Group Title: Madison enterprise-recorder.
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00411
 Material Information
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate Title: Madison enterprise recorder
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Madison enterprise-recorder
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison, Fla.
Madison Fla
Publication Date: December 25, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028405
Volume ID: VID00411
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
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* From Our Famil To Yc


www.greenepublishing.com


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E~nterptieeitlveor;Er


Our 145th Year, Number 19


MPD

Investigator

Graduates

From University
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Ben Ebberson,
sergeant investigator with
the Madison Police De-
partment, recently re-
Ii I x ceived his Bachelor of
Science degree in Crimi-
nal Justice from Florida
Gulf Coast University
Ebberson said that he
had worked for several
years to get the bachelor's
degree.
Ben Ebberson "I did it to help me be-
come a better police officer
so I can better help serve and protect the people of Madi-
son," he said.
In addition to his job with the MPD, Ebberson is
Please see Ebberson, Page 4A



Bern Smith


Retiring


From USDA


Friday, December 25, 2009


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460 + 44 Tax=SUj

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www.greenepublishing.com
Madison, Florida


Sheriff Praises

Register At Retirement


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, December 23, 2009
Sheriff Ben Stewart presented Sgt. Freddie Register a handsome plaque recognizing his years of dis-
tinguished service with the Madison County Sheriff's Office. Pictured left to right are: Sheriff Ben Stewart,
Kathy Register, Alan Register, Sergeant Freddie Register and April Register.


Sergeant Freddie Register has served the Madi-
son County Sheriff's Office for 18 years. Prior to that,
he headed up the Lee Police Department. Through-
out those years, he has established a reputation for
getting the job done right, building a mountain of re-
spect in the process. In fact, while speaking at his re-
tirement lunch held on Dec. 23, Sheriff Ben Stewart
playfully asked him to reconsider.
Stewart acknowledged how much Register has
meant to the department. "Will you reconsider?" the


Sheriff said.
Stewart went on to say how much Register would
be missed, wishing only the best for him and his fam-
ily in retirement.
Lunch was catered by O'Neals, and accompanied
by four ten-layer masterpieces baked in his honor by
members and friends of the department.
His lovely wife, Kathy and children Alan and
April, who is currently a dispatcher with the depart-
ment, joined Register at the celebration.


Two


Representative


Vehicles Bembry Pays Tribute


Photo submitted by USDA Soil Conservation Service
Bern Smith is pictured next to the cake at his
retirement party held Friday. Dec. 11.
Born L 11an i 1 t'i 0I ial : sinaill l far ln i e:-
Johns.to\ n. Penns yl:vnia. Bern moiel -Ito Florli
il1a \ l\n hi- \e\a- sevntlleell I hec iI:ul il not heIlp
\\here he \\- L:b rn bit ,iv':ild1l 1: -s:o l inethnlll
aL:oIt \"here he liv\eI It \"as swil that \"hen he
in i\il- lhe i I pro\ l Lioth pla:i, e
He g:raidtI: lua t'i'Iom t he Lit\ n i sty oi So uth
Flor i:la \ iltli BA ilde:ee in Bo:tan:n He ji:oinl
the LIS Na\ and se-rved fo-l ur te:,ars a:, a QOu:arter-
nma-str L assisanl:nt tr tlhe Na\ lato:r ii nLa:Ial :an
i ovan z1iin utLoaL t hoimei pirtLIel in Mai port
After Linel hiino:irabli\ iish-larzed fromli:i tlhe
Na lie: attended thie Uini\ersity [o Florila
Lradiuatin2 \\ irl a NLak:.-te-r it' Si'enCe in A'rL'oino.
mn \%i lth a minor in Soil S'lei'i He : i'inunil
to serL\e -h i oiiuntrL' in thle Li S ALi Rr n LR e.
anil after 22. ei: ars renl aS a Sierian First
Please see Bern Smithnili. Page 4


.rasn


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Two drivers escaped
injury in an automobile
accident on Sunday Dec.
20, at approximately 6:30
a.m. at the intersection of
County Road 53 and Win-
quepin Street.
According to a Flori-
da Highway Patrol report,
Elva Ochoa, 41, was travel-
ing south in a 1996 Buick
on CR 53 at a slow rate of
speed, looking to make a
left turn onto SE Win-
quipin Street.
Jerry Inmon, 60, was
approaching Ochoa's
Buick in his own 2008 Vol-
vo.
Inmon attempted to
overtake Ochoa, who
struck his vehicle as it was
passing.
The area of impact
took place in the north
travel lane.
Ochoa's Buick came
to rest on the west shoul-
der.
Inmon's Volvo crossed
SE Winquepin Street and
entered the east shoulder.
Inmon then crossed the
north and south travel
lane, coming to a final rest
on the west shoulder.
FHP Trooper Billy
Ernst was the investigat-
ing officer.


To Mayor Kinsey
Mayor Ernestine Kin-
sey was recently recog-
nized in a dedication at -
Lee City Hall, where a new
meeting room that bears --
her name was dedicated
in her honor. Adding tos
that recognition, State
Representative Leonard
Bembry issued a special
tribute from the Florida
House of Representatives,
expressing congratula-
tions and praise for her ex-
emplary service to the
community
"I have received your
invitation to the Dedica-
tion Ceremony and I
deeply regret that I will
not be able to attend the
Ernestine E. Kinsey Hall Photo submitted
Dedication today due to a State Representative Leonard Bembry issues a
prior commitment in tribute to Lee Mayor Ernestine Kinsey for her years of
Franklin County Howev- dedicated service to the "Little but Proud" community.
er, I do want to take this
time to congratulate you on your many accomplishments over the past fifteen years
as the Mayor of the Town of Lee and look forward to working with you for many
more years," Bembry stated.
"What an honor to have the meeting room extension to the Lee City Hall dedi-
cated in your name. This is a reflection of your hard work and dedication to the com-
munity known as the "Little But Proud" Town of Lee," he added.
"I would like to present you with the enclosed 'Tribute' in your honor. As your
State Representative, I want to thank you for working tirelessly to make the Town of
Lee a better place for all," he went on to say
Bembry, the representative for District 10 that includes Madison County, echoed
the sentiments of the Mayor's colleagues, family and friends throughout Madison
County


In


1 Section, 14 Pages
Around Madison 6A Outdoors 11A
Turn Back Time 9A Junior Auxilary 7A
Classifieds 12A Legals 13A
Auto Directory 10A Church 8A


.lto pyrig iteU IViaIti Ia
as Cundirmfiarl r-nntant


J y IIUICLLm U m V.il iL -II
Available from Commercial News Providers"


ap* ..





www. reenepublishin,.cor


2A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Uiicpoints & Opinions


Friday, December 25, 2009


One Of My

Parents' Gifts
Other than love and security, the gift that my
parents gave me that I appreciate more than any-
thing is instilling in me a love of reading.
As a youngster, I devoured books. I remember
when Wilmer Bassett, who was my father's boss, got
the bookmobile to come to our neighborhood. He did
it because he knew that I loved to read. My father
had to work on Saturdays and my mother didn't dri-
ve, so the library was out of the question but the
bookmobile was a library on wheels.
Every other Saturday, I would wait with great
anticipation for the world to bring itself to my
neighborhood. I met many people because of that
bookmobile. It was there that I met George Wash-
ington, John Kennedy, the Roosevelts, Dwight Eisen-
hower and innumerable other people I read about. I
made friends with fictional characters, such as Tom
Sawyer, Huck Finn and the Hardy Boys. Sports he-
roes stepped off the pages. Babe Ruth swatted home-
runs. Joe Namath threw touchdown passes. Lou
Gehrig, the "Iron Man of Baseball," was a champion
in his sport but lost his battle to the muscular disor-
der that bears his name. Rocky Marciano knocked
out his opponents and Rocky Graziano, another box-
er, proclaimed, "Somebody up there likes me."
I still love to read. Whenever I treat myself to a
gift, it is usually either a book or something that has
to do with the computer. The computer has also
opened up worlds of other books for me. One of my
favorite websites, if not my very favorite, is
www.archive.org. There, I find many books in the
public domain. Last night (Monday evening), I found
a book entitled The Story of the Other Wise Man.
Written by Henry van Dyke, it is the story of the un-
known fourth wise man, who gets delayed and does-
n't make it in time to see the newborn King. There
are also many other books, including classic novels,
biographies, self-help books, etc. In addition, there
is also music, movies and TV shows which are in
the public domain and available for free download.
One of the gifts that my parents gave me was
the love of reading. I thank God for my mother
teaching me to read and I thank God for my father
teaching me to love to read biographies and history
It is a great Christmas gift!
Merry Christmas.

S lori4a Press Associ


2008
Award Winning Newspaper

'Che fabison

Entctptie-Recorter

P.O. Box 772 Madison, FL 32341
1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32340
(850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121
greenepub@greenepublishing.com
www.greenepublishing.com

Publisher Classified and
Emerald Greene Legal Ads
Laura Little
Editor Deadline for classified
Jacob Bembry is Monday at 3 p.m.
Production Manager Deadline for
Heather Bowen legal advertisements is
Wednesday at 5 p.m.
Staff Writer There will be a $3 charge
Michael Curtis for affidavits.
Graphic Designers Circulation
Stephen Bochnia Department
and Dee Hall Sheree Miller and
Bobbi Light
Advertising Sales Bobbi Light
Representatives Subscription Rates:
Mary Ellen Greene, In-County $35
Dorothy McKinney Out-of-County $45
and Jeanette Dunn (State & local
taxes included)


-Since 1865-
"Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity."
Zhe flabison Enterprise-Recorter
Madison Recorder established 1865
New Enterprise established 1901
Consolidated June 25, 1908
Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S
SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at
Madison Post Office 32340. Publication No. 177.400.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison
Enterprise-Recorder, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any adver-
tisement, news matter or subscriptions that, in the opinion of
the management, will not be for the best interest of the coun-
ty and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate
any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publi-
cation in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6
months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Pub-
lishing Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


Why JESUS is

Better Than

Santa Claus
Santa lives at the North Pole ...
JESUS is everywhere.
Santa rides in a sleigh ...
JESUS rides on the wind and walks on the
water.
Santa comes but once a year ...
JESUS is an ever present help.
Santa fills your stockings with goodies ...
JESUS supplies all your needs.
Santa comes down your chimney uninvited ...
JESUS stands at your door and knocks, and
then enters your heart when invited.
You have to wait in line to see Santa ...
JESUS is as close as the mention of His name.
Santa lets you sit on his lap ...
JESUS lets you rest in His arms.
Santa has a belly like a bowl full of jelly ...
JESUS has a heart full of love.
All Santa can offer is HO HO HO ...
JESUS offers health, help and hope.
Santa says "You better not cry" ...
JESUS says "Cast all your cares on me,
for I care for you."
Santa's little helpers make toys ...
JESUS makes new life, mends wounded hearts,
repairs broken homes and builds mansions.
Santa is a "jolly old elf'
JESUS is the King of Kings
Santa may make you chuckle but ...
JESUS gives you joy that is your strength.
While Santa puts gifts under your tree ...
JESUS became our gift and died on a tree.


