Group Title: Madison enterprise-recorder.
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00391
 Material Information
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate Title: Madison enterprise recorder
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Madison enterprise-recorder
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison, Fla.
Madison Fla
Publication Date: August 7, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028405
Volume ID: VID00391
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
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Preceded by: Enterprise-recorder

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www.greenepublishing.com


Cbe MaOison ; Est1865


nteprwise RecorO c


Our 144th Year, Number 49


Friday, August 7, 2009


46 + 4 Tax=500








www.greenepublishing.com
Madison, Florida


Greenville Resident usts Made


Expla



Conti


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Since purchasing
property in Greenville
four years ago, Luther
Pickels has diligently at-
tended to the contamina-
tion that came with the
property Previously a
timber processing site, ap-
proximately one acre of
the 47-acre parcel con-
tained very high levels of
contamination, especially
of the chemical arsenic.
Pickels isolated the
contaminated acre- legal-
ly and literally sur-
rounding it with a barbed
wire fence to mark off the
area. In coordination with
the Florida Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion (FDEP), Pickels con-
tracted with the Florida
office of Waste Manage-
ment for cleanup services.
Unfortunately, even
though Pickels has al-
ready paid out over
$50,000, the cleanup is still
ongoing.
"When I acquired the
property, I knew a cleanup
effort would be required,
which I have consistently
arranged. In addition to
the expense of these ser-
vices, I have worked close-
ly with DEP on numerous
occasions, and remain




AL A


By aco em ry


Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Senior Citizens
Council of Madison
County, Inc, is advising
people that they will not
send anyone to your
home without prior no-
tice. If someone shows
up at the door unan-
nounced, saying that
they are from the Senior
Center, or regarding the
Senior Citizens Council,
the person at the house
should immediately call
law enforcement at 911
and then inform their
Senior Citizens case
manager at 973-4241.
A recent incident in-
volved someone posing
as an employee of Se-
nior Citizens going in-
side the person's home.
Law enforcement is
treating the case as a
burglary





8/7
Partly cloudy with an afternoon
shower or thunderstorm. High 94F.
Sat 95/75
8/8
A few thunderstorms possible.
Highs in the mid 90s and lows in
the mid 70s.
Sun 95/75
8/9
Isolated thunderstorms. Highs in
the mid 90s and lows in the mid
70s.


Mon
8/10


94/76


Slight chance of a thunderstorm.


1 Sections, 18 Pages
Around Madison 6-10A
Classifieds 16A
Legals 17A
Masonic Golf Tourney 8-9A
Obituaries 5A
Crime 4A
Outdoors 15A
Church 11A


lins Property



amination












t







Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, August5, 2009
Luther Pickels stands by the barbed wire fence that now surrounds the con-
taminated area that was previously an industrial site.
committed to finding a so- question. That article er do anything to hurt the
lution, although I am con- was evidently premature, community, and I appreci-
fident there has been no and the writer expressed ate all the family and
harm to any adjacent his sincere regrets for friends who supported me
properties," Pickels ex- any inconvenience it during this awkward ex-
plained. caused. change. I truly hope any-
A neighbor who Pickels' friends and one concerned about this
chose to remain anony- family have expressed situation will let me know,
mous recently contacted their strong opposition to and that any confusion
this newspaper, which the characterization of about the cleanup has
lead to an article that him as anything but a been set straight," Pickels
gave the impression Pick- goo d steward of the corm- added.
els may have been ne- munity Michael Curtis can be
glectful and contributed "I want all my neigh- reached at michael@gree-
to the contamination in bors to know I would nev- nepublishing.com.rn


