Group Title: Madison enterprise-recorder.
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00398
 Material Information
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate Title: Madison enterprise recorder
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Madison enterprise-recorder
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison, Fla.
Madison Fla
Publication Date: September 25, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028405
Volume ID: VID00398
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
 Related Items
Preceded by: Enterprise-recorder

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Zbc ma5tsonEt. 1865



6nterprse^Rccorb er


Our 145th Year, Number 5


Friday, September 25, 2009


46 + 4 Tax=500

G- ,, bhiih ig, Madsn Conty Carterp -
S. Ent.rpri.-R.. od..




www.greenepublishing.com
Madison, Florida


Madison

Academy

To Host

Fundraiser
By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The eighth grade
class of Madison Acade-
my will be holding a car
wash on Saturday, Sep-
tember 26, from 10 a.m.-3
p.m. The class will be
washing cars in the
parking lot of O'Neals
Country Buffet.
The Madison Acade-
my students will also be
selling tickets for a
chance to win $100 gas
gift card. The drawing
will be held Saturday,
and ticket holders will
not need to be present to
win.
Come out and get a
car wash and support
the students of Madison
Academy

District

Adopts

$56

Million

Budget
The Suwannee River
Water Management Dis-
trict (District) adopted
its final budget and work
plan at its second public
hearing on Sept. 22. The
Fiscal Year 2009-10 Bud-
get, set at $56 million, re-
flects a 20 percent
decrease over last year's
budget. The ad valorem
millage rate, which was
set at 0.4399 mills, is 6
percent less than the
rollback rate of 0.4654.
This marks the 20th
consecutive year the
District has not raised
the tax rate.
Under a 0.4399 rate
- 43.99 cents for every
$1,000 of assessed prop-
erty value the owner
of a home assessed at
$100,000, claiming
$50,000 homestead ex-
emption, would pay $22
in property taxes to the
Please see Budget,
Page 4A

Teachers
Reminded
To Apply
For
Mini-Grants
The Florida Farm
Bureau Federation re-
minds teachers that Oct.
2 is the deadline to apply
for its Ag in the Class-
room Mini-Grants. The
grants are designed to
assist educators with
projects that integrate
agriculture into stu-
dents' classroom experi-
ence.
"There are facts of
agriculture that apply to
every discipline," said
Shaun Fulford, coordi-
nator of Florida Farm
Bureau's Young Farm-
ers and Ranchers and
Women's programs.
"The mini-grants en-
courage teachers to in-
corporate agriculture
into any and all aspects
of their curriculum."
All kindergarten
Please see Grants,
Page 4A


Lee Town Council


Declines


Wastewater Project


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Following several months of de-
bate and deliberation among both
council members and local residents,
the Lee Town Council met on Tuesday
night, September 22, to take a final
vote on whether or not to pursue the
construction of a wastewater (sewer)
system in Lee. In the final tally, all
agreed the town manager and engi-
neer worked hard to accommodate the
project, finally getting total costs to an
approximate fee of $29 per month for
average usage, with no hook up fees
for any resident. In the end though,
the council declined the proposal.
Prior to the meeting, it was antic-
ipated that about one third of the ap-
plicable residents those earning
over a specified income level would
have been responsible to dispose
(crush) their existing septic system at
a price of several thousand dollars,


which was a big point of contention.
However, in the last hours, funds were
secured from a state office to cover
this cost as well, so no resident would
have to incur hook-up fees.
Still, it was very evident from the
protests levied, that many residents
not only didn't trust the numbers be-
ing suggested, many vehemently ex-
pressed their outright disdain at the
whole idea of "government telling
them what to do." Examples were giv-
en by some regarding claims that oth-
er towns had been told similar stories
only to have the future costs come in
much higher, while others simply said
no additional monthly bills could be
afforded by them whatsoever.
In fact, one resident in a wheel
chair expressed great emotion, plead-
ing with the council that she would
have to choose between her expensive
heart medicine and the new waste
Please see Water, Page 4A


res Ever So Slightly


Figures released by the Florida Agency on
Friday Sept. 18, show that Jefferson County had
rate of 8.2 percent in August, compared with tl
percent for July Jefferson County's jobless rate
The latest figures translate into 557 jobless
of a labor force of 6,828, compared with 612 jot
in July and 385 jobless out of a workforce of 6,8
Madison County, meanwhile, had a season


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Tiffany Wood, who is a seventh grader at Madi-
son County Central School, recently competed in
her first barrel racing show in Cairo, Georgia.
There she won first place in the youth division and
the following night she also competed in Nashville,
Georgia, where she won third place in the open divi-
sion where she raced against all ages.
Tiffany has been training this past summer on
her horse "Fortune" at the Buck Wild Ranch in Quit-
man, Georgia. The owners of the ranch, Buck and
Brandi Johnson have helped her tremendously
Tiffany says she just really loves being with her
horse, the winning part is just extra.
She is the daughter of Tracy Wood and Jason
Wood of Lovett.
Friends and family said, "We are sure to see
more of this Madison County youth in the future.
Cowgirl up, Tiffany We're all so proud of you."


Sunset Hills Farm Stewardship


Re-Certification And Tour


During a Stewardship Tour of their
property in Madison County on Tuesday,
September 15, Jan & Bern Smith's Sunset
Hills Farm was again re-certified by the
Florida Forest Stewardship Program. A
small awards presentation was conducted
during the tour to commem-
orate this event.
The tour included half a
dozen stops throughout the
Smith property and demon-
strated a diversity of man-
agement practices
including:
natural and farm pond
management,
natural and planted
timberland management
practices (prescribed burn-
ing, thinning, marketing,
water quality maintenance,
understory control methodolo-
gy, invasive species management,
and available assistance programs),
a host of wildlife management topics
(prescribed burning, transition zones, for-
age and browse supplementation, quail life
cycle and management, native foods and


cover, and available assistance programs).
Foresters, biologists, conservationists,
and Extension specialists from several dis-
ciplines and representing several cooper-
ating agencies (the Florida Division of
Forestry, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission, Nat-
ural Resources
Conservation Service,
Florida IFAS Extension,
and the University of
Florida were available
to answer questions and
make management sug-
gestions to interested
landowners attending
the Tour.
If you think you'd
like to participate in the
Forest Stewardship Pro-
gram (or need any other as-
sistance related to managing
your Madison County timber-
land), contact the Madison County
Forester phone 850.973.5115, email flem-
inj@doacs.statefl.us, or visit the Division
of Forestry's excellent web-site at fl-
dof.com to see if you qualify.


Jan & Bern Smith


I Loal eater


I ~~Indx


I Nections'. 2X pari ,
Aron o sections ae Fri 92/73 Sat 88/72 Sun 87 Mon 8570 /
Around Madison 5 8A Obituaries 5A 9/25 9/26 882 9/27 86/71 9/28 85
Classifieds 14A Greenville 9A Sunshine and clouds mixed. A Partly cloudy with a stray thunder- Scattered thunderstorms possible. Slight chance of a thunderstorm.
Legals 15A Turn Back Time 10A stray afternoon thunderstorm is storm.
Church 1 A Outdoors 13A possible.


I







2A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



icTopoints & Opinions


Friday, September 25, 2009


Lad d er Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper

Jacob bry Keepers Of The Chapel Seeking

SAnother Government Bailout?


The Titanic, Forrest

Gump, Pr. Pepper,

Scar ett 0' tara

And King Solomon
Do you ever have those days when you wake up
and you feel like you are the "king of the world?"
(Okay, I know that Leonardo Dicaprio's character,
Jack Dawson, said that in a certain movie.) As soon
as you get off to a good start, you run into an ice-
berg. (I know that Jack Dawson died after the ship
he was on crashed into an iceberg.)
Some days are just like that. You try to stow
away on an ocean liner and you just happen to pick
the Titanic. Other days are great, however. They
may start without a prospect for hope, but as the day
goes on, doors open wide for you. That is what
makes life so interesting and fantastic. Life is like a
box of chocolates. You never know what you're go-
ing to get. (Yes, I know that Forrest Gump said that
- in the movie.) In the book by Winston Graham, he
had another saying that was also used a time or two
in the movie, especially after Gump had drunk all
those Dr. Peppers before meeting President Kennedy
Some days are diamonds; some days are stones.
(Okay, I will admit those are lyrics from a John Den-
ver song.) Each day is different, but do you know
what the Bible tells us about life, creativity and the
universe in general? It tells us, "There is nothing new
under the sun." King Solomon wrote those words in


Ecclesiastes 1:9.
There are no new
trials. There are no new
people. Sure, there are
others who are born
who have totally differ-
ent genetic makeups
and DNA. (DNA stands
for deoxyribonucleic
acid. I was in O'Neal's
the other night when I
heard a man ask some-
one that question. The
kid he asked it to did not
know the answer. I al-
most yelled out, "What
is deoxyribonucleic
acid?" like he was Alex
Trebek and I was on
Jeopardy.) Although
they have different
DNA, different sexes
and different races, they
are still people like
Adam and Eve were.
There may be new
inventions but they are
created from the same
material that has been
here since God created
Earth. Even if synthetic
materials are used, they
had to be created out of
something.
When you see the
good in the day and the
bad in the day, just real-
ize that today is today
and "after all, tomorrow
is just another day" (I
know that Margaret
Mitchell's character
Scarlett O'Hara said
that in Gone with the
Wind.) We just need to
live, as God has instruct-
ed, one day at a time. I
give God thanks for the
day
May he bless each of
my days and help me to
be prosperous and en-
large my territory


Dear Editor,
I writing this letter in regards to the head-
line "Yes or No" About the city purchasing the
chapel with grant money. All I can think of is
"another government bailout!!!"
They way I see it is, if the "Keepers of the
Chapel" were a little bit more reasonable with
their prices, they might not be in the fix their
in. The cost of $1,200.00-$1,500.00 to rent out the
chapel is quite a lot for a rural community, this
is not Tallahassee. "The Keepers are comprised
of businessmen interested in historic preserva-
tion" according to Brenda Menendez, investors
also no doubt. They want the City to purchase it
and let them operate and maintain it and then
keep whatever profits are made. GIVE ME A
BREAK!!!!
Also, While I'm on the subject on affordable
rental space, The Smith Mansion is also a bit
high, considering it's our tax dollars that help
maintain it! The Smith Mansion is owned by
NFCC which is state funded. Now, granted it
doesn't cost as much as the chapel, but when you
add in fees for outdoor use and cleaning fees, ear-
ly set up fees etc., they start to add up.


I would like the City to go ahead and apply
for the grant and then let the City, Woman's
Club, or the Historical Society operate it. The
City prison crew could then maintain the yard
work and do clean up after events. This way,
everyone within the community would be able to
enjoy this beautiful church, and a non-profit or-
ganization would be able to benefit some.
Thank You,
Cheryl Quick
P.O. Box 591
Madison, Fl.

Reader Would Like

To See Letters To The

Editor On Web Site
Dear Editor:
Your web site's organization is very nice and
the sections offered present a nice sampling of
the community news and activities. In line with
other newspapers, it would be nice to read the let-
ters to the editor so that an online reader can stay
apprised of the local ideas and thoughts. Can we
expect you to soon provide this requested infor-
mation?
Thank you for your assistance.
Dr. Eneida Pugh
1458 NE Post Rd
Madison, Fl.


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Friday, September 25, 2009


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Uicwpoints & Opinions


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A


If you
don't know
your choles-
terol num- Madison Coun
ber, it's time Extension Servi
you did.
September Diann Dougla
is designat- Guest Columnist
ed as Na-
tional
Cholesterol
Education it'S National
Month to re-
mind us to EducatiK
keep a check
on cholesterol levels. One of the health
risks for heart disease, a cholesterol count
of 200 mg. or below is a desirable number.
Cholesterol is a type of dietary fat
found in animal sources of food. We pro-
duce our own cholesterol, so the dietary
cholesterol you get from food only adds to
your blood levels. Some people have good
genes and their body does an efficient job
of eliminating excess cholesterol, while
others can't keep their levels in check.
The National Institutes of Health is
now recommending a more intensive
treatment for people at high and moder-
ately high risk for heart attack. The com-
ponents of therapeutic lifestyle changes
(TLC) are nutrition, physical activity and
weight control. If followed, these three
lifestyle changes also reduce your risk for
many other health related problems. Fol-
low these dietary recommendations to re-
duce your cholesterol level:
Eat a diet low in fat and cholesterol.
Switch to low-fat dairy foods. Reduced-fat
cheeses are now more flavorful. Take your
milk down a notch by switching to a lower-
fat version. If you drink whole milk,
switch to 2 percent. Give yourself a few
months, then take it down to 1 percent. Be-
fore you know it, you will be able to switch
to skim without noticing a big change in
flavor and texture.
Choose leaner cuts of meat and trim
visible fat before cooking. Round, flank
and sirloin are examples of leaner cuts
that can be very tender if you prepare
them with the appropriate cooking tech-
niques. Remove skin from chicken and
you'll eliminate most of the fat. Bake,
broil simmer or roast all meat, poultry or
fish. Leave frying out of your food prepa-
ration it's too messy anyway, so you will
save time on clean up.
Be careful with ready-to-serve baked
goods. Many of these foods are prepared
with saturated fats which tend to increase
cholesterol levels.
Eat less than 300 milligrams of di-
etary cholesterol a day Read labels to de-


I Cholesti
on Month


termine the
amount of
cholesterol
in the food
you are eat-
ing. Pre-
pare lean
cuts of meat
and keep it
to a 3-oz.
serving size,
which is
equal to the
size of a
deck of


cards. Switch to low-fat and fat free dairy
foods.
One egg yolk has about 300 mg. of cho-
lesterol (the recommended number for the
day), so limit your servings. Egg whites,
on the other hand have no fat or choles-
terol, so get creative when serving eggs. If
you are preparing scrambled eggs, use one
egg with additional egg whites. When
baking, use two egg whites in place of
each whole egg in a recipe and you elimi-
nate all of the cholesterol your cakes and
muffins.
Soluble fiber has been proven to help
your body get rid of cholesterol. Dried
beans and peas are an excellent source of
fiber. Increase you intake of kidney beans,
limas, lentils and black-eyed peas. Vegeta-
bles rich in fiber are squash, sweet pota-
toes and broccoli.
Increase your physical activity -
Aim for 30 minutes each day Walking,
swimming, bicycling are examples of
moderate level activities. Regular house-
hold chores like gardening and cleaning
also count as activity Be sure to consult
your doctor before starting an exercise
program.
Weight management Maintaining
a healthy weight will also help keep your
cholesterol levels in check. By keeping
your food intake in check and increase
your activity level, your weight will reach
a healthy level without any effort.
Three components of a healthy
lifestyle sensible eating, regular activity
and managing you weight all work to keep
your cholesterol level at an acceptable lev-
el. If you have difficulty keeping your cho-
lesterol below 200 mg. be sure to consult
your doctor. For more information on food
and nutrition, contact the Madison Coun-
ty Extension Service.
The University of Florida Extension -
Madison County is an Equal Employment
Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer
authorized to provide research, educational
information and other services only to indi-
viduals and institutions that function with-
out regard to race, color, sex,


age, nanaicap or national
origin.


