reverse mortgages? I was considering one last year, but now I hear they are more difcult to get. Ready to Reverse Dear Ready,That’s correct. Tighter rules on reverse mortgages that have recently gone into affect have made them harder to get, especially for seniors with heavy debt problems. The reason the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) made these changes was to strengthen the product, which has suffered from a struggling housing market and a growing number of defaults by borrowers. Here’s a rundown of how reverse mortgages now work in 2014. Overview: The basics are still the same. A reverse mortgage is a loan that allows senior homeowners to borrow money against the equity in their house. The loan doesn’t have to be repaid until the homeowner dies, sells the house or moves out for at least 12 months. It’s also important to know that with a reverse mortgage, you, not the bank, own the house, so you’re still responsible for property taxes, insurance and repairs. Eligibility: To be eligible for a reverse mortgage you must be at least 62 years old, own your own home (or owe only a small balance) and currently be living there. You will also need to undergo a nancial assessment to determine whether you can afford to make all the necessary tax and insurance payments over the projected life of the loan. Lenders will look at your sources of income, assets and credit history. Depending on your nancial situation, you may be required to put part of your loan into an escrow account to pay future bills. If the nancial assessment nds that you cannot pay your insurance and taxes and have enough cash left to live on, you will be denied. Loans: Nearly all reverse mortgages offered today are Home Equity Conversion Mortgages (HECM), which are FHA insured and offered through private mortgage lenders and banks. HECM’s also have home value limits that vary by county, but cannot exceed $625,500. See hud.gov/ll/code/llslcrit.cf m for a list of HUD approved lenders. Loan amounts: The amount you get through a reverse mortgage depends on your age, your home’s value and the prevailing interest rates. Generally, the older you are, the more your house is worth, and the lower the interest rates are, the more you can borrow. A 70-year-old, for example, with a home worth $300,000 could borrow around $170,000 with a xed-rate HECM. To calculate how much you can borrow, visit reversemortgage.org. Loan costs: Reverse mortgages have a number of up-front fees including a 2 percent lender origination fee for the rst $200,000 of the home’s value and one percent of the remaining value, with a cap of $6,000; a 0.5 percent initial mortgage insurance premium fee; along with an appraisal fee, closing costs and other miscellaneous expenses. Most fees can be deducted for the loan amount to reduce your out-of-pocket cost at closing. In addition, you’ll also have to pay an annual mortgage insurance premium of 1.25 percent of the loan amount. Payment options: You can receive the money in a lump sum, a line of credit, regular monthly checks or a combination of these. But in most cases, you cannot withdraw more than 60 percent of the loan during the rst year. If you do, you’ll pay a 2.5 percent upfront insurance premium fee. Counseling: All borrowers are required to get face-to-face or telephone counseling through a HUD approved independent counseling agency before taking out a reverse mortgage. Some agencies are awarded grants that enable them to offer counseling for free, but most charge around $125 to $250. To locate a counseling agency near you, visit hud.gov/ofces/hsg/sfh/h ecm/hecmhome.cfm or call 800-569-4287. The esophagusThe esophagus is a muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. It lies behind the windpipe (trachea) and in front of the spine and in adults is about 1013 inches long. At its smallest point, it is a little less than one inch wide. It carries food and liquids to the stomach. The wall of the esophagus has several layers. Cancer of the esophagus starts in the inner layer and grows outward into deeper layers. In the lower part of the esophagus that connects to the stomach, a sphincter muscle opens to allow food to enter the stomach. This muscle also closes to keep stomach acid and juices from backing up into the esophagus. When stomach juices escape into the esophagus, it is called gastroesophageal reux disease (GERD) or just reux. In many cases, reux can cause symptoms such as heartburn or a burning feeling spreading out from the middle of the chest. But sometimes, reux can happen without any symptoms at all. Long-term reux of stomach acid into the esophagus can lead to problems. It can change the cells in the lower end of the esophagus. They become more like the cells that line the stomach. When these cells change, the person has a condition called Barrett's esophagus. These altered cells can change into cancer, so the person has a much higher risk of cancer of the esophagus and should be closely watched by a doctor. Still, most people with Barrett's esophagus do not go on to get cancer of the esophagus. Can cancer of the esophagus be prevented? Not all cases of esophageal cancer can be prevented, but the risk of getting this disease can be greatly reduced by not using tobacco and alcohol. Diet is also important. Eating many fruits and vegetables may offer some protection. Staying active and keeping a healthy weight may also help. Some studies have found that the risk can be lowered in people who take aspirin or other drugs such as ibuprofen (NSAIDs) that reduce inammation. But using these drugs every day can lead to problems like kidney damage and bleeding in the stomach. For this reason, most doctors do not advise the use of NSAIDs to prevent cancer. If you are thinking of using one of these regularly, you rst should talk to your doctor about the pros and cons. Some studies have also found a lower risk of esophageal cancer in patients with Barrett’s esophagus who take a type of drug called statins. Statins are used to treat high cholesterol. These are drugs like atorvastatin (Lipitor) and rosuvastatin (Crestor). While taking one of these drugs to lower cholesterol may also help some patients lower esophageal cancer risk, doctors don’t advise taking them to prevent cancer. These drugs can have serious side effects. Doctors recommend that people with Barrett’s esophagus have certain tests done to look for cell changes that may be a sign of cancer. Treating reux may help to prevent Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal cancer. If you have chronic heartburn (or reux), you should talk to your health care team about it. Treatment with drugs or even surgery can improve symptoms and may prevent future problems. This information is provided by the American Cancer Society. If you need more information, please call your physician or the Florida Department of Health in Madison at 850-973-5000 or the Florida Department of Health in Jefferson at (850) 342-0170.HealthMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 7A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Make 2014 the year you change your life CLASSES IN MADISON STA RTMBachelors Degree Programs €Business Administration with specialization in Management €Computer Information Systems €Criminal Justice €Elementary Education €Health Care Management €Human Services €Psychology Full-time students may be eligible for the Florida Resident Access Grant (FRAG) Approved for VA Bene“ts/GI Bill Classes now forming in Madison(850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu What you need for where youre going Now offering The Doctorate of Business Administration (Online and On Campus) ou need for wher What y e y ou need for wher e going r  ou dministration A usiness B € ee egr re s D  achelor B dministration ograms r ro ee P dministration A usiness B € with specialization in nformation Computer I € anagement M anagement e M ealth Car H € ducation lementary E E € ustice riminal J C € ystems S dministration with specialization in nformation anagement ducation N The D ing fer w of o N octorate of The D chology sy P € ervices uman S H € G) rant (FRA G esident ida R lor F be eligible for the ull-time students may F ervices ccess A esident be eligible for the ull-time students may usiness B The D nline and O (O dministration A usiness octorate of The D ampus) n C nline and O V ed for v o ppr ro A ill ene“ts/GI B B adison in M w for Classes nowww A VA madison@saintleo.edu (850) 973-3356 ming w for.saintleo.edu/mp www madison@saintleo.edu (850) 973-3356.saintleo.edu/mp What is cancer of the esophagus? Savvy Senior: How Reverse Mortgages Work in 2014

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Outdoors8A €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Loud & Clearand FREE Florida residents with a hearing loss are eligible to receive a free amplied phone from the non-prot Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. Cordless and corded phones for persons with mild to severe hearing loss are available at 23 distribution centers statewide. Limit one per customer. CONTACT YOUR AREA CENTER FOR DETAILS Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. 1820 E. Park Avenue, Suite 101 Tallahassee, FL 32301 800-222-3448 (v) 888-447-5620 (tty) Current FTRI clients: If your phone isnt working properly or your hearing has changed, or should you no longer need your phone or are moving out of Florida, call FTRI at 888-554-1151 for assistance. Commissioner Putnam Urges Caution During Wildfire Awareness Week Submitted by Ray Boothe, Senior Forest Ranger, Perry District Office More than 500 Wildfires Have Burned 9,000 Acres Since January Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam and the Florida Forest Service shared tips today urging Floridians to be extremely careful with fires outdoors. This week is Wildfire Awareness Week, which recognizes wildfires that raged across Florida in 1998, burning more than 500,000 acres and damaging or destroying 337 homes and structures. “This year, we have been very fortunate with increased rainfall in some parts of the state, but other areas are still very dry,” said Commissioner Putnam. “Our firefighters are working to minimize risk of wildfire and help keep homes, businesses and residents of Florida safe, but there are also simple steps Floridians can take to help prevent wildfire.” Wildfires generally occur in the spring and early summer months due to a lack of rainfall, low humidity and strong winds combined with increased springtime yard burns. Since Jan. 1, the Florida Forest Service’s firefighters have responded to more than 500 wildfires on 9,183 acres, most from human carelessness. “We all have the responsibility to help prevent wildfires,” said James Karels, Florida Forest Service state forester. “By preventing just one wildfire, we can reduce the risk to life, homes and property, while also reducing the cost to Florida taxpayers.” The following tips can help prevent wildfires: Check with your local city or county officials to see if there are any burn restrictions in the area. Keep fires contained to an eight-foot diameter pile or noncombustible barrel. Fires must be at least 25 feet from forests, 25 feet from homes, 50 feet from paved public roads and 150 feet from other occupied buildings. Obtain a burning authorization from the Florida Forest Service for piles larger than eight feet in diameter. Call your local Florida Forest Service field office (850) 973 5115, ( http://www.freshfromflorida.com/Divisions-Offices/Florida-F orest-Service ). Check the weather daily and don’t burn on windy days or when the humidity is below 30 percent. Never leave a fire unattended and make sure it is completely out before leaving. Keep a shovel and water hose handy in case a small fire starts to escape containment. Report suspicious activity to the Arson Alert Hotline at 1-800342-5869. Callers may remain anonymous, and information about an arson-caused fire could be worth up to a $5,000 reward. The Florida Forest Service manages more than one million acres of public forest land while protecting 26 million acres of homes, forestland and natural resources from the devastating effects of wildfire. For statewide wildfire updates and additional wildfire information, visit www.floridaforestservice.com. For more information about the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, visit www.FreshFromFlorida.com.FLORIDA FOREST SERVICE CELEBRATES ECOLOGY DAYPhoto SubmittedDave Norton of Rock Tenn Paper presents to a group of 3rdgraders at the 24thannual Ecology Field Day at North Florida Community College while Justin Kania (Forester), Tanner Greene, Luis Medina and Chris Norris (Forest Rangers) look on. Submitted by Justin Kania, Madison County ForesterFriday, April 4, marked the 24thannual 4H Ecology Field Day at North Florida Community College. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’ Florida Forest Service along with Rock Tenn Forester, Dave Norton, provided instruction in forest ecology as well as prescribed fire applications. Using the school’s Ladell Brothers’ natural area as a backdrop and classroom, Madison Forest Rangers presented an overview on the use of fire to manage Florida timberlands as well as the potential destructiveness of wildfire in those same timberlands. The students, over 200 of them from several Madison County public and private schools, were also presented an opportunity to learn some basics of Forest Ecology and Forest Management with presentations by foresters Justin Kania and Dave Norton. If you would like to learn more about Florida’s timberlands and their management, contact the Madison County Forester at (850) 973 5115 or e-mail justin.kania@freshfromflorida.com.

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Ripley’s Ghost Train Adventure’s is a 90 minute paranormal investigation that takes you down the streets of St. Augustine stopping at many of the local haunts, including the Our 90-minute paranormal investigation takes you down the narrow streets of St. Augustine, stopping to investigate at the old Castillo de San Marcos National Monument, the Public Burying Grounds of 1821 and the 1800s haunted Castle Warden. For more information, call (904) 824-1606.Visit St. AugustineMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 9A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 St, Augustine, Florida is known as the Ancient City for all of the history that has happened there. It is a two-hour drive from Madison. It offers a variety of exciting places to explore and have fun. There is Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Museum, Castillo de San Marcos National Monument, Alligator Farm Zip line and Potter’s Wax Museum. The downtown area offers a wide variety of different and unique shops to explore. There is also a lovely beach that can be enjoyed by everyone in the family. Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Museum According to Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Museum website, the building was built by Standard Oil partner William G. Warden, and later became a hotel, Castle Warden, when purchased by Pulitzer Prize winning author Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings and her husband Norton Baskin. Robert Ripley did not create the museum. He frequently stayed in the hotel. After his death in 1949 Castle Warden was purchased to house his collections, which included rosaries made of human bone and drum kit featuring two human skulls fused together and covered with human skin. The collection of weird and fascinating artifacts has grown and has over 800 exhibits, artifacts and artwork. Other attractions that Ripley’s offers is the Red Train tour and the Ghost Train Tours. According to Ripley’s website, the Red Train Tours take you around St. Augustine and one loop is 7 mile. This includes 24 stops and from start to nish takes approximately 90 minutes. A new tour begins every 15-20 minutes at all stops. Ripley’s Ghost Train Alligator Farm Zip Line The Alligator Farm in St. Augustine started offering a new adventure a couple of years ago. According to the Alligator Farm website, the Crocodile Crossing is a zip line and aerial obstacle course. You can experience the feeling of standing over crocodiles as the bath in the sun. It includes two different courses. The Sepik River Course is the shorter course of the two. It takes approximately 45 minutes for completion. The course is 20-feet high and includes three zip lines. Then if you haven’t had enough fun, upgrade to the Nile River Course, which is longer and more difcult. According to Alligator Farms, you should allow two hours to complete this course. You are 60-feet above the ground and there are nine zip lines. They now offer, Dark Side of the Zoo, where you can zip line at night. This adventure is a modied version of the Nile River Course. The include six zip lines and 23 obstacles. If you want to know what the alligators and crocodiles do at night this is perfect for you. This adventure also includes a nocturnal reptile tour, which include the great Maximo. For more information, call (904) 824-3337. Potter’s Wax MuseumPotter’s Was Museum in St. Augustine offers over 160 wax figures. According to Potter’s Wax Museum’s website, the newest addition is Tiger Woods. They are also going to be adding Halle Barry and Robert De Niro to the collection soon. Potter’s Wax Museum is open 7 days a week. Adult tickets are $10.00 and children tickets are $7.00. For more information, call (904) 829-9056.

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Around Madison County10A €Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Marvin Bass was born in 1925 in Madison County and except for 10 weeks during his life, has never left Madison County. He worked on his father’s farm, along with his eight brothers and two sisters, and studied in a two-room schoolhouse in Shaw. He has hand-strung tobacco, grown corn and peanuts and raised cows, goats and hogs. Marvin said he had a good, but hard life as a farmer. Having cows gave the family milk and butter and the garden gave them plenty of vegetables, but mules did all the plowing in the garden, as he didn’t have his rst tractor until sometime in the 1950’s. With his sharp memory, Marvin can remember working the same mule team his father owned when he was born, giving the family 27 crops before having to retire them. In 1990, after a lifetime of farming, Marvin retired and moved to 360 south, where he and Estelle live today. Estelle Colvin was born in 1926 in Madison County and except for ve of the same weeks Marvin was outside of the county, has always been in Madison County. Her family also farmed, but instead of owning one, moved from farm to farm, working where needed. Estelle’s family was also large, with seven brothers and ve sisters; giving them plenty of hands to help on a farm. Even with the help, she said farming was a tough life and would “hate to have to go down that road again.” When working on farms, she picked cotton and tended to cows and hogs. She distinctly remembers a time when having to milk a cow and the cow reciprocating by kicking her. Marvin and Estelle met while her family was working on a farm close to Marvin’s family’s farm. They didn’t “date” during this time, but were playmates. After Estelle’s family moved back to Lee, where she had been born, is when Marvin began “dating” Estelle. He visited her at her house in his 1929 yellow Model “A” Roadster a few times, but not very regular said Marvin, due to the strictness of her father. They both said dating, like going to the movies or hanging out today, was not something done back then. After seeing her for about a month, Marvin worked up the courage, much to Estelle’s fear, of asking her Father and Mother for their blessing of marriage. Marvin and Estelle were married on a Friday, April 1, 1944 at the Madison Courthouse. Marvin was 19 years old and Estelle was 17 years old. Their family started quickly as Estelle delivered their rst child at home on their farm in January of 1945, where Estelle almost died during childbirth. Marvin said he had paid a doctor to come from Aucilla, but it was Estelle’s Aunt Vanona that actually delivered the baby and helped save Estelle’s life. Estelle said she did recover, but was unable to walk for several weeks. That traumatic event and the pain were forgotten however, as the two raised a total of ve boys and one girl during their lives together. After retirement, Marvin had his share of medical problems. In 1992, he had surgery due to an aneurism and in 1994 had open-heart surgery, where he actually did die. Daughter Kay said it was a long time before he would speak of it, but while on the surgery table, felt himself being lifted from the table and witnessed the “light at the end of the tunnel” like so many others who have “died” also have seen. His vision, as Marvin calls it, continues as he says he then witnessed a large group of people coming down a stairway and saw a large group of people taking a wide path and only a few going down a smaller, narrow path. This vision greatly strengthened Marvin’s faith after recovering. Today, Marvin and Estelle, still together in the house they retired to, have life a little easier, but as Marvin said, “You can take the boy out of the country but you can’t take the country out of the boy.” Marvin helps out his neighbors, xing farm equipment and raises a few goats saying he can’t do without his animals. He also has two sheep and one calf, and a donkey named Fruit Loops and according to Estelle, got that name because that’s what Marvin feeds him. When Estelle speaks of marriage with Marvin, she said, “I married a good boy and he’s been good to me all these years. He worked hard, we raised our children, went to church and trusted in the Lord.” Agape love, often described as unconditional love, is how Marvin describes the love between him and Estelle and says it is what has kept them together through 70 years of marriage. He said their love is the same kind of love referred to in the Bible. “We couldn’t have done it by ourselves,” said Marvin. “We had to have a higher power, I wish everybody could have that type of love.” The two renewed their vows on their 50thwedding anniversary at Hopewell Baptist Church and this year, on their 70th, will be celebrating at the same church. All of Marvin and Estelle’s family and friends are invited to join them. For more information, call daughter Kay at (850) 973-0542.Marvin And Estelle Bass Celebrate 70 Years Of Love Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, March 18, 2014Saturday, April 19, from 2 … 4 p.m., Marvin and Estelle Bass will be celebrating 70 years of marriage together at Hopewell Baptist Church, located at 4730 SW CR 360 in Madison. All friends and family are invited.

