The Madison enterprise-recorder

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Material Information

Title:
The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title:
Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title:
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication:
Madison Fla
Creation Date:
May 31, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note:
Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID:
UF00028405:00616

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Our 149th Year, Number 16www.greenepublishing.com Since 1865, T elling It Like It Is And Defending The Peasant's Right T o Know Index 1 Sections, 18 Pages Local Weather Viewpoints 2 Around Madison 4-5 Greenville Christmas 6-8Church/History 9 Gift Ideas 11-13 School 14-15Classieds 16 Legals 17Friday, December 20, 2013 Madison, Florida Two Arrested When Meth Lab BustedMadison County Sheriff Ben Stewart reports that on Tuesday night, Dec. 17, at 10:17 p.m., deputies of the Madison County Sheriff's Ofce responded to a residence located at 823 NW Hickory Road to investigate a complaint of loud music. Upon arrival, deputies went to the front and rear of the residence. As deputies knocked on the front door a black male later identied as Artavious Rashod Gatlin, 21, of Quitman, Ga. was observed exiting the back door of the residence holding what appeared to be specic items used to manufacture methamphetamine. Deputies identied themselves and ordered Gatlin to stop, however Gatlin ignored the command and ed back Steve Vickers, Jr. Artavious Rashod Gatlin See Meth Bust On Page 3A Hallelujah ChristmasŽ To Raise Money For The Salvation ArmyMichael Keeler will present "A Hallelujah Christmas" on Saturday, Dec. 21, at the Lee Town Pavilion."A Hallelujah Christmas" is a concert that will be a fundraiser for the Salvation Army. Admission is free and there will be kettles to put money in for the Salvation Army. The concert will begin at 6 p.m. and feature music by Mortal MisGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob BembryMortal Mission, featuring Billy Haynie, left, and Bill Maher will perform at the Lee Town Pavilion Saturday. Allen McCormick is also shown. See Hallelujah Christmas On Page 3Rep. Ted Yoho, Johnson, Hardee Help Soldier Return Home After Grandfather Passes AwayBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc.When the grandson of a Brooks County, Ga., man, William James "Jamie" Mitchell, was not allowed to leave Afghanistan to attend his grandfather's funeral, two Madison County men, including the Supervisor of Elections and a Madison County Sheriff's deputy, went to work looking to help him and they found help through Rep. Ted Yoho's ofce. According to Sheriff's Sgt. Brad Johnson, Royce Hutcherson's family had contacted him, after Hutcherson had died, to see what he could do about getting his grandson home for the funeral. Johnson contacted the Veterans Administration and the Red Cross, who offered little hope since it was Hutcherson's grandson and not his own son. Mitchell's father had murdered the boy's mother when he was 11 years old and he had stayed with his grandfather a while during his formative years. Johnson contacted Hardee, who immediately contacted a number of elected ofcials, some who didn't even bother to return his calls. Despite the government shutdown at the time, though, Rep. Yoho (R-Jacksonville) called and told Hardee that he would work to get Mitchell back on American soil and that he would not take no for an answer. Yoho was able to contact a four-star general, who had earlier said that the young man would not be able to leave the front lines in Afghanistan. The rst time Hutcherson's grandson was called, the connection was lost because the soldier came under re. Mitchell was nally able to make it back to the States. Although it was too late for the funeral, the funeral home had held the body so the young man could see it. The soldier also did not have to return to Afghanistan. Photo submittedUS Rep. Ted Yoho (R-Jacksonville) helped a young soldier get home from Afghanistan when his grandfather died. Jamie Mitchell is shown with wife Brittany, and son Riley. Project Cares Visits School BoardBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.People with developmental disabilities want the same things out of life as anyone. They want the same quality of life. They want to feel safe and be protected from harm. They want to be people of value, who are valued by others. They want to do productive things in the community. But they might need a little extra help in getting there.Teresa Gallegos and Leslie McLeod addressed the Madison County School Board as representatives of PROJECT CARES of Madison, Taylor and Jefferson Counties, representing a coalition of volunteer parents with developmentally disabled children, or people who are themselves developmentally disabled: those with cerebral palsy, autism, Down's Syndrome and other conditions. The organization started about a year and a half ago. The volunteers hail from the public, private and business communities, and their goal is for people to "see the person, not the disability," as well as improving opportunities for people with developmental disabilities to be a part of, be included in, and even give back to, theirGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 10, 2013Teresa Gallegos and Leslie McLeod speak to the Madison County School Board on behalf of Project Cares, a coalition looking for innovative ways to make children and adults with developmental disabilities an integral part of the community. See Project Cares On Page 3 Christmas Gift Guide See Pages 11-13 Page 15 Page 4

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Celebrating the Christmas season American style means food is a part of the festivities. There is always food preparation for guests, family, covered dish events and buffets. As you prepare for holiday gatherings and meals, USDA reminds us to keep foods fresh and safe to eat. If food containing harmful bacteria is consumed, it could cause foodborne illness. So, when you serve food, follow this food safety checklist recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water for a full 20 seconds before and after handling raw food. Use plastic or other non-porous cutting boards. Cutting boards should be run through the dishwasher – or washed with soap and hot water – after each use. Store raw meat, poultry, and seafood on a plate or tray, so raw juices don’t drip onto other foods. Use one cutting board for raw meat products and another one for salads and other ready-to-eat foods, or wash cutting boards in between each use. Never place cooked food on a plate that previously held raw meat, poultry or seafood unless the plate has been washed. Bacteria spreads quickly with dirty sponges, dishcloths, or towels, so change them frequently. Bacteria also thrive in the moist areas where bits of food may exist. Use paper towels or freshlycleaned sponges or cloths and soap and hot water to clean food preparation surfaces. When cooking meat, poultry and other dishes, use a food thermometer to make sure foods are cooked to a safe internal temperature. When reheating sauces, soups, and gravies, bring them to a boil. Heat other leftovers thoroughly to 165F. Make sure the refrigerator temperature is 40F or below and 0F or below in the freezer. Occasionally verify these temperatures using an appliance thermometer. Refrigerate or freeze perishables, prepared foods, and leftovers within two hours. Never defrost or marinate food at room temperature; use the refrigerator. You can also thaw foods in airtight packaging in cold water (change the water every 30 minutes, so the food continues to thaw). Or, thaw in the microwave, if you’ll be cooking the food immediately. Divide large amounts of leftovers into shallow containers for quick cooling in the refrigerator. Don’t over-ll the refrigerator. Cold air must circulate to keep food at a safe temperature. For more information on keeping your holiday food safe, contact the Madison County Extension ofce. The University of Florida Extension/ IFAS – Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution. Christmas time is almost here. I think of Jesus’ humble birth in a manger in Bethlehem so many years ago. I think of all the gifts He has given me in my life, including salvation from sins. I think of my wonderful family and friends. I think of that wonderful Christmas gift two years ago, when He raised me from my deathbed. I have all the gifts that a man deserves but I thought I would have a little fun this year and put my Christmas wish list on here. The only things on this list that I really have needs for this year are for my family to be healthy and for my SUV to be xed. I need reliable transportation for my family in case something happens. I have some really awesome friends who are helping as well as they can with the problem and my work family has allowed me to use a work van. As far as my don’t need list this year: *A new smart phone and about a year of prepaid service. *A leather bomber jacket *Bluetooth headphones, so I’m not stuck to whatever I am listening to and I would have room to walk away from a stereo, TV or computer and still hear what’s going on. I don’t really need any of the things mentioned above. Although I may not have everything I want, I have all that I need. I have a roof over my head, a warm house to live in, and clothes to wear. I have a wonderful church to attend and a best friend and big brother in Jesus Christ. I have a job and wonderful friends and the best family anyone could ask for. My Christmas wish for you is that, if you don’t already know it, for you to realize what Jesus Christ’s life really meant on this Earth and that He died on the Cross and was resurrected to save everyone from their sins. My greatest Christmas wish is that everyone who is not a Christian comes to know Jesus as his or her Savior. Merry Christmas. Yes, Jesus Christ is the reason for the season. Jacobs Ladder Viewpoints & Opinions2Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 Jacob BembryColumnist Conservative Corner Conservative Corner By Claudia Anderson Diann DouglasGuest ColumnistMadison County Extension Service My Own Prison So I held my head up high, hiding hate that burns inside,Which only fuels the selsh pride, I cry out to God seeking only His decision Gabriel stands and conrms I've created my own prison. ---C reed, “My Own Prison” I read an interview the other day where evangelist Kenneth Copeland is quoted as saying that PTSD and similar conditions, including depression, were not of God, and therefore "good Christians" did not have conditions such as that. According to the Mr. (Rev) Copeland, if you are a proper Christian, you would not be affected by these problems because you would simply "hand it over to God" and get over it. I was appalled. Seriously? Perhaps one of the things that grieved me most was who said it. This is not some silly Ph.D. sitting in his ivory-towered university or laboratory. This is a nationally recognized preacher, a purveyor (creator) of current Christian doctrine (or in this case dogma). This is someone who people look to for actual guidance. (Granted this is the same man who he and his preacher daughter helped spawn an outbreak of measles by telling their parishioners to forgo childhood vaccinations because God would heal them, but still.) Exactly -But Still! This is a man who people look up to for guidance, and he is telling people that if they are suffering from depression or PTSD, then it is their own fault because they are not good Christians? To he who is given much, much will be expected. Do not get me wrong. The ultimate healer IS God. The Creator gave life; The Creator heals life. Creator is Healer. But His healing comes through those that He has created and called to that position. A condition that affects the mind is no different than one that affects the body. PTSD is to the mind what diabetes or the u is to the body. Telling the brain to push off its illness and get over it is like telling the body to get over that silly insulin or virus problem and just get over it. Having depression or PTSD is no more a handicap than diabetes or anything else. In fact people with traditional “handicaps” will tell you that the only handicap is in the mind. The prison we create is believing that we cannot overcome these issues. The true disease is thinking that you are hampered by your condition and believing that you cannot overcome it. God gave us medications for diabetes so that His people could overcome their trials. He gave us medications and counseling for depression or PTSD so that His people could overcome. Before you think you are at risk of succumbing to your trials, let us think about something. We all remember the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist. At the end of the baptism, God calls down with the message, "This is my son in whom I am well pleased." (Matt 3:17.) That is the end of that chapter. The very next verse is Matt 4:1, and if you read it straight through without the chapter break, it goes something like this: "This is My son, in whom I am well pleased. Then Jesus was led up into the desert by the Spirit to be tempted by the Satan." Get my point? If the Creator of All things, God of Heaven and Earth, the Great Architect, if He takes His Son, in whom He is well pleased, and leads him unto temptation and tribulation, then is it not understandable that we too should have testing and trials? Having diabetes does not make you a bad Christian. It makes you a person with a trial. Having PTSD or depression does not make you a bad Christian. It makes you a person with a trial. When a preacher tells you that you are not a good Christian because of your “problem,” then in my humble opinion, they are not very Reverend. The prison is not what was put on you. It is the one you created by thinking you are stuck where you are. The prison is also the one that you allow to be put on you by other people when listening to them telling you what makes you “not good.” No matter who that person is. You are not the problem. Think about it. Harvey GreeneGuest Columnist Once a year, the birth of a baby is represented in a small nativity scene on the Shaw Air Force Base in South Carolina. This year, the Military Religious Freedom Foundation (MRFF) demanded that this annual “birth” be aborted and “buried” under wraps for removal, and the Pentagon, playing the role of Herod, responded with directives. However, just as there was a resurrection of the man who grew from the baby represented in this drama, the Nativity scene has also been resurrected, this time at the base chapel. Why is it so inappropriate to display a religious symbol, while not forcing on anyone, the faith behind that symbol? How is it that a little, plastic baby can offend someone? Well, I am offended when Christians are refused the right of expression, which, in turn, is forcing on us the religion of atheism. We have allowed our CHRISTmas to be stolen through political correctness and by the exchanging of the green dollar sign for the green CHRISTmas tree. Where will we feel the next attack? TREES FOR TROOPS Perhaps my ignorance is due to not having television service in my home, but today brought my rst knowledge of the Trees for Troops program launched in 2005, which is sponsored by the Christmas SPIRIT Foundation and FedEx Corp. My response was, “Wow! I didn’t know that!” Last month at Dull’s Tree Farm in Thorntown, Ind., an event was held where volunteers from FedEx, Indiana Christmas Tree growers, local FFA students and the Indiana Department of Agriculture helped organize and prepare trees for shipment to U.S. troops stationed overseas. During the weekend of Dec. 6-8, more than 30 farms and lots across the country had a FedEx trailer at their sites to receive donated trees for delivery, during the following week, to military families at participating bases. Just last week, FedEx delivered trees to MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa for active duty members and their families. This program, in its rst year, was organized in only 45 days and delivered 4,300 real CHRISTmas trees to families at ve military bases in the U.S. and overseas. Due to the separation that is often felt by military families, a real CHRISTmas tree can ease the feeling of distance and be the best gift they could have received during the Christmas season. These are the impressive totals through 2012: Trees delivered 122,180 Trees shipped overseas 2,859 Farms donating trees 800 Bases receiving trees 65 Countries with deliveries 156 FedEx miles traveled 419,862 Again, I say “Wow!” Through the CHRISTmas Spirit Foundation, we too, can help provide real Christmas trees for our military and their families, helping to keep the traditional CHRISTmas spirit alive. To all the volunteers, donors, tree farms and the FedEx organization, thank you for delivering all those CHRISTmas trees. God bless you, our military and all the families represented. MERRY CHRISTMAS! SHAW AIR FORCE BASE DISCRIMINATION AND ABORTIONŽ? Christmas Wishes Think Food Safety During The Christmas SeasonTHE REPUBLICAN CLUB OF MADISON COUNTY Meets Monday, January 13, 2014, at noon at Shelby's Restaurant EVERYONE WELCOME Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee MadisonRepublican@embarqmail.com Something To Think About A person can live without food for about a month, but only about a week without water. If the amount of water in your body is reduced by just 1%, you'll feel thirsty. If it's reduced by 10%, you'll die. Did You Know?

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hometown communities. The organization also provides support to Madison Autism Parents (MAP) and Always Support Kids with developmental disabilities (ASK). The independent coalition of volunteers has the support of several state agencies, including the Florida Developmental Disabilities Council, the Ounce of Prevention Fund of Florida, the Agency For Persons With Disabilities and Arc of Madison and Jefferson, providing information and research support; Arc of Madison has also provided meeting space for the group when needed. The dilemma faced by the coalition is that with tough economic times, government and medical support services, which are critical for health, survival and quality of life for developmentally disabled individuals, are being cut. There are over 22,000 known persons with developmental disabilities in Florida, all on waiting lists for services, some for over a decade; but in Madison, Taylor and Jefferson Counties, there are 26, 54, and 35 individuals, respectively. With the much smaller number of people in the tri-county area, the coalition believes it can reach every one of them; to do that, they want to develop a network of community supports for those individuals, so that they can reach their full potential, by providing opportunities and support for people who often cannot go anywhere alone. The network would not be a handout, but a partnership. The main mission is to educate the community, promote awareness and put innovative strategies in place that would help the developmentally disabled participate and be a part of their community. “They want to be a part of their school, their church, and events around town like Light Up Madison,” said Gallegos. However, the support services that would facilitate those activities are being cut. The volunteer coalition wants to involve the community and mobilize local, non-traditional resources into a sustainable support system that would replace the disappearing services. As they clear-cut the funding forest, grassroots are needed states one of the coalition’s informational handouts. “We have to be a grassroots organization that grows back what is being cut,” Gallegos told the school board members, inviting them to share their experience and expertise with the coalition and help with community education and forming a community resource committee. Leslie McLeod, who has a son diagnosed with autism, told the board that, “the mountains are pretty high, but we’ve picked out three mountains.” One was having a special day class for developmentally disabled children in one of the outlying schools. Since some of the children, especially the ones with autism, can become over-stimulated, the day class in a smaller school environment would be more benecial, more conducive to learning and mingling with their peers, and less intimidating than the mammoth Central School, where they tend to disappear into a classroom and not come out again. The point is to let them experience being out among other children and to let other children see them, get to know them and understand them. Also, children do better in the smaller school environment that is more like the calmer home environment where they live. The second mountain is to promote the children’s inclusion in the school yearbooks, where they can really be seen as part of the student body, and not just the ‘special day class.’ The third is to ght the school-to-couch syndrome, where the children go home from school and then just “veg out” in front of the TV set, by including them in afterschool activities. Public schools receive federal dollars and federal dollars come with strings attached; one of those strings is making after school activities accessible to all students. The coalition would like the board’s help in guring out how to do that, “so that the school-tocouch doesn’t keep happening, happening, happening.” In the meantime, since the Project Cares volunteers have been working in the tricounty area, they have formed a support group for parents of developmentally disabled children, made their voices heard and raised community awareness through local media, and have already managed to include the children in some community activities for the past year, such as Downtown Halloween and Down Home Days. They have also put together a summer “Buddy Camp” that allows the children to experience summer camp, and an Art Workshop For Autism. The paintings that the children created were later auctioned off, and the kids were thrilled to see people actually buying their artwork. The group would like to recruit more members to work together and help climb those mountains, and they invite any community members who would like to get involved to come forward and share their expertise and knowledge. Project Cares meets at Big Bend Arc every third Thursday of each month from 6 to 7 p.m. To get on their contact list and receive more information, email Joe Anson at janson@ounce.org or call (850) 921-4494, ext. 103.sion and MJB. George Blevins, of the Salvation Army, will speak briey on the goals of the Salvation Army and what the group does during the Christmas season. Jacob Bembry will serve as emcee for the event. Everyone is invited to go out and help the Salvation Army make a difference this Christmas season. From Page One Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 World NewsBy Rose KleinMan With Sword Demands Free FoodIn San Antonio, Texas, a 28-year-old man walked into the Alondras De Jalisco restaurant and asked for free tacos. When the waitress informed Adam Kramer they would not be free, he began sliding a sword in and out of its sheath that he was wearing around his waist. The man left the restaurant when his phone rang, prompting the waitress to lock the door. Kramer came back to the door of the restaurant, yelling that “he wanted free tacos or somebody was going to die.” Kramer left the scene, but was arrested the following day on an unrelated charge of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon where he was recognized from the incident at Alondras De Jalisco. Kramer was charged with aggravated robbery in connection with the restaurant incident.Thieves Take Christmas Gifts While Child WatchesIn Forest Park, Ga., Christmas presents intended for a nine-year-old boy were stolen from his grandparents’ home as he watched. Two armed men entered the house of Charles Campbell and his wife by way of an unlocked door. One man held the family captive by holding a pair of scissors at the back of Campbell’s wife while the other man went through the house looking for things to steal. The men took all the gifts intended for the Campbells’ grandson, along with other household items and electronics. The Campbells said they had spent months saving for the gifts. No one was hurt during the robbery but police currently do not have any suspect in the robbery.Missing Dog Brings Reward Of Familys CarIn Elizabethtown, Ky., a family has offered their 1999 Pontiac Grand Prix as a reward for their missing golden retriever. Ashley and Mike Burns said, “Bella” ran off with their other dog, “Marley,” who has since been found by animal control, but “Bella” remains missing. Despite 10 years of trying, the Burns haven’t been able to have any kids and view the two dogs as their children. Ashley Burns said, “We love our pets like children, like family members.” The car is valued at $3,100. Mike Burns said, “We want people to take the car. We don’t want people to say, I’ll give you your dog back, we don’t want your car.” We want people to know that this is payment on a reward, however you want to look at it, for bringing our dog back.” 12/11 Deontre Martez Williams – VOP (possession of more than 20 grams of marijuana) Alvin Humphrey, Jr. – Criminal registration 12/12 Barry Alonzo Terry – No charge information available 12/13 Robert Lee Lowery – Resisting arrest without violence, disorderly conduct Kim Anderson – Possession of methamphetamine, battery, child abuse/endangerment, possession of drug equipment, manufacture of methamphetamine 12/16 Derrick Dewayne Mackey – Drug possession, possession of drug equipment Eric Antonio Brown – Possession of a weapon, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, possession of drug paraphernalia 12/17 Jimmy Lee Weatherspoon – VOP Timothy Ray Linville – Possession of drug paraphernalia, improper tag. Information in the Jail Report is provided to Greene Publishing, Inc. by the Madison County Sheriff’s Office. All people are considered innocent until proven guilty. Questions about people identified in the report should be directed to the MCSO at (850) 973-4001. Jail ReportMadison County… The MadisonEnterprise-Recorder PublisherEmerald GreeneSenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris, Rose KleinGraphic DesignerTori SelfAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette Dunn, Shanna SwopeBookkeeperBrooke KinsleyClassified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classi“eds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Wednesday at 3 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included)Since 1865 -Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity.ŽThe Madison The Madison Enterprise-Recorder Enterprise-RecorderMadison Recorder established 1865 New Enterprise established 1901 Consolidated June 25, 1908 Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post Of“ce 32340. Publication No. 177.400. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison Enterprise-Recorder P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.P.O. Box 772 € Madison, FL 32341 1695 South SR 53 € Madison, FL 32340 (850) 973-4141 € Fax: (850) 973-4121 greenepub@greenepublishing.com www.greenepublishing.com 2013 Meth Bust Cont. From Page 1into the residence. Deputies immediately pursued Gatlin inside the residence and detected a strong chemical odor that the deputies recognized as the odor Methamphetamine produces when being cooked. Deputies located Gatlin in a rear bedroom and another male identied as Steve Allen Vickers, Jr., 22, of Madison in the living room. Deputies also observed an active meth lab and several weapons including a “sawed off” shotgun in plain sight. Deputies evacuated the residence and placed both Gatlin and Vickers under arrest. Madison County Drug Task Force investigators responded to the scene and assumed control of the investigation. Agents of the Lake City Police Department that are certied in meth lab dismantling and removal assisted with the destruction and cleanup of the lab after all evidence had been collected. Gatlin and Vickers were charged with manufacturing methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a short-barreled shotgun and possession of a rearm during a felony. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob BembryMJB, featuring from left to right: Michael Keeler (on guitar), Burt Sealey (on drums) and Chad McCormick (on bass) will perform at A Hallelujah Christmas.Ž Hallelujah Christmas Cont. From Page 1 Project Cares Cont. From Page 1