Give The Gift


that's Perfect for


the Outdoor Dad


FLORIIA CIUKIN'




1, 1Ea fr & tldin thV QOB oodA & Samps ofTuorida


OVER
1,110 RECIPES
IF FLIHIA'S
WILI GAME
(am tuwf*")


Dad Will Love

All These

Great Recipes

For Deer, Dove,

Quail, Turkey,

Squirrel and

So Much More!



Local Author,

Tommy Greene,

will autograph

books if desired.


The cost of this "one of a kind" recipe book is just $28.
DON'T WAIT!
Get your copy at
Madison Sporting Goods, in Madison, Florida,
Jackson's Drug Store, in Greenville, Florida,
Guys & Gals Styling Salon, in Madison, Florida,
Uphold's Feed Store, in Madison, Florida, and
Greene Publishing, Inc.,
located on SR 53, in Madison, FL.


orida Press Associ,


20086
Award Winning Newspaper

'Che Maison
6Entctptise-Reco(er i

P.O. Box 772 Madison, FL 32341
1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32340
(850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121
greenepub@greenepublishing.com
www.greenepublishing.com

Publisher Classified and
Emerald Greene Legal Ads
Laura Little
Editor Deadline for classifieds
Jacob Bembry is Monday at 3 p.m.
Production Manager Deadline for
Heather Bowen legal advertisements is
Wednesday at 5 p.m.
Staff Writers There will be a $3 charge
Michael Curtis and for affidavits.
Bryant Thigpen
Circulation
Graphic Designers Department
Stephen Bochnia Sheree Miller and
and Dee Hall Bobbi Light
Advertising Sales Subscription Rates:
Representatives In-County $35
Mary Ellen Greene, Out-of-County $45
Dorothy McKinney, (State & local
Jeanette Dunn taxes included)
and Chelsea Bouley

-Since 1865-
"Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity."
bhe flaOison Enterptise-Recotter
Madison Recorder established 1865
New Enterprise established 1901
Consolidated June 25, 1908
Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S
SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at
Madison Post Office 32340. Publication No. 177.400.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison
Enterprise-Recorder, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any adver-
tisement, news matter or subscriptions that, in the opinion of
the management, will not be for the best interest of the coun-
ty and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate
any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publi-
cation in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6
months from the date they are dropped off. Greene Pub-
lishing Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.








4A Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com




Law enforcement & Rcgional Crime


Friday, September 25, 2009


Unemployment

cont from Page 1A
national unemployment rate of 9.7 percent. The
last time that the state's unemployment rate was
higher than the past three months was in October
1975 when it reached 11.0 percent, according to the
AWI.
"Florida's total nonagricultural employment
in August 2009 was 7,348,400, representing a job
loss of 372,700, or -4.8 percent compared to August
2008," the AWI states. "This was steeper than the
national rate of decline for August, which was -4.3
percent over the year. The August 2009 job loss
continued the trend of annual declines that began
in August 2007. The downturn started with de-
clines in construction jobs, but has now spread to
almost all other major industries."
The AWI finds the relative stability of the
state's unemployment rate over the past few
months "encouraging."
"We anticipate improvement in Florida's job
market in the second quarter of next year and are
already seeing glimmers of hope to that effect,"
AWI Director Cynthia R. Lorenzo is quoted saying.
"As we build on these positive signs, Governor
Crist has proclaimed September Workforce Devel-
opment Month in Florida, reaffirming the impor-
tance our state has placed on ensuring that
Florida's greatest resource, our people, have the
knowledge and skills to help move Florida's econ-
omy forward toward a more vibrant and prosper-
ous future."
Based on economic estimates, the AWI expects
that the state's job market will start improving in
the second quarter of 2010, as "the job growth rate
turns positive"
States the AWI release: "Current forecasts pro-
ject a job growth rate of 1.5 percent in the second
quarter of next year. Florida's unemployment rate
is forecasted to peak at 11.0 percent in the second
quarter of 2010 before beginning a gradual de-
crease."
The AWI identifies professional and business-
es services as the industry losing the most jobs: -
93,300 jobs. Other industries losing jobs over the
year are trade, transportation and utilities, -85,100
jobs; construction, -62,700 jobs; manufacturing, -
45,000 jobs; leisure and hospitality, -35,200 jobs; fi-
nancial activities, -28,900 jobs; information, -12,600
jobs; and government, -8,900 jobs.
States the AWI: "These industry job losses are
due to weakness in employment services; motor
vehicle and parts dealers; specialty trade contrac-
tors; fabricated metal product and manufacturing;
amusement, gambling and recreation; credit in-
termediation; publishing and telecommunication;
local government; and repair and maintenance.
As in past months, private education and
health services are identified as the only sector
gaining jobs among Florida's major industries, a
gain of 4,900, according to the AWI. Actually,
growth in healthcare and social assistance ac-
counts for the increase. The latter increased by
9,100 jobs, whereas private education declined by
4,200 jobs.
Liberty County continued to have the state's
lowest unemployment rate at 5.6 percent, followed
by Monroe and Walton counties, 6.5 percent each;
Okaloosa County, 6.9 percent; Lafayette County, 7.0
percent; and Franklin County, 7.1 percent.
On the end of the scale, Hendry County con-
tinued to have the highest unemployment rate at
16.4 percent, followed by Flagler County at 15.7
percent; Indian River County, 15.2 percent; St. Lu-
cie County, 14.7 percent; and Lee County, 13.5 per-
cent.
The AWI notes that many of the counties with
low unemployment rates have a relatively high
percentage of government workers and more
tourism during the summer months. Conversely,
the counties with the high unemployment rates
have either seasonal declines in agriculture or
continued weakness in construction and manufac-
turing.
Jefferson County rated 55 out of the 67 coun-
ties in term of its unemployment rate and Madi-
son County ranked 24, with Hendry County at No.
1 and Liberty at No. 67.
The AWI reports that all metro areas in the
state lost jobs in August. Jefferson County is part
of the Tallahassee Metropolitan Statistic Area
(MSA), one of 23 such areas across the state. The
Tallahassee MSA had the third lowest rate of job
decline in the state during August. That rate was
7.4.
The Ft. Walton Beach-Crestview-Destin MSA
had the lowest rate of job decline at 6.9 percent,
followed by the Gainesville MSA at 7.3 percent.


Grants

cont from Page 1A
through 12th grade teachers are welcome to apply
The grants are $250 each and can be used for a vari-
ety of educational projects pertaining to agricul-
ture.
The goal of the Florida Farm Bureau-Agricul-
ture in the Classroom grant program is to increase
the understanding of agriculture among students
and educators. This year, Florida Farm Bureau will
contribute up to $7,500 in mini-grants throughout
the state.


Because agriculture has no subject area bound-
aries, proposals are encouraged in social studies,
math, language arts, science, environmental educa-
tion or any other subject area or combination of ar-
eas that effectively integrate key agricultural
principles (i.e., production, promotion, etc.)
The application to apply for the grant can be
downloaded from the Florida Farm Bureau Web site
at http://floridafarmbureau.org/programs/teache-
r_minigrants


Water


cont from Page 1A
water bill. And although this same resident was re-
portedly seen smoking a cigarette outside the meet-
ing room a few minutes later, ultimately the council
decided 4-1 against moving forward. Officially, the
motion to approve died for lack of a second.
Supporters of the system tried to point out that
$30-40 per month for sewer was actually a lower cost
and much better alternative to septic systems, espe-
cially when facing costly repairs or replacement,
and that septic systems are under fire statewide for
environmental and commercial reasons. Others not-
ed that since inspections and septic system mainte-
nance isn't enforced, old systems, many of which
are contaminating local soil and groundwater ac-
cording to tests performed after recent flooding, can
and have been ignored. They added that septic sys-
tems are not supposed to be maintenance free until
they breakdown, and even opponents of the project
acknowledged that systems are often ignored and
should be looked into for the health of the commu-
nity
An official with Suwannee River Water Manage-
ment was on hand, joining the engineer who at-
tempted to clarify complaints, noting that the grant
funding and loans that had been secured were no-
table and rarely available at such levels. In the end,
however, far more residents at the meeting were out-
spoken against the project, which was then reflected
in council's final vote to kill the project.
Additional details of the project included an in-
ter-local agreement with the City of Madison and
the introduction of numerous grinder pumps, both
viewed by some as other pieces of the puzzle that
could bite the town later. Lastly, the prevailing senti-
ment was also that potential commercial advantages
of the system were of little use either, believing the
town had little likelihood or need of growth. There
was one point of agreement though, and that was
everyone would be neighbors in the morning, and
that regardless of the personal and political attacks
that transpired, Lee remains "Little but Proud."
Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael@greenepublishing.com.


Budget

cont from Page 1A
District.
Property taxes paid to the District fund numer-
ous services to the public. This year's budget and
work plan includes the following:
The Suwannee River Partnership the pro-
gram provides cost-share funding to local farmers
for implementing best management practices to
help protect water resources.
The Ichetucknee Partnership (TIP) the part-
nership works with farmers and land owners to pro-
tect the river and springs in the Ichetucknee
Springshed.
The RiskMAP Program the project involves
updating digital flood maps and establishing flood
elevations. It will provide the public better access
and data to view which properties are located in a
flood zone.
Land acquisition and management the pro-
gram allows the District to purchase property for
the purpose of flood control, water quality protec-
tion and natural resource conservation. Lands are
also open to the public for recreational use.
Hydrologic, groundwater and surface water
monitoring- the network allows the District to mon-
itor water levels and quality and to track rainfall
and flooding conditions. The figures are available to
the public through the District's website.
Water Supply Assessment the initiative will
allow the District to assess water availability in or-
der to develop a water supply plan for the Upper San-
ta Fe River Basin.
To view a copy of the District's Fiscal Year 2009-
10 Budget and Work Plan or for more information
about the above programs visit
www.mysuwanneerivercom.


Good
Morning!
Subscribe today to
enjoy your local news
at the start of every
Wednesday and Friday!
Just $35 in county
and $45 out of county.
Call us at 850-973-4141
to start your subscription
today!


Madison County... __


9/15/09
Thaddeus Donte
Dye VOP (circuit), dis-
orderly intoxication
9/16/09
Terry Andre Bay-
nard Battery
Gregory Sean Coo-
ley Writ of bodily at-
tachment
Bobby Emmanuel
Dennis VOP (circuit)
Wilbert Clarence
Sears Failure to ap-
pear (trespass after
warning)
9/17/09
Jose Antonio
Duarte Battery (do-
mestic violence)
Shanna Collins
Meyer Out of county
warrant
9/18/09
David Smithie -
VOP (circuit)
Vincent Lee
Sanders VOP (circuit),
VOP (county)
9/19/09
Donte Rashad Jack-
son Possession of alco-
hol by a person under 21
Lois Ancizar Silva -
Driving while license
suspended
Travis Hill Out of
county warrant
9/20/09
Allen James Hall -
Battery (domestic vio-
lence)
Ralph Hall VOP
(county)
Johnny Curtis Bed-


good Drug possession,
possession of drug para-
phernalia, driving
while license suspended
or revoked
Kevin Leon Bell, Sr.
- VOP (county)
Stadius Lorenzo
Brown Possession of
drugs, paraphernalia,
weapon
9/21/09
Ronald Lynn Roach
- Possession of drug
paraphernalia
Tony Lee Patterson
- Possession of pre-
scription drugs without
a prescription, posses-
sion of a controlled sub-
stance
9/22/09
Larry Bernard
Joseph Out of county
warrant
Terrance Antone
White Criminal regis-
tration
Melvin Clarence
Gandy VOP (county)
Cassie Leigh
Brunet VOP (circuit)
Bradley Everett
Bayer Criminal regis-
tration
Nathan Markalan
Bull Out of county
warrant
Jonathan Phillip
Henley Battery, VOP
(circuit)
Tanya Marie
Bagley Driving while
license suspended or re-
voked


CLASSES FORMING NOW.
Bachelor's Degree Programs: Registration in Progress
* Psvcholoav Classes Start October 19th


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* Elementary Education
* Human Services Administration
* Business Administration with a
specialization in Management
* Criminal Justice
Saint Leo University admits students of any race, color,
religion and national or ethnic origin.


* Full-time students are eligible for the
Florida Resident Access Grant (FRAG).
* Approved for VA Benefits/GI Bill



SAINT LEO
UNIVERSITY
What you need for where you're going.
Founded in 1889


Former 6ifor aton all*(501-93-3 56or eTnTTl: *-n son s aintl
w w w ~ s a i n t l e e d








Friday, September 25, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com




xouoiA Mabison Countp


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5A


Way Back When ...


September 23, 1949
The Madison High School Red
Devils open their first home game
against Liberty County on Friday
night, Sept. 23, at Lanier Field.
Billy Roberts of Cherry Lake, a
member of the Madison High
School Class of 1949, will attend
school at Emory Junior College in
Valdosta, Ga. this fall.
Mrs. T.F. Hay and son, Bill, have
returned from a motor trip to the
southern part of the state and Day-
tona Beach.

