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The Madison enterprise-recorder ( May 24, 2013 )

UF00028405 UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00550

Material Information

Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title: Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title: Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Creation Date: May 24, 2013
Publication Date: 05-24-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID: UF00028405:00593

Related Items

Preceded by: Enterprise-recorder

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00550

Material Information

Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title: Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title: Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Creation Date: May 24, 2013
Publication Date: 05-24-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID: UF00028405:00593

Related Items

Preceded by: Enterprise-recorder


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Full Text

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Our 148th Year, Number 39 Friday, May 24, 2013 Madison, Floridawww.greenepublishing.com Since 1865, Telling It Like It Is And Defending The Peasant's Right To Know Index2 Sections, 26 Pages Local WeatherVeiwpoints 2A From Page One3A Around Madison5A Memorial Day6-7A Greenville 8-9A School 10A Classieds/Legals 12-13A Health Guide Section B By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. A Greenville man was injured in a wreck at US 221, south of SW #1 Federal Road. According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, Colin M. Tomkins, 49, was southbound on US 221 when he suffered a medical event and blacked out. Tomkins drove onto the west shoulder of US 221 and then rotated clockwise and overturned one time. The 1989 Ford Bronco Tomkins was driving came to a nal rest, facing west on the west shoulder of US 221. The Madison County Sheriffs Ofce, Madison County EMS, Taylor County Sheriffs Ofce and Greenville Volunteer Fire Department assisted FHP. Tomkins was taken by ambulance to Doctors Memorial Hospital in Perry, where he was treated for minor injuries. FHP Trooper W. Brian Lundy was the investigating ofcer. Blackout Causes Accident Correction: After press time for the Wednesday, May 22,Carrier, the date of the Spirit of Greenville Fundraiser was changed. The fundraiser will now be held on June 14-15. By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. As a Part of the Florida DOTs federally funded Safe Routes to School program, several streets and intersections will soon have some new sidewalks, with crosswalks at key intersections at Highway 90. The project will improve safety for children who walk to schools located along Base Street/U.S. Hwy 90, and pedestrians walking along Anastasia Way to and from the Recreational Complex. Work has already begun on the east side of Southwest Anastasia Way between the highway and the rec park. Other sidewalks being constructed include: the south side of Base Street from SW Captain Brown Road to SW Anastasia Way the north side of Northwest 90th Avenue between Base Street the north side of Captain Brown road from Southeast Fifth Avenue to Base Street Crosswalks will be added at several locations along Base Street, including one at Madison County Central School and Madison County High School. The project also includes several new school zone ashing signals, new driveways, upgrade drainage pipes and replacing 12 mailboxes to meet current safety requirements.New Sidewalks To Be Added Along Base StreetThe intersection at SW Anastasia Way and Base Street will soon have additional sidewalks and a crosswalk.Photo submitted Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Brooke Kinsley 5/22/2013Cherry Lake American Legion Post 224 Event: Memorial Day Open House May 27, 2013, Monday | Starts at 11:00am Memorial Day is an occasion of special importance, because it is a day sacred to the memory of all those Americans who made the supreme sacrice for the liberties we enjoy . You are cordially invited to attend our Open House on May 27, 2013, which starts at 11:00am. Please feel welcome to bring your immediate family. The "Open House" will have BBQ chicken dinners(1/4 chicken) with 2 sides and dessert for $7.00. Tour the facilities, and meet other veterans and their families. Our mission is serving active duty military personnel, veterans, their families, and serving our community. Resources will be available to assist Veterans and Families obtain copies of military records and any Awards and Decorations the Veteran has earned. Such as Military Service Records and Ofcial Military Personnel Files (OMPFs, DD Form 214 and separation/discharge papers that were issued before the Korean War) Ever wondered where the medals and awards are for a love one who served? Here is an opportunity to replace them and leave a legacy for their service. Maybe they were lost or never issued at the time of separation. Have a computer? The Online request site is called eVETSRecs:Website is :https://vetrecs.archives.gov/VeteranRequest/home.htmlThis special event is open to the public and is a volunteer community service by the Cherry Lake American Legion. We very much would like for you to become a part of our family. Anything we personally can do to assist you or your family, please do not hesitate to contact us. For additional information call the Post at: 850.929.2953 or Regina Barber We encourage all members to participate in this special event. Cherry Lake AL Post 224 | 4383 NE Cherry Lake Circle | Madison, FL 32340By Kristin Finney Greene Publishing, Inc. Every year, Madison holds nominations for Citizen of the Year. The Citizen of the Year is a person in the county that exemplies kindness and helps support Madison County. This years nominees included Jenny Andrews, Ted Ensminger, Merv Mattair, Gean McCullough and Jerome Wyche. The winner for 2013 was Jenny Andrews. In order to be nominated, someone in the community must send a letter nominating you and explaining why they feel you would be good for the title. One of the letters written about Jenny Andrews was lled with many reasons why Andrews would make a good choice. Below is a copy of the letter: As long as I have known Jenny, (more than 30 years) she has served as a spiritual mentor for young and old in her church and in the community. She has led numerous Bible studies, and taught Sunday School for many years, always leading others toward a closer relationship with God, and towards becoming better members of our families, churches, and communities. She has been an active advocate for Madison County, and has always been at the forefront of spurring the community on towards becoming a better community. She has worked with people in all walks of life, from high school students, where she taught and mentored for many years, to people who have found themselves with no resources, to young evolving Christians, to us middle aged, middle classed citizens who need a little guidance and direction. I can think of no other who has inuenced so many lives for the better. In addition, she is a talented artist, who uses her talents in so many ways to enhance and beautify our church, the First Methodist Church of Madison. I nominate Jenny Andrews to be 2013 Citizen of the Year because she is the true meaning of a citizen to all people; whether its the many students she Story submitted Juan Williams, the City of Madisons Fire Inspector for the past three years, has been promoted to the position of City Inspector and will handle the citys re safety, risk management, and code enforcement programs, City Manager Tim Bennett announced today. He will be our eyes and ears internally within the city staff and externally within the community to ensure were doing what we need to do to keep our employees and citizens safe, Bennett said. Juan has the kind of rm, common-sense approach were looking for to successfully work with employees and citizens to promote safety and to enforce codes. He will report directly to Bennett. Williams already had been handling re safety inspections and prevention for the city and for Madison County. He will continue in both roles. He also had been conducting the citys risk management program to promote By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. After Just Youth Services announced that it no longer wanted to run Joann Bridges Academy, School Superintendent Doug Brown and District Administrators Davis Barclay, Paula Ginn and Andy Barnes researched other education companies, ultimately choosing G4S Youth Services, LLC, drawing up the contract and presenting it to the school board for a vote. However there were several minutes of discussion rst. School board member VeEtta Hagan, whose Greenville-area district includes the Academy, asked about the organizations track record. Brown replied that the track record looked good for a ve-year-old company that was successfully running educational institutions throughout Florida and the U.S., and that their presentation to the school district administrators had been very good. I would not present this if I did not feel good about it, he said. But what about the school board members? Hagan asked. We should have been invited to this presentation. What about workshops, where we could ask questions? It seems, you just present us with this contract and make the decision for us. We dont know anything about this company. School Board Attorney Tommy Reeves discussed the contract and explained how it was set up, including an arbitration clause that would be far less expensive for settling disputes than the traditional legal route. However, the one caveat was that the school board would lose much of its right to appeal, since a decision rendered by arbitration was binding, unless it was way out of line. Financial Director Andy Barnes said that hed had a lengthy meeting with the companys representatives andSchool Board Approves New Organization to Run Joann Bridges AcademySchool Superintendent Doug Brown presents the case for G4S Youth Services. Jenny Andrews Named Citizen of the Year 2013 Juan Williams is Now City InspectorMadison Fire Inspector Juan Williams, promoted to City Inspector, will assume responsibility for the citys re safety, risk management and code enforcement issues. Photo submittedCherry Lake American Legion Memorial Day Open House Please See New Sidewalks on Page 3A Please See Jenny Andrews on Page 3A Please See Juan Williams on Page 3A Please See Bridges Academy on Page 3AGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, May 21, 2013

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Although I know that its not true, I feel like Ive been stealing from death. The rst instance I have no memory of. I know what I was doing one minute and the next thing I remember is waking up ve days later in the cardiac intensive care unit in Tallahassee. The second instance of theft I remember vividly. I had just returned from taking pictures of my niece before her senior prom. I was uploading the photos to Facebook and deleting some when all of a sudden, I felt like I was about to black out. I felt as if I were being hurtled into unconsciousness at 500 miles per hour. A split second later I was wide-awake as I felt a boom and a shock. My internal debrillator had red and jolted me out of impending doom. The rst time, in December 2011, in the words of Emergency Medical Services personnel and doctors, I had coded. That means my heart had stopped and, in medical terms, I had clinically died. I had not really died because God had not said I had died. Hebrews 9:27 says, It is appointed unto men once to die but after this the judgment. I did not die biologically because my brain was still working and they were able to get me to the hospital, where doctors began a radical treatment called Arctic Sun, where the body is basically put in arctic conditions to preserve brainpower. Doctors and nurses iced me down. The fact that the staff at my ofce did the job that they did to keep me alive and the fact that EMS showed up when they did and they got me to the hospital when they did saved my life. Doctors had told my father that my prognosis wasnt good but they did what they could and friends all over the world were praying for me. God healed me. After that miracle, doctors implanted the internal debrillator. This past Saturday, it worked for the rst time and, although I know that God holds the cards when it comes to life and death, but I was told by medical professionals that if I didnt have the debrillator, I would be dead now. My heart had been racing at 387 beats per minute. I didnt even feel that because as the woman who works for the company who made the debrillator said, Its just a utter at that point. Neither time did I hear the heavy footsteps of death stalking me. Neither time did I realize how sick I was. One time ended with a clinical death, from which God rescued me. The next ended with my medical device ring. Once again, God rescued me from death. I have no doubt that if I had died, I would go to Heaven. Do you know where you will go when you die? Have you accepted Jesus as your personal savior? If Viewpoints & Opinions2AMadison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 The MadisonEnterprise-Recorder PublisherEmerald GreeneEditorKristin FinneySenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WriterLynette NorrisGraphic DesignersTori Self, Steven Godfrey Advertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette Dunn, Shelly SmithClassified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classieds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Wednesday at 5 p.m. There will be a $3 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included)Since 1865 -Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity.The Madison The Madison Enterprise-Recorder Enterprise-RecorderMadison Recorder established 1865 New Enterprise established 1901 Consolidated June 25, 1908 Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post Ofce 32340. Publication No. 177.400. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison Enterprise-Recorder P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.P.O. Box 772 Madison, FL 32341 1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32340 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 greenepub@greenepublishing.com www.greenepublishing.com Jacobs LadderJacob BembryColumnist Madison County Extension ServiceDiann DouglasGuest Columnist Information in the Jail Report is provided to Greene Publishing, Inc., by the Madison County Sheriffs Office. All people are considered innocent until proven guilty. Questions about people identified in the report should be directed to the MCSO at (850) 973-4001.Jail Report Conservative Corner Conservative CornerBy Nelson Pryor, LeeMadison County Memorial weekend is here and it marks the beginning of the summer season of backyard grilling. Meals cooked outdoors always increase during the summer months and the variety of food people put on the grill seems to be expanding. With all of the food preparation in summer temperatures, you need to be aware of safe food handling practices. Backyard chiefs dont think about it, but each year outbreaks of food poisoning increase during the summer months. Bacteria that cause food poisoning are invisible, odorless and tasteless; summer temperatures only increase the potential population explosion. Since it is not appetizing to think about food invaders like E. coli, clostridium perfringens or salmonella, using safe food handling methods will drastically reduce your chances of exposing your family and friends to food borne illness. First, marinate meats in a glass dish in the refrigerator, not the kitchen countertop. If you plan to use some of the marinade for basting or a dip, reserve a portion before you put raw meat into it. Bacteria from raw meat will contaminate the liquid and it should be discarded after the marinating time is over. Coals should be very hot before food is placed on the grill for cooking. A hot grill will assure that food is cooked at a high enough temperature to destroy bacteria. It takes 30 minutes or longer before coals are hot enough; they should appear to have a light coating of ash for the highest temperature. Meat should be thoroughly cooked. The best way to check for doneness is to use a meat thermometer. Whole cuts of beef, steaks and roasts should be cooked to internal temperature of 145F, while ground meat needs to reach an internal temperature of 160F. Poultry needs to reach an internal temperature of 165F, be sure the thermometer is inserted in the eshy part of the meat and not touching bone. If you dont have a thermometer, visually check by cutting into the meat to be sure the juices are clear and not pink in color. To avoid are-ups and charred food, remove visible fat from meat. Temperatures for cooking pork have changed in recent years; USDA now recommends a cooking temperature of 145F with a resting time of 3 minutes. Research showed the internal temperature continues to rise during the resting time and reaches 160F. Put cooked foods on a clean plate that hasnt been used to hold raw meat or poultry. Cooking food destroys bacteria, but if you put it back on the same plate, you just exposed it to bacteria again. Food safety experts call this cross contamination and it is sure to cause food borne illness. Perishable foods need to be served hot off the grill. Food safety experts advise food should be eaten within two hours. If you are eating outdoors, keep in mind warm temperatures reduce that time to one hour. Leftovers should be promptly divided in to small containers and placed in the refrigerator. Simple changes in the way you prepare and serve your backyard barbeque will greatly reduce your risk for food borne illness. For more information on food safety, contact the Madison County Extension Service. The University of Florida Extension Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution. Put Safety First When Grilling OutdoorsWhere Have All The Flowers Gone?5/15 James Carl Cleo Osborne-Disorderly Intoxication OT Nash Jr.Drug (Crack Cocaine with Intent), Drug (Marijuana [Less than 20 grams]), Resisting without Violence, Drug Equipment, Out of County Tanisha Ashley Key-Possession of Cocaine 5/16 Brittany Ray GodfreyBattery/Domestic Kenneth Cedric Locke-Violation On 10/20/1981, Kathy Boudin, a veteran of the long-dormant Weather Underground, was captured, for murder. Boudin was last seen eleven years before that, eeing naked from the ruins of the Greenwich Village town house she and her comrades were using for a bomb factory. Early on 3/6/1970, a group of Weathermen inadvertently blew up three of their members along with a townhouse on Eleventh Street. The group was trying tro build an anti-personnel bomb, in order to give Americans a taste of the kind of cruel weaponry their government was using in Vietnam. In an earlier life, Boudin had been a student at Bryn Mawr College, where she had joined the New Left and had become a community organizer. She followed the Rules for Radicals, by Saul Alinsky, in communities like Chester, Pa., and Cleveland. Caught in Brinks Robbery The New York Times of 10/22/1981`, reported the New York robber netted $1,589,000 in cash, six bags of money. In a wild chase, she and three others, were caught and held without bail on charges second-degree murder in the deaths of a Brinks guard, Peter Paige, 49, and two police ofcers. Kathy had grown up in a family steeped in the traditions of the left. Raised to cherish social and racial justice, she explained, Its about doing what you feel is right. Collegians in Disgrace The academic honors are raining down on her now. The Weather Underground terrorist, who already has an adjunct professorship at the Columbia School of Social work, was named by the New York University Law School as Rose Sheinberg Scholar in Residence (for working on cutting-edge issues of gender, race and class) Her caper with the Brinks robbery, resulting in 22 years in jail, hardly slowed down her community organizer activities. The National Review, of 5/6/2013, p. 8, reports that Kathy wrote letters of apology to the families of her victims but never mailed them. Crime and Its Results Another winner of fame, and one never slowed down from his community organizer activity, is Bill Ayers. Ayers is currently a professor of education, who is deantly unapologetic, both on camera and in the pages of his 2001 memoir Fugitive Days. I dont regret setting bombs, he told the New York Times in a prole published, unfortunately for him, on September 11, 2001. In fact, I dont think we did enough. Taken By Surprise? Where have all the owers gone? To teach! Bill Ayers, Kathy Boudin, and other community organizers, are in positions of authority, and are all paid from taxes extracted from people like us. What a disgrace! Does any of this matter to an academic establishment thats still starry-eyed about 1960s radicals? No one should be surprised. These community organizers have populated the academy that I have known. As a matter of fact, to make this personal, I can state categorically, that I have never had one teacher that I recognized as a conservative. What a disgrace!THE REPUBLICAN CLUB OF MADISON COUNTY Meets Monday, June 9 at 12:00 noon at Shelbys Restaurant EVERYONE WELCOME Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee MadisonRepublican@embarqmail.com Stealing From Death Read Jacobs blog at www.jacobbembry.com. His book, Higher Call, is available in Kindle format and www.amazon.com or in paperback at www.amazon.com, www.bn.com and www.booksamillion.com or by sending $10 plus $3.99 shipping and handling to Jacob Bembry, P.O. Box 9334, Lee, FL 32059. Contact him at jacobbembry@hotmail.com. 2013 of Probation Robert Louis AbsenaultReckless Driving 5/17 Tyrece Shantel Fleming-Failure to Appear (3 Counts Felony Petit Theft) Ronald Eugene Webb-Writ of Bodily Attachment Winfort Kardell Bareld-Violation of Probation (County) 5/18 Jonathon Levon Andrews-Driving with a Suspended License Williams Turner IV-No Drivers License Darron Lamar Brown-Violation of Probation (County) Jabaria McFadden-Violation of Probation (County) Gregory Reshun GrahamViolation of Probation (County) 5/19 Marvin Franklin TillmanAssault (Aggravated Domestic), Battery (Domestic), Witness Refusing 911 Help David Laron Mobley Jr.-Domestic Battery 5/20 Jennifer Denise Johnson-No Drivers License Deomarcus Leon Jackson-Criminal Registration Jermaine Quantez Monson-Trespassing After Warning CORRECTION Last weeks article, A Black Catalog of Crimes, was also written by Nelson Pryor