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Melvin Boynton, 64, of Madison, A United States Army Veteran and entrepreneur, died Saturday, November 16, 2013 in Durham, North Carolina. He was the son of the late Hayman Boynton and the late Rosetta “Cat” Simmons and stepfather, Tim Simmons. Melvin attended the Madison County School System and Putnam County where he graduated. He received the National Defense Service Medal SS M-14 while serving in the United States Army. He also served in the United States Army Reserves. He leaves to cherish his memory, two sons, Jason Hasty of Hempstead, N.Y. and Joshua Boynton of Madison; ve daughters, Melvine Boynton, Meloise Boynton, Jawanda Boynton, Brittany Boynton and Da’Mah Johnson all of Madison; three stepchildren, Jermaine Monlyn, Tara Monlyn and Travis Gillyard; two grandchildren, Melvin Boynton and Ja’Asja Hasty; one god-child, Takeria Beasley and eleven step-grandchildren; ve brothers, Howard Johnson (Patsy) of Madison, Reverend Herman Joseph (Sharon) of Lake Wales, Alfonso Frazier of Hempstead, N.Y., Bobby Simmons (Evelina) of Gainesville and Johnny Simmons (Lenora) of Hempstead, N.Y.; two sisters, Deborah Simmons and Patricia Craig (Michael) both of Madison; two aunts, Mary E. Williams and Careatha Williams (Andrew) both of Madison; special friend, Joyce Ann Hazzard and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and sorrowing friends. Funeral Services were held at 11 a.m. Saturday, November 23, 2013 at New Bethel Primitive Baptist Church in Madison. Burial followed at the Oak Ridge Cemetery in Madison.Around Madison County4 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 Community CalendarObituaries December 21Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church, 407 NE Mt. Zion Church Avenue in Cherry Lake, will hold a Hanson, Pinetta and Cherry Lake Community Christmas Outreach Dinner on Saturday, Dec. 21, from 12:303:30 p.m. Meals will be delivered to community residents beginning at 9:30 a.m. Anyone interested in helping with the event is welcome to go serve with them. Anyone needing transported to the church or who is sick or shut-in can call Brother Johnnie Woods at (850) 9294141. For more information, please call Savilla Murphy at (850) 929-4386. December 21Live Nativity from 5-7 p.m. at the First Baptist Church of Madison. Please join them in the church parking lot as they go back in time to the village of Bethlehem and what the rst Christmas might have looked like.December 21“A Hallelujah Christmas” at Lee Town Hall on Saturday, Dec. 21, beginning at 6 p.m. to raise money for the Salvation Army. Featured artists include Mortal Mission and MJB. George Blevins, with the Salvation Army, will speak. Jacob Bembry will serve as emcee. December 22 Children’s pageant under the direction of Martha Beggs and Martha Register, 11 a.m., at the First Baptist Church in Madison. December 22Midway Baptist Church will present their Christmas cantata, Glory to the Newborn King on Sunday, December 22, at 6 p.m. Midway Baptist Church is located at 338 SE Midway Church Road. December 22Midway Church of God will present their children’s Christmas play on Sunday, December 22, at 6 p.m. Everyone is invited. Midway Church of God is located at 2849 SE Midway Church Road in Lee. December 24Christmas Eve candlelight service and Lord’s Supper in the 1898 Sanctuary at the First Baptist Church in Madison. Eunice Davis went home to be with the Lord on December 14, 2013. She was born to her parents, Jim and Gladys Johnson-Davis on August 21, 1936 in Madison. The funeral service will be 1 p.m. Saturday, December 21, 2013, at Pineland Missionary Baptist Church with burial at Oakridge Cemetery. Visitation will be from 5:307 p.m., Friday, December 20, 2013, at Cooks & Cooper Funeral Home. Memorial Services were held at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, December 18, 2013 at First Baptist Church of Lafayette for Emily Beth Shirey, 72, who passed away on Monday, December 16, 2013 at 7:29 p.m. at The Regional Medical Center of Acadiana. Steve Horn, Pastor of First Baptist Church conducted the memorial services. Mrs. Shirey, a resident of Lafayette, La., was the daughter of the late Kenneth Burnett and the former Trudy Pickles. She is survived by her husband, of fty years, William Shirey; daughters, Elizabeth Ann Shirey and husband Mizo, and Robin Rebecca Kreimer and husband David; and son, Steven Hobson Shirey; grandchildren, Hannah Shirey, Emi Mizobuchi, Sarah Kent, Ken Mizobuchi and Stephen Kent; and brother, Frederick Burnett. Her parents and her brother, Michael Burnett, preceded her in death. Personal condolences may be sent to the Shirey family at www.delhommefuneralhome.com. Delhomme Funeral Home, 1011 Bertrand Drive, Lafayette, La., was in charge of funeral arrangements.Melvin FreddieŽ BoyntonEunice Davis E m ily Sh irey Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 12, 2013When the Womans Club drew the raf”e tickets for the door prizes at their December meeting, it turned out that Mary Ellen Greene was holding two of the lucky tickets, winning both the large poinsettia on the left and the smaller Christmas cactus on the right. The Woman’s Club rafes off door prizes every month as a fundraiser, for items donated by downtown merchants or the members themselves; the money goes toward the club’s charitable projects. December door prizes included several poinsettias, Christmas cactus and other Christmasthemed plants, donated by Wendy’s Florist and Beggs Funeral Home.Mary Ellen Greene Wins A Lot Of RedBy Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Boothill Motorcycle club is a not-for-profit organization that provides service to the community by hosting projects within Madison County for families and individuals in need. The Christmas Toy Giveaway follows their recent gifts of Thanksgiving dinner baskets to families throughout the county.Boothill will be hosting two toy giveaways this Saturday, Dec. 21. The rst giveaway will be in Greenville at Haffeye Park between 10 a.m.–noon. The second giveaway will be in Madison at Sumpter A. James Park between 12:30–2 p.m. Two toys will be provided per child, ages one through twelve, while supplies last.Christmas Toy Giveaway Hosted By Boothill MC

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 5 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 Mr. And Mrs. Santa Claus Visit Madison Health And Rehabilitation CenterBy Diana Maurice, RN, Admissions/Public Relations, Madison Health And Rehabilitation CenterAvery special and beautiful gift was given to the residents of Madison Health and Rehab on the evening of Dec. 13 when a former Madison resident, John Shaw and Marie, his wife, who now reside in Jackson, Ga., and have a ministry for seniors at Christmas time, arrived to the center dressed up as Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus. They arrived in an RV loaded with gifts for all of the 60 residents, employees and families, pulling a sleigh lled with toys for all of the children that attended the annual Christmas party at the Center. It was such a special night that was organized by Activities Director, Sharon Dawkins. Sharon, along with her assistant, Marty Giacomazzi, prepared feverishly for the event. There were special musical performances by young Jermaine Dawkins on the trumpet as well as song by Victoria Dawkins. Several carols were sung by a young girl named Ariel, who was accompanied by her mom, Porshe, on the cello and "The Christmas Story" was read by volunteer Rosemarie Henderson. All of these guests traveled from Tallahassee to share their gifts with everyone there that beautiful night. What a delight it was to learn that our Santa, John Shaw, was raised in Madison, graduated from MCHS, then went on to university in Atlanta, Ga. John and Marie explained that after they retired from working for the federal government, John in accounting and Marie at the Department of Health and Human Services, realized during the Christmas season that many charities were there for children and families however for the elderly there were few organizations reaching out to them and even less for those seniors that were living alone at home. This awakening sparked them to begin doing just that! In 2006, they began visiting nursing homes and those less fortunate at home, bringing small gifts and dressing up as Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus. thus "Santa's Rest Home Ministry" was born. Last December, the couple visited 17 nursing homes across four states, as well as many seniors still living at home. In that month, they continue ministering even up to Christmas Day, giving gifts and relling their supply by traveling home to Jackson, Ga., to pack the recreational vehicle and trailer with more gifts. Then begins the journey to those in need of a hug, smile and lots of joy and presents. The work doesn't end at Christmas however as the shopping begins all over again as the couple looks for after the holiday sales, along with the help of friends and family, picking up as much as they can for the next season coming. I nearly forgot to mention that the Shaws do not solicit funds for any of the gifts given. They have been shopping and giving from their own resources and retirement incomes since the ministry began. In a very sentimental moment, John stated, "We are dedicating this trip to my parents, former Madison residents, Walter and Annie Shaw." Louise Herring, John's sister, is a regular visitor at the Center and accompanied the couple during the event. Marie Shaw added, "We believe that we are bringing Jesus to the needy outside of the four walls of the church and we love it!" Photo submittedMarty Giacomazzi, assistant activities director, enjoys sampling the refreshments at the Christmas party. Photo submitted Guests and employees sample some of the delicious refreshments at the Christmas party at Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center. Photo submittedMr. and Mrs. Santa Claus (John and Marie Shaw) enjoyed their visit to Madison Health and Rehab. Photo submittedResidents enjoy opening Christmas presents during the Christmas party at Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center. During your accumulation years, you may have categorized your risk as conservative,Ž moderateŽ or aggressiveŽ and that guided how your portfolio was built. Maybe you concerned yourself with finding the best-performing funds,Ž even though you knew past performance does not guarantee future results. What occurs with many retirees is a change in mindset-its less about finding the bestperforming fundŽ and more about consistent performance. It may be less about a risk continuum-that stretches from conservative to aggressive-and more about balancing the objectives of maximizing your income with sustaining it for a lifetime. You may even find yourself willing to forego return potential for steady income. A change in your mindset may drive changes how you consider shaping your portfolio and the investments you choose to fill it. Lets examine how this might look at an individual level. During your working years, you appreciated the short-term volatility of the stock market but accepted it for its growth potential value over longer time periods. Youre now in retirement and still believe in that concept. In fact, you know stocks remain important to your financial strategy over a 30-year or more retirement period. But youve also come to understand that withdrawals from your investment portfolio has the potential to accelerate the depletion of your assets when investment values are declining. How you define your risk tolerance may not have changed, but you understand the new risks introduced by retirement. Consequently, its not so much about managing your exposure to stocks, but considering new strategies that adapt to this new landscape. For instance, it may mean that you hold more cash than you ever did when you were earning a paycheck. It also may mean that you consider investments that shift the risk of market uncertainty to another party, such as an insurance company. The guarantees of an annuity contract depend on the issuing company claimspaying ability. Annuities have contract limitations, fees, and charges, including account and administrative fees, underlying investment management fees, mortality and expense fees, and charges for optional benefits. Most annuities have surrender fees that are usually highest if you take out the money in the initial years of the annuity contact. Withdrawals and income payments are taxes as ordinary income. If a withdrawal is made prior to age 59.5, a 10% federal income tax penalty may apply (unless an exception applies). The march of time affords us everchanging perspectives on life and that has never been truer than for the time we spend in retirement.Keep in mind that the return and principal value of stock prices will fluctuate as market conditions change. And shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. This is a hypothetical example used for illustrative purposes only.Stacy Bush, PresidentBush Wealth ManagementThe Bush Wealth Advantage Your Changing Definition of Risk in RetirementOur column, The Bush Wealth AdvantageŽ is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. 842611

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www.greenepublishing.com G G r r e e e e n n v v i i l l l l e e C C o o u u n n t t r r y y C C h h r r i i s s t t m m a a s s W W r r a a p p U U p p6Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, December 20, 2013 By Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc.With Commander Roy Scott and Vice Commander Arthur Paquette of the Greenville American Legion, Post 131, serving as Citizens of the Year and Rep. Halsey Beshears (R-Monticello) serving as the parade Grand Marshal, Greenville’s Country Christmas was a delight this year to everyone who attended. The fun began on Friday afternoon, Dec. 13, as the bake-off and gingerbread houses were dropped off for judging at the Greenville/Madison Multi-Purpose Center. The judging took place at 5 p.m. At 6 p.m., the traditional Christmas events took place at the Haffye Hayes Park and Gazebo. There was an invocation and announcement, followed by caroling from the Greenville Baptist Church Community Kids and a live Nativity scene, provided by Renewed Life Outreach Center in Greenville. At 7 p.m., the community enjoyed refreshments. On Saturday morning, Dec. 14, the day began with arts and crafts and food booths, which were open all day. The children’s art contest and the gingerbread houses were displayed. At 10 a.m., the opening ceremonies began with the invocation and the National Anthem, which was sung by Cindy Vees. This was followed by the salute to the American ag and the recognition of Beshears as the grand marshal and Scott and Paquette as the citizens of the year. The Greenville Country Christmas Parade began at 11 a.m. and thrilled those in attendance. Georgia Red, a Christian rapper, took the stage to perform. At noon, the bake-off contest winners were announced, along with the gingerbread house contest winners and the children’s art contest winners. Winners in the bake-off contest were: BREADS: First place – Debbie Shepherd, Pumpkin bread Second place – Kerry Cohen, Sourdough Santa bread CAKES: First place – Juanita Cason, Hummingbird cake Second place – Abby Reams, Cherry cheesecake Third place – Debbie Shepherd, Turtle cheesecake CANDIES: First place – Kerry Cohen, Turtledove Second place – Debbie Shepherd, Peanut butter almond bark Third place – Sloan Bickford, Christmas confetti COOKIES: First place – Judith Fritcsche, Popcorn melt away Second place – Jocelyn Davis, Seven-layer bars Third place – Marie Cone, Cake mix cookies PIES: First place – Debbie Shepherd, Pecan pie Second place – Kerry Cohen, Cranberry fudge pie GINGERBREAD HOUSE: First Place: Kerry Cohen Children’s art contest winners included: Pre-K through Kindergarten: First place: Tyson Davis First through third grades: First place: Jasmine Odom Second place: J’Nariez Miller Third place: Dylan Agner Fourth through fth grade: First place: Zakira Howard Second place: Jonathan Mitchell Third place: Lane Agner At 1 p.m., the cake auction was held. Brett Wellman and the Stone Cold Blues Band followed this. The day’s festivities ended with the Greenville High School reunion, held at 6 p.m. Photo submitted by Kathy Reams, December 13, 2013Renewed Life Outreach Center presents a live Nativity scene during the Country Christmas festivities. Photo submitted by Kathy Reams, December 13, 2013Greenville Country Christmas President Stuart Mac Iver and his wife, Donna, helped coordinate the Country Christmas festivities. Photo submitted by Kathy Reams, December 13, 2013Hosting the reception for the community Friday evening were, from left to right: Janet Morris, Adrenia Lyons, Lucile Day and Rose Thigpen. Photo submitted by Kathy Reams, December 13, 2013Bake-off contest winners included, from left to right: Jocelyn Davis, Juanita Cason, Judith Fritsche, Debbie Shepherd, Kerry Cohen and Abby Reams. They are shown with Franee Morris, far left and Elesta Pritchett, far right. Photo submitted by Kathy Reams, December 13, 2013The Greenville Baptist Church Kids Choir sings Christmas carols on Friday evening, Dec. 13.