September 25, 1959
Monticello High School defeat-
ed Greenville High last Friday
night, Sept. 18, by a score of 39-6.
Mr. Talmadge Bland went to
Jacksonville Tuesday for a checkup
following a recent operation. Mrs.
Bland accompanied him.
J.C. Agner, of the Lee route, in
renewing the E-R for another year
writes, "We enjoy reading the pa-
per."
Mrs. J.K. Johnson of Boga-
lousa, La., came Saturday for a vis-
it with her son, J.P. Johnson and
Mrs. Johnson and daughter, Mary
Lilla.

September 26, 1969
It was announced that St. Regis
bought a total of $200,900 worth of
pulpwood grown in Madison Coun-
ty during 1968.
The children of Mr. and Mrs.
Wesley Wilburn Catledge, Sr. of
Madison invite all friends and rela-
tives to a reception at their home
Sunday, Sept. 28, from 3-5 p.m. in
honor of their 50th wedding an-
niversary.
Mrs. Martha Bass will be hon-
ored on her 87th birthday Sunday,
Sept. 28, by her family with an open
house at the home of Mr. and Mrs.


Newton Collins at Cherry Lake
from 2-5 p.m. All friends and rela-
tives are invited to attend.
Greenville High School beat
Trenton 22-0 in the first game of
the season Friday night. Henry
Reaves ran 90 yards with an inter-
ception, and Ron Moore recovered a
fumble for a touchdown. Mike
McUire passed 13 yards to Mike
McHargue for the other Greenville
touchdown.
Suwannee River of Madison
won 28-6 over Howard Academy of
Monticello Saturday night.

September 28, 1979
Senior Airman Willie J. Jackson,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Willie Jackson
of Route 1, Greenville, has arrived
for duty at RAF Upper Heyford in
Great Britain.
The Lee 4-H Explorers Club met
Sept. 20. Discussion was made of
Community Pride projects and what
they were going to do to have a bang
of a year, and then they elected the
following officers: President: Mitch
Kuhl; Vice President: Gena Stokes;
Treasurer: Lori Williams; Parlia-
mentarian: Chuck and James Cone;
Reporters: Mitch Kuhl and Ray Yea-
ger; Refreshment Chairman: Laura
Williams.
Recent graduates of Valdosta
Area Vo-Tech School include Ms.
Cynthia Ann Bell, Lee, secretarial;
Ms. B.J. Hahn, Madison, Med Lab
Technology; and Thomas A. Cowart,
Madison, Architectural Drafting and
Mechanical Design Technology.
Mary Ellen Jordan, chairman of
the CPR Unit of the Madison Heart
Association, demonstrated compres-
sions of the new "Anatomic Annie,"
which was donated to the Heart As-
sociation by the Woodmen of the
World, Unit 168, on Sept. 6 at the
K&M Restaurant.


It was one
of those mo-
ments. You see
somebody
whose face you
recognize but
whose name
you can't recall.
My friend and I
were coming off
a plane. Some-
one races up to
her and begins
talking to her
like they've
been best
friends for
years. After a


generic introduction
(the kind you do where
you let two people intro-
duce themselves while
you fumble for the
name) the guy says "Hi,
I'm Bob." Twenty sec-
onds later, my friend
and I are off to baggage
claim.
When out of listen-
ing range, I ask, "Who's
Bob?" to which my
friend replies:
"Haven't a clue. I
don't know him from
Adam."
It's a phrase com-
monly used, especially


AP


by KI2

(Why We Say The Things We


Adam Whi


here in the South. But
the question remains:
who is this Adam and
why do we compare
strangers to him? To un-
derstand the meaning, I
take you to the Bible.
To the extent that
Adam represents every
man, not knowing some-
one from Adam, is sim-
ply a colorful way of
saying, "Never met the
guy."
But given that
Adam was created, not
born, some (with too
much time on their
hands, perhaps) have


been known to
contemplate his
\ navel, (as Adam,
having had no
birth mother,
would've had no
need for one).
So yes, tech-
nically, we could
pick Adam out
of a line-up, pro-
vided he was
Say) wearing no
more than a fig
:? leaf. But argu-
ing this point
doesn't lend in-
sight to the
true origin of the
phrase.
To give credit where
credit is due, the phrase
in its entirety is: "does-
n't know from Adam's
off ox," made popular
in the mid 1800s by a
book of Nantucket col-
loquialisms. Adam's
house cat, later became
our Americanized ver-
sion. But regardless the
animals tacked to the
phrase "Don't know
him from Adam" is just
another way of saying
"Couldn't pick him out
of a crowd of two."


ForthIcopute alndr, ist wwLrenepblshig om


September 25
The Senior Citizens
Council of Madison
County will be hosting a
health fair at Lee City
Hall from 10 a.m.-12:30
p.m. Vital information
about health and ser-
vices for seniors will be
provided. Door prizes
will be given away, and a
light breakfast and
lunch will be provided.
For more information,
please call (850) 973-4241.

September 27
Madison Church of
God will be holding a
Men's Breakfast fellow-
ship on Sunday, Septem-
ber 27, at 8 a.m. All men
are invited and church
members are encour-
aged to bring a friend.

September 27
Legendary Naomi
and the Segos will be in
concert at Midway
Church of God on Sun-
day evening, September
27, at 6 p.m. Admission is
free, however a love of-
fering will be received
during the concert. For
more information,
please call (850) 971-5200.

September 27
Hanson United
Methodist Church will


be holding their annual
Homecoming on Sunday,
September 27, starting at
11 a.m. The guest speak-
er for the event will be
Connie Peterson, who is
the national director for
the Covenant Bible Col-
lege of Madison. Every-
one is invited to attend.

October 4
The Joseph Wash-
ington Thomas Family
Reunion will be held on
Sunday, October 4, from
9:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. at
the Lee City Hall. Fami-
ly members are asked to
bring a covered dish
lunch and items for the
auction.

October 8
The Nation's leading
male quartet, Gold City,
will be in concert at Yogi
Bear's Jellystone Park in
Madison on Thursday,
October 8, at 7 p.m.
LifeSong will join Gold
City for an unforgettable
evening of gospel music.
For ticket information,
please call (850) 464-0114
or visit www.northflor-
idaconcerts.com.

October 17
Hickory Grove
Founder's Day is set for
Saturday, October 17, on
the grounds of the Hick-
ory Grove United
Methodist Church.
Come out to experience
the old fashion way of
living and great gospel
music.


THIS SUNDAY
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Get an Eye Exam
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Plus all Glasses are
Buy 1 Pair and Get 1 Pair Free


E
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Call For Appointment (229)444-7259
We accept walk-in and
outside prescriptions.

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We have the best prices in S. Georgia and
N. Florida guaranteed!!!
Located 2031 N. Ashley Valdosta, GA 31601


October 18
Jeslamb AME
Church will be having
an old fashion church
service on October 18, at
11 a.m. Come dressed
like the ancestors did in
the old time way, or casu-
al and comfortable. The
guest speaker will be
Rev. Dozier Balloon, Jr.
Everyone is invited to at-
tend.

Thursdays-Mondays
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park
will host an ongoing
wood carving workshop
on Thursdays through
Mondays, from noon un-
til 4 p.m. Participants
can create figure carv-
ings, wood spirits,
spoons, bowls, relief
carvings and more dur-
ing this four-hour class.
Workshop fees are $15
per session and include
park admission. For ad-
ditional information or
to register for the work-
shops, please call (386)
397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.o
rg.

Each Weekday Except
Tuesday
The Senior Citizens
Center offers computer
classes to seniors 60
and older each weekday
except Tuesday. For
more information or to
sign up, please call
(850) 973-4241. A regu-
lar instructor is needed
to teach these classes.
Interested individuals
should ask to speak
with Sharon concern-
ing the opening at the
number above.


Every
Tuesday-Saturday
The Diamonds in
the Ruff Adoption Pro-
gram at the Suwannee
Valley Humane Society
is open every Tuesday
through Saturday from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is lo-
cated on 1156 SE Bisbee
Loop, Madison, FL 32340.
For more information,
or directions, call (866)
236-7812 or (850) 971-9904.

First Saturday
of Each Month
Everyone is invited
to gospel (open mic)
sings at Lee Worship
Center the first Satur-
day night of each
month, beginning at 7
p.m. The church is locat-
ed at 397 Magnolia Dr. in
Lee. Everyone is asked
to bring a dish for the
pot luck supper. There
will be great musicians,
so those who can play an
instrument are welcome
to come and join in.
Bring a friend with you.
For more information,
call Allen McCormick at
(850) 673-9481.

Second and Fourth
Saturday of Each
Month
The Madison
Church of God hosts a
free soup kitchen the
second and fourth Sat-
urday of each month at
the Greenville Senior
Citizens Center. Lunch
is served from noon to 1
p.m.

Third Tuesday
of Each Month
The Greater
Greenville Area Dia-
betes Support Group is a


free educational service
and support for diabetes
and those wanting to
prevent diabetes. The
group meets the third
Tuesday of each month
at the Greenville Public
Library Conference
Room at 312 SW Church
St., Greenville, 11-11:30
a.m. Everyone is wel-
come!

Every Wednesday and
Friday
The Senior Citizens
Center's sewing club for
seniors 60 and older
meets every Wednesday
and Friday. For more in-
formation or to sign up,
please call (850) 973-
4241.

Third Wednesday of
Each Month
The Madison Coun-
ty Health Education
Club is holding a free
educational service and
support group for peo-
ple interested in pre-
venting or controlling
diabetes, high blood
pressure, elevated cho-
lesterol levels, obesity
and other chronic
health conditions. The
club meets the third
Wednesday of each
month at the Madison
Public Library Confer-
ence Room at 378 NW
College Loop, Madison,
12:15-12:45 p.m. Every-
one is welcome to bring
their own lunch.

Third Wednesday of
Each Month
The Madison Coun-
ty Diabetes Support
Group is a free educa-
tional service and sup-
port group for diabetes


and those wanting to
prevent diabetes. The
group meets the third
Wednesday of each
month at the Madison
Public Library Confer-
ence Room at 378 NW
College Loop, Madison,
11:45 a.m.-12:10 p.m.
Everyone is welcome is
bring their own lunch.
For details, contact
Marcia Kazmierski at
(386) 752-2461 or Lor-
raine Miller at (386)
752-6439.

Fourth Wednesday of
Each Month
An informational
meeting for those in-
jured and needing help
returning to work will
be held the fourth
Wednesday of each
month from 12-3 p.m. at
the Madison County
Extension Office locat-
ed at 184 College Loop,
Madison. The meeting
is free and open to the
public. For more infor-
mation, please call
(850) 245-3489.

Fourth Tuesday of
Each Month
Big Bend Hospice's
adult Grief Support
Group meets on the
fourth Tuesday of each
month at the Madison
County Senior Center,
located at 4886 SW Rut-
ledge. The group is
open to anyone in the
community who has
experienced the death
of someone in their
life. The support
groups are a free com-
munity service. For
more information,
please call Casey Shaf-
fer at 566-6189.


Jerry Borgert Owner


A B) & Sons Painting, Inc

Family Owned and Operated
Interior/Exterior Caulking Waterproofing *
* Pressure Cleaning Spray Painting Faux Finishes Wood Repair *
Fence Painting Deck Restoration* Roof Painting *
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YO HAVE IT.










Got something you no longer use or need?
Sell it in the classifieds.

thama 850-973-4141


CSEISS3L







6A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



xounoA Mabison Countp


Friday, September 25, 2009


Refuge House Holds "


Awareness Month Events
- - ---IJ- A 33


Every October, Refuge House leads our
Big Bend communities in recognizing Do-
mestic Violence Awareness Month. The
Refuge House Domestic Violence Speak out
and Vigil will be held on Wednesday, October
7, 2009 at Lake Ella on North Monroe Street
from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The event hon-
ors victims of domestic violence and their
families, celebrates the successes of sur-
vivors, and announces the community's
commitment to ending domestic violence.
Among the speakers and presenters will be
Florida Representative Michelle Rehwinkel-
Vasilinda, Florida Representative Allan
Williams, Black on Black Rhyme, the Talla-
hassee Girls Choir, and the SAIL Americana
Bluegrass Ensemble. Spanish translation
will be provided. Survivors of domestic vio-
lence and their families are invited to speak.
In 2008, there were 1,313 reports of do-
mestic violence in Leon County alone.
Across the eight counties of the Big Bend,
the number rises to 1,989. National research
indicates that approximately 400% of attacks
are never disclosed to law enforcement. At
the same time, the face of domestic violence
is already known to many of us. Nearly
three out of four (74%) Americans personal-


ly know someone who is or has been a victim
of domestic violence, and thirty percent
(30%) of Americans say they know a woman
who has been physically abused by her hus-
band or boyfriend in the past year.' And
we can all help. Inviting victims we know
to access Refuge House services can be a
powerful tool for stopping abuse. Studies
show that access to shelter services leads
to a 60-70% reduction in incidence and
severity of re-assault during the 3-12
months' follow up period compared to
women who did not access shelter. Shelter
services led to greater reduction in severe
re-assault than did seeking court or law
enforcement protection, or moving to a
new location.2 Reach out, learn more, and
support justice and peace for everyone in
our community during Domestic Violence
Awareness Month.
1 Allstate Foundation National Poll on
Domestic Violence, 2006.
2 Campbell, JC, PhD, RN, FAAN. Anna D.
Wolf, Johns Hopkins University School of
Nursing, Protective Action and Re-assault:
Findings from the RAVE study.


Join us on October 7th


Join our speakers, musicians, poets
and supporters for an evening of
recognition and unity. The Famous
Refuge House Hot Dog Buffet will
be served. And there will be
activities for children. Admission is
FREE and everyone is welcome!
We support all survivors who wish
to participate. Please call Patricia
Smith, 922-6062 for safety planning
and information.