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Story SubmittedMadison County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism OfficeIt has become a community tradition for over 20 years that the students from Becky’s Dance Steps Studio perform at Madison’s Down Home Days Festival. That’s exactly what the studio’s dancers will do again on Friday, April 18that 6 p.m. on Pinckney Street near the south end of the Courthouse in front of the Annex. A preview of the studio’s upcoming 38thannual recital, “Just Dance” will feature dancers ranging from ages three to 25, proudly performing in their sparkling new costumes. There will be something for everyone as the dancers showcase a variety of 14 ballet, tap, jazz and hip hop numbers to music from classic to contemporary. Always a showstopper, the adorable three year olds will perform their signature dance, “Body Rock.” This year the studio has not one, but two groups of three year olds that will make their “stage debut” at Down Home Days for the audience to enjoy. Another new addition to the show is a Hip Hop dance choreographed by Jazz Instructor and choreographer, Scott Benson, featuring 18 tweens with lots of energy, enthusiasm and some awesome steps. Completing this year’s show and in honor of Good Friday and Easter weekend will be the beautiful dance “Amazing Grace” performed traditionally each year by the studio’s senior students. According to Becky Robinson, studio owner and director, “My students always work very hard to get ready for our Down Home Days Festival show and look forward to the performance each year. It’s a chance for Madison’s talented young dancers to gain some performance experience while giving their friends and family a sneak peek of their upcoming recital and to do what they like to do best…”Just Dance!” Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder € 11A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Ridin And Ropin For Down Home Days April 17-19Story SubmittedMadison County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism OfceLasso up the family and get ready ‘cause it’s time once again for the Down Home Days Festival, Parade and Rodeo in Madison, April 18 and 19, brought to you by Tobacco Free Madison and Century Link as well as many other community partners. This exciting three-day event gallops in on Friday, April 18, with over 150 cowboys and cowgirls from the Professional Cowboy Association competing in several heart-thumping, foot-stomping events like calf roping, steer wrestling, barrel racing, break-away roping and even bull riding. Meet The History Channel’s AxMen from Season 7, the Dreadknots. They’ll be on hand Friday at 6 p.m. to give autographs at Lanier Field, located just behind O’Neal’s Restaurant and just off U.S. Highway 90 in Madison. The fun rolls into downtown Madison Saturday, April 19 with the Down Home Days festival from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. featuring over 100 vendors, a Parade at 10 a.m., Antique and Classic car show, jeep and motorcycle show, a petting zoo, antique tractor and engine show, a frog hop, two tness runs and more. This year the Down Home Days Parade theme is Gone Country and one highlight is a 1912 Winona Wagon, owned by Harry Driggers of Wildwood. The wagon is one-of-a-kind in the southwest region of the US, restored to 90 percent of its original condition, according to Driggers. “It was sold from a mercantile store in 1912 in Missouri, where a farm family used it every day until 1987,” said Driggers. Festival-goers on the parade route will see the Winona Wagon Saturday, April 19 at 10 a.m., and later displayed at Four Freedoms Park. The Down Home Days Parade sponsored by Tri-County Electric travels down U.S. Highway 90 from O’Neal’s Restaurant past the Courthouse, a different route from years past. The Down Home Days Easter weekend is packed with family-friendly activities, with sponsors such as Nestl Waters, Big Bend AHEC, Madison County Community Bank, Johnson & Johnson, Gordon Tractor and C.M. Brandies, Inc. The Madison County Chamber of Commerce & Tourism hosts the event. For the rst time in Madison County, a Special Needs Private Exhibition Rodeo takes place Thursday, April 17 at Lanier Field. Special Needs children, adults, families and organizations have received invitations to experience a free exhibition rodeo rsthand. Lunch will be provided and sponsored by Transeld Services. Thursday night at 5 p.m., a Barbecue Cook-Off fundraiser sponsored by Harvey’s Supermarket and Elmer’s Genealogy Corner will dish up $6 barbecued chicken meals leading up to the Pet Contest at 6 p.m. at Four Freedoms Park. Adorable pets will vie for “top dog.” Proceeds from the Barbecue Cook-Off go to Boyz to Kings, a non-prot organization to mentor young men in Madison County. Becky’s Dance Steps Studio Recital at 6 p.m. April 18 energizes Pinckney Street between the Courthouse and Annex, with 14 street dances, including an elegant Easter presentation, following the Citizen of the Year announcement. Easter weekend Rodeo events, 6:30 p.m. nightly, feature Pastor Rick Lane of Amazing Horse Ministries, Friday, April 18 showing how his wild horse was tamed. The Circle Cross Cowboy Band performs Gospel music, Saturday, April 19. Walt’s Live Oak Ford is Vehicle Sponsor with the Main Gate Sponsor being Duke Energy. Chute Sponsors are Best Western, Busy Bee, Capital City Bank, Comcast Communications, Live Oak Pest Control and Stahl-Meyer Food. Event sponsors are A Main Street Realty, Buckeye Community FCU, Burger King, Burns Funeral Home, Lake Park of Madison, Madison County Community Bank, Madison Realty Group, NFCC, Odiorne Insurance, Townsend Livestock, Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park Camp-Resort and Citizens State Bank. Ticket Sponsor is Madison Veterinary Clinic. Rodeo tickets are available at the gate only: $12 for age 13 and up; $5 for ages 5-12; children under 4 are free. The Down Home Days Festival begins Saturday, April 19 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. with over 100 vendors on both sides of Range Avenue, closed south of Highway 90 past Macon Street. Go online www.madison.org Down Home Days tab, for more information. Story SubmittedMadison County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism OfceWith mouthwatering recipes, a select number of top area chefs will compete in the Down Home Days’ 2014 BBQ Cook-Off Contest, sponsored by Harvey’s Supermarket of Madison. BBQ Cook-Off chicken plates with all sides will be sold leading up to the Pet Contest Thursday, April 17, starting at 5 p.m. at Four Freedoms Park. The $50 entry fee for chefs includes chicken that will be provided. Prizes are $100 for First Place and $50 for Second Place. Entrants must bring their own tables, extension cords, grills and other supplies. Side dishes of slaw, beans and Texas Toast will be provided for the meals sold to the public. The event is hosted by Boyz to Kings and all proceeds benet this mentoring organization for young men in Madison County. For more information call the Madison County Chamber of Commerce at (850) 973-2788.Beckys Dance Steps Studio To Perform At Down Home Days Festival Down Home Days Down Home DaysBBQ Cook„Off Announced BBQ Cook„Off Announced

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE WANTED FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . 12A € Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, April 11, 2014 AUCTION FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 4/7/2014 THROUGH 4/13/2014 I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).3/26 rtn, n/c Deadline for Classifieds Every Monday and Wednesday 3:00 p.m. Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBe A CNA Would you like to work as a nursing assistant? Become a CNA. Quest Training offers a nurse taught, 40 hr. prep class. No GED required if age 18 yr. Day and Evening classes. 386-362-1065.4/2 4/30, pdSet Of New Tires For a Ford F150 Truck. Size 265/60/18. $400 for the set. Call (850) 464-7296.4/2, 4/9, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/cCDL Class A Driver Needed 2 years vari“ed experience. Runs mostly SE extended area. Good 2 year MVR. Blue Cross and blue shield health insurance offered. (850) 929-2279.4/11 rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Our newspaper of“ce is seeking an outstanding individual to join or sales team. Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a good personality and LOVE to talk on the telephone? If you are a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, have a friendly can-doattitude, a great work ethic, are organized, and self-motivated then this job might be just for you. Valid Drivers License a must! Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper of“ce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison. Too Much Junk? … Do you have a garage or barn or attic full of junk and want it clean? Granddads barn that needs to be cleaned or removed? Let us make you an offer on it all … And we clean it up at the same time. Call 850-973-7916 and leave a message.2/26 rtn, n/c We want your Ghosts!! We are collecting YOUR stories of Ghosts, Goblins, Spooks, Specters, Aliens, Haunted Houses, Paranormal Events, Angels, and any other Supernatural Tales from Madison County and surrounding counties. We want personal experiences, legends, and family traditions. Call 850-973-7916 and leave a message.2/26 rtn, n/cQueen Pillow Top Mattress and Box Set New, still in company plastic. $195 obo. (850) 596-6437.3/14 4/9, pdBusy medical practice looking for part-time medical assistance. Send resume to CIMG 293 W Base Street Madison, Fl 32340.4/2, 4/9, c RN On Call Madison County This PRN position will provide evening and weekend On Call for Madison County primarily and occasionally may provide on call coverage for Taylor or Jefferson County. Must have current Florida RN license. BSN preferred. Minimum of 3 years of experience preferably in Hospice or home health. Interested candidates can fax their resume to (850)325-6290 or email to grace@bigbendhospice.org RN On Call Jefferson County This PRN position will provide evening and weekend On Call for Jefferson County primarily and occasionally may provide on call coverage for Taylor or Madison County. Must have current Florida RN license. BSN preferred. Minimum of 3 years of experience preferably in Hospice or home health. Interested candidates can fax their resume to (850)325-6290 or email to grace@bigbendhospice.org EOE/DFWP4/2, 4/9, c Set of four (4) “Weld” (Mountain Crusher) billet aluminum wheels 8 lug with bolt on center caps. Fits Dodge or Chevy. $200 OBO. Call (229) 460-5296.3/26 rtn, n/c AUCTION SATURDAY APRIL 12 AT 6:30 P.M. MADISON AUCTION HOUSE. 1693 SW MOSELEY HALL RD (CR360) 850 973-1444 SELLING ITEMS FOR HOME, YARD AND SHOP. TO MANY ITEMS TO LIST. SAVE OVER STORE PRICES AND HAVE SOME FUN. 10% BUYERS PREMIUM. MC, VISA, DISCOVER, DEBIT CARDS, CHECKS AND CASH ACCEPTED. AU3968 Brandon Mugge Auctioneer, AB2490.4/2, 4/9, pd Equipment operator needed minimum three years experience required. Mechanical experience a plus. Must be willing to work nights and weekends. Email resume to valdostamill@yahoo.com.4/2, 4/9, c Announcement Of Job Vacancy The Madison County Foundation for Excellence in Education is seeking a person to “ll the position of College Success Coach in their Take Stock in Children Program. The minimum educational requirement is a Bachelors degree, preferably in education or guidance. The deadline for applying is May 1, 2014. Anyone interested in an application should call Tim Sanders, (850) 464-1507 or Jo Willis, (850) 973-8583.4/4, 4/9, c A few chickens and a rooster for my yard. (850) 661-6868.4/9 rtn, n/cJMPHS is accepting applications for teachers, guidance/teacher, and administrative assistant. Please see www.jmphs.org for more information. JMPHS is a tuition-free public charter school that does not discriminate regarding employment or educational programs.4/9, 4/16, cNorth Florida Community College, Madison FL., has the following positions available: Project Coordinator of Healthcare Information Program; and Automation and Production Technology (APT) Instructor. See www.nfcc.edu for details. Staff Assistant position available at North Florida Community College. See www.nfcc.edu for details.4/9 4/23, cEmployment Opportunity Town Manager/Clerk Town of Lee is currently seeking a proven professional for the position of Town Manager/Clerk. Commission-Town Manager form of government. $1 million budget includes 6 departments (administration, public works, water, sewer, streets, and recreation services). Successful applicant must possess strong communication, leadership, organization, management, and computer skills. Knowledge in preparation and execution of budgets, QuickBooks (including payroll), water, sewer, public works, recreation and land planning is needed. Email your resume to leemanager@leeorida.org or apply at Town Hall, 286 NE CR 255, Lee FL 32059, Monday … Friday, 8:00 am … 5:00 pm. Copies of the full job description and application can be found on the towns website: ( www.leeorida.org ). The Town expects to ll the position by June 16th, 2014. Applications for this position are due no later than 5pm on April 30th, 2014. Salary Range: $25,000 to $28,000 The Town of Lee is a drug free workplace and an Equal Opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or disability. Applications Accepted For Open Positions Only.4/9, c RN’s & PCT’s Needed! If you love patient-centered health care with real relationships inside a company that encourages fun on and off the clock, then DaVita is the place for you. We offer career options to “t your lifestyle! DaVita has openings now in Madison, for RN & PCT. The hours are M-W-F 5 a.m. … 5 p.m. Dialysis experience is strongly preferred but DaVita will train. Why wait? Explore a career with DaVita today! Apply online at: http://careers.davita.com or contact Tiffy Christian at 877-482-7625. DaVita is an Equal Opportunity Employer. http://careers.davita.com 2011 DaVita Inc. All rights reserved.4/9, 4/16, c Auctions Absolute Auction-Black Warrior River, creek, Us Hwy 78,Walker County, Alabama parcels ,Jasper residential lots, April 17,1:00 pm-Details Gtauctions.com 205.326.0833-Granger, Thagard&Assoc, Inc, Jack F Granger#873. Educational Services AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for quali“ed students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-741-9260 www.FixJets.com. Help Wanted ATTN: Drivers! Bring a Rider! $$$ Up to 50 cpm $$$ BCBS + 401k + Pet & Rider Quality Hometime Orientation Sign On Bonus CDL-A Req 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com. Averitt Express has New Dedicated CDL-A Driver Opportunities w/Excellent Bene“ts & Regular Hometime. 855-430-8869 AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer Females, minorities, protected veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. CDL-A Team Owner Operators: $2,500 Lease Incentive! Team Dedicated Routes. Great Revenue & Regular Weekly Home Time! 888-486-5946 NFI Industries npartners.com. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Quali“ed drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Miscellaneous Miss Sunshine Pop Star Music Pageant. Hey Girls! Here's Your Chance Win $5,000 Cash, a Recording Contract, and Much More Prizes! 18+ Only Call (904) 246-8222 CypressRecords.com. NURSING CAREERS begin here Get trained in months, not years. Small classes, no waiting list. Financial aid for quali“ed students. Apply now at Centura Institute Orlando (888) 220-3219. Real Estate NEAR BOONE, NC 2+/ac. tract 350ft of rushing streams 3000ft elevation private and secluded underground utilities and paved roads from only $9900. Call 1-877-717-5273 ext 91. Real Estate/ Lots & Acreage Tennessee Log Home Sale! Saturday April 12th Only. New 1200 sf ready to “nish log cabin on 10 acres with FREE Boat Slip on 160,000 acre recreational lake. Only $89,900. Excellent “nancing. Call now 877-888-0267, x76.

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www.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder € 13A ----Legals---IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF OLIN HARRELL GODWIN, Deceased. File No. 2014-31-CP Division Probate NOTICE TO CREDITORS (summary administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby noti“ed that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of OLIN HARRELL GODWIN deceased, File Number 2014-31-CP, by the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 125 SW Range Avenue, Madison, Florida 32340 ; that the decedents date of death was December 28, 2013 ; that the total value of the estate is $8,000.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Kenneth Gregory Godwin 5538 Union Road and Tammy B. Godwin, his wife Hahira, Georgia 31632 Michael H. Godwin 4248 Louis Drive And Jayne C. Godwin, his wife Valdosta, Georgia 31605 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must “le their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of “rst publication of this Notice is April 11 2014. Attorney for Person Giving Notice:Person Giving Notice: RICHARD L. COLEMANKENNETH GREGORY GODWIN Attorney for the Petitioner5538 Union Road, Hahira, Coleman Talley, LLPGeorgia 31632 richard.coleman@colemantalley.com 910 North Patterson Street Valdosta, Georgia 31601 MICHAEL H. GODWIN (229) 242-7562, 4248 Louis Drive, Valdosta, (229) 333-0885 facsimile Georgia 31605 Florida Bar No. 0781568 4/11, 4/18

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14A € Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 The All New 2015 Tahoe & Suburban 2014 RAM 1500 CREWAll prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or Valdosta dealerships. All prices good through April 12, 2014 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Truck prices include $500 rebate when financed with Chrysler Capital. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised pric e. 2013-2014 Motor Trend of the Year Back-to-Back First Time Ever per Motor Trend Magazine. 2014 RAM 2500 4 DOOR 4X4 HEAVY DUTYV1402845.7L HEMI, AUTO, HEATED LEATHER BUCKETS, REMOTE STARTNAVI ,20 Ž CHROME WHEELS, REAR BACK-UP CAMERAMSRP $44,745 DISC. -$5,953 2014 RAM 1500 LARAMIE 4 DR Q1401382014 DODGE AVENGER Q1401112014 RAM 1500 QUAD Q140098 V140148 Q140044 2013 DODGE DART V130392 888-304-2277801 E. SCREVEN ST € QUITMAN, GA888-463-68314164 N. VALDOSTA RD. € VALDOSTA, GA 229-263-7561 8640 HWY 84 WESTAll prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or Valdosta dealerships.Vehicle prices include Trade-In & GM Loyalty Rebate (owners of 1999 or newer GM vehicles. All prices good through April 12, 2014 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. 2014 CHEVY CRUZE 1.8L ECOTEC ENGINEAUTO TRANSMISSIONPOWER EQUIPMENT GROUPON-STAR SIRIUS SATELLITE RADO 2014 CHEVY SONIC LTC140154 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DR LTALL-STAR EDITION 18 Ž ALUM WHEELS, REAR CAMERA REMOTE START & MORE! MSRP: $37,120 DISC. $7,132 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DR LT 4X4 2014 SILVERADO 1500 C140162 2014 CHEVY EQUINOX 32 MPG (PER WINDOW STICKER) BLUE TOOTH WIRELESSUSB PORT, 2.4L SIDI SIRIUS/MP3 PLAYERALL-STAR EDITION 5.3L V8 18 Ž ALUM WHEELS, REAR CAMERA REMOTE START, NAVI & MORE! MSRP $41,725 -DISC. $7,732 C140066860539 2014 CHEVY MALIBUC1401082014 DODGE JOURNEY V140068 2014 RAM 1500 Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2014 2014 RAM 3500 DUALLY 4 DOOR HEAVY DUTYQ1401276.7L CUMMIN DIESEL, REAR BACK-UP CAMERA, TRAILER BRAKE CONTROL 5TH WHEEL/GOOSENECK TOW GROUP, CHROME GROUPMSRP $48,205 DISC. -$6,451 2014 CHEVY CAMARO Everyone Knows Chevys Cost Less In Quitman!!! C150006 2015 SILVERADO 2500HD 4 DR 4X4 2015 CHEVY SUBURBAN2015 CHEVY TAHOE Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2013 2014 GRAND CARAVAN Q140042 Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2013 Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2014Supplier PricingƒYou Pay What We Pay! Over to Choose from! 2014 CHEVY IMPALAC140147 Huge Selection! Over Rams to Choose From!!! 2014 JEEP PATRIOT V140398 2014 JEEP CHEROKEE V140369 V1304322013 200 CONVERTIBLE 2013 DODGE CHALLENGER R/T 5.7L HEMI 20 Ž CHROME WHEELS NAVI, LOADED! MSRP $37,065 DISC -$4,168 V130397