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www.greenepublishing.com G G r r e e e e n n v v i i l l l l e e C C o o u u n n t t r r y y C C h h r r i i s s t t m m a a s s W W r r a a p p U U p pMadison Enterprise-Recorder 7Friday, December 20, 2013 Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013The Spirit of Greenville featured the How the Grinch Stole ChristmasŽ ”oat in the parade. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Shamora Lott looked regal as she rode in the parade as the Greenville Elementary School queen. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Roy Scott, left, and Arthur Paquette, right, were the Citizens of the Year for the 2013 Greenville Country Christmas. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Erin Jarvis, Regan Crosby, and Elainie Jarvis were raising money for their dance team to compete in Jacksonville Jan. 31-Feb. 2, 2014. Not pictured: Mary Kate Brooks. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Tax Collector Lisa Tuten, front, and Property Appraiser Leigh Bar“eld, back, rode in the Country Christmas Parade. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Cub Scout Pack 628 in Greenville was holding a bake sale fundraiser, during Greenville Country Christmas. Pictured left to right: Lane Agner, Romeo Wilson and Dylan Agner. To join the Scouts, call Alyson Norris at (850) 694-8784. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Halsey Beshears was the Grand Marshal for this years Country Christmas parade. He is shown with his daughters, Grace, Turner and Suzanne, in the Country Christmas parade. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Cindy Vees, Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce, rode in the parade with her daughter, Kayla Vees, and granddaughter, Kendall Vees. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013The SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) Team took part in the Greenville Country Christmas festivities.

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www.greenepublishing.com G G r r e e e e n n v v i i l l l l e e C C o o u u n n t t r r y y C C h h r r i i s s t t m m a a s s W W r r a a p p U U p p8Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, December 20, 2013 Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013The Greenville Elementary School Boys and Girls Club, the Spartans, marched and played instruments in the parade. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013The Madison County High School band marches in the parade. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013The Renewed Life Outreach Center rode in the parade. Photo submitted by Kathy Reams, December 13, 2013Frances Ginn holds her granddaughter, Natalie Newman. Photo submitted by Kathy Reams, December 13, 2013Bali Thigpen helped coordinate the Gingerbread House contest. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Cindy Vees, executive director of the Greater Madison County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism, sings the National Anthem at the start of the Greenville Country Christmas. e

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Tomorrow night, Saturday, Dec. 21, 5 ~ 7 p.m. Journey through BethlehemƒO little town of Bethlehem, How still we see thee lie! Above thy deep and dreamless sleep the silent stars go by. Yet in thy dark streets shineth the everlasting Light. The hopes and fears of all the years are met in thee tonight.Ž Join us for a walking tour through the sights and sounds of first century Bethlehem. Its free! The event will be held in the church parking lot at the corner of Base (Hwy. 90) and Orange Streets. Refreshments will be served. Sunday morning 11 a.m. worship ~ Dec. 22 ~ Firstthird Grade Sunday School Class Christmas Pageant This pageant has been held for at least 40 years on the Sunday morning before Christmas Day. There are children in the pageant whose parents were in the presentation when they were children. Among them are Riley Beggs (Father: Judson; Grandparents: Ashley and Martha), Jackson Kendrick (Mother: Amy Stewart Kendrick, Grandmother: Toy Stewart), and Parker Copeland (Father: Walter, Grandparents: W. C. & Frances). The month of December is when Southern Baptist churches remember our international missionaries with the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering emphasis. The theme is Totally His: Heart, Hands, Voice.Ž Use the prayer guide provided to pray daily for missionaries. Plan now the sacrificial offering you will make. Our goal is $3500. This week our time of praise included The Birthday of a KingŽ and Oh, Come Little Children.Ž The Christmas carols included We Three Kings,Ž and Hark, The Herald Angels Sing.Ž The offertory, How Great Our JoyŽ was especially beautiful. The worship choir sang a selection, Yahweh, Hear our Pleas.Ž Bro. Gabes sermon was based on Luke 1:5-17 God had been silent for some 450 years and was getting ready to speak again. As you read this account of the Priest Zacharias and the Father of John the Baptist consider the events that took place that were not just happen soŽ events. There was in the days of Herod, the king of Judea, a certain priest named Zacharias, of the division of Abijah. His wife was of the daughters of Aaron, and her name was Elizabeth. And they were both righteous before God, walking in all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless. But they had no child, because Elizabeth was barren, and they were both well advanced in years. So it was, that while he was serving as priest before God in the order of his division, according to the custom of the priesthood, his lot fell to burn incense when he went into the temple of the Lord. And the whole multitude of the people was praying outside at the hour of incense. Then an angel of the Lord appeared to him, standing on the right side of the altar of incense. And when Zacharias saw him, he was troubled, and fear fell upon him. But the angel said to him, Do not be afraid, Zacharias, for your prayer is heard; and your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son, and you shall call his name John. And you will have joy and gladness, and many will rejoice at his birth. For he will be great in the sight of the Lord, and shall drink neither wine nor strong drink. He will also be filled with the Holy Spirit, even from his mothers womb. And he will turn many of the children of Israel to the Lord their God. He will also go before Him in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just, to make ready a people prepared for the Lord.Ž Christmas came with a surety. Christmas came with a promise. Christmas came with the pages of the Scriptures being proven true and faithful. And it still does today! Dec. 24 ~ 6 p.m. Christmas Eve Candle Light Service/Lords Supper in the 1898 Sanctuary. Dec. 25-27 ~ Office closed for the holidays. Dec. 29 ~ No evening service If you have questions about any of the announcements or prayer concerns, the church staff is ready to serve you. The church office hours are 8:30 a. m 4:30 p.m., Monday Friday. The office phone number is 973-2547 or you can reach the church secretary by email at 1stbaptistoffice@gmail.com. We also have a website, madisonfbc.net, that is regularly updated. Our pastor can be reached at gabekrell@yahoo.com. Jim Carey, our music minister can be reached at muzicman123@gmail.com Join us this week for Sunday School at 9:45 a.m., where we have classes for nursery through senior adults. Worship begins at 11 a.m. when we will honor the Lord with songs of praise, prayers, offerings, and the spoken word. SUNDAY NIGHTS @ FIRSTŽ..ƒ Our evening service @ First begins at 5 p.m. This will allow us the opportunity to share in praise, worship, and the Word from 5-5:45. Then from 5:45-7:30 a variety of class options will be available to grow your faith. For ADULTS three different classes are being offered: Experiencing God, led by Andrea Krell, When Gods Spirit Moves, led by LaVerne Deckard, and Divorce Care led by Bro. Gabe, Ann McLeod, and Shelly Smith. This is a class for those experiencing separation, divorcees or those going through a divorce. All sessions stand alone, so you can join any one at anytime. Call the church office at 973-2547 to register for these classes. The YOUTH, grades 6-8, will have an opportunity to study the Book of James led by Amy Kendrick and Dave Deckard. For HIGH SCHOOL, 9-12 grades, through COLLEGE/CAREER age folks Melanie Parks, Ray Pike and Ansley Rogers will be leading a study entitled Forgotten God.Ž The CHILDREN also have special places. The Preschool Choir ages three-six are being taught by Beth Carey and Carol Bynum. Jim Carey, Martha Beggs, and Thelma DeHart will lead the Childrens Choir for those in first-fifth grades. And of course, a Nursery will be provided for those babies through age two. Dinner will be served from 7-7:30 for preschool through college. No matter your age or where you are in your walk with Christ, there is a place for you SUNDAY NIGHTS @ FIRST!Ž God is doing awesome things! And remember as Christmas comes for you, will you anticipate the work of the Lord Jesus in your life for salvation, and then to mold and make you into a tool for His work in the world?9Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013Church/Turn Back Time Way Back When AtMadison First Baptist ChurchSubmitted By Judy PhillipsGuest Columnist Taken from the November 27, 1998 edition of the Madison Enterprise-RecorderDecember 24, 1943 Fire originating in the ceiling of the Baptist pastorium Sunday afternoon about 4:30 o’clock caused great damage to the building before it could be brought under control. A small roof re at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B.G. Waring on the highway east of Madison Monday morning threatened for a while but was put under control by the re department. Miss Callie Coody of Jacksonville is expected to arrive next week for a holiday visit with Mr. and Mrs. Chandler Rains and other relatives. John Coffee returned home last Tuesday after serving 20 months in the Army. While in the service, he was awarded the Good Conduct medal. He received a medical discharge. December 18, 1953 Mr. J.B. Golden sold the Sinclair Station in Lee this week to Mr. S.D. Medlin, who is in charge now. Medlin plans to enlarge the stock of goods. Mrs. Claymore Schnitker has arrived to be with her mother, Mrs. J.B. Wooten, while Mr. Schnitker is overseas. Madison is gaily decorated for the holiday season with festoons of colored lights on the Courthouse and chains of lights encircling the entire Courthouse park. Louie Fraleigh, of Tallahassee, formerly of Madison, has been appointed secretary to the State Road Department. December 20, 1963 Miss Annell Ragans came home Sunday to be with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Waldron C. Ragans, for the Christmas holidays. Mr. Dalton Mercer was a business visitor in Jacksonville for a few days last week. The Men’s Brotherhood of the First Baptist Church met Tuesday evening in the educational building with 14 present. Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Henderson are celebrating their 60thwedding anniversary Sunday, Dec. 22, at their home with an open house from 2-5 p.m. Buried Treasures

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10Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 Introducing the All New 2014 Jeep Cherokee! 12 to Choose F rom! All prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or Valdosta dealerships. All prices good through December 21, 2013 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. Retail value of TV is $200, limit of 1 per each vehicle purchased. ALL 2013 200 CONV. ALL 2013 CHALLENGERALL 2013 DODGE DART 888-304-2277 888-463-6831801 E. SCREVEN ST € QUITMAN, GA 4164 N. VALDOSTA RD. € VALDOSTA, GA ALL 2013 RAM 1500 RC ALL 2013 RAM 1500 QUAD ALL 2013 RAM 2500ALL 2013 RAM 3500 ALL 2013 CAB & CHASSISALL 2013 GRAND CARAVANALL 2013 TOWN & COUNTRYALL 2013 200 SEDAN ALL 2013 CARGO VAN ALL 2013 RAM 1500 CREW ALL 2013 300 ALL 2013 CHARGER 0% EXAMPLE: V130370 Journey MSRP $21,490 $2500 down = $18,990/60 = $316/mth. 0% EXAMPLE: V130186 Chrysler 200 MSRP $23,845 $1000 discount $1000 down = $21,485/72 = $298/mth.ALL 2013 DURANGO ALL 2013 JOURNEY C130045 2013 CHEVY SUBURBANC130226 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DOOR LTC140066ALL-STAR EDITION 18 Ž ALUM WHEELS REAR CAMERA REMOTE START & MORE! 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DOOR LT 4X4 ALL-STAR EDITION 5.3L V8 18 Ž ALUM WHEELS REAR CAMERA REMOTE START & MORE!C140040 834617 Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. Retail value of TV is $200, limit of 1 per each vehic le purchased. CHEVYS GIVINGMORETis the Season for a Great Deal on a New Chevy! 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4.3L ECOTEC ENGINEPOWER WINDOWS/LOCKSKEYLESS ENTRYCHROME PACKAGE MSRP $25,650 DISCOUNT -$4,053 C140050 C140008 2014 CHEVY CRUZE 1.8L ECOTEC ENGINEAUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONPOWER EQUIPMENT GROUPON-STARSIRIOUS SATELLITE RADO 1.8L ECOTEC ENGINEAUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONPOWER EQUIPMENT GROUPCHEVY MYLINKBLUE TOOTHC1302512013 CHEVY SONIC LT Chevys Giving More Chevys Giving More C130045SUNROOFNAVIGATIONREMOTELINK 20 Ž WHEELSHIGH INTENSITY HEADLAMPS2013 CHEVY CAMARO LT Chevys Giving More Chevys Giving More 2014 CHEVY EQUINOX 32 MPG (PER WINDOW STICKER) BLUE TOOTH WIRELESSUSB PORT2.4 L SIDI SIRIUS/MP3 PLAYER 8640 HWY 84 WEST841776 MSRP $30,585 Discount $6,590 All prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or Valdosta dealerships. All prices good through December 21, 2013 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price.Retail value of TV is $200, limit of 1 per each vehicle purchased.MSRP $44,865 DISCOUNT -$6,867

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St. Nicholas was born in 280 AD, in Patara, a city of Lycia, in Asia Minor. He became the gift giver of Myra. His gifts were given late at night, so that the gift giver's identity would remain a secret. St. Nicholas was eventually named the patron saint of children, sailors, Russia and Greece. St. Nicholas was a Christian priest, who later became a bishop. He was a rich person, and traveled the country helping people, giving gifts of money and other presents. St. Nicholas did not like to be seen when he gave away presents, so the children of the day were told to go to sleep quickly or he would not come! Nothing has changed and Santa Claus will not arrive this Christmas unless the children go to sleep early. A famous story about St. Nicholas is about a poor man who had no money to give to his three daughters on their wedding day. St Nick dropped bags of gold into the stockings which the girls had left to dry by the re. The sisters found the gold and ever since, children have hung up stockings on Christmas Eve hoping that they will be lled with presents by Christmas morning. Despite being quite young Nicholas had earned a reputation for kindliness and wisdom. In the year 303, the Roman emperor Diocletian commanded all the citizens of the Roman Empire, which included Asia Minor, to worship him as a god. Christians believed in one god and one god alone, so their conscience would not allow them to obey the Emperor's order. Angered by their stubbornness, Diocletian warned the Christians that they would be imprisoned. The Emperor carried out the threat and St. Nicholas, who resisted too was also imprisoned. For more than ve years, St. Nicholas was conned to a small cell. He suffered from cold, hunger, and thirst, but he never wavered in his beliefs. In 313, when Diocletian resigned, and Constantine came to power Nicholas was released, and he returned to his post as Bishop of Myra. He continued his good works and became even wiser and more understanding by the time of his death on Dec. 6, 343. In the eyes of the Catholics, a saint is someone who has lived such a holy life that, after dying and going to heaven, he or she is still able to help people on earth. They often become patron to different groups of people one such was children and many legends sprang up to explain his presence. By 450, churches in Asia Minor and Greece were being named in honor of him. By 800, he was ofcially recognized as the a saint by the Eastern Catholic Church. In the 1200s, Dec. 6 began to be celebrated as Bishop Nicholas Day in France. By end of the 1400s, St. Nicholas was the third most beloved religious gure, after Jesus and Mary. There were more than 2000 chapels and monasteries named after him. In the 1500s, people in England stopped worshipping St Nicholas and favored more another gift giving gure, Father Christmas. Over the centuries, St. Nicholas' popularity grew, and many people in Europe made up new stories that showed his concern for children. The name Santa Claus was derived from the Dutch Sinter Klass pronunciation of St. Nicholas. Early Dutch settlers in New York (once called New Amsterdam) brought their traditions of St. Nicholas. As children from other countries tried to pronounce Sinter Klass, this soon became Santa Klass, which was settled as Santa Claus. The old bishop's cloak with mitre, jewelled gloves and crozier were soon replaced with his red suit and clothing seen in other modern images. Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 Saint Nicholas A Brief History

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12Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 CCA Thrift Store Offers Christmas BargainsGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 6, 2013Christmas items for purchase at the CCA Thrift Store can help you decorate for the holidays or help check-off names from your gift list.By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.If you are still on the hunt for Christmas decorations or gifts, some place you may not have considered is the recently opened CCA Thrift Store, located in Lee. The store was created as a way to help raise funds for the Corinth Christian Academy School. Purchasing items from the store will not only whittle down your Christmas list, but will help others in the community. Money made from the store will allow students to attend future mission trips and also help meet the needs of individuals and organizations in the tri-county area. The store has a lot of low-cost items to choose from and Cindy Abbott, who oversees the store, says there are Christmas specials, such as buyone-get-one-free on all Christmas items and stuff-a-bag of clothing for $5. You can even nd brand-new items still in the original packaging that have been donated to the store for resell. The store will be open this Friday and Saturday, Dec. 20 and 21, from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. The thrift store is located at the intersection of Highways 255 and 90, at the caution light. VISIT OUR TOY DEPARTMENT HURRY BEFORE THEYRE GONE! NOW IN STOCK! Madame Alexander Dolls Doll House Police Set SHOEDEPARTMENT Toads & Teacups Childrens Shop Clothing Department SHOE DEP Puddle Jumpers, Lamore, Angel, Ga Boot, Wee Squeak, Pediped, Keds, Chooze, Willets & Riley RoosSHOE DEPARTMENT SHOE DEPARTMENT Remember Nguyen € Frumpy Rumps € Rosalina Young Colors € Petite Ami € Bailey Boys € Mud Pie 229-244-72201601 Baytree Rd., Suite B2 € Valdosta 229-244-7220 www.toadsandteacupschildrensshop.com