Every October, our community comes together:
* To support victims and their families
* To celebrate the courage of survivors
* To commit ourselves to ending domestic violence
Wednesday, October 7th, 2009
6pm-8pm Lake Ella


Refuge House


Refuge House P.O. Box 20910 A Tallahassee, Florida 32316 www.RefugeHouse.com
24 Hour Crisis Line 850-681-2111 Local or 800-500-1119 Toll Free


Gladys Hutchinson Honored On 90th Birthday


Photo submitted
Family help Gladys Hutchinson celebrate her 90th birthday. Pictured left to right, back row, are Tony
Huggins, Tyree and Heather H. Jordan, Rosalind Huggins, Honoree Mrs. Hutchinson, Jerry Hutchinson,
Paige Mahnken (holding Lauren), Scott Stearns, David Mahnken, Erin Stearns, Jeannie Walker and Kirby
Hutchinson. Kendall, left, and Courtney Stearns standing in front. Approximately 200 friends, neighbors,
and family attended including her Church Family, from Faith Baptist Church, members of the Order of East-
ern Star and the Retired Teachers and Aides of Madison Primary School. Assisting the family with hospi-
tality duties were Mrs. Dale Sowell, Ms. June Ragans-Wood, Mrs. Helen Bland and Mrs. Minnie L. Newborn.


Good Morning!
Subscribe today to enjoy your local news
At the start of every Wednesday and Friday!
Just $35 in county and $45 out of county.
Call us at 850-973-4141
To start your subscription today!


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Gladys Hutchinson cele-
brated her 90th birthday with a
party at Shelby's Restaurant
on Sunday, Aug. 9, from 3-5 p.m.
Over 200 guests and old
friends attended the party, in-
cluding Edith Davis, Juanita
Ragans and Eddie Bevis. A live
bluegrass band entertained the
guests.
Shelby Richards and her
crew at Shelby's delivered a
scrumptious meal and ab-
solutely beautiful cakes.
Mrs. Hutchinson worked in
the school system in Madison
County for years and has been
an inspiration to everyone she
has met. She is a member of
Faith Baptist Church in Madi-
son.
Belated birthday wishes
are extended to Gladys
Hutchinson. Greene Publish-
ing, Inc. wishes her many more
birthdays.


N *


t 9


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4 Thurs.-Fri.-Sat.-Sun.
4 DAY SALE Sept. 24th 27th
Whole Semi-Boneless Boneless Beef Smoked Sliced Grade A Fryer
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5, 5 Lbs.o10" 1 00 0 100O
399 for___Rjfori


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PORK GROUND WHOLE PORK
CHOPS CHUCK FRYERS RIBS
1 2? f10O 99 .l4

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEK LIVE AK STORE OPE 3 Slabs


OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK UVE OAK STORE OPEN SUNDAY


636 South Ohio Av
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-330-5122


L.J. Mobley & Son
e.
Prices good
September 24-27


6769-180th St.
McAlpin, FL 32062
386-963-5215


The family of Richard Wayne Col-
lis, Sr. would like to acknowledge with
deep appreciation your kind expressions of
support during our recent, unexpected loss.
The food, flowers and fellowship will nev-
er be forgotten. Please keep us in your
prayers during our struggle to mend.







Friday, September 25, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com



xouno Mabison Countp


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7A


WELCOME


I0


4gELCARRISAL


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Madison is known
for having some of the
best restaurants that
can be found anywhere.
And the addition of a
new Mexican restau-
rant, El Carrisal, is no
exception to that rule.
Opening on Monday,
September 28, El Car-
risal will offer Madison
a chance to experience
dinner...Mexican style.
From Adel, Geor-
gia, Hector and Carla
Nunez has owned and
managed a Mexican
restaurant in Adel, also
called El Carrisal. The
company has been in
business for nearly
eight years, which has
equipped them to bring
much experience and
satisfaction to the
table. El Carrisal is


guaranteed to bring a
first class taste to Mexi-
can food lovers in
Madison.
"I want Madison
residents to experience
the best Mexican food
they've ever ate," stat-
ed Hector. "Great ser-
vice and a friendly
atmosphere is what we
want people to enjoy."
The El Carrisal is
located at the former
location of Food For
Thought and KFC on
Hwy. 90.
Business hours are:
Monday-Friday, (lunch)
11 a.m.-2 p.m., (dinner)
5-10 p.m.; Saturday,
(lunch) 11:30 a.m.-2
p.m., (dinner) 5-10 p.m.;
closed on Sunday.
To experience some
of the best Mexican
food, stop in and see the
folks at El Carrisal.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Bryant Thigpen, September 23,
2009
Hector, along with
his wife Carla, are the
owners of the newest
restaurant in town, the El
Carrisal.


P Energ


,Rqust Rat Hke


PAYMENTS RECEIVED AS OF AUG 31 2009
RS-1 001 RESIDENTIAL SERVICE
BILLING PERIOD..08-12-09 TO 09-11-09 30 DAYS
CUSTOMER CHARGE
ENERGY CHARGE
FIRST 1000 KWH 1000 KWH 3 5.5690C
ABOVE 1000 KWH 103 KWH @ 6.5690C
FUEL CHARGE
FIRST 1000 KWH 1000 KWH 8 5.6000C
ABOVE 1000 KWH 103 KWH @ 6.60000


TOTAL ELECTRIC COST
RATE ADJUSTMENT
GROSS RECEIPTS TAX
MUNICIPAL FRANCHISE FEE
MUNICIPAL UTILITY TAX


TOTAL CURRENT BILL
TOTAL DUE THIS STATEMENT


According to local
media Progress Energy
of Florida is before the
Public Service Commis-
sion of Florida request-
ing a 300% increase of the
basic rate of electricity.
Tallahassee's WCTV
(Channel 6) quotes
Suzanne Grant of
Progress Energy who
states, "Our base rates
have been relatively flat
for 25 years. In fact,
they've only gone up 1
percent, where costs and
things of that nature
have gone up dramati-
cally in those 25 years."
A search of avail-
able records shows that
the "overall cost" for
electricity from
Progress Energy of


Florida in Madison
County has gone up 84
percent in the past 25
years. That includes
base rates, fuel charge,
taxes and any of the oth-
er fees placed on the
monthly billing. In Feb-
ruary of 1984 1,416 kilo-
watt hours of electricity
resulted in a total bill of
$113.30. In July of 2009
1,419 kilowatt hours cost
$208.50. If the base rate
has only gone up 1 per-
cent in 25 years what ac-
counts for the other 8
percent?
And if you go back
32 years the over all in-
crease in the cost of elec-
tricity in Madison
County from Progress
Energy has gone up 190


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30 increase in the Gross
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M.O.D.E.L. Mentoring
Program To Hosts
"Meet and Greet" Event
Social Event, to be Held Monday, September
28, Gives Community Members an
Opportunity to Learn About the Rewards
of a Mentoring Relationship
Over 1.5 million children in the United States
have a parent serving a sentence in a state or feder-
al prison. Most of this increasing population lives in
poor neighborhoods, where their particular needs
compound the pressure on families and cities al-
ready struggling with violence, discrimination, so-
cial instability and poverty
With over 2,000 children in North Central Flori-
da with parents incarcerated, CHS established the
Mentors Opening Doors Enriching Lives (MODEL)
program in 2005. Through a federal grant CHS is
able to provide one-to-one community-based men-
tors for children who have a parent incarcerated in
a federal or state prison. Each youth is matched with
a trained mentor who is 21 years of age or older, who
can provide leadership and encouragement to help
direct a child toward a positive path in life.
Community members are invited to socialize
with mentors and staff from the MODEL program
on Monday September 28, 2009, from 5 p.m. to 6:30
p.m. at Bruegger's Bagels, 3425 Thomasville Road
#1. Guests will learn about the rewards of being a
mentor, the training and support provided by pro-
gram staff, and how to become involved in this suc-
cessful program. Bruegger's Bagels will also offer
discounted food and beverages to guests during the
event.
"Through the simple act of being a friend, each
mentor makes a world of difference to the youth in
our program," said Louise Bradshaw, MODEL pro-
gram supervisor. The MODEL program aids each
mentor and youth in structuring a caring and re-
warding relationship. "On average about 20 youth
are waiting to be matched with a mentor through
our program," said Bradshaw.
Research has revealed that youth who are in-
volved in mentoring programs do better in school,
are less likely to engage in high-risk activities, and
have improved family and social relationships. With
a commitment of just one hour per week for one
year, a child's life can be changed forever.
About Children's Home Society of Florida
Founded in Jacksonville in 1902, Children's
Home Society of Florida (CHS) is the third largest
private not-for-profit serving children and families
in the United States and Canada accredited by the
Council on Accreditation. CHS was a founding
member of the Child Welfare League of America,
and was instrumental in helping to pass Florida's
first laws protecting children. Services include fos-
ter care, adoption, child abuse prevention, emer-
gency shelters, residential group homes,
independent and transitional living for teens, early
education and care, parent education, counseling,
mentoring, and treatment for developmentally dis-
abled children. CHS, which served more than 86,000
children and families in 2007-2008, is headquartered
in Winter Park, Fla., has 14 divisions and employs
more than 1,900 staff who are dedicated to providing
child-focused, family-centered care.


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8A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com




xouoiA Mabison Countp


Friday, September 25, 2009


Jefferson County Fire Towers


To Be A Thing Of The Past...


One Tower Being Moved Into Madison County
By Fran Hunt pany turn off the electricity to the office next to the tow- structed in March of 1956, but it, too, is soon destined to
Special From The Monticello News er early Friday morning for the safety of the crew, and change. Griffin said that the Department, had also de-
The three fire towers of Jefferson County, which they had an option as to whether to take the concrete clared the 80-foot tall Wacissa tower as surplus.
long stood as familiar historical markers and land footers or not. They were also responsible for any dam-
markers, and were also used in locating, and combating age caused during the removal process, including land-
forest fires, will soon be no more.
For many years, the towers served as lookouts over
Jefferson County lands, but that program faded in the
late 90's, and came to an end with the eventual sale and
dismantling of all three of the county towers.
The Division of Forestry declared the towers sur- Mr.nnin a...... InNnhntn h,, Fr. un,.


At noon Wednesday, the only remaining rem-
nants of where the Monticello fire tower once stood,
was gone, other than the concrete footers.
scaping damages.
Forty feet down the structure from the base of the
cab, the crew of men workers loosening bolts and mark-
ing every piece to be reassembled at a different location.
A few of the bolts, which secured the stairs which
could not be reached because they were located under
the wood, were cut with a blow torch. After checking,
double and triple checking that all bolts were loose, the
harness was secured properly, and all tools had been re-
moved, the crane lowered the harness, which was at-
tached to all four corners below the cab.
At noon, the mammoth machine lifted the top 40-
foot section from the structure and lowered it inst above


Monticello News photos by Fran Hunt
Wednesday morning, Sept. 16, all that remained
of the Monticello fire tower was this 20-foot base sec-
tion.

plus, due to the technology of today and fires being bet-
ter tracked by either satellite or people calling in on
their cellular phones whenever a fire was spotted. The
positions in the state were closed in either 1995 or 1996
and Jefferson County phased out their three towers
shortly afterward.
The three county towers were: the Ashville tower,
formerly located off of the Ashville Highway next to
the Ashville Area Volunteer Fire Department; the sec-
ond was the tower located off of US-19 south of Monti-
cello; and finally, the Wacissa tower.
The Ashville tower was 100-feet tall and built in
March 1956, and though, the exact year that it was dis-
mantled could not be recalled by the bidder who re-
moved the tower, Cross Environmental Services of
Crystal Springs, estimated that it was about 2002 or
2003.
The tower had the top 40-foot section removed as a
single unit, and the remainder removed in 20-foot sec-
tions. Finally, the base was dismantled. Presently, the
top 80 feet of the tower serves as an observation tower
at the privately owned Gum Creek Hunting Preserve in
Madison County
The land for the Monticello tower was purchased
from Otto and Elsa Lorenzen Nov 4, 1955, and the tower
was erected in March, 1956, by Aermotor of Chicago, IL
at a cost of $3,855.29, which included the materials and
construction of the structure which stood 100 feet tall.
The cab compartment measured 49 square feet, seven
feet by seven feet.
For more than 53 years, the tower provided a look-
out over Jefferson County woodlands, becoming a fa-
miliar sight to everyone living in the county or passing
through.
At 9 a.m., Monday, Sept. 14, a crew from Cross En-
vironmental Services, of Crystal Springs, pulled into
the site to dismantle and move the tower. Division of
Forestry representative Allen Griffin said the depart-
ment had declared the tower surplus and put it on the
auction block, and then it was sold to the highest bidder,
which had 45 days from the point of payment, to fully
remove the tower.
He explained that the bidder had the electric com-


Monticello News photos by Fran Hunt
At 4 p.m. Monday afternoon, there were two 20-
foot sections of tower sitting on the ground near the
remaining 20-foot section of base.
The land for the tower was purchased in 1944, and
the tower was constructed in 1945 by a company called
International. "I was down there about a month ago,
surveying the area and mapping out diagrams," said
Griffin. "Then it will be put up for bid and the highest
bidder will be awarded the tower and be responsible for
dismantling it and removing it."
Crew foreman Wayne Oliver explained that when it
was raining, as long as there was no lightning in the
area, it was the option of the men to work despite the
wet and slippery conditions. Standing on the metal, and
trying to hold onto it could cause a problem. He said
that removing a tower was usually a two to three-day
job, depending on the weather. He estimated that the
work at the Monticello tower would be completed by the
following Wednesday morning.
Oliver also knew the fate of the tower and its desti-
nation. "Tentatively, the top 40-foot section containing
the cab, will become an observation tower at Gum
Creek Hunting Preserve in Madison County, north of
Greenville," said Oliver. "And tentatively, the two 20-foot
sections will be reassembled and be used as an obser-
vation deck, also at Gum Creek."
He added that they probably would lose the base
section, due to the design of it.
Oliver said that Gum Creek and Cross Environ-
mental Service, Inc., are both owned by Clyde Biston of
Zephyrhills, Fl.
Oliver also discovered that the 80-foot observation


Monticello News photos by Fran Hunt
Tuesday at noon, one 20-foot section of tower
and the 20-foot base section remained.
tower, which presently stands at Gum Creek, was the
former 80-foot tall Ashville tower. He said that Gum
Creek does offer private hunts and they feature exotic
wildlife such as Fallow deer, Red Stag, Whitetail deer,
and Black Horned Antelope.
Though the Ashville and Monticello towers are
now just a Jefferson County memory and a piece of his-
tory, they will continue to do what they were construct-
ed to do more than 50 years ago: overlook the trees and
the bountiful wildlife, which dwells in the area, within
them.