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M M a a d d i i s s o o n n E E n n t t e e r r p p r r i i s s e e R R e e c c o o r r d d e e r r S S e e c c t t i i o o n n B B A A p p r r i i l l 1 1 1 1 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 4 4 Health Health And AndWellness Wellness Guide Guide

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2014 Health & Wellness 2B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, April 11, 2014

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2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, April 11, 2014 € 3B From the office of: Morgan Family Dentistry 10820 Marvin Jones Blvd Dowling Park, FL 32064 386-658-5870 AGD: FACTSHEETCompiled for you by the Academy of General Dentist r

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Dry eye is a very common disorder in today’s world, affecting all age groups. A person may experience the feeling of something like sand in their eyes, burning or itching. Some people experience blurred vision or excess tearing, and may not associate those symptoms with dryness. The causes of dry eye include aging, medications (especially certain blood pressure, antidepressants and antihistamines), and medical conditions such as arthritis and diabetes. Women frequently experience dry eye during pregnancy, menopause or using birth control pills. Long term computer use or TV viewing decreases blinking, which is required to spread tears over the eyes. Overhead fans save on energy bills but can cause dry eye symptoms, while windy, dry, low humidity days will do the same. The main treatment for dry eye symptoms is the addition of artificial tear drops to the tears on the front of the eye. Some people with more chronic or advanced dry eye need prescription eye drops. One form of drop actually makes the body produce more tears. Another type of drop reduces inflammation and irregularities on the front of the eye so that tears can spread more evenly. An approach to keep more tears on the front of the eye is to plug the tear draining canals. This can be done with plugs inserted into the canal, or closing the canals surgically. There is now evidence that omega 3 fatty acids help to increase tear production. This can be achieved by diet or supplements. Since dry eye is so common, if you experience any of the above symptoms, you should not suffer with it, but visit your eye doctor for the appropriate treatment. 2014 Health & Wellness 4B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, April 11, 2014 Helen King Symptoms, Causes and Treatments Dry Eyes:

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2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, April 11, 2014 € 5B Madison County Memorial Hospital Is Nearing Completion Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, April 3, 2014Shown above is the front main entrance to the new, almost completed Madison County Memorial Hospital. By Jessie R. Box Greene Publishing, Inc Ted Ensminger, Director of Marketing, expects patient transfers to begin August 1, 2014. The new hospital still has a ways to go. There are places where the ceiling is not installed and the flooring has not been started. The elevators are expected to be operational by June 15. May 15 is the expected date for the new hospital equipment to be installed. All wiring and plumbing is installed but are unusable until the building is inspected. “What we are focusing on is what we refer to as holistic care,” said Ensminger. “What holistic care means is not just healing the body but healing the mind and the spirit as well. Taking care of the emotional needs of the patients as best as we possibly can.” The hospital will begin the construction tours on April 21 through May 15. Women are not allowed any open-toed shoes, as it will still be a construction site. The completed tours begin after May 15. Anyone who cannot climb stairs is asked to wait until the elevators are operating.

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6B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, April 11, 2014 2014 Health & Wel lness

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2014 Health & WellnessMadison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, April 11, 2014 € 7B By Carol KatzOrganizations across the Big Bend area come together each year to honor their volunteers as part of April’s Volunteer Appreciation Month. This year Big Bend Hospice will show our appreciation to over 400 volunteers from our eight-county service areas. For over 30 years, Big Bend Hospice has been providing compassionate care to those facing a life-limiting illness. But through our Volunteer Program, we also provide others with the opportunity to increase their quality of life. Volunteering is more than just helping others. Volunteering is important in that it goes a long way towards creating a healthy community. When people get together for a common mission, things get done more efficiently. In a time when resources can be scarce and the economy is questionable, volunteers become more valuable than ever before. People who volunteer get connected to others, strengthen friendships and build self-confidence. Volunteering showcases someone’s gratitude and gives them an outlet to give back. Volunteers with Big Bend Hospice give others hope. A person will be uplifted when they realize that there are people who will help them out. It brings back their faith in the goodness of people and makes them aware that not everything is about money. Volunteer opportunities through Big Bend Hospice allow people to share their creative gifts like photography, quilting and scrapbooking. They can offer practical tasks such as cooking, running errands and light housekeeping. BBH Volunteers can also participate in relationship-building activities such as sitting vigil through the last few hours of life, providing respite to a caregiver or visiting patients in their homes or at the Margaret Z. Dozier Hospice House in Tallahassee. More than anything, volunteering emboldens the human spirit, whether through Big Bend Hospice or other nonprofit organizations. The selfless act of helping another person provides a spiritual boost. Knowing you did something good for someone or some cause is an emotionally uplifting experience that can never be matched by money or fame. So in honor of Volunteer Appreciation month, I encourage you to look into volunteering if you’re not already and more importantly, thank someone you know who volunteers. Carol Katz is the Team Manager for Jefferson/Madison/Ta ylor Counties of Big Bend Hospice. Big Bend Hospice has been serving this community since 1983 with compassionate end-of-life care along with grief and loss counselors available to provide information and support to anyone in Leon, Jefferson, Taylor, Madison, Gadsden, Liberty, Franklin or Wakulla County. If you would like additional information about services, please call (850) 878-5310 or visit www.bigbendhospice.org. The Benefits Of Volunteering “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” – Norman MacEwan Carol Katz

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By: Ron Pollack Have you started to experience challenges with living on your own? Do you need help with medical care or daily activities? A nursing home may seem like your only option. But there are good alternatives, including home care and assisted living. However, it's important for you to learn what kinds of services Medicare and Medicaid will and won't cover. (Medicaid is the nation's health insurance program for low-income individuals and families—including seniors—and for people with disabilities.) What is homeand community-based care? You may have access to services such as Meals on Wheels, visiting and shopper services, and adult day care programs. But what if you need other kinds of assistance? Home health services (also called homeand community-based care) help seniors who need additional support so they can safely stay in their homes or who are recovering after a hospital stay These services include short-term nursing care and rehabilitative care (like physical therapy). Registered nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, home health aides and medical social workers provide home health care. Medicare pays for a limited number of one-hour home health visits, but only for medical care. Medicaid may pay for other types of home care, depending on your situation and the state you live in. You may be able to find other nonmedical services in your community through your local Area Agency on Aging. What is assisted living? Assisted living facilities (or assisted living homes) bridge the gap between independent living and nursing homes. These facilities typically provide services like assistance with personal care and medications, and they give residents more freedom and privacy than nursing homes. They range in size from small houses that serve a few residents to very large facilities with hundreds of residents. Assisted living facilities cost less than nursing homes but are still very expensive, costing an average of $3,300 a month. What do Medicare and Medicaid pay for nursing home care and nursing home alternatives? Many people are confused about what Medicare and Medicaid cover. Nursing Home Care Medicare does not cover most nursing home care. Medicare pays only for certain skilled nursing or rehabilitative care, and only after a hospital stay The duration of this coverage is limited. To learn more about coverage limits, visit the Medicare website at http://www.medicare.gov/coverage/skilled-nursing-facility-care.html. Medicaid covers most nursing home care if you have a low income. Each state sets its own income eligibility level for Medicaid coverage of nursing home care. In many states, you must also have limited assets to have Medicaid cover your nursing home care. Alternatives to Nursing Home Care Medicare covers very little of this care. For example, Medicare won't pay your rent for an assisted living facility, but it will cover some health care you receive while you are in assisted living. Medicaid pays for some assisted living costs for people with low incomes in several states. Every state has at least one Medicaid program that will pay for other alternatives to nursing facility care, and most have multiple programs. Each state's program is different. Plus, individuals must meet the eligibility rules for that particular program. For example, some programs focus on individuals with particular health care needs. And some programs are limited to a certain number of people, which creates waiting lists. Many people end up paying the full cost of assisted living entirely out of their own pockets. To Learn More To learn more about Medicare and Medicaid coverage of nursing home care, assisted living, and other options, contact your State Health Insurance Assistance Program, or SHIP. SHIPs offer free counseling and assistance by phone and in person. Find the SHIP in your state online at https://shipnpr .shiptalk.org/shipprofile.aspx Also, the Eldercare Locator connects older Americans and their caregivers with information on senior services. Find it online at http://www.eldercare.gov/eldercare.net/Public/Index.aspx. 2014 Health & Wellness 8B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, April 11, 2014 William R. Howard, M.D.Board CertifiedDermatologistSpecializing In The Diagnosis And Treatment Of Skin CancerNew Patients Welcome(229) 247-25952704 N or th O a k St B-2 € V aldo st a, GA 31602 ALTERNATIVES TO NURSING HOME CARE When You Need A Little Help:

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The Arc of Florida, The Arc Big Bend and Florida Developmental Disabilities Council today unveiled a plan designed to ensure that Floridians with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) are fully included in their communities and not segregated in institutions and nursing homes. The four-part Invest in Florida’s Communities plan includes Medicaid Waiver Waitlist Funding, Increased Rates for Services, Community-Based Services and Alternative Family Homes. “We encourage lawmakers and Governor Scott to take this opportunity to invest in our communities and protect some of Florida’s most vulnerable citizens,” said Pat Young, President of The Arc of Florida. “This plan will keep individuals with developmental disabilities out of institutions and allow them to become contributing members of society.” The Arc Big Bend is proud that our local governments have adopted Resolutions acknowledging March as Developmental Disabilities Awareness month. We hope that the local government and our community as a whole will support the Invest in Florida’s Communities plan for those members of our community that face these challenges on a daily basis. Here is a breakdown of the Invest in Florida’s Communities plan: Medicaid Waiver Waitlist Funding Florida must invest in Medicaid Waiver Waitlist Funding by supporting the Governor’s recommendation for $20 million in funding for the 2014 – 2015 fiscal year. The current Developmental Disabilities Medicaid Waiver system and long waitlist for services is inadequately funded to meet the health, safety and basic rights of individuals with I/DD. Funding is essential to providing necessary services and supports to Floridians with I/DD. Increased Rates for Services Florida must increase provider rates by five percent for the 2014-2015 fiscal year and the funding for this should not be taken away from current client services. The Arc of Florida also supports building a plan to continue to increase rates in the coming years and increasing all provider rates to at least minimum wage. Florida must invest in provider rate increases so individuals with I/DD are served by qualified and quality professionals. Right now, professionals working with Floridians with I/DD make less money than employees at fast food restaurants, although they are responsible for lives and required to have a much higher level of training. Payments for Floridians with I/DD in residential settings currently range from as low as $3.01 per hour for basic care to $11.04 per hour to care for the most involved individuals. Community-Based Services Florida must support the request to the Agency for Persons with Disabilities to create and implement a comprehensive five-year plan to reduce the number of people with I/DD living in Florida institutions. The plan will include a review of the cost of serving individuals in state institutions compared to community-based settings. Florida must invest in community-based services so people are not institutionalized. This will benefit both individuals with I/DD and taxpayers. Florida taxpayers would save at least $61 million per year by funding community-based services as opposed to institutional placements. There are approximately 677 individuals with I/DD living in Florida public institutions. The average cost of living in an institution is about $120,000 per year per person, while community-based services are $30,000 per person annually. Alternative Family Homes Florida must make funding and services available to families caring for children who are medically fragile so they can leave nursing homes and return to their communities. There are 149 children with medically complex conditions living in skilled nursing facilities in Florida. Families wishing to keep their children with extensive medical needs at home should be able to do so. The Arc of Florida also believes families wishing to adopt children with extensive medical needs should be able to do so.The Arc of Florida, Inc., is a non-profit organization whose mission is to improve the quality of life for persons with developmental disabilities. Working with local, state and national partners, The Arc of Florida advocates for local chapters, public policies and high quality supports for people with developmental and other disabilities to be fully included in all aspects of their community. Find out how to get involved by visiting www.arcflorida.org. 2014 Health & WellnessMadison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, April 11, 2014 € 9B Developmental Disability Advocates Urge Lawmakers To Invest In Florida’s Communities

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By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc. A Health Education Expo, sponsored by Healthcare Workforce Network and North Florida Community College (NFCC) Allied Health Programs of Madison was held April 4 on the Madison Courthouse lawn. The expo started at 10 a.m., and ran until 2 p.m., where student groups from NFCC programs assisted Madison residents and other attendees of the expo with blood pressure and blood sugar checks, handed out information to participants on ways to increase healthy lifestyle habits and prevention of diseases as well as offering information on the college’s health-based programs. Other organizations who participated in the expo and offered information on health and health services were Tri-County Family Health Center, Saint Leo University, Madison Health and Rehabilitation, Curves Fitness Center, Little Pine Pediatrics, Madison County Memorial Hospital, Big Bend Hospice and the Madison County Health Department, represented by the department programs of: Whole Child TriCounty, Healthy Start, Tobacco Free Madison and the Madison Abstinence Program. After registering, attendees were given a check-off card as an incentive for them to receive all the information and take advantage of all the services offered. When a participant’s card was full of check marks, they returned to the registration table to receive a gift for attending. Since the expo ran through the lunch hour, the LPN class of NFCC was selling chicken and rice dinners in an effort to raise money for their graduation and testing expenses, helping both the class and hungry visitors alike. 10B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, April 11, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness Successful In Keeping Madison Residents InformedHealth EducationExpo Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, April 4, 2014NFCCs Pharmacy Technician class was at the expo, teaching medication safety. Standing left to right in the front row are Ralaysha Daniels, Shatoria Menchan, Rebecca Jackson, Cherry Johnson and Sydnee Jacobs. The instructor for the class, Mekia Jackson, is in the back. story cont. on page 11B

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2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, April 11, 2014 € 11B Expo continued from page 10B Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, April 4, 2014The Madison County Health Department Abstinence Program directors were on hand to speak to attendees about prevention of sexually transmitted diseases and to promote healthy attitudes on abstinence. Speaking to attendees were, from left to right, Merv Mattair and Pam Robinson. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, April 4, 2014The Medical Administrative Specialists were in charge of registration at the expo. Sitting at the table from left to right are Emily Parsons and Paula McGhee. In the middle row, from left to right are RN and class instructor Tammy Kemp, Susie Hernandez, Pamela Barron, DeAnna Haynes, Gail Crawford, Leola Seabrooks and Aaron Thomas. In the back row, from left to right are Sharell Miller, Lisa West, Laverne Smith and Shirley L. Mattair. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, April 4, 2014Attending the expo and having her blood sugar tested is Cynthia Francis-Ensminger (seated) and LPN student Kasey Kelley, representing NFCC.

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12B € Madison Enterprise-Recorder € Friday, April 11, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness



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By Bryant ThigpenCourtesy of The Suwannee DemocratALive Oak man walked out of a Suwannee County courtroom Thursday evening a free man after being on trial for two counts of capital rst degree murder. It took a jury nearly seven hours to render a verdict in the case of State of Florida versus Marcus Nathaniel Cole. The 12 member panel found Cole not guilty on both counts. Following the reading of the verdict, family members of the two brothers that were shot and killed by Cole were emotionally vocal to both jury and Cole. Cole, 41, was hosting a party and cookout at his home on 225thRoad on Jan. 26, 2013. At approximately 10 p.m., six of the partygoers got into a ght, according to reports from the Suwannee County Sheriffs Ofce. Shortly after the ght had broken up, Cole went into his home and retrieved a 30.06 rie and shot and killed Mike Williams, 46, and his brother, Abram Williams, 41. Mike and Abram Williams were the sons of Kenny Williams, who grew up in Lee. The brothers were also kin to a host of other relatives in the Madison County community. Third Judicial Circuit Assistant State Attorney Craig Jacobsen and John Weed represented the state of Florida. Attorneys John Hendrick, David Valin and Jonathan Austin of the Third Judicial Circuit Public Defenders Ofce, represented Marcus Cole. Day 1 March 25 Day one began with opening statements from Jacobsen and Hendrick. The state then called Sharmee Greer Williams, who was married to Abe Williams at the time of the shooting, as their rst witness. According to Sharmee Williams, Karen Thompson, who was in charge of the cooking for the party, invited Sharmee and her husband to come over, and said it was OK for friend, David Fillyaw and Abes brother, Michael Williams, who was with them, to come along. On the stand, Sharmee testied everyone in the vehicle had been at a previous party where alcoholic beverages were involved, and stated she had roughly eight to nine beers at that party. Sharmee stated she met Marcus Cole through Karen at a previous cookout. Her recollection of the night was they arrived at the Cole residence around 9:30-10 p.m. She observed people drinking upon their arrival. Sharmee said a ght broke out and she did not know why, but she observed Marcus and David ghting. She said she then told her husband, Abe Williams, Lets get out of here. She said when she got into a truck, Abe was there and Mike was following behind. She said they were going to leave when Mike Williams got into the truck. Abe Williams was sitting in the drivers seat and Sharmee was in the passenger seat. She testied she watched her brother-in-law Mike Williams fall to the ground. While sitting in the truck, Abe looked over at her and reportedly said, What the (censored), and thats when she said Abe Williams was shot in the head by Marcus. Abe was transported to a Gainesville hospital, but she did not get to ride with him in the ambulance. Abe later died from his injuries. The state called William Cimiotta as their second witness, who was reportedly living at the Cole residence at the time of the shooting along with his wife, Kayla. Marcus was his step-father at that time. William Cimiotta testied to being at the party for the entire evening and said there was beer, vodka and marijuana at the party. He said he and Kayla had not been drinking. William Cimiotta said those that arrived at the party had appeared to have been drinking. William Cimiotta said Mike Williams said some inappropriate things to his mother which caused things to escalate. A ght broke out, and he said Marcus later appeared to have grease on him. William Cimiotta reportedly told Marcus to go inside and clean off and he did so. While Marcus was inside the mobile home, William Cimiotta said he attempted to break up the ght. He testied the ght soon ended. Karen was attending to Josh White who had been cut, and Marcus was still in the home at that time. He said three people were getting in their vehicle and were getting ready to leave. Abe and Sharmee were in the vehicle and Mike was walking toward the vehicle. He said he then saw Marcus with the rie and tried snatching the gun away from him but was not successful. William Cimiotta said he told him, We can do this another way. William Cimiotta recalled Marcus then saying a few words to him before pulling the trigger. William Cimiotta said Marcus then went back in the front door after he shot the two victims. He testied he Our 149th Year, Number 31www.greenepublishing.com Since 1865, Telling It Lie It Is And Defending The Peasant's Right To Know Index2 Sections, 26 Pages Local WeatherViewpoints 2A Around Madison 3-6A, 10-11A Health 7A Outdoors 8AVisit St. Augustine 9A Classieds 12A Legals 13A Health Guide Section BFriday, April 11, 2014Madison, Florida Georgia Johnson, New Centenarian, Is Honored With Resolution Georgia Johnson, (ne Hudson), born and raised in Madison County, recently celebrated her 100thbirthday (March 29, 2014) with friends and family. In her honor, the County Commission drafted Resolution No. 2014-04-09A, in recognition of a life well-lived and worthy of an expression of appreciation for her contributions to Madison County and the people that reside in it. A longtime member of Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church, she married another lifelong Madison resident, William Johnson, Jr., and they were blessed with six children, 14 grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Shown below, left to right, County Commission Chair Justin Hamrick presents the newly-signed resolution, a way of saying thank you and a gesture of admiration, respect and appreciation, to two of her family members, son-in-law George Jesse Anderson and daughter Pauline Miller. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, April 9, 2014 Madison County Memorial Hospital Name Not ChangingBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. Madison County Memorial Hospital name will not change when moved to the new building. Several months ago, it was decided that the name would change to Faith Community Hospital at Madison. After receiving input from several members of our community and from the Madison County Board of County Commissioners, our hospital board met and conferred and decided that in the best interest of continuity and preserving history, the name of the new hospital would continue toSee MCMH On Page 3A Williams Brothers Killer Found Not GuiltySee Not Guilty On Page 3ACounty To Keep In-Town Shuttle Rolling Another YearBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.During a recent trip to Winn-Dixie, County Commissioner Ronnie Moore, who also serves on the Transportation Disadvantaged Committee, decided on that location to take a ride on Big Bend Transit's InTown Shuttle and talk to some of the people who use the service and see how they would be affected if the bus were no longer available. The shuttle has suf-See Shuttle On Page 3A Mobile Office To Be In Madison Monday, April 14Astaff member from Senator Marco Rubios ofce will be available on Monday, April 14, from 10 a.m. until noon at the Madison County Courthouse, Room 110, to meet one-on-one with citizens needing assistance in dealing with a federal agency. For more information, call (850) 599-9100. Madison County Building Department Issued 59 PermitsBy Jessie R. BoxGreene Publishing, Inc. The March permit report for Madison County Building Department shows that there was a total of 59 permits issued. New residential construction had two permits issued. For the two new residential construction permits, the total valuation of construction was $500,122 and the total square feet of living area was 9,692. There were no commercial projects for March. The electrical permits were the highest of permits issued with 19 in total. Mechanical per-See Permits On Page 3A Ready For The Big ShowGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, April 9, 2014Getting ready for their Palm Sunday weekend concerts, the Madison Boys Choir tries out the stage at the RATT Pact Theater where the shows will be presented this weekend, Friday evening, April 11, at 7 p.m., Saturday afternoon April 12 at 3 p.m., and again that evening at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 each. Contact Tim Dunn at (850) 973-6665.