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14Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013School and Education FEED TIMESHow to use: The major and minor feeding times for each day are listed below. The major feeding times are the best for the sportsman and last about 2 hours, the minor feeding times can also have good success, but last only about 1 hour. Good luck and be careful out there. Major feed times are marked by an asterisk (*) The Week Of December 20 December 26, 2013 Friday December 20 *1:10 AM 7:20 AM *1:30 PM 7:50 PM Saturday December 21 *2:00 AM 8:10 AM *2:20 PM 8:30 PM Sunday December 22 *2:45 AM 8:55 AM *3:10 PM 9:25 PM Monday December 23 *3:35 AM 9:45 AM *3:55 PM 10:10 PM Tuesday December 24 *4:20 AM 10:30 PM *4:40 PM 10:55 PM Wednesday December 25 *5:10 AM 11:20 AM *5:30 PM 11:45 PM Thursday December 26 *5:50 AM 12:00 AM *6:25 PM Lee Elementary Students Hear Special Anti-Bullying MessageBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.As Lee third graders settled into the cafeteria, Principal Robin Hill spoke a few words of introduction for Dolly Ballard, who was visiting the school with a special anti-bullying message.“We’ve been talking about bullying, now we’re talking about the effect,” said Hill. “So put your listening ears on. It’s all about being a better citizen. It’s not just reading, math and science, it’s about being better persons and respectful citizens.” Dolly Ballard, a school volunteer and a familiar sight at Lee Elementary, where she has taught music classes and organized the children’s Veterans Day musical program for local veterans, said she had been moved by the Holy Spirit to bring the children the special anti-bullying message, “because each of you are special. God made you.” And bullying was wrong not only because it hurt feelings, but also because it degraded both the victim and the perpetrator. As children grow up, they need to develop a sense of right and wrong not only as it applies to following the rules, but also as to how they treat other people and allow other people to treat them. Ballard, a former police detective with a background in missing persons and runaway juveniles, explained the various forms of bullying to familiarize the children with what those rules were in each case, so they would have a guideline to follow, but she also explained why those rules were there and why they were important. Bullying could have serious consequences. In some nationally publicized extreme cases of bullying, young victims had been driven as far as suicide. By learning the emotional effects bullying could have on victims, by understanding what it felt like, by learning to develop empathy for other students, they would also have an inner guideline that would tell them what was right and wrong, and why. “Always listen to that little voice inside you,” said Ballard. She also noted that many Americans’ rights were being taken away, including the right to talk about God in public schools, “but I’m going to break the rules here and talk about God. I love you children, and I know you’re children, but today, I’m going to treat you like adults.” When she asked how many of them knew what bullying was, nearly all hands went up. When she asked how many children had experienced bullying, many hands went up again. Bullying affects all ages, and both genders about equally. “Florida now has an anti-bullying statute. That’s a written law that allows those who bully others to be prosecuted,” she explained. The four main categories of bullying are: 1) physical 2) verbal 3) covert and 4) cyber-bullying, a new category that is a product of the modern age, and has reached epidemic proportions. Almost everyone is familiar with physical bullying: hitting, pushing, shoving, kicking, tripping. This is not typical ghting between two students who are angry at each other – it usually involves one or more people attacking another person without being provoked. The victim is usually chosen because something about him or her is “different,” whether it is the way they dress, speak or look. However, the proper way to handle bullying is not by ghting back; should the victim manage to injure the bully, perhaps by knocking him down on a concrete sidewalk, then the law has to get involved, and an act of defense becomes a crime. The best and only way to handle bullying is by going to a teacher or a school resource ofcer and letting the adult authority gure take it from there. Verbal bullying is also a familiar concept. The teasing, the hateful remarks, the name-calling...nearly everyone has been on the business end of an insulting, belittling remark or tirade and knows the resulting feelings of shame, worthlessness, degradation; the desire to become very small and hide away, the desire to crawl into a dark hole, perhaps even the desire to die. The “sticks and stones” maxim notwithstanding, words hurt. They are sharp, jagged and painful. They have a way of digging themselves deep down into a person’s psyche and echoing there over and over. They are destructive in that way. “Don’t go there,” Ballard told the children regarding name-calling. “Once you open your mouth and say something hurtful or destructive, it’s like a piece of paper in the wind. You’re always chasing after it and you can never take it back. Never say anything you can’t take back.” Verbal bullying also includes racial slurs and remarks about someone’s religion. Or someone who stutters. Or someone who speaks a different language at home and speaks English with difculty or with an accent. The third category, covert bullying, is also familiar to many. This is the gossiping, backbiting and lying about someone. It is spreading rumors, indicating disrespect through body language or rude gestures, or simply excluding someone on purpose. People may associate this type of bullying with “cliques,” especially if these cliques seem to target certain people, but anyone can be guilty of spreading hurtful rumors and lies about another person. “Have consideration and respect for your companions,” said Ballard. “How would you feel if someone left you out of everything?” Finally, there is cyber-bullying. Computer technology has brought email and the pervasive social media that allow people to stay in touch 24/7, anywhere in the world. The down side is that this also allows a bully to harass a victim 24/7, anywhere in the world. For the victim, there is little or no escape when the school day ends, because the hateful tweets, texts and emails simply follow him or her home. The omnipresent nature of cyberspace means that is it much easier to spread hateful remarks and vindictive rumors to a large number of people, and that more people can gang up on one person, sometimes hiding behind electronic anonymity, and once things are posted online, they stay, sometimes popping up again months or years down the road to reopen old wounds. Because of the pervasive nature of cyber-bullying, victims are more likely to be driven to suicide. Cyber-bullying is far more pervasive than many people realize. According to some statistics, nearly half of all adolescents and teens have been victims, or perpetrators. Cyber bullying is also the least likely to be reported to parents or authorities. Cyber-bullies often believe what they are doing is funny, but they should realize that their actions could have serious consequences for them on down the road. Cyber-bullies and their parents may face legal charges; online postings with fake names may seem safely anonymous, but these transmissions can be traced. Also, even if the perpetrator is never brought up on charges, many colleges and employers do background checks and comb through social media for more information on prospective applicants, and past instances of cyber-bullying will reect poorly on one’s character or integrity. It comes down to everyday living, where people need to have patience, understanding and respect for their classmates, and realize that being different is not bad; people should not be judged because they look or act differently, or because they appear to be loners, or because they wear glasses or speak with an accent or walk with a limp. There will always be people who look different; people who have disabilities; people who are shy or lack social skills; even people who prefer to be alone, or who occasionally need “space” to work through emotional setbacks. The most important thing, Ballard emphasized, was not to judge other people when there was no way of knowing what was going on in their lives. “Remember that song we learned for the Veterans Day Program, ‘Let There Be Peace on Earth,’” she reminded them. The peace, the compassion, and the understanding had to begin with each and every one of them. “I don’t mean to offend anyone, but I am a Christian, and we learned to be tolerant because we are all children of God,” she said. “God is our creator. He created us to know him, love him and be happy with him. God is all good, God is all light...darkness is the work of Satan, evil and chaos.” The evil of bullying, she believed, is one that is learned. To stop it, it needs to be unlearned and replaced with kindness, graciousness and goodness. Children need to learn empathy how to put themselves in someone else’s place and see things from that person’s point-of-view and imagine how that person would feel in any given situation. “And when we get mad and say bad things to our friends, we should say we’re sorry,” she added. Principal Hill also reminded the children that Ballard had seen many things during her career as a law enforcement ofcer, and she had seen victims and what had happened to them when bullying had escalated, gotten out of hand and turned into a tragedy. “You are special,” Ballard concluded. “As a result of this, I hope I touched somebody’s heart...and no bullying at Lee School. Remember that I love you and that God loves you.” Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, December 6, 2013Dolly Ballard (left) and Lee Elementary School Principal Robin Hill talk to the LES third graders about bullying and how to put a stop to it. THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE FL NOTICE OF UPCOMING ELECTION TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 2014 Voter Registration Books are open for the Town of Greenville FL election. Registration books will close February 10, 2014. ____________________ The election March 11, 2014 is to fill three (3) Council positions Groups 1, 2 and 5. ___________________ Qualifying dates for potential candidates are Noon, Jan. 20, 2014 until Noon, Jan. 24, 2014 __________________ Anyone wishing to qualify for the positions should contact Greenville Town Hall 154 SW Old Mission Avenue, Greenville FL 32331 PH: 850-948-2251 or Email: kreams@embarqmail.com

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By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.When you think of school as a child, what comes to mind? Is it hanging out with your friends, signing yearbooks and going to football games? Or is it constant study and testing pressure, unfashionable clothes, inadequate supplies or bullying? No matter what experience you had as a child, as an adult, we tend to think of the rst scenario when thinking about kids in school today. Most adults think a child's life is easy, at least compared to their own daily grind. Caught up in responsibilities and bills, we tend to forget how stressful school can be for kids. The reality is that a student's life is lled with stress. They are learning how to play competitively, honing their social skills, trying to make friends, dealing with aggression, learning how to control emotions and urges, experiencing peer pressure and rethinking or questioning moral beliefs, all while trying to get an education while having graduation and college looming over their heads. Today, kids are dealing with these stressors as well as some additional ones that most students in the past have not. The counselors at Madison County High School have seen the usual stressors: pressure from receiving good grades and what college they will be attending to feeling like they don't t in because they don't have the right shoes, jacket or jeans for the year. In today's evolving culture, MCHS counselor, Takeysha Thomas, says some kids are facing even more pressure due to increased responsibilities at home. The family structure containing two parents, where one or both work, can no longer be expected. Due to the increase of single-family homes and poor job economy, kids are losing some parental support, both personally and academically. If the single parent is working, there might not be anyone there to "pick up the slack" in checking homework, attending events or listening to social dilemmas. But, it can get even more difcult; some students are now working when parents lose jobs, taking care of sick parents or cooking and caring for younger siblings. With this kind of responsibility, it's no wonder that days spent at school and future education goals can fall in priority. Highly stressed students can show noticeable signs and should be watched for. Signs of stress in a child can include: frequent headaches, stomach aches, bad dreams or nightmares, a noticeable change in behavior such as withdrawing or being more aggressive than usual, crying or temper tantrums, eating disorders, drug or alcohol abuse, withdrawing from friends, spending excessive amounts of time on the computer, or unusual and sudden interest in other cultures and activities. Students have shown that parents, or other signicant adults in a child's life, who involves themselves in a child's school life results in higher grades and test scores, longterm academic achievement and positive attitudes and behavior. Thomas counsels 11thand 12thgrade students and says that the majority of her sessions are spent discussing decision-making skills concerning personal issues, graduation and life after high school. When speaking with students, Thomas says if there is a problem, it seems to center around one issue, lack of support. "A lot more support is what's needed and students need to know what support is out there so it can be accessed." Thomas says that a lot of resources for additional support are available. Parents attending parent/teacher conferences, calling their school counselor about problems (personal or academic), reaching out to their church, community or neighborhood can also provide support. In order to help students deal with and overcome school related stress, parents can show support to their child by having realistic expectations for them, listening to them when they open up to talk, don't over-commit the child with too many extra activities, make sure they have plenty of sleep, food and downtime for fun. When wading through their day at school or when considering what will happen after graduation, Thomas says what kids really want to know is, "Who is in my corner and how can they help?"School and EducationMadison Enterprise-Recorder 15 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 Stress In School-Aged ChildrenGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, November 13, 2013Takeysha Thomas, 11th and 12thgrade counselor at MCHS, supports and navigates students towards their goals. Greenville Country Christmas Childrens Art Contest Winners AnnouncedBy Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. There were 32 entries in the Greenville Country Christmas Children's Art Contest, from students in pre-Kindergarten through the fth grade. Seven winners walked away with ribbons for their efforts. In the pre-Kindergarten through Kindergarten category, Tyson Davis was named the rst place winner. In the rst through third grade category, Jasmine Odom captured rst prize; J'Nariez Miller was the second place winner; and Dylan Agner took third place. Zakira Howard took the top prize for the fourth and fth grade category; Jonathan Mitchell took second place; and Lane Agner took third place. First place winners received a ribbon and $25. Second place winners received a ribbon and $15. Third place winners received a ribbon and $10.Photo submitted by Jerri PetersonTyson Davis captured “rst place in the Pre-K through Kindergarten category. Photo submitted by Jerri PetersonJasmine Odom won “rst place in the “rst through third grade category in the Greenville Country Christmas childrens art contest. Photo submitted by Jerri PetersonDylan Agner was a happy boy, as he was named the third place winner in the art contest. Photo submitted by Jerri PetersonJNariez Miller won second place in the “rst through third grade category in the Greenville Country Christmas childrens art contest. Photo submitted by Jerri PetersonZakira Howard was the “rst place winner in the fourth through “fth grade category in the childrens art contest. Photo submitted by Jerri PetersonJonathan Mitchell was the second place winner in the fourth through “fth grade category in the art contest.Photo submitted by Jerri PetersonLane Agner took third place in the art contest Sudoku Puzzle Of The Day

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrun, c MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED WANTED TO BUY www.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . 16Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, December 20, 2013 FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 12/16/2013 THROUGH 12/22/2013 I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).12/18 rtn, n/cPageant and Prom Dresses For Sale:Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ”ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ”ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, ”owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful ”owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 Leave a message. Of“ce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayQuest Training offers a professional CNA prep class taught by a registered nurse. High pass rates on state test. No GED or Diploma required if age18 yr. Day and evening classes. Next classes Jan. 6 (day) and Jan. 20 (night) 386-362-1065.12/4 12/25, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cWasher And Dryer For Sale! Kenmore series 70 washer, top load. Series 80 dryer, front load (door opens from top down). White in color and both are in perfect working order. $400 “rm. Call (229) 460-5296. Newspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.6/19 rtn, n/c Asphalt Milling For Sale $350 for 18 ton load (850) 464-1230.One Person Cabin On Farm $395/month. Background check required. Call (850) 673-1117.10/16 rtn, cCASH FOR FLORIDA LICENSE PLATES! $1000 for Madison Co enamel Tags dated 1911-17, $100 each for FL tags starting with #35 for years 1938, 39, 40, 43, 49, and 54. Jeff Francis gobucs13@aol.com or 727 424 1576.www.”oridalicenseplates.com10/23 -12/25, pdNew and Repo Homes 25 to pick from. Come to Lake City the dual makers at Freedom Homes. Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cNov and Dec special 4/2 28x80 home only $49,900 cash deal only. Call Magic Mike at Freedom Homes (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cBeen turned down? Have 10k to 15k? Call me I can make a deal. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cLand home package with 10k down in Lake City Florida. We do the deals. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cIn house “nancing with 10k down on used or repo houses. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cTriple wide $29,900 as is. Wholesale price, hardwood ”oors, ceramic tile. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cReduced $10,000 Lot Model 4/2, new 2014. 2,016 square feet. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cCASH special up to $5,000. Reduced price on new or used quali“ed models. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cUltimate home 2,027 square feet 3/2 $69,900. Beautiful new home with “replace. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cLive Oak or Merit Homes. Low prices. Freedom Mobile Homes. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, c Ad Builder/Graphic Artist needed for the Madison County Carrier and the Madison EnterpriseRecorder. Must be a team player and able to handle multiple tasks. Experience with Adobe Photoshop a must, experience with Quark Express a plus. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.11/20 rtn, n/c Set of four (4) WeldŽ (Mountain Crusher) billet aluminum wheels. 8 lug with bolt on center caps. Fits Dodge or Chevy. $400 OBO. Call 229-460-5296.12/11 rtn, n/c CDL Class A Truck DriverRuns mostly SE extended area. 2 years driving experience. Good 2 year MVR. Home weekends and some during the week. (850) 973-2747.12/11 rtn, cAdvent Christian Village Current JOBS Line Advertisement call 658-5627 or visit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week EMT … Part Time For local area community for night time & weekend shifts. Current valid Florida EMT certi“cate and DL required with good driving record. Prior experience a plus. Competitive pay, access to onsite daycare and “tness facilities. Apply in person at Personnel Of“ce Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE / Drug-Free Workplace / Criminal background checks required.12/13, 12/18, c Coord for XCEL-IT Program/ Clinical Coord/Maintenance Equipment Specialist/ Staff Assistant See www.nfcc.edu .12/18, 12/25, c Adoption UNPLANNED PREGNANCY? Adoption-A brave & sel”ess choice. Medical, living & counseling expenses paid. Choose the loving & “nancially secure family. Compassionate Atty. Lauren Feingold 24/7 866-633-0397 www.fklhearttoheart.net #0958107. A childless, young, successful woman seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON Mom! Financial security. Expenses paid.Visit: www.jodi2adopt.webs.com /, call Jodi 1-800-7185516 or text 609-7701255. Adam Sklar #0150789. Help Wanted DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certi“cations. GI Bill Bene“ts Eligible. 1-866-362-6497. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Quali“ed drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin here … Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for quali“ed students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769. Schools & Instruction You can become an expert in HVAC installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Institute Online HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVAC-Online-Education.com. MANAGER OF FINANCE Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an opening for a full-time Manager of Finance in our Madison Of“ce. The candidate is required to have a Bachelors Degree in Accounting, Business Administration or related “eld. An advanced degree or CPA is desirable. Three to “ve years experience in utility accounting is also highly desirable. The candidate must also have solid personal computer skills and be familiar with Microsoft Of“ce software. The ideal candidate will have a broad understanding and/or experience in “nancial statement preparation, “nancial analysis, budgeting, and debt management. The Cooperative offers competitive salary and bene“ts. Tri-County is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and Drug Free Work Place (DFWP). Please send resume and completed Tri-County Employment Application Form, which is available at any TCEC of“ce or online at www.tcec.com, before January 21, 2014 to: Stephanie Carroll Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. 2862 West US 90 Madison, FL 32340.12/20 1/8, c

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www.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 Madison Enterprise-Recorder 17 ----Legals ---NOTICE OF PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE BY THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE GREENVILLE, FLORIDA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that proposed Ordinance No. 234, bearing title as follows, will be considered Monday, December 30, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. at City Hall, Greenville, Florida. ORDINANCE NO. 234 AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE AMENDING SECTION 2.03 OF THE CHARTER OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE IN REGARDS TO COMPENSATION OF COUNCIL; AMENDING SECTION 2.07 OF THE CHARTER OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE IN REGARDS TO VACANCIES ON THE COUNCIL; AMENDING SECTION 3.04 OF THE CHARTER OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE IN REGARDS TO THE TOWN MANAGERS POWER AND RESPONSIBILITIES; REVISING THE CHARTER OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE TO INCLUDE GENDER NEUTRAL LANGUAGE THROUGHOUT; SUBMITTING THIS PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT TO THE ELECTORS OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE BEING SUBJECT TO APPROVAL BY THE ELECTORS OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE. A copy of the proposed Ordinance is available for public inspection at City Hall, Greenville, Florida during regular business hours. At the meeting, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Town, the person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. TOWN OF GREENVILLE, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Kimberly Reams Town Clerk12/20 TOWN OF GREENVILLE FAIR HOUSING INFORMATIONAL MEETING NOTICE In conjunction with a proposed FFY 2013 CDBG Neighborhood Revitalization application, the Town of Greenville is conducting an informational meeting on Fair Housing, including review of the existing Town of Greenville Fair Housing Ordinance. The educational presentation is designed for Elected Of“cials and the General Public to acquaint them with the Towns Fair Housing requirements. The meeting is scheduled for Monday, December 30, 2013, at 6:00 P.M., or as soon as possible thereafter, at Town Hall, 154 SW Old Mission Avenue, Greenville, Florida. To obtain additional information, please contact Ms. Kimberly Reams, Town Clerk, at 850/948-2251. The meeting is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER/ HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE/FAIR HOUSING12/20 Christian radio station WYJC will be holding a public meeting at Greenville Public Library on Thursday, January 2 at 9:30am This is a general meeting that will address public issues, and any questions or concerns about CSN International The public is invited to attend.12/20 NOTICE OF INTENTION TO REGISTER FICTITIOUS NAME Notice is given that the undersigned Florida limited liability company desires to engage in business as an auction company under the “ctitious name of GULF COAST LIVESTOCK at 2639 East Highway 90, Madison, Florida 32340 in Madison County, Florida. Notice is further given that the undersigned intends to register this “ctitious name with the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated: December 16, 2013 SIX SHOOTERS INVESTMENT GROUP, LLC a Florida limited liability company By: Mary Bland, Managing Member CARY A. HARDEE, II Hardee Law Firm, PL Post Of“ce Drawer 450 Madison, Florida 32341 Telephone: (850) 973-4007 Facsimile: (850) 973-8495 Florida Bar Number 133856 Primary Email: lawhatter@aol.com Secondary Email: CaryHardee@hardeelaw“rm.net 12/20 12/20, 12/27