On Friday afternoon, Sept. 11, the Monticello fire
tower stood as it had for the past 53 years, overlook-
ing the county.
a trailer, which lay in waiting. The structure was then
maneuvered, placed on its side in one piece, secured,
and transported out of town.
The crew then rescaled the tower stairs to a point 20
feet below where the 40-foot section had been removed,
and repeated the process. After that piece was lowered
to the ground, the men started working 20 feet up, on the
next section.
By 4 p.m., when the skies opened and lightning
bolts flashed, the crew had lowered the final piece to the
ground, leaving only the 20-foot section of the base
standing on the footers and two equal sections of tower
standing beside it.
Early Tuesday morning, despite the moderate to
heavy rains, the men had begun disassembling the sec-
tion, which had come off the base section, and loading
it, piece by piece. At noon, when that section had been
completely dismantled, they moved to the section that
had been closest to the top, and began dismantling it
and loading it piece by piece. By 4 p.m., the second sec-
tion had been dismantled, loaded and the two sections
of tower were transported from the scene.
Wednesday morning at 8 a.m., all that remained
was the base section of tower and despite a thick fog,
the crew was at work. By noon Wednesday, Sept. 16, all
remnants of where the tower had once stood for many
years, were gone, leaving only the concrete footers be-
hind.
Monticello News photos by Fran Hunt As of Sept. 16, only the Wacissa fire tower re-
By noon Monday, Sept. 14, the top 40-foot sec- mained in Jefferson County That tower had stood
tion of the Monticello tower was being removed, alone, for 11 years until its sister towers were con-


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Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A


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From Jellyroll To Historic Landmark


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On June 23, 1930, Ray
Charles Robinson was
born in Alban, Ga. A few
years later, he moved
into Jellyroll, a small
community on the west-
ern side of Greenville.
The home, located at 465
Western Avenue, was
rented to Margaret
Robinson, the grand-
mother of Ray
At age five, Ray start-
ed going blind, and by
seven was without sight.
His mother and family,
realizing young Ray
would face enormous dif-
ficulties with his quickly
approaching blindness,
began preparing him
early for those future
challenges. He was later
sent to The Florida
School for the Deaf and
Blind in St. Augustine.
His father, Bailey Robin-
son, died a few years lat-
er and his mother,
Aretha Williams, died
five years after his father.
It certainly wasn't
all tragedy for Ray,
though. While attending
school, Ray developed


Officials and friends of Greenville gather at Haffye Hayes Park to commem-
orate the boyhood home of Ray Charles as an historic landmark. Front row, left
to right are: Justina Cone, Lucile Day, Elesta Pritchett and Reverend J.B. Duval;
Second row, left to right are: Sherry Roland, Timothy Dennis, Ronald Poppell,
Debe Scott and Kovacherich Arnold; Back row, left to right are: Jim Parrish, J.C.
Fead and Martin Lee.


great musical abilities,
learning to play piano
and sing in a manner few
have achieved since. He
later dropped the last
name Robinson, and for
the next 60 years, dazzled
crowds and wowed
America as one of the


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, September 23, 2009
A ceremony was held on September 23 to recog-
nize the historic landmark placed at the childhood
home of Ray Charles, located on SW Ray Charles Av-
enue in Greenville.


most prolific blues and
rock performers, Ray
Charles.
On the anniversary
of his birthday, officials,
residents and friends of
Greenville gathered at
Haffye Hayes Park, near
the childhood home,
where the street has been
renamed SW Ray Charles
Avenue. Coming together
to celebrate the restora-
tion and placement of a
historic landmark at the
property, through the uti-
lization of a $50,000
grant, among other con-
tributions, the home has
been fully restored, and
was opened to the public
for the first time.
Greenville First
Lady and Councilwoman
Elesta Pritchett opened
the ceremony, followed
by Jim Parrish, who has
been fundamental in
raising funds for the pro-
ject and coordinating the


project with the Ray
Charles Foundation. Af-
ter recognizing officials
and several contributors
who have been central to
the restoration process,
including the Greenville
Heritage Committee, Lu-
cile Day gave a brief
overview of the steps
leading to rebuilding the
historic landmark.
Following the
speakers, visitors
boarded two buses pro-
vided by the Madison
County School Board,
traveling to the boy-
hood home where the
historic marker was
unveiled. Local digni-
taries, including State
Representative Leonard
Bembry, joined county
and municipal offi-
cials, as well as State
Senator Al Lawson, in
expressing their appre-
ciation for the effort.
After the tour, everyone


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, September 23, 2009
First Lady of Greenville Elesta Pritchett opens
the dedication ceremony celebrating the restoration
of the childhood home of legendary singer and mu-
sician, Ray Charles.


returned to the park for
light refreshments, the
centerpiece of which
were appropriately, "an
RC Cola and a Moon Pie."
Anyone wishing to
make a period piece or
cash donation to com-


plete furnishing of the
home is warmly invited
to contact Greenville
City Hall at (850) 948-
2251.
Michael Curtis can
be reached at michael@
greenepublishing.com.


Crosswinds Demonstrates Talent During Show


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The first ever Crosswinds Talent Show took
place on Wednesday, September 16, as residents and
staff performed before a packed house. From
singing to dancing, the show was very entertaining
and could be deemed as one of the most successful
events at the facility
The event kicked off with the lovely ladies from
Crosswind's Red Hat Society These ladies demon-
strated class and style as they moved across the
stage.
Devany Yearby, who is a CNA from Crossland-
ings in Monticello, was up next and performed a
powerful rendition of "Jesus Loves Me". Yearby was
a crowd favorite.
An act by Diane Sullivan and James Robinson
was a hit as they let loose on stage and performed
Guitarzan.
James Robinson followed the Guitarzan act with



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a touching gospel song titled, "So Many Times."
During this song, the crowd sang along and the tal-
ent show turned into a church service. Robinson put
his heart into the song.
A young lady by the name of Sharon Mays was
up next and performed a song for the audience.
Mays did an awesome job and stole the heart of the
audience.
The talent show then changed gears with a per-
formance of "I've Got You, Babe." The comical act of
Diane Sullivan and resident Walter Broome had the
crowd rolling in laughter.
'Ain't No Mountain High Enough" was per-
formed next by residents Patricia Towels and Walter
Broome. Towels and Broome turned in a stellar per-
formance and quickly grabbed the audience's atten-
tion.
Another act that kept the focus on the stage was
by administrators Diane Williams, Ellis Williams


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Bryant Thigpen, September 16, 2009
Julia Swain is a member of the Red Hat Society
and started the show demonstrating her talent.


and Paul Kovray on an act called Gladys Knight and
the pimps. Their performance was very entertain-
ing and kept the crowd in stitches.
Robinson returned for another song, but this
time he performed a funny country song.
Up next was an act by Diane Sullivan and Diane
Williams. These two women acted "Ragged and Fun-
ny" and came up with funniest lines during their
performance.
The judges then tallied up the votes and the win-
ners were announced. Every staff and resident who
participated won an award. "Everybody were win-
ners and did a fantastic job," stated Activities Coor-
dinator Diane Sullivan.
A great time was had by all in attendance. "We
definitely plan to do this again next year," she said.
The grand finale of the event was everyone tak-
ing center stage for a dance. The good times rolled
and excitement is in the air, anticipating next year's
event.


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10A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



Zurn Back ZimC


Friday, September 25, 2009


Attorneys In Madison County

Reprinted from The Madison Enterprise-Recorder, Sept. 26. 1969


By Billy Williams
The largest retail business in Madison County in
the 1850s was he firm of Parramore and Thomas. Red-
den W Parramore and S.B. Thomas were partners in
a mercantile business, which catered to the general
needs of the planters in the area. Parramore, in addi-
tion to owning two large plantations and half-share in
the general store, operated as a cotton commission
merchant for a New York law firm. David L. Kennedy,
minister of the Madison Methodist Church, also op-
erated a drugstore in Madison during the late 1850s.
Other druggists who also operated in Madison Coun-
ty during this period were Maynard Perry and PB.
Williams.
*


Richard Bradford practiced law in Madison
County. A captain in the Confederate Army, Bradford
was the first Florida officer to be killed in the War Be-
tween the States. He died at the Battle of Santa Rosa
Island, on October 9,1861. New River County, estab-
lished in 1858, was renamed Bradford County on De-
cember 6, 1861, in honor of Captain Bradford.
In September 1853, Benjamin E Wardlaw and
John L. Miller began operation of the "Madison Wide
Hotel." They promised, "It will be our aim to make
our house in all respects what a hotel should be." The
hotel dining room became the favorite eating spot for
all bachelor professional men in Madison. A visitor to
the hotel once remarked, "it would prompt the palate
of an anchorite to peep into the dining room of
Messrs. Wardlaw and Miller and get a view of the
good eatings prepared for the numerous guests."
The two most highly regarded professions in an-
tebellum Middle Florida were law and medicine. Law


was the more lucrative profession, the top income
from its practice being $4,000 a year, while the best
medical practice brought in hardly half that amount.
As the Town of Madison grew and prospered, sev-
eral lawyers arrived to practice their trade. Estimates
of the ability of these early lawyers varied. Achille
Murat, a resident of Jefferson County, characterized
them as follows;
"...The lawyers, jurisconsuls, barristers, attor-
neys and notaries now arrive. Our county now
abounds with a host of poor devils, without any pecu-
niary means, although, however, they may have re-
ceived some sort of education. They shut themselves
up and study the laws; at the same time following
some other occupation, such as the army, in a count-
ing house, or even an hotel, and as soon as they feel
themselves sufficiently competent to undergo an ex-
amination, they are received, and a gain a livelihood
thereby Here are found a host of little pettifoggers -
who enter into discussion, and get up quarrels among
the poor ignorant people drag them into law courts,
and accomplish their end by pocketing thirty dollars
or so.. .Nothing can be more despicable and miserable
than the illegal pollution surrounding the court
house of a new state in its infancy. I must, however,
make exceptions; many among them are gentlemen,
who perfect themselves in their studies by practice,
make money, and acquire respect and consideration."
The members of the bar in Madison County were
somewhat better qualified than those lawyers alluded
to by Murat. At least two, Enoch J. Vann and Richard
Bradford, were graduates of the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill. Another man, who occasion-
ally practiced law in Madison, was General Waddy
Thompson, an old line Whig, who had served as Pres-
ident James K. Polk's minister to Mexico. E.J. Vann
practiced in partnership with Carraway Smith. They
were licensed to practice in the Florida Supreme
Court, the United States District Court, and in the Cir-
cuit Courts of the counties of Leon, Wakulla, Jeffer-
son, Madison, Taylor, Lafayette, Hamilton and
Columbia in Florida, and the adjoining counties of
Thomas and Lowndes in Georgia. Another firm prac-
ticing law in Madison at this time was that of William
B. Peacock and John Clements. Barton C. Pope and
Alexander McDonald were also associated in a law
practice. O.M. Lee, a native of North Carolina, moved
to Madison and set up a law practice in 1856.
In order to gain admission to the bar, the prospec-
tive lawyer had to go through an apprenticeship peri-
od of "reading the law" in the office of an established
attorney E.J. Vann served his period of apprentice-
ship in the offices of Pope and Mays in Madison.
When the would-be lawyer felt adequately prepared,
he applied to the Judge of the Circuit Court for ad-
mission to the bar. Vann related his experience as fol-
lows:
"...At that time, the Judge appointed a committee
of three to examine applicants and report to him as to
their fitness. The committee in my case met after sup-
per at the hotel and examined me there. After having


examined me for some time, I was asked the question:
'What is the difference between a contingent remain-
der and an executory devise?' As I had Blackstone at
my finger's end, I answered promptly, during which
Gen. Waddy Thompson came in, and he and the com-
mittee got into a discussion as to my answer, which
lasted some time, when I was discharged without fur-
ther examination."


Gen. Waddy Thompson practiced law in Madison
County. He also served as the U.S. ambassador to
Mexico from 1842-1844.
Due to the small population and poor traveling
conditions in Middle Florida, the holding of court
was often difficult. The scarcity of lawyers in
many counties required many attorneys to ride cir-
cuit. Vann recorded his observations on this cus-
tom:
"In those days, as now, the Third Judicial Cir-
cuit Court, was held in several counties, the judge
holding a fall and spring term in each in every year.
There was no railroad, and the lawyers used to
travel from county to county by private con-
veyances. Frequently, lawyers from Jacksonville
and Tallahassee attended court here: D.S. Walker
afterwards became governor; M.D, Papy, who be-
came attorney general; William Archer Cocke; and
others. I attended every session of every court,
sometimes the court in Lowndes County, Georgia,
then held in Troupeville (now Valdosta) at which I
flattered myself that I learned more law."
As might be expected, lawyers were the leading
political figures in antebellum Madison County


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Church


Friday, September 25, 2009


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11 A


Madison County Well Represented


In Corinth Christian Athletics


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The boy's flag foot-
ball team and the girl's
volleyball team battled
hard on game night, as
Corinth Christian Acad-
emy hosted the visitors
from Starke. Warrior
fans came out in big
numbers to support
their teams against
Northside, and among
those dedicated players
and fans, Madison Coun-
ty was well represented,
including standouts
from both Lee and Madi-
son.
Principal Karen
Godwin graciously host-
ed the visitors, who
brought two exceptional
teams ready to play The
visitors managed to put
up a win in both compe-
titions, but not before
the Warriors proved
they know how to deliv-
er athletics, in addition
to their strong academic
and religious studies.
Coach Trent Ab-
bott's flag football team
put up a few scores, but
couldn't overcome
Northside's high point
production. Whereas,
Coach Mike
Boatwright's girls' vol-
leyball team kept it close
down to the wire, com-
ing back from two sets to
one to push the match
into a fifth set where
they eventually lost by
only a point.
The church grounds
were buzzing with ex-
citement, and the re-
freshments lived up to
their popularity Fami-
lies and friends made an


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, September 18, 2009


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, September 18, 2009 Corinth Christian Flag Football Coach Trent Abbott stands with the players
who live in Madison County. Boys, standing front, left to right: Cody Williams,
Jason and Dawn Phillips stand with their daugh- Kyle Bailey, Justin Phillips and Jacob Phillips; and back, left to right: Brandon
ters, Tiffany (center) and Rebecca, during game night Vees, Trent Abbott and P.J. Vees.
at Corinth Christian Academy.


afternoon of it, showing
their team pride until
the final whistle blew.
Lee visitor Rachel
Curtis and her siblings,
Cianna Jane and Isaac,
were equally impressed.
Invited by their family
friend, High School In-
structor Mary Jane Sut-
ter, the kids had a blast
playing on the play-
ground and sharing
snacks. They were pleas-
antly surprised to find a
few old friends, making
a few new friends, as
well who they look for-
ward to seeing them
again on the next game
night.
"It was a wonderful
experience," Rachel
said, adding, "I had so
much fun playing there
and the people at


Corinth Christian Acad-
emy are 'sooo' nice, just
like Miss Mary Jane. I
also had a great time
watching the girl's vol-
leyball team. I am thank-
ful that Miss Mary Jane
invited my family It was
a wonderful time."
Corinth Christian
Academy is located just
across the county line in
Hamilton. Serving the
educational needs of the
region for years, the
school has established
an exceptional reputa-
tion. The campus is lo-
cated at 7042 SW 41st
Avenue in Jasper and
may be reached by
phone at (386) 938-2279.
Michael Curtis can
be reached at
michael@greenepublishi
ng.com.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, September 18, 2009
The Lady Warriors of Corinth Christian huddle under the lights during a five
set loss to Northside. The girls' volleyball team played hard, down to the wire.