rYou IMnow i'Ve

RBeen Tlning
Sheree Miller
Columniist





www.greenepublishin. cor


Friday, December 25, 2009


Uicmpoints & Opinions


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A


T iii-
_ st~7 I


Courtesy of
northpolesantaclaus.com
Santa Claus hasn't al-
ways looked like the jolly
old fellow we know today
Like so many other Ameri-
can traditions, he's a prod-
uct of the great American
melting pot a blend of
many different cultures
and customs. His earliest
ancestors date back to pre-
Christian days, when sky-
riding gods ruled the earth.
The mythological charac-
ters Odin, Thor, and Saturn
gave us the basis for many
of Santa's distinctive char-
acteristics.
But the most influen-
tial figure in the shaping of
today's generous as loving
Santa Claus was a real
man. St. Nicholas of Myra
(now Turkey), a fourth cen-
tury bishop. As a champion
of children and the needy
he was legendary for his
kindness and generosity
A Tradition Of
Benevolence
In a well known story
illustrating St, Nicholas'
benevolence, we find two of
the basic principles of the
holiday spirit giving to
others and helping the less
fortunate as well as the
tradition of hanging stock-
ings by the fireplace.
According to this leg-
end, there were three Ital-
ian maidens whose
families had fallen on hard
times. Because their father
could not afford the
dowries necessary for them
to marry he was consider-
ing selling one of his
daughters into slavery to
get dowries for the other
two. When the good saint
heard of the family's plight,
he went to their home late
one night and anonymous-
ly tossed three bags of gold
down the chimney Miracu-
lously a bag fell into each of
the sisters stockings, were
hanging by the fire to dry
His kindhearted gift made
it possible for all three sis-
ters to marry
A variation of this sto-
ry is that as each girl was
ready to wed, St. Nicholas
came in the middle of the
night when no one could
see him and tossed a bag of
gold through an open win-
dow into her stocking. The
idea of gifts being delivered
through an open window
may have begun as a way to
explain how Santa enters
homes that have no chim-
ney
Patron Saint
Because of his wisdom
and sensitivity many
groups claimed St.
Nicholas as their patron
saint. Children, orphans,
sailors, and even thieves of-
ten prayed to the compas-
sionate saint for guidance
and protection. Entire
countries, including Russia
and Greece, also adopted
him as their patron saint,
as well as students and
pawnbrokers.
Throughout his life, St.
Nicholas tried to help oth-


ers while inspiring the to
imitate his virtues. Leg-
ends of his unselfish giving
spread all over Northern
Europe, and accounts of
his heroic deeds blended
with regional folklore.
Eventually, the image of
the stately saint was trans-
formed onto an almost
mystical being, one known
for rewarding the good and
punishing the bad.
The date of his death,
December 6th, was com-
memorated with an annual
feast, which gradually
came to mark the begin-
ning of the medieval
Christmas season. On St.
Nicholas' Eve, youngsters
would set out food for the
saint, straw for his horses
and schnapps for his atten-
dant. The next morning,
obedient children awoke to
find their gifts replaced
with sweets and toys, found
their offering untouched ,
along with a rod or a bun-
dle of switched. St.
Nicholas' Day is still ob-
served in many countries,
and gifts are exchanged in
honor of the spirit of
brotherhood and charity
that he embodied.
The Making Of Santa
Claus
After the Protestant
Reformation in the six-
teenth century the feasting
and veneration of Catholic
saints were banned. But
people had become accus-
tomed to the annual visit
from their gift-giving saint
and didn't want to forget
the purpose of the holiday
So in some countries, the
festivities of St. Nicholas'
Day were merged with
Christmas celebrations,
and although the gift-bear-
er took on new, non-reli-
gious forms, he still
reflected the saints gener-
ous spirit.
In Germany he ap-
peared as Weihnachts-
mann, in England as
Father Christmas, and in
France, as Pere Noel, who
left small gifts in the chil-
dren's shoes.
In the areas where St.
Nicholas was still por-
trayed as the gift-bearer, a
host of other characters de-
veloped to be his assistants.
Two of his most well-
known helpers were
Knecht Ruprecht and the
Belsnickle. Depending on
the local tradition, they
were either attendants to
St. Nicholas or gift-bears
themselves, but in all cases,
both were fearsome charac-
ters, brandishing rods and
switches. It was not only
their dusty to reward good
children but also to reprove
children who were naughty
and couldn't recite their
prayers.
Knecht Ruprecht
(meaning Servant Rupert)
was also by other names
such as Black Peter (so
called because he delivered
the presents down the
chimney for St. Nicholas
and became blackened


with soot).
In some places, the im-
ages, of Knecht Ruprecht
and St. Nicholas merged to
form Ru Klaus (meaning
Rough Nicholas so named
because of his rugged ap-
pearance), Aschen Klaus
(meaning Ash Nicholas -
because he carried a sack
of ashes as well as a bundle
of switches), and Pelznick-
le (meaning Furry
Nicholas referring to his
fur clad appearance).
Not all of St. Nicholas'
companions were frighten-
ing. In fact, the Christkindl
(meaning Christ Child)
was thought to accompany
him in many countries. Of-
ten portrayed by a fair-
haired young girl, this
angelic figure was some-
times the gift-bearer too.
Santa In America
Immigrants to the
New World brought along
their various beliefs when
they crossed the Atlantic.
The Scandinavians intro-
duced gift-giving elves, the
Germans brought not only
their Belsnickle and
Chistkindle but also their
decorated trees and the
Irish contributed the an-
cient Gaelic custom of plac-
ing a lighted candle in the
window.
In the 1600's, the Dutch
presented Sinterklaas
(meaning St. Nicholas) to
the colonies. In their excite-
ment, many English-speak-
ing children uttered the
name so quickly that Sin-
terklaas sounded like Santy
Claus. After years of mis-
pronunciation, the name
evolved into Santa Claus.
In 1808, American au-
thor Washington Irving
created a new version of
old St. Nick. This one rode
over the treetops in a horse
drawn wagon "dropping
gifts down the chimneys of
his favorites." In his satire,
Diedrich Knickerbocker's
History of New York from
the Beginning of the World
to the End of the Dutch Dy-
nasty Irving described San-
ta as a jolly Dutchman who
smoked a long stemmed
clay pipe and wore baggy
breeches and a broad
brimmed hat. Also, the fa-
miliar phrase, "...laying his
finger beside his nose...,"
first appeared in Irving's
story
That phrase was used
again in 1822 in the now-
classic poem by Dr.
Clement Clarke Moore, "A
Visit from St. Nicholas,"
more commonly know as
"The Night Before Christ-
mas." His verse gave an
Arctic flavor to Santa's im-
age when he substituted
eight tiny reindeer and a
sleigh for Irving's horse
and wagon. It is Moore's de-
scription of Santa that we
most often think of today:
"He had a broad face, and a
little round belly that
shook, when he laughed,
like a bowl full of jelly"
Up to this point, San-
ta's physical appearance


and the color of his suit
were open to individual in-
terpretation. Then in 1863,
Thomas Nast, a German
immigrant, gave us a visu-
al image of the cheerful
giver that was to later be-
come widely accepted.
When Nast was asked
to illustrate Moore's
charming verse for a book
of children's poems, he
gave us a softer, kinder San-
ta who was still old but ap-
peared less stern than the
ecclesiastical St. Nicholas.
He dressed his elfin figure
in red and endowed him
with human characteris-
tics. Most important of all,
Nast gave Santa a home at
the North Pole. For twenty-
three years, his annual
drawings in Harpers Week-
ly magazine allowed Amer-
icans to peek into the
magical world of Santa
Claus and set the stage for
the shaping of today's mer-
ry gentleman.
Artist Haddon Sund-
blom added the final touch-
es to Santa's modern image.
Beginning in 1931, his bill-
board and other advertise-
ments for Coca Cola-Cola
featured a portly grandfa-
therly Santa with human
proportions and a ruddy
complexion. Sunblom's ex-
uberant, twinkle-eyed San-
ta firmly fixed the
gift-giver's image in the
public mind.
St. Nicholas' evolution
into today's happy larger-
than-life Santa Claus is a
wonderful example of the
blending of countless be-
liefs and practices from
around the world. This
benevolent figure encom-
passes all the goodness and
innocence of childhood.
And because goodness is
his very essence, in every
kindness we do, Santa will
always be remembered.


Merry Christmas
Before I offer glad tidings today, I must break my
patience of not writing Lee News and offer condo-
lences, to both the Greene and the Bembry families
on the loss of their loved ones recently.
I have been associated with the Greene family
professionally since Tommy put me on staff many
years ago and know they are a loving, close-knit
family and to lose one so young is very hard.
With the Bembry family, I'm more closely con-
nected. Jacob's grandfather Gene was my stepfa-
ther's brother and Bobby was named for him. Also
Carlton was a close personal friend of my family. He
and my children grew up as pals and he and his wife
Brenda always spent time with us when they were in
town and were guests at daughter Joan's in Atlanta
often, especially when we were there.
And now I will simply say, 'Make sure Santa can
make it down your chimney' and have a safe but
Merry Christmas!
r -- -- -- -- -- -- -- ----- n

Fill out the form below and send it in to:

Greene Publishing, Inc.
P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341
With money order or check payment
made out to Greene Publishing, Inc. in the
amount for the In or Out-of-County rate

W $35 In County $45 Out-of-County

Name:
Address:

SCity:
I State: Zip:
Phone:


I!
P GREENER I



C Publishing, Inc.,
L---------------- _J


FLORIDA COOKN1'

wMU st<^


* Recipes
* Cleaning, Preparing &
Storing Wild Game
* Curing & Smoking
* Making Sausage &
Bologna
* Microwave Cooking
* Glossary
* Equivalents
* Substitutions
* Weights & Measures
* Can Sizes
* Herbs & Spices
* Helpful Cooking Hints
* Helpful Household Hints
* Detailed Drawing
On How To Build & Use
Your Own Water
Oven/ Smoker


Get your copy at
Madison Sporting Goods
in Madison, FLorida
Jackson's Drug Store
in Greenville, FLorida
Studstill Lumber
in Madison, FLorida
Farmers Supply
in downtown Madison and
Greene Publishing, INC.
located at
1695 South SR 53
in Madison, FL.