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Relay For Life Co-Ed Softball Tournament SlatedFrom Page OneMadison Enterprise-Recorder 3A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 FEED TIMESHow to use: The major and minor feeding times for each day are listed below. The major feeding times are the best for the sportsman and last about 2 hours, the minor feeding times can also have good success, but last only about 1 hour. Good luck and be careful out there. Major feed times are marked by an asterisk (*) The Week Of May 24 May 30, 2013 Friday May 24 6:10 AM *12:20 AM 6:30 PM Saturday May 25 *12:50 AM 7:10 AM *1:20 PM 7:30 PM Sunday May 26 *1:55 AM 8:10 AM *2:30 PM 8:45 PM Monday May 27 *3:10 AM 9:20 PM *3:35 PM 9:50 PM Tuesday May 28 3:45 AM *9:45 AM 3:55 PM *10:20 PM Wednesday May 29 *5:15 AM 11:30 AM *5:45 PM Thursday May 30 12:10 AM *6:10 PM 12:20 PM *6:30 PM By Kristin Finney Greene Publishing, Inc. There will be a Relay for Life softball tournament held on Saturday, June 1. This softball tournament will be held at the Madison Recreation Complex. Tickets will be $1 and it will be $10 to play. During the tournament there will be food and fun for all. All proceeds from the tournament will go to benet the Relay for Life. The Madison Recreation Complex is located on West Highway 90. For more information or if you would like to have a team in the tournament or sell concessions as a team fundraiser call Denise Bell at (850) 973-9481. New Sidewalks Cont. From Page 1ALane closures will not be allowed until after 8 a.m. or between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. on weekdays, and aggers will direct trafc during lane closures. The new ve-foot-wide sidewalks will cost $566,677 and is a collaborative effort by parents, school, community leaders, and local, state and federal governments working together to make bicycling and walking to school safer and more appealing for Kindergarten through eighth grade students. The Florida DOT is overseeing the construction, and plans to have the work completed in the fall of 2013, barring any unforeseen conditions. Jenny Andrews Cont. From Page 1Ataught, the young people she mentors, or a stranger. She has a heart for people, especially young people. Each week, young people ll her home to learn about life and making good choices. She is a prayer warrior for many people always carrying soup to the sick, visiting the shut-ins and showing her love by her actions Jenny Andrews has earned the distinction of 2013 Citizen of the year because she has served Madison County for three-fourths of one century. As a retired educator, she has taught thousands of young people how to think and shown them love and integrity by example. Jenny serves our Lord as a dedicated First United Methodist Church member where she serves in every capacity from being a Sunday School teacher, creatively decorating our altar and leading weekly Bible studies. However, the most compelling reason is Jennys servants heart. Daily Jenny assists people, whether friend or stranger. She shows people Jesus at Dollar General or at the grocery store as she greets them to really get to know them, pray for them and genuinely help them by providing whatever they need. The saying, You may be the only Bible some people read, is synonymous with Jenny as an outstanding Madison County citizen. Congratulations Jenny Andrews. Juan Williams Cont. From Page 1A Bridges Academy Cont. From Page 1Aworker safety. That will continue as well. During the past month, he has been the citys point man in enforcing city codes and has been active in resolving code violations concerning property nuisances, signs and renewal of occupational licenses. I felt it would be benecial to consolidate all his duties under one title Inspector and to position him in the citys organizational chart so that he has a direct line to the city manager, Bennett said. I believe this will lead to more effective safety programs and code enforcement. Williams will continue to work closely with Charles Hitchcock, the citys Building Ofcial and Community Development Director. They form a team that also includes Code Enforcement Administrator Mary Graham, Police Chief Gary Calhoun and Fire Chief Bruce Jordan to address safety and code issues. Between the ve of them, they bring 115 years of experience to their jobs. We have an excellent team in place, Bennett said. Our goal is to educate citizens about the citys ordinances, apply common sense to enforcement, and hold ourselves accountable as to how effective we work with citizens to enforce the ordinances. Williams has certications in Fireghter II and Fire Inspector II, which includes Fire and Life Safety; he is certied in Installation and Maintenance of Fire Suppression Systems by the National Institute for Certication in Emergency Technologies (NICET); he is nearing completion for certication in Fire Investigation; and he is pursuing certication as a building inspector. He also is in an inactive status as a certied plumber. He is a single parent of two children. His son Juan Jr., is a rising senior and football captain at Lawton Chiles High School in Tallahassee, and his daughter Justyn is a rising junior, also at Lawton Chiles High School. The family lives in Tallahassee. talked about their operations in St. Johns County, Polk County, Lake City, Miami-Dade, and Avon Park, all Florida facilities, and the company seemed well organized. Hagan protested that Barnes was the districts nancial expert, not necessarily the educational services expert. We must remember that numbers are different from education, she said. Brown, who added that he was still certied in all levels of education, even though his most recent work experience was in higher education, and that he also had an extensive background in juvenile justice, said that he had spoken to several counties that used G4Ss services, and also spoken at length to DJJ (Department of Juvenile Justice) about them. They come highly recommended. I didnt just pull them out of thin air. Hagan pointed out that she had a legitimate concern for the Academy and had a right to ask questions; Brown acknowledged that she did. I was elected by the people and Im trying to serve the people, she added. The board voted 3/2 to approve G4S Youth Services, LLC., with Hagan and fellow school board member Karen Pickles dissenting.

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Around Madison County4AMadison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013Community CalendarMark Your Calendar! May 25The listening party of LifeSongs new album will be held at 7 p.m. at Shelbys Restuarant. May 26Ochlawilla Baptist Church will be having their annual homecoming on May 26. Services will begin at 10:30am with song service and special guest speaker Brother Mike Alvarez. A covered dish lunch will follow morning worship. We will have The Evergreen Pickers as our special music. Everyone is invited to attend./June 1An open microphone gospel sing and potluck supper, honoring Sharon Sauls, wife of Pastor Richard Sauls, will be held at Lee Worship Center. There will be a challenge between Seminole fans and Gator fans to see who can get the most people in attendance for the sing. Lee Worship Center is located at 471 SE Magnolia Avenue in Lee. There is no charge for the sing or the supper. A love offering will be accepted. By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. Tina DeMotsis heads up its Fraud Division of the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce. Recently, she addressed the 55 Plus Club about the topic of identity theft and provided club members with a wealth of information. Over the next three weeks, this report will look at the problem in three parts: How Identity Thieves Get Your Information, How to Protect Yourself From Identity Thieves, and What To Do If Your Identity is Stolen PART I: How Identity Thieves Get Your Information While identity thieves still resort to old-fashioned legwork, i.e., dumpster diving, staking out curbside mailboxes and so forth, the digital age of the Internet means that their loot personal information they can use to defraud people and rob them blind is often just a few mouse clicks away. Technology is scary, said Tina DeMotsis of the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce, who does not use ATMs, pays in cash only at restaurants, and advises against using debit cards at all, because they can be too easily compromised. All an identity thief needs is the PIN number to completely clean out a debit card account. When it comes to credit cards, the toughest one for thieves to crack is American Express for some reason, and when it comes to telephone conversations, a land line beats a cell phone, and a landline phone where the handset is attached to the phone body with a cord beats a wireless, walk-around handset, especially if you are discussing sensitive information with your bank, credit card company or nancial advisor. Also, if you must relay personal information over a cell phone outside your home, beware of who is standing behind you or who is lingering close enough to overhear what you are saying. Along with the dizzying advances in technology that make an identity thiefs job easier, the massive popularity of social media like Facebook and Twitter can be a gold mine. Be careful what you put out there (on the social media), she said. DeMotsis has been with the MCSO since 2005 and now heads up its fraud division, works constantly on stacks and stacks of fraud and identity theft cases. She recently spoke to the 55 Plus Club about the threats and scams that are out there and what people can do to safeguard their nancial assets from digital burglars and pickpockets. Identity theft, in a nutshell, is a criminal action of obtaining enough personal identication to impersonate the victim and then obtain credit and loans, or make purchases in the victims name. Then, the perps dont pay the bill, leaving the victim holding the bag...in this case, a bag full of unpaid invoices and creditors trying to collect the money. Often, the only pieces of information thieves need are someones Social Security Number, date of birth and telephone number sometimes, resourceful thieves can manage with less than that one piece of information will often help them get another and another. They can use vacant lots as drop zones for items purchased on someone elses credit. Where do they get this information? I could go on all day about that, said DeMotsis. They can get it from the hospital, if youve ever been hospitalized; from the doctors ofceor dentists ofce; from your or your childs school; from your place of employment; from your health insurance carrier; even from your bank. The list goes on and on, and includes anywhere youre required to provide personal identifying information. There could be a criminal-minded individual employed at any of these locations, gleaning your information from any les or records he or she may have access to such individuals can sell stolen identities over the internet for as little as $2 to shady companies in foreign countries, where it is virtually impossible to trace the perpetrator. Two dollars a pop may not sound like much, but if the individual in question has access to hundreds of identities each day, it can add up. A larcenous individual sitting in any waiting room may overhear you providing personal information to a receptionist or other employee who is asking you the questions and lling out the form for you. If the establishments you use dont shred or destroy old documents before disposal, identity thieves can go dumpster diving to retrieve valuable information. If you yourself do not shred or destroy old utility bills, credit card slips, ATM receipts, and other kinds of sensitive nancial documents, thieves need only to sift through your garbage to retrieve your most personal nancial information. Then, there is the technology angle that evolves at a dizzying pace. Conventional wisdom of only a short time ago was to never let your credit card out of your sight if you used it in a restaurant. Use it only if you were allowed to check out at a cash register when you had nished eating and could watch the transaction with your card. Now, there are card reader devices known as spider devices that are so small they can be concealed in the palm of a hand, and these devices can store information from hundreds of cards. Even if the restaurant employee never leaves your sight with your card, it can be compromised. Thieves can also simply Google someones name and go on a data-mining expedition throughout the Internet and nd out enough to allow them to hack into credit and bank accounts. They can also illegally obtain your credit report or simply le a public records request at the courthouse. The threat is out there and it is quite formidable. A person doesnt have to lose a purse or wallet to have his or her identity stolen. Just a few pieces of misplaced information will do. There are undoubtedly many other ways someone can nd such information, and when they do, they can wreak havok. NEXT WEEK: Part II, How to Protect Yourself From Identity Thieves, will address some the things you can do to thwart them.Tina DeMotsis: Identity Theft Still A Major Concern, PART I

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 5A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 Announcing a new name for Progress Energy. Look for our new name and logo in your bills and other places. No other aspect of your service or account is changing. Although our name has changed, our commitment to you and the communities we serve remains the same. So you can count on us for reliable electricity every time you ip the switch. Learn more at duke-energy.com/newname Duke Energy CorporationProgress Energy now has a new name: Duke Energy. By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. In the northwest corner of Four Freedoms Park, a tall, slender monument stands in a square of ground, surrounded with liriope plantings. The pedestal beneath the tall obelisk reads: DEDICATED TO THE FORMER SLAVES OF MADISON COUNTY AND THEIR SUPPORTERS AND THE UNSUNG HEROES WHO GAVE THEIR PRAYERS, BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS TO MAKE OUR COMMUNITY WHAT IT IS TODAY. MAY 20, 1996. One of those Unsung Heroes is Rev. David DeLaughter, former pastor of the Damascus Missionary Baptist Church and St. James Missionary Baptist Church. Rev. DeLaughter was formally recognized as such during the 20th of May Jubilee Celebration at Four Freedoms Park, Monday, May 20, at 5:00 p.m. May 20, 1865 is the date when the news of the Emancipation finally reached Florida, over two years after slavery officially ended for the entire country Jan. 1, 1863. The 20th of May Jubilee Celebrations are held in several towns throughout Florida in honor of that day. In Madison, one of the major events in that celebration is recognizing the official Unsung Hero Of Madison County. Rev. DeLaughter, who in addition to being pastor of Damascus and St. James Missionary Baptist Churches for 36 years, also worked as a technician in the audio visual section of the library and North Florida Community College. Widowed several years ago, he retired last year and moved to South Carolina to live with one of his sons. Unsung Hero seems a most fitting description for DeLaughter, according to those who remember him. He was basically a quiet leader...a quiet man, Rev. Oliver Bradley of Genesis Missionary Baptist Church, who presided over the ceremony, said afterward. In addition to his duties as pastor and video technician at NFCC, DeLaughter also served as president of the Madison County Training Union. In 1990, DeLaughter and others in the Ministerial Association founded the annual Holy Week services that are now a solid tradition in Madisons observance of the Easter season. He also worked Howell Waring to have the Unsung Heroes monument erected in Four Freedoms Park. After a ceremony at the Gazebo that included selections from the Madison Boys Choir and a keynote address by Julius Hackett, Ann Waring, widow of Howell Waring, presented a wreath to members of the DeLaughter family, who carried it over to the Unsung Heroes Monument. If my father were here, said son Donald DeLaughter, Hed give all the praise and honor to the Lord.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, May 20, 2013The Madison Boys Choir performs at the Unsung Hero Ceremony in honor of Rev. David DeLaughter.Rev. David DeLaughter Proclaimed Unsung Hero Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 20, 2013Members of the DeLaughter family and Ann Waring, whose late husband Howell Waring worked with Rev. DeLaughter to have the Unsung Heroes Monument placed in the park, stand beside it with the wreath presented in his honor. Left to right: Betty DeLaughter (sister-in-law), Naomi Anderson (sister), Donald DeLaughter (son) and Waring. By Kristin Finney Greene Publishing, Inc. Madison Welding opened their shop back in August of 2010. In the almost three years that they have spent in Madison, they have come to love Madison County and its inhabitants. Larry Smithwick, Jr. is the owner, along with his wife Ivy Smithwick, and the two of them are so thankful for the support of Madison residents. Its been really nice getting to meet new people. The people of Madison are so nice, said Ivy. The team at Madison Welding is able to do just about anything metal related. They work on trailers, farm equipment, boats, gates, handrails and much more. Madison Welding is proud to announce that they have mobile welding capabilities. They also have a telehandler lift that people can rent if they need it. Madison is small and friendly community and I love it. I love getting to meet new people every day with walk-ins. So much of our business is through referrals from our customers and we are so thankful for all of the support from the community, Ivy stated. If you are interested in getting a quote on a job, please bring the job to their ofce if you can. Every day is a surprise here and there are so many different types and sizes of all of the materials we work with. It is almost impossible to give an accurate quote over the phone. We prefer to see the job and give you the quote that way. Madison Welding is located in Madison at 1411 State Road 53 South. For more information about Madison Welding or for any questions please call 9736600. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Kristin Finney, May 22, 2013. Pictured above is the team from Madison Welding. From left to right are, Jeffrey Webb; Owner, Larry Smithwick, Jr.; David Midgette and Tom Ackerman. Business Spotlight: Madison Welding