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When I was a wee little tot Im not exactly sure but probably no more than five or eight my grandmother had a chicken pen and coup behind her house. Come to think of it, I dont know if I can remember a time that there was not a chicken pen of some version on that farm, either at my grandmothers house or down at the barn. But when I was really young, it was behind my grandmothers house, along with a pear tree, a fig tree and two cumquat trees, all of which I loved to pick and eat. But I digress. This story is not about pears, figs or cumquats. It is about chickens and eggs. As I said above, at the time of this storys origin, I must have been about five or so, no more than eight. My grandmother had gone out back to the pen to gather the eggs, and I had bounded with her. This was probably not my first time doing this, because I dont remember there being anything special in the beginning, and of course it was certainly not my last trip to the chicken pen. But assuredly it was one of my most important. As I was walking around the pen, holding the basket for my grandmother like the big little boy I was, I tripped on something and fell. I do not remember what made me fall now, and I am sure it is not really the important part. But trip and fall I did. Basket, eggs and Harvey all went flying and tumbling into the dirt and mud of the chicken pen. I skinned my knees and elbows, and spilt my basket. The chickens immediately rushed in and began pecking at the broken egg matter on the ground. I dont know for sure, of course, but I suppose that is one thing that chickens live for to frighten young egg stealers. Well, frighten me they did. Today I am not sure what made me cry more, the bruises and scrapes, or the broken eggs, or the fear of all the chickens around me pecking at everything. Some things from this event I no longer remember. But some things I very much remember. I remember sitting and crying. I remember a strong pair of hands lifting me up and standing me back onto my feet. I remember looking up into the eyes of my father, and beside him over his shoulder, my grandfather. I do not remember them being in the pen originally, but I remember looking up at those two men who were looking back at me. And as my fathers strong pair of hands placed the little boy back on his feet, and dusted him off, I remember my fathers words. Son, his voice both kind and stern, both velvet and steel. In this life as you grow up, there will be lots of times when you trip and fall. And things will break. And there will be people who will rush at you while you are down, and it will scare you. It isnt bad to fall. We all fall down sometimes. What matters is that you dont let it scare you, and that you get back up. Do you understand? I nodded, sniffling back the tears. I am not sure how much I really understood then or not. But I wanted to. Good. How about you and your grandmother get the rest of the eggs then, huh? I remember my grandfather patting my father on the back and looking up into his eyes with a certain look on his face. That look meant nothing to me then of course. But since then I have felt that same look on my own face, directed at each of my children, whether they were present or not, when something I heard or saw or read showed them to be the adult I had hoped they would become. They have each received it more than once. I know that look now. But I have always remembered my fathers words from that day. It doesnt matter that we fall down. It doesnt matter that falling down may hurt. We all fall down sometimes. And there are always people that will rush in to peck at us while we are down. None of that matters, because no matter what we do, sooner or later it will happen, and probably more than once. What matters is that we get back up. Think about it.Have you ever felt like you have poured your heart and soul into your job or into your family and friends but felt like they don't appreciate you? Well, you're in good company. Around 2,000 years ago, not just any ordinary man rode into Jerusalem, as the crowds threw palm fronds and their clothes down in front of him. The man was not riding on just any ordinary animal. He was riding on a donkey that had not yet been broke. The crowd was ecstatic as it screamed, Hosanna, proclaiming that the Messiah had come. How many times have you felt like this, riding high like you had the world by the reins? Those times are much more memorable than the times when you feel abused, neglected or hurt by your comrades. I know I cherish my victories a lot more than my defeats. Jesus Christ rode into Jerusalem on that Palm Sunday. By Friday, he would be hanging on a cross, after being beaten, scourged and spat upon by people who may have been in the crowd, cheering his entry into Jerusalem. He had been betrayed by one of the people closest to Him, sold out for money. No matter how bad our suffering and complaining about lack of appreciation may be, it can be nothing compared to what Christ went through. He had performed miracles, He had raised the dead, yet His followers had turned from Him. Don't you know that hurt? When I am hurt by someone I feel the closest to, I try and remember what Christ had to go through. Many times, I fail to do that and get hurt even more. I am sorry that Christ had to suffer such shame and such pain and that I was responsible for it, too, with my sins. They may have come 2,000 years later, but Christ knew what He was doing and who He was doing it for. He was doing it for me and for you and whosoever will turn from His sins. Do you know Christ as your Savior? If you do, are you living for Him? Are you telling others of His amazing saving love. If not, begin doing it today. April is National Financial Literacy Month, a designation passed by the U.S. House of Representatives to raise public awareness about the importance of nancial education. Everyday Americans make nancial decisions that affect our long term nancial stability. According to supporters of the resolution, nancial literacy is an issue that demands our attention because many Americans are not adequately managing their nances for education, healthcare and retirement. According to national surveys, the savings rate is low, while Americans owe over $850 billion in credit card debt. To complicate matters, while the mortgage industry is slowly coming out of a crisis, foreclosures are still high. All of these issues increase the need for consumer knowledge of money and nance. Education is the key to help move Americans toward improved spending and saving habits and raise the level of money invested in retirement plans. And, it is never too early to encourage long-term savings for future goals. According to the National Endowment for Financial Education, surveys show as few as ten hours of education can inuence the practices and nancial knowledge of young people. Some good news on the educational front, during this legislative session, a bill passed requiring a course in nancial education for all high school students in the state of Florida. This is a major step in the right direction, however, nancial education should be an integral component of the entire educational system, Pre-K through the 12thgrade. Financial literacy needs to start early in a childs life. Early decisions about how to spend an allowance gives a child practice in decision making skills. Parents can help kids practice the concepts of planned spending and saving for a future purchase, a simple piggy bank can be the rst step. All consumers, regardless of age, need to understand the decision making process of spending, saving and wise use of credit. As consumers, adults need to sharpen their shopping skills and learn all they can about managing money and making sound nancial decisions. To learn more about managing money, contact the Madison County Extension ofce. We have consumer information to help you get organized and headed down the path of nancial stability.The University of Florida Extension/Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution.Viewpoints & Opinions2A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Read Jacobs blog at www.jacobbembry.com. His book, Higher Call, is available in Kindle format at www.amazon.com or in paperback at www.amazon.com, www.bn.com and www.booksamillion.com or by sending $10 plus $3.99 shipping and handling to Jacob Bembry, P.O. Box 9334, Lee, FL 32059. Contact him at jacobbembry@hotmail.com. Madison County Extension Service Jacobs Ladder Jacob BembryColumnist Conservative Corner Conservative CornerBy Nelson A. Pryor Diann DouglasGuest Columnist Something To Think AboutBy Harvey Greene Harvey GreeneGuest Columnist Water rarely flows in one of the streambeds it really seems to be a little more than a small ditch-that Dean Lemke points out to a visitor on his 800-acre farm in Dows, Iowa. I wouldnt even call it a stream, he said. There is only water flow in it when it rains. Mr. Lemke is a former Iowa state governmental official who supervised water-quality programs. He is also a fifth-generation farmer who grows corn and soybeans on his acreage, about 75 miles north of Des Moines, and he has never worried that the government would be concerned about that small ditch. But that will soon change. The Environmental Protection Agency is set to issue regulations that farmers like Mr. Lemke say may require them to get permits for work for which they have long been exempt. Pending the text of the EPA rules, farmers face a power grab of unknown proportions, that could stifle economic growth and intrude on property owners rights. Farmers are expecting fees for environmental assessments and to get permits just to till the soil near gullies, ditches, low spots or dry streambeds where water only collects or flows when it rains. The strangers on your land authorize permits for any activity, like farming or construction, that creates a discharge into a body of water covered under the Clean Water Act or affects the health of it, like filling in a wetland or blocking a stream. The proposed regulations have also raised concerns among industries beyond agriculture, and objections have been filed by several groups. To coordinate the opposition efforts, the New York Times of March 3, reports opposition groups joining forces with the American Farm Bureau Federation to create the Water Advocacy Coalition to lobby against increased environmental regulation. In a letter last month to the White House and members of Congress, the coalition said the agencys decision to move forward on the new rules failed to comply with regulatory requirements and relied on a flawed economic analysis concerning its effect on industry. The coalition also said the scientific report the agency and the Army Corps of Engineers relied on to justify the new rules had not been reviewed by other scientists. Several members of Congress have also weighed in. Representative Bill Shuster, a Pennsylvania Republican and chairman of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, said in a March 6 letter to the White House and Gina McCarthy, the EPA administrator, that the new water regulations were part of a pattern of an imperial presidency that seeks to use brute force and executive action while ignoring Congress. Representative Lamar Smith, a Texas Republican, said the regulations could be the largest expansion of EPA regulatory authority ever. Mr. Lemke is most concerned about planting seasons, with seasons delayed while the agency goes through the lengthy process to decide if a permit is needed to plow or plant near those usually dry water beds. He is not optimistic. The Unappreciated Strangers On Your Land THE MADISON COUNTY REPUBLICAN CLUB OF MADISON COUNTY Meets April 14, at 12 noon at Shelbys Restaurant. Speaker, Tommy Hardee, Supervisor Of ElectionsEVERYONE WELCOMEPaid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee MadisonRepublican@embarqmail.com Chickens And Eggs Its Financial Literacy Month HEY! WERE ON FACEBOOK!Check us out and become a fan of our page![ Greene Publishing, Inc. ]Its never been easier to share your local news with friends and family!

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fered cutbacks in funding as grants have expired, and has already cut back its hours of operation to save money, operating only during hours of peak use. We have a diverse group of people less fortunate, in that they are without transportation, Moore told fellow commissioners. Among those he spoke to was an 80-year-old lady who schedules all of her doctor appointments on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, because those are the days that the shuttle operates, and another elderly gentleman who was grocery shopping for his wife at home. It's needed, he said. And I think it's a big plus if we can fund it." It would ll a needed gap in the social services area for county residents without any other means to get to grocery stores, doctor's ofces, or even to work. Moore had been working with the City Commission to see if the city would be able to put up half the funds needed, but since the city could not make that commitment, Moore recommended that the county kick in the entire $10,000 necessary before the June 1 deadline, in order to keep the shuttle running for another year. The County Commission agreed, and approved the measure to continue funding the shuttle for one more year. The money would come from the County's Fiscally Constrained Fund.didnt feel threatened by those who were leaving. Jacobsen asked William Cimiotta if the Williams were leaving quietly, he replied, Yes, sir. The state called their third witness, Stacy Cole, ex-wife of Marcus Cole, and mother of William Cimiotta. At the time of the shooting, Stacy said she was working at the Econo Lodge at night as an auditor. Stacy said Mike Williams had made inappropriate comments to her. Marcus then reportedly told her to go inside the mobile home. She later saw Marcus inside the home and he told her to call 911 when he had grease splashed on his face. She later called 911 again, this time not instructed by Marcus. Stacy said Sharmee was sitting inside a maroon truck when she proceeded to go behind it to get the license plate number. She said at that time, Mike Williams had already been shot. She testied Marcus was standing on the second step of the homes entrance steps when the second bullet was red. Two 911 calls that were made were then played for the jury to hear. They were attempting to leave, Stacy said. Stacy said she uncovered the weapon laying on the couch when she went searching for it. The state then called their fourth witness, Kayla Cimiotta. At the time of the incident and trial, Cimiotta was married to William Cimiotta. Kayla said she was inside the mobile home with William Cimiotta and Stacy when they heard a big bang. They went outside and discovered Marcus had grease on him and there was ghting. Kayla said William Cimiotta was pulling everybody off when Joshua White told Karen Thompson he got stabbed. She said David Fillyaw was the only person she saw with a knife. David was later arrested for aggravated battery with a deadly weapon. Kayla said she had asked the guests to leave and they were leaving in a calmly way. She then said William Cimiotta tried to stop him by standing in front of him trying to get the gun away. The state then called Sgt. Jake Greene of the Suwannee County Sheriffs Ofce. Greene was the rst responder on the scene. Greene said he was approached by three individuals who informed him Marcus was the man who shot the victims. Greene then approached Marcus and checked on injured individuals. Greene was on the scene when crime scene analysts from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement arrived. The state then called Cpl. Brian Barrs of the SCSO. Barrs testied when he arrived on the scene, Marcus was standing by a deputys car. When he saw a substance dripping from Marcus, he asked an EMT personnel what the liquid was. Barrs said Marcus, who was standing close by, spontaneously said, They threw grease on me. I had to shoot them. Barrs said Marcus was never asked anything directly regarding the substance. The state then called their seventh witness, Investigator Jeff Cameron of the SCSO. Cameron also testied on the second day of trial. Cameron said when he arrived on the scene, he had no communication with Marcus since he was in the back of a patrol car. Later at the Suwannee County Jail during the booking process, Cameron said he read Marcus his Miranda Rights, which he waived, but said he wasnt talking until he talked with an attorney. However, Cameron said Marcus was making spontaneous statements such as, They threw grease on me. I had to shoot. Cameron also testied that he did not see blisters or red marks on Marcus at the time of booking that he could have sustained from hot grease and did not see any evidence that Marcus was in pain. He said Marcus was not admitted to the hospital or treated for injuries the night of the shooting. Day 2 March 26 On the second day of trial, the state called their nal witness, Stacy Simmons, medical examiner of Jacksonville. Simmons performed the autopsies on Abe and Mike Williams, and said autopsies are generally performed when there is a traumatic death or drug overdose. Following her examinations, Simmons determined and testied to the cause of death. Simmons said Abe Williams died as a result of a gunshot wound to the head and Mike Williams died as a result of a gunshot wound to the chest. Simmons said the manner of death for both individuals was determined to be a homicide, which she dened as a killing of one person by another person. The state then rested. Defense calls their witnesses The defense then called Karen Thompson to the stand. Karen, who was reportedly dating Joshua White at that time, said she had known Marcus for approximately ve years. Karen said she was cooking at the party when the guests arrived at the Cole residence. She said she knew Abe and Sharmee Williams, who she invited, but she didnt know Mike Williams or David Fillyaw prior to that day. Karen said she went inside and when she came back out, there was ghting going on. When Marcus passed by her, Karen testied he said, They burnt me. They threw grease on me. Karen said the ght continued when Cole went inside. She cared for Joshua White after he sustained an injury. I thought Josh was going to die, Karen said. The scene was very chaotic. Karen testied she heard a gunshot, but did not know who was shooting. She said she then saw Marcus holding a gun. The defense then called Joshua White. Joshua testied he was fearful of his life after being cut on his upper back while helping Marcus, who he said was laying on the ground getting beaten. I was down on the bottom of the pile. When I managed to get out, I felt a burning sensation, Joshua said. My ngers actually went into my neck. At that point, White said the guests were still ghting. It looked like they had no will of stopping, he said. Marcus Cole takes the stand The defense then called Marcus Cole to the stand as their nal witness. Marcus was living at the residence on 225thRoad with his wife Stacy; her son, William Cimiotta, and his wife, Kayla. Marcus said he and Stacy had been married two years prior to the event. Marcus said the occasion of the family get-together was to eat meat from a hog killed the previous day. He said Josh and Karen had a 400 pound boar hog that had escaped the pen. It was night time, it was raining. They called me up because they dont own a gun, to come and shoot it. So, I got a gun, a 30-06 ... I shot it, Marcus said. Marcus said they packed the meat on ice and then had it processed the next day. Marcus said as a payment, Karen brought some ribs and a shoulder over and said they wanted to have a cookout. I said we could cook it at my house. We agreed to have some shrimp and oysters and fried dill pickles, Marcus said. Marcus said the 3006 gun previously belonged to his dad who passed away, and was given to him by his step-mom. Marcus recalled when he got off work on Jan. 26, the day of the party, he stopped by a convenience store and got a 12 pack of beer and a bag of ice and went home. Later, folks who he described as close friends arrived around 6 p.m. and began cooking. Marcus said the radio was loud and everyone was happy. Around 10 p.m., Abe and Sharmee Williams arrived at the party along with Mike Williams and David Fillyaw, who he said was acting somewhat aggressive. They all had a beer in their hand, Marcus said. Later, Marcus said they were making rude comments to his wife and to Karen. Thats when Marcus said he asked the ladies to go into the home. Marcus said when he told Abe and his company to leave, they just laughed. Marcus testied he asked them to leave on four different occasions. (Abe) said he wasnt going anywhere, so I went into the house and told my wife to call 911, Marcus said. They were just trying to make us ght. They should have left when I asked them. Marcus said they attacked him when he made it clear he didnt want them at his home anymore. When punches were exchanged, Marcus said Abe Williams kicked him in the knees to make him fall to the ground. He said they aggressively continued to punch and kick him while he was down on the ground. Marcus testied that Mike Williams picked up a pot full of hot grease which had been used for cooking and threw it at him, burning his upper body. I thought I was going to be blind and not have a face, Marcus said. I started screaming and saying I couldnt see. Marcus said he felt like it was an attempt to kill him. Later, he witnessed Joshua White, his best friend, he said, bleeding from a cut which he believed to be life threatening. I thought he was going to bleed to death, Marcus said. I was horried. Marcus continued, Each ght was getting more and more aggressive. I felt like I had to go get my gun to protect my loved ones. They almost killed me and Josh is bleeding to death, Marcus said. When he returned outside from getting the rearm, Marcus said he stood between the aggressors and his loved ones. Marcus said he was unsure if Abe Williams had a weapon in the truck. He also said he was unsure if Mike Williams had a weapon on him, but stated he had not seen one during this incident. Marcus said Mike Williams was coming at him and he took action to protect himself. I did not have a choice, Marcus said. Im still horried. Thats a feeling you dont want to feel. It hasnt changed over the 14 months. Day 3 March 27 Day three began with closing statements by Marcus Coles attorney and the state. The jury was then sent into deliberation at 2:20 p.m. At approximately 9:15 p.m., the jury rendered a verdict of not guilty of two counts of capital rst degree murder. From Page One Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 The MadisonEnterprise-Recorder PublisherEmerald GreenePath of Faith WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris Rose Klein Jessie BoxGraphic DesignerTori Self Hunter GreeneAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette DunnBookkeeperBrooke KinsleyClassified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classieds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Wednesday at 3 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included)Since 1865 -Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity.The Madison The Madison Enterprise-Recorder Enterprise-RecorderMadison Recorder established 1865 New Enterprise established 1901 Consolidated June 25, 1908 Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post Ofce 32340. Publication No. 177.400. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison Enterprise-Recorder, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.P.O. Box 772 Madison, FL 32341 1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32340 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 greenepub@greenepublishing.com www.greenepublishing.com 2013 Not Guilty Cont. From Page 1A Permits Cont. From Page 1Amits came in second with a total of 11 permits issued. Mobile home or modular set up permits had seven issued. Fire safety and renovations or remodeling had four permits issued each. Other permit category such as demolition had four permits issued. Mobile Homes permits were issued three times. Plumbing and buildings permits, such as barns or storage, each had two permits issued. Roofing permits had one permit issued. The total of fees collected for March was $9,489.75 be Madison County Memorial Hospital, said Ted Ensminger, HCAHPS Coordinator and Director of Marketing at Madison County Memorial Hospital. This decision also supports the three key values of the hospital: Faith, Family and History. The new Madison County Memorial Hospital building is expected to be ready to begin transferring patients from the old building on August 1. The building still has some items that must be finished before it is ready. The ceiling and flooring is not installed completely yet. MCMH Cont. From Page 1A Shuttle Cont. From Page 1A