Historical
Recipes and
Little Known
Facts About
Florida's
Wildlife


FLSIUA CUOOKOI'











OVER T
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IF FLORIDA'
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4A Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com




aw Enforcement & Rcgional Crime


Friday, December 25, 2009


Bern Smith

cont from Page 1A


Class.
His career with the
USDA Soil Conservation
Service (later to become
the Natural Resources
Conservation Service)
began as a soil conserva-
tionist in the Green Cove
Snrinrr onrl +Stork filrld


offices. He transferred
to the Madison field of-
fice in May of 1981, was
promoted to district con-
servationist there in
1987, and is retiring after
35 years of federal ser-
vice. His retirement will
hnrnmn nffircol non DTn


He is married to
Madison native Jan Had-
den and has one son
John Mack, who is a ju-
nior at Florida State
University After retire-
ment, he will continue to
litr in Maditorlicnn rxrhn


he will keep busy on the
farm growing perennial
peanut hay and pine
trees, try to keep several
old tractors and a Model
A Ford running, and do
volunteer work with the
USDA Earth Team and
in hic hurlrh


Ebberson

cont from Page 1A
also an adjunct professor with the Criminal Justice
Academy at North Florida Community College.
"I couldn't have done it without my beautiful wife,
Beth, my son, Seth, and my daughter, Anna, putting up
with me doing the work to get the degree," Ebberson
added.
Ebberson is one of the candidates for the police
chief's position vacated by the retiring Rick Davis.


jrmi-ll, Bro w vL-r County LSchool vIIjjj o iJe,. livVjI Jll VJ.auJ.O vvle J ill |i ...


Former Broward County School MadisonCounty...


Jeffrey H. Sloman, Acting United States Attor-
ney for the Southern District of Florida, and John V
Gillies, Special Agent in Charge, Federal Bureau of
Investigation, Miami Field Office, announced the fil-
ing of an Indictment charging Beverly Gallagher, 51,
of Pembroke Pines, with committing extortion un-
der color of official right, bribery in programs re-
ceiving federal funds, and wire fraud by depriving
the citizens of honest services, in violation of Title
18, United States Code, Sections 1951, 666, 1341, and
1346, respectively. Gallagher was arrested on Sep-
tember 23, 2009 on a criminal complaint in connec-
tion with these charges. She was released on a
$100,000 personal surety bond.
As set forth in the Indictment, the charges are a
result of an FBI undercover investigation. The un-
dercover FBI agents posed as asset managers who
claimed to represent contractors seeking to obtain
contracts with local government entities, including
the Broward County School District. Specifically,
the undercover agents claimed to be acting on behalf
of a client who owned a glass company and a project
manager for a large construction company Both
companies were purportedly seeking to obtain con-
tracts from the Broward County School District.
According to the allegations in the Indictment,
from approximately November 2007 through June
2009, Beverly Gallagher used her official position, in
exchange for the unlawful receipt of property, in-
cluding money and other things of value. Specifical-
ly, Gallagher allegedly agreed to act as an
undisclosed "consultant" and to use her influence
working "behind the scenes" to obtain contracts or
other favorable actions from the Broward Country
School District for contractors associated with the
undercover FBI agents. Gallagher allegedly insisted
that she be paid in cash and for her personal benefit,


instead of to her political campaign. In total, Gal-
lagher allegedly accepted $12,500 in cash and other
property, including boat trips and the payment of
restaurant bills. In exchange for the cash and other
remuneration, Gallagher is alleged to have used her
official position to benefit contractors who were at-
tempting to become pre-qualified before the
Broward County School Board and obtain various
projects and subcontract work on projects from the
Broward County School Board.
Acting U.S. Attorney Jeffrey H. Sloman said,
"Elected officials are held to a high standard of con-
duct because of the special position of trust given
them by the public. We, as citizens, have a right to
hold them to this standard, and to demand that they
be held accountable. In this case, Gallagher's actions
fell far short of this standard. She used her office for
purely personal gain, and must now face the conse-
quences of her actions. Good governance requires
no less."
FBI Special Agent in Charge John V. Gillies stat-
ed, "Beverly Gallagher betrayed the trust placed in
her by the citizens of Broward County by using her
position as a school board member for her own per-
sonal benefit. As the top criminal priority of the
FBI, we will continue to work with our partners and
devote all necessary resources to address public cor-
ruption where we find it."
Mr. Sloman commended the investigative efforts
of the FBI and the Internal Revenue Service, Crimi-
nal Investigation Division, in connection with the
investigation of this matter. The case is being prose-
cuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Jeffrey N. Kaplan
and Neil Karadbil.
An Indictment is only an accusation and a de-
fendant is presumed innocent until and unless
proven guilty


12/16
Delma Allen Blair
- VOP (circuit)
Joseph Keith Platt
- Aggravated battery
with a deadly weapon,
harassing telephone
calls
Freddie James
Morris, Jr. Fleeing,
invalid drivers license
Michael Antone
Hill Possession of a
firearm in the commis-
sion of a felony, fleeing
or attempting to elude,
driving while license
suspended, attaching a
tag not assigned
Justin Lee Jones -
Driving while license
suspended
12/17
Jimmy Joseph
Dunigan Failure to
appear for arraign-
ment
Samuel Lee Gallon
- Disorderly intoxica-
tion
Bonita Monique
McQuay VOP (coun-
ty)
Stacey Lynn
Deeter VOP
'12/18
Rickey Ellis Rober-
son Failure to appear
Alisha Janae


Robinson VOP
Xavier Octavies
Brown Aggravated
assault with a deadly
weapon, improper ex-
hibition of a deadly
weapon
12/20
Frederick Ernest
Marshall Driving
while license suspend-
ed, fleeing and attempt-
ing to elude
12/21
Jerrell Donche
Tyson Failure to ap-
pear
Tegwyn Lynette
Flournoy False infor-
mation to law enforce-
ment officer
Johnny Anthony
Marshall VOP (coun-
ty), out of county war-
rant
12/22
Deanna Lee
Williams Retail theft
Larry William
Reed Failure to ap-
pear for arraignment
William Calvin
Crumity Failure to
appear, writ of bodily
attachment
William Dewayne
Darby Driving while
license suspended with
knowledge


FBI Presents Director's Community Leadership


Award To The Anti-Defamation League


Special Agent in Charge (SAC) John V Gillies,
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Miami Field
Office, announced today that the Anti-Defamation
League (ADL), Florida office, is the recipient of the
2009 Director's Community Leadership Award. The
ADL was presented the award at a ceremony held to-
day at the FBI's office in Miami.
Established in 1990, the Director's Community
Leadership Award is presented each year by FBI
field offices to an individual or organization who
has exhibited exemplary leadership within the com-
munity and whose leadership has assisted the FBI
and local law enforcement personnel in making
safer communities. These individuals or organiza-
tions, whose achievements in the areas of crime pre-
vention, drug deterrence, or similar educational
programs, have made a positive difference in their
communities.
The ADL was founded in 1913 to stop the
defamation of Jewish people and to secure justice
and fair treatment for all. It fights anti-Semitism
and all forms of bigotry in the United States and
abroad through information, education, legislation,
and advocacy. Listed below are several initiatives
which warrant recognition:
L.E.A.R.N.: The Law Enforcement Agency Re-
source Network website is a comprehensive and reg-
ularly updated database which tracks actionable
information on extremist activities for local, state,
and federal law enforcement agencies. Information


on hate symbols, extremist incidents and arrests,
and training can also be found on this website.
A World of Difference Institute: This initiative
provides anti-bias education and training with cur-
riculum and materials for Pre-K through university
level students, community groups, civic associa-
tions, and religious organizations.
Bearing Witness Program: A partnership with
the ADL and Catholic schools to provide educators
with the training and resources necessary to teach
students about the historical relationship between
Jewish and Catholic communities. This program is
also responsible for maintaining relationships and
dialogue with international, national, and local reli-
gious leaders of all faiths.
The ADL's commitment to scrutinizing and ex-
posing extremists, hate groups, fostering interfaith
relations, and developing educational programs
that support this cause are exemplary and merits
recognition by the FBI.
Special Agent in Charge John V Gillies stated,
"It is such an honor to present this award to the
Anti-Defamation League. Over the years, the FBI
has relied on their extensive research and training
expertise to assist us in
carrying out our mis-
sion The AD, Florida


office is an outstanding
partner in every sense of
the word and is truly de-I


Photo Courtesy of FBI
From Left to Right: SAC John Gillies, ADL Florida Regional Director Andrew
Rosenkranz, ADL Southern Area Legal Counsel David Barkey, and Community
Outreach Specialist Jeff Green.


serving of the Director's Award for Community
Leadership."
Past winners include:
Handy, Inc.: a non-profit organization found-
ed in 1985 to address the fundamental needs of
Broward County's Foster Care Children.
National Black MBA Association, Inc.:
founded in 1987 to provide mentoring, leadership
development, and scholarship opportunities for
socio-economically disadvantaged students who
are interested in attending college.
Ms. Shirley Taylor-Prakkelt: the former Di-
rector of Housing for the Town of Davie, Florida,
who was responsible for implementing neighbor-
hood revitalization programs to reduce crime,
drugs, and gang violence in her local community.
Her Youth Scholarship Award Fund was high-
lighted as a positive ini-
tiative which
encourages students to
take part in activities
which would positively
impact their local com-
munity.


Board Member Indicted On


Public Corruption Charges


Law Offices of


Monica Taibl, P.L.

Personal Injury

Worker's Compensation

Civil Bankruptcy

Family Law

Wills & Probate


(850) 973-1477

125 NE Range Avenue

Madison, FL 32340

The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information
about their qualifications and experience.


C







Friday, December 25, 2009


O rj.


www.greenepublishing.com




Axoun mabison Countp


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5A


I-KL


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I MMM mmmmm"
-- --111


LWNNlVNl I1


)L?0A


January 2
Legendary Naomi
and the Segos will be
in concert at Yogi
Bear's Jellystone Park
in Madison on Satur-
day, January 2, at 7
p.m. Admission is free,
but a love offering will
be received during the
concert. For more in-
formation, please call
(850) 464-0114.
Thursdays-Mondays
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park will host an ongo-
ing wood carving work-
shop on Thursdays
through Mondays, from
noon until 4 p.m. Partic-
ipants can create figure
carvings, wood spirits,
spoons, bowls, relief
carvings and more dur-
ing this four-hour class.
Workshop fees are $15
per session and include
park admission. For


additional informa-
tion or to register for
the workshops, please
call (386) 397-1920 or
visit www.stephenfos-
terCSO.org.
Each Weekday
Except Tuesday
The Senior Citizens
Center offers computer
classes to seniors 60
and older each weekday
except Tuesday. For
more information or to
sign up, please call (850)
973-4241.
Every
Tuesday-Saturday
The Diamonds in
the Ruff Adoption Pro-
gram at the Suwannee
Valley Humane Society
is open every Tuesday
through Saturday from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is lo-
cated on 1156 SE Bisbee
Loop, Madison, FL
32340. For more infor-
mation, or directions,
call (866) 236-7812 or


(850) 971-9904.
Second and Fourth
Saturday of Each
Month
The Madison
Church of God hosts a
free soup kitchen the
second and fourth Sat-
urday of each month at
the Greenville Senior
Citizens Center. Lunch
is served from noon to 1
p.m.
Third Tuesday
of Each Month
The Greater
Greenville Area Dia-
betes Support Group is
a free educational ser-
vice and support for di-
abetes and those
wanting to prevent dia-
betes. The group meets
the third Tuesday of
each month at the
Greenville Public Li-
brary Conference Room
at 312 SW Church St.,
Greenville, 11-11:30
a.m. Everyone is wel-


come!
Every
Wednesday and
Friday
The Senior Citizens
Center's sewing club for
seniors 60 and older
meets every Wednesday
and Friday For more in-
formation or to sign up,
please call (850) 973-4241.
Third Wednesday of
Each Month
The Madison Coun-
ty Health Education
Club is holding a free ed-
ucational service and
support group for peo-
ple interested in pre-
venting or controlling
diabetes, high blood
pressure, elevated cho-
lesterol levels, obesity
and other chronic
health conditions. The
club meets the third
Wednesday of each
month at the Madison
Public Library Confer-
ence Room at 378 NW