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18Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013



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Our 149th Year, Number 16www.greenepublishing.com Since 1865, Telling It Like It Is And Defending The Peasant's Right To Know Index1 Sections, 18 Pages Local WeatherViewpoints 2 Around Madison 4-5 Greenville Christmas 6-8Church/History 9 Gift Ideas 11-13 School 14-15Classieds 16 Legals 17Friday, December 20, 2013 Madison, Florida Two Arrested When Meth Lab BustedMadison County Sheriff Ben Stewart reports that on Tuesday night, Dec. 17, at 10:17 p.m., deputies of the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce responded to a residence located at 823 NW Hickory Road to investigate a complaint of loud music. Upon arrival, deputies went to the front and rear of the residence. As deputies knocked on the front door a black male later identied as Artavious Rashod Gatlin, 21, of Quitman, Ga. was observed exiting the back door of the residence holding what appeared to be specic items used to manufacture methamphetamine. Deputies identied themselves and ordered Gatlin to stop, however Gatlin ignored the command and ed back Steve Vickers, Jr. Artavious Rashod Gatlin See Meth Bust On Page 3A Hallelujah Christmas To Raise Money For The Salvation ArmyMichael Keeler will present A Hallelujah Christmas on Saturday, Dec. 21, at the Lee Town Pavilion.A Hallelujah Christmas is a concert that will be a fundraiser for the Salvation Army. Admission is free and there will be kettles to put money in for the Salvation Army. The concert will begin at 6 p.m. and feature music by Mortal MisGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob BembryMortal Mission, featuring Billy Haynie, left, and Bill Maher will perform at the Lee Town Pavilion Saturday. Allen McCormick is also shown. See Hallelujah Christmas On Page 3Rep. Ted Yoho, Johnson, Hardee Help Soldier Return Home After Grandfather Passes AwayBy Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc.When the grandson of a Brooks County, Ga., man, William James Jamie Mitchell, was not allowed to leave Afghanistan to attend his grandfathers funeral, two Madison County men, including the Supervisor of Elections and a Madison County Sheriffs deputy, went to work looking to help him and they found help through Rep. Ted Yohos ofce. According to Sheriffs Sgt. Brad Johnson, Royce Hutchersons family had contacted him, after Hutcherson had died, to see what he could do about getting his grandson home for the funeral. Johnson contacted the Veterans Administration and the Red Cross, who offered little hope since it was Hutchersons grandson and not his own son. Mitchells father had murdered the boys mother when he was 11 years old and he had stayed with his grandfather a while during his formative years. Johnson contacted Hardee, who immediately contacted a number of elected ofcials, some who didnt even bother to return his calls. Despite the government shutdown at the time, though, Rep. Yoho (R-Jacksonville) called and told Hardee that he would work to get Mitchell back on American soil and that he would not take no for an answer. Yoho was able to contact a four-star general, who had earlier said that the young man would not be able to leave the front lines in Afghanistan. The rst time Hutchersons grandson was called, the connection was lost because the soldier came under re. Mitchell was nally able to make it back to the States. Although it was too late for the funeral, the funeral home had held the body so the young man could see it. The soldier also did not have to return to Afghanistan. Photo submittedUS Rep. Ted Yoho (R-Jacksonville) helped a young soldier get home from Afghanistan when his grandfather died. Jamie Mitchell is shown with wife Brittany, and son Riley. Project Cares Visits School BoardBy Lynette NorrisGreene Publishing, Inc.People with developmental disabilities want the same things out of life as anyone. They want the same quality of life. They want to feel safe and be protected from harm. They want to be people of value, who are valued by others. They want to do productive things in the community. But they might need a little extra help in getting there.Teresa Gallegos and Leslie McLeod addressed the Madison County School Board as representatives of PROJECT CARES of Madison, Taylor and Jefferson Counties, representing a coalition of volunteer parents with developmentally disabled children, or people who are themselves developmentally disabled: those with cerebral palsy, autism, Downs Syndrome and other conditions. The organization started about a year and a half ago. The volunteers hail from the public, private and business communities, and their goal is for people to see the person, not the disability, as well as improving opportunities for people with developmental disabilities to be a part of, be included in, and even give back to, theirGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 10, 2013Teresa Gallegos and Leslie McLeod speak to the Madison County School Board on behalf of Project Cares, a coalition looking for innovative ways to make children and adults with developmental disabilities an integral part of the community. See Project Cares On Page 3 C h r i s t m a s G i f t G u i d e S e e P a g e s 1 1 1 3 Page 15 Page 4

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Celebrating the Christmas season American style means food is a part of the festivities. There is always food preparation for guests, family, covered dish events and buffets. As you prepare for holiday gatherings and meals, USDA reminds us to keep foods fresh and safe to eat. If food containing harmful bacteria is consumed, it could cause foodborne illness. So, when you serve food, follow this food safety checklist recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water for a full 20 seconds before and after handling raw food. Use plastic or other non-porous cutting boards. Cutting boards should be run through the dishwasher or washed with soap and hot water after each use. Store raw meat, poultry, and seafood on a plate or tray, so raw juices dont drip onto other foods. Use one cutting board for raw meat products and another one for salads and other ready-to-eat foods, or wash cutting boards in between each use. Never place cooked food on a plate that previously held raw meat, poultry or seafood unless the plate has been washed. Bacteria spreads quickly with dirty sponges, dishcloths, or towels, so change them frequently. Bacteria also thrive in the moist areas where bits of food may exist. Use paper towels or freshlycleaned sponges or cloths and soap and hot water to clean food preparation surfaces. When cooking meat, poultry and other dishes, use a food thermometer to make sure foods are cooked to a safe internal temperature. When reheating sauces, soups, and gravies, bring them to a boil. Heat other leftovers thoroughly to 165F. Make sure the refrigerator temperature is 40F or below and 0F or below in the freezer. Occasionally verify these temperatures using an appliance thermometer. Refrigerate or freeze perishables, prepared foods, and leftovers within two hours. Never defrost or marinate food at room temperature; use the refrigerator. You can also thaw foods in airtight packaging in cold water (change the water every 30 minutes, so the food continues to thaw). Or, thaw in the microwave, if youll be cooking the food immediately. Divide large amounts of leftovers into shallow containers for quick cooling in the refrigerator. Dont over-ll the refrigerator. Cold air must circulate to keep food at a safe temperature. For more information on keeping your holiday food safe, contact the Madison County Extension ofce. The University of Florida Extension/ IFAS Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution. Christmas time is almost here. I think of Jesus humble birth in a manger in Bethlehem so many years ago. I think of all the gifts He has given me in my life, including salvation from sins. I think of my wonderful family and friends. I think of that wonderful Christmas gift two years ago, when He raised me from my deathbed. I have all the gifts that a man deserves but I thought I would have a little fun this year and put my Christmas wish list on here. The only things on this list that I really have needs for this year are for my family to be healthy and for my SUV to be xed. I need reliable transportation for my family in case something happens. I have some really awesome friends who are helping as well as they can with the problem and my work family has allowed me to use a work van. As far as my dont need list this year: *A new smart phone and about a year of prepaid service. *A leather bomber jacket *Bluetooth headphones, so Im not stuck to whatever I am listening to and I would have room to walk away from a stereo, TV or computer and still hear whats going on. I dont really need any of the things mentioned above. Although I may not have everything I want, I have all that I need. I have a roof over my head, a warm house to live in, and clothes to wear. I have a wonderful church to attend and a best friend and big brother in Jesus Christ. I have a job and wonderful friends and the best family anyone could ask for. My Christmas wish for you is that, if you dont already know it, for you to realize what Jesus Christs life really meant on this Earth and that He died on the Cross and was resurrected to save everyone from their sins. My greatest Christmas wish is that everyone who is not a Christian comes to know Jesus as his or her Savior. Merry Christmas. Yes, Jesus Christ is the reason for the season. Jacobs LadderViewpoints & Opinions2Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 Jacob BembryColumnist Conservative Corner Conservative CornerBy Claudia Anderson Diann DouglasGuest ColumnistM a d i s o n C o u n t y E x t e n s i o n S e r v i c e My Own Prison So I held my head up high, hiding hate that burns inside,Which only fuels the selsh pride, I cry out to God seeking only His decision Gabriel stands and conrms I've created my own prison. ---Creed, My Own Prison I read an interview the other day where evangelist Kenneth Copeland is quoted as saying that PTSD and similar conditions, including depression, were not of God, and therefore "good Christians" did not have conditions such as that. According to the Mr. (Rev) Copeland, if you are a proper Christian, you would not be affected by these problems because you would simply "hand it over to God" and get over it. I was appalled. Seriously? Perhaps one of the things that grieved me most was who said it. This is not some silly Ph.D. sitting in his ivory-towered university or laboratory. This is a nationally recognized preacher, a purveyor (creator) of current Christian doctrine (or in this case dogma). This is someone who people look to for actual guidance. (Granted this is the same man who he and his preacher daughter helped spawn an outbreak of measles by telling their parishioners to forgo childhood vaccinations because God would heal them, but still.) Exactly -But Still! This is a man who people look up to for guidance, and he is telling people that if they are suffering from depression or PTSD, then it is their own fault because they are not good Christians? To he who is given much, much will be expected. Do not get me wrong. The ultimate healer IS God. The Creator gave life; The Creator heals life. Creator is Healer. But His healing comes through those that He has created and called to that position. A condition that affects the mind is no different than one that affects the body. PTSD is to the mind what diabetes or the u is to the body. Telling the brain to push off its illness and get over it is like telling the body to get over that silly insulin or virus problem and just get over it. Having depression or PTSD is no more a handicap than diabetes or anything else. In fact people with traditional handicaps will tell you that the only handicap is in the mind. The prison we create is believing that we cannot overcome these issues. The true disease is thinking that you are hampered by your condition and believing that you cannot overcome it. God gave us medications for diabetes so that His people could overcome their trials. He gave us medications and counseling for depression or PTSD so that His people could overcome. Before you think you are at risk of succumbing to your trials, let us think about something. We all remember the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist. At the end of the baptism, God calls down with the message, This is my son in whom I am well pleased. (Matt 3:17.) That is the end of that chapter. The very next verse is Matt 4:1, and if you read it straight through without the chapter break, it goes something like this: This is My son, in whom I am well pleased. Then Jesus was led up into the desert by the Spirit to be tempted by the Satan. Get my point? If the Creator of All things, God of Heaven and Earth, the Great Architect, if He takes His Son, in whom He is well pleased, and leads him unto temptation and tribulation, then is it not understandable that we too should have testing and trials? Having diabetes does not make you a bad Christian. It makes you a person with a trial. Having PTSD or depression does not make you a bad Christian. It makes you a person with a trial. When a preacher tells you that you are not a good Christian because of your problem, then in my humble opinion, they are not very Reverend. The prison is not what was put on you. It is the one you created by thinking you are stuck where you are. The prison is also the one that you allow to be put on you by other people when listening to them telling you what makes you not good. No matter who that person is. You are not the problem. Think about it. Harvey GreeneGuest Columnist Once a year, the birth of a baby is represented in a small nativity scene on the Shaw Air Force Base in South Carolina. This year, the Military Religious Freedom Foundation (MRFF) demanded that this annual birth be aborted and buried under wraps for removal, and the Pentagon, playing the role of Herod, responded with directives. However, just as there was a resurrection of the man who grew from the baby represented in this drama, the Nativity scene has also been resurrected, this time at the base chapel. Why is it so inappropriate to display a religious symbol, while not forcing on anyone, the faith behind that symbol? How is it that a little, plastic baby can offend someone? Well, I am offended when Christians are refused the right of expression, which, in turn, is forcing on us the religion of atheism. We have allowed our CHRISTmas to be stolen through political correctness and by the exchanging of the green dollar sign for the green CHRISTmas tree. Where will we feel the next attack? TREES FOR TROOPS Perhaps my ignorance is due to not having television service in my home, but today brought my rst knowledge of the Trees for Troops program launched in 2005, which is sponsored by the Christmas SPIRIT Foundation and FedEx Corp. My response was, Wow! I didnt know that! Last month at Dulls Tree Farm in Thorntown, Ind., an event was held where volunteers from FedEx, Indiana Christmas Tree growers, local FFA students and the Indiana Department of Agriculture helped organize and prepare trees for shipment to U.S. troops stationed overseas. During the weekend of Dec. 6-8, more than 30 farms and lots across the country had a FedEx trailer at their sites to receive donated trees for delivery, during the following week, to military families at participating bases. Just last week, FedEx delivered trees to MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa for active duty members and their families. This program, in its rst year, was organized in only 45 days and delivered 4,300 real CHRISTmas trees to families at ve military bases in the U.S. and overseas. Due to the separation that is often felt by military families, a real CHRISTmas tree can ease the feeling of distance and be the best gift they could have received during the Christmas season. These are the impressive totals through 2012: Trees delivered 122,180 Trees shipped overseas 2,859 Farms donating trees 800 Bases receiving trees 65 Countries with deliveries 156 FedEx miles traveled 419,862 Again, I say Wow! Through the CHRISTmas Spirit Foundation, we too, can help provide real Christmas trees for our military and their families, helping to keep the traditional CHRISTmas spirit alive. To all the volunteers, donors, tree farms and the FedEx organization, thank you for delivering all those CHRISTmas trees. God bless you, our military and all the families represented. MERRY CHRISTMAS! SHAW AIR FORCE BASE DISCRIMINATION AND ABORTION? Christmas Wishes Think Food Safety During The Christmas SeasonTHE REPUBLICAN CLUB OF MADISON COUNTY Meets Monday, January 13, 2014, at noon at Shelby's Restaurant EVERYONE WELCOME Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee MadisonRepublican@embarqmail.com Something To Think About A person can live without food for about a month, but only about a week without water. If the amount of water in your body is reduced by just 1%, you'll feel thirsty. If it's reduced by 10%, you'll die. Did You Know?

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hometown communities. The organization also provides support to Madison Autism Parents (MAP) and Always Support Kids with developmental disabilities (ASK). The independent coalition of volunteers has the support of several state agencies, including the Florida Developmental Disabilities Council, the Ounce of Prevention Fund of Florida, the Agency For Persons With Disabilities and Arc of Madison and Jefferson, providing information and research support; Arc of Madison has also provided meeting space for the group when needed. The dilemma faced by the coalition is that with tough economic times, government and medical support services, which are critical for health, survival and quality of life for developmentally disabled individuals, are being cut. There are over 22,000 known persons with developmental disabilities in Florida, all on waiting lists for services, some for over a decade; but in Madison, Taylor and Jefferson Counties, there are 26, 54, and 35 individuals, respectively. With the much smaller number of people in the tri-county area, the coalition believes it can reach every one of them; to do that, they want to develop a network of community supports for those individuals, so that they can reach their full potential, by providing opportunities and support for people who often cannot go anywhere alone. The network would not be a handout, but a partnership. The main mission is to educate the community, promote awareness and put innovative strategies in place that would help the developmentally disabled participate and be a part of their community. They want to be a part of their school, their church, and events around town like Light Up Madison, said Gallegos. However, the support services that would facilitate those activities are being cut. The volunteer coalition wants to involve the community and mobilize local, non-traditional resources into a sustainable support system that would replace the disappearing services. As they clear-cut the funding forest, grassroots are needed, states one of the coalitions informational handouts. We have to be a grassroots organization that grows back what is being cut, Gallegos told the school board members, inviting them to share their experience and expertise with the coalition and help with community education and forming a community resource committee. Leslie McLeod, who has a son diagnosed with autism, told the board that, the mountains are pretty high, but weve picked out three mountains. One was having a special day class for developmentally disabled children in one of the outlying schools. Since some of the children, especially the ones with autism, can become over-stimulated, the day class in a smaller school environment would be more benecial, more conducive to learning and mingling with their peers, and less intimidating than the mammoth Central School, where they tend to disappear into a classroom and not come out again. The point is to let them experience being out among other children and to let other children see them, get to know them and understand them. Also, children do better in the smaller school environment that is more like the calmer home environment where they live. The second mountain is to promote the childrens inclusion in the school yearbooks, where they can really be seen as part of the student body, and not just the special day class. The third is to ght the school-to-couch syndrome, where the children go home from school and then just veg out in front of the TV set, by including them in afterschool activities. Public schools receive federal dollars and federal dollars come with strings attached; one of those strings is making after school activities accessible to all students. The coalition would like the boards help in guring out how to do that, so that the school-tocouch doesnt keep happening, happening, happening. In the meantime, since the Project Cares volunteers have been working in the tricounty area, they have formed a support group for parents of developmentally disabled children, made their voices heard and raised community awareness through local media, and have already managed to include the children in some community activities for the past year, such as Downtown Halloween and Down Home Days. They have also put together a summer Buddy Camp that allows the children to experience summer camp, and an Art Workshop For Autism. The paintings that the children created were later auctioned off, and the kids were thrilled to see people actually buying their artwork. The group would like to recruit more members to work together and help climb those mountains, and they invite any community members who would like to get involved to come forward and share their expertise and knowledge. Project Cares meets at Big Bend Arc every third Thursday of each month from 6 to 7 p.m. To get on their contact list and receive more information, email Joe Anson at janson@ounce.org or call (850) 921-4494, ext. 103.sion and MJB. George Blevins, of the Salvation Army, will speak briey on the goals of the Salvation Army and what the group does during the Christmas season. Jacob Bembry will serve as emcee for the event. Everyone is invited to go out and help the Salvation Army make a difference this Christmas season. From Page One Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 World NewsBy Rose KleinMan With Sword Demands Free FoodIn San Antonio, Texas, a 28-year-old man walked into the Alondras De Jalisco restaurant and asked for free tacos. When the waitress informed Adam Kramer they would not be free, he began sliding a sword in and out of its sheath that he was wearing around his waist. The man left the restaurant when his phone rang, prompting the waitress to lock the door. Kramer came back to the door of the restaurant, yelling that he wanted free tacos or somebody was going to die. Kramer left the scene, but was arrested the following day on an unrelated charge of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon where he was recognized from the incident at Alondras De Jalisco. Kramer was charged with aggravated robbery in connection with the restaurant incident.Thieves Take Christmas Gifts While Child WatchesIn Forest Park, Ga., Christmas presents intended for a nine-year-old boy were stolen from his grandparents home as he watched. Two armed men entered the house of Charles Campbell and his wife by way of an unlocked door. One man held the family captive by holding a pair of scissors at the back of Campbells wife while the other man went through the house looking for things to steal. The men took all the gifts intended for the Campbells grandson, along with other household items and electronics. The Campbells said they had spent months saving for the gifts. No one was hurt during the robbery but police currently do not have any suspect in the robbery.Missing Dog Brings Reward Of Familys CarIn Elizabethtown, Ky., a family has offered their 1999 Pontiac Grand Prix as a reward for their missing golden retriever. Ashley and Mike Burns said, Bella ran off with their other dog, Marley, who has since been found by animal control, but Bella remains missing. Despite 10 years of trying, the Burns havent been able to have any kids and view the two dogs as their children. Ashley Burns said, We love our pets like children, like family members. The car is valued at $3,100. Mike Burns said, We want people to take the car. We dont want people to say, Ill give you your dog back, we dont want your car. We want people to know that this is payment on a reward, however you want to look at it, for bringing our dog back. 12/11 Deontre Martez Williams VOP (possession of more than 20 grams of marijuana) Alvin Humphrey, Jr. Criminal registration 12/12 Barry Alonzo Terry No charge information available 12/13 Robert Lee Lowery Resisting arrest without violence, disorderly conduct Kim Anderson Possession of methamphetamine, battery, child abuse/endangerment, possession of drug equipment, manufacture of methamphetamine 12/16 Derrick Dewayne Mackey Drug possession, possession of drug equipment Eric Antonio Brown Possession of a weapon, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, possession of drug paraphernalia 12/17 Jimmy Lee Weatherspoon VOP Timothy Ray Linville Possession of drug paraphernalia, improper tag. Information in the Jail Report is provided to Greene Publishing, Inc., by the Madison County Sheriffs Office. All people are considered innocent until proven guilty. Questions about people identified in the report should be directed to the MCSO at (850) 973-4001.Jail ReportMadison County The MadisonEnterprise-Recorder PublisherEmerald GreeneSenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WritersLynette Norris, Rose KleinGraphic DesignerTori SelfAdvertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette Dunn, Shanna SwopeBookkeeperBrooke KinsleyClassified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classieds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Wednesday at 3 p.m. There will be a $7 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included)Since 1865 -Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity.The Madison The Madison Enterprise-Recorder Enterprise-RecorderMadison Recorder established 1865 New Enterprise established 1901 Consolidated June 25, 1908 Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post Ofce 32340. Publication No. 177.400. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison Enterprise-Recorder, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.P.O. Box 772 Madison, FL 32341 1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32340 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 greenepub@greenepublishing.com www.greenepublishing.com 2013 Meth Bust Cont. From Page 1into the residence. Deputies immediately pursued Gatlin inside the residence and detected a strong chemical odor that the deputies recognized as the odor Methamphetamine produces when being cooked. Deputies located Gatlin in a rear bedroom and another male identied as Steve Allen Vickers, Jr., 22, of Madison in the living room. Deputies also observed an active meth lab and several weapons including a sawed off shotgun in plain sight. Deputies evacuated the residence and placed both Gatlin and Vickers under arrest. Madison County Drug Task Force investigators responded to the scene and assumed control of the investigation. Agents of the Lake City Police Department that are certied in meth lab dismantling and removal assisted with the destruction and cleanup of the lab after all evidence had been collected. Gatlin and Vickers were charged with manufacturing methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a short-barreled shotgun and possession of a rearm during a felony. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob BembryMJB, featuring from left to right: Michael Keeler (on guitar), Burt Sealey (on drums) and Chad McCormick (on bass) will perform at A Hallelujah Christmas. Hallelujah Christmas Cont. From Page 1 Project Cares Cont. From Page 1