Fire Destroys Log Home
At 5:06 p.m. on Wednesday August 5, the Madison County 911 Dispatch Cen-
ter received a call, reporting a brush fire deep in the woods south of Interstate 10
and East of Highway 53. Responding units from Madison Fire & Rescue discov-
ered it was actually a structure fire and asked for additional units at 5:15 p.m..
Smoke from the fire could be seen for eight to 10 miles. Lee Fire Rescue and the
Florida Division of Forestry came to the scene, as did Madison County Emer-
gency Medical Services.
The burning structure appeared to be a log home that was not currently lived
in. It was a total loss.
There were no reported
injuries. The cause of
the fire is unknown but
there was a long lasting
thunderstorm in that
eir pth ioul be snr eie. Pa rea prior to the firs e call.
or Dieon o restay camte on senep ai M adi son C ounty the
National Weather Ser-

suther obinte starctre y tared trbed of lg m vie that werd the lightning
history inm the area and
T erfound two positive





strikes near the fire loca-
Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo August 5,c2009 tion at 4:30 p.m.
The owners of the
Firefighters put out the dying embers of a home a did not live ain

home firemon Wednesday afternoon deep in the Madison County ando


south. at the time of the fire.


In Human


Traffic c I(ki &'n


Narcotics

By Fran Hunt
Special from The Monticello News
All last week in a joint initiative, Florida High-
way Patrol, US Border Patrol, Jefferson County
Sheriff's Office, Madison County Sheriff's Office
and the Florida Department of Corrections, as well
as Alabama and Georgia authorities, teamed up,
and several arrests were
made on 1-10 in Jefferson
County, in human traf-
ficking, and narcotics, in
the "Take Back Our
Highways" campaign.
"Take Back Our
Highways" is an initia-
tive among state law en-
forcement to increase
patrols, reduce traffic fa-
talities and keep drivers
safe. But, federal agents
from US Border Patrol
were also out with state aimed Farias
troopers July 27-31, cracking down on drug and hu-
man trafficking.
Through large interagency work and strategy,
several significant arrests were made, including one
in human trafficking on Thursday and a large co-
caine bust on Friday.
The Asst. Chief Pa-
trol Agent, Office of the
Border Patrol, said that
in the human traffick-
ing charges, the illegal
aliens would be sent
back to Mexico and the
e na t driver was arrested and
charged with human
.-.. s. trafficking. "We (law en-
I forcement agencies)

therefore, the communi-
ties are much safer,"
said Colon. "It's always
a pleasure to work with
Pedro Alvarez-Pena the law enforcement
agencies in that area."
U.S. Border Patrol and Immigration Customs
Enforcement officials were also involved, patrolling
1-10 in Florida and Interstates 10 and 20 in Georgia
and Alabama.
Laz Guzman with the U.S. Border Patrol said,
"We have been in the area (Jefferson County) for
about a week because the 1-10 Corridor is a very
well-documented route for both human and nar-
cotics trafficking. We decided to do a surge opera-
tion in the area, and it yielded several
apprehensions directly related to human trafficking
and narcotics smuggling.
Sgt. Daniel Roddenberry with FHP said, "It af-
fects our family and our children. This is one way to
combat it; to get it on the highway before it reaches
the sellers; before it reaches our children, before it
reaches our communities."
Two of the local busts, began at 8:12 a.m., Thurs-
day morning, with a call for mutual aid going out to
the Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, from FHP and
Border Patrol. They were requesting help due to
FHP initiating a traffic stop of a van around the 235-
mile marker near the rest area, westbound, and sev-
eral Hispanic males getting out of the vehicle and
Please see Trafficking, Page 4A


WOMOH ESCHg0 IHIHrl Four Arrested


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Two Madison
women were involved in
an automobile accident
on Tuesday morning,
August 4.
According to a Flori-
da Highway Patrol re-
port, Carrie McClamma,
82, driving a 1984 Lin-
coln, made a left turn
from the intersection of
NE Brickyard Pond
Road onto State Road
145.
Naomi Rooney, 32,
was traveling north on
State Road 145 in a 2001
GMC truck.
McClamma pulled
into the path of
Rooney's truck. The
truck's front left collid-
ed with the rear of the
Lincoln.
McClamma came to
a final rest in the south-
bound travel lane on
State Road 145, facing


south.
Rooney continued
traveling north and
stopped on the east
shoulder.
No one was injured
in the accident.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Phot
A 2001 GMC truck, driv(
hit by a 1984 Lincoln, drivel
Tuesday morning.