College Loop, Madison,
12:15-12:45 p.m. Every-
one is welcome to bring
their own lunch.
Third Wednesday of
Each Month
The Madison Coun-
ty Diabetes Support
Group is a free educa-
tional service and sup-
port group for diabetes
and those wanting to
prevent diabetes. The
group meets the third
Wednesday of each
month at the Madison
Public Library Confer-
ence Room at 378 NW
College Loop, Madison,
11:45 a.m.-12:10 p.m.
Everyone is welcome is
bring their own lunch.
For details, contact Mar-
cia Kazmierski at (386)
752-2461 or Lorraine
Miller at (386) 752-6439.
Fourth Wednesday of
Each Month
An informational
meeting for those in-


jured and needing
help returning to work
will be held the fourth
Wednesday of each
month from 12-3 p.m.
at the Madison County
Extension Office locat-
ed at 184 College Loop,
Madison. The meeting
is free and open to the
public. For more infor-
mation, please call
(850) 245-3489.
First and Third
Saturday of the
Month
Girl Scout Troop
150 meets at Greenville
United Methodist
Church every first
and Third Saturday
of the month from
10:00 a.m. until Noon.
Please call Janice or
Sean Carson at
850/948-6901 or the
Girl Scout Council
Office at 850/386-2131
for more informa-
tion.


Whose Name Is Mudd?


By Paul Niemann
"If the offenders are done to death
by that tribunal ... they will pass
as martyrs with half the world. "
The above quote sounds like it
could apply to modern-day terror-
ists, but it was actually spoken by
a former attorney general named
Edward Bates nearly 150 years
ago.
Sam was a successful young
doctor who was tried for conspira-
cy to commit one of the most well-
known murders in American
history. He was convicted and sen-
tenced to life in prison.
Prior to that, he was also in-
volved in planning a kidnapping
that never materialized. He also
had shot one of his slaves. His
name received a bad rap through-
out history ever since one fateful
day in April of 1865.
Sam was born in 1833 in
Charles County, Maryland, as one
of ten siblings. A year after grad-
uating from medical school, he
married his childhood sweet-
heart, Sarah Frances Dyer.
Sarah's family and friends called
her Frankie or Frank for short.
If a girl can be named Frank,
and since Sam is also a girl's
name, could you say that Sam and
his wife Frances could have been
known as Frank and Samantha in-
stead of Sam and Frances? Proba-
bly not, but I was just wondering
out loud how that would sound.
Meanwhile, in 1864, a well-
known actor in the area was plan-
ning on kidnapping President
Lincoln. When the attempt never
happened due to Lincoln changing
his plans that day, the actor decid-
ed to assassinate him the follow-
ing year. That actor, as we all
know, was John Wilkes Booth.
On that fateful, historical
night of April 14, 1865, Booth


broke a bone in his leg when he
landed on the stage at Ford's The-
atre after shooting Lincoln. He
then rode his getaway horse to Dr.
Sam's house in Bryantown, Mary-
land, about 15 miles south of
Washington, DC.
So who was this Dr. Sam and
why was he arrested for conspira-
cy to commit murder?
His full name was Dr. Samuel
Mudd. The same Dr. Mudd who set
the broken leg of John Wilkes
Booth the day after he assassinat-
ed President Lincoln. As a result
of Mudd's cooperation, Booth was
able to continue his escape.
Dr. Sam Mudd was a Confeder-
ate sympathizer and slave owner.
We were taught in History class
that he did not know at the time
that John Wilkes Booth was the
person who shot President Lin-
coln when he set his broken leg -
meaning that he inadvertently
helped a murderer escape.
It's not that simple, though,
because the truth is that Mudd
did know Booth as far back as No-
vember of 1864, when he was in-
volved with Booth and seven
others in planning the kidnap-
ping of the president. After Lin-
coln was assassinated, Mudd
denied knowing him to avoid be-
ing prosecuted.
Dr. Mudd served nearly four
years in jail, and was later par-
doned by Lincoln's successor,
President Andrew Johnson, in
1869. He and wife Sarah (Frankie)
went on to have the final five of
their nine kids together after he
was released from prison.
It is often assumed that the
"My name is mud" saying refers
to Dr. Samuel Mudd, which is
true, but the saying originated in
1823, which is ten years before
Sam Mudd was born.


Free H1N1 Swine Flu Vaccines

are now available

FOR ALL Madison County residents

Vaccines are now available for persons 65 and older

All residents older than 6 months should receive
HINI Swine Flu Vaccine

It is important that the following people get vaccinated:
Pregnant women
Household contacts and caregivers of babies less than
6 months
Children and young adults
Residents with medical conditions and at higher risk
for complications from influenza



CLINIC HOURS:

MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:00 A.M.-11:00 A.M. & 1:00 P.M.-4:00 P.M.

Madison County Health Department
218 Southwest Third Ave


No appointment necessary.
For more information, please call

850 973-5000


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF

HEALTH


Irv


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L1


- -
F1
d11


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. E-I 7


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FA!.o 44,A





www.greenepublishin. cor


6A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Alounb mabion County


Friday, December 25, 2009


Local Eastern Star Chapter Entertains


At "Official Inspection"


By Emerald Greene
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The evening of Thurs-
day November 12, found
the Madison Chapter of the
Order of the Easter Star
#109 entertaining mem-
bers, visitors, and guests
during their "Official In-
spection" at the Masonic
Lodge/Eastern Star build-
ing in downtown Madison.
The grand honoree was Sis-
ter Lois Mock, Grand Con-
ductress.
The evening began
with a Thanksgiving type
dinner at 6:00 p.m. The offi-
cial meeting began at 7:00
p.m. when officers of the lo-
cal chapter marched in for-
mally and opened the
chapter in long form.
Madison's Worthy Ma-
tron, Karen FerDon, wel-
comed all the out-of-town
guests as Madison's Con-
ductress and Associate
Conductress, Edith Terry
and Jennifer Stanley did
the proper introductions.
Following the intro-
ductions, the "exemplifica-
tion of work" was
demonstrated by Conduc-
tress, Edith Terry and As-
sociate Conductress,
Jennifer Stanley The Silver
Drill went to Hospice and
Paliative Care, Sylvia Mor-
row, Worthy Grand Ma-
tron's special project.
The address of the As-
sociate Grand Matron was
a special treat, as she spoke
of her many friends who
were there with her, on this
special event. She thanked
everyone for the hospitality
shown to her during her
stay and for the wonderful
food that had been pre-
pared, in her honor, earlier
that evening.
The meeting was then
closed, in due form.
The Order of the East-
ern Star, Madison Chapter


#109, officers for 2009 in-
clude: Worthy Matron,
Karen FerDon; Worthy Pa-
tron, Roy Hibbs; Associate
Matron, Beth Ward; Associ-
ate Patron, Homer Mel-
gaard; Secretary Nancy
Banks; Treasurer, Ali Hi-
bbs; Conductress, Edith
Terry; Associate Conduc-
tress, Jennifer Stanley;
Chaplain, Emerald Greene;
Marshal, Mary Ellen
Greene; Organist, Betty
Sirmon; Adah, Karen Hol-
man; Ruth, Mary Helen
Studebaker; Esther,
Heather Bowen; Martha,
Tanya Terry; Electa,
Yvonne Smith; Warder,
Bert Banks; and Sentinel,
C. D. Agner.
The Madison Eastern
Star is a service organiza-
tion, a sister group of the
Masons, who collect per-
sonal items for men and
women and send them to
the Masonic Home, In St.
Petersburg. These items
are given to the nursing
home residents at no
charge, as the State Eastern
Star members donate them.
The Order of the East-
ern Star, or OES, is an adop-
tive rite of Freemasonry
with its philosophy clearly
based on the Holy Bible. Its
objectives are charitable,
and benevolent. OES is a
social order, comprised of
persons with spiritual val-
ues, but it is not a religion.
Its appeal rests in the true
beauty of the refreshing
and character-building
lessons that are so sincere-
ly portrayed in its ritualis-
tic work.
A deep fraternal bond
exists between its mem-
bers. It is the wholesome
relationship of sisterly and
brotherly love, brought
about through high princi-
ples exemplified in their
daily lives that make its


members near and dear to
each other.
Members must be eigh-
teen years of age or older
and either a Master Mason
in good standing, or proper-
ly related to a Master Ma-
son in good standing. The
latter category includes
wives, widows, sisters,
daughters, mothers, grand-
daughters, step-mothers,
stepdaughters, step-sisters,
and half-sisters. In 1994 this
was expanded to include
nieces, daughter-in-laws,
and grandmothers. Annual
dues are $20 to support the
local chapter.
If anyone, man or
woman, is interested in
joining the Order of the
Easter Star, Madison Chap-
ter, call Emerald Greene at
(850) 973-3497.


luieenI ruuiilsllllg, Iin. rnoto uy teIIIialu uleeIe, INUVUInIIui Iz, zuu
The Madison Chapter of the Eastern Star was honored with a visit from the
Grand Conductress of the State of Florida. Pictured left to right are: Madison's
Worthy Matron, Karen FerDon; Grand Conductress, Sister Lois Mock; and Madi-
son's Worthy Patron, Roy Hibbs.


ureene Publisning, Inc. Pfoto by Emerald ureene, November 12, ZUU9
The Madison Chapter #109 2009 Officers are (Front row left to right): Worthy Matron, Karen FerDon; Wor-
thy Patron, Roy Hibbs; Associate Matron, Beth Ward; Associate Patron, Homer Melgaard; Conductress,
Edith Terry; and Associate Conductress, Jennifer Stanley. (Back row left to right): Treasurer, Ali Hibbs;
Chaplain, Emerald Greene; Marshal, Mary Ellen Greene; Adah, Karen Holman; Ruth, Mary Helen Studebak-
er; Esther, Heather Bowen; and Sentinel, C. D. Agner. (Not pictured: Secretary, Nancy Banks; Warder, Bert
Banks; Organist, Betty Sirmon; Martha, Tanya Terry; and Electa, Yvonne Smith)


BUSINESS CARD Directory


Serving Madison, Jefferson,

Taylor & Lafayette Counties
Auto, Life, Health, Home
Freddy Pitts, Agency Manager
Jimmy King, Agent & Glen King, Agent
24/7 Claim Service: 233 W. Base St. Madison 850-973-4071
1-866-275-7322 Freddy Pitts Glen King Agent
105 W. Anderson St. Monticello 850-997-2213
Freddy Pitts Ryan Perry, Agent
Helping You Is 813 Wshington St.* Perry* 850-584-2371
What We Do Best." Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL* 386-294-1399