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Melvin Boynton, 64, of Madison, A United States Army Veteran and entrepreneur, died Saturday, November 16, 2013 in Durham, North Carolina. He was the son of the late Hayman Boynton and the late Rosetta Cat Simmons and stepfather, Tim Simmons. Melvin attended the Madison County School System and Putnam County where he graduated. He received the National Defense Service Medal SS M-14 while serving in the United States Army. He also served in the United States Army Reserves. He leaves to cherish his memory, two sons, Jason Hasty of Hempstead, N.Y. and Joshua Boynton of Madison; ve daughters, Melvine Boynton, Meloise Boynton, Jawanda Boynton, Brittany Boynton and DaMah Johnson all of Madison; three stepchildren, Jermaine Monlyn, Tara Monlyn and Travis Gillyard; two grandchildren, Melvin Boynton and JaAsja Hasty; one god-child, Takeria Beasley and eleven step-grandchildren; ve brothers, Howard Johnson (Patsy) of Madison, Reverend Herman Joseph (Sharon) of Lake Wales, Alfonso Frazier of Hempstead, N.Y., Bobby Simmons (Evelina) of Gainesville and Johnny Simmons (Lenora) of Hempstead, N.Y.; two sisters, Deborah Simmons and Patricia Craig (Michael) both of Madison; two aunts, Mary E. Williams and Careatha Williams (Andrew) both of Madison; special friend, Joyce Ann Hazzard and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and sorrowing friends. Funeral Services were held at 11 a.m. Saturday, November 23, 2013 at New Bethel Primitive Baptist Church in Madison. Burial followed at the Oak Ridge Cemetery in Madison.Around Madison County4 Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 Community CalendarO b i t u a r i e s December 21Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church, 407 NE Mt. Zion Church Avenue in Cherry Lake, will hold a Hanson, Pinetta and Cherry Lake Community Christmas Outreach Dinner on Saturday, Dec. 21, from 12:303:30 p.m. Meals will be delivered to community residents beginning at 9:30 a.m. Anyone interested in helping with the event is welcome to go serve with them. Anyone needing transported to the church or who is sick or shut-in can call Brother Johnnie Woods at (850) 9294141. For more information, please call Savilla Murphy at (850) 929-4386. December 21Live Nativity from 5-7 p.m. at the First Baptist Church of Madison. Please join them in the church parking lot as they go back in time to the village of Bethlehem and what the rst Christmas might have looked like.December 21A Hallelujah Christmas at Lee Town Hall on Saturday, Dec. 21, beginning at 6 p.m. to raise money for the Salvation Army. Featured artists include Mortal Mission and MJB. George Blevins, with the Salvation Army, will speak. Jacob Bembry will serve as emcee. December 22 Childrens pageant under the direction of Martha Beggs and Martha Register, 11 a.m., at the First Baptist Church in Madison. December 22Midway Baptist Church will present their Christmas cantata, Glory to the Newborn King, on Sunday, December 22, at 6 p.m. Midway Baptist Church is located at 338 SE Midway Church Road. December 22Midway Church of God will present their childrens Christmas play on Sunday, December 22, at 6 p.m. Everyone is invited. Midway Church of God is located at 2849 SE Midway Church Road in Lee. December 24Christmas Eve candlelight service and Lords Supper in the 1898 Sanctuary at the First Baptist Church in Madison. Eunice Davis went home to be with the Lord on December 14, 2013. She was born to her parents, Jim and Gladys Johnson-Davis on August 21, 1936 in Madison. The funeral service will be 1 p.m. Saturday, December 21, 2013, at Pineland Missionary Baptist Church with burial at Oakridge Cemetery. Visitation will be from 5:307 p.m., Friday, December 20, 2013, at Cooks & Cooper Funeral Home. Memorial Services were held at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, December 18, 2013 at First Baptist Church of Lafayette for Emily Beth Shirey, 72, who passed away on Monday, December 16, 2013 at 7:29 p.m. at The Regional Medical Center of Acadiana. Steve Horn, Pastor of First Baptist Church conducted the memorial services. Mrs. Shirey, a resident of Lafayette, La., was the daughter of the late Kenneth Burnett and the former Trudy Pickles. She is survived by her husband, of fty years, William Shirey; daughters, Elizabeth Ann Shirey and husband Mizo, and Robin Rebecca Kreimer and husband David; and son, Steven Hobson Shirey; grandchildren, Hannah Shirey, Emi Mizobuchi, Sarah Kent, Ken Mizobuchi and Stephen Kent; and brother, Frederick Burnett. Her parents and her brother, Michael Burnett, preceded her in death. Personal condolences may be sent to the Shirey family at www.delhommefuneralhome.com. Delhomme Funeral Home, 1011 Bertrand Drive, Lafayette, La., was in charge of funeral arrangements.M e l v i n F r e d d i e B o y n t o n E u n i c e D a v i s E m i l y S h i r e y Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 12, 2013When the Womans Club drew the rafe tickets for the door prizes at their December meeting, it turned out that Mary Ellen Greene was holding two of the lucky tickets, winning both the large poinsettia on the left and the smaller Christmas cactus on the right. The Womans Club rafes off door prizes every month as a fundraiser, for items donated by downtown merchants or the members themselves; the money goes toward the clubs charitable projects. December door prizes included several poinsettias, Christmas cactus and other Christmasthemed plants, donated by Wendys Florist and Beggs Funeral Home.M a r y E l l e n G r e e n e W i n s A L o t O f R e d By Rose Klein Greene Publishing, Inc.Boothill Motorcycle club is a not-for-profit organization that provides service to the community by hosting projects within Madison County for families and individuals in need. The Christmas Toy Giveaway follows their recent gifts of Thanksgiving dinner baskets to families throughout the county.Boothill will be hosting two toy giveaways this Saturday, Dec. 21. The rst giveaway will be in Greenville at Haffeye Park between 10 a.m.noon. The second giveaway will be in Madison at Sumpter A. James Park between 12:30 p.m. Two toys will be provided per child, ages one through twelve, while supplies last.Christmas Toy Giveaway Hosted By Boothill MC

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 5 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 Mr. And Mrs. Santa Claus Visit Madison Health And Rehabilitation CenterBy Diana Maurice, RN, Admissions/Public Relations, Madison Health And Rehabilitation CenterAvery special and beautiful gift was given to the residents of Madison Health and Rehab on the evening of Dec. 13 when a former Madison resident, John Shaw and Marie, his wife, who now reside in Jackson, Ga., and have a ministry for seniors at Christmas time, arrived to the center dressed up as Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus. They arrived in an RV loaded with gifts for all of the 60 residents, employees and families, pulling a sleigh lled with toys for all of the children that attended the annual Christmas party at the Center. It was such a special night that was organized by Activities Director, Sharon Dawkins. Sharon, along with her assistant, Marty Giacomazzi, prepared feverishly for the event. There were special musical performances by young Jermaine Dawkins on the trumpet as well as song by Victoria Dawkins. Several carols were sung by a young girl named Ariel, who was accompanied by her mom, Porshe, on the cello and The Christmas Story was read by volunteer Rosemarie Henderson. All of these guests traveled from Tallahassee to share their gifts with everyone there that beautiful night. What a delight it was to learn that our Santa, John Shaw, was raised in Madison, graduated from MCHS, then went on to university in Atlanta, Ga. John and Marie explained that after they retired from working for the federal government, John in accounting and Marie at the Department of Health and Human Services, realized during the Christmas season that many charities were there for children and families however for the elderly there were few organizations reaching out to them and even less for those seniors that were living alone at home. This awakening sparked them to begin doing just that! In 2006, they began visiting nursing homes and those less fortunate at home, bringing small gifts and dressing up as Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus. thus Santas Rest Home Ministry was born. Last December, the couple visited 17 nursing homes across four states, as well as many seniors still living at home. In that month, they continue ministering even up to Christmas Day, giving gifts and relling their supply by traveling home to Jackson, Ga., to pack the recreational vehicle and trailer with more gifts. Then begins the journey to those in need of a hug, smile and lots of joy and presents. The work doesnt end at Christmas however as the shopping begins all over again as the couple looks for after the holiday sales, along with the help of friends and family, picking up as much as they can for the next season coming. I nearly forgot to mention that the Shaws do not solicit funds for any of the gifts given. They have been shopping and giving from their own resources and retirement incomes since the ministry began. In a very sentimental moment, John stated, We are dedicating this trip to my parents, former Madison residents, Walter and Annie Shaw. Louise Herring, Johns sister, is a regular visitor at the Center and accompanied the couple during the event. Marie Shaw added, We believe that we are bringing Jesus to the needy outside of the four walls of the church and we love it! Photo submittedMarty Giacomazzi, assistant activities director, enjoys sampling the refreshments at the Christmas party. Photo submitted Guests and employees sample some of the delicious refreshments at the Christmas party at Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center. Photo submittedMr. and Mrs. Santa Claus (John and Marie Shaw) enjoyed their visit to Madison Health and Rehab. Photo submittedResidents enjoy opening Christmas presents during the Christmas party at Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center. During your accumulation years, you may have categorized your risk as conservative, moderate or aggressive and that guided how your portfolio was built. Maybe you concerned yourself with finding the best-performing funds, even though you knew past performance does not guarantee future results. What occurs with many retirees is a change in mindset-its less about finding the bestperforming fund and more about consistent performance. It may be less about a risk continuum-that stretches from conservative to aggressive-and more about balancing the objectives of maximizing your income with sustaining it for a lifetime. You may even find yourself willing to forego return potential for steady income. A change in your mindset may drive changes how you consider shaping your portfolio and the investments you choose to fill it. Lets examine how this might look at an individual level. During your working years, you appreciated the short-term volatility of the stock market but accepted it for its growth potential value over longer time periods. Youre now in retirement and still believe in that concept. In fact, you know stocks remain important to your financial strategy over a 30-year or more retirement period. But youve also come to understand that withdrawals from your investment portfolio has the potential to accelerate the depletion of your assets when investment values are declining. How you define your risk tolerance may not have changed, but you understand the new risks introduced by retirement. Consequently, its not so much about managing your exposure to stocks, but considering new strategies that adapt to this new landscape. For instance, it may mean that you hold more cash than you ever did when you were earning a paycheck. It also may mean that you consider investments that shift the risk of market uncertainty to another party, such as an insurance company. The guarantees of an annuity contract depend on the issuing company claimspaying ability. Annuities have contract limitations, fees, and charges, including account and administrative fees, underlying investment management fees, mortality and expense fees, and charges for optional benefits. Most annuities have surrender fees that are usually highest if you take out the money in the initial years of the annuity contact. Withdrawals and income payments are taxes as ordinary income. If a withdrawal is made prior to age 59.5, a 10% federal income tax penalty may apply (unless an exception applies). The march of time affords us everchanging perspectives on life and that has never been truer than for the time we spend in retirement.Keep in mind that the return and principal value of stock prices will fluctuate as market conditions change. And shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. This is a hypothetical example used for illustrative purposes only.Stacy Bush, PresidentBush Wealth ManagementThe Bush Wealth Advantage Your Changing Definition of Risk in RetirementOur column, The Bush Wealth Advantage is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. 842611

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www.greenepublishing.com G r e e n v i l l e C o u n t r y C h r i s t m a s W r a p U p 6Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, December 20, 2013 By Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc.With Commander Roy Scott and Vice Commander Arthur Paquette of the Greenville American Legion, Post 131, serving as Citizens of the Year and Rep. Halsey Beshears (R-Monticello) serving as the parade Grand Marshal, Greenvilles Country Christmas was a delight this year to everyone who attended. The fun began on Friday afternoon, Dec. 13, as the bake-off and gingerbread houses were dropped off for judging at the Greenville/Madison Multi-Purpose Center. The judging took place at 5 p.m. At 6 p.m., the traditional Christmas events took place at the Haffye Hayes Park and Gazebo. There was an invocation and announcement, followed by caroling from the Greenville Baptist Church Community Kids and a live Nativity scene, provided by Renewed Life Outreach Center in Greenville. At 7 p.m., the community enjoyed refreshments. On Saturday morning, Dec. 14, the day began with arts and crafts and food booths, which were open all day. The childrens art contest and the gingerbread houses were displayed. At 10 a.m., the opening ceremonies began with the invocation and the National Anthem, which was sung by Cindy Vees. This was followed by the salute to the American ag and the recognition of Beshears as the grand marshal and Scott and Paquette as the citizens of the year. The Greenville Country Christmas Parade began at 11 a.m. and thrilled those in attendance. Georgia Red, a Christian rapper, took the stage to perform. At noon, the bake-off contest winners were announced, along with the gingerbread house contest winners and the childrens art contest winners. Winners in the bake-off contest were: BREADS: First place Debbie Shepherd, Pumpkin bread Second place Kerry Cohen, Sourdough Santa bread CAKES: First place Juanita Cason, Hummingbird cake Second place Abby Reams, Cherry cheesecake Third place Debbie Shepherd, Turtle cheesecake CANDIES: First place Kerry Cohen, Turtledove Second place Debbie Shepherd, Peanut butter almond bark Third place Sloan Bickford, Christmas confetti COOKIES: First place Judith Fritcsche, Popcorn melt away Second place Jocelyn Davis, Seven-layer bars Third place Marie Cone, Cake mix cookies PIES: First place Debbie Shepherd, Pecan pie Second place Kerry Cohen, Cranberry fudge pie GINGERBREAD HOUSE: First Place: Kerry Cohen Childrens art contest winners included: Pre-K through Kindergarten: First place: Tyson Davis First through third grades: First place: Jasmine Odom Second place: JNariez Miller Third place: Dylan Agner Fourth through fth grade: First place: Zakira Howard Second place: Jonathan Mitchell Third place: Lane Agner At 1 p.m., the cake auction was held. Brett Wellman and the Stone Cold Blues Band followed this. The days festivities ended with the Greenville High School reunion, held at 6 p.m. Photo submitted by Kathy Reams, December 13, 2013Renewed Life Outreach Center presents a live Nativity scene during the Country Christmas festivities. Photo submitted by Kathy Reams, December 13, 2013Greenville Country Christmas President Stuart Mac Iver and his wife, Donna, helped coordinate the Country Christmas festivities. Photo submitted by Kathy Reams, December 13, 2013Hosting the reception for the community Friday evening were, from left to right: Janet Morris, Adrenia Lyons, Lucile Day and Rose Thigpen. Photo submitted by Kathy Reams, December 13, 2013Bake-off contest winners included, from left to right: Jocelyn Davis, Juanita Cason, Judith Fritsche, Debbie Shepherd, Kerry Cohen and Abby Reams. They are shown with Franee Morris, far left and Elesta Pritchett, far right. Photo submitted by Kathy Reams, December 13, 2013The Greenville Baptist Church Kids Choir sings Christmas carols on Friday evening, Dec. 13.