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Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Bryan and Mr. Rocky Duncan Sr. of Colquitt, Ga. would like to announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Tomi Lynn Heard to Mr. Ronnie Gene Thompson Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Ronnie Thompson Sr. of Madison. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher Shefeld of Colquitt, Ga. and Mr. and Mrs. Grover Duncan of Colquitt, Ga. and the late Mr. and Mrs. Bennie Bryan of Colquitt, Ga. Tomi Lynn is currently employed at Dees gift store in Colquitt, Ga. The groom elect is the grandson of Mrs. Guilda Swain and the late Mr. C.W. Swain of Sale City, Ga. and Mrs. Vivian Thompson and the late Mr. Ronald Thompson of Sale City, Ga. Ronnie is currently employed with Peanuts in Colquitt, Ga. The wedding will be May 10th, at 7 p.m. at The Long Branch Lodge in Colquitt, Ga. All friends and family are invited, as no invitations will be sent. Around Madison County4A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 ObituariesNorma Jean Townsend Hendry, 78, of Madison, passed away Tuesday, April 8, at her home. Funeral Services were held at 11 a.m. Thursday, April 10, at Beggs Funeral Home, Madison Chapel, with burial at Oak Ridge Cemetery. The family received friends from 57 p.m. Wednesday, April 9, at Beggs Funeral Home. She was born in Madison County on November 5, 1935 to the late Jim and Daisy Townsend. She graduated from Madison High School in 1953. She worked for the City of Madison as the City Clerk for 17 years. Later, she was the owner of The Rosery Florist, along with her late husband, Edwin Hendry, for 25 years. Norma Jean played a major role in the development and establishing the Senior Citizens Council of Madison County and served as the rst director. She was a charter and active member of Unity Baptist Church. After her retirement in 1999, she devoted her time to cooking for her family, her church family and sharing the bounty of her kitchen with many families whom she knew. She is survived by two sons: Troy Hendry (Jenny) of Madison, and Todd Hendry of St. Augustine; two grandchildren; Sara Whitaker (Kyle) of Madison, and Andrew Hendry (anc, Magan Taylor) of Madison; one great grandson; Asher Whitaker, as well as many nephews and nieces and friend, Betty DeLaughter of Madison. She was preceded in death by husband, James Edwin Hendry of 57 years; parents, Jim and Daisy Townsend; four brothers and three sisters. She was the youngest and last surviving child of the Townsend family. Beggs Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements: (850) 973-2258. You may send your condolences to the family by visiting the website www.beggsfuneral.com.Norma Jean Townsend Hendry Helen Glean PearsonHelen Glean Pearson was born on July 7, 1939. She was called home on April 6, surrounded by family and friends. Her wake will be on Friday, April 11, at Cooks and Coopers Funeral Home at 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. This event is open to the public. Funeral services will follow on Saturday, April 12, at noon at New Life Christian International Ministries. Cooks and Coopers Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements: (850) 973-6666. Wedding Announcement Paris Blair BassParis Blair Bass left this world for a better place on Sunday, April 6. Her viewing was held Thursday, April 10, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Beggs Funeral Home in Madison. Graveside service will be held at a later date at San Pedro Cemetery in Madison. She is survived by her daughter; Paula Bass and four granddaughters; Shyanne, Kindall, Keriston and Karindall Williamson; three brothers; Eddie Blair, Allen Blair and Mike Blair; one sister; Heidi Blair. She was preceded in death by her father and mother; Rodger and Dot OQuinn Blair and brother; Mark Blair. Beggs Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements: (850) 973-2258. THANK YOU!The Healthy Start Coalition of Jefferson, Madison and Taylor Counties, Inc. would like to thank the Pine Tree Craft N Quilters for donating 36 beautiful handmade quilts for our Moms and their babies! A special thank you to the following: Sandra Bass, Ruth Bishop, Deborah Brown, Beth Dees, Mary Dees, Hilda Dixon, Nell Dobbs, Linda Doud, Louanna Forness, Sarah Freytag, Elizabeth Gant, Geraldine Harden, Sally Hubbard, Millie Leonardson, Gean McCullough, Jeanette Mitchell, Effie Pate, Irene Rowell, Betty Sirman, Louise Strickland, Karen Sutton, Helen Whitten, Ila Willis and Lenora Zipperer. June Elizabeth Nipper Townsend MorrisJune Elizabeth Nipper Townsend Morris, 83, of Mason, Ohio, passed away Sunday, April 6, of renal failure. She was born April 13, 1930 in Miami, to the late William Jackson and Della Lorena Adams Nipper. The Nipper family moved to Cherry Lake Farms when June was five years old. She graduated from Madison High School in 1948. She was preceded in death by her husband, Jim Allen Townsend, Jr. of four months, son Jim Allen Townsend, III, two sisters: Vera Nipper Hart and Odessa Nipper Brown and brother Don E. Nipper. She was also the former wife of the late Phillip Gail Morris for 16 years. She is survived and was the beloved mother of Phillip Gail (Debi) of San Diego, Calif., Nancy Odom (James) of Murrieta, Calif., Cindy Weeks (Scott) of Pensacola, Gabrielle Morris of Paso Robles, Calif., and Karma Decker (Jeffrey) of Mason, Ohio. She is also survived by 19 grandchildren, 31 great-grandchildren, sister Barbara Milton of Live Oak, and many nieces and nephews. The family will receive friends on Tuesday, April 15th, from 2 p.m. until time for funeral services at 3 p.m. at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1374 W Base St., Madison, followed by Interment at Pinegrove Cemetery. Condolences may be sent to junem413@gmail.com. Beggs Funeral Home, in Madison, is in charge of arrangements: (850) 973-2258. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, April 2, 2014Wendi Webb was one of the winners for the Wild Adventure's Splash Island give-a-way, that Greene Publishing advertised and promoted. She is holding her grandson Trent. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, April 2, 2014Leola Arnold was also a Greene Publishing/Wild Adventures ticket winner. Greene Publishing's Wild Adventures Ticket WinnersHeard-Thompson Announce Engagement

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By Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.As she begins her presentation at the Madison Rotary Club, Wanda Hodnett of A Woman's Pregnancy Center prefaces it with the story of Norma McCorvey, the young woman who became the Jane Roe of Roe Vs. Wade, and then had a change of heart. An icon of the pro-choice movement, she joined the pro-life group, Operation Rescue, after it moved in next door to the abortion clinic where she had been working. As a result, she became a surprise champion of the prolife movement, making headlines with her dramatic reversal. Ironically, McCorvey never had the abortion; by the time the law was passed, it was too late. Forty years after Roe Vs. Wade, abortion is legal in all states, but Hodnett reported that nationally, abortion rates had dropped 12 percent in 2013, and some abortion clinics had closed down as the pro-life movement has gained traction. However, her primary focus was A Woman's Pregnancy Center of Madison, 345 NW Marion St., and the alternative it offers women who find themselves pregnant and alone, with nowhere else to turn. Located near the new hospital, A Woman's Pregnancy Center is an entity she described as a Christian ministry that receives no state or federal money, relying instead on donations (all gifts are tax-deductible) and three major fundraisers per year: the Celebration of Life Banquet at Divine Events in the fall; the Walk For Life in the spring, which raises money through sponsors; and the Baby Bottle Ministry, where people take baby bottles home with them, fill them with loose change and bring them back. Churches do this a lot, said Hodnett of the Baby Bottle Ministry. Typically, they will pass out the baby bottles to congregations on Mother's Day and collect them on Father's Day. Because the Center accepts no federal or state money, We can share the love of Christ with people, and all our services are free. The Center offers pregnancy tests and ultrasounds, encouraging its clients to be under the care of a doctor for any further medical services they will likely need. The Center's services are mostly counseling the abortion-minded in the love of Jesus, showing instructional videos on parenting and providing some of the material things the young women will need, from the 20thweek of their pregnancy through the first six months of their baby's life. We try to find out what kind of support system she has and whether or not she's being abused, but many of our clients are church-goers, said Hodnett. Whoever they may be, they are all received with love. So many of these girls need to be shown that they are loved and that God loves them unconditionally. One of the first things a young woman will be given after coming to the Center is a hand-crocheted baby blanket made by volunteers. Other items might include diapers and baby clothes, depending on the need. When it comes to larger items, clients are put on a list until the needed items can be found. For instance, if she needs a baby bed but cannot afford one, the Center can put the word out through its network of volunteers for anybody with a baby bed to donate. After the baby is born, the Center staff gives the mother a Shower in a Bag with all new stuff that every newborn needs. Many of the young women who come to the Center have never even heard of a baby shower before. Additionally, every baby receives a child's Bible. The Center accepts donations of money, time and baby items (including clothing, diapers and furniture). Donations come from churches and civic clubs holding diaper drives and delivering stacks of diapers, from businesses, or from members of the community, such as women who donate baby things their own children have outgrown. By offering an alternative to abortion, A Woman's Pregnancy Center has saved 99 babies in the past four years, Hodnett told the audience, and spared the young mothers the after-affects of the procedure. Just because you have an abortion, it doesn't mean you aren't a mother or father, she said. You're the mother or father of a deceased baby. Even though abortion is currently legal in all states, there is a national effort underway to pass a new law requiring an ultrasound before an abortion can be performed. After seeing the ultrasound image, Hodnett explained, many young women change their minds and continue their pregnancies. A Woman's Pregnancy Center is a wideopen mission, she said. Where Christ can be shared, and is being shared.Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 5A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Family Bake Sale To Benet Jefferson Couple Affected By CancerBy Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.Family members will be holding a bake sale for Charles and Ann Savage this Friday, Saturday and Sunday, April 11-13, to assist the couple with medical bills and supplies. Charles has been diagnosed with prostate cancer and will be undergoing radiation treatment beginning Monday, April 14 at the Tallahassee Memorial Cancer Center. Treatments will be at the Tallahassee Memorial Cancer Center, making it difcult for the couple, as they do not own transportation. Sales of baked goods or donations will go towards paying for transportation through Big Bend as well as Charles bills and medical supplies. The bake sale will be held at the Country Yard Flea Market located on Hwy 19 South. Baked goods will be sold Friday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. until all baked goods are gone. For more information or donations, call Ann at (850) 408-9365.Wanda Hodnett Of A Woman's Pregnancy Center Addresses Rotary Club Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, April 2, 2014Wanda Hodnett speaks at the Rotary Club on behalf of A Woman's Pregnancy Center of Madison. Recall Updates Tyson Products Tyson is recalling over 75,000 pounds of chicken nuggets after the company received reports of mouth injuries to customers who ate the product. USDA's report said small pieces of plastic broken off a product scraper inside a blending machine were responsible for the injuries. The recall affects 20-lb bags of Spare Time Fully Cooked Nugget-Shaped Breast Pattie Fritters (pkg. numbers 0264SDL0315 through-19, and 0474SDL0311 through-14.) Also affected are 5-lb bags of Tyson Fully Cooked White Meat Chicken Nuggets with use by dates of Jan. 26, 2015 or Feb. 16, 2015 (pkg. Numbers 0264SDL0315 through -19 and 0474SDL0311 through-14). For questions regarding the recall, contact Tyson Foods Consumer Services at 1-866-328-3156.Sprouts Farmers Market Sprouts Farmers Market is recalling peppercorns sold under the names Sprout, Frontier and Simply Organic, for possible salmonella poisoning. The spice comes in 2.12 ounce cans with an expiration date of October 2016, lot numbers 3256, 3246, 3221 and 3262. If you purchased any of these products, do not use them: return them to the place of purchase for a refund. The deadline to file your taxes for 2013 is April 15th, 2014. Aside from April 15th being the last day to file your taxes, it is also the deadline for IRA contributions. If you plan to file an extension, remember that your IRA contribution deadline will not be extended. So, do dont delay in getting these done! As I see it, there are a few things to consider about IRA contributions: Contributing to an IRA lets you invest money that can grow tax-deferred or tax-free. You may even be eligible for a tax deduction! With tax benefits, money can grow even faster than in accounts without benefits. For most people, Social Security will not provide enough money for a comfortable retirement. Investing in an IRA, particularly every year over a long period of time, can play a major role in making retirement more enjoyable. Roth IRAs Powerful Planning Tools for All Generations If the current income restrictions associated with Roth IRAs prevent you from using one for your own planning purposes, consider taking steps to ensure that your children or other younger family members establish and fund a Roth IRA of their own. Roth IRAs offer ample tax benefits for retirement particularly for younger investors. Yet perhaps the more long lasting benefit of the Roth IRA can be realized when it is used as a wealth transfer mechanism. Roth IRAs for Minors One of the main contributors to successful retirement planning is time the more of it you have, the better the result. For this reason alone, setting up a Roth IRA for a child can be one of your best long-term planning strategies. When investment compounding has upwards of 50 years to run its course, even a relatively modest savings rate can produce substantial wealth. There is no minimum age requirement for opening a Roth IRA, and many IRA providers will accept accounts for minors. In most cases, the only real issue is whether the child has taxable earned income. Fortunately there is no requirement that the same earned income is the money that funds the IRA. If your child earned income from a summer or part-time job, but then spent it, there is no restriction on using money provided by parents to establish and fund the IRA account. You can contribute up to $5,500 to a Roth IRA in 2013 as long as your child earned at least that much. However, contributions cannot exceed your childs income for the year. Contributions to a Roth IRA are not tax deductible, but earnings are never taxed provided your child meets the distribution requirements chief among them waiting until at least 59 12 before tapping the account Wealth Transfer with a Roth IRA As effective a retirement planning tool as a Roth IRA can be, its greatest strength may be its potential as a wealth transfer instrument. Unlike traditional IRAs, minimum distributions are not required from Roth IRAs once the owner reaches age 70 12 Therefore a child theoretically could have held a Roth IRA his or her entire life never having tapped into it and then pass it on to his or her beneficiaries upon death. At this point the account would fall under the same minimum withdrawal rules that pertain to traditional IRAs. However, beneficiaries may choose to string out those withdrawals over many years, continuing to earn tax-free income on the remaining account balance. The hidden value of the Roth IRA is its exceptional growth potential. If heirs decide to spend or withdraw Roth IRA assets immediately upon inheritance, the Roths strategic value as a wealth transfer tool is lost. If however, they choose to let the Roth IRA continue to grow and only withdraw what is required by law each year, the true power of the Roth IRA can be realized.Stacy Bush, PresidentBush Wealth ManagementThe Bush Wealth Advantage Our column, The Bush Wealth Advantage is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. Stacy Bush has practiced independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.comSecurities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. 862109