Design
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Cold Hardy Palms
Light Debris Clean-Up
Tree Spade Transplanting
Over 35 Acres In Production
30 Years Serving This Area

Peacock's Landscaping
sensed & Insured (850) 975-2848
Toll Free 1-800-9PEACOCK


MusI LESSONS

.s Ki.lpt rick
Piano Voice Organ Cello
Lessons given at First Baptist Church in
Greenville, Mondays Day and Evening
F.S.. Music Degree Church Musician
Retired School Teacher
850-997-3717 i


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Owners:
Tire *& n r Daryl &
Center Lee Anne Hall
1064 E. US 90 adison, FL
3side Clover Frm26
850-0-3-3026


9 9

Ewing Construction
& Roofing
Commercial / Residential
State Certified Building Contractor & Roofing Contractor
CBC 1251818 / CCC1328133
QUALITY GUARANTEED


Ben Ewing 850-971-5043
Owner


Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates


ButJAette
Plu~mbin & Well Service
Drilling & Repairs
plumbing Repairs* Fixtures-Faicets
Sewer & Water Connections* Water Heater Repairs
Wells Drilled" Pumps Replaced
Tanks Replaced .All Repairs
carlton Burnete 125 SW Shelby Ave.
"850 -'9"" 4 Madison, FL 32340
850-973-1404 i


I


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m


L-




www.greenepublishin. cor


Friday, December 25, 2009


Atouno mabion County


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7A


Junior Auxiliary Receives Grant

Money From Wachovia
Junior Auxiliary of
Madison County:


V(Cenren7e,
Wachovia Bank, N.A., a Wells Fargo Company
(NYSE: WFC), recently awarded Junior Auxiliary
of Madison, FL, a $500 grant from the Wachovia
Wells Fargo Foundation as part of its Community
Partners program.
Junior Auxiliary is a service organization that
is based on the principles of helping children by
focusing on welfare and development. Junior Aux-
iliary consists of women 50 years and older who
are focused on meeting community needs. It has
served the families of Madison County with more
than 5,000 volunteer hours, according to Lisa
Flournoy, vice president of Junior Auxiliary, who
accepted the grant during a recognition breakfast.
According to Ruthellen Caldwell, Store Manag-
er for Wachovia City President, and who is also a
Junior Auxiliary member, "The Wachovia Wells
Fargo Foundation chose Junior Auxiliary to re-
Presenting the Community Partners program check to Junior Auxiliary during a recognition break- ceive a $500 grant because its programs comple-
fast are: (left to right): Carrin Meadows; Bernice Bodenstein; Deborah Ponder; Melanie Moore; Lisa ment the Foundation's mission 'to build strong and
Flournoy, Junior Auxiliary vice president; Ruthellen Caldwell, Store Manager at City President and a Ju- vibrant communities, improve the quality of life,
nior Auxiliary member; Janie Barnes, Junior Auxiliary treasurer; Joni Hughey; and Judith Doyle. and make a positive difference.' "


Keep Up TeGodWr
9322



I 10 &, 53 S outh 0 M adison, F L A
gI I IIII ~IIII


NORTH AMERICA

Thank you
Junior Auxiliary dies
For All You Do
For Madison County!


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THOMASVILL, GA 31792
850-694-2314


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424 West Base Street P.O. Box 267
Madison, Florida 32340
Phone 850.973.2600 Fax 850.973.2606
rfSs www.csbfl.net ...
We Salute
The Junior Auxiliary Ladies
and All They Do
For Our Community


8 N


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8A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com




Church


Friday, December 25, 2009


J1appenip'w


At

Madison

First Bapti

Church

By Kristin Finne

'As it is written: "I
have made you father of
many nations." He is our
father in the sight of
God, in whom he be-
lieved-the God who
gives life to the dead and
calls things that are not
as though they were. "Ro-
mans 4:17
Sunday morning be-
gan in a very special
way; Beth Carey wel-
comed everyone to ser-
vice with a beautiful
song called "Unto us."
This special piece
was then followed by
Dan Campbell and Cindy
Brown singing an old
southern gospel piece
called "Beautiful Star of
Bethlehem." Pastor Fer-
rell said the offertory
prayer and was followed
by the Choir singing
"The Kings Came Call-
ing," a piece from the
Christmas Cantata. Pas-
tor Ferrell's message
came from Luke 2:10. He
spoke of the room for


improvement in every
aspect of life. While we
may be doing well in our
activities, there is al-
ways room as a church
and as an individual for
improvement.
This week has been
busy in the life of Madi-
son First Baptist. Tues-
day we had caroling
around Madison County,
Wednesday was the
youth's Christmas party
And, Christmas eve
we had our annual Can-
dle Light Service in the
1898 Sanctuary We pray
that everyone has had a
blessed Christmas holi-
day, and with the coming
new year, God's love will
remain strong in your
heart.
The History Com-
mittee would like to re-
mind you of the
upcoming Homecoming
Celebration" 175
Years." They are trying
to compile a Memory
Book and everyone is


C. - & ..7711


Christmas And Easter


Cannot Be Separated
By James J Jackson
Following a parochial school Christmas program, one person complained about
parts of the program. "Why did the pastor have to intersperse so much about Christ's cru-
cifixion in the story of Christmas?
I wondered about those comments later that day Why would the Easter story disturb
anyone, no matter when it is told? Actually both stories are interchangeable as well as in-
separable. Perhaps many people would just as soon leave Christ in the manger as a baby
rather than consider the fact that He went on to grow up and move toward His manifest
destiny ordained by God Himself.
As we go through the motions of the Christmas celebration, it is easy to lose sight of
the fact that the story of a beautiful baby who was foretold by prophets and announced by
legions of angels who appeared in the skies, giving Him glory and honor. We could sim-
ply revel in this heart-warming story of two people, who could not find lodging or a place
to birth their baby
Some writers have even taken the story of Christ's birth and related it to today's so-
cial issues, calling Joseph and Mary homeless. In fact, they had a home, but God had led
them to Bethlehem. He first used Herod's greed to move him to call for a census, which
meant that each adult would have to return to his or her ancestral home to be registered
and counted and placed on the tax rolls.
Since God had ordained that the Messiah would be born in Bethlehem, in Judea, He
arranged for Joseph to take his wife, who was pregnant by the Holy Spirit, to the City of
David for two purposes-to obey man's law, and to fulfill prophesy The Creator of the uni-
verse could have simply sent His Son as an adult into the world to live a blameless life, for-
give sins, and offer Heaven as a free gift to those who would receive the gift.
But God, in His infinite wisdom, sent His Son to enter earthly life as mankind does,
rendering Him true man, and to live a perfect life and become the only sufficient sacrifice
for all human sin, which only true God could do.
Had Jesus Christ not entered human flesh the way man does, and had He not lived a
perfect life, and had He not suffered and died to pay for all sin, God's own standards for
payment for our rebellion in The Garden of Eden would not have been satisfied.
If we, therefore, attempt to celebrate only the birth of Christ, without attaching it to
His suffering and dying for us, or if we only focus on the suffering and dying, then we fail
to grasp the complete story of Christ. Christ came into the world the way mankind does.
He died by giving up His spirit, as mankind does. But, in God's magnificent plan, Christ
arose from the dead to show us that death has no power over us.
That is the beauty of John 3:16, "For God so loved the world, that he gave His only Son,
so whosoever believes in Him will not die, but have everlasting life."
Christ did not remain in the manger. He grew up to change the world forever, by
teaching us repentance, forgiveness and the Way to eternal life. He paid with His life for
the sins of even those who hate Him. He offers eternal life to all who repent and believe
in Him.
Christmas and Easter are the celebration of His life, resurrection the end of the fear
of death. The two cannot be separated.


(850) 222-5997
944 W. Brevard St.
Tallahassee, Florida j


019% Culligan triteiqta ional Co. T Ph.., 1, 4s.. ce fo 1 9 je
Sirce Culligan Dealers am irndepen~dentir operated ,.:ffersand participation m-ayvaryj


asked to share their
memories. The dead-
line has been moved to
January 1st. Also the
Historical Committee
will be selling com-
memorative orna-
ments. These
ornaments are now
available in the church
office and on Sundays
in the church foyer for
$12 each. For more in-
formation contact Jean
McWilliams. (973-2841)
AWANA is being
held every Wednesday
at 6:00p.m. All students
are welcome to be a
part of AWANA or M-
Pact Youth. Youth Min-
ister Jim Carey would
also like to invite every-
one to join in fellowship
with our youth group.
They meet every
Wednesday at 6:15p.m.
We would like to in-
vite you to join us for
our services! Our wor-
ship schedule is as fol-
lows: Sunday School
10-11 a.m. Sunday
Morning Worship 11
a.m.-12 noon. Sunday
Evening Worship 6-7
p.m., followed by youth
dinner and fellowship
until 8 p.m. Wednesday
evening services begin
at 6 p.m. for both the
adults and youth and
lasts until 8 p.m.
"Glory to God in
highest heaven, and
peace on earth to those
with whom God is
pleased." Luke 2:14
God Bless!








Friday, December 25, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com




Zurn Back ZimC


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A


Madison Changes Through The Years
This week we turn back time an


>1.~


r'j1~


4--

-


look at the City of Madison from
years past. The face of the town has
changed dramatically over the years,
but like Dorian Gray, in many ways
remains the same. That is part of the
charm that is Madison. All photos
courtsey of the Florida Public
Archives.


A view along Range Street in 1914.


Employees of the Van H. Priest Company are pictured. The company, which
bean in Madison, became a chain with stores throughout North Florida and
South Georgia. Back row (L-R): Newton Priest, Chalmos Bowden, Jack Sale,
James Sale, Pay Priest. Middle row: Eunice (Shune) Stokes, Elise Nogel, Eliza-
beth Sale, Alma Tate Hendry, Evelyn Millinor, Gordon Selman, Bert Stokes, Bu-
ford Selman, Jack Wade, ? Smith, Van H. Priest. Front row: Fletcher Priest,
Louise Sherrod Bassett, Lottie Noegel, Clyde Priest, Charles (Hooley) Noegel,
Weasey Wade, Tom Millinor, Bill Noegel, Rosalie Priest and Bessie Page.


The intersection of Highway 53 North and US 90 in 1953.


I
A view
from the
Courthouse
of Range
Street.


Range Street is pictured in 1956.


Customers visit at the T.J. Beggs De-
partment Store.


The interior of the orig-
inal Van H. Priest Store in
1925.


The interior of the old T.J. Beggs Department
Store.