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www.greenepublishing.com G r e e n v i l l e C o u n t r y C h r i s t m a s W r a p U p Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7Friday, December 20, 2013 Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013The Spirit of Greenville featured the How the Grinch Stole Christmas oat in the parade. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Shamora Lott looked regal as she rode in the parade as the Greenville Elementary School queen. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Roy Scott, left, and Arthur Paquette, right, were the Citizens of the Year for the 2013 Greenville Country Christmas. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Erin Jarvis, Regan Crosby, and Elainie Jarvis were raising money for their dance team to compete in Jacksonville Jan. 31-Feb. 2, 2014. Not pictured: Mary Kate Brooks. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Tax Collector Lisa Tuten, front, and Property Appraiser Leigh Bareld, back, rode in the Country Christmas Parade. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Cub Scout Pack 628 in Greenville was holding a bake sale fundraiser, during Greenville Country Christmas. Pictured left to right: Lane Agner, Romeo Wilson and Dylan Agner. To join the Scouts, call Alyson Norris at (850) 694-8784. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Halsey Beshears was the Grand Marshal for this years Country Christmas parade. He is shown with his daughters, Grace, Turner and Suzanne, in the Country Christmas parade. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Cindy Vees, Executive Director of the Chamber of Commerce, rode in the parade with her daughter, Kayla Vees, and granddaughter, Kendall Vees. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013The SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) Team took part in the Greenville Country Christmas festivities.

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www.greenepublishing.com G r e e n v i l l e C o u n t r y C h r i s t m a s W r a p U p 8Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, December 20, 2013 Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013The Greenville Elementary School Boys and Girls Club, the Spartans, marched and played instruments in the parade. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013The Madison County High School band marches in the parade. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013The Renewed Life Outreach Center rode in the parade. Photo submitted by Kathy Reams, December 13, 2013Frances Ginn holds her granddaughter, Natalie Newman. Photo submitted by Kathy Reams, December 13, 2013Bali Thigpen helped coordinate the Gingerbread House contest. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Greene, December 14, 2013Cindy Vees, executive director of the Greater Madison County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism, sings the National Anthem at the start of the Greenville Country Christmas. e

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T o m o r r o w n i g h t S a t u r d a y D e c 2 1 5 ~ 7 p m J o u r n e y t h r o u g h B e t h l e h e m O little town of Bethlehem, How still we see thee lie! Above thy deep and dreamless sleep the silent stars go by. Yet in thy dark streets shineth the everlasting Light. The hopes and fears of all the years are met in thee tonight. Join us for a walking tour through the sights and sounds of first century Bethlehem. Its free! The event will be held in the church parking lot at the corner of Base (Hwy. 90) and Orange Streets. Refreshments will be served. S u n d a y m o r n i n g 1 1 a m w o r s h i p ~ D e c 2 2 ~ Firstthird Grade Sunday School Class Christmas Pageant This pageant has been held for at least 40 years on the Sunday morning before Christmas Day. There are children in the pageant whose parents were in the presentation when they were children. Among them are Riley Beggs (Father: Judson; Grandparents: Ashley and Martha), Jackson Kendrick (Mother: Amy Stewart Kendrick, Grandmother: Toy Stewart), and Parker Copeland (Father: Walter, Grandparents: W. C. & Frances). T h e m o n t h o f D e c e m b e r is when Southern Baptist churches remember our international missionaries with the L o t t i e M o o n C h r i s t m a s O f f e r i n g emphasis. The theme is Totally His: Heart, Hands, Voice. Use the prayer guide provided to pray daily for missionaries. Plan now the sacrificial offering you will make. Our goal is $3500. This week our time of praise included The Birthday of a King and Oh, Come Little Children. The Christmas carols included We Three Kings, and Hark, The Herald Angels Sing. The offertory, How Great Our Joy was especially beautiful. The worship choir sang a selection, Yahweh, Hear our Pleas. Bro. Gabes sermon was based on Luke 1:5-17 God had been silent for some 450 years and was getting ready to speak again. As you read this account of the Priest Zacharias and the Father of John the Baptist consider the events that took place that were not just happen so events. There was in the days of Herod, the king of Judea, a certain priest named Zacharias, of the division of Abijah. His wife was of the daughters of Aaron, and her name was Elizabeth. And they were both righteous before God, walking in all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless. But they had no child, because Elizabeth was barren, and they were both well advanced in years. So it was, that while he was serving as priest before God in the order of his division, according to the custom of the priesthood, his lot fell to burn incense when he went into the temple of the Lord. And the whole multitude of the people was praying outside at the hour of incense. Then an angel of the Lord appeared to him, standing on the right side of the altar of incense. And when Zacharias saw him, he was troubled, and fear fell upon him. But the angel said to him, Do not be afraid, Zacharias, for your prayer is heard; and your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son, and you shall call his name John. And you will have joy and gladness, and many will rejoice at his birth. For he will be great in the sight of the Lord, and shall drink neither wine nor strong drink. He will also be filled with the Holy Spirit, even from his mothers womb. And he will turn many of the children of Israel to the Lord their God. He will also go before Him in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just, to make ready a people prepared for the Lord. Christmas came with a surety. Christmas came with a promise. Christmas came with the pages of the Scriptures being proven true and faithful. And it still does today! D e c 2 4 ~ 6 p.m. Christmas Eve Candle Light Service/Lords Supper in the 1898 Sanctuary. D e c 2 5 2 7 ~ Office closed for the holidays. D e c 2 9 ~ No evening service If you have questions about any of the announcements or prayer concerns, the church staff is ready to serve you. The church office hours are 8:30 a. m 4:30 p.m., Monday Friday. The office phone number is 973-2547 or you can reach the church secretary by email at 1stbaptistoffice@gmail.com. We also have a website, madisonfbc.net, that is regularly updated. Our pastor can be reached at gabekrell@yahoo.com. Jim Carey, our music minister can be reached at muzicman123@gmail.com Join us this week for Sunday School at 9:45 a.m., where we have classes for nursery through senior adults. Worship begins at 11 a.m. when we will honor the Lord with songs of praise, prayers, offerings, and the spoken word. S U N D A Y N I G H T S @ F I R S T . Our evening service @ First begins at 5 p.m. This will allow us the opportunity to share in praise, worship, and the Word from 5-5:45. Then from 5:45-7:30 a variety of class options will be available to grow your faith. For A D U L T S three different classes are being offered: Experiencing God, led by Andrea Krell, When Gods Spirit Moves, led by LaVerne Deckard, and Divorce Care led by Bro. Gabe, Ann McLeod, and Shelly Smith. This is a class for those experiencing separation, divorcees or those going through a divorce. A l l s e s s i o n s s t a n d a l o n e s o y o u c a n j o i n a n y o n e a t a n y t i m e Call the church office at 973-2547 to register for these classes. The Y O U T H g r a d e s 6 8 w i l l have an opportunity to study the Book of James led by Amy Kendrick and Dave Deckard. For H I G H S C H O O L 9 1 2 g r a d e s t h r o u g h C O L L E G E / C A R E E R age folks Melanie Parks, Ray Pike and Ansley Rogers will be leading a study entitled Forgotten God. The C H I L D R E N also have special places. The P r e s c h o o l C h o i r ages three-six are being taught by Beth Carey and Carol Bynum. Jim Carey, Martha Beggs, and Thelma DeHart will lead the Childrens Choir for those in first-fifth grades. And of course, a N u r s e r y will be provided for those babies through age two. Dinner will be served from 7-7:30 for preschool through college. No matter your age or where you are in your walk with Christ, there is a place for you S U N D A Y N I G H T S @ F I R S T God is doing awesome things! And remember as Christmas comes for you, will you anticipate the work of the Lord Jesus in your life for salvation, and then to mold and make you into a tool for His work in the world?9Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013Church/Turn Back Time Way Back When AtMadison First Baptist ChurchSubmitted By Judy PhillipsGuest Columnist Taken from the November 27, 1998 edition of the Madison Enterprise-RecorderDecember 24, 1943 Fire originating in the ceiling of the Baptist pastorium Sunday afternoon about 4:30 oclock caused great damage to the building before it could be brought under control. A small roof re at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B.G. Waring on the highway east of Madison Monday morning threatened for a while but was put under control by the re department. Miss Callie Coody of Jacksonville is expected to arrive next week for a holiday visit with Mr. and Mrs. Chandler Rains and other relatives. John Coffee returned home last Tuesday after serving 20 months in the Army. While in the service, he was awarded the Good Conduct medal. He received a medical discharge. December 18, 1953 Mr. J.B. Golden sold the Sinclair Station in Lee this week to Mr. S.D. Medlin, who is in charge now. Medlin plans to enlarge the stock of goods. Mrs. Claymore Schnitker has arrived to be with her mother, Mrs. J.B. Wooten, while Mr. Schnitker is overseas. Madison is gaily decorated for the holiday season with festoons of colored lights on the Courthouse and chains of lights encircling the entire Courthouse park. Louie Fraleigh, of Tallahassee, formerly of Madison, has been appointed secretary to the State Road Department. December 20, 1963 Miss Annell Ragans came home Sunday to be with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Waldron C. Ragans, for the Christmas holidays. Mr. Dalton Mercer was a business visitor in Jacksonville for a few days last week. The Mens Brotherhood of the First Baptist Church met Tuesday evening in the educational building with 14 present. Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Henderson are celebrating their 60thwedding anniversary Sunday, Dec. 22, at their home with an open house from 2-5 p.m. B u r i e d T r e a s u r e s

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10Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 Introducing the All New 2014 Jeep Cherokee! 12 to Choose F rom! All prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or Valdosta dealerships. All prices good through December 21, 2013 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. Retail value of TV is $200, limit of 1 per each vehicle purchased. ALL 2013 200 CONV. ALL 2013 CHALLENGERALL 2013 DODGE DART 888-304-2277 888-463-6831801 E. SCREVEN ST QUITMAN, GA 4164 N. VALDOSTA RD. VALDOSTA, GA ALL 2013 RAM 1500 RC ALL 2013 RAM 1500 QUAD ALL 2013 RAM 2500ALL 2013 RAM 3500 ALL 2013 CAB & CHASSISALL 2013 GRAND CARAVANALL 2013 TOWN & COUNTRYALL 2013 200 SEDAN ALL 2013 CARGO VAN ALL 2013 RAM 1500 CREW ALL 2013 300 ALL 2013 CHARGER 0% EXAMPLE: V130370 Journey MSRP $21,490 $2500 down = $18,990/60 = $316/mth. 0% EXAMPLE: V130186 Chrysler 200 MSRP $23,845 $1000 discount $1000 down = $21,485/72 = $298/mth.ALL 2013 DURANGO ALL 2013 JOURNEY C130045 2013 CHEVY SUBURBANC130226 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DOOR LTC140066ALL-STAR EDITION 18 ALUM WHEELS REAR CAMERA REMOTE START & MORE! 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4 DOOR LT 4X4ALL-STAR EDITION 5.3L V8 18 ALUM WHEELS REAR CAMERA REMOTE START & MORE!C140040834617Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price. Retail value of TV is $200, limit of 1 per each vehicle purchased. CHEVYS GIVINGMORETis the Season for a Great Deal on a New Chevy! 2014 SILVERADO 1500 4.3L ECOTEC ENGINEPOWER WINDOWS/LOCKSKEYLESS ENTRYCHROME PACKAGE MSRP $25,650 DISCOUNT -$4,053 C140050 C1400082014 CHEVY CRUZE 1.8L ECOTEC ENGINEAUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONPOWER EQUIPMENT GROUPON-STARSIRIOUS SATELLITE RADO 1.8L ECOTEC ENGINEAUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONPOWER EQUIPMENT GROUPCHEVY MYLINKBLUE TOOTHC1302512013 CHEVY SONIC LT Chevys Giving More Chevys Giving More C130045SUNROOFNAVIGATIONREMOTELINK 20 WHEELSHIGH INTENSITY HEADLAMPS2013 CHEVY CAMARO LT Chevys Giving More Chevys Giving More 2014 CHEVY EQUINOX 32 MPG (PER WINDOW STICKER) BLUE TOOTH WIRELESSUSB PORT2.4 L SIDI SIRIUS/MP3 PLAYER 8640 HWY 84 WEST841776 MSRP $30,585 Discount $6,590 All prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or Valdosta dealerships. All prices good through December 21, 2013 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. Must present ad at time of purchase to receive all/any advertised price.Retail value of TV is $200, limit of 1 per each vehicle purchased.MSRP $44,865 DISCOUNT -$6,867

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St. Nicholas was born in 280 AD, in Patara, a city of Lycia, in Asia Minor. He became the gift giver of Myra. His gifts were given late at night, so that the gift giver's identity would remain a secret. St. Nicholas was eventually named the patron saint of children, sailors, Russia and Greece. St. Nicholas was a Christian priest, who later became a bishop. He was a rich person, and traveled the country helping people, giving gifts of money and other presents. St. Nicholas did not like to be seen when he gave away presents, so the children of the day were told to go to sleep quickly or he would not come! Nothing has changed and Santa Claus will not arrive this Christmas unless the children go to sleep early. A famous story about St. Nicholas is about a poor man who had no money to give to his three daughters on their wedding day. St Nick dropped bags of gold into the stockings which the girls had left to dry by the re. The sisters found the gold and ever since, children have hung up stockings on Christmas Eve hoping that they will be lled with presents by Christmas morning. Despite being quite young Nicholas had earned a reputation for kindliness and wisdom. In the year 303, the Roman emperor Diocletian commanded all the citizens of the Roman Empire, which included Asia Minor, to worship him as a god. Christians believed in one god and one god alone, so their conscience would not allow them to obey the Emperor's order. Angered by their stubbornness, Diocletian warned the Christians that they would be imprisoned. The Emperor carried out the threat and St. Nicholas, who resisted too was also imprisoned. For more than ve years, St. Nicholas was conned to a small cell. He suffered from cold, hunger, and thirst, but he never wavered in his beliefs. In 313, when Diocletian resigned, and Constantine came to power Nicholas was released, and he returned to his post as Bishop of Myra. He continued his good works and became even wiser and more understanding by the time of his death on Dec. 6, 343. In the eyes of the Catholics, a saint is someone who has lived such a holy life that, after dying and going to heaven, he or she is still able to help people on earth. They often become patron to different groups of people one such was children and many legends sprang up to explain his presence. By 450, churches in Asia Minor and Greece were being named in honor of him. By 800, he was ofcially recognized as the a saint by the Eastern Catholic Church. In the 1200s, Dec. 6 began to be celebrated as Bishop Nicholas Day in France. By end of the 1400s, St. Nicholas was the third most beloved religious gure, after Jesus and Mary. There were more than 2000 chapels and monasteries named after him. In the 1500s, people in England stopped worshipping St Nicholas and favored more another gift giving gure, Father Christmas. Over the centuries, St. Nicholas' popularity grew, and many people in Europe made up new stories that showed his concern for children. The name Santa Claus was derived from the Dutch Sinter Klass pronunciation of St. Nicholas. Early Dutch settlers in New York (once called New Amsterdam) brought their traditions of St. Nicholas. As children from other countries tried to pronounce Sinter Klass, this soon became Santa Klass, which was settled as Santa Claus. The old bishop's cloak with mitre, jewelled gloves and crozier were soon replaced with his red suit and clothing seen in other modern images. Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 Saint Nicholas A Brief History

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12Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 C C A T h r i f t S t o r e O f f e r s C h r i s t m a s B a r g a i n s Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, December 6, 2013Christmas items for purchase at the CCA Thrift Store can help you decorate for the holidays or help check-off names from your gift list.By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.If you are still on the hunt for Christmas decorations or gifts, some place you may not have considered is the recently opened CCA Thrift Store, located in Lee. The store was created as a way to help raise funds for the Corinth Christian Academy School. Purchasing items from the store will not only whittle down your Christmas list, but will help others in the community. Money made from the store will allow students to attend future mission trips and also help meet the needs of individuals and organizations in the tri-county area. The store has a lot of low-cost items to choose from and Cindy Abbott, who oversees the store, says there are Christmas specials, such as buyone-get-one-free on all Christmas items and stuff-a-bag of clothing for $5. You can even nd brand-new items still in the original packaging that have been donated to the store for resell. The store will be open this Friday and Saturday, Dec. 20 and 21, from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. The thrift store is located at the intersection of Highways 255 and 90, at the caution light. VISIT OUR TOY DEPARTMENT HURRY BEFORE THEYRE GONE! NOW IN STOCK! Madame Alexander Dolls Doll House Police Set Toads & Teacups Childrens Shop Clothing Department Puddle Jumpers, Lamore, Angel, Ga Boot, Wee Squeak, Pediped, Keds, Chooze, Willets & Riley RoosSHOE DEPARTMENTSHOE DEPARTMENT Remember Nguyen Frumpy Rumps Rosalina Young Colors Petite Ami Bailey Boys Mud Pie229-244-72201601 Baytree Rd., Suite B2 Valdosta229-244-7220 www.toadsandteacupschildrensshop.com