FHP Trooper John
Sleigher was the investi-
gating officer.
See video of the ve-
hicles involved in the ac-
cident at www.greenep-
ublishing.com.

















to by Jacob Bembry, August 4, 2009
en by Naomi Rooney, was
n by Carrie McClamma on


.& V .P ..iL & .lOW L 7 1 L

In Marijuana


Cultivation


Investigation
Madison County Sheriff Ben Stewart reports
that on Wednesday, August 5, the Madison County
Sheriff's Office Drug Task Force served a narcotic
search warrant at 2066 SW Main Street in
Greenville.
The search warrant was the result of an inves-
tigation into marijuana cultivation. Several items
were seized as evidence, including marijuana
plants, marijuana packaged for sale, scales and oth-
er items used to support the sale of marijuana.
Arrested was Roger Stephen Jones, 32, charged
with cultivating marijuana and possession of drug
paraphernalia, Joshua Montrell Copeland, 18,
charged with cultivating marijuana and possession
of drug paraphernalia, and Courtney Lamar Den-
nis, 19, charged with cultivating marijuana, posses-
sion of marijuana with intent to sell and possession
of drug paraphernalia along with a juvenile, who
was also charged with cultivating marijuana and
possession of drug paraphernalia.








2A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com




OicTopoints & Opinions


Friday, August 7, 2009


idax .Ar -xu .Maeke


The


Warrior


Turns 40

My sister, Abbie, has a lot of friends. I wish that
I could make friends the way that she does.
If Abbie sees something in someone that she
decides she likes, she goes up and makes friends,
even if they have never met. I remember last year,
when the Bradys were performing in Madison, Ab-
bie went up and high-fived the two women in the
group, Sylvia Green and Kaila Martin, although
she had never seen or heard them. I believe that the
Holy Spirit inside her recognized the Holy Spirit in-
side of them.
Abbie loves to high-five people. Try to shake
her hand and she may not. Try to hug her and you
will probably get shunned. She only hugs people on
her own terms, but she will usually, not always, give
a high-five to her friends.
Abbie will celebrate a big birthday this Sunday.
It is not just any birthday. She will turn 40 years
old.


Abbie is a warrior and she maintains a warrior
spirit. She has fought many battles in her life. In ad-
dition to being mentally challenged, she has had
health problems, including having open heart
surgery when she was seven. She also had prob-
lems with her ears. She is a warrior, however, and
she is garbed in the spiritual armor found in Eph-
esians 6.
Abbie is also a sports fanatic. She enjoys watch-
ing football and basketball on TV, especially if the
Seminoles are playing. She also enjoys pro
wrestling, but I think she mostly watches it for the
comedy and the loudmouths on there.
Abbie enjoys church and her friends at church.
She loves youth church and she enjoys being in the
class with the children
and teenagers.
Abbie enjoys ice
cream, especially the
snft sor-vr kind oul find


By Paul Niemann
Margaret Tobin (1867 1932) was an interesting lady
She always did things her way regardless of what society
considered proper back in her day.
She was born in Hannibal, Missouri. Her parents,
John and Johanna, were Irish immigrants. Margaret
would later become known by her nickname a nickname
which was given to her after she died.
Growing up relatively poor, Margaret went to work at
age 13 to help support her family At 19, she followed her half
sister to Leadville, Colorado, in 1886. Later that year she
married James Brown (no, not that James Brown), whom
she met at a Catholic church picnic, and she became Mar-
garet Brown. James and Margaret would have a son and a
daughter together.
She had originally planned to marry for money rather
than love. James did not have much money but Margaret
fell in love with him and chose to marry for love instead.
Their fate changed seven years later when James, while
working as a superintendent for the Ibex Mining Company,
created a way to reduce the number of cave-ins in the
mines by using baled hay and timbers.