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By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. Theres a saying, made popular by Gen. Douglas McArthur, that old soldiers never die, they simply fade away. Like old soldiers, old Americans ags own in their honor also fade. They become worn-out and tattered. Once they can no longer be repaired, and are no longer serviceable, they should be retired in a dignied and respectful manner. Since Memorial Day is often observed by placing American ags on the graves of U.S. Veterans, and that often means replacing worn-out ags that have been there awhile perhaps since the previous Memorial Day the problem becomes what to do with the ags that are faded, tattered and worn...ags that need to be retired. According to the U.S. Flag Code, the preferred method is to burn the old one in a discreet and respectful manner, after checking with local ofcials about re codes and ordinances in the area. If outdoor burning is allowed, then the U.S. Flag Code guidelines include making sure that the re is large and intense enough to consume the ag completely; the ag should be properly folded, and placed not thrown on the re. Those gathered around the re may salute the ag, recite the Pledge of Allegiance, or simply observe a period of silent reection. The key is to show respect and dignity during the burning, which signies purication and rebirth. Afterward, the re should be safely extinguished and the ashes buried. People can burn their own ags, or take them to a civic or veterans organization that will handle it for them. This Memorial Day, May 27, the American Legion Post #195, Commander Al Alexander, assisted by the Madison Fire Department, will conduct a burning ceremony for old ags in Four Freedoms Park, beginning at 11 a.m. Anyone who has an old, tattered, worn-out ag they would like to see burned in a proper patriotic ceremony can bring it to Four Freedoms Park that mor ning, prefer ably by 10:45. `The ceremony will include Jim Jenkins playing patriotic music, the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce presenting the colors in an honor guard, an invocation, a recognition of all veterans present in the audience, and Jerry Chandler, USAF (retired) and vice-commander of American Legion Post of Cherry Lake, as the keynote speaker. Other Options: It is also acceptable to seal the old ag in a box or bag and bury it, since some locations may not allow outdoor burning, and ags constructed of modern fabrics like nylon release toxic gases when burned. Again, the most important thing is showing respect during the burial process. Yet another alternative for nylon ags is recycling, where the old nylon is remade into new nylon material for new ags. If, however, your ag is merely dirty, but otherwise in good repair, there is nothing in the U.S. Flag Code that forbids washing. Most outdoor type ags can be hand-washed in a mild laundry detergent, or taken to a dry-cleaner, if the material is not washable. It is also perfectly acceptable to do some small repairs yourself. The criteria is that the repairs must be done well enough so that they are not noticeable when the ag is ying, and they must not alter the dimensions of the ag in any way. For a more in-depth look at the U.S. Flag Code, go to the website www.united-states-ag.com. 6A Madison Enterprise Recorder Madison Enterprise Recorder 7Awww.greenepublishing.com www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, May 24, 2013Wednesday, May 24, 2013 By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. Korean War Veteran Ed Shefeld doesnt often speak publicly about the things he endured at the hands of enemy soldiers, after his capture by the North Korean army in 1950, but when he does, the story he tells is compelling. It is the story of someone who lost many friends and comrades. It is a story of survival, almost by sheer force of will, under horric circumstances most people can only try to imagine. I am very, very lucky to be here, he recently told the Rotary Club. After three years in the hands of an enemy who did not regard human life the same way we did. While he speaks of the things he and fellow POWs endured, his voice is calm, quiet, matter-of-fact. There are pauses here and there, as if he is searching for words adequate to describe the horrors, some of which are given in detail, others only alluded to. Shefeld was stationed in Japan when the Korean War broke out, June 25, 1950. Communist North Korea was attempting to overrun democratic South Korea. Shefelds division was quickly sent to the front lines and ordered to hold off the enemy at all costs. His division (a typical army division could be anywhere from 10,000 to 30,000 men) was the rst to encounter the North Korean army. Unfortunately, the U.S. soldiers were outnumbered 100 to one. Within the rst few days of conict, the enemy advanced so fast that, at times, the American troops were shooting them at point-blank range, with heavy artillery that would normally be used from as much as a mile away. Some of their heavy guns were burned up from the constant ring at the enemy. As they fell back under the onslaught for days on end, the enemy nally stopped advancing quite so fast, but the narrow dirt roads bordered on either side by rice paddies or mountains offered the Americans no place to set up their heavy artillery. To make matters worse, the roads were often lled with throngs of refugees, carrying everything they owned on their backs, eeing south to escape the ghting as the Americans were trying once again to press northward. Then, too late, they discovered that North Korean soldiers had been slipping through with the crowds of eeing civilians. Disguised as civilians themselves, with their weapons and uniforms hidden in backpacks, they were getting behind the American troops and cutting them off. Shefeld remembers seeing his commander with a loudspeaker telling everyone that they had been surrounded. I watched him get shot, he recalls quietly. The bridges behind them had been blown up, cutting off any escape. They were trapped as the enemy opened re and wiped out their front-line men. Well-camouaged North Korean troops looked like little bushes moving around in the rice paddies and hillsides. Looking to his left, he saw ve North Koreans with weapons aimed at him. Another ran up behind him and pushed a bayonet against his back. The North Koreans disarmed Shefeld and other prisoners, bound their hands with communication wire, and began moving them up through the line as the ghting continued. Along the way, Shefeld was shot in the leg by a sniper. Out of Shefelds entire division thousands of soldiers only about 700 were still alive. The North Koreans took them, along with several captured civilians missionaries, diplomats, war correspondents and priests and began moving north, toward Seoul, the capitol of South Korea. The North Korean Army had penetrated that far into South Korea. The next 11 days were a steady march north. That October 30, he recalls being in a corneld by the Yalu River and seeing the bodies of 300 American soldiers who had been executed in a tunnel several days earlier. As weeks passed into November, the weather grew colder, with temperature plummeting to 20 degrees at night. The men huddled together in tiny stick-mud huts to keep from freezing to death, but some died during the night, succumbing to the bitter cold. Those who died were taken outside the huts and left on the ground. Their bodies would be frozen solid by morning. Yet to come was the 100-mile death march. The North Koreans announced that any prisoners who fell behind would be shot. When one of the prisoners, Lt. Thornton, protested, he was summarily blindfolded and shot in the back of the head. After the Koreans machine-gunned everyone who was in the makeshift sickbay, the march commenced. Shefeld learned which weeds he could eat. He also ate grass, cornstalks and anything he could nd as they marched over icy roads through mountainous country. Inevitably, many became too sick to walk. Their friends carried them as far as possible, until an enemy soldier would decide it was time to shoot them. The dead men were left on the side of the road and covered over with snow. To Shefeld, it wasnt so much the possibility of dying that haunted him, as the thought of being tossed aside and left by the side of a road in the middle of a godforsaken no-mans-land. Before the march ended, another 105 men had died. The remaining men were crammed into tiny shacks to endure a bitter winter of below-zero temperatures. As many as 20 to 30 would be crammed into a room so small they could not all lie down at the same time. Some had to remain standing. About once a day, they were given one tennis-ball-sized clump of rice or millet to be passed around to the whole room. Those unfortunate enough to be at the back of the room got none. Throughout the bitter winter, another 300 men died of dysentery, starvation, exposure, or beriberi, a neural condition resulting from severe thiamine deciency, with symptoms including extreme muscle weakness and swelling of the legs. Shefeld saw men with legs swollen to three or four times their normal size. Once the swelling advanced up to the torso, it was usually fatal. Disease from contaminated food or water also claimed its share. Shefeld made up his mind to survive. He would stay in as good a shape as possible under the circumstances and he would live. When spring nally came, signaling the end of the deadly bitter cold and snow, and then the summer, there was heavy work detail involving pickaxes and shovels, but it kept Shefeld in better shape. He learned that it was imperative to quickly adjust to his surroundings. He learned to forget about the comfortable things back home and the good things to eat. He learned that a person could endure a great deal of punishment over extensive periods of time, if he kept his will to live and kept his nerve. He adjusted, he endured, he lived through three years of starvation, sleeping on hard rock oors in bitterly cold winters, and watching more and more of his friends and companions die. Upon his release three years later, his weight had dwindled from 170 pounds to less than 70. When an American General asked him if there was anything he wanted, he replied, Yes, sir. I would like to sleep in a bed one night and have an American meal. He is grateful to be one of the few who survived the three years of captivity, to be able to come home again and see the familiar sights of American airports and cities as he made his way to the familiar sights of his hometown, and nally, the faces of his family and friends that he had left behind. He still has scars from sleeping on rocky prison oors and bad memories that will never leave him. There are also memories of many, many friends and fellow soldiers who never made it home. On Memorial Day, we gather to honor those who didnt make it back, the ones who died in wars close at hand and halfway around the world, a long way from home. We also honor veterans like Ed Shefeld, who fought against an overwhelming enemy, survived against overwhelming odds, and lived to tell the story. It is a story of courage, loyalty and survival, and it is a story of unimaginable loss. It is one of many stories of why we observe Memorial Day. Ed Shefeld shares a harrowing story of the three years he spent as a POW of the North Korean Army. When Old Flags Retire: Flag Burning Ceremony Memorial Day A POWs Story: Ed Sheffield May 27, 2013

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8AMadison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Anyone who ever attended Greenville High School is welcomed to attend the high school reunion at the home of Richard and Lou Miller, located at 4741 NW US 221 in Greenville, next Saturday, June 8. The reunion is a great time for people to stop and get caught up with friends and discuss old times, old ball games and funny incidences involving teachers and classmates. The Millers will serve up a delicious barbecued meal to all of the guests. Greenville High School Reunion Set At Home of Richard and Lou Miller Joseph Morgan and George Pridgeon were members of the Greenville High School Class of 1963. Pridgeon allowed Greene Publishing, Inc. to borrow the annuals for the photos seen on these pages. Ruth Ann Warren Wheeler was the very rst majorette at the Greenville High School. She is shown, left, in a photo from 1958 with Nancy Harper Scarboro, center, and Valinda Andrews Williams, right.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 The Greenville peewee football team in 1969 featured Frank Laney, an exceptional athlete who would be offered a football schola rship to the University of Florida but would not be able to attend due to injuries suffered in a car wreck and Frankie Carroll, who coached Madison County High School to a state football championship. Among the seniors in 1963 were Delbert and Brenda Blair. Delbert retired from the school system as a maintenance supervisor and Brenda was the mother of current Property Appraiser Leigh Bareld. She passed away at a young age. Homeroom mothers are shown in 1956, Mrs. Inez Warren and Mrs. Harvey Rye.

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SchoolMadison Enterprise-Recorder 10A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 Fran Hunt Special to Greene Publishing, Inc. The Aucilla Christian Academy middle school Lady Warriors wrapped up the season on a 6-2 record, after pulling victories out of their nal two games. The young Lady warriors hit the diamond against Maclay on April 2 and Aucilla came out on top of an 8-1 win. The young Lady Warriors had 16 at-bats, with three hits, and seven walks. Third baseman Ashlyn Rogers went two for three, with a single, ands a double. Shortstop Megan Scholl went one for three with one single. On the mound, Elizabeth Hightower faced 15 batters, striking out 11, and giving up one walk. On April 11, the young Lady Warriors hit the diamond and squared off against Trinity. In the nal game of the season, Aucilla knocked their opponent for an 8-2 ACA win. Aucilla had 21 at-bats, with seven hits, and seven walks. Center elder Camryn Grant led the hitting for the young Lady Warriors, going three for four, with three singles, and scoring three runs, on a total of nine stolen bases or passed balls. Rogers went one for one with a stand-up triple, and had two walks. Team catcher Cali Burkett, went one for three. Left elder Katie James went one for two. Pitcher Ramsey Sullivan went one for two at the dish. On the mound, Sullivan faced 25 batters, striking out 15, and giving up six walks. We had a great season and a team full of girls with great attitudes, said Assistant Coach Danny Deason.ACA Middle School Girls Wrap Up Season 6-2 Shannan Leutner is pictured with Joseph Gallegos, her date for the prom in Hamilton County, on Saturday, May 18. Shannan is the daughter of Debra Leutner of Lee and Greg Leutner of Killdeer, N.D. She is the maternal granddaughter of the late Louella Bembry and Bobby Bembry of Lee and the paternal granddaughter of Dot Leutner of Jennings and the late Charles Leutner. She is also the niece of Jacob, Danny and Abbie Bembry of Lee. Shannan Leutner Attends Hamilton County High Prom