WayBak he


December 23, 1909
Six jolly days and six merry nights of solid fun,
recreation and amusement will be held as the John-
ny J. Jones Exposition Shows with great trained
wild animals will be in Madison the week of Dec.
27-Jan. 1.
Miss Rachel Martin, the attractive daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Z. Martin, is home for the
holidays from Brerea College, Gainesville, Ga.
Miss Ollie Sloan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S.H.
Sloan, is visiting her uncle, Mr. A.H. Sloan, at Bar-
tow.
Ask to see the latest Christmas present for your
sweetheart at T.J. Beggs and Company.
December 23, 1949
Pfc. John H. Cone of Greenville arrived this
week from San Antonio, Texas, Air Force Base, and
is visiting his parents on an eleven-day delay route
to his new assignment at Scott Air Force Base in
Illinois.
Lt. Edwin Cooper of Reese Air Force Base, Lub-
bock, Texas, has arrived home to spend the holi-
days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Cooper.
The Christmas Mass will be celebrated at St.
Vincent's Catholic Church Christmas morning at
10 o'clock. Father M.J. Kelly will say the Mass.
Edwin B. Browning, who has been attending
classes at Florida State University, is spending the
holidays at home.
December 25, 1959
Mr. and Mrs. G.F. Rykard have as guests for
Christmas, and during the holidays, their son-in-


Pioneer Excavating

& Tractor Service


SSmall Site Clearing
SHome Site Preparation
Fence Rows Small Fields
Culverts Ponds Fill Dirt
Paul Kinsley


law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Bob Yates of Win-
ter Haven, Mr. and Mrs. Thos Grice and Mr. and
Mrs. WC. Sweat and two children of Jack-
sonville.
Mr. Charles Johnson, 70, father of Mrs. John
Wilson of Route 3, Madison, died Monday at his
home near Quitman. Mr. and Mrs. John Wilson, Mr.
and Mrs. E.B. Wilson and Mr. and Mrs. Bryan Wil-
son attended the services.
Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Rutherford of Madison an-
nounce the birth of a baby boy, Dec. 19. The baby
weighed 7 lbs. and 3 12 ounces.
Miss Jenobel Zipperer, popular bride-elect, was
complimented with a series of lovely parties this
past week.
December 26, 1969
Pvt. Harvey J. Evans, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs.
James D. Evans, Sr., of Greenville, has joined the
select group of basic trainees at the U.S. Army
Training Center, Infantry, who have scored the
maximum 500 points on the final physical combat
proficiency test.
Ocie Edwards, Jr., whose parents live on Route
1, Madison, was promoted Nov. 18 to Army Special-
ist Five in Vietnam, where he is serving with the
45th Engineer Group.
The new Madison County Health Department,
located in southwest Madison on the old Perry
Road, measuring 40' by 90', and having facilities
and space for all service, is moving along and will
be ready for occupancy in early 1970.
The home of Mr. and Mrs. J.P. Johnson was the
setting Saturday evening for a delightful open




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,Madison, FL


house when they and Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Clif-
ford, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cantey and Mrs. Edith Be-
van entertained about 150 guests.
December 28, 1979
Ms. Kathryn Koob, a first cousin of Ms.
Carmelita Jenkins of Cherry Lake, is one of 43 or
50 Americans held hostage by the Ayatollah's rene-
gades in Tehran, Iran.
Neil Martain of East Base Street was the re-
cent winner of an Olds Cutlass auto given away by
Pantry Pride in a football contest.
The Enterprise-Recorder was informed
Wednesday that the 1979 Sugar Bowl Queen is the
great niece of Dan Walker of Madison. She is Cam-
mie Williams of Gadsden, Ala. She is the grand-
daughter of the late Mrs. Clara Walker Ralls,
formerly of Madison.
Bill Grant, president of the Bank of Madi-
son, has been elected Florida Director of the In-
dependent Bankers Association, for a one-year
term.


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www.greenepublishin. cor


Agents
* Frankie Bell Alice Bell
Email: frankiebell@embarqmail.com
Office 850-973-8312
Office 850-973-8341
Fax 850-973-3774
* P.O. Box 915 348 W. Base St.
* Madison, FL 32341
q []


Hall's
Tire & Muffler


, II*


1064 East Base St. Madison, FL
(Beside Clover Farm)
(850) 973-3026
Daryl & Lee Anne Hall


U] The

Automotive

Directory

Mo- i-


DUNHAM
BODY SHOP
100% Customer Satisfaction Is Our Goal
FORIEGN & DOMESTIC
Body Paint Work*Frame Straightening
Free Estimates Insurance Work Welcome
1630 E. Jackson St. Thomasville, GA
(Located behind Langdale Auto Mall)

I 229-226-2077




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Tire Center, Inc.
If you need Lawn Mower, ATV, Passenger,
Light Truck, Semi and/or Tractor Tires.....
we've got your tires!
We have an ASE Certified Mechanic
on duty for all your repair needs.
SDon't forget, we are also afull service and lube station.
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850.997.4689


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1512 E. Base St. Madison, FL
850-973-1230


Mastercraft
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MV#54796


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850-973-2676
Reg# MV10818


New & Used
Tires
Automotive
Repairs


CAR CARE CORNER
The Waq You Drive MaI Call For More
Frequent Maintenance
(NAPSI)-The way you maintain your car should take into
account the conditions in which you drive. That's the word from
AAA, which says too many drivers underestimate the severity
of their driving habits. As a result, they follow the wrong
maintenance schedule.
When polled recently by AAA, only 6 percent of motorists felt
they did most of their driving under severe driving conditions.
But when asked about the actual driving behaviors that create
severe operating conditions, 62 percent of motorists admitted
they drive their vehicle that way all or most of the time.
Some of the conditions and behaviors that are considered
severe include:
* Driving on short trips of less than five miles in normal temperatures or
less than 10 miles in freezing temperatures.
* Driving in hot-weather stop-and-go traffic.
* Driving at low speeds of less than 50 miles per hour for long distances.
* Driving on roads that are dusty or muddy or have salt, sand or gravel
spread on the surface.
* Towing a trailer, carrying a camper (if a pickup truck) or transporting
items on a roof rack or in a cartop carrier.


"Manufacturers provide different maintenance
recommendations for severe driving conditions because such
operation increases wear on vehicle components and fluids,"
said John Nielsen, director of AAA Approved Auto Repair and
Auto Buying Services. Maintenance schedules for severe
driving conditions typically recommend changing the vehicle's
fluids and filters more often, and include more frequent
inspections of certain components.
AAA advises motorists to:
* Read their owner's manual and/or maintenance booklet.
* Learn what the manufacturer considers normal and severe driving
conditions for their vehicles.
* Make an honest assessment of their driving habits.
* Schedule service in accordance with the appropriate maintenance
schedule.
For additional assistance in evaluating driving conditions and
determining proper maintenance intervals, motorists can visit
any of the more than 8,000 AAA Approved Auto Repair
facilities across North America. These shops have undergone
an extensive inspection and meet stringent standards for
quality, ability, integrity and professionalism.
Since its founding in 1902, the AAA has been an advocate for
the safety and security of all travelers. To learn more or locate
a nearby Approved Auto Repair facility, visit AAA.com/repair.


I OA nladison EnteI rprisec-Record er


Friday, December 25, 2009


I





www.greenepublishin. com


Friday, December 25, 2009


Outdoors


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11A


Ammodump
International, LLC



formerly B& GP Enterprises
The Week Of December 25 December 31, 2009
Friday Saturday Sunday Custom built AR-15's Have it your way
'. December 25 December 26 December 27 Revolvers, Pistols, Always in Stock
*5:45 AM 12:25 AM 1:05 AM Re-Loading Components In Stock
11:55 AM *6:25 AM *7:10 AM Winchester Primers In Stock
*6:10 PM 12:35 PM 1:20 PM
*6:50 PM *7:40 PM Hodgdon, IMR, Alliant Powder, In Stock

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday (850) 973-8880
December 28 December 29 December 30 December 31
1:55 AM 2:45 AM 3:40 AM 4:35 AM ammodump@embarqmail.com
*8:00 AM *8:55 AM *9:50 AM *10:50 AM
2:10 PM 3:05 PM 4:00 PM 5:00 PM 10 am to 4 pm Tues, Wed, Thur.
*8:30 PM *9:25 PM *10:20 PM *11:20 PM Call for weekend Gun Shows





featured creature

-t The Wildlife Foundation of Florida
_ helps fund marine life conservation


The nonprofit Wildlife
Foundation of Florida, Inc.
offers nature lovers a way
to help Florida keep its
natural character through
tax-deductible donations.
The foundation provides
assistance, funding and
promotional support to the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
and other organizations
engaged in science-based
nature conservation, man-
agement, education and
research.


The t... i ...-,' ray is one ,. i-,,. most ..... ,/creatures in the ocean and one -f i,, largest rays. (Photo by Zig Leszczynski)


Florida's rays are majestic,


graceful, shy and shocking


By FWC Staff

At least 11 species of rays inhabit
Florida's coastal waters. Some of them
are enormous almost 30 feet across.
One of them can generate electricity to
stun its prey. Some have barbs that are
equipped with venom. All of them are
shy creatures that prefer to avoid contact
with people.
Manta ray
The largest of the rays is the manta
ray. The full-grown ones average about
22 feet from the tip of one of their pec-
toral fins (which resemble wings) to the
other (disc width), but they can reach
29.5 feet in disc width and weigh up to
3,000 pounds.
All mantas have two modified "fins"
called lobes that extend from the front
of their head just in front of their eyes.
These fins are actually used by these
amazing fish to direct water current into
their mouth so they can filter out their
favorite food. Early scientists thought
that the cephalic fins resembled the
horns of a devil, thus the well-recog-
nized common name "devil rays." In
fact, the most common manta species
present in Florida waters is called the
devil ray. The devil ray is small in com-
parison to most other mantas, reaching a
disc width of only 4-5 feet.
Mantas sometimes show up close to
shore. At other times, people see them
over the continental shelf and over reef
habitats, usually close to the ocean's
surface. They are often seen swimming
in schools, and they sometimes leap out
of the water and land with a huge splash.
Scientists aren't sure why they jump,
however some believe it is to dislodge
parasites that often attach to the rays'
skin. Others have speculated they may
use jumping to attract mates.
Manta rays usually are dark brown,
grayish blue or black on top with pale
edges and white underneath. Some, but


not all, mantas have a venomous barb
which is near the base of the tail on
the top surface. They live at least 20
years.

Spotted eagle ray
The spotted eagle ray is another large
species of ray that may reach a disc
width of up to 9.8 feet and weigh up-
wards of 500 pounds.
They have very long whip-like tails.
At the base of their tails spotted eagle
rays have one or more venomous spines.
Eagle rays use the spines as defense
against predators, such as sharks.
People see spotted eagle rays mostly
in bays, over coral reefs and in estuar-
ies. They like inshore waters, but they
also show up in deeper coastal waters.
Mostly, they swim in pairs or small
groups in the open water close to the
surface, and they often leap out of the
water similar to their close relatives,
the manta rays.
This is one of the most beautiful rays,
named for the cryptic spotted pattern
across the top of its body with small
white, bluish-white, greenish, pearly
or yellow spots on its black, dark gray
or brown body. Sometimes the spots
are large white rings with black dots in
the center. Eagle rays are typically all
white on their bottom side.
Cownose ray
Yet another ray species common to
Florida is the cownose ray. It typically
grows to 35 45 inches disc width,
although there is a report of one reach-
ing 84 inches. Cownose rays will have
at least one venomous barb at the base
of the tail and typically are brown with
a whitish or yellowish belly and a broad
head, eyes wide-apart.
This species has very hard tooth plates
and powerful jaw muscles that it uses
to crush various shellfish species that
it primarily feeds on, such as clams,
oysters, scallops and crabs. They
often swim in large schools containing
thousands of individuals. These large


schools of rays when feeding can
devastate local shellfish beds.