da Press Assocq



Award Winning Newspaper
P.O. Box 772 Madison, FL 32341
1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32340
(850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121
greenepub@greenepublishing.com
www.greenepublishing.com
-Since 1865-
"Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity."
Zbhe Mlabison Enterprise-Recorter
Madison Recorder established 1865
New Enterprise established 1901
Consolidated June 25, 1908
Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S SR 53,
Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post
Office 32340. Publication No. 177.400.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison
Enterprise-Recorder, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertise-
ment, news matter or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the
management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or
the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertise-
ment submitted.
All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication
in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from
the date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing Inc. will not be
responsible for photos beyond said deadline.


Margaret Brown was known as a socialite, philan-
thropist and activist. She was a champion of human rights.
One of her achievements was to help women win suffrage,
which sounds like a bad thing but is actually a good thing.
Working with a local judge, she helped establish the first ju-
venile court in the United States. She was also one of the
first women to run for Congress when she ran for the Sen-
ate in 1814, which was eight years before women had the
right to vote.
Let's see ... what else can I tell you about Margaret To-
bin Brown without giving away her identity?
Oh, there was one other thing that I almost forgot. She
survived a deadly accident on a ship in 1912 in the Atlantic
Ocean.
Part of her nickname is based on the fact that she sur-
vived. The other part of her nickname was given to her by
playwright Richard Morris in 1960 for a Broadway musical.
She was never called by this nickname during her life.
And that disastrous accident in 1912 in the Atlantic
Ocean? Well, that was the sinking of the Titanic. Margaret
Tobin Brown was "The Unsinkable Molly Brown."
But you knew that all along, didn't you?


INc flmaiOR


Publisher
Emerald Greene

Editor
Jacob Bembry

Production Manager
Heather Bowen

Staff Writers
Michael Curtis and
Bryant Thigpen

Graphic Designers
Stephen Bochnia
and Amber Acree

Advertising Sales
Representatives
Mary Ellen Greene,
Dorothy McKinney,
Jeanette Dunn
and Chelsea Bouley


Classified and
Legal Ads
Laura Little
Deadline for classified
is Monday at 3 p.m.
Deadline for
legal advertisements is
Wednesday at 5 p.m.
There will be a $3 charge
for affidavits.

Circulation
Department
Sheree Miller and
Bobbi Light

Subscription Rates:
In-County $35
Out-of-County $45
(State & local
taxes included)


at Dairy Queen. She en-
joys eating out, particu-
larly at O'Neal's.
Abbie loves her fam-
ily She is a blessing to
us all and I thank God
for her.
Happy birthday, Ab-
bie.


Good

Morning!

Subscribe today to
enjoy your local news
at the start of every
Wednesday and Friday!
Just $35 in county
and $45 out of county.

Call us at

850-973-4141
to start your subscription

today!