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 Turn Back Time Way Back When Buried Treasures By Kristin FinneyGreene Publishing, Inc.Each week, Greene Publishing, Inc. will publish one of the many buried treasures found in our archives. These treasures might be pictures of people from the past, ads from the past or interesting stories long since forgotten. Keep an eye on our upcoming editions; you might be the next Buried Treasure. From the December 8, 1995 Enterprise Recorder. AtMadison First Baptist ChurchSubmitted By Judy PhillipsGuest ColumnistChurchMay 28, 1943Nest Sunday night, at nine oclock, Rev. Russell Williams will preach the graduation sermon to a class of seven members from Lee School. A car of Tom Watson watermelons, rst of the season of that variety, brought $1500 at Groveland Saturday. There was 900 melons in the car and they averaged 22 lbs. each. Cpl. W.F. Brown of Ft. Benning, Ga., spent Sunday here with Mrs. Brown. Mrs. W.L. Jones was a business visitor in Madison Saturday and Tuesday. May 22, 1953Mr. and Mrs. Truman Cruce are announcing the arrival of a baby boy, born May 21, at Archbold Hospital in Thomasville, Ga. Mr. and Mrs. J. Mack Clark, of Jacksonville, were weekend visitors of Mrs. Clarks mother, Mrs. R.V. Dial. Mr. and Mrs. Graham V. Wheeler announce the birth of a daughter, born Sunday, May 17, at the local hospital. The baby was named Dorothy Ann. Mrs. J.J. Newman spent the weekend in Starke with her daughter, Mrs. Audrey Newman. May 24, 1963The new building at Suwannee River Junior College will be dedicated Sundy afternoon, May 26, at 4:30 p.m. with appropriate ceremonies. Mr. and Mrs. Bobby Whitty, and son Bruce, of Marianna, spent last weekend with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.B. Whitty. Mrs. E.B. Williams is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. L.L. McMullen and Lewis fr several days. The NFJC Student Council held a dance Friday evening for the college students in the Student Center. The church ofce hours are 8:30 a. m. 4:30 p.m., Monday Friday. The ofce phone number is 973-2547 or you can reach the church secretary by email at 1stbaptistofce@gmail.com. We also have a website, madisonfbc.net, that is regularly updated. Our pastor can be reached at gabekrell@yahoo.com. Jim Carey, our music minister can be reached at muzicman123@gmail.com. After the prelude, welcome and prayer, Bro. Jim led us in a time of praise and worship. We honored our graduates during this time. Honorees included Mikeshia Arnold, Connor Ginn, Bud Hall, Alisann Parks all from Madison County High School; Brooke Kinsley and Josh Woods from Aucilla Christian Academy; Kelsey McGriff, FSU; Cheltsie Kinsley, NFCC; and Kristin Finney, Valdosta State University. CONGRATULATIONS to all of these GRADUATES! The children, preschool-grade 2, were dismissed to childrens worship. We appreciate the faithfulness of those volunteers who lead this group each week. The worship choir sang a song, Whispering Hope, Wonderful Peace Medley, in memory of Bro. Jims Grandmother. It was a tting tribute. The title for this weeks sermon was The Fire. Bro. Gabe challenged the graduates and congregation with verses from 2 Timothy 2:14-15 NKJV Remind them of these things, charging them before the Lord not to strive about words to no prot, to the ruin of the hearers. Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth. We need to remember that Paul was writing to his son in the faith and wanting to remind him of some important truths. Bro. Gabe compared out lives to being a torch. Each life is a solitary ame from God to parents and then to us. Set a re in your life. Burn down self. Keep the main thing, the main thing! Dont get caught up in meaningless debates. Be a diligent worker for God so you wont have to be ashamed when presenting yourself before God. Study so you can rightly divide or accurately interpret the Word of God. Fish Fry to honor the Senior Men/Ladies Sunday school classesThe Outdoorsmen SS Class is hosting a sh fry for the senior men/ladies Sunday school classes. The event will be held at the church fellowship hall on Thursday, May 30th at noon. Please respond to the church ofce or to Archie & Patsy Davis at 971-5779, if you are going to attend. Disciple Now Weekend ~ June 28-30...The Disciple Now Retreat will be held at Cherry Lake for students grade 6 through college. Guest speakers and lots of wonderful activities for those attending are in the making. Cost and further information will be announced at a later date. Mark your calendars. Mothers Day Offering The Florida Baptist Childrens Homes have worked since 1904 to provide safe, stable Christian homes for boys and girls who have been neglected, abandoned, orphaned and abused. Please join in our goal to create a world were no child is left alone. Throughout the month of May you will have the opportunity to give beyond your local tithe to support this ne organization. Thank youfrom Les Parks for all the support he and the team have received from First Baptist. It is with this support that they are able to help get the camp ready for the children in Alaska. It is a great opportunity for which he is grateful. Please keep this group in your prayers that they may have Gods hand of protection over them and lives may be changed. When you read this, the team still has another week in Alaska. Do your part daily through prayer support. As a side note, David and Christy Bass Adams and Carter are serving with this group. Christy grew up in First Baptist. First Baptist Choirs ~ Yard Sale ~ Saturday, June 29th.The Sanctuary and JOY choirs are holding a large yard sale from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. for the purpose of raising money for the purchase of new music. We need items to be donated for the yard sale. Nows a good time to clean out some of your gently used clutter and put these items to good use. Remember, One mans trash is another mans treasure. Bro. Gabe issued a challenge to the graduates and the rest of us to read the Bible through. Heres the plan: First, get a good study Bible and one that you dont mind highlighting. Begin reading ve chapters a week in the New Testament and whenever your study Bible refers back to an Old Testament book, highlight that verse in the New and Old Testaments. By doing this highlighting, you will have referenced the most Old Testament books quoted: Genesis, Deuteronomy, Psalms, and Isaiah. Finish reading the New Testament then read the Old Testament through the lens of the New Testament. Will you take the challenge? See you Sunday morning for Sunday school at 9:45 a.m. where we have classes for nursery through senior adults. Worship begins at 11:00 a.m. when we will honor the Lord with songs of praise, prayers, offerings, and the spoken word.

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrun, c MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTEDwww.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . .12AMadison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, May 24, 2013 Classifieds Classifieds Work Work$12 $12(for 20 words or less)Wednesday and Friday Wednesday and Friday and on the website and on the websiteDeadline For Classieds 3:00 p.m. Every MondayCall 850-973-4141 FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 5/20/2013 THROUGH 5/26/2013Pageant and Prom Dresses For Sale: Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves, buttons around neck with circular cut-out on back, beautiful gown $100. Size 8 Teen Dress Light baby blue dress with baby blue and black array of designs from the waist down. The top is a gathered bodice with black sequins crisscrossed across the front. Has a beautiful train. $175. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200. Size 6-8 Teen Dress A turquoise dress that has sequined straps that criss cross across the back. The dress is also sequined in the stomach area and is made out of mesh material. Also has a beautiful long train in the back. $75. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250. Size 10 Teen Dress bright baby blue dress, halter top bodice with sequins stitched throughout; built-in crinoline with sequin appliques on lace overlay. Cinderella looking beautiful dress! $200.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 and leave a message.3/3, run, n/c Deadline for Classieds Every Monday and Wednesday 3 p.m. Sago Palms For Sale Call (850)-464-2239.6/27 rtn, n/c Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-41417/18 rtn n/c New ve bedroom three bath doublewide home must go now. Make offer. Selling below cost! Call Steve 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cYes we take trades! Replace your old home with a more efcient and much stronger safer home now. Call 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cNow is the best time to buy a new mobile home! Low rates means new homes under $400 month! 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cStop throwing money away! Our new homes cost less than $100 month to heat and cool! Call Steve 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cNice triplewide, replace, glamour bath, sliding glass doors, new metal roof. Must sell now. Reduced to only $22,900 cash. 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cBlow out pricing on all 2012 mobile homes. Making room for new 2013 homes. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c2013 Homes of Merit tape and texture starting at $375 per month. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, cUsed single wide 16x80 3 bedroom 2 bath home ready to go at $15,900. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c2006 Fleetwood home. Super clean and looks brand new. Call Mike at 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, cNew and used homes starting as low as $6,500 on doublewides. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c For Sale 99 Black GMC Sonoma for sale by owner. $3,600. Call (850) 464-7544.11/14 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayYou Can Be A CNA Quest training offers a CNA prep class taught by a RN No GED or diploma required if age 18. No TABE test. Professional, high pass rates, day and evening classes. 386-362-1065.5/1 5/29, pd REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNERGreenville, 3/2 nice house on 6 high and dry city lots. New windows, roof, heat & ac, siding, master shower. $92,000.00 Possible owner nancing. 850-599-5121.1/18 rtn, cNear Lloyd; 3/3 double wide. Very nice with lots of tile and hardwood, replace, skylight, screenroom, carport, workshop on 5 beautiful acres with live stream, woods and fenced pasture. Asking $129k, possible owner nancing. 850-599-5121.1/18 rtn, c Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Must be a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, and be able to get along with an entire ofce staff. Must have good personality, love to talk on the telephone, and a valid drivers license. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper ofce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.3/15 rtn, n/c1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cMan of many trades and talents available for hire. Honest, reliable, creative, and reasonable/fair pricing. Specializes in custom deck building, sheds, fencing, special projects. Can also do pressure washing, and gardening (tree trimmings, ower beds, grooming seasonal shrubs and trees etc.) If interested, please Call John at 850-673-9192. References available.5/1 rtn, n/cDental Assistant: Golden Opportunity! Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a beautiful smile? Is cosmetics important to you along with helping others? Our dental practice is seeking an outstanding individual to provide concierge level service for our patients in the clinical area. Dental or medical experience a plus but not mandatory. If you have a friendly can-doattitude, a great work ethic, you are organized, and self motivated with a good sense of humor, then Call 888-486-2408 to hear a message with more details about the position and instructions on how to apply for this position.5/10 rtn, cAMCS is seeking a Full-time Assistant Property for an apartment community in Madison, Florida. Requirements Must have at least three years of property management experience. Knowledgeable in Affordable Housing Have excellence written and oral communication skills Onesite and Opts experience is a plus Candidates must be able to pass a back ground check. We offer competitive wages based on experience. Insurance, 401K, and Gas mileage reimbursement. Equal Opportunity Employer Please send resume to Execasst@amcs-inc.com.5/15, 5/22, c Concrete Finishers & General Laborers (Temporary/Seasonal) needed for construction project in Madison. Please call (386) 496-3883 to apply. Equal Opportunity Employer.5/15, 5/22, pdJames Madison Preparatory High School is accepting applications for teachers and an administrative assistant for the 2013-14 school year. Visit www.jmphs.org for full more information.5/15, 5/22, c Van Driver needed part time/on call Experienced driver with a clear MVR to drive our residents to appointments. Certied Nursing Assistant preferred with CPR Certication. Will train the right candidate. Drug screen and level 2 background check required. Apply in person 8:30 am 4:00 pm. EOE, F/M/D/V Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center 2481 West US 90 Madison, Fl. 32340 850-973-4880.5/22, 5/29, c Education MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Ofce Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888) 374-7294. Help Wanted Driver Two raises in rst year. Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. 3 months OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Homes for Rent Buy 1-3bd Homes From $1000/mo! PreForeclosured and Rent2OWN Homes! Bad Credit OK! Only 500 Credit Score Min! To learn more and access local listings call 1-866-955-0621. Miscellaneous MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE TRAIN ONLINE FOR ALLIED HEALTH AND MEDICAL MANAGEMENT. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. COMPUTER AND FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. SCHEV AUTHORIZED. CALL 888-203-3179 WWW.CENTURAONLINE.C OM Attend College Online 100%. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, *Web. Job placement assistance. Computer and Financial Aid for qualied students. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualied Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769. AIRLINE CAREERS Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualied Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769.

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www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A ----Legals---5/17, 5/24 5/17, 5/24 5/17, 5/24

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14AMadison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 DURMAX TURBO DIESEL, ALLISON AUTO TRANS. LOCKING REAR DIFF., SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, Z-71 OFF ROAD, TRAILER TOW, REAR VISION CAMERAOVER $9000 DISCOUNT!MSRP $53,020 DISCOUNT -$9,107 7 PASS. SEATING SOUTH GEORGIA NORTH FLORIDA RAM TRUCK HEADQUARTERSOVER 100 NEW RAM TRUCKS TO CHOOSE FROM!!! 31 MPG 39 MPG CHEVY & GM TRUCK OWNERS(1999 & NEWER)SAVE ANOTHER$1500ON 1500 SILVERADO 7 PASS. SEATING 2013 RAM 1500 LARAMIE 4 DOOR Q130081 2013 DODGE DART2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVANV130277 V1300642013 DODGE JOURNEYV130168 Q37475.7L HEMI, Auto, Heated Leather Buckets, Remote Start 20 Chrome Wheels Rear Back-up CameraMSRP $42,665 DISCOUNT $6,752 2013 RAM 2500 4 DOOR 4X4All prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Military Rebate $500 bonus cash: to all active military & 20 year retired military. 2013 Truck of the Year per Motor Trend Magazine, Jan. 2013. Highway MPG per window factory sticker. Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or Valdosta dealerships. All prices good through May 25, 2013 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. 2013 TRUCK OF THE YEAR!Q130148 CASS BURCH 36 MPG 39 MPG ALL STAR EDITION18 WHEELSSPRAY-IN BEDLINERMSRP $35,190 DISCOUNT -$7,777 C130118 2013 SILVERADO 1500 C130146 All prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Owner Loyalty Bonus Cash Applies On All 2013 Chevy 1500 Silverados. Must provide proof of registration, on a 1999 or newer Chevy or GMC truck. USAA rebate requires proof of USAA membership. Highway mpg per factory window sticker. SOUTH GEORGIA VOTED US BEST OVERALL BUSINESS! COME SEE WHYFIND NEW ROADS C130041ALL STAR EDITION Z71 OFF-ROADSPRAY-IN BEDLINERMSRP $37,170 DISCOUNT $8,757 2013 SILVERADO LT 1500 X-CAB Z-71 4X4 C1301302013 CHEVY CRUZE LT 2013 CHEVY SONIC MSRP $28,205 Discount $6,208 C130046 USAA MEMBERS SAVE ANOTHER$750ON ALL CHEVYS! 2013 SILVERADO LT 2500 HD CREW CAB Z-71 4X4C130080 41 MPGC130054 SPRAY-IN BEDLINER ALREADY INSTALLED IN EVERY TRUCK! 2013 CHEVY TAHOE LTC130199 YOU HAVE A CHOICE, EVERYBODY KNOWS CHEVYS COST LESS IN QUITMAN! Best Placeto buy a New Truck2013 Best Overall Business2013 2013 SILVERADO LT 3500 HD CREW CAB 4X4 32 MPG 2013 CHEVY EQUINOXC130151 8029241.4L ECOTEC ENGINEMY LINK, REAR VISION CAMERA, ENHANCEDSAFETY PACKAGE.V130109 2013 CHRYSLER 200AUTOMATICP/WINDOWS P/LOCKS, A/C TILT & CRUISE888-304-2277 888-463-6831801 E. SCREVEN ST QUITMAN 4164 N. VALDOSTA RD. VALDOSTAPrices good through May 25, 2013 or until vehicle is sold whichever comes first.COME SEE WHYSOUTH GEORGIA VOTED US BEST PLACE TO BUY A NEW TRUCK! 2013 DODGE CHALLENGER V1301182012 RAM 1500 4 DOOR 2013 RAM 1500 V1300954.7L V-8 Auto, P/W/L,Mirrors A/C, Tilt & Cruise, Spray-In BedlinerMSRP $30,890 DISC. -$6,977 GET A WORLD-FAMOUS ROCKER WITH EVERY VEHICLE PURCHASED!THEYRE BACK! 2013 DODGE CHARGER Q130251 2013 CHRYSLER 300V130046 2013 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRYV130141 Loaded! Power Windows, Locks & Doors, NAV, DVD, Rearview Camera, Leather Buckets, Bluetooth & More! THEYRE BACK!GET A WORLDFAMOUS ROCKER WITH EVERY VEHICLE PURCHASED! 8640 HWY 84 WEST2013 IMPALA LT FIND NEW ROADS