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By Jessie R. Box Greene Publishing, Inc. Parents as you are watching your children play contact sports, pay attention to the cuts or abrasions they may receive. According to the Mayo Clinic website, staph infections are caused by staphylococcus bacteria, a type of germ commonly found on a persons skin or in the nose. The bacteria can get under a persons skin through a break in the skin. Normal, healthy people who maintain good hygiene do not get staph infections that often, said Harvey Greene, P.A.-C at Family Health Center in Madison. According to the Mayo Clinic, common types of staph infections are boils, impetigo and cellulitis. Boils are pockets of pus that develops in a hair follicle or oil gland. Impetigo is a contagious rash that occurs mostly in young children. Cellulitis is an infection of the deeper layers of skin and causes skin redness and swelling on the surface of the skin. Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome affects mostly newborns and the symptoms include fever, rash and blisters. According to Greene, staph infections are less communicable than the common cold and he explains that it is because everyone has staph bacteria on their skin. The bacteria helps ght off other bacteria. Treatment of staph infections is case by case due to methicillim-resistant staphylococcus aureus or MRSA, a stain of staph infection that resists certain antibiotics. Before treatment, it must be determined which antibiotic will kill the infection. According to Mayo Clinic, less than 10 percent of todays staph infections can be cured with penicillin and half are resistant to cephalosporin and nafcillin. Greene warned that if you think you have a staph infection, then have your physician look at it. Earlier treatment is easier treatment, said Greene.Around Madison County6A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Way Back When Way Back WhenApril 8, 1949 Arthur Clark Smith, of Tallahassee, was elected principal of the Pinetta School for the 1949-1950 term at a meeting of the County Board of Education Wednesday. Mr. Smith is working on his Master of Arts Degree at Florida State University and will finish his course this summer. He is a native of Virginia and received his early education at Abingdon, Va. He is married and has three children. Little Ella Mae Rogers of Boyd celebrated her 7thbirthday a few days ago with a party given in her honor by her mother, Mrs. David Rogers. There were 21 guests. Miss Elizabeth Brannen helped her mother with the children. Ella Mae received many nice gifts. The Legislature is meeting again this week in what many consider an important session. Governor Warren and others say that the state is facing a crisis, with forty to fifty million dollars more budgeted than that for which revenue is in sight. New taxes will be proposed by the Governor and reiteration of his opposition to the sales tax will be made. Mr. and Mrs. W M Burton expect to leave this week, driving to San Francisco from where they will embark for Guam, April 20, by steamer. Mr. Burton will be connected with the U.S. Engineering Department. April 14, 1950 Many friends and relatives gathered at Mrs. J G Thigpens Sunday night to celebrate Mrs. Florence Thigpens eighty-fifth birthday. A number of gifts were presented to her, with wishes for many more birthdays yet. The students and teachers of Lee School enjoyed the Easter Recess, which extended from April 6 to April 11. Every one attended one or more Easter egg hunts. The separate rooms at school had their egg hunts and picnics, which are a tradition of the school. Fire caused from a spark falling on the shingles burned a considerable hole in the roof of Mary Tillmans home in West Madison Friday. Effective work of the Fire Department saved the home. Presbyterian children were entertained at their annual egg hunt Saturday afternoon on the church lawn. Quite a large number enjoyed the affair. Ice cream was served after the eggs were found. Prizewinners were Harriet Gandy, Billie Bryant, Joy Harris, Beverly Gibson, Gayle Coffee and Phillip Ragans. April 13, 1951 John L. Marker, age 29, of Greenville, is in the local hospital with shoulder and back injuries and cuts on the face, and Harrison Williams, 60, also of Greenville, a rider in Mr. Markers car, with a severely cut foot, as the result of an automobile accident about 1:15 p.m. Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Horace Bailey, Madison Route 3, announce the birth of a son, April 10. Susan Selman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Buford Selman was honored with a lovely birthday Thursday afternoon on the occasion of her second birthday anniversary. The Intentional baseball league composed of Pinetta, Fla., and the following Georgia Teams: Glenn, Stockton, Eastside Valdosta, Lakeland, and Homerville, opens for the season Sunday, April 15. Games will be played each Sunday afternoon during the season. Glenn will play Pinetta in Pinetta this Sunday afternoon at three oclock. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, April 9, 2014Desmond Roberson and Daniel Graham, guests at the 55 Plus Club, spoke briey about the Madison Boy's Choir Palm Sunday Concert program at the RATT Pact Theater, Friday evening, April 11 at 7 p.m., Saturday afternoon, April 12, at 3 p.m., and Saturday evening, April 12, at 7 p.m. One of the main questions from the audience was Where do we get tickets? The answer, contact Deborah Brown at (850) 929-4938, or Tim Dunn, who is in the phone book. If enough tickets are sold, the choir will schedule a second matinee performance on Palm Sunday afternoon, April 13, at 3 p.m. After their appearance at 55 Plus, Roberson, Graham and the choir were scheduled to begin rehearsing in the theater building, in readiness for the upcoming concert.Daniel Graham, Desmond Roberson Drop In At 55 Plus ClubParents Pay Attention For Staph Infections

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Dear Savvy Senior, What can you tell me about reverse mortgages? I was considering one last year, but now I hear they are more difcult to get. Ready to Reverse Dear Ready,Thats correct. Tighter rules on reverse mortgages that have recently gone into affect have made them harder to get, especially for seniors with heavy debt problems. The reason the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) made these changes was to strengthen the product, which has suffered from a struggling housing market and a growing number of defaults by borrowers. Heres a rundown of how reverse mortgages now work in 2014. Overview: The basics are still the same. A reverse mortgage is a loan that allows senior homeowners to borrow money against the equity in their house. The loan doesnt have to be repaid until the homeowner dies, sells the house or moves out for at least 12 months. Its also important to know that with a reverse mortgage, you, not the bank, own the house, so youre still responsible for property taxes, insurance and repairs. Eligibility: To be eligible for a reverse mortgage you must be at least 62 years old, own your own home (or owe only a small balance) and currently be living there. You will also need to undergo a nancial assessment to determine whether you can afford to make all the necessary tax and insurance payments over the projected life of the loan. Lenders will look at your sources of income, assets and credit history. Depending on your nancial situation, you may be required to put part of your loan into an escrow account to pay future bills. If the nancial assessment nds that you cannot pay your insurance and taxes and have enough cash left to live on, you will be denied. Loans: Nearly all reverse mortgages offered today are Home Equity Conversion Mortgages (HECM), which are FHA insured and offered through private mortgage lenders and banks. HECMs also have home value limits that vary by county, but cannot exceed $625,500. See hud.gov/ll/code/llslcrit.cf m for a list of HUD approved lenders. Loan amounts: The amount you get through a reverse mortgage depends on your age, your homes value and the prevailing interest rates. Generally, the older you are, the more your house is worth, and the lower the interest rates are, the more you can borrow. A 70-year-old, for example, with a home worth $300,000 could borrow around $170,000 with a xed-rate HECM. To calculate how much you can borrow, visit reversemortgage.org. Loan costs: Reverse mortgages have a number of up-front fees including a 2 percent lender origination fee for the rst $200,000 of the homes value and one percent of the remaining value, with a cap of $6,000; a 0.5 percent initial mortgage insurance premium fee; along with an appraisal fee, closing costs and other miscellaneous expenses. Most fees can be deducted for the loan amount to reduce your out-of-pocket cost at closing. In addition, youll also have to pay an annual mortgage insurance premium of 1.25 percent of the loan amount. Payment options: You can receive the money in a lump sum, a line of credit, regular monthly checks or a combination of these. But in most cases, you cannot withdraw more than 60 percent of the loan during the rst year. If you do, youll pay a 2.5 percent upfront insurance premium fee. Counseling: All borrowers are required to get face-to-face or telephone counseling through a HUD approved independent counseling agency before taking out a reverse mortgage. Some agencies are awarded grants that enable them to offer counseling for free, but most charge around $125 to $250. To locate a counseling agency near you, visit hud.gov/ofces/hsg/sfh/h ecm/hecmhome.cfm or call 800-569-4287. The esophagusThe esophagus is a muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. It lies behind the windpipe (trachea) and in front of the spine and in adults is about 1013 inches long. At its smallest point, it is a little less than one inch wide. It carries food and liquids to the stomach. The wall of the esophagus has several layers. Cancer of the esophagus starts in the inner layer and grows outward into deeper layers. In the lower part of the esophagus that connects to the stomach, a sphincter muscle opens to allow food to enter the stomach. This muscle also closes to keep stomach acid and juices from backing up into the esophagus. When stomach juices escape into the esophagus, it is called gastroesophageal reux disease (GERD) or just reux. In many cases, reux can cause symptoms such as heartburn or a burning feeling spreading out from the middle of the chest. But sometimes, reux can happen without any symptoms at all. Long-term reux of stomach acid into the esophagus can lead to problems. It can change the cells in the lower end of the esophagus. They become more like the cells that line the stomach. When these cells change, the person has a condition called Barrett's esophagus. These altered cells can change into cancer, so the person has a much higher risk of cancer of the esophagus and should be closely watched by a doctor. Still, most people with Barrett's esophagus do not go on to get cancer of the esophagus. Can cancer of the esophagus be prevented? Not all cases of esophageal cancer can be prevented, but the risk of getting this disease can be greatly reduced by not using tobacco and alcohol. Diet is also important. Eating many fruits and vegetables may offer some protection. Staying active and keeping a healthy weight may also help. Some studies have found that the risk can be lowered in people who take aspirin or other drugs such as ibuprofen (NSAIDs) that reduce inammation. But using these drugs every day can lead to problems like kidney damage and bleeding in the stomach. For this reason, most doctors do not advise the use of NSAIDs to prevent cancer. If you are thinking of using one of these regularly, you rst should talk to your doctor about the pros and cons. Some studies have also found a lower risk of esophageal cancer in patients with Barretts esophagus who take a type of drug called statins. Statins are used to treat high cholesterol. These are drugs like atorvastatin (Lipitor) and rosuvastatin (Crestor). While taking one of these drugs to lower cholesterol may also help some patients lower esophageal cancer risk, doctors dont advise taking them to prevent cancer. These drugs can have serious side effects. Doctors recommend that people with Barretts esophagus have certain tests done to look for cell changes that may be a sign of cancer. Treating reux may help to prevent Barretts esophagus and esophageal cancer. If you have chronic heartburn (or reux), you should talk to your health care team about it. Treatment with drugs or even surgery can improve symptoms and may prevent future problems. This information is provided by the American Cancer Society. If you need more information, please call your physician or the Florida Department of Health in Madison at 850-973-5000 or the Florida Department of Health in Jefferson at (850) 342-0170.HealthMadison Enterprise-Recorder 7A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Make 2014 the year you change your life CLASSES IN MADISON STA RTMBachelors Degree Programs Business Administration with specialization in Management Computer Information Systems Criminal Justice Elementary Education Health Care Management Human Services Psychology Full-time students may be eligible for the Florida Resident Access Grant (FRAG) Approved for VA Benets/GI Bill Classes now forming in Madison(850) 973-3356 madison@saintleo.edu What you need for where youre going Now offering The Doctorate of Business Administration (Online and On Campus) ou need for wher What y e y ou need for wher e going r ou dministration A usiness B ee egr re s D achelor B dministration ograms r ro ee P dministration A usiness B with specialization in nformation Computer I anagement M anagement e M ealth Car H ducation lementary E E ustice riminal J C ystems S dministration with specialization in nformation anagement ducation N The D ing fer w of o N octorate of The D chology sy P ervices uman S H G) rant (FRA G esident ida R lor F be eligible for the ull-time students may F ervices ccess A esident be eligible for the ull-time students may usiness B The D nline and O (O dministration A usiness octorate of The D ampus) n C nline and O V ed for v o ppr ro A ill enets/GI B B adison in M w for Classes nowww A VA madison@saintleo.edu (850) 973-3356 ming w for.saintleo.edu/mp www madison@saintleo.edu (850) 973-3356.saintleo.edu/mp What is cancer of the esophagus? Savvy Senior: How Reverse Mortgages Work in 2014

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Outdoors8A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Loud & Clearand FREE Florida residents with a hearing loss are eligible to receive a free amplied phone from the non-prot Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. Cordless and corded phones for persons with mild to severe hearing loss are available at 23 distribution centers statewide. Limit one per customer.CONTACT YOUR AREA CENTER FOR DETAILS Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. 1820 E. P ark Avenue, Suite 101 Tallahassee, FL 32301 800-222-3448 (v) 888-447-5620 (tty)Current FTRI clients: If your phone isnt working properly or your hearing has changed, or should you no longer need your phone or are moving out of Florida, call FTRI at 888-554-1151 for assistance. Commissioner Putnam Urges Caution During Wildfire Awareness Week Submitted by Ray Boothe, Senior Forest Ranger, Perry District Office More than 500 Wildfires Have Burned 9,000 Acres Since January Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam and the Florida Forest Service shared tips today urging Floridians to be extremely careful with fires outdoors. This week is Wildfire Awareness Week, which recognizes wildfires that raged across Florida in 1998, burning more than 500,000 acres and damaging or destroying 337 homes and structures. This year, we have been very fortunate with increased rainfall in some parts of the state, but other areas are still very dry, said Commissioner Putnam. Our firefighters are working to minimize risk of wildfire and help keep homes, businesses and residents of Florida safe, but there are also simple steps Floridians can take to help prevent wildfire. Wildfires generally occur in the spring and early summer months due to a lack of rainfall, low humidity and strong winds combined with increased springtime yard burns. Since Jan. 1, the Florida Forest Services firefighters have responded to more than 500 wildfires on 9,183 acres, most from human carelessness. We all have the responsibility to help prevent wildfires, said James Karels, Florida Forest Service state forester. By preventing just one wildfire, we can reduce the risk to life, homes and property, while also reducing the cost to Florida taxpayers. The following tips can help prevent wildfires: Check with your local city or county officials to see if there are any burn restrictions in the area. Keep fires contained to an eight-foot diameter pile or noncombustible barrel. Fires must be at least 25 feet from forests, 25 feet from homes, 50 feet from paved public roads and 150 feet from other occupied buildings. Obtain a burning authorization from the Florida Forest Service for piles larger than eight feet in diameter. Call your local Florida Forest Service field office (850) 973 5115, ( http://www.freshfromflorida.com/Divisions-Offices/Florida-F orest-Service). Check the weather daily and dont burn on windy days or when the humidity is below 30 percent. Never leave a fire unattended and make sure it is completely out before leaving. Keep a shovel and water hose handy in case a small fire starts to escape containment. Report suspicious activity to the Arson Alert Hotline at 1-800342-5869. Callers may remain anonymous, and information about an arson-caused fire could be worth up to a $5,000 reward. The Florida Forest Service manages more than one million acres of public forest land while protecting 26 million acres of homes, forestland and natural resources from the devastating effects of wildfire. For statewide wildfire updates and additional wildfire information, visit www.floridaforestservice.com. For more information about the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, visit www.FreshFromFlorida.com.FLORIDA FOREST SERVICE CELEBRATES ECOLOGY DAYPhoto SubmittedDave Norton of Rock Tenn Paper presents to a group of 3rdgraders at the 24thannual Ecology Field Day at North Florida Community College while Justin Kania (Forester), Tanner Greene, Luis Medina and Chris Norris (Forest Rangers) look on. Submitted by Justin Kania, Madison County ForesterFriday, April 4, marked the 24thannual 4H Ecology Field Day at North Florida Community College. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida Forest Service along with Rock Tenn Forester, Dave Norton, provided instruction in forest ecology as well as prescribed fire applications. Using the schools Ladell Brothers natural area as a backdrop and classroom, Madison Forest Rangers presented an overview on the use of fire to manage Florida timberlands as well as the potential destructiveness of wildfire in those same timberlands. The students, over 200 of them from several Madison County public and private schools, were also presented an opportunity to learn some basics of Forest Ecology and Forest Management with presentations by foresters Justin Kania and Dave Norton. If you would like to learn more about Floridas timberlands and their management, contact the Madison County Forester at (850) 973 5115 or e-mail justin.kania@freshfromflorida.com.

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Ripleys Ghost Train Adventures is a 90 minute paranormal investigation that takes you down the streets of St. Augustine stopping at many of the local haunts, including the Our 90-minute paranormal investigation takes you down the narrow streets of St. Augustine, stopping to investigate at the old Castillo de San Marcos National Monument, the Public Burying Grounds of 1821 and the 1800s haunted Castle Warden. For more information, call (904) 824-1606.Visit St. AugustineMadison Enterprise-Recorder 9A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 St, Augustine, Florida is known as the Ancient City for all of the history that has happened there. It is a two-hour drive from Madison. It offers a variety of exciting places to explore and have fun. There is Ripleys Believe It or Not! Museum, Castillo de San Marcos National Monument, Alligator Farm Zip line and Potters Wax Museum. The downtown area offers a wide variety of different and unique shops to explore. There is also a lovely beach that can be enjoyed by everyone in the family. Ripleys Believe It or Not! Museum According to Ripleys Believe It or Not! Museum website, the building was built by Standard Oil partner William G. Warden, and later became a hotel, Castle Warden, when purchased by Pulitzer Prize winning author Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings and her husband Norton Baskin. Robert Ripley did not create the museum. He frequently stayed in the hotel. After his death in 1949 Castle Warden was purchased to house his collections, which included rosaries made of human bone and drum kit featuring two human skulls fused together and covered with human skin. The collection of weird and fascinating artifacts has grown and has over 800 exhibits, artifacts and artwork. Other attractions that Ripleys offers is the Red Train tour and the Ghost Train Tours. According to Ripleys website, the Red Train Tours take you around St. Augustine and one loop is 7 mile. This includes 24 stops and from start to nish takes approximately 90 minutes. A new tour begins every 15-20 minutes at all stops. Ripleys Ghost Train Alligator Farm Zip Line The Alligator Farm in St. Augustine started offering a new adventure a couple of years ago. According to the Alligator Farm website, the Crocodile Crossing is a zip line and aerial obstacle course. You can experience the feeling of standing over crocodiles as the bath in the sun. It includes two different courses. The Sepik River Course is the shorter course of the two. It takes approximately 45 minutes for completion. The course is 20-feet high and includes three zip lines. Then if you havent had enough fun, upgrade to the Nile River Course, which is longer and more difcult. According to Alligator Farms, you should allow two hours to complete this course. You are 60-feet above the ground and there are nine zip lines. They now offer, Dark Side of the Zoo, where you can zip line at night. This adventure is a modied version of the Nile River Course. The include six zip lines and 23 obstacles. If you want to know what the alligators and crocodiles do at night this is perfect for you. This adventure also includes a nocturnal reptile tour, which include the great Maximo. For more information, call (904) 824-3337. Potters Wax MuseumPotters Was Museum in St. Augustine offers over 160 wax figures. According to Potters Wax Museums website, the newest addition is Tiger Woods. They are also going to be adding Halle Barry and Robert De Niro to the collection soon. Potters Wax Museum is open 7 days a week. Adult tickets are $10.00 and children tickets are $7.00. For more information, call (904) 829-9056.