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12A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com




Real estate


Friday, September 25, 2009


Clean Green And Conserve

Dep Offers Tips For Pollution Prevention
-~DEP Encourages energy and water conservation; green cleaning during P2 Week-


It's Pollution Prevention Week (P2), and the
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
(DEP) encourages Floridians to stop pollution at its
source by taking simple steps to conserve energy
and water, and clean green. Adopting a more sus-
tainable routine not only helps protect Florida's nat-
ural resources, but is also protective of human
health and saves money without compromising
comfort.
"What better time to become environmentally
conscientious than during P2 Week," said DEP Di-
rector of Sustainable Initiatives Deas Bohn. "Tak-
ing simple steps to cut down on water, energy and
waste creation, plus the use of homemade green
cleaners are easy ways to be green and save green."
A large component of P2 Week 2009 involves
conserving energy and water by implementing a few
simple steps such as:
Installing low-flow sink aerators that fit on to
faucets in the bathroom and kitchen. Sink aerators
allow water pressure to remain the same using only
a third of the water.
Installing compact fluorescent light bulbs
(CFLs) which are nearly four times more energy ef-
ficient than a standard incandescent bulb.
Buying a reusable water bottle instead of bot-
tled water. Up to 90 percent of plastic bottles are not
recycled, using valuable space in landfills.
Installing a programmable thermostat. Home-
owners can save about $180 a year by properly set-
ting their programmable thermostats and
maintaining those settings. Recommended settings
are 78 degrees in the summer months and 68 degrees
in the winter months.
Using reusable grocery bags. The average Amer-
ican uses 350 plastic bags a year. Many of them are
not recycled and can end up in streams, rivers and
oceans harming marine life.


Using a microfiber cloth, an environmentally
friendly alternative to the paper towel. Americans
send 3,000 tons of paper towels to landfills each day;
this can be avoided by switching to a reusable mi-
crofiber cloth.
Consumers can also create home-mixed clean-
ers that are equally as effective as traditional prod-
ucts, and safer for people and the environment. DEP
offers the following recipes for 'do-it-yourself' green
cleaners:

All Purpose Cleaner
1/2 teaspoon soda ash or baking soda
Dab of liquid soap
2 cups hot water
Combine in a spray bottle; shake until all pow-
der is dissolved. Apply and wipe off residue with a
rag or sponge.

Glass Cleaner
1 quart water
2 tablespoons white vinegar
1 drop liquid dish detergent
Combine in a spray bottle; shake until all pow-
der is dissolved. Apply and wipe off residue with a
rag or sponge.

Furniture Polish
1 cup vegetable or olive oil
1/2 cup lemon juice
Mix in spray bottle and shake well. Apply small
amount to a cloth.

Drain Cleaner
Pour 1/2 cup baking soda down the drain, fol-
lowed by 1/2 cup vinegar. Cover the drain and allow
to sit for 15 minutes. Flush with 2 quarts boiling wa-


(NAPS)-When heating and cooling costs have your back against the wall,
it's time for a DIY project-air sealing. You can save money and energy and help
the environment by sealing gaps and cracks with silicone caulk. An easy task
for most handy homeowners, it can cut home heating and cooling costs by as
much as 14 percent. Here are hints on how:
Step 1: Select the right caulk. Not all caulk provides energy savings over
time. Silicone caulk does. Unlike acrylic caulk, silicone is permanently flexible,
shrink- and crack-proof and waterproof. In fact, silicone remains unaffected by
all weather and temperature conditions so gaps and cracks, where energy dol-
lars can pass, will not form. Leaks are never a good thing but even more dan-
gerous when you assume they don't exist following your sealing efforts. Look
for GE Silicone II* Window & Door or GE Silicone II* Paintable Silicone.
Step 2: Weatherize before "weather" hits. Don't put off weatherizing until
it's cold out and your energy dollars have already gone up the chimney
Step 3: Search the house for leaks and seal the gaps with silicone. Air can
enter or exit a house through cracks and openings in many places. Some of the
most common areas to find leaks:
Attic: Leakage is likely to be greatest where walls meet the floor, dropped-
ceiling areas and behind or under knee walls. If you find dirty insulation, this
indicates a leak, as air is moving through it.
Basement: Check along the top of the basement wall where cement or
blocks come in contact with the wood frame. Flexibility is key in unheated
spaces. Acrylic can lose flexibility and crack over time, which could leave the
area vulnerable to energy loss. Flexible silicone caulk means sustained sealing
benefits.
Doors and Windows: If you can see daylight around the frames, air can
get through, too. On a windy day, use a lighted incense stick inside to seek air
leaks. Moving air makes the smoke waver. Heat and the sun's rays can take a toll
on the home's exterior, causing acrylic caulk to crack and crumble over time.
Silicone continues to fill the gap regardless of weather conditions.
Plumbing and Wiring Entrance Sites: Holes for pipe and wire instal-
lation can be quite large, letting air flow in or out. Major leakage sites can be
found around plumbing, ducts, recessed lighting, and cables and electrical
wiring through floors, walls and the exterior of the home. Rain and snow can
seep in around these areas.
For more information, visit www.caulkandsave.com.


Mold Killer
2 teaspoons tea tree oil
2 cups water
Combine in spray bot-
tle and shake to blend.
Spray on problem areas.
Do not rinse.

'Almost any type of
home cleaner can be cre-
ated using only vinegar,
water and baking soda,"
said Bohn. "For instance,
almost one gallon of an


all-purpose cleaner consisting of white vinegar
and water can be homemade for around $2, provid-
ing ten times more product than a 12-ounce, name-
brand pine cleaner that can cost $3 or more."
For those who don't have time to make their
own cleaners, there are now hundreds of environ-
mentally friendly products widely available
through stores and the Internet. Important safety
and environmental features of these products in-
clude being non-toxic, biodegradable, made from
renewable resources and petroleum-free. The
Green Seal, EcoLabel or other third party certifi-
cation offer environmentally friendly contents.
Old cleaners should be properly disposed of at the
nearest city or county recycling or drop-off facili-
ties, rather than being thrown in the trash. For
more green cleaning tips, visit www.dep.state.fl
. us/green/cleaning., htm.
National P2 Week is an annual education
event that occurs the third week of September.
Florida's theme for this year's P2 Week is 'Green-
ing Florida's Future' and is focused on water con-
servation, energy efficiency and green cleaning
methods.
Highlights of P2 Week include distribution of
conservation kits at The Vitamin Shoppe and The
Fresh Market locations statewide, which include
two compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFL), two low-
flow sink aerators, two microfiber cloths, a conser-
vation information sheet and green cleaning recipe
card. Participating locations can be found at
www.dep.state.fl.us/green/p2week.htm.
In addition, green cleaning kits will be distrib-
uted through media outreach and an online 'green
tip' contest hosted by the Department. DEP also
launched a new green Web site in conjunction with
P2 Week to provide citizens tips and information on
the benefits of practicing conservation and prevent-
ing pollution. To learn more, visit
www.dep.statefl.us/green.
P2 Week is administered by DEP's Office of Sus-
tainable Initiatives, which is comprised of three vol-
untary, non-regulatory programs that assist Florida
industry and citizens in protecting the environ-
ment. The Clean Marina Program, the Florida
Green Lodging Program and the Clean Vessel Act
Grant Program. The goal of the Sustainable Initia-
tives programs is to meet the needs of the present
population without compromising resources for fu-
ture generations.
To view the Governor's proclamation for Pollu-
tion Prevention Week, visit http://www.dep.state
.fl.us/green/doc/p2weekproclamation.pdf.


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Friday, September 25, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com




Outdoors


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A


As I See It
By Rodney Barreto,
Chairman
Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission




Fish Kills Usually

Are Natural

Occurrences

Lots of rain, cloudy skies and the occasional
flooding we see this time of year cause more than
dreary skies and wet feet. It can also cause fish to
suffocate and die.
Hold on, you may say. What do rainy days have
to do with fish dying?
It's very simple really, but first I need to explain
a bit of biology Fish breathe oxygen, in the form of
dissolved oxygen, which they get from water,
through their gills. The water gets its oxygen from
plants and algae. If there's not enough oxygen in the
water, the fish begin to gasp, and eventually they die.
Think of it like this: if all the oxygen was somehow
sucked out of the air, humans, and anything else
that breathes air, would suffocate and die.
Now, back to rain, clouds and flooding. The
heavy rains wash organic debris, such as plant and
animal material, into the waterways and stir up the
sediments at the bottom, making things a muddy
mess. Naturally, this debris begins to decay, and that
process consumes the dissolved oxygen in the water.
At the same time, the overcast skies and muddy
waters reduce sunlight, so algae do not produce oxy-
gen. As a result there is not enough dissolved oxy-
gen in the water for the fish to breathe.
Fish need about 5 parts per million of dissolved
oxygen to do well. As the process continues, levels
drop and the fish have a hard time catching their
breath. That's when they begin coming to the sur-
face and gulping air. The size of the fish kills de-
pends on how low and widespread the dissolved
oxygen levels are in the water body They can range
from only a few individuals in a small area being af-
fected to massive kills where millions of fish die.
Many different species of fish can be affected by
fish kills caused by low dissolved oxygen levels, in-
cluding largemouth bass, bluegill, black crappie and
catfish. However, frogs, turtles, alligators and other
reptiles and amphibians are not affected, because
they have lungs and get their oxygen from the air,
like people do.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) often gets calls from the public
reporting fish kills shortly after someone has
sprayed a lake or pond with a herbicide to kill unde-
sirable aquatic plants such as hydrilla. Callers gen-
erally blame the herbicide, but in fact, it's the same
process at work the herbicide kills the plants, the
dead and dying plants use dissolved oxygen to decay,
and the fish don't have enough to breathe.
Of course there are other causes of fish kills,
but most of the time they are naturally occurring as
a result of this process. Although many fish may be
affected, these types of fish kills generally do no per-
manent damage to the fish populations.
To report a large fish kill, call the FWC's Fish
Kill Hotline at 800-636-0511. If you want to know
about the safety of eating distressed or dying fish,
you should call your local health department.


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(NAPS)-If you live
in the southern regions
of the U.S., now is the
time to think about fire
ants. Treating early can
prevent these pests from
invading your yard and
wreaking havoc on your
life.
Fire ants currently
inhabit about 13 states.
They take up residence
in yards, sidewalks,
playgrounds and electric
boxes and are both a nui-
sance and a danger to
your family
Fire ants pose safety
risks-particularly for
children and pets-be-
cause they bite and
sting. Not only can fire
ants damage property,
but their mounds can be
a danger. Warmer tem-
peratures create a wel-
come environment as
fire ants begin the task
of starting new colonies.
Foragers start doing
some work near the sur-
face of the soil as they
look for food-making
spring the best time to
stop these pests in their
tracks.
"It is extremely im-
portant to treat before
the fire ants divide into
new colonies," says Neal
Denton, extension agent
and county director with
the University of Ten-
nessee. "In order to do


so, you must get to them
early in the spring."
Fire Ant Treatment
There are two com-
mon approaches for ef-
fectively controlling fire
ants-broadcast treat-
ment and mound treat-
ment. For large yards
and early season preven-
tion, use a broadcast
treatment to treat the en-
tire yard. For smaller ar-
eas when visible
mounds are present, use
a mound treatment
around individual
mounds.
For the most com-
plete control, especially
in the case of severe in-
festation, experts recom-
mend the Two-Step
Method using both
broadcast and mound
treatment.
First, treat your en-
tire yard with a broadcast
treatment, such as Over 'n
Out Fire Ant Killer or
Amdro FireStrike, just
like you fertilize your
lawn. Broadcast treat-
ments eliminate fire ants
you can't see.
Then, treat particu-
larly stubborn mounds
you see with Amdro Fire
Ant Bait to eliminate
fire ant activity in as lit-
tle as one week. Worker
ants believe the bait is
food and bring it down to
their tunnels to feed


VISIBLE
MOUND
I


HIDDEN
MOUNDS


Fire ant mounds are not always visible; some are
hidden below ground. To effectively treat for fire
ants, treat both visible and hidden mounds with the
recommended Two-Step Method.


their queen and other
ants, killing the ants and
destroying the colony.
Used together, these
treatments provide sea-
son-long control.
Neighborhood Programs
The best way for
homeowners to treat and
prevent fire ant infesta-
tions is to coordinate ap-
plication of fire ant
products with neighbors
to get rid of these pests.
"There are a num-
ber of benefits to neigh-
borhood programs,"
says Tim Davis, a fire
ant suppression special-
ist with Clemson (S.C.)
University "'A coordinat-
ed effort between neigh-
bors makes the treated


areas bigger, making it
harder for fire ants to
recolonize. The larger
the treated area, the
longer it takes the ant
population to re-
bound."
Areas with diligent
neighborhood pro-
grams, where multiple
homeowners treat their
property at the same
time with the same two-
step treatment, can re-
duce the number of
active mounds by as
much as 96 percent.
For more informa-
tion about fire ants, vis-
it www.FireAntFree.
com or the FireRANT!
blog at http://blog.
TheFireRANT.com.