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Our 148th Year, Number 39 Friday, May 24, 2013 Madison, Floridawww.greenepublishing.com Since 1865, Telling It Like It Is And Defending The Peasant's Right To Know Index2 Sections, 26 Pages Local WeatherVeiwpoints 2A From Page One3A Around Madison5A Memorial Day6-7A Greenville 8-9A School 10A Classieds/Legals 12-13A Health Guide Section B By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. A Greenville man was injured in a wreck at US 221, south of SW #1 Federal Road. According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, Colin M. Tomkins, 49, was southbound on US 221 when he suffered a medical event and blacked out. Tomkins drove onto the west shoulder of US 221 and then rotated clockwise and overturned one time. The 1989 Ford Bronco Tomkins was driving came to a nal rest, facing west on the west shoulder of US 221. The Madison County Sheriffs Ofce, Madison County EMS, Taylor County Sheriffs Ofce and Greenville Volunteer Fire Department assisted FHP. Tomkins was taken by ambulance to Doctors Memorial Hospital in Perry, where he was treated for minor injuries. FHP Trooper W. Brian Lundy was the investigating ofcer. Blackout Causes Accident Correction: After press time for the Wednesday, May 22,Carrier, the date of the Spirit of Greenville Fundraiser was changed. The fundraiser will now be held on June 14-15. By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. As a Part of the Florida DOTs federally funded Safe Routes to School program, several streets and intersections will soon have some new sidewalks, with crosswalks at key intersections at Highway 90. The project will improve safety for children who walk to schools located along Base Street/U.S. Hwy 90, and pedestrians walking along Anastasia Way to and from the Recreational Complex. Work has already begun on the east side of Southwest Anastasia Way between the highway and the rec park. Other sidewalks being constructed include: the south side of Base Street from SW Captain Brown Road to SW Anastasia Way the north side of Northwest 90th Avenue between Base Street the north side of Captain Brown road from Southeast Fifth Avenue to Base Street Crosswalks will be added at several locations along Base Street, including one at Madison County Central School and Madison County High School. The project also includes several new school zone ashing signals, new driveways, upgrade drainage pipes and replacing 12 mailboxes to meet current safety requirements.New Sidewalks To Be Added Along Base StreetThe intersection at SW Anastasia Way and Base Street will soon have additional sidewalks and a crosswalk.Photo submitted Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Brooke Kinsley 5/22/2013Cherry Lake American Legion Post 224 Event: Memorial Day Open House May 27, 2013, Monday | Starts at 11:00am Memorial Day is an occasion of special importance, because it is a day sacred to the memory of all those Americans who made the supreme sacrice for the liberties we enjoy . You are cordially invited to attend our Open House on May 27, 2013, which starts at 11:00am. Please feel welcome to bring your immediate family. The "Open House" will have BBQ chicken dinners(1/4 chicken) with 2 sides and dessert for $7.00. Tour the facilities, and meet other veterans and their families. Our mission is serving active duty military personnel, veterans, their families, and serving our community. Resources will be available to assist Veterans and Families obtain copies of military records and any Awards and Decorations the Veteran has earned. Such as Military Service Records and Ofcial Military Personnel Files (OMPFs, DD Form 214 and separation/discharge papers that were issued before the Korean War) Ever wondered where the medals and awards are for a love one who served? Here is an opportunity to replace them and leave a legacy for their service. Maybe they were lost or never issued at the time of separation. Have a computer? The Online request site is called eVETSRecs:Website is :https://vetrecs.archives.gov/VeteranRequest/home.htmlThis special event is open to the public and is a volunteer community service by the Cherry Lake American Legion. We very much would like for you to become a part of our family. Anything we personally can do to assist you or your family, please do not hesitate to contact us. For additional information call the Post at: 850.929.2953 or Regina Barber We encourage all members to participate in this special event. Cherry Lake AL Post 224 | 4383 NE Cherry Lake Circle | Madison, FL 32340By Kristin Finney Greene Publishing, Inc. Every year, Madison holds nominations for Citizen of the Year. The Citizen of the Year is a person in the county that exemplies kindness and helps support Madison County. This years nominees included Jenny Andrews, Ted Ensminger, Merv Mattair, Gean McCullough and Jerome Wyche. The winner for 2013 was Jenny Andrews. In order to be nominated, someone in the community must send a letter nominating you and explaining why they feel you would be good for the title. One of the letters written about Jenny Andrews was lled with many reasons why Andrews would make a good choice. Below is a copy of the letter: As long as I have known Jenny, (more than 30 years) she has served as a spiritual mentor for young and old in her church and in the community. She has led numerous Bible studies, and taught Sunday School for many years, always leading others toward a closer relationship with God, and towards becoming better members of our families, churches, and communities. She has been an active advocate for Madison County, and has always been at the forefront of spurring the community on towards becoming a better community. She has worked with people in all walks of life, from high school students, where she taught and mentored for many years, to people who have found themselves with no resources, to young evolving Christians, to us middle aged, middle classed citizens who need a little guidance and direction. I can think of no other who has inuenced so many lives for the better. In addition, she is a talented artist, who uses her talents in so many ways to enhance and beautify our church, the First Methodist Church of Madison. I nominate Jenny Andrews to be 2013 Citizen of the Year because she is the true meaning of a citizen to all people; whether its the many students she Story submitted Juan Williams, the City of Madisons Fire Inspector for the past three years, has been promoted to the position of City Inspector and will handle the citys re safety, risk management, and code enforcement programs, City Manager Tim Bennett announced today. He will be our eyes and ears internally within the city staff and externally within the community to ensure were doing what we need to do to keep our employees and citizens safe, Bennett said. Juan has the kind of rm, common-sense approach were looking for to successfully work with employees and citizens to promote safety and to enforce codes. He will report directly to Bennett. Williams already had been handling re safety inspections and prevention for the city and for Madison County. He will continue in both roles. He also had been conducting the citys risk management program to promote By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. After Just Youth Services announced that it no longer wanted to run Joann Bridges Academy, School Superintendent Doug Brown and District Administrators Davis Barclay, Paula Ginn and Andy Barnes researched other education companies, ultimately choosing G4S Youth Services, LLC, drawing up the contract and presenting it to the school board for a vote. However there were several minutes of discussion rst. School board member VeEtta Hagan, whose Greenville-area district includes the Academy, asked about the organizations track record. Brown replied that the track record looked good for a ve-year-old company that was successfully running educational institutions throughout Florida and the U.S., and that their presentation to the school district administrators had been very good. I would not present this if I did not feel good about it, he said. But what about the school board members? Hagan asked. We should have been invited to this presentation. What about workshops, where we could ask questions? It seems, you just present us with this contract and make the decision for us. We dont know anything about this company. School Board Attorney Tommy Reeves discussed the contract and explained how it was set up, including an arbitration clause that would be far less expensive for settling disputes than the traditional legal route. However, the one caveat was that the school board would lose much of its right to appeal, since a decision rendered by arbitration was binding, unless it was way out of line. Financial Director Andy Barnes said that hed had a lengthy meeting with the companys representatives andSchool Board Approves New Organization to Run Joann Bridges AcademySchool Superintendent Doug Brown presents the case for G4S Youth Services. Jenny Andrews Named Citizen of the Year 2013 Juan Williams is Now City InspectorMadison Fire Inspector Juan Williams, promoted to City Inspector, will assume responsibility for the citys re safety, risk management and code enforcement issues. Photo submittedCherry Lake American Legion Memorial Day Open House Please See New Sidewalks on Page 3A Please See Jenny Andrews on Page 3A Please See Juan Williams on Page 3A Please See Bridges Academy on Page 3AGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, May 21, 2013

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Although I know that its not true, I feel like Ive been stealing from death. The rst instance I have no memory of. I know what I was doing one minute and the next thing I remember is waking up ve days later in the cardiac intensive care unit in Tallahassee. The second instance of theft I remember vividly. I had just returned from taking pictures of my niece before her senior prom. I was uploading the photos to Facebook and deleting some when all of a sudden, I felt like I was about to black out. I felt as if I were being hurtled into unconsciousness at 500 miles per hour. A split second later I was wide-awake as I felt a boom and a shock. My internal debrillator had red and jolted me out of impending doom. The rst time, in December 2011, in the words of Emergency Medical Services personnel and doctors, I had coded. That means my heart had stopped and, in medical terms, I had clinically died. I had not really died because God had not said I had died. Hebrews 9:27 says, It is appointed unto men once to die but after this the judgment. I did not die biologically because my brain was still working and they were able to get me to the hospital, where doctors began a radical treatment called Arctic Sun, where the body is basically put in arctic conditions to preserve brainpower. Doctors and nurses iced me down. The fact that the staff at my ofce did the job that they did to keep me alive and the fact that EMS showed up when they did and they got me to the hospital when they did saved my life. Doctors had told my father that my prognosis wasnt good but they did what they could and friends all over the world were praying for me. God healed me. After that miracle, doctors implanted the internal debrillator. This past Saturday, it worked for the rst time and, although I know that God holds the cards when it comes to life and death, but I was told by medical professionals that if I didnt have the debrillator, I would be dead now. My heart had been racing at 387 beats per minute. I didnt even feel that because as the woman who works for the company who made the debrillator said, Its just a utter at that point. Neither time did I hear the heavy footsteps of death stalking me. Neither time did I realize how sick I was. One time ended with a clinical death, from which God rescued me. The next ended with my medical device ring. Once again, God rescued me from death. I have no doubt that if I had died, I would go to Heaven. Do you know where you will go when you die? Have you accepted Jesus as your personal savior? If Viewpoints & Opinions2AMadison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 The MadisonEnterprise-Recorder PublisherEmerald GreeneEditorKristin FinneySenior Staff WriterJacob BembryStaff WriterLynette NorrisGraphic DesignersTori Self, Steven Godfrey Advertising Sales RepresentativesJeanette Dunn, Shelly SmithClassified and Legal AdsCheltsie KinsleyDeadline for classieds is Monday at 3 p.m.Deadline for legal advertisements is Wednesday at 5 p.m. There will be a $3 charge for affidavits.Circulation DepartmentSheree MillerSubscription Rates:In-County $35 Out-of-County $45 E-Edition $25 ($5 add on to existing subscription) (State & local taxes included)Since 1865 -Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity.The Madison The Madison Enterprise-Recorder Enterprise-RecorderMadison Recorder established 1865 New Enterprise established 1901 Consolidated June 25, 1908 Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post Ofce 32340. Publication No. 177.400. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison Enterprise-Recorder P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.P.O. Box 772 Madison, FL 32341 1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32340 (850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121 greenepub@greenepublishing.com www.greenepublishing.com Jacobs LadderJacob BembryColumnist Madison County Extension ServiceDiann DouglasGuest Columnist Information in the Jail Report is provided to Greene Publishing, Inc., by the Madison County Sheriffs Office. All people are considered innocent until proven guilty. Questions about people identified in the report should be directed to the MCSO at (850) 973-4001.Jail Report Conservative Corner Conservative CornerBy Nelson Pryor, LeeMadison County Memorial weekend is here and it marks the beginning of the summer season of backyard grilling. Meals cooked outdoors always increase during the summer months and the variety of food people put on the grill seems to be expanding. With all of the food preparation in summer temperatures, you need to be aware of safe food handling practices. Backyard chiefs dont think about it, but each year outbreaks of food poisoning increase during the summer months. Bacteria that cause food poisoning are invisible, odorless and tasteless; summer temperatures only increase the potential population explosion. Since it is not appetizing to think about food invaders like E. coli, clostridium perfringens or salmonella, using safe food handling methods will drastically reduce your chances of exposing your family and friends to food borne illness. First, marinate meats in a glass dish in the refrigerator, not the kitchen countertop. If you plan to use some of the marinade for basting or a dip, reserve a portion before you put raw meat into it. Bacteria from raw meat will contaminate the liquid and it should be discarded after the marinating time is over. Coals should be very hot before food is placed on the grill for cooking. A hot grill will assure that food is cooked at a high enough temperature to destroy bacteria. It takes 30 minutes or longer before coals are hot enough; they should appear to have a light coating of ash for the highest temperature. Meat should be thoroughly cooked. The best way to check for doneness is to use a meat thermometer. Whole cuts of beef, steaks and roasts should be cooked to internal temperature of 145F, while ground meat needs to reach an internal temperature of 160F. Poultry needs to reach an internal temperature of 165F, be sure the thermometer is inserted in the eshy part of the meat and not touching bone. If you dont have a thermometer, visually check by cutting into the meat to be sure the juices are clear and not pink in color. To avoid are-ups and charred food, remove visible fat from meat. Temperatures for cooking pork have changed in recent years; USDA now recommends a cooking temperature of 145F with a resting time of 3 minutes. Research showed the internal temperature continues to rise during the resting time and reaches 160F. Put cooked foods on a clean plate that hasnt been used to hold raw meat or poultry. Cooking food destroys bacteria, but if you put it back on the same plate, you just exposed it to bacteria again. Food safety experts call this cross contamination and it is sure to cause food borne illness. Perishable foods need to be served hot off the grill. Food safety experts advise food should be eaten within two hours. If you are eating outdoors, keep in mind warm temperatures reduce that time to one hour. Leftovers should be promptly divided in to small containers and placed in the refrigerator. Simple changes in the way you prepare and serve your backyard barbeque will greatly reduce your risk for food borne illness. For more information on food safety, contact the Madison County Extension Service. The University of Florida Extension Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution. Put Safety First When Grilling OutdoorsWhere Have All The Flowers Gone?5/15 James Carl Cleo Osborne-Disorderly Intoxication OT Nash Jr.Drug (Crack Cocaine with Intent), Drug (Marijuana [Less than 20 grams]), Resisting without Violence, Drug Equipment, Out of County Tanisha Ashley Key-Possession of Cocaine 5/16 Brittany Ray GodfreyBattery/Domestic Kenneth Cedric Locke-Violation On 10/20/1981, Kathy Boudin, a veteran of the long-dormant Weather Underground, was captured, for murder. Boudin was last seen eleven years before that, eeing naked from the ruins of the Greenwich Village town house she and her comrades were using for a bomb factory. Early on 3/6/1970, a group of Weathermen inadvertently blew up three of their members along with a townhouse on Eleventh Street. The group was trying tro build an anti-personnel bomb, in order to give Americans a taste of the kind of cruel weaponry their government was using in Vietnam. In an earlier life, Boudin had been a student at Bryn Mawr College, where she had joined the New Left and had become a community organizer. She followed the Rules for Radicals, by Saul Alinsky, in communities like Chester, Pa., and Cleveland. Caught in Brinks Robbery The New York Times of 10/22/1981`, reported the New York robber netted $1,589,000 in cash, six bags of money. In a wild chase, she and three others, were caught and held without bail on charges second-degree murder in the deaths of a Brinks guard, Peter Paige, 49, and two police ofcers. Kathy had grown up in a family steeped in the traditions of the left. Raised to cherish social and racial justice, she explained, Its about doing what you feel is right. Collegians in Disgrace The academic honors are raining down on her now. The Weather Underground terrorist, who already has an adjunct professorship at the Columbia School of Social work, was named by the New York University Law School as Rose Sheinberg Scholar in Residence (for working on cutting-edge issues of gender, race and class) Her caper with the Brinks robbery, resulting in 22 years in jail, hardly slowed down her community organizer activities. The National Review, of 5/6/2013, p. 8, reports that Kathy wrote letters of apology to the families of her victims but never mailed them. Crime and Its Results Another winner of fame, and one never slowed down from his community organizer activity, is Bill Ayers. Ayers is currently a professor of education, who is deantly unapologetic, both on camera and in the pages of his 2001 memoir Fugitive Days. I dont regret setting bombs, he told the New York Times in a prole published, unfortunately for him, on September 11, 2001. In fact, I dont think we did enough. Taken By Surprise? Where have all the owers gone? To teach! Bill Ayers, Kathy Boudin, and other community organizers, are in positions of authority, and are all paid from taxes extracted from people like us. What a disgrace! Does any of this matter to an academic establishment thats still starry-eyed about 1960s radicals? No one should be surprised. These community organizers have populated the academy that I have known. As a matter of fact, to make this personal, I can state categorically, that I have never had one teacher that I recognized as a conservative. What a disgrace!THE REPUBLICAN CLUB OF MADISON COUNTY Meets Monday, June 9 at 12:00 noon at Shelbys Restaurant EVERYONE WELCOME Paid for and approved by the Madison County Republican Executive Committee MadisonRepublican@embarqmail.com Stealing From Death Read Jacobs blog at www.jacobbembry.com. His book, Higher Call, is available in Kindle format and www.amazon.com or in paperback at www.amazon.com, www.bn.com and www.booksamillion.com or by sending $10 plus $3.99 shipping and handling to Jacob Bembry, P.O. Box 9334, Lee, FL 32059. Contact him at jacobbembry@hotmail.com. 2013 of Probation Robert Louis AbsenaultReckless Driving 5/17 Tyrece Shantel Fleming-Failure to Appear (3 Counts Felony Petit Theft) Ronald Eugene Webb-Writ of Bodily Attachment Winfort Kardell Bareld-Violation of Probation (County) 5/18 Jonathon Levon Andrews-Driving with a Suspended License Williams Turner IV-No Drivers License Darron Lamar Brown-Violation of Probation (County) Jabaria McFadden-Violation of Probation (County) Gregory Reshun GrahamViolation of Probation (County) 5/19 Marvin Franklin TillmanAssault (Aggravated Domestic), Battery (Domestic), Witness Refusing 911 Help David Laron Mobley Jr.-Domestic Battery 5/20 Jennifer Denise Johnson-No Drivers License Deomarcus Leon Jackson-Criminal Registration Jermaine Quantez Monson-Trespassing After Warning CORRECTION Last weeks article, A Black Catalog of Crimes, was also written by Nelson Pryor