Lesser electric stingray
You can find the lesser electric ray
along the beaches and coastal waters
of the western Atlantic Ocean from
North Carolina to Argentina and in the
Gulf of Mexico. They keep to shal-
low coastal waters, buried beneath the
sand or mud or in sea grass most of the
time, but they sometimes venture into
water 180 feet deep.
They have the ability to generate
an electric discharge of 14-37 volts,
which they use to stun prey and to
fend off predators.
This species does not have a venom-
ous barb. It is dark brown, light brown
or reddish orange on top with irregular
rings or ovals. The underside is white,
yellowish or greenish.
Males grow to about 26 inches
across; females are a little smaller.
Electric stingrays eat primarily
marine worms but also include other
invertebrates, juvenile snake eels,
anemones, small fish and crustaceans
in their diet.


Interested people may
send donations to the Wild-
life Foundation of Florida,
Inc., P.O. Box 11010,Talla-
hassee, FL 32302 or make
donations on the founda-
tion's Web site, www.Wild-
lifeFoundationofFlorida.
com.
Florida is like no other
place on earth. Working to-
gether, we can keep it that
way.
For more information,
call 850-922-1066 or visit
the foundation's Web site.


W-ILDLIFE FOUNDATION OF FLORIDA
ESTABLISHED i 1994


Beachgoers should always

do the stingray shuffle


Beachgoers should exercise
caution. Beaches and coast-
lines are where you find sting-
rays year-round.
The most common rays in
Florida coastal waters include
three species of whip-tail rays,
including the Atlantic sting-
ray, bluntnose stingray, and
southern stingray. Although
stingrays are actually very shy
by nature, they are equipped
with a sharp spine (or barb) on
their tail which they use as de-
fense against predators, such
as sharks.
These rays also use
camouflage to hide from


predators-burying themselves
under the sand with only their
eyes and long spaghetti-
shaped tail exposed. That
makes them very difficult for
beachgoers to see. Unaware
bathers walking or wading in
shallow waters can step on a
ray resulting in being stung
in the leg or foot by the ray's
sharp, venomous spine.
To avoid being stung, bath-
ers only need to shuffle their
feet as they move across the
sandy bottom. Rays usually
sense the disturbance and
swim away.


Remember: heat to treat
A stingray's spine or barb is razor-sharp and made of a
hard, tooth-like material called dentine. It has notches on
both sides that act like a series of miniature arrowheads,
preventing the spine from backing out of a wound.
Most stingrays have a single spine, but some have more,
from 1 to 8 inches long. The spine produces venom, and
anyone stung by a stingray should seek immediate medi-
cal attention. Medical professionals can remove all traces
of the spine and flush out the wound with antiseptic to
prevent infection. Victims also usually require a tetanus
shot.
Also, soaking the wound in hot water (at least 113
degrees Fahrenheit) can bring immediate relief from the
painful effects of the venom. Remember the saying- "Heat
to treat."



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f 8Reasonable Prices
Quality Work
In Business For Over 20 Years!
SOwned & Operated by

Vivian Bass
S Shoulder MouLn Deer Prices Reduced
To $350 until Jan. 1. 2010
850-973-4664
Madison, FL


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More





12A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


Friday, December 25, 2009


Inside Treasnres & More
Shops 3609 Glassware
slla, hl


DUNN'S
Lawn Mower Repair
WELDING
New & Used Parts
Senior Citizen Discounts

850-973-4723
2o89 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340
ANYTHING LEFT OVER 7 DAYS
WILL BE SOLD
rtn, n/c

Cleaning Lady, Great Cook
& Your Helper and I also
cut grass


Call 850-464-333
386-965-5262




Promote Your Bus
with low cost sign
banners. 850-242-





^^^ f


Mobile Homes For Rent
2 or 3 bedrrom mobile
homesfor rent near Anderson
Pond $450 + deposit
869-0916
10/28, rl, c

2nd FloorApartment
For Rent, 1 large room with
big bathroom, walk-in closet,
a garage and double doors
that go out to a covered
porch. Great for a single
person or a couple with no
children. 850-971-5587


12/16, rm, c
;9 or
2 bedroom, 1 bath House
9/23, rtn, pd for rent or sale. Currently
being upgraded, will be
ready Jan. 1st, 2010. New
siness central heat and air, great
s and neighborhood, within City
9342 Limits. $550 per month for
rent or $75,000 to buy
11/18, rc 850-673-9425
12/9, 12/16,c
3 bd/2 bath doublewide near
Cherry lake $550.00, deposit
& References 850-973-2353


Wanted: Chickens, turkeys,
guineas and peafowl.
850-464-1165
rtn, n/c

BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004. IF NO
ANSWER, PLEASE LEAVE
NAME, TELEPHONE NUMBER
AND INFO ABOUT THE MILL
rtn, n/c



G=


Colonial Twin Bui
with headboard, foo
stairstep with rails.
drawer underbed st(
months old, paid $8
ing $550 OB(
850-210-313'


8/19, r ,


Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for
Senior's and Disabled.
1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.).
HUD vouchers accept-
ed Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd,
Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and Employer



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
rtnCC


Ik Bed Clean as new. Two story, 3
board, BR, 2.3 baths, formal LR &
and 3 DR. 1705 Sq. Ft. New
rage. 6 Kitchen, Range, Ref, D/W,
00 ask- G/D. Oak Floor downstairs,
S k Heart Pine upstairs. 2 Central
0 H&A. Yard maint. included.
7 ADULT FAMILY. No pets.
9/23n $700 rent and deposit. Good
credit req. 205 NE Shelby Ave.
Madison. Call George 973-
8583 or 557-0994.


Diamond late Alum. ricK-
up truck tool boxes.
Various sizes. $50 each. Call
973-4172 8am-5pm M-F
5/6-rtn, n/c

Australian Western Saddle

brand new with tags on it:
comes with blanket, two bri-
dles, two breastplates (one
custom made), and saddle
stand. Call
850-545-5764

10/21, rtn, n/


1 Fireplace ($75) and 1
wood burning stove insert
($125) Call
850-210-3137

10/28, rtn n/


John Deere 2 Row
with fertilizer hopp
lb capacity. New s
and chains. C
850-997-158


8/12 -rm, c


'outhem c1i3as of

C 01adison Cpartments



Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR
HC & non-HC accessible
apts. Call 850-973-8582,
TDD/TTY 711. 315 SW
Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtn, c


Small Cottages $395
Good neighborhood in Madi-
lanter son, clean as new. Heat &
ers, 100 air, R&R, 3 rooms. Matured
rockets male only. Water, garbage &
all yard maintenance, furnished.
Q2 Write "Jim" P.O. Box 8,
12/16, rtn, n/ Madison, Fl 32341. State
age.


2007 Yamaha Majesty
Scooter, electric blue,
3,000 miles, $5,000.
850-929-6950, please leave
message
11/18, rtn, n/c






Apartment on Lazy Hen
Farm

$330 a month + $65 for elec-
tric, direct TV, quiet, private
entrance, large bath, large
kitchen, washer & dryer,
screen porch, 1 month secu-
rity deposit. 2 miles out of
town. Call 850-973-4030
or 850-673-1117

9/9, rn, pd


2 bedroom trailers for rent
850-570-0459
11/25, rtn, c

Double Wide

3 bedroom, 2 bath on
Rockyford Rd. Call
850-929-2649


Must Go!
2009 3/2 DW 1200
cludes furniture. "
long @ $34,387.
@ 386-719-5
jetdec @windstre


Stop!
Quit throwing yo
earned money awa
ing! Become a hoi
today! I have 3/2
starting @ $24,500
@ 386-719-5
jetdec @windstre


CQf-f^- 14^-- -f*


I For Sale:
Ssq. ft. in- House & Lot
Won't last In the Town of Suwannee
Call Eric was $135,000, Now $99,000.
5560 2 BR/1 BA. Fully Furnished,
eam.net New Metal Roof, and New
Paint. Utility Building with
12/2 12/30, c Washer and Dryer. Nice Fruit
Trees. 386-719-0421
rtn, n/c
)ur hard
ur arFantastic Lake
y on rent- and Mountain Views
me owner from this 2 Bed/ 2Bth Home.
2 DW's Open and Covered Decks,
Call Eric Large Screened Porch, Gas
5560 FP, CH/A, Oak Floors & Cab-
eam.net inets, and Appliances.
Offered Furnished at
12/2 -12/30, c $179,900. Call BJ Peters at
,L. .C f 850-508-1900


Starter Home with Starter
Payments: 3 bedroom 2
bath, $345.00 per month.
Only one at this price. Call
Rick 386-752-1452

11/4,rm, c
Brand New 2010!
5 bedroom 3 full baths, 2300
sq. ft., for payments of only
$569.14 a month. Call Eric
today @ 386-719-5560
jetdec @windstream.net


122 12/30, c
c Large 3 bedroom 2 bath
mobile home, bank repo,
make offer. Call
386-752-8196, ask for
Mr. Mott


11/4,rtn, c

NEED QUICK CASH,
SELLING MY 16X80, 3
BEDROOM, 2 BATH FOR
ONLY $9,900. CALL
STEVE AT
386-365-8549
12/9, rn, c
Forcloseure!
2001 28x40 3/2 DW on 1
acre of land! Banks loss,
your gain @ only $49,995
call Eric @ 386-719-5560
jetdec @windstream.net
12/2 12/30, c

New 5 bedroom
mobile home only $56,900
or $443.00 per month. Call
Rick for more details
386-752-1452
11/4, rtn, c


09 FLEETWOOD HOME
5 BEDROOM, 3 BATH
HOME, DELIVERED TO
YOUR LAND AT $487.49
PER MONTH, CHEAPER
THAN RENT, CALL MIKE
386-623-4218

12/9, rtn, c

No Money Down!
100% financing on New
Government Assistance
Loans! Plus tax credits up to
$8000 to 1st time buyers &
up to $6500 for existing
home owners! Don't miss
out. Call Eric @
386-719-5560
jetdec @windstream.net
12/2 -12/30,c


MOBILE HOMES NEW -
USED. BUY- SELL-
TRADE. ANYTHING OF
VALUE FOR DOWN PAY-
MENT. WE HAVE FI-
NANCE ASSISTANCE.
CALL PAT
386-344-5024

12/9, rtn, c


11/18,rtn, c

Lake Front Home
2 bedroom 2 bath, furnished.
Includes water, electric &
gas. Lawn maintenance pro-
vided. 1 yr lease $800 de-
posit, $1,050 per month
850-973-3025
8/5, rtn, pd

FOR SALE OR RENT
Nice 4 bedroom house on
1 &3/4 acre of land in quiet
Country Subdivision near
Madison C.I. $169,000 or
$1350 per month + deposit.
Possible owner financing
with $5000 down. Reference
& Credit Check Required
850-856-5221