Simple Tips For Starting Your Own Kitchen Garden


(NAPS)-Edible gardening is growing in popu-
larity; the National Gardening Association expects
a 19 percent jump in the number of Americans
growing their own grub this year. The Obama fami-
ly has even joined the trend by planting the first
White House kitchen garden since World War II.
There are a number of reasons growing your
own fruits, vegetables and herbs is so attractive. Or-
ganically grown fruits and vegetables are more
healthful, with significantly more nutrients includ-
ing vitamin C, magnesium and iron. Gardening is a
fun activity for the whole family, giving kids an out-
door project. It can even save you money on gro-
ceries.
Many people know these benefits but are hesi-
tant to start an edible garden because they're wor-
ried about taking the wrong approach. The fact is,
by following just a few simple steps, just about
everyone can set themselves up for a successful har-
vest.
Take the high ground. Gardens do best in
the elevated parts of your yard. Lower, indented ar-
eas can trap cold air and stifle growth.
Break out the compass. Edible gardens in
the Northern Hemisphere should place the tallest
plants on the northernmost plot. Sunlight shines
from a southern angle, so smaller plants won't be
left in the shade.
Box it up. Use planting boxes or raised beds
whenever possible, because they create soil control
for drainage and maximize nutrients. Boxes also
protect your roots from critters.
Keep a close watch. Try not to plant your
garden out of sight. If you can see the garden from
your windows, it will be easier to identify when the


plants are at their ripest or might need extra care.
Don't be a Luddite. There's great technology
out there to help beginning gardeners. For example,
after 24 hours in your garden, the EasyBloom Plant
Sensor reveals all the plants and vegetables that will
thrive there and tells you how to care for existing
plants. This handy tool takes detailed readings of
sunlight, temperature, humidity and soil drainage
to make expert recommendations.
Edible gardening doesn't have to be an intimi-
dating project. With the right planning and support,
millions of families will be adding fresh ingredients
to their meals this year and you can, too.

WEATHER ALMANAC
For centuries, farmers and sailors people whose
livelihoods depended on the weather relied on
lore to forecast the weather. They quickly connect-
ed changes in nature with rhythms or patterns of
the weather. Here is a collection of proverbs relat-
ing to months, weeks, and days.

September
Fair on September 1st, fair for the month.
Heavy September rains bring drought.
If on September 19th there is a storm from the
south, a mild winter may be expected.
(29th) If St. Michael's brings many acorns,
Christmas will cover the field with snow.
October
Much rain in October, much wind in Decem-
ber.
For every fog in October, a snow in the winter
Full Moon in October without frost, no frost
till full moon in November



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14A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


Friday September 25, 2009


IL H MS F O Inside Treasures & More1
Shops9SH19 Glassware
I I U1 11V 1A, l' AU A 11 K ,., , (l,


Wanted: Chickens, turkeys,
guineas and peafowl.
850-464-1165
rtn, n/c

BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004. IF NO
ANSWER, PLEASE LEAVE
NAME, TELEPHONE NUMBER
AND INFO ABOUT THE MILL
rtn, n/c
Needed
Madison Resident with back-
hoe for stump removal. Do
one pile or less acre to burn
& bury, left disc & level de-
bris free. Please email me
for estimate per acre
jasminel813@aol.com or
561-635-6362
9/23 / 10/14, pd




Diamond Plate Alum. Pick-
up truck tool boxes.
Various sizes. $50 each. Call
973-4172 8am-5pm M-F
5/6-rtn, n/c








Colonial Twin Bunk Bed
with headboard, footboard,
stairstep with rails, and 3
drawer underbed storage. 6
months old, paid $800, ask-
ing $550 OBO
850-210-3137
9/23, rt, n/c




$395 a month, includes utili-
ties, direct TV, quiet, private
entrance, large bath, large
kitchen, small bedroom,
washer & dryer, screen
porch, 1 month security de-
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miles out of town. Call
850-973-4030 or
850-673-1117
9/9, rtn, pd

2 bedroom 1 bath older mo-
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or single person who likes
quiet living. 2 miles south of
1-10 on Rogers Sink Rd.
Call 850-971-5856
9/23, 9/30, pd
Clean as new. Two story, 3
BR, 2.3 baths, formal LR &
DR. 1705 Sq. Ft. New
Kitchen, Range, Ref, D/W,
G/D. Oak Floor downstairs,
Heart Pine upstairs. 2 Central
H&A. Yard maint. included.
ADULT FAMILY. No pets.
$750 rent and deposit. Good
credit req. 205 NE Shelby Ave.
Madison. Call George 973-
8583 or 557-0994.
8/12 rtn, c
3 bd/2 bath doublewide near
Cherry lake $550.00, deposit
& References 850-973-2353
8/19, rtn, c

Lake Front Home
2 bedroom 2 bath, includes
Kitchen appliances, lawn
maintenance and water, 1 yr
lease $800 deposit, $800 per
month 850-973-3025
8/5, rtn, pd

CLEAN 3 BR, CH & Air,
Oak Floors, new R & Rfg,
1335 sq. ft. ADULT FAMI-
LY ONLY, no pets. $650
rent & deposit. Yard mainte-
nance provided. Credit
Check. 432 NE Horry Ave.,
Madison. Call George
973-8583 or 557-0994.
8/12, rtn, c


Qouthem 1illas of

M adison Opartments


Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR
HC & non-HC accessible
apts. Call 850-973-8582,
TDD/TTY 711. 315 SW
Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing
Opportunity



A t rtn, s




$199 Move-In Special!!
1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-
HC accessible apts.
Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-
3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville


Pointe Trail, Greenville,
FL 32331.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtn,


Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for
Senior's and Disabled.
1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.).
HUD vouchers accept-
ed Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd,
Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and Employer


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
rtncc


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U


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8/19, rtn, c
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Full Triplewide
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delivery & set-up on your lot
for $53,500 Call Bruce
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New USDA loan no money
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packages! Call Eric @
386-719-5560
9/23 10/23, c

LOTMODEL CLOSE-
OUT SALE INTEREST
AS LOW AS 4.85% WAC
FREE CREDIT AP-
PROVAL CALL
850-576-2106
9/25, C

Investors Got Money
In your bank drawing 1-2%
interest when you could be
getting 12% or more w/short
& long term real estate secu-
rity, Call 386-365-5129
8/19, rtn, c

"Must Sell"
Lost job, never titled 14x52
SW will sell @ cost for only
$18,759 call Eric for details
(386) 590-6268
(leave message)
9/23 10/23, c

Cash
For your used mobile homes
1990 or newer
386-752-5355
8/19, rm, c

Used Singlewides
1999 14x66 Fleetwood total-
ly re-done $19,500 delivery
& set-up Call Bruce
386-344-9452
9/11 10/2,c

Work for the County or the
State? Special financing for
home purchase Call
800-769-0952
8/19, rtn, c

5 BEDROOM 3 BATH
HOME INCLUDES
CLOSING COST AND
DELIVERY TO YOUR
LAND $599 PER
MONTH. FREE CRED-
IT APPROVAL CALL
850-576-2106
9/25,

Bank Repo!
28x56 3/2 1500 sq. ft. Want
laast long @ $24,900
call Eric at
(386) 719-5560
9/23 10/23, c
28x80 5 Bedroom
reduced $15,000 for quick
sale call Mike at
386-623-4218
8/19, rtn, c
Home Financing
Owner finance, mo-
bile/modular, credit issues
O.K.
386-365-5370
8/19, rtn, c
The Wait Is Over!
Introducing "Mossy Oak"
the most innovative, quality
and affordable manufactured
houses in the industry. Call
Mr. Mott (386) 752-1452
9/2 10/2, c
Used Doublewides
1998 28x56 Skyline $27,550
set-up, A/C, steps Call
Bruce 386-344-9452
9/11,- 10/2,c
Repo Mobile Homes
Due to the state of the
economy, one persons' loss
is another ones gain. Save
thousands on these bank
repos. Call Rick
(386) 752-1452
9/2 10/2, c
Factory Overruns!
Built to many 28x40's, must
sell @ factory cost. Only 3
left @ $24,900
Call Eric @ (386) 719-5560


3 Bedroom Repo Sale
Payoff $96,200.00, will ac-
cept offers over $50,000.00
386-752-5355
8/19, rtn, c
Owner Financing
on mobile homes new &
used for land owners or large
cash down payments credit
does not matter Call Bruce
386-344-9452
9/11 10/2,c
LOT MODEL ONLY
SPECIAL SALE! ONLY
ONE AT THIS PRICE
DELIVERED TO YOUR
LAND 4 BEDROOM 2
BATH ONLY $399 PER
MONTH CALL
850-576-2106
9/25, (

Own your own home for less
than rent and receive up to
$8,000 bonus! Information
Call 800-769-0952
8/19, rtn, c
New 32x80 4 Bedroom
loaded w/upgraded options,
TURN KEY READY TO
MOVE IN including well,
septic, wiring, & closing cost
on your own land. $553.33 a
month w/no money down &
620 or better credit score
Call Lynn 386-365-5129
8/19, rtn, c
Rent To Own
3 bedroom, fenced, Wellborn
Area, $750.00 a month
386-752-5355
8/19, rtn, c
New Manufactured Homes
Starting at $23.70 sq. ft.
Guaranted lowest prices in
North Florida. Call Rick
(386) 752-8196
9/2 10/2,c
Need A Home?
Tired of being turned down
because you have no money
or credit score is too low but
you own your own land? I
have solutions Call Lynn
Sweat 386-365-5129
8/19, rtn, c
Yearly Mobile Home Sale
Fair offers considered. Fi-
nancing assistance. "Yes"
Help! 386-365-5370
8/19, rtn, c



For Sale:
House & Lot
In the Town of Suwannee
was $135,000, Now $99,000.
2 BR/1 BA. Fully Furnished,
New Metal Roof, and New
Paint. Utility Building with
Washer and Dryer. Nice Fruit
Trees. 386-719-0421


Fantastic Lake
and Mountain Vi
from this 2 Bed/ 2Bth
Open and Covered L
Large Screened Porcl
FP, CH/A, Oak Floors
inets, and Applian.
Offered Furnished
$179,900. Call BJ Pe
850-508-1900

House For Sal
Cherry Lake Area, re
remodeled, 3/2 1800
cypress home, new
kitchen, and roof. B
flooring on 3/4 ac
$132,500 850-929-

Completely Remoi
3 BR/ 2 Bath, new
new carpet/vinyl, nev
new bath fixtures,
kitchen cabinets
appliances $79,5
McWilliams Rea
(850) 973-8614


Buy a home easy!
bank! No red tape
credit welcomed!
315-429-9644 ext
9/9, 9/16,9/


Commercial/Indu
Property
with state highwayfro
Corner lots. Fronts
Harvey Greene D
& Highway 53 So
Enterprise Zon
Natural gas line, 8 in
ter main, access to cit
ties, fire hydrant, and
from two power corn
Property has easy acc
1-10, via SR 53 & S
Will build to suit ten
short or long term l
Call Tommy Greene
973-4141

OFFICE BUILD
FOR RENT
across street from
Post Office, Courtho
and Courthouse Ann
(Old Enterprise Recorder
111 SE Shelby St., Ma
Newly renovated
back to the 1920's i
Call Tommy Green
850-973-4141


Office Space For I
9/23-1023, c Downtown Madis
973-9909
9/:


rtn, n/c
eW
ews
Home.
)ecks,
h, Gas
& Cab-


One Acre of Land
for sale in Cherry Lake off
Diving Bird Loop $5,500
229-292-8274
9/25, pd


U


Cook
also


or
3, rtn, pd
ing

cial,
all
10/14, pd


Cleaning Lady, Great
& Your Helper and I
cut grass

Call 850-971-0064
386-965-5262
9/2
Traci's House Clean
Services...
Residential, Commerc
reasonable rates. Ca
850-973-7494
9/23-
I Do Housekeepin
Rentals, Offices, Aparti
and home. Weekly,
weekly or monthly. /
light yard work inclu
bush hogging
850-464-2727




Kenmore Washer $10(
Window AC $75.00
Dining Table $25.00
Frigidaire Fridge $150
White Dresser $30.00
Complete Twin bed $5

Prices are negotiab
850-973-2388 or
850-973-6095
9/16




Multi-Family Yard S
2/96 R n6 ? nm 587


/wz, o dam z iml, JO / 1l1
SR 6, Lee 1 mile E of CR
255
9/25, pd

0( urnfY arcl Aafe
First Ever

Saturday October 3rd

8:00 am 4:00 pm
9/25 10/2, pd




FREE TO GOOD HOME

Lab puppies, about 4 months
old. 1 female & 1 male.
850-210-3137
9/23, rtn, n/c
Large 7 month black
lab/dane mix, female. Free
to good home.
850-464-9659
9/23, 9/30, n/c


ces. $$AVON$$
d at Earn 50%, only $10 for
ters at starter kit! Call Today
850-570-1499 or visit
rtn n/c www.youravon.com/tdavies
e 5/13-trm, c
recently CENTER MANAGER
sq. ft, needed for a primary care
baths, medical practice in
amboo Greenville, FL. Minimum
4991 Qualifications: professional
8/5, rm, pd leadership experience with
deled strong interpersonal skills;
deled staff supervision; ver-
CHA, bal/written communication
w roof, proficiency; budget manage-
new ment experience; working
and knowledge of computers &
500 software applications; prefer
lty 2-5 years management expe-
nc rience or related college de-
gree with 1 year experience.
No Send resume to: hrdepart-
All ment@nfmc.org or fax to
Call 850-298-6054.
659 EOE/DFWP/M-F
/23, 9/30, pd 9/23,9/30, c


E Senior Citizens Council of
Madison County, Inc. is now
accepting applications for
Nutritional Manager. High
strial School Diploma/GED, expe-
rience in food service, sanita-
ntage. tion, and have a Food
both Services Ceritificate. Must
)r. be able to complete required
uth. reports, inventory, and some
e experience in management.
ch wa-
y utili- Applicants need to apply in
service Person at the Madison Coun-
panies. ty Senior Citizens Council at
cess to 486 SW Rutledge Street,
R 14. Madison, Florida. No phone
calls.
ant or 9/16,9/23, c
ease.
850- Seasonal Customer Rela-
tions Representative
rtn, n/c
Amerigas, the nation's
largest propane distributor
has an immediate opening
use, for a detailed oriented, cus-
nex. tomer focused seasonal Cus-
Office) tomer Relations
Adison; Representative for our Madi-
era son, FL location. Customer
ne service experience and com-
puter skills are required.
rtnn/ Please fax resumes to: 850-
7ease 973-2254 or mail to 1606
son Colin Kelly Hwy Madison,
Fl 323410
..... 9/25- 10/7, c


850-838-1422 (SAT/SUN) Furniture
We Buy 850-584-7124 (MON/FRI)
Call Us SAT 9-3 SUN 10-4 Tools


PRN MEDICAL
ASSISTANT with great in-
terpersonal skills for medical
clinic in Greenville, FL.
Clinical experience with
phlebotomy certification and
proficient computer skills are
required. Send resume to:
hrdepartment@nfmc.org or
fax to 850-298-6054.