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Relay For Life Co-Ed Softball Tournament SlatedFrom Page OneMadison Enterprise-Recorder 3A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 FEED TIMESHow to use: The major and minor feeding times for each day are listed below. The major feeding times are the best for the sportsman and last about 2 hours, the minor feeding times can also have good success, but last only about 1 hour. Good luck and be careful out there. Major feed times are marked by an asterisk (*) The Week Of May 24 May 30, 2013 Friday May 24 6:10 AM *12:20 AM 6:30 PM Saturday May 25 *12:50 AM 7:10 AM *1:20 PM 7:30 PM Sunday May 26 *1:55 AM 8:10 AM *2:30 PM 8:45 PM Monday May 27 *3:10 AM 9:20 PM *3:35 PM 9:50 PM Tuesday May 28 3:45 AM *9:45 AM 3:55 PM *10:20 PM Wednesday May 29 *5:15 AM 11:30 AM *5:45 PM Thursday May 30 12:10 AM *6:10 PM 12:20 PM *6:30 PM By Kristin Finney Greene Publishing, Inc. There will be a Relay for Life softball tournament held on Saturday, June 1. This softball tournament will be held at the Madison Recreation Complex. Tickets will be $1 and it will be $10 to play. During the tournament there will be food and fun for all. All proceeds from the tournament will go to benet the Relay for Life. The Madison Recreation Complex is located on West Highway 90. For more information or if you would like to have a team in the tournament or sell concessions as a team fundraiser call Denise Bell at (850) 973-9481. New Sidewalks Cont. From Page 1ALane closures will not be allowed until after 8 a.m. or between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. on weekdays, and aggers will direct trafc during lane closures. The new ve-foot-wide sidewalks will cost $566,677 and is a collaborative effort by parents, school, community leaders, and local, state and federal governments working together to make bicycling and walking to school safer and more appealing for Kindergarten through eighth grade students. The Florida DOT is overseeing the construction, and plans to have the work completed in the fall of 2013, barring any unforeseen conditions. Jenny Andrews Cont. From Page 1Ataught, the young people she mentors, or a stranger. She has a heart for people, especially young people. Each week, young people ll her home to learn about life and making good choices. She is a prayer warrior for many people always carrying soup to the sick, visiting the shut-ins and showing her love by her actions Jenny Andrews has earned the distinction of 2013 Citizen of the year because she has served Madison County for three-fourths of one century. As a retired educator, she has taught thousands of young people how to think and shown them love and integrity by example. Jenny serves our Lord as a dedicated First United Methodist Church member where she serves in every capacity from being a Sunday School teacher, creatively decorating our altar and leading weekly Bible studies. However, the most compelling reason is Jennys servants heart. Daily Jenny assists people, whether friend or stranger. She shows people Jesus at Dollar General or at the grocery store as she greets them to really get to know them, pray for them and genuinely help them by providing whatever they need. The saying, You may be the only Bible some people read, is synonymous with Jenny as an outstanding Madison County citizen. Congratulations Jenny Andrews. Juan Williams Cont. From Page 1A Bridges Academy Cont. From Page 1Aworker safety. That will continue as well. During the past month, he has been the citys point man in enforcing city codes and has been active in resolving code violations concerning property nuisances, signs and renewal of occupational licenses. I felt it would be benecial to consolidate all his duties under one title Inspector and to position him in the citys organizational chart so that he has a direct line to the city manager, Bennett said. I believe this will lead to more effective safety programs and code enforcement. Williams will continue to work closely with Charles Hitchcock, the citys Building Ofcial and Community Development Director. They form a team that also includes Code Enforcement Administrator Mary Graham, Police Chief Gary Calhoun and Fire Chief Bruce Jordan to address safety and code issues. Between the ve of them, they bring 115 years of experience to their jobs. We have an excellent team in place, Bennett said. Our goal is to educate citizens about the citys ordinances, apply common sense to enforcement, and hold ourselves accountable as to how effective we work with citizens to enforce the ordinances. Williams has certications in Fireghter II and Fire Inspector II, which includes Fire and Life Safety; he is certied in Installation and Maintenance of Fire Suppression Systems by the National Institute for Certication in Emergency Technologies (NICET); he is nearing completion for certication in Fire Investigation; and he is pursuing certication as a building inspector. He also is in an inactive status as a certied plumber. He is a single parent of two children. His son Juan Jr., is a rising senior and football captain at Lawton Chiles High School in Tallahassee, and his daughter Justyn is a rising junior, also at Lawton Chiles High School. The family lives in Tallahassee. talked about their operations in St. Johns County, Polk County, Lake City, Miami-Dade, and Avon Park, all Florida facilities, and the company seemed well organized. Hagan protested that Barnes was the districts nancial expert, not necessarily the educational services expert. We must remember that numbers are different from education, she said. Brown, who added that he was still certied in all levels of education, even though his most recent work experience was in higher education, and that he also had an extensive background in juvenile justice, said that he had spoken to several counties that used G4Ss services, and also spoken at length to DJJ (Department of Juvenile Justice) about them. They come highly recommended. I didnt just pull them out of thin air. Hagan pointed out that she had a legitimate concern for the Academy and had a right to ask questions; Brown acknowledged that she did. I was elected by the people and Im trying to serve the people, she added. The board voted 3/2 to approve G4S Youth Services, LLC., with Hagan and fellow school board member Karen Pickles dissenting.

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Around Madison County4AMadison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013Community CalendarMark Your Calendar! May 25The listening party of LifeSongs new album will be held at 7 p.m. at Shelbys Restuarant. May 26Ochlawilla Baptist Church will be having their annual homecoming on May 26. Services will begin at 10:30am with song service and special guest speaker Brother Mike Alvarez. A covered dish lunch will follow morning worship. We will have The Evergreen Pickers as our special music. Everyone is invited to attend./June 1An open microphone gospel sing and potluck supper, honoring Sharon Sauls, wife of Pastor Richard Sauls, will be held at Lee Worship Center. There will be a challenge between Seminole fans and Gator fans to see who can get the most people in attendance for the sing. Lee Worship Center is located at 471 SE Magnolia Avenue in Lee. There is no charge for the sing or the supper. A love offering will be accepted. By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. Tina DeMotsis heads up its Fraud Division of the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce. Recently, she addressed the 55 Plus Club about the topic of identity theft and provided club members with a wealth of information. Over the next three weeks, this report will look at the problem in three parts: How Identity Thieves Get Your Information, How to Protect Yourself From Identity Thieves, and What To Do If Your Identity is Stolen PART I: How Identity Thieves Get Your Information While identity thieves still resort to old-fashioned legwork, i.e., dumpster diving, staking out curbside mailboxes and so forth, the digital age of the Internet means that their loot personal information they can use to defraud people and rob them blind is often just a few mouse clicks away. Technology is scary, said Tina DeMotsis of the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce, who does not use ATMs, pays in cash only at restaurants, and advises against using debit cards at all, because they can be too easily compromised. All an identity thief needs is the PIN number to completely clean out a debit card account. When it comes to credit cards, the toughest one for thieves to crack is American Express for some reason, and when it comes to telephone conversations, a land line beats a cell phone, and a landline phone where the handset is attached to the phone body with a cord beats a wireless, walk-around handset, especially if you are discussing sensitive information with your bank, credit card company or nancial advisor. Also, if you must relay personal information over a cell phone outside your home, beware of who is standing behind you or who is lingering close enough to overhear what you are saying. Along with the dizzying advances in technology that make an identity thiefs job easier, the massive popularity of social media like Facebook and Twitter can be a gold mine. Be careful what you put out there (on the social media), she said. DeMotsis has been with the MCSO since 2005 and now heads up its fraud division, works constantly on stacks and stacks of fraud and identity theft cases. She recently spoke to the 55 Plus Club about the threats and scams that are out there and what people can do to safeguard their nancial assets from digital burglars and pickpockets. Identity theft, in a nutshell, is a criminal action of obtaining enough personal identication to impersonate the victim and then obtain credit and loans, or make purchases in the victims name. Then, the perps dont pay the bill, leaving the victim holding the bag...in this case, a bag full of unpaid invoices and creditors trying to collect the money. Often, the only pieces of information thieves need are someones Social Security Number, date of birth and telephone number sometimes, resourceful thieves can manage with less than that one piece of information will often help them get another and another. They can use vacant lots as drop zones for items purchased on someone elses credit. Where do they get this information? I could go on all day about that, said DeMotsis. They can get it from the hospital, if youve ever been hospitalized; from the doctors ofceor dentists ofce; from your or your childs school; from your place of employment; from your health insurance carrier; even from your bank. The list goes on and on, and includes anywhere youre required to provide personal identifying information. There could be a criminal-minded individual employed at any of these locations, gleaning your information from any les or records he or she may have access to such individuals can sell stolen identities over the internet for as little as $2 to shady companies in foreign countries, where it is virtually impossible to trace the perpetrator. Two dollars a pop may not sound like much, but if the individual in question has access to hundreds of identities each day, it can add up. A larcenous individual sitting in any waiting room may overhear you providing personal information to a receptionist or other employee who is asking you the questions and lling out the form for you. If the establishments you use dont shred or destroy old documents before disposal, identity thieves can go dumpster diving to retrieve valuable information. If you yourself do not shred or destroy old utility bills, credit card slips, ATM receipts, and other kinds of sensitive nancial documents, thieves need only to sift through your garbage to retrieve your most personal nancial information. Then, there is the technology angle that evolves at a dizzying pace. Conventional wisdom of only a short time ago was to never let your credit card out of your sight if you used it in a restaurant. Use it only if you were allowed to check out at a cash register when you had nished eating and could watch the transaction with your card. Now, there are card reader devices known as spider devices that are so small they can be concealed in the palm of a hand, and these devices can store information from hundreds of cards. Even if the restaurant employee never leaves your sight with your card, it can be compromised. Thieves can also simply Google someones name and go on a data-mining expedition throughout the Internet and nd out enough to allow them to hack into credit and bank accounts. They can also illegally obtain your credit report or simply le a public records request at the courthouse. The threat is out there and it is quite formidable. A person doesnt have to lose a purse or wallet to have his or her identity stolen. Just a few pieces of misplaced information will do. There are undoubtedly many other ways someone can nd such information, and when they do, they can wreak havok. NEXT WEEK: Part II, How to Protect Yourself From Identity Thieves, will address some the things you can do to thwart them.Tina DeMotsis: Identity Theft Still A Major Concern, PART I

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Around Madison CountyMadison Enterprise-Recorder 5A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 Announcing a new name for Progress Energy. Look for our new name and logo in your bills and other places. No other aspect of your service or account is changing. Although our name has changed, our commitment to you and the communities we serve remains the same. So you can count on us for reliable electricity every time you ip the switch. Learn more at duke-energy.com/newname Duke Energy CorporationProgress Energy now has a new name: Duke Energy. By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. In the northwest corner of Four Freedoms Park, a tall, slender monument stands in a square of ground, surrounded with liriope plantings. The pedestal beneath the tall obelisk reads: DEDICATED TO THE FORMER SLAVES OF MADISON COUNTY AND THEIR SUPPORTERS AND THE UNSUNG HEROES WHO GAVE THEIR PRAYERS, BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS TO MAKE OUR COMMUNITY WHAT IT IS TODAY. MAY 20, 1996. One of those Unsung Heroes is Rev. David DeLaughter, former pastor of the Damascus Missionary Baptist Church and St. James Missionary Baptist Church. Rev. DeLaughter was formally recognized as such during the 20th of May Jubilee Celebration at Four Freedoms Park, Monday, May 20, at 5:00 p.m. May 20, 1865 is the date when the news of the Emancipation finally reached Florida, over two years after slavery officially ended for the entire country Jan. 1, 1863. The 20th of May Jubilee Celebrations are held in several towns throughout Florida in honor of that day. In Madison, one of the major events in that celebration is recognizing the official Unsung Hero Of Madison County. Rev. DeLaughter, who in addition to being pastor of Damascus and St. James Missionary Baptist Churches for 36 years, also worked as a technician in the audio visual section of the library and North Florida Community College. Widowed several years ago, he retired last year and moved to South Carolina to live with one of his sons. Unsung Hero seems a most fitting description for DeLaughter, according to those who remember him. He was basically a quiet leader...a quiet man, Rev. Oliver Bradley of Genesis Missionary Baptist Church, who presided over the ceremony, said afterward. In addition to his duties as pastor and video technician at NFCC, DeLaughter also served as president of the Madison County Training Union. In 1990, DeLaughter and others in the Ministerial Association founded the annual Holy Week services that are now a solid tradition in Madisons observance of the Easter season. He also worked Howell Waring to have the Unsung Heroes monument erected in Four Freedoms Park. After a ceremony at the Gazebo that included selections from the Madison Boys Choir and a keynote address by Julius Hackett, Ann Waring, widow of Howell Waring, presented a wreath to members of the DeLaughter family, who carried it over to the Unsung Heroes Monument. If my father were here, said son Donald DeLaughter, Hed give all the praise and honor to the Lord.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lynette Norris, May 20, 2013The Madison Boys Choir performs at the Unsung Hero Ceremony in honor of Rev. David DeLaughter.Rev. David DeLaughter Proclaimed Unsung Hero Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Lynette Norris, May 20, 2013Members of the DeLaughter family and Ann Waring, whose late husband Howell Waring worked with Rev. DeLaughter to have the Unsung Heroes Monument placed in the park, stand beside it with the wreath presented in his honor. Left to right: Betty DeLaughter (sister-in-law), Naomi Anderson (sister), Donald DeLaughter (son) and Waring. By Kristin Finney Greene Publishing, Inc. Madison Welding opened their shop back in August of 2010. In the almost three years that they have spent in Madison, they have come to love Madison County and its inhabitants. Larry Smithwick, Jr. is the owner, along with his wife Ivy Smithwick, and the two of them are so thankful for the support of Madison residents. Its been really nice getting to meet new people. The people of Madison are so nice, said Ivy. The team at Madison Welding is able to do just about anything metal related. They work on trailers, farm equipment, boats, gates, handrails and much more. Madison Welding is proud to announce that they have mobile welding capabilities. They also have a telehandler lift that people can rent if they need it. Madison is small and friendly community and I love it. I love getting to meet new people every day with walk-ins. So much of our business is through referrals from our customers and we are so thankful for all of the support from the community, Ivy stated. If you are interested in getting a quote on a job, please bring the job to their ofce if you can. Every day is a surprise here and there are so many different types and sizes of all of the materials we work with. It is almost impossible to give an accurate quote over the phone. We prefer to see the job and give you the quote that way. Madison Welding is located in Madison at 1411 State Road 53 South. For more information about Madison Welding or for any questions please call 9736600. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Kristin Finney, May 22, 2013. Pictured above is the team from Madison Welding. From left to right are, Jeffrey Webb; Owner, Larry Smithwick, Jr.; David Midgette and Tom Ackerman. Business Spotlight: Madison Welding