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Around Madison County10A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Marvin Bass was born in 1925 in Madison County and except for 10 weeks during his life, has never left Madison County. He worked on his fathers farm, along with his eight brothers and two sisters, and studied in a two-room schoolhouse in Shaw. He has hand-strung tobacco, grown corn and peanuts and raised cows, goats and hogs. Marvin said he had a good, but hard life as a farmer. Having cows gave the family milk and butter and the garden gave them plenty of vegetables, but mules did all the plowing in the garden, as he didnt have his rst tractor until sometime in the 1950s. With his sharp memory, Marvin can remember working the same mule team his father owned when he was born, giving the family 27 crops before having to retire them. In 1990, after a lifetime of farming, Marvin retired and moved to 360 south, where he and Estelle live today. Estelle Colvin was born in 1926 in Madison County and except for ve of the same weeks Marvin was outside of the county, has always been in Madison County. Her family also farmed, but instead of owning one, moved from farm to farm, working where needed. Estelles family was also large, with seven brothers and ve sisters; giving them plenty of hands to help on a farm. Even with the help, she said farming was a tough life and would hate to have to go down that road again. When working on farms, she picked cotton and tended to cows and hogs. She distinctly remembers a time when having to milk a cow and the cow reciprocating by kicking her. Marvin and Estelle met while her family was working on a farm close to Marvins familys farm. They didnt date during this time, but were playmates. After Estelles family moved back to Lee, where she had been born, is when Marvin began dating Estelle. He visited her at her house in his 1929 yellow Model A Roadster a few times, but not very regular said Marvin, due to the strictness of her father. They both said dating, like going to the movies or hanging out today, was not something done back then. After seeing her for about a month, Marvin worked up the courage, much to Estelles fear, of asking her Father and Mother for their blessing of marriage. Marvin and Estelle were married on a Friday, April 1, 1944 at the Madison Courthouse. Marvin was 19 years old and Estelle was 17 years old. Their family started quickly as Estelle delivered their rst child at home on their farm in January of 1945, where Estelle almost died during childbirth. Marvin said he had paid a doctor to come from Aucilla, but it was Estelles Aunt Vanona that actually delivered the baby and helped save Estelles life. Estelle said she did recover, but was unable to walk for several weeks. That traumatic event and the pain were forgotten however, as the two raised a total of ve boys and one girl during their lives together. After retirement, Marvin had his share of medical problems. In 1992, he had surgery due to an aneurism and in 1994 had open-heart surgery, where he actually did die. Daughter Kay said it was a long time before he would speak of it, but while on the surgery table, felt himself being lifted from the table and witnessed the light at the end of the tunnel like so many others who have died also have seen. His vision, as Marvin calls it, continues as he says he then witnessed a large group of people coming down a stairway and saw a large group of people taking a wide path and only a few going down a smaller, narrow path. This vision greatly strengthened Marvins faith after recovering. Today, Marvin and Estelle, still together in the house they retired to, have life a little easier, but as Marvin said, You can take the boy out of the country but you cant take the country out of the boy. Marvin helps out his neighbors, xing farm equipment and raises a few goats saying he cant do without his animals. He also has two sheep and one calf, and a donkey named Fruit Loops and according to Estelle, got that name because thats what Marvin feeds him. When Estelle speaks of marriage with Marvin, she said, I married a good boy and hes been good to me all these years. He worked hard, we raised our children, went to church and trusted in the Lord. Agape love, often described as unconditional love, is how Marvin describes the love between him and Estelle and says it is what has kept them together through 70 years of marriage. He said their love is the same kind of love referred to in the Bible. We couldnt have done it by ourselves, said Marvin. We had to have a higher power, I wish everybody could have that type of love. The two renewed their vows on their 50thwedding anniversary at Hopewell Baptist Church and this year, on their 70th, will be celebrating at the same church. All of Marvin and Estelles family and friends are invited to join them. For more information, call daughter Kay at (850) 973-0542.Marvin And Estelle Bass Celebrate 70 Years Of Love Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, March 18, 2014Saturday, April 19, from 2 4 p.m., Marvin and Estelle Bass will be celebrating 70 years of marriage together at Hopewell Baptist Church, located at 4730 SW CR 360 in Madison. All friends and family are invited.

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Story SubmittedMadison County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism OfficeIt has become a community tradition for over 20 years that the students from Beckys Dance Steps Studio perform at Madisons Down Home Days Festival. Thats exactly what the studios dancers will do again on Friday, April 18that 6 p.m. on Pinckney Street near the south end of the Courthouse in front of the Annex. A preview of the studios upcoming 38thannual recital, Just Dance will feature dancers ranging from ages three to 25, proudly performing in their sparkling new costumes. There will be something for everyone as the dancers showcase a variety of 14 ballet, tap, jazz and hip hop numbers to music from classic to contemporary. Always a showstopper, the adorable three year olds will perform their signature dance, Body Rock. This year the studio has not one, but two groups of three year olds that will make their stage debut at Down Home Days for the audience to enjoy. Another new addition to the show is a Hip Hop dance choreographed by Jazz Instructor and choreographer, Scott Benson, featuring 18 tweens with lots of energy, enthusiasm and some awesome steps. Completing this years show and in honor of Good Friday and Easter weekend will be the beautiful dance Amazing Grace performed traditionally each year by the studios senior students. According to Becky Robinson, studio owner and director, My students always work very hard to get ready for our Down Home Days Festival show and look forward to the performance each year. Its a chance for Madisons talented young dancers to gain some performance experience while giving their friends and family a sneak peek of their upcoming recital and to do what they like to do bestJust Dance! Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 11A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Ridin And Ropin For Down Home Days April 17-19Story SubmittedMadison County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism OfceLasso up the family and get ready cause its time once again for the Down Home Days Festival, Parade and Rodeo in Madison, April 18 and 19, brought to you by Tobacco Free Madison and Century Link as well as many other community partners. This exciting three-day event gallops in on Friday, April 18, with over 150 cowboys and cowgirls from the Professional Cowboy Association competing in several heart-thumping, foot-stomping events like calf roping, steer wrestling, barrel racing, break-away roping and even bull riding. Meet The History Channels AxMen from Season 7, the Dreadknots. Theyll be on hand Friday at 6 p.m. to give autographs at Lanier Field, located just behind ONeals Restaurant and just off U.S. Highway 90 in Madison. The fun rolls into downtown Madison Saturday, April 19 with the Down Home Days festival from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. featuring over 100 vendors, a Parade at 10 a.m., Antique and Classic car show, jeep and motorcycle show, a petting zoo, antique tractor and engine show, a frog hop, two tness runs and more. This year the Down Home Days Parade theme is Gone Country and one highlight is a 1912 Winona Wagon, owned by Harry Driggers of Wildwood. The wagon is one-of-a-kind in the southwest region of the US, restored to 90 percent of its original condition, according to Driggers. It was sold from a mercantile store in 1912 in Missouri, where a farm family used it every day until 1987, said Driggers. Festival-goers on the parade route will see the Winona Wagon Saturday, April 19 at 10 a.m., and later displayed at Four Freedoms Park. The Down Home Days Parade sponsored by Tri-County Electric travels down U.S. Highway 90 from ONeals Restaurant past the Courthouse, a different route from years past. The Down Home Days Easter weekend is packed with family-friendly activities, with sponsors such as Nestl Waters, Big Bend AHEC, Madison County Community Bank, Johnson & Johnson, Gordon Tractor and C.M. Brandies, Inc. The Madison County Chamber of Commerce & Tourism hosts the event. For the rst time in Madison County, a Special Needs Private Exhibition Rodeo takes place Thursday, April 17 at Lanier Field. Special Needs children, adults, families and organizations have received invitations to experience a free exhibition rodeo rsthand. Lunch will be provided and sponsored by Transeld Services. Thursday night at 5 p.m., a Barbecue Cook-Off fundraiser sponsored by Harveys Supermarket and Elmers Genealogy Corner will dish up $6 barbecued chicken meals leading up to the Pet Contest at 6 p.m. at Four Freedoms Park. Adorable pets will vie for top dog. Proceeds from the Barbecue Cook-Off go to Boyz to Kings, a non-prot organization to mentor young men in Madison County. Beckys Dance Steps Studio Recital at 6 p.m. April 18 energizes Pinckney Street between the Courthouse and Annex, with 14 street dances, including an elegant Easter presentation, following the Citizen of the Year announcement. Easter weekend Rodeo events, 6:30 p.m. nightly, feature Pastor Rick Lane of Amazing Horse Ministries, Friday, April 18 showing how his wild horse was tamed. The Circle Cross Cowboy Band performs Gospel music, Saturday, April 19. Walts Live Oak Ford is Vehicle Sponsor with the Main Gate Sponsor being Duke Energy. Chute Sponsors are Best Western, Busy Bee, Capital City Bank, Comcast Communications, Live Oak Pest Control and Stahl-Meyer Food. Event sponsors are A Main Street Realty, Buckeye Community FCU, Burger King, Burns Funeral Home, Lake Park of Madison, Madison County Community Bank, Madison Realty Group, NFCC, Odiorne Insurance, Townsend Livestock, Yogi Bears Jellystone Park Camp-Resort and Citizens State Bank. Ticket Sponsor is Madison Veterinary Clinic. Rodeo tickets are available at the gate only: $12 for age 13 and up; $5 for ages 5-12; children under 4 are free. The Down Home Days Festival begins Saturday, April 19 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. with over 100 vendors on both sides of Range Avenue, closed south of Highway 90 past Macon Street. Go online www.madison.org Down Home Days tab, for more information. Story SubmittedMadison County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism OfceWith mouthwatering recipes, a select number of top area chefs will compete in the Down Home Days 2014 BBQ Cook-Off Contest, sponsored by Harveys Supermarket of Madison. BBQ Cook-Off chicken plates with all sides will be sold leading up to the Pet Contest Thursday, April 17, starting at 5 p.m. at Four Freedoms Park. The $50 entry fee for chefs includes chicken that will be provided. Prizes are $100 for First Place and $50 for Second Place. Entrants must bring their own tables, extension cords, grills and other supplies. Side dishes of slaw, beans and Texas Toast will be provided for the meals sold to the public. The event is hosted by Boyz to Kings and all proceeds benet this mentoring organization for young men in Madison County. For more information call the Madison County Chamber of Commerce at (850) 973-2788.Beckys Dance Steps Studio To Perform At Down Home Days Festival Down Home Days Down Home DaysBBQ CookOff Announced BBQ CookOff Announced

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c MOBILE HOME FOR SALE FOR SALE WANTED FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTEDwww.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . 12A Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, April 11, 2014 AUCTION FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 4/7/2014 THROUGH 4/13/2014I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).3/26 rtn, n/c Deadline for Classifieds Every Monday and Wednesday 3:00 p.m. Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBe A CNA Would you like to work as a nursing assistant? Become a CNA. Quest Training offers a nurse taught, 40 hr. prep class. No GED required if age 18 yr. Day and Evening classes. 386-362-1065.4/2 4/30, pdSet Of New Tires For a Ford F150 Truck. Size 265/60/18. $400 for the set. Call (850) 464-7296.4/2, 4/9, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.3/12 rtn, n/cNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.3/12 rtn, n/cCDL Class A Driver Needed 2 years varied experience. Runs mostly SE extended area. Good 2 year MVR. Blue Cross and blue shield health insurance offered. (850) 929-2279.4/11 rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayJust received a new supply of repo homes Great price! Call for details (386) 466-8315.1/29 rtn, c Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Our newspaper ofce is seeking an outstanding individual to join or sales team. Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a good personality and LOVE to talk on the telephone? If you are a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, have a friendly can-doattitude, a great work ethic, are organized, and self-motivated then this job might be just for you. Valid Drivers License a must! Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper ofce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison. Too Much Junk? Do you have a garage or barn or attic full of junk and want it clean? Granddads barn that needs to be cleaned or removed? Let us make you an offer on it all And we clean it up at the same time. Call 850-973-7916 and leave a message.2/26 rtn, n/c We want your Ghosts!! We are collecting YOUR stories of Ghosts, Goblins, Spooks, Specters, Aliens, Haunted Houses, Paranormal Events, Angels, and any other Supernatural Tales from Madison County and surrounding counties. We want personal experiences, legends, and family traditions. Call 850-973-7916 and leave a message.2/26 rtn, n/cQueen Pillow Top Mattress and Box Set. New, still in company plastic. $195 obo. (850) 596-6437.3/14 4/9, pdBusy medical practice looking for part-time medical assistance. Send resume to CIMG 293 W Base Street Madison, Fl 32340.4/2, 4/9, c RN On Call Madison County This PRN position will provide evening and weekend On Call for Madison County primarily and occasionally may provide on call coverage for Taylor or Jefferson County. Must have current Florida RN license. BSN preferred. Minimum of 3 years of experience preferably in Hospice or home health. Interested candidates can fax their resume to (850)325-6290 or email to grace@bigbendhospice.org RN On Call Jefferson County This PRN position will provide evening and weekend On Call for Jefferson County primarily and occasionally may provide on call coverage for Taylor or Madison County. Must have current Florida RN license. BSN preferred. Minimum of 3 years of experience preferably in Hospice or home health. Interested candidates can fax their resume to (850)325-6290 or email to grace@bigbendhospice.org EOE/DFWP4/2, 4/9, c Set of four (4) Weld (Mountain Crusher) billet aluminum wheels 8 lug with bolt on center caps. Fits Dodge or Chevy. $200 OBO. Call (229) 460-5296.3/26 rtn, n/c AUCTION SATURDAY APRIL 12 AT 6:30 P.M. MADISON AUCTION HOUSE. 1693 SW MOSELEY HALL RD (CR360) 850 973-1444 SELLING ITEMS FOR HOME, YARD AND SHOP. TO MANY ITEMS TO LIST. SAVE OVER STORE PRICES AND HAVE SOME FUN. 10% BUYERS PREMIUM. MC, VISA, DISCOVER, DEBIT CARDS, CHECKS AND CASH ACCEPTED. AU3968 Brandon Mugge Auctioneer, AB2490.4/2, 4/9, pd Equipment operator needed, minimum three years experience required. Mechanical experience a plus. Must be willing to work nights and weekends. Email resume to valdostamill@yahoo.com.4/2, 4/9, c Announcement Of Job Vacancy The Madison County Foundation for Excellence in Education is seeking a person to ll the position of College Success Coach in their Take Stock in Children Program. The minimum educational requirement is a Bachelors degree, preferably in education or guidance. The deadline for applying is May 1, 2014. Anyone interested in an application should call Tim Sanders, (850) 464-1507 or Jo Willis, (850) 973-8583.4/4, 4/9, c A few chickens and a rooster for my yard. (850) 661-6868.4/9 rtn, n/cJMPHS is accepting applications for teachers, guidance/teacher, and administrative assistant. Please see www.jmphs.org for more information. JMPHS is a tuition-free public charter school that does not discriminate regarding employment or educational programs.4/9, 4/16, cNorth Florida Community College, Madison FL., has the following positions available: Project Coordinator of Healthcare Information Program; and Automation and Production Technology (APT) Instructor. See www.nfcc.edu for details. Staff Assistant position available at North Florida Community College. See www.nfcc.edu for details.4/9 4/23, cEmployment Opportunity Town Manager/Clerk Town of Lee is currently seeking a proven professional for the position of Town Manager/Clerk. Commission-Town Manager form of government. $1 million budget includes 6 departments (administration, public works, water, sewer, streets, and recreation services). Successful applicant must possess strong communication, leadership, organization, management, and computer skills. Knowledge in preparation and execution of budgets, QuickBooks (including payroll), water, sewer, public works, recreation and land planning is needed. Email your resume to leemanager@leeorida.org or apply at Town Hall, 286 NE CR 255, Lee FL 32059, Monday Friday, 8:00 am 5:00 pm. Copies of the full job description and application can be found on the towns website: ( www.leeorida.org ). The Town expects to ll the position by June 16th, 2014. Applications for this position are due no later than 5pm on April 30th, 2014. Salary Range: $25,000 to $28,000 The Town of Lee is a drug free workplace and an Equal Opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or disability. Applications Accepted For Open Positions Only.4/9, c RNs & PCTs Needed! If you love patient-centered health care with real relationships inside a company that encourages fun on and off the clock, then DaVita is the place for you. We offer career options to t your lifestyle! DaVita has openings now in Madison, for RN & PCT. The hours are M-W-F 5 a.m. 5 p.m. Dialysis experience is strongly preferred but DaVita will train. Why wait? Explore a career with DaVita today! Apply online at: http://careers.davita.com or contact Tiffy Christian at 877-482-7625. DaVita is an Equal Opportunity Employer. http://careers.davita.com 2011 DaVita Inc. All rights reserved.4/9, 4/16, c Auctions Absolute Auction-Black Warrior River, creek, Us Hwy 78,Walker County, Alabama parcels ,Jasper residential lots, April 17,1:00 pm-Details Gtauctions.com, 205.326.0833-Granger, Thagard&Assoc, Inc, Jack F Granger#873. Educational Services AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualied students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-741-9260 www.FixJets.com. Help Wanted ATTN: Drivers! Bring a Rider! $$$ Up to 50 cpm $$$ BCBS + 401k + Pet & Rider Quality Hometime Orientation Sign On Bonus CDL-A Req 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com. Averitt Express has New Dedicated CDL-A Driver Opportunities w/Excellent Benets & Regular Hometime. 855-430-8869 AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer Females, minorities, protected veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. CDL-A Team Owner Operators: $2,500 Lease Incentive! Team Dedicated Routes. Great Revenue & Regular Weekly Home Time! 888-486-5946 NFI Industries npartners.com. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Miscellaneous Miss Sunshine Pop Star Music Pageant. Hey Girls! Here's Your Chance Win $5,000 Cash, a Recording Contract, and Much More Prizes! 18+ Only Call (904) 246-8222 CypressRecords.com. NURSING CAREERS begin here Get trained in months, not years. Small classes, no waiting list. Financial aid for qualied students. Apply now at Centura Institute Orlando (888) 220-3219. Real Estate NEAR BOONE, NC 2+/ac. tract 350ft of rushing streams 3000ft elevation private and secluded underground utilities and paved roads from only $9900. Call 1-877-717-5273 ext 91. Real Estate/ Lots & Acreage Tennessee Log Home Sale! Saturday April 12th Only. New 1200 sf ready to nish log cabin on 10 acres with FREE Boat Slip on 160,000 acre recreational lake. Only $89,900. Excellent nancing. Call now 877-888-0267, x76.