Madison County School Board
Announces its policy for Free and Reduced Price Meals for students under the
NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH AND BREAKFAST PROGRAMS.
Any interested person may review a copy of the policy by contacting
Jan McHargue, 210 NE Duval Avenue, Madison, FL 32340
Household size and income criteria will be used to determine eligibility. These criteria can be found on the second page of this document. Children from families
whose income is at or below the levels shown may be eligible for Free or Reduced Price Meals. An application can not be approved unless it contains complete
eligibility information. Once approved, meal benefits are good for an entire year. You need not notify the organization of changes in income and household size.
Application forms are being sent to all homes with a letter to parents or guardians. To apply for Free or Reduced Price Meals, households must complete the
application and return it to the school. Additional copies are available at the principal's office in each school. The information provided on the application will be
used for the purpose of determining eligibility and may be verified at any time during the school year. Applications may be submitted at any time during the year.
Households that receive Food Stamps or TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families) are required to list on the application only the child's name, Food
Stamp / TANF case number, and signature of adult household member.
Foster children will receive benefits (i.e., free, reduced-price, or paid) based on the child's personal income regardless of the income of the household.
Household with children who are considered migrants, homeless, or runaway should contact the district liaison, Ms. Gwen Hubbard at 850-973-5022.
For the purpose of determining household size, deployed service members are considered a part of the household. Families should include the names of the
deployed service members on their application. Report only that portion of the deployed service member's income made available to them or on their behalf to the
family. Additionally, a housing allowance that is part of the Military Housing Privatization Initiative is not to be included as income.
All other households must provide the following information listed on the application:
* Total household income listed by gross amount received, type of income (e.g., wages, child support, etc.) and how often the income is received by each
household member;
* Names of all household members;
* Signature of an adult household member certifying the information provided is correct; and
* Social security number of the adult signing the application or the word "NONE" for this household member if he or she does not have a social security
number.
If a household member becomes unemployed or if the household size changes, the school should be contacted. Children of parents or guardians who become
unemployed should also contact the school. Such changes may make the student eligible for reduced price or free meals if the household income falls at or below
the levels shown below.
Under the provisions of the Free and Reduced Price meal policy
Coordinator of Support Services or Designee
will review applications and determine eligibility. If a parent or guardian is dissatisfied with the ruling of the official, he or she may wish to discuss the decision with
the determining official on an informal basis. If the parent wishes to make a formal appeal, he or she may make a request either orally or in writing to
Andrew Barnes, 210 NE Duval Avenue, Madison, FL 32340 850-973-5022
Unless indicated otherwise on the application, the information on the Free and Reduced Price Meal application may be used by the school system in determining
eligibility for other educational programs.
FLORIDA INCOME ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR FREE AND REDUCED PRICE MEALS
Effective from July 1, 2009, to June 30, 2010
Free Meal Scale is 130% of Federa Poverty Level
Household size Annual Monthly Twice Per Every Two Weekly
Month Weeks
1 14,079 1,174 587 542 271
2 18,941 1,579 790 729 365
3 23,803 1,984 992 916 458
4 28,665 2,389 1,195 1,103 552
5 33,527 2,794 1,397 1,290 645
6 38,389 3,200 1,600 1,477 739
7 43,251 3,605 1,803 1,664 832
8 48,113 4,010 2,005 1,851 926
Each additional
family member, 4,862 406 203 187 94
add
Reduced Meal Scale is 185% of Federal Poverty Level
Household size Annual Monthly Twice Per Every Two Weekly
Month Weeks
1 20,036 1,670 835 771 386
2 26,955 2,247 1,124 1,037 519
3 33,874 2,823 1,412 1,303 652
4 40,793 3,400 1,700 1,569 785
5 47,712 3,976 1,988 1,836 918
6 54,631 4,553 2,277 2,102 1,051
7 61,550 5,130 2,565 2,368 1,184
8 68,469 5,706 2,853 2,634 1,317
Each additional
family member, 6,919 577 289 267 134
add
To determine annual income:
* If you receive the income every week, multiply the total gross income by 52.
* If you receive the income every two weeks, multiply the total gross income by 26.
* If you receive the income twice a month, multiply the total gross income by 24.
* If you receive the income monthly, multiply the total gross income by 12.
Remember: The total income before taxes, social security, health benefits, union dues, or other deductions must be reported.
"In accordance with Federal law, and US Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national
origin, sex, age, or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC
20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TTY). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer."
-9n-nLO







Friday, August 7, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com



OicTopoints & Opinions


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A


Mladison County j
Extension Service il
Diann Douglas t
Guest Coluninst


Protect Your Foll

Duin A Power Outage
Summer weather brings thunder storms and we
have been experiencing our share. Although the
rain is welcome, these storms often cause a power
outage. Although most electricity is restored fairly
quickly, you may find yourself without power for
several hours. Consumers risk losing