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By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. Theres a saying, made popular by Gen. Douglas McArthur, that old soldiers never die, they simply fade away. Like old soldiers, old Americans ags own in their honor also fade. They become worn-out and tattered. Once they can no longer be repaired, and are no longer serviceable, they should be retired in a dignied and respectful manner. Since Memorial Day is often observed by placing American ags on the graves of U.S. Veterans, and that often means replacing worn-out ags that have been there awhile perhaps since the previous Memorial Day the problem becomes what to do with the ags that are faded, tattered and worn...ags that need to be retired. According to the U.S. Flag Code, the preferred method is to burn the old one in a discreet and respectful manner, after checking with local ofcials about re codes and ordinances in the area. If outdoor burning is allowed, then the U.S. Flag Code guidelines include making sure that the re is large and intense enough to consume the ag completely; the ag should be properly folded, and placed not thrown on the re. Those gathered around the re may salute the ag, recite the Pledge of Allegiance, or simply observe a period of silent reection. The key is to show respect and dignity during the burning, which signies purication and rebirth. Afterward, the re should be safely extinguished and the ashes buried. People can burn their own ags, or take them to a civic or veterans organization that will handle it for them. This Memorial Day, May 27, the American Legion Post #195, Commander Al Alexander, assisted by the Madison Fire Department, will conduct a burning ceremony for old ags in Four Freedoms Park, beginning at 11 a.m. Anyone who has an old, tattered, worn-out ag they would like to see burned in a proper patriotic ceremony can bring it to Four Freedoms Park that mor ning, prefer ably by 10:45. `The ceremony will include Jim Jenkins playing patriotic music, the Madison County Sheriffs Ofce presenting the colors in an honor guard, an invocation, a recognition of all veterans present in the audience, and Jerry Chandler, USAF (retired) and vice-commander of American Legion Post of Cherry Lake, as the keynote speaker. Other Options: It is also acceptable to seal the old ag in a box or bag and bury it, since some locations may not allow outdoor burning, and ags constructed of modern fabrics like nylon release toxic gases when burned. Again, the most important thing is showing respect during the burial process. Yet another alternative for nylon ags is recycling, where the old nylon is remade into new nylon material for new ags. If, however, your ag is merely dirty, but otherwise in good repair, there is nothing in the U.S. Flag Code that forbids washing. Most outdoor type ags can be hand-washed in a mild laundry detergent, or taken to a dry-cleaner, if the material is not washable. It is also perfectly acceptable to do some small repairs yourself. The criteria is that the repairs must be done well enough so that they are not noticeable when the ag is ying, and they must not alter the dimensions of the ag in any way. For a more in-depth look at the U.S. Flag Code, go to the website www.united-states-ag.com. 6A Madison Enterprise Recorder Madison Enterprise Recorder 7Awww.greenepublishing.com www.greenepublishing.com Wednesday, May 24, 2013Wednesday, May 24, 2013 By Lynette Norris Greene Publishing, Inc. Korean War Veteran Ed Shefeld doesnt often speak publicly about the things he endured at the hands of enemy soldiers, after his capture by the North Korean army in 1950, but when he does, the story he tells is compelling. It is the story of someone who lost many friends and comrades. It is a story of survival, almost by sheer force of will, under horric circumstances most people can only try to imagine. I am very, very lucky to be here, he recently told the Rotary Club. After three years in the hands of an enemy who did not regard human life the same way we did. While he speaks of the things he and fellow POWs endured, his voice is calm, quiet, matter-of-fact. There are pauses here and there, as if he is searching for words adequate to describe the horrors, some of which are given in detail, others only alluded to. Shefeld was stationed in Japan when the Korean War broke out, June 25, 1950. Communist North Korea was attempting to overrun democratic South Korea. Shefelds division was quickly sent to the front lines and ordered to hold off the enemy at all costs. His division (a typical army division could be anywhere from 10,000 to 30,000 men) was the rst to encounter the North Korean army. Unfortunately, the U.S. soldiers were outnumbered 100 to one. Within the rst few days of conict, the enemy advanced so fast that, at times, the American troops were shooting them at point-blank range, with heavy artillery that would normally be used from as much as a mile away. Some of their heavy guns were burned up from the constant ring at the enemy. As they fell back under the onslaught for days on end, the enemy nally stopped advancing quite so fast, but the narrow dirt roads bordered on either side by rice paddies or mountains offered the Americans no place to set up their heavy artillery. To make matters worse, the roads were often lled with throngs of refugees, carrying everything they owned on their backs, eeing south to escape the ghting as the Americans were trying once again to press northward. Then, too late, they discovered that North Korean soldiers had been slipping through with the crowds of eeing civilians. Disguised as civilians themselves, with their weapons and uniforms hidden in backpacks, they were getting behind the American troops and cutting them off. Shefeld remembers seeing his commander with a loudspeaker telling everyone that they had been surrounded. I watched him get shot, he recalls quietly. The bridges behind them had been blown up, cutting off any escape. They were trapped as the enemy opened re and wiped out their front-line men. Well-camouaged North Korean troops looked like little bushes moving around in the rice paddies and hillsides. Looking to his left, he saw ve North Koreans with weapons aimed at him. Another ran up behind him and pushed a bayonet against his back. The North Koreans disarmed Shefeld and other prisoners, bound their hands with communication wire, and began moving them up through the line as the ghting continued. Along the way, Shefeld was shot in the leg by a sniper. Out of Shefelds entire division thousands of soldiers only about 700 were still alive. The North Koreans took them, along with several captured civilians missionaries, diplomats, war correspondents and priests and began moving north, toward Seoul, the capitol of South Korea. The North Korean Army had penetrated that far into South Korea. The next 11 days were a steady march north. That October 30, he recalls being in a corneld by the Yalu River and seeing the bodies of 300 American soldiers who had been executed in a tunnel several days earlier. As weeks passed into November, the weather grew colder, with temperature plummeting to 20 degrees at night. The men huddled together in tiny stick-mud huts to keep from freezing to death, but some died during the night, succumbing to the bitter cold. Those who died were taken outside the huts and left on the ground. Their bodies would be frozen solid by morning. Yet to come was the 100-mile death march. The North Koreans announced that any prisoners who fell behind would be shot. When one of the prisoners, Lt. Thornton, protested, he was summarily blindfolded and shot in the back of the head. After the Koreans machine-gunned everyone who was in the makeshift sickbay, the march commenced. Shefeld learned which weeds he could eat. He also ate grass, cornstalks and anything he could nd as they marched over icy roads through mountainous country. Inevitably, many became too sick to walk. Their friends carried them as far as possible, until an enemy soldier would decide it was time to shoot them. The dead men were left on the side of the road and covered over with snow. To Shefeld, it wasnt so much the possibility of dying that haunted him, as the thought of being tossed aside and left by the side of a road in the middle of a godforsaken no-mans-land. Before the march ended, another 105 men had died. The remaining men were crammed into tiny shacks to endure a bitter winter of below-zero temperatures. As many as 20 to 30 would be crammed into a room so small they could not all lie down at the same time. Some had to remain standing. About once a day, they were given one tennis-ball-sized clump of rice or millet to be passed around to the whole room. Those unfortunate enough to be at the back of the room got none. Throughout the bitter winter, another 300 men died of dysentery, starvation, exposure, or beriberi, a neural condition resulting from severe thiamine deciency, with symptoms including extreme muscle weakness and swelling of the legs. Shefeld saw men with legs swollen to three or four times their normal size. Once the swelling advanced up to the torso, it was usually fatal. Disease from contaminated food or water also claimed its share. Shefeld made up his mind to survive. He would stay in as good a shape as possible under the circumstances and he would live. When spring nally came, signaling the end of the deadly bitter cold and snow, and then the summer, there was heavy work detail involving pickaxes and shovels, but it kept Shefeld in better shape. He learned that it was imperative to quickly adjust to his surroundings. He learned to forget about the comfortable things back home and the good things to eat. He learned that a person could endure a great deal of punishment over extensive periods of time, if he kept his will to live and kept his nerve. He adjusted, he endured, he lived through three years of starvation, sleeping on hard rock oors in bitterly cold winters, and watching more and more of his friends and companions die. Upon his release three years later, his weight had dwindled from 170 pounds to less than 70. When an American General asked him if there was anything he wanted, he replied, Yes, sir. I would like to sleep in a bed one night and have an American meal. He is grateful to be one of the few who survived the three years of captivity, to be able to come home again and see the familiar sights of American airports and cities as he made his way to the familiar sights of his hometown, and nally, the faces of his family and friends that he had left behind. He still has scars from sleeping on rocky prison oors and bad memories that will never leave him. There are also memories of many, many friends and fellow soldiers who never made it home. On Memorial Day, we gather to honor those who didnt make it back, the ones who died in wars close at hand and halfway around the world, a long way from home. We also honor veterans like Ed Shefeld, who fought against an overwhelming enemy, survived against overwhelming odds, and lived to tell the story. It is a story of courage, loyalty and survival, and it is a story of unimaginable loss. It is one of many stories of why we observe Memorial Day. Ed Shefeld shares a harrowing story of the three years he spent as a POW of the North Korean Army. When Old Flags Retire: Flag Burning Ceremony Memorial Day A POWs Story: Ed Sheffield May 27, 2013

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8AMadison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013By Jacob Bembry Greene Publishing, Inc. Anyone who ever attended Greenville High School is welcomed to attend the high school reunion at the home of Richard and Lou Miller, located at 4741 NW US 221 in Greenville, next Saturday, June 8. The reunion is a great time for people to stop and get caught up with friends and discuss old times, old ball games and funny incidences involving teachers and classmates. The Millers will serve up a delicious barbecued meal to all of the guests. Greenville High School Reunion Set At Home of Richard and Lou Miller Joseph Morgan and George Pridgeon were members of the Greenville High School Class of 1963. Pridgeon allowed Greene Publishing, Inc. to borrow the annuals for the photos seen on these pages. Ruth Ann Warren Wheeler was the very rst majorette at the Greenville High School. She is shown, left, in a photo from 1958 with Nancy Harper Scarboro, center, and Valinda Andrews Williams, right.

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 The Greenville peewee football team in 1969 featured Frank Laney, an exceptional athlete who would be offered a football schola rship to the University of Florida but would not be able to attend due to injuries suffered in a car wreck and Frankie Carroll, who coached Madison County High School to a state football championship. Among the seniors in 1963 were Delbert and Brenda Blair. Delbert retired from the school system as a maintenance supervisor and Brenda was the mother of current Property Appraiser Leigh Bareld. She passed away at a young age. Homeroom mothers are shown in 1956, Mrs. Inez Warren and Mrs. Harvey Rye.

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SchoolMadison Enterprise-Recorder 10A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 Fran Hunt Special to Greene Publishing, Inc. The Aucilla Christian Academy middle school Lady Warriors wrapped up the season on a 6-2 record, after pulling victories out of their nal two games. The young Lady warriors hit the diamond against Maclay on April 2 and Aucilla came out on top of an 8-1 win. The young Lady Warriors had 16 at-bats, with three hits, and seven walks. Third baseman Ashlyn Rogers went two for three, with a single, ands a double. Shortstop Megan Scholl went one for three with one single. On the mound, Elizabeth Hightower faced 15 batters, striking out 11, and giving up one walk. On April 11, the young Lady Warriors hit the diamond and squared off against Trinity. In the nal game of the season, Aucilla knocked their opponent for an 8-2 ACA win. Aucilla had 21 at-bats, with seven hits, and seven walks. Center elder Camryn Grant led the hitting for the young Lady Warriors, going three for four, with three singles, and scoring three runs, on a total of nine stolen bases or passed balls. Rogers went one for one with a stand-up triple, and had two walks. Team catcher Cali Burkett, went one for three. Left elder Katie James went one for two. Pitcher Ramsey Sullivan went one for two at the dish. On the mound, Sullivan faced 25 batters, striking out 15, and giving up six walks. We had a great season and a team full of girls with great attitudes, said Assistant Coach Danny Deason.ACA Middle School Girls Wrap Up Season 6-2 Shannan Leutner is pictured with Joseph Gallegos, her date for the prom in Hamilton County, on Saturday, May 18. Shannan is the daughter of Debra Leutner of Lee and Greg Leutner of Killdeer, N.D. She is the maternal granddaughter of the late Louella Bembry and Bobby Bembry of Lee and the paternal granddaughter of Dot Leutner of Jennings and the late Charles Leutner. She is also the niece of Jacob, Danny and Abbie Bembry of Lee. Shannan Leutner Attends Hamilton County High Prom