EOE/DFWP/M/F
9/23, 9/30,c


--g MDS/Care Plan Coordinator
g MDS/CPC needed at Madison
Bi- Nursing Center. RN with a FL
S0o state license in good standing.
.so Two years experience required
ding along with strong assessment,
analytical, and organizational
skills. Competitive wages and
9/23, pd good benefit package.
SFax resume to Peggy Powers,
RN DON or Joann Gnewuch,
NHA at 850-973-2667 or ap-
0.00 ply in person.
9/16, 9/23,c

).00 MUSIC
Local southern gospel trio is
50.00 currently auditioning inter-
ested persons for the tenor or
le! alto part. Must be ministry
minded and interested in per-
forming on weekends. Audi-
,9/23, pd tions start immediately. For
more information, please call
(850) 464-0114 or (850)
973-6662. Demos and re-
sumes may be sent to
Sale tenorauditions@yahoo.com.
9 Ni T9/11,.rmnn/c


I SEVIC


FO IDA PRSS SERVICE



STATEIDE CLASSIFIEDl ADSII


FO MODA /2/20
THROUGH 9/27/2009~i~i


Announcements


Advertise in Over 100 Pa-
pers! One Call One Or-
der One Payment The
Advertising Networks of
Florida Put Us to work
for You! (866)742-1373
www.national-classi-
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classifieds.com

Antiques/Collectibles

COINS & Gold Jewelry -
Top prices paid (90% to
U) for scrap gold jewelry,
US coins, Paper Money &
Silver. Weekends Only -
Ralph (800) 210-2606

Apartment for Rent

HUD HOMES! 4bdr 3ba
$217/mo! 3 bdrm only
$199/mo! Stop Renting!
5% dw, 15 yrs @ 8% apr
For Listings (800)366-
9783 ext 5669

Auctions

VIRGINIA MOUNTAIN
LAND Auction, 15
Acreage Tracts, Ab-
solute/Reserve Lots, Cove
Creek Community,
Tazewell County, VA, Oc-
tober 17, 2009. Iron Horse
Auction, VAAL580,
(800)997-2248.
www.ironhorseauction.co
m

Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING TAX
CREDIT! 40 yr Warranty.
Direct from manufacturer.
30 colors in stock Quick
turnaround. Delivery avail-
able. Gulf Coast Supply &
Manufacturing, (888)393-
0335
www.gulfcoastsupply.com
Business Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING! Do
you earn $800 in a day?
25 Local Machines and
Candy $9,995. (888)629-
9968 B02000033 CALL
US: We will not be under-
sold!

Cars for Sale

Acura Integra 98 $500!
Honda Civic 00 $800! Nis-
san Altima 99 $500! Toy-
ota Corolla 02 $1000!
Police Impounds! For list-
ings call (800)366-9813
ext 9275.

Help Wanted

Heating/Air Tech Training.
3 week accelerated pro-
gram. Hands on environ-
ment. State of Art Lab.
Nationwide certifications
and Local Job Placement
Assistance! CALL NOW:


(877)994-9904.
Investors


Oak Ridge, TN. Condotel
Owner or Investor, NO
Mgmt. Responsibility Fully
Maintained & Furnished,
No Rental Commissions
for Owner Efficiency to 2
Bedrooms, $69,000 to
$109,000 Participating
with Brokers (561)702-
3757
www.westgateor.com

Lots & Acreage

Owner Must Sell. 4+
acres- $57,300 Nice oak
trees, private access to
lake. All utilities in. Ready
to build when you are! Fi-
nancing avail. Call now
(866)352-2249.
www.fllandoffer.com

Miscellaneous

ATTEND COLLEGE ON-
LINE from Home. *Med-
ical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance.
Computer available. Fi-
nancial Aid if qualified.
Call (888)203-3179,
www.CenturaOnline.com.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for high paying Avia-
tion Maintenance Career.
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified -
Housing available. CALL
Aviation Institute of Main-
tenance (888)349-5387.

Real Estate

NC MOUNTAINS CLOSE-
OUT SALE! Cabin Shell,
2+ acres with great view,
very private, big trees, wa-
terfalls & large public lake
nearby, $99,500 Bank Fi-
nancing. (866)275-0442.

HUNTING BARGAIN 48
AC/ POND- $79,794 Tim-
ber Co liquidating rugged,
unspoiled & untamed WV
wilderness loaded w/
wildlife & 4 season recre-
ation! Wooded /pasture,
wildlife pond site, stream,
trails, views & privacy ga-
lore. Perfect for hunting
lodge! Excellent financing.
Call now (877)526-3764, x
680 wvtimberland.com.
Participating with Cabela's
Trophy Properties.

LOG CABIN ON 5 ACRES
with Dockable Lakefront
only $69,900. 1791 sf log
cabin kit on 5 acres with
dockable lake frontage on
12,000 acre recreational
lake. Boat to Gulf of Mexi-
co. ALL amenities com-
pleted! Excellent
financing. Call now


COMMERCIAL
* Cozy professional offices,
5 rooms, very nice,
kitchenette, $450 plus tax
* Office complex, behind Post
Office, multiple offices,
$795 plus tax
* Corner location @ traffic
stop light, good parking,
$550 plus tax
* Huge wall of windows,
US 90 location, limited
parking, $350 plus tax
APARTMENT
* 1 BD/1BTH, upstairs, in town
$450.00
HOMES
* Millinor St., 3/1, nice yard
$450.00
* Range @ Dinkins, 3/1, porch
$450.00
* Range @ Millinor, 2/1,
garage $425.00
* US 90, 5/3, pool, $1200.00
* Millinor @ Shelby, 3/1, cozy
$375.00
* Greenville, 3/1, porches
$600.00
* Moseley Hall @ Delray, 2/1,
rustic $600



LnteC I I;* BIroke






Friday, September 25, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison County Carrier 15A


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.


CIVIL ACTION
CASE NUMBER: 09-300-CA
DIVISION:


FRANCISCO GARCIA and
YOLANDA MEDRANO,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Francisco Garcia
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage
on the following property in Madison County, Florida:
PARCEL 3. BLOCK D
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH;
RANGE 10 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 25 AND RUN SOUTH 89
DEGREES 36 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 22.69 FEET TO THE EAST
RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD 255, THENCE SOUTH 01 DE-
GREES 16 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY 897.88 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY, RUN
NORTH 88 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 2031.32 FEET,
THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST
286.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 01 SEC-
ONDS EAST 879.75 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 87 DE-
GREES 34 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 869.76 FEET, THENCE
SOUTH 01 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 1996.98 FEET,
THENCE SOUTH 87 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST
319.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 47 SEC-
ONDS WEST 551.56 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 04 MIN-
UTES 28 SECONDS WEST 2018.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, CONTAINING 40.02 ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
PLUS THE SOUTH 10 FEET OF THE NORTH 20 FEET OF THE WEST
2902.92 FEET AND THE NORTH 20 FEET OF THE EAST 870.58 FEET
OF TRACT B DESCRIBED BELOW:
TRACT B
A 40 FOOT STRIP OF LAND LYING 20 FEET ON EACH SIDE OF THE
FOLLOWING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE: COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH;
RANGE 10 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 22.69 FEET TO
THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD 255, THENCE SOUTH
01 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT
OF WAY 2636.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF SAID CEN-
TERLINE, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, AND LEAVING SAID
RIGHT OF WAY, RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 22 SEC-
ONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 801.04 FEET, THENCE
NORTH 88 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID
CENTERLINE 566.27 FEET, THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 02 MIN-
UTES 32 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 324.24 FEET,
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 812.58 FEET, THENCE NORTH 87 DE-
GREES 14 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE
194.61 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 47 SEC-
ONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 756.55 FEET, THENCE
NORTH 87 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID
CENTERLINE 318.13 FEET TO THE TERMINAL POINT OF SAID
CENTERLINE

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on H. EDWARD GARVIN, Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is P.O. Box 358041, Gainesville, Florida 32635, within 30
days from the first publication of this notice, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court, Honorable Tim Sanders, whose address is 125 SW
Range Ave., Madison, Florida 32340, either before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter. If you fail to answer, defend or otherwise
plead to this action to foreclose a mortgage, a Default will be entered
against you for relief demanded in the Complaint. This Notice of Action is
executed and published pursuant to the provisions of Florida Statutes.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 17 day
of September, 2009

TIM SANDERS
Clerk of the Court

BY: Ramona Dickerson
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order
to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator for
the Third Judicial Circuit, 145 N. Hernando St., PO Box 1569, Lake City,
FL 32056, (386) 758-2163, within 2 working days of your receipt of this no-
tice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
9/25, 10/2


LEG~AL


WOODLAND III, LTD.,
a Florida limited partnership,

Plaintiff,


Got news

straight from
the horse's mouth?



We Do.



The Madison County Carrier
& Madison Enterprise Recorder




Your^I loalPae











.II^


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TRIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC,
Plaintiff
CASE NO. 40-2008-CA-000291
vs. DIVISION
MARK STEWART, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclo-
sure Sale dated September 21, 2009 and entered in Case NO. 40-2008-CA-
000291 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for
MADISON County, Florida wherein COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS,
INC, is the Plaintiff and MARK STEWART; are the Defendants, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for cash at EAST DOOR OF THE MADI-
SON COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11 :OOAM, on the 22 day of October,
2009, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:
LOTS 9 AND 10, BLOCK H, LAKESIDE HEIGHTS OF THE TOWN OF
MADISON, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 156 SE SEMINOLE STREET, MADISON, FL 32340
Any person chiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on September 21, 2009.
Tim Sanders
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Ramona Dickerson
Deputy Clerk
9/25, 10/2

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF APPLICATION

The Department announces receipt ofn n application from Clint
Roberts File No. 40-0291729-001-ES, to recover pre-cut submerged
timber from the North Withlacoochee River beginning at the Geor-
gia/Florida state line and ending just above the Suwannee River State
Park boundary. The timber recoveries will be conducted in Madison
and Hamilton Counties.

This application is being processed and is available for public inspec-
tion during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday, except legal holidays, at the Northwest District office
at 160 Governmental Center, Pensacola, Florida 32502-5794


Enjoy incredible mountain vistas from
this 2.87+ acre European-style estate.
Just 2 minutes to downtown, this home
is surrounded by golfing, fly-fishing,
hiking, tennis, shopping, and fine restaurants.
* 5BR/5.5BA, Library, Study, Gym, 3 Fireplaces
* 6,200+ Heated sq. ft. plus 896 sq. ft. of
Screened Outdoor Living Rooms


GRAND ESTATES
AUCTION COMPANY"
call for a FREE color brochure
800-552-8120


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ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA

Classified I Display I M~etro Daily


WHOLESALE PRICES
on Quality Winter Pool Supplies,
Pool Kits & Accessories
DEEP DISCOUNTS
on Inground Safety Covers
SAVE MONEY on all
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BW Inc. (BBB Rating A+) Call M a er
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NOTICE
SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED UNTIL 9:00 A.M. ON OCTOBER
5, 2009 FOR THE SALE OF THE FOLLOWING VEHICLES DECLARED
SURPLUS PROPERTY BY THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF
MADISON COUNTY.
1991 Chevrolet Truck 1 ton w/air comp & lift gear
VIN#1GBHC34N9ME166497
INTERESTED PERSONS ARE TO REQUEST A BID PACKET FROM
THE TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT, AT MADISON COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD. ENVELOPES CONTAINING BIDS SHALL BE
MARKED "SEALED BID SURPLUS TRUCK."
VEHICLES MAY BE VIEWED AT THE TRANSPORTATION DEPART-
MENT OF MADISON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD, MONDAY THRU
FRIDAY 8:00 A.M. TO 4:00 P.M.
FOLLOWING BOARD ACTION TO ACCEPT BIDS, SUCCESSFUL BID-
DER SHALL, WITHIN 7 DAYS, PAY FOR BY CERTIFIED CHECK AND
REMOVE THE VEHICLE FROM SCHOOL BOARD PREMISES. ANY
VEHCILE NOT REMOVED WITHIN 7 DAYS SHALL BE OFFERED TO
THE NEXT BEST BID.
THE BOARD RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL BIDS.
THE MADISON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD DOESN'T WARRANTY
THESE SURPLUS VEHICLES THEY ARE SOLD AS IS.

9/25, 9/30


I wwwGrandEstatesAuctioncom William A Higgins NCAL 8812/Firm NCAL 6981 1


mml




www.greenepublishing.com


Cass Burch

Process


16A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Friday, September 25, 2009




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