11/27,rtn, c


$199 Move-In Special!!
1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-
HC accessible apts.
Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-
3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville
Pointe Trail, Greenville,
FL 32331.
Equal Housing
Opportunity


12/9 -12/30, pd


Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highwayfrontage.
Corner lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Dr.
& Highway 53 South.
Enterprise Zone
Natural gas line, 8 inch wa-
ter main, access to city utili-
ties, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or long term lease.
Call Tommy Greene 850-
973-4141
rtni, I/

OFFICE BUILDING
FOR RENT
across street from
Post Office, Courthouse,
and Courthouse Annex.
(Old Enterprise Recorder Office)
111 SE Shelby St., Madison;
Newly renovated
back to the 1920's era
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141
rtn,n/c





Own an English bulldog via
adoption for as low as $500
or even free. We rescue
these wonderful creatures
from families who no longer
want to keep them. If you
are sure you could raise one
of these, contact Lisa at
dagreatrescue@yahoo.com
Puppies and other breeds
also available


850-838-1422 (SAT/SUN) Furniture
We Buy 850-584-7124 (MON/FRI)
Call Us SAT 9-3 SUN 10-4 Tools



HEL WATE


$$AVON$$
Earn 50%, only $
starter kit! Call'
850-570-1499 or
www.youravon.con



Mystery Shop
earn up to $150 pei
der cover shoppers
judge retail and dini
lishments. No ex]
required. Ca
888-731-118



LPN 11-7
M-1; XT-;-C


vMaduison IN using C
a full time position
a LPN charge nurse
SNF experience pre
Benefits include he;
tal and life insurance
401K retirement an
working environme
in person at 2481 W
90, Madison, Fl. 32
fax resume to DON
973-2667.


PRN MEDICAL A
TANT with great in
sonal skills for med
in Greenville, FL. (
experience with phl
certification and prn
computer skills are
Send resume to: hrd
ment@nfmc.org or
850-298-6054.

EOE/DFWP/M/F


Technician/Ins

minimum 5 years
ence; must have re
certification; mus
valid driver's licer
pass a drug test an
ground check; onl
applicants need t
Call 929-27


Now taking applications for
11/11 12/30, pd experienced cooks, cook's
helpers, dishwashers, wait-
Just in time for Christmas resses, cashiers and deli
Yorkie/Pom puppies, will be workers for all shifts, full
small, 2 males $350/each time and part-time. Apply in
850-464-0999 or person at the new Madison
850-464-0575 Lunch Box, 2497 SW Coun-
ty Rd. 360, or call 850-319-
12/18, 12/23, pd 8789


12/23, 12/30, c


Yorkie/Terrier
female, black with yellow
trim, 8 1/2 lbs, she answers
to the name "Sassy". Lost in
Lee on Blue Ridge Landing
NE, 1 mile from
Withallcoochee River.
850-971-2871

12/18, 12/23, n/c


i CENTER MANAGER
;10 for needed for a primary care
Today medical practice in
r visit Greenville, FL. Minimum
n/tdavies Qualifications: professional
leadership experience with
5/3- ritn, c strong interpersonal skills;
staff supervision; ver-
pers bal/written communication
r day un- proficiency; budget manage-
needed to ment experience; working
ing estab- knowledge of computers &
perience software applications; prefer
all 2-5 years management expe-
80 rience or related college de-
gree with 1 year experience.
11/18 -1/6, pd Send resume to HRdepart-
ment@nfmc.org or fax (850)
298-6054. EOE/DFWP/M-
F


_enter nas
open for
1, 11-7.
referred.
alth, den-


12/23,12/30, c


:es, PTO, Town Manager-Lee, Florida
d a good Population 402. Council-
nt. Apply Mayor-Manager form of
Vest US government with a $280,000
340 or annual budget. North Flori-
Sat 850- da community located 60
miles east of Tallahassee.
Requires no less than two
12/16, 12/23, c years of progressive respon-
sible supervisory experience
in administration or a Bache-
SSIS- lor's degree in Administra-
nterper- tion. Candidates should have
ical clinic excellent interpersonal and
Clinical intergovernmental skills,
lebotomy with hands on experience in
oficient all facets of management, fi-
required. nance, budget, accounting
depart and computer skills. Must
ax be able to provide leadership
in short and long range pro-
gram planning. Must be
bondable. Salary commensu-
12/23,12/30, c rate with qualifications
$25,000.-$30,662. plus bene-
fit package negotiable. Sub-
staller mit resume to Town
Manager, 286 NE County
s experi- Road 255, Lee, Florida
refrigerate 32059 by January 8, 2010.
t have a Completion of Town of Lee
ise; must application required. All ap-
d a back- plications/resumes subject to
y serious public disclosure under Fl.
o apply. Statute. The Town of Lee is
62 an equal opportunity em-
ployer. Applications on-line
10/28, rn, c at leeflorida.org


12/25, c


Buy, Sell or
Trade In The
Classifieds
Call 973-4141
To Place
Your Ad Today


FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES,

INC. STATEWID


Announcements


Advertise in Over 100
Papers throughout
Florida. Advertising
Networks of Florida,
Put us to work for You!
(866)742-1373
www.florida-classi-
fieds.com.

Apartment for Rent

HUD HOMES! 4bdr 3ba
$217/mo! 3 bdrm only
$199/mo! Stop Renting!
5% dw, 15 yrs @ 8% apr
For Listings (800)366-
9783 ext 5669

Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING TAX
CREDIT! 40 yr Warran-
ty Direct from manufac-
turer. 30 colors in stock
Quick turnaround. De-
livery available. Gulf
Coast Supply & Manu-
facturing, (888)393-0335
www.gulfcoastsupply.co
m

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING!
Do you earn $800 in a
day? 25 Local Machines
and Candy $9,995.
(888)629-9968 BO2000033
CALL US: We will not
be undersold!

Help Wanted

Travel, Travel, Travel!
$500 Sign-on-bonus.
Seeking sharp guys and


gals, Rock-n-Roll Atmos-
phere, Blue Jean Envi-
ronment! Call Ally
(800)716-0048 today.

RV delivery drivers
needed. Deliver RVs,
boats and trucks for
PAY! Deliver to all 48
states and Canada. For
details log on to

www.RVdeliveryjobs.co
m
Miscellaneous

AIRLINES ARE HIRING
- Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid
if qualified Housing
available. CALL Avia-
tion Institute of Mainte-
nance (888)349-5387.

ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Account-
ing, *Criminal Justice.
Job placement assis-
tance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if
qualified. Call (888)203-
3179,
www.CenturaOnline.co
m.

Real Estate

LAND OR DEVELOP-
MENTS WANTED. We
buy or market develop-
ment lots. Mountain or
Waterfront Communi-
ties in NC, SC, AL, GA
and FL. Call (800)455-


Y)]-*- A J.-





Friday, December 25, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A


LEG~AL


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that MIDWAY FINANCIAL LLC, the hold-
er of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be
issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description
of the property, and name in which it is assessed is as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO.: 07-195-TD
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2007
NAME INWHICH ASSESSED: MARJORIE BLAGROVE
PARCEL ID: 08-2S-10-1430-002-010
LEGAL DESCRIPTION: See Attached Exhibit "A"
All of said property being in the County of Madison, State of Florida. Un-
less such certificate shall be redeemed according to the law, the property de-
scribed in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the west front
door at the Madison County Courthouse on the 7th day of JANUARY, 2010
at 11:00 a.m.
Dated this 30TH day of November 2009.
TIM SANDERS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
MADISON COUNTY
MADISON, FLORIDA
BY: Ramona Dickinson
DEPUTY CLERK
EXHIBIT "A"
LEGAL DESCRIPTION
(MIDWAY FOREST PARCEL-10)
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH;
RANGE 10 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 8, AND RUN SOUTH 89
DEGREES 35 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,202.73
FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD No.
53; THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY, A DISTANCE OF 1,154.88 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 42 SECONDS
EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY, A DISTANCE OF 30.25 FEET;
THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES
35 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 856,58 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 246.89 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 59 MIN-
UTES 23 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 506.46 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 86 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 218.46 FEET; THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 34 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 18,87 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 35 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 285.72
FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 33 SECONDS
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1,596.17 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTAINING 5.31 ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
AND BEING SUBJECT TO ALL COUNTY ROAD RIGHT OF WAYS.
AND BEING SUBJECT TO A 10.0 FOOT EASEMENT FOR UTILITIES
AND DRAINAGE ON THE NORTH, SIDE LOT LINES.
AND BEING SUBJECT TO A 20.0 FOOT EASEMENT FOR UTILITIES
AND DRAINAGE ON ALL FRONT LOT LINES, SOUTH AND WEST
LOT LINES.
AND BEING SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING ACCESS EASEMENT.
AN ACCESS EASEMENT LYING IN SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH;
RANGE 10 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 8,
AND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 1,202.73 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF
COUNTY ROAD No. 53; THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 44 MINUTES
42 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY, A DISTANCE OF
1,124.63 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT
OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 42
SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 60.50 FEET; THENCE LEAVING
SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 33 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 68.15 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAIN-
ING 0.09 ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
12/4,12/11,12/18,12/25


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
The North Florida Broadband Authority ("NFBA") announces a public
meeting to which all interested persons are invited. The NFBA is a legal en-
tity and public body created pursuant to the provisions of Section 163.01,
Florida Statutes, and an Interlocal Agreement among: Baker, Bradford, Co-
lumbia, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Jefferson, Lafayette, Levy, Madison, Putnam,
Suwannee, Taylor and Union Counties and municipalities of Cedar Key,
Cross City, Lake City, Live Oak, Monticello, Perry, White Springs and Wor-
thington Springs, Florida. The regular meeting will be held at 2:00 p.m.
E.T. on Wednesday, January 6, 2010 at the Suwannee River Water Manage-
ment District, Suwannee Room, 9225 County Road 49, Live Oak, Florida
32060. The NFBA Board will address general operating issues of the NFBA.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the NFBA with respect
to any matter considered at the meeting, such person will need a record of
the proceedings and may need to ensure that a verbatim record is made, in-
cluding the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be made. In
accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing spe-
cial accommodations or an interpreter to participate in this proceeding, or
if you have any questions regarding this meeting, please contact the Clerk to
the NFBA Board at (877) 552-3482, at least two business days prior to the
date of the meeting.
12/25

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83. PART IV
Under the Authority of the Self-Service Storage Facility Act, Section 83.805
the described below has been seized for nonpayment of rent and other
accrued expenses. Property consists primarily of household & personal
goods in units rented by: Barbara Aikens, Darlene Choice, Marcelia
Waston, and Marcus Hawkins. The property will be sold at auction to the
highest bidder as provided by the Self-Storage Facility Act, Section
83.806. The sale will be held Saturday Jan. 2, 2010 at 9:00 A.M., at the
Madison Mini Storage, 1098 E. U.S. 90. in Madison, Florida. For further
information call 973-6246.
12/18, 12/25


Ir vPl -l


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14A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishin. com


Friday, December 25, 2009




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