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Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11A www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 Turn Back Time Way Back When Buried Treasures By Kristin FinneyGreene Publishing, Inc.Each week, Greene Publishing, Inc. will publish one of the many buried treasures found in our archives. These treasures might be pictures of people from the past, ads from the past or interesting stories long since forgotten. Keep an eye on our upcoming editions; you might be the next Buried Treasure. From the December 8, 1995 Enterprise Recorder. AtMadison First Baptist ChurchSubmitted By Judy PhillipsGuest ColumnistChurchMay 28, 1943Nest Sunday night, at nine oclock, Rev. Russell Williams will preach the graduation sermon to a class of seven members from Lee School. A car of Tom Watson watermelons, rst of the season of that variety, brought $1500 at Groveland Saturday. There was 900 melons in the car and they averaged 22 lbs. each. Cpl. W.F. Brown of Ft. Benning, Ga., spent Sunday here with Mrs. Brown. Mrs. W.L. Jones was a business visitor in Madison Saturday and Tuesday. May 22, 1953Mr. and Mrs. Truman Cruce are announcing the arrival of a baby boy, born May 21, at Archbold Hospital in Thomasville, Ga. Mr. and Mrs. J. Mack Clark, of Jacksonville, were weekend visitors of Mrs. Clarks mother, Mrs. R.V. Dial. Mr. and Mrs. Graham V. Wheeler announce the birth of a daughter, born Sunday, May 17, at the local hospital. The baby was named Dorothy Ann. Mrs. J.J. Newman spent the weekend in Starke with her daughter, Mrs. Audrey Newman. May 24, 1963The new building at Suwannee River Junior College will be dedicated Sundy afternoon, May 26, at 4:30 p.m. with appropriate ceremonies. Mr. and Mrs. Bobby Whitty, and son Bruce, of Marianna, spent last weekend with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.B. Whitty. Mrs. E.B. Williams is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. L.L. McMullen and Lewis fr several days. The NFJC Student Council held a dance Friday evening for the college students in the Student Center. The church ofce hours are 8:30 a. m. 4:30 p.m., Monday Friday. The ofce phone number is 973-2547 or you can reach the church secretary by email at 1stbaptistofce@gmail.com. We also have a website, madisonfbc.net, that is regularly updated. Our pastor can be reached at gabekrell@yahoo.com. Jim Carey, our music minister can be reached at muzicman123@gmail.com. After the prelude, welcome and prayer, Bro. Jim led us in a time of praise and worship. We honored our graduates during this time. Honorees included Mikeshia Arnold, Connor Ginn, Bud Hall, Alisann Parks all from Madison County High School; Brooke Kinsley and Josh Woods from Aucilla Christian Academy; Kelsey McGriff, FSU; Cheltsie Kinsley, NFCC; and Kristin Finney, Valdosta State University. CONGRATULATIONS to all of these GRADUATES! The children, preschool-grade 2, were dismissed to childrens worship. We appreciate the faithfulness of those volunteers who lead this group each week. The worship choir sang a song, Whispering Hope, Wonderful Peace Medley, in memory of Bro. Jims Grandmother. It was a tting tribute. The title for this weeks sermon was The Fire. Bro. Gabe challenged the graduates and congregation with verses from 2 Timothy 2:14-15 NKJV Remind them of these things, charging them before the Lord not to strive about words to no prot, to the ruin of the hearers. Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth. We need to remember that Paul was writing to his son in the faith and wanting to remind him of some important truths. Bro. Gabe compared out lives to being a torch. Each life is a solitary ame from God to parents and then to us. Set a re in your life. Burn down self. Keep the main thing, the main thing! Dont get caught up in meaningless debates. Be a diligent worker for God so you wont have to be ashamed when presenting yourself before God. Study so you can rightly divide or accurately interpret the Word of God. Fish Fry to honor the Senior Men/Ladies Sunday school classesThe Outdoorsmen SS Class is hosting a sh fry for the senior men/ladies Sunday school classes. The event will be held at the church fellowship hall on Thursday, May 30th at noon. Please respond to the church ofce or to Archie & Patsy Davis at 971-5779, if you are going to attend. Disciple Now Weekend ~ June 28-30...The Disciple Now Retreat will be held at Cherry Lake for students grade 6 through college. Guest speakers and lots of wonderful activities for those attending are in the making. Cost and further information will be announced at a later date. Mark your calendars. Mothers Day Offering The Florida Baptist Childrens Homes have worked since 1904 to provide safe, stable Christian homes for boys and girls who have been neglected, abandoned, orphaned and abused. Please join in our goal to create a world were no child is left alone. Throughout the month of May you will have the opportunity to give beyond your local tithe to support this ne organization. Thank youfrom Les Parks for all the support he and the team have received from First Baptist. It is with this support that they are able to help get the camp ready for the children in Alaska. It is a great opportunity for which he is grateful. Please keep this group in your prayers that they may have Gods hand of protection over them and lives may be changed. When you read this, the team still has another week in Alaska. Do your part daily through prayer support. As a side note, David and Christy Bass Adams and Carter are serving with this group. Christy grew up in First Baptist. First Baptist Choirs ~ Yard Sale ~ Saturday, June 29th.The Sanctuary and JOY choirs are holding a large yard sale from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. for the purpose of raising money for the purchase of new music. We need items to be donated for the yard sale. Nows a good time to clean out some of your gently used clutter and put these items to good use. Remember, One mans trash is another mans treasure. Bro. Gabe issued a challenge to the graduates and the rest of us to read the Bible through. Heres the plan: First, get a good study Bible and one that you dont mind highlighting. Begin reading ve chapters a week in the New Testament and whenever your study Bible refers back to an Old Testament book, highlight that verse in the New and Old Testaments. By doing this highlighting, you will have referenced the most Old Testament books quoted: Genesis, Deuteronomy, Psalms, and Isaiah. Finish reading the New Testament then read the Old Testament through the lens of the New Testament. Will you take the challenge? See you Sunday morning for Sunday school at 9:45 a.m. where we have classes for nursery through senior adults. Worship begins at 11:00 a.m. when we will honor the Lord with songs of praise, prayers, offerings, and the spoken word.

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$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrun, c MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE FOR RENT FOR RENT HELP WANTED HELP WANTEDwww.greenepublishing.com SERVICES Classifieds . .12AMadison Enterprise-Recorder Friday, May 24, 2013 Classifieds Classifieds Work Work$12 $12(for 20 words or less)Wednesday and Friday Wednesday and Friday and on the website and on the websiteDeadline For Classieds 3:00 p.m. Every MondayCall 850-973-4141 FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAM STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 5/20/2013 THROUGH 5/26/2013Pageant and Prom Dresses For Sale: Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves, buttons around neck with circular cut-out on back, beautiful gown $100. Size 8 Teen Dress Light baby blue dress with baby blue and black array of designs from the waist down. The top is a gathered bodice with black sequins crisscrossed across the front. Has a beautiful train. $175. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200. Size 6-8 Teen Dress A turquoise dress that has sequined straps that criss cross across the back. The dress is also sequined in the stomach area and is made out of mesh material. Also has a beautiful long train in the back. $75. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, owing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful owing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250. Size 10 Teen Dress bright baby blue dress, halter top bodice with sequins stitched throughout; built-in crinoline with sequin appliques on lace overlay. Cinderella looking beautiful dress! $200.Call Emerald Greene (850) 973-3497 and leave a message.3/3, run, n/c Deadline for Classieds Every Monday and Wednesday 3 p.m. Sago Palms For Sale Call (850)-464-2239.6/27 rtn, n/c Ofce Building For Rent Across the street from the Courthouse, on Shelby Street. (between Owens Propane and Burnette Plumbing) Newly Renovated 1120 square foot. Call Emerald Greene 850-973-41417/18 rtn n/c New ve bedroom three bath doublewide home must go now. Make offer. Selling below cost! Call Steve 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cYes we take trades! Replace your old home with a more efcient and much stronger safer home now. Call 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cNow is the best time to buy a new mobile home! Low rates means new homes under $400 month! 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cStop throwing money away! Our new homes cost less than $100 month to heat and cool! Call Steve 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cNice triplewide, replace, glamour bath, sliding glass doors, new metal roof. Must sell now. Reduced to only $22,900 cash. 386-365-8549.11/7 rtn, cBlow out pricing on all 2012 mobile homes. Making room for new 2013 homes. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c2013 Homes of Merit tape and texture starting at $375 per month. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, cUsed single wide 16x80 3 bedroom 2 bath home ready to go at $15,900. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c2006 Fleetwood home. Super clean and looks brand new. Call Mike at 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, cNew and used homes starting as low as $6,500 on doublewides. Call Mike 386-623-4218.11/7 rtn, c For Sale 99 Black GMC Sonoma for sale by owner. $3,600. Call (850) 464-7544.11/14 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, c Deadline For Classieds (850) 973-4141 3:00 p.m. Every MondayYou Can Be A CNA Quest training offers a CNA prep class taught by a RN No GED or diploma required if age 18. No TABE test. Professional, high pass rates, day and evening classes. 386-362-1065.5/1 5/29, pd REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNERGreenville, 3/2 nice house on 6 high and dry city lots. New windows, roof, heat & ac, siding, master shower. $92,000.00 Possible owner nancing. 850-599-5121.1/18 rtn, cNear Lloyd; 3/3 double wide. Very nice with lots of tile and hardwood, replace, skylight, screenroom, carport, workshop on 5 beautiful acres with live stream, woods and fenced pasture. Asking $129k, possible owner nancing. 850-599-5121.1/18 rtn, c Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed. Must be a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, and be able to get along with an entire ofce staff. Must have good personality, love to talk on the telephone, and a valid drivers license. Apply in person only at Greene Publishing, Incs newspaper ofce, located at 1695 South SR 53, in Madison.3/15 rtn, n/c1/4 inch coat galvanized steel cable for sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.4/10 rtn, n/cMan of many trades and talents available for hire. Honest, reliable, creative, and reasonable/fair pricing. Specializes in custom deck building, sheds, fencing, special projects. Can also do pressure washing, and gardening (tree trimmings, ower beds, grooming seasonal shrubs and trees etc.) If interested, please Call John at 850-673-9192. References available.5/1 rtn, n/cDental Assistant: Golden Opportunity! Do you possess a sunny, friendly attitude? Can you talk with customers easily and help them feel at home? Do you have a beautiful smile? Is cosmetics important to you along with helping others? Our dental practice is seeking an outstanding individual to provide concierge level service for our patients in the clinical area. Dental or medical experience a plus but not mandatory. If you have a friendly can-doattitude, a great work ethic, you are organized, and self motivated with a good sense of humor, then Call 888-486-2408 to hear a message with more details about the position and instructions on how to apply for this position.5/10 rtn, cAMCS is seeking a Full-time Assistant Property for an apartment community in Madison, Florida. Requirements Must have at least three years of property management experience. Knowledgeable in Affordable Housing Have excellence written and oral communication skills Onesite and Opts experience is a plus Candidates must be able to pass a back ground check. We offer competitive wages based on experience. Insurance, 401K, and Gas mileage reimbursement. Equal Opportunity Employer Please send resume to Execasst@amcs-inc.com.5/15, 5/22, c Concrete Finishers & General Laborers (Temporary/Seasonal) needed for construction project in Madison. Please call (386) 496-3883 to apply. Equal Opportunity Employer.5/15, 5/22, pdJames Madison Preparatory High School is accepting applications for teachers and an administrative assistant for the 2013-14 school year. Visit www.jmphs.org for full more information.5/15, 5/22, c Van Driver needed part time/on call Experienced driver with a clear MVR to drive our residents to appointments. Certied Nursing Assistant preferred with CPR Certication. Will train the right candidate. Drug screen and level 2 background check required. Apply in person 8:30 am 4:00 pm. EOE, F/M/D/V Madison Health and Rehabilitation Center 2481 West US 90 Madison, Fl. 32340 850-973-4880.5/22, 5/29, c Education MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Ofce Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888) 374-7294. Help Wanted Driver Two raises in rst year. Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. 3 months OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualied drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com EOE. Homes for Rent Buy 1-3bd Homes From $1000/mo! PreForeclosured and Rent2OWN Homes! Bad Credit OK! Only 500 Credit Score Min! To learn more and access local listings call 1-866-955-0621. Miscellaneous MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE TRAIN ONLINE FOR ALLIED HEALTH AND MEDICAL MANAGEMENT. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. COMPUTER AND FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. SCHEV AUTHORIZED. CALL 888-203-3179 WWW.CENTURAONLINE.C OM Attend College Online 100%. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, *Web. Job placement assistance. Computer and Financial Aid for qualied students. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualied Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769. AIRLINE CAREERS Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualied Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769.

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www.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A ----Legals---5/17, 5/24 5/17, 5/24 5/17, 5/24

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14AMadison Enterprise-Recorderwww.greenepublishing.com Friday, May 24, 2013 DURMAX TURBO DIESEL, ALLISON AUTO TRANS. LOCKING REAR DIFF., SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, Z-71 OFF ROAD, TRAILER TOW, REAR VISION CAMERAOVER $9000 DISCOUNT!MSRP $53,020 DISCOUNT -$9,107 7 PASS. SEATING SOUTH GEORGIA NORTH FLORIDA RAM TRUCK HEADQUARTERSOVER 100 NEW RAM TRUCKS TO CHOOSE FROM!!! 31 MPG 39 MPG CHEVY & GM TRUCK OWNERS(1999 & NEWER)SAVE ANOTHER$1500ON 1500 SILVERADO 7 PASS. SEATING 2013 RAM 1500 LARAMIE 4 DOOR Q130081 2013 DODGE DART2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVANV130277 V1300642013 DODGE JOURNEYV130168 Q37475.7L HEMI, Auto, Heated Leather Buckets, Remote Start 20 Chrome Wheels Rear Back-up CameraMSRP $42,665 DISCOUNT $6,752 2013 RAM 2500 4 DOOR 4X4All prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Military Rebate $500 bonus cash: to all active military & 20 year retired military. 2013 Truck of the Year per Motor Trend Magazine, Jan. 2013. Highway MPG per window factory sticker. Vehicles may be located at either of our Quitman or Valdosta dealerships. All prices good through May 25, 2013 or until vehicle is sold, whichever comes first. 2013 TRUCK OF THE YEAR!Q130148 CASS BURCH 36 MPG 39 MPG ALL STAR EDITION18 WHEELSSPRAY-IN BEDLINERMSRP $35,190 DISCOUNT -$7,777 C130118 2013 SILVERADO 1500 C130146 All prices plus tax, title & Lemon Law fee of $3 and reflect all applicable factory rebates. Owner Loyalty Bonus Cash Applies On All 2013 Chevy 1500 Silverados. Must provide proof of registration, on a 1999 or newer Chevy or GMC truck. USAA rebate requires proof of USAA membership. Highway mpg per factory window sticker. SOUTH GEORGIA VOTED US BEST OVERALL BUSINESS! COME SEE WHYFIND NEW ROADS C130041ALL STAR EDITION Z71 OFF-ROADSPRAY-IN BEDLINERMSRP $37,170 DISCOUNT $8,757 2013 SILVERADO LT 1500 X-CAB Z-71 4X4 C1301302013 CHEVY CRUZE LT 2013 CHEVY SONIC MSRP $28,205 Discount $6,208 C130046 USAA MEMBERS SAVE ANOTHER$750ON ALL CHEVYS! 2013 SILVERADO LT 2500 HD CREW CAB Z-71 4X4C130080 41 MPGC130054 SPRAY-IN BEDLINER ALREADY INSTALLED IN EVERY TRUCK! 2013 CHEVY TAHOE LTC130199 YOU HAVE A CHOICE, EVERYBODY KNOWS CHEVYS COST LESS IN QUITMAN! Best Placeto buy a New Truck2013 Best Overall Business2013 2013 SILVERADO LT 3500 HD CREW CAB 4X4 32 MPG 2013 CHEVY EQUINOXC130151 8029241.4L ECOTEC ENGINEMY LINK, REAR VISION CAMERA, ENHANCEDSAFETY PACKAGE.V130109 2013 CHRYSLER 200AUTOMATICP/WINDOWS P/LOCKS, A/C TILT & CRUISE888-304-2277 888-463-6831801 E. SCREVEN ST QUITMAN 4164 N. VALDOSTA RD. VALDOSTAPrices good through May 25, 2013 or until vehicle is sold whichever comes first.COME SEE WHYSOUTH GEORGIA VOTED US BEST PLACE TO BUY A NEW TRUCK! 2013 DODGE CHALLENGER V1301182012 RAM 1500 4 DOOR 2013 RAM 1500 V1300954.7L V-8 Auto, P/W/L,Mirrors A/C, Tilt & Cruise, Spray-In BedlinerMSRP $30,890 DISC. -$6,977 GET A WORLD-FAMOUS ROCKER WITH EVERY VEHICLE PURCHASED!THEYRE BACK! 2013 DODGE CHARGER Q130251 2013 CHRYSLER 300V130046 2013 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRYV130141 Loaded! Power Windows, Locks & Doors, NAV, DVD, Rearview Camera, Leather Buckets, Bluetooth & More! THEYRE BACK!GET A WORLDFAMOUS ROCKER WITH EVERY VEHICLE PURCHASED! 8640 HWY 84 WEST2013 IMPALA LT FIND NEW ROADS