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14Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013School and Education FEED TIMESHow to use: The major and minor feeding times for each day are listed below. The major feeding times are the best for the sportsman and last about 2 hours, the minor feeding times can also have good success, but last only about 1 hour. Good luck and be careful out there. Major feed times are marked by an asterisk (*) The Week Of December 20 December 26, 2013 Friday December 20 *1:10 AM 7:20 AM *1:30 PM 7:50 PM Saturday December 21 *2:00 AM 8:10 AM *2:20 PM 8:30 PM Sunday December 22 *2:45 AM 8:55 AM *3:10 PM 9:25 PM Monday December 23 *3:35 AM 9:45 AM *3:55 PM 10:10 PM Tuesday December 24 *4:20 AM 10:30 PM *4:40 PM 10:55 PM Wednesday December 25 *5:10 AM 11:20 AM *5:30 PM 11:45 PM Thursday December 26 *5:50 AM 12:00 AM *6:25 PM Lee Elementary Students Hear Special Anti-Bullying MessageBy Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc.As Lee third graders settled into the cafeteria, Principal Robin Hill spoke a few words of introduction for Dolly Ballard, who was visiting the school with a special anti-bullying message.Weve been talking about bullying, now were talking about the effect, said Hill. So put your listening ears on. Its all about being a better citizen. Its not just reading, math and science, its about being better persons and respectful citizens. Dolly Ballard, a school volunteer and a familiar sight at Lee Elementary, where she has taught music classes and organized the childrens Veterans Day musical program for local veterans, said she had been moved by the Holy Spirit to bring the children the special anti-bullying message, because each of you are special. God made you. And bullying was wrong not only because it hurt feelings, but also because it degraded both the victim and the perpetrator. As children grow up, they need to develop a sense of right and wrong not only as it applies to following the rules, but also as to how they treat other people and allow other people to treat them. Ballard, a former police detective with a background in missing persons and runaway juveniles, explained the various forms of bullying to familiarize the children with what those rules were in each case, so they would have a guideline to follow, but she also explained why those rules were there and why they were important. Bullying could have serious consequences. In some nationally publicized extreme cases of bullying, young victims had been driven as far as suicide. By learning the emotional effects bullying could have on victims, by understanding what it felt like, by learning to develop empathy for other students, they would also have an inner guideline that would tell them what was right and wrong, and why. Always listen to that little voice inside you, said Ballard. She also noted that many Americans rights were being taken away, including the right to talk about God in public schools, but Im going to break the rules here and talk about God. I love you children, and I know youre children, but today, Im going to treat you like adults. When she asked how many of them knew what bullying was, nearly all hands went up. When she asked how many children had experienced bullying, many hands went up again. Bullying affects all ages, and both genders about equally. Florida now has an anti-bullying statute. Thats a written law that allows those who bully others to be prosecuted, she explained. The four main categories of bullying are: 1) physical 2) verbal 3) covert and 4) cyber-bullying, a new category that is a product of the modern age, and has reached epidemic proportions. Almost everyone is familiar with physical bullying: hitting, pushing, shoving, kicking, tripping. This is not typical ghting between two students who are angry at each other it usually involves one or more people attacking another person without being provoked. The victim is usually chosen because something about him or her is different, whether it is the way they dress, speak or look. However, the proper way to handle bullying is not by ghting back; should the victim manage to injure the bully, perhaps by knocking him down on a concrete sidewalk, then the law has to get involved, and an act of defense becomes a crime. The best and only way to handle bullying is by going to a teacher or a school resource ofcer and letting the adult authority gure take it from there. Verbal bullying is also a familiar concept. The teasing, the hateful remarks, the name-calling...nearly everyone has been on the business end of an insulting, belittling remark or tirade and knows the resulting feelings of shame, worthlessness, degradation; the desire to become very small and hide away, the desire to crawl into a dark hole, perhaps even the desire to die. The sticks and stones maxim notwithstanding, words hurt. They are sharp, jagged and painful. They have a way of digging themselves deep down into a persons psyche and echoing there over and over. They are destructive in that way. Dont go there, Ballard told the children regarding name-calling. Once you open your mouth and say something hurtful or destructive, its like a piece of paper in the wind. Youre always chasing after it and you can never take it back. Never say anything you cant take back. Verbal bullying also includes racial slurs and remarks about someones religion. Or someone who stutters. Or someone who speaks a different language at home and speaks English with difculty or with an accent. The third category, covert bullying, is also familiar to many. This is the gossiping, backbiting and lying about someone. It is spreading rumors, indicating disrespect through body language or rude gestures, or simply excluding someone on purpose. People may associate this type of bullying with cliques, especially if these cliques seem to target certain people, but anyone can be guilty of spreading hurtful rumors and lies about another person. Have consideration and respect for your companions, said Ballard. How would you feel if someone left you out of everything? Finally, there is cyber-bullying. Computer technology has brought email and the pervasive social media that allow people to stay in touch 24/7, anywhere in the world. The down side is that this also allows a bully to harass a victim 24/7, anywhere in the world. For the victim, there is little or no escape when the school day ends, because the hateful tweets, texts and emails simply follow him or her home. The omnipresent nature of cyberspace means that is it much easier to spread hateful remarks and vindictive rumors to a large number of people, and that more people can gang up on one person, sometimes hiding behind electronic anonymity, and once things are posted online, they stay, sometimes popping up again months or years down the road to reopen old wounds. Because of the pervasive nature of cyber-bullying, victims are more likely to be driven to suicide. Cyber-bullying is far more pervasive than many people realize. According to some statistics, nearly half of all adolescents and teens have been victims, or perpetrators. Cyber bullying is also the least likely to be reported to parents or authorities. Cyber-bullies often believe what they are doing is funny, but they should realize that their actions could have serious consequences for them on down the road. Cyber-bullies and their parents may face legal charges; online postings with fake names may seem safely anonymous, but these transmissions can be traced. Also, even if the perpetrator is never brought up on charges, many colleges and employers do background checks and comb through social media for more information on prospective applicants, and past instances of cyber-bullying will reect poorly on ones character or integrity. It comes down to everyday living, where people need to have patience, understanding and respect for their classmates, and realize that being different is not bad; people should not be judged because they look or act differently, or because they appear to be loners, or because they wear glasses or speak with an accent or walk with a limp. There will always be people who look different; people who have disabilities; people who are shy or lack social skills; even people who prefer to be alone, or who occasionally need space to work through emotional setbacks. The most important thing, Ballard emphasized, was not to judge other people when there was no way of knowing what was going on in their lives. Remember that song we learned for the Veterans Day Program, Let There Be Peace on Earth, she reminded them. The peace, the compassion, and the understanding had to begin with each and every one of them. I dont mean to offend anyone, but I am a Christian, and we learned to be tolerant because we are all children of God, she said. God is our creator. He created us to know him, love him and be happy with him. God is all good, God is all light...darkness is the work of Satan, evil and chaos. The evil of bullying, she believed, is one that is learned. To stop it, it needs to be unlearned and replaced with kindness, graciousness and goodness. Children need to learn empathy how to put themselves in someone elses place and see things from that persons point-of-view and imagine how that person would feel in any given situation. And when we get mad and say bad things to our friends, we should say were sorry, she added. Principal Hill also reminded the children that Ballard had seen many things during her career as a law enforcement ofcer, and she had seen victims and what had happened to them when bullying had escalated, gotten out of hand and turned into a tragedy. You are special, Ballard concluded. As a result of this, I hope I touched somebodys heart...and no bullying at Lee School. Remember that I love you and that God loves you. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, December 6, 2013Dolly Ballard (left) and Lee Elementary School Principal Robin Hill talk to the LES third graders about bullying and how to put a stop to it. THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE FL NOTICE OF UPCOMING ELECTION TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 2014 Voter Registration Books are open for the Town of Greenville FL election. Registration books will close February 10, 2014. ____________________ The election March 11, 2014 is to fill three (3) Council positions Groups 1, 2 and 5. ___________________ Qualifying dates for potential candidates are Noon, Jan. 20, 2014 until Noon, Jan. 24, 2014 __________________ Anyone wishing to qualify for the positions should contact Greenville Town Hall 154 SW Old Mission Avenue, Greenville FL 32331 PH: 850-948-2251 or Email: kreams@embarqmail.com

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By Rose KleinGreene Publishing, Inc.When you think of school as a child, what comes to mind? Is it hanging out with your friends, signing yearbooks and going to football games? Or is it constant study and testing pressure, unfashionable clothes, inadequate supplies or bullying? No matter what experience you had as a child, as an adult, we tend to think of the rst scenario when thinking about kids in school today. Most adults think a childs life is easy, at least compared to their own daily grind. Caught up in responsibilities and bills, we tend to forget how stressful school can be for kids. The reality is that a students life is lled with stress. They are learning how to play competitively, honing their social skills, trying to make friends, dealing with aggression, learning how to control emotions and urges, experiencing peer pressure and rethinking or questioning moral beliefs, all while trying to get an education while having graduation and college looming over their heads. Today, kids are dealing with these stressors as well as some additional ones that most students in the past have not. The counselors at Madison County High School have seen the usual stressors: pressure from receiving good grades and what college they will be attending to feeling like they dont t in because they dont have the right shoes, jacket or jeans for the year. In todays evolving culture, MCHS counselor, Takeysha Thomas, says some kids are facing even more pressure due to increased responsibilities at home. The family structure containing two parents, where one or both work, can no longer be expected. Due to the increase of single-family homes and poor job economy, kids are losing some parental support, both personally and academically. If the single parent is working, there might not be anyone there to pick up the slack in checking homework, attending events or listening to social dilemmas. But, it can get even more difcult; some students are now working when parents lose jobs, taking care of sick parents or cooking and caring for younger siblings. With this kind of responsibility, its no wonder that days spent at school and future education goals can fall in priority. Highly stressed students can show noticeable signs and should be watched for. Signs of stress in a child can include: frequent headaches, stomach aches, bad dreams or nightmares, a noticeable change in behavior such as withdrawing or being more aggressive than usual, crying or temper tantrums, eating disorders, drug or alcohol abuse, withdrawing from friends, spending excessive amounts of time on the computer, or unusual and sudden interest in other cultures and activities. Students have shown that parents, or other signicant adults in a childs life, who involves themselves in a childs school life results in higher grades and test scores, longterm academic achievement and positive attitudes and behavior. Thomas counsels 11thand 12thgrade students and says that the majority of her sessions are spent discussing decision-making skills concerning personal issues, graduation and life after high school. When speaking with students, Thomas says if there is a problem, it seems to center around one issue, lack of support. A lot more support is whats needed and students need to know what support is out there so it can be accessed. Thomas says that a lot of resources for additional support are available. Parents attending parent/teacher conferences, calling their school counselor about problems (personal or academic), reaching out to their church, community or neighborhood can also provide support. In order to help students deal with and overcome school related stress, parents can show support to their child by having realistic expectations for them, listening to them when they open up to talk, dont over-commit the child with too many extra activities, make sure they have plenty of sleep, food and downtime for fun. When wading through their day at school or when considering what will happen after graduation, Thomas says what kids really want to know is, Who is in my corner and how can they help?School and EducationMadison Enterprise-Recorder 15 www.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 Stress In School-Aged ChildrenGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Rose Klein, November 13, 2013Takeysha Thomas, 11th and 12thgrade counselor at MCHS, supports and navigates students towards their goals. G r e e n v i l l e C o u n t r y C h r i s t m a s C h i l d r e n s A r t C o n t e s t W i n n e r s A n n o u n c e d By Jacob BembryGreene Publishing, Inc. There were 32 entries in the Greenville Country Christmas Childrens Art Contest, from students in pre-Kindergarten through the fth grade. Seven winners walked away with ribbons for their efforts. In the pre-Kindergarten through Kindergarten category, Tyson Davis was named the rst place winner. In the rst through third grade category, Jasmine Odom captured rst prize; JNariez Miller was the second place winner; and Dylan Agner took third place. Zakira Howard took the top prize for the fourth and fth grade category; Jonathan Mitchell took second place; and Lane Agner took third place. First place winners received a ribbon and $25. Second place winners received a ribbon and $15. Third place winners received a ribbon and $10.Photo submitted by Jerri PetersonTyson Davis captured rst place in the Pre-K through Kindergarten category. Photo submitted by Jerri PetersonJasmine Odom won rst place in the rst through third grade category in the Greenville Country Christmas childrens art contest. Photo submitted by Jerri PetersonDylan Agner was a happy boy, as he was named the third place winner in the art contest. Photo submitted by Jerri PetersonJNariez Miller won second place in the rst through third grade category in the Greenville Country Christmas childrens art contest. Photo submitted by Jerri PetersonZakira Howard was the rst place winner in the fourth through fth grade category in the childrens art contest. Photo submitted by Jerri PetersonJonathan Mitchell was the second place winner in the fourth through fth grade category in the art contest.Photo submitted by Jerri PetersonLane Agner took third place in the art contest Sudoku Puzzle Of The Day

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrun, c MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTED WANTED TO BUYwww.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . . . . . 16Madison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, December 20, 2013 FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 12/16/2013 THROUGH 12/22/2013I am a retired nurse; and want to do private duty work with the elderly. If you can use me, I am available for any shift. Excellent references. 464-7276 (Cell).12/18 rtn, n/cPageant and Prom Dresses For Sale:Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 Leave a message. Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-4141.10/16 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayQuest Training offers a professional CNA prep class taught by a registered nurse. High pass rates on state test. No GED or Diploma required if age18 yr. Day and evening classes. Next classes Jan. 6 (day) and Jan. 20 (night). 386-362-1065.12/4 12/25, pd1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cWasher And Dryer For Sale! Kenmore series 70 washer, top load. Series 80 dryer, front load (door opens from top down). White in color and both are in perfect working order. $400 rm. Call (229) 460-5296. Newspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.6/19 rtn, n/c Asphalt Milling For Sale $350 for 18 ton load (850) 464-1230.One Person Cabin On Farm $395/month. Background check required. Call (850) 673-1117.10/16 rtn, cCASH FOR FLORIDA LICENSE PLATES! $1000 for Madison Co enamel Tags dated 1911-17, $100 each for FL tags starting with #35 for years 1938, 39, 40, 43, 49, and 54. Jeff Francis gobucs13@aol.com or 727 424 1576.www.oridalicenseplates.com10/23 -12/25, pdNew and Repo Homes 25 to pick from. Come to Lake City the dual makers at Freedom Homes. Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cNov and Dec special 4/2 28x80 home only $49,900 cash deal only. Call Magic Mike at Freedom Homes (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cBeen turned down? Have 10k to 15k? Call me I can make a deal. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cLand home package with 10k down in Lake City Florida. We do the deals. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cIn house nancing with 10k down on used or repo houses. Call Magic Mike (386) 623-4218.11/20 rtn, cTriple wide $29,900 as is. Wholesale price, hardwood oors, ceramic tile. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cReduced $10,000 Lot Model 4/2, new 2014. 2,016 square feet. Call Tish (386) 755-5355.11/20 rtn, cCASH special up to $5,000. Reduced price on new or used qualied models. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cUltimate home 2,027 square feet 3/2 $69,900. Beautiful new home with replace. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, cLive Oak or Merit Homes. Low prices. Freedom Mobile Homes. Call Tish (386) 752-5355.11/20 rtn, c Ad Builder/Graphic Artist needed for the Madison County Carrier and the Madison EnterpriseRecorder. Must be a team player and able to handle multiple tasks. Experience with Adobe Photoshop a must, experience with Quark Express a plus. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.11/20 rtn, n/c Set of four (4) Weld (Mountain Crusher) billet aluminum wheels. 8 lug with bolt on center caps. Fits Dodge or Chevy. $400 OBO. Call 229-460-5296.12/11 rtn, n/c CDL Class A Truck DriverRuns mostly SE extended area. 2 years driving experience. Good 2 year MVR. Home weekends and some during the week. (850) 973-2747.12/11 rtn, cAdvent Christian Village Current JOBS Line Advertisement call 658-5627 or visit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week EMT Part Time For local area community for night time & weekend shifts. Current valid Florida EMT certicate and DL required with good driving record. Prior experience a plus. Competitive pay, access to onsite daycare and tness facilities. Apply in person at Personnel Ofce Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE / Drug-Free Workplace / Criminal background checks required.12/13, 12/18, c Coord for XCEL-IT Program/ Clinical Coord/Maintenance Equipment Specialist/ Staff Assistant See www.nfcc.edu .12/18, 12/25, c Adoption UNPLANNED PREGNANCY? Adoption-A brave & seless choice. Medical, living & counseling expenses paid. Choose the loving & nancially secure family. Compassionate Atty. Lauren Feingold 24/7 866-633-0397 www.fklhearttoheart.net #0958107. A childless, young, successful woman seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON Mom! Financial security. Expenses paid.Visit: www.jodi2adopt.webs.com /, call Jodi 1-800-7185516 or text 609-7701255. Adam Sklar #0150789. Help Wanted DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certications. GI Bill Benets Eligible. 1-866-362-6497. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Miscellaneous AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualied students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769. Schools & Instruction You can become an expert in HVAC installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Institute Online HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVAC-Online-Education.com. MANAGER OF FINANCE Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an opening for a full-time Manager of Finance in our Madison Ofce. The candidate is required to have a Bachelors Degree in Accounting, Business Administration or related eld. An advanced degree or CPA is desirable. Three to ve years experience in utility accounting is also highly desirable. The candidate must also have solid personal computer skills and be familiar with Microsoft Ofce software. The ideal candidate will have a broad understanding and/or experience in nancial statement preparation, nancial analysis, budgeting, and debt management. The Cooperative offers competitive salary and benets. Tri-County is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and Drug Free Work Place (DFWP). Please send resume and completed Tri-County Employment Application Form, which is available at any TCEC ofce or online at www.tcec.com, before January 21, 2014 to: Stephanie Carroll Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. 2862 West US 90 Madison, FL 32340.12/20 1/8, c

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www.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013 Madison Enterprise-Recorder 17 L e g a l s NOTICE OF PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE BY THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE GREENVILLE, FLORIDA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that proposed Ordinance No. 234, bearing title as follows, will be considered Monday, December 30, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. at City Hall, Greenville, Florida. ORDINANCE NO. 234 AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE AMENDING SECTION 2.03 OF THE CHARTER OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE IN REGARDS TO COMPENSATION OF COUNCIL; AMENDING SECTION 2.07 OF THE CHARTER OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE IN REGARDS TO VACANCIES ON THE COUNCIL; AMENDING SECTION 3.04 OF THE CHARTER OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE IN REGARDS TO THE TOWN MANAGERS POWER AND RESPONSIBILITIES; REVISING THE CHARTER OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE TO INCLUDE GENDER NEUTRAL LANGUAGE THROUGHOUT; SUBMITTING THIS PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT TO THE ELECTORS OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE BEING SUBJECT TO APPROVAL BY THE ELECTORS OF THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE. A copy of the proposed Ordinance is available for public inspection at City Hall, Greenville, Florida during regular business hours. At the meeting, all interested parties may appear to be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Town, the person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. TOWN OF GREENVILLE, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Kimberly Reams Town Clerk12/20 TOWN OF GREENVILLE FAIR HOUSING INFORMATIONAL MEETING NOTICE In conjunction with a proposed FFY 2013 CDBG Neighborhood Revitalization application, the Town of Greenville is conducting an informational meeting on Fair Housing, including review of the existing Town of Greenville Fair Housing Ordinance. The educational presentation is designed for Elected Ofcials and the General Public to acquaint them with the Towns Fair Housing requirements. The meeting is scheduled for Monday, December 30, 2013, at 6:00 P.M., or as soon as possible thereafter, at Town Hall, 154 SW Old Mission Avenue, Greenville, Florida. To obtain additional information, please contact Ms. Kimberly Reams, Town Clerk, at 850/948-2251. The meeting is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER/ HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE/FAIR HOUSING12/20 Christian radio station WYJC will be holding a public meeting at Greenville Public Library, on Thursday, January 2 at 9:30am This is a general meeting that will address public issues, and any questions or concerns about CSN International. The public is invited to attend.12/20 NOTICE OF INTENTION TO REGISTER FICTITIOUS NAME Notice is given that the undersigned Florida limited liability company desires to engage in business as an auction company under the ctitious name of GULF COAST LIVESTOCK at 2639 East Highway 90, Madison, Florida 32340 in Madison County, Florida. Notice is further given that the undersigned intends to register this ctitious name with the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated: December 16, 2013 SIX SHOOTERS INVESTMENT GROUP, LLC a Florida limited liability company By: Mary Bland, Managing Member CARY A. HARDEE, II Hardee Law Firm, PL Post Ofce Drawer 450 Madison, Florida 32341 Telephone: (850) 973-4007 Facsimile: (850) 973-8495 Florida Bar Number 133856 Primary Email: lawhatter@aol.com Secondary Email: CaryHardee@hardeelawrm.net 12/20 12/20, 12/27

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18Madison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, December 20, 2013