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www.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A ----Legals---IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF OLIN HARRELL GODWIN, Deceased. File No. 2014-31-CP Division Probate NOTICE TO CREDITORS (summary administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notied that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of OLIN HARRELL GODWIN deceased, File Number 2014-31-CP, by the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 125 SW Range Avenue, Madison, Florida 32340 ; that the decedents date of death was December 28, 2013; that the total value of the estate is $8,000.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Kenneth Gregory Godwin 5538 Union Road and Tammy B. Godwin, his wife Hahira, Georgia 31632 Michael H. Godwin 4248 Louis Drive And Jayne C. Godwin, his wife Valdosta, Georgia 31605 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must le their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of rst publication of this Notice is April 11 2014. Attorney for Person Giving Notice:Person Giving Notice: RICHARD L. COLEMANKENNETH GREGORY GODWIN Attorney for the Petitioner5538 Union Road, Hahira, Coleman Talley, LLPGeorgia 31632 richard.coleman@colemantalley.com 910 North Patterson Street Valdosta, Georgia 31601 MICHAEL H. GODWIN (229) 242-7562, 4248 Louis Drive, Valdosta, (229) 333-0885 facsimile Georgia 31605 Florida Bar No. 0781568 4/11, 4/18

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14A Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, April 11, 2014 The All New 2015 Tahoe & Suburban 2014 RAM 1500 CREWAll prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or Valdosta dealerships. All prices good through April 12, 2014 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Truck prices include $500 rebate when financed with Chrysler Capital. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. 2013-2014 Motor Trend of the Year Back-to-Back First Time Ever per Motor Trend Magazine. 2014 RAM 2500 4 DOOR 4X4 HEAVY DUTYV1402845.7L HEMI, AUTO, HEATED LEATHER BUCKETS, REMOTE STARTNAVI ,20 CHROME WHEELS, REAR BACK-UP CAMERAMSRP $44,745 DISC. -$5,953 2014 RAM 1500 LARAMIE 4 DR Q1401382014 DODGE AVENGER Q1401112014 RAM 1500 QUAD Q140098 V140148 Q140044 2013 DODGE DART V130392 888-304-2277801 E. SCREVEN ST QUITMAN, GA888-463-68314164 N. VALDOSTA RD. VALDOSTA, GA 229-263-7561 8640 HWY 84 WESTAll prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or Valdosta dealerships.Vehicle prices include Trade-In & GM Loyalty Rebate (owners of 1999 or newer GM vehicles. All prices good through April 12, 2014 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. 2014 CHEVY CRUZE 1.8L ECOTEC ENGINEAUTO TRANSMISSIONPOWER EQUIPMENT GROUPON-STAR SIRIUS SATELLITE RADO 2014 CHEVY SONIC LTC140154 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DR LTALL-STAR EDITION 18 ALUM WHEELS, REAR CAMERA REMOTE START & MORE! MSRP: $37,120 DISC. $7,132 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DR LT 4X4 2014 SILVERADO 1500 C140162 2014 CHEVY EQUINOX 32 MPG (PER WINDOW STICKER) BLUE TOOTH WIRELESSUSB PORT, 2.4L SIDI SIRIUS/MP3 PLAYERALL-STAR EDITION 5.3L V8 18 ALUM WHEELS, REAR CAMERA REMOTE START, NAVI & MORE! MSRP $41,725 -DISC. $7,732 C140066860539 2014 CHEVY MALIBUC1401082014 DODGE JOURNEY V140068 2014 RAM 1500 Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2014 2014 RAM 3500 DUALLY 4 DOOR HEAVY DUTYQ1401276.7L CUMMIN DIESEL, REAR BACK-UP CAMERA, TRAILER BRAKE CONTROL 5TH WHEEL/GOOSENECK TOW GROUP, CHROME GROUPMSRP $48,205 DISC. -$6,451 2014 CHEVY CAMARO Everyone Knows Chevys Cost Less In Quitman!!!C150006 2015 SILVERADO 2500HD 4 DR 4X4 2015 CHEVY SUBURBAN2015 CHEVY TAHOE Best Place to Buy a New Truck 20132014 GRAND CARAVAN Q140042 Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2013 Best Place to Buy a New Truck 2014Supplier PricingYou Pay What We Pay! Over to Choose from! 2014 CHEVY IMPALAC140147 Huge Selection! Over Rams to Choose From!!! 2014 JEEP PATRIOT V140398 2014 JEEP CHEROKEE V140369 V1304322013 200 CONVERTIBLE 2013 DODGE CHALLENGER R/T 5.7L HEMI 20 CHROME WHEELS NAVI, LOADED! MSRP $37,065 DISC -$4,168 V130397

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M M a a d d i i s s o o n n E E n n t t e e r r p p r r i i s s e e R R e e c c o o r r d d e e r r S S e e c c t t i i o o n n B B A A p p r r i i l l 1 1 1 1 , 2 2 0 0 1 1 4 4 Health Health And AndWellness Wellness Guide Guide

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2014 Health & Wellness 2B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, April 11, 2014

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2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, April 11, 2014 3B From the office of: Morgan Family Dentistry 10820 Marvin Jones Blvd Dowling Park, FL 32064 386-658-5870 AGD: FACTSHEETCompiled for you by the Academy of General Dentist r

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Dry eye is a very common disorder in todays world, affecting all age groups. A person may experience the feeling of something like sand in their eyes, burning or itching. Some people experience blurred vision or excess tearing, and may not associate those symptoms with dryness. The causes of dry eye include aging, medications (especially certain blood pressure, antidepressants and antihistamines), and medical conditions such as arthritis and diabetes. Women frequently experience dry eye during pregnancy, menopause or using birth control pills. Long term computer use or TV viewing decreases blinking, which is required to spread tears over the eyes. Overhead fans save on energy bills but can cause dry eye symptoms, while windy, dry, low humidity days will do the same. The main treatment for dry eye symptoms is the addition of artificial tear drops to the tears on the front of the eye. Some people with more chronic or advanced dry eye need prescription eye drops. One form of drop actually makes the body produce more tears. Another type of drop reduces inflammation and irregularities on the front of the eye so that tears can spread more evenly. An approach to keep more tears on the front of the eye is to plug the tear draining canals. This can be done with plugs inserted into the canal, or closing the canals surgically. There is now evidence that omega 3 fatty acids help to increase tear production. This can be achieved by diet or supplements. Since dry eye is so common, if you experience any of the above symptoms, you should not suffer with it, but visit your eye doctor for the appropriate treatment. 2014 Health & Wellness 4B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, April 11, 2014 Helen King Symptoms, Causes and Treatments Dry Eyes:

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2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, April 11, 2014 5B Madison County Memorial Hospital Is Nearing Completion Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, April 3, 2014Shown above is the front main entrance to the new, almost completed Madison County Memorial Hospital. By Jessie R. Box Greene Publishing, Inc Ted Ensminger, Director of Marketing, expects patient transfers to begin August 1, 2014. The new hospital still has a ways to go. There are places where the ceiling is not installed and the flooring has not been started. The elevators are expected to be operational by June 15. May 15 is the expected date for the new hospital equipment to be installed. All wiring and plumbing is installed but are unusable until the building is inspected. What we are focusing on is what we refer to as holistic care, said Ensminger. What holistic care means is not just healing the body but healing the mind and the spirit as well. Taking care of the emotional needs of the patients as best as we possibly can. The hospital will begin the construction tours on April 21 through May 15. Women are not allowed any open-toed shoes, as it will still be a construction site. The completed tours begin after May 15. Anyone who cannot climb stairs is asked to wait until the elevators are operating.

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6B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, April 11, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness

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2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, April 11, 2014 7B By Carol KatzOrganizations across the Big Bend area come together each year to honor their volunteers as part of Aprils Volunteer Appreciation Month. This year Big Bend Hospice will show our appreciation to over 400 volunteers from our eight-county service areas. For over 30 years, Big Bend Hospice has been providing compassionate care to those facing a life-limiting illness. But through our Volunteer Program, we also provide others with the opportunity to increase their quality of life. Volunteering is more than just helping others. Volunteering is important in that it goes a long way towards creating a healthy community. When people get together for a common mission, things get done more efficiently. In a time when resources can be scarce and the economy is questionable, volunteers become more valuable than ever before. People who volunteer get connected to others, strengthen friendships and build self-confidence. Volunteering showcases someones gratitude and gives them an outlet to give back. Volunteers with Big Bend Hospice give others hope. A person will be uplifted when they realize that there are people who will help them out. It brings back their faith in the goodness of people and makes them aware that not everything is about money. Volunteer opportunities through Big Bend Hospice allow people to share their creative gifts like photography, quilting and scrapbooking. They can offer practical tasks such as cooking, running errands and light housekeeping. BBH Volunteers can also participate in relationship-building activities such as sitting vigil through the last few hours of life, providing respite to a caregiver or visiting patients in their homes or at the Margaret Z. Dozier Hospice House in Tallahassee. More than anything, volunteering emboldens the human spirit, whether through Big Bend Hospice or other nonprofit organizations. The selfless act of helping another person provides a spiritual boost. Knowing you did something good for someone or some cause is an emotionally uplifting experience that can never be matched by money or fame. So in honor of Volunteer Appreciation month, I encourage you to look into volunteering if youre not already and more importantly, thank someone you know who volunteers. Carol Katz is the Team Manager for Jefferson/Madison/Ta ylor Counties of Big Bend Hospice. Big Bend Hospice has been serving this community since 1983 with compassionate end-of-life care along with grief and loss counselors available to provide information and support to anyone in Leon, Jefferson, Taylor, Madison, Gadsden, Liberty, Franklin or Wakulla County. If you would like additional information about services, please call (850) 878-5310 or visit www.bigbendhospice.org. The Benefits Of Volunteering We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give. Norman MacEwan Carol Katz

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By: Ron Pollack Have you started to experience challenges with living on your own? Do you need help with medical care or daily activities? A nursing home may seem like your only option. But there are good alternatives, including home care and assisted living. However, it's important for you to learn what kinds of services Medicare and Medicaid will and won't cover. (Medicaid is the nation's health insurance program for low-income individuals and familiesincluding seniorsand for people with disabilities.) What is homeand community-based care? You may have access to services such as Meals on Wheels, visiting and shopper services, and adult day care programs. But what if you need other kinds of assistance? Home health services (also called homeand community-based care) help seniors who need additional support so they can safely stay in their homes or who are recovering after a hospital stay. These services include short-term nursing care and rehabilitative care (like physical therapy). Registered nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech pathologists, home health aides and medical social workers provide home health care. Medicare pays for a limited number of one-hour home health visits, but only for medical care. Medicaid may pay for other types of home care, depending on your situation and the state you live in. You may be able to find other nonmedical services in your community through your local Area Agency on Aging. What is assisted living? Assisted living facilities (or assisted living homes) bridge the gap between independent living and nursing homes. These facilities typically provide services like assistance with personal care and medications, and they give residents more freedom and privacy than nursing homes. They range in size from small houses that serve a few residents to very large facilities with hundreds of residents. Assisted living facilities cost less than nursing homes but are still very expensive, costing an average of $3,300 a month. What do Medicare and Medicaid pay for nursing home care and nursing home alternatives? Many people are confused about what Medicare and Medicaid cover. Nursing Home Care Medicare does not cover most nursing home care. Medicare pays only for certain skilled nursing or rehabilitative care, and only after a hospital stay The duration of this coverage is limited. To learn more about coverage limits, visit the Medicare website at http://www.medicare.gov/coverage/skilled-nursing-facility-care.html. Medicaid covers most nursing home care if you have a low income. Each state sets its own income eligibility level for Medicaid coverage of nursing home care. In many states, you must also have limited assets to have Medicaid cover your nursing home care. Alternatives to Nursing Home Care Medicare covers very little of this care. For example, Medicare won't pay your rent for an assisted living facility, but it will cover some health care you receive while you are in assisted living. Medicaid pays for some assisted living costs for people with low incomes in several states. Every state has at least one Medicaid program that will pay for other alternatives to nursing facility care, and most have multiple programs. Each state's program is different. Plus, individuals must meet the eligibility rules for that particular program. For example, some programs focus on individuals with particular health care needs. And some programs are limited to a certain number of people, which creates waiting lists. Many people end up paying the full cost of assisted living entirely out of their own pockets. To Learn More To learn more about Medicare and Medicaid coverage of nursing home care, assisted living, and other options, contact your State Health Insurance Assistance Program, or SHIP. SHIPs offer free counseling and assistance by phone and in person. Find the SHIP in your state online at https://shipnpr.shiptalk.org/shipprofile.aspx. Also, the Eldercare Locator connects older Americans and their caregivers with information on senior services. Find it online at http://www.eldercare.gov/eldercare.net/Public/Index.aspx. 2014 Health & Wellness 8B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, April 11, 2014 William R. Howard, M.D.Board CertifiedDermatologistSpecializing In The Diagnosis And Treatment Of Skin CancerNew Patients Welcome(229) 247-25952704 North Oak St B-2 V aldosta, GA 31602 ALTERNATIVES TO NURSING HOME CARE When You Need A Little Help:

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The Arc of Florida, The Arc Big Bend and Florida Developmental Disabilities Council today unveiled a plan designed to ensure that Floridians with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) are fully included in their communities and not segregated in institutions and nursing homes. The four-part Invest in Floridas Communities plan includes Medicaid Waiver Waitlist Funding, Increased Rates for Services, Community-Based Services and Alternative Family Homes. We encourage lawmakers and Governor Scott to take this opportunity to invest in our communities and protect some of Floridas most vulnerable citizens, said Pat Young, President of The Arc of Florida. This plan will keep individuals with developmental disabilities out of institutions and allow them to become contributing members of society. The Arc Big Bend is proud that our local governments have adopted Resolutions acknowledging March as Developmental Disabilities Awareness month. We hope that the local government and our community as a whole will support the Invest in Floridas Communities plan for those members of our community that face these challenges on a daily basis. Here is a breakdown of the Invest in Floridas Communities plan: Medicaid Waiver Waitlist Funding Florida must invest in Medicaid Waiver Waitlist Funding by supporting the Governors recommendation for $20 million in funding for the 2014 2015 fiscal year. The current Developmental Disabilities Medicaid Waiver system and long waitlist for services is inadequately funded to meet the health, safety and basic rights of individuals with I/DD. Funding is essential to providing necessary services and supports to Floridians with I/DD. Increased Rates for Services Florida must increase provider rates by five percent for the 2014-2015 fiscal year and the funding for this should not be taken away from current client services. The Arc of Florida also supports building a plan to continue to increase rates in the coming years and increasing all provider rates to at least minimum wage. Florida must invest in provider rate increases so individuals with I/DD are served by qualified and quality professionals. Right now, professionals working with Floridians with I/DD make less money than employees at fast food restaurants, although they are responsible for lives and required to have a much higher level of training. Payments for Floridians with I/DD in residential settings currently range from as low as $3.01 per hour for basic care to $11.04 per hour to care for the most involved individuals. Community-Based Services Florida must support the request to the Agency for Persons with Disabilities to create and implement a comprehensive five-year plan to reduce the number of people with I/DD living in Florida institutions. The plan will include a review of the cost of serving individuals in state institutions compared to community-based settings. Florida must invest in community-based services so people are not institutionalized. This will benefit both individuals with I/DD and taxpayers. Florida taxpayers would save at least $61 million per year by funding community-based services as opposed to institutional placements. There are approximately 677 individuals with I/DD living in Florida public institutions. The average cost of living in an institution is about $120,000 per year per person, while community-based services are $30,000 per person annually. Alternative Family Homes Florida must make funding and services available to families caring for children who are medically fragile so they can leave nursing homes and return to their communities. There are 149 children with medically complex conditions living in skilled nursing facilities in Florida. Families wishing to keep their children with extensive medical needs at home should be able to do so. The Arc of Florida also believes families wishing to adopt children with extensive medical needs should be able to do so.The Arc of Florida, Inc., is a non-profit organization whose mission is to improve the quality of life for persons with developmental disabilities. Working with local, state and national partners, The Arc of Florida advocates for local chapters, public policies and high quality supports for people with developmental and other disabilities to be fully included in all aspects of their community. Find out how to get involved by visiting www.arcflorida.org. 2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, April 11, 2014 9B Developmental Disability Advocates Urge Lawmakers To Invest In Floridas Communities

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By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc. A Health Education Expo, sponsored by Healthcare Workforce Network and North Florida Community College (NFCC) Allied Health Programs of Madison was held April 4 on the Madison Courthouse lawn. The expo started at 10 a.m., and ran until 2 p.m., where student groups from NFCC programs assisted Madison residents and other attendees of the expo with blood pressure and blood sugar checks, handed out information to participants on ways to increase healthy lifestyle habits and prevention of diseases as well as offering information on the colleges health-based programs. Other organizations who participated in the expo and offered information on health and health services were Tri-County Family Health Center, Saint Leo University, Madison Health and Rehabilitation, Curves Fitness Center, Little Pine Pediatrics, Madison County Memorial Hospital, Big Bend Hospice and the Madison County Health Department, represented by the department programs of: Whole Child TriCounty, Healthy Start, Tobacco Free Madison and the Madison Abstinence Program. After registering, attendees were given a check-off card as an incentive for them to receive all the information and take advantage of all the services offered. When a participants card was full of check marks, they returned to the registration table to receive a gift for attending. Since the expo ran through the lunch hour, the LPN class of NFCC was selling chicken and rice dinners in an effort to raise money for their graduation and testing expenses, helping both the class and hungry visitors alike. 10B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, April 11, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness Successful In Keeping Madison Residents InformedHealth EducationExpo Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, April 4, 2014NFCCs Pharmacy Technician class was at the expo, teaching medication safety. Standing left to right in the front row are Ralaysha Daniels, Shatoria Menchan, Rebecca Jackson, Cherry Johnson and Sydnee Jacobs. The instructor for the class, Mekia Jackson, is in the back. story cont. on page 11B

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2014 Health & Wellness Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, April 11, 2014 11B Expo continued from page 10B Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, April 4, 2014The Madison County Health Department Abstinence Program directors were on hand to speak to attendees about prevention of sexually transmitted diseases and to promote healthy attitudes on abstinence. Speaking to attendees were, from left to right, Merv Mattair and Pam Robinson. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, April 4, 2014The Medical Administrative Specialists were in charge of registration at the expo. Sitting at the table from left to right are Emily Parsons and Paula McGhee. In the middle row, from left to right are RN and class instructor Tammy Kemp, Susie Hernandez, Pamela Barron, DeAnna Haynes, Gail Crawford, Leola Seabrooks and Aaron Thomas. In the back row, from left to right are Sharell Miller, Lisa West, Laverne Smith and Shirley L. Mattair. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Rose Klein, April 4, 2014Attending the expo and having her blood sugar tested is Cynthia Francis-Ensminger (seated) and LPN student Kasey Kelley, representing NFCC.

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12B Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, April 11, 2014 2014 Health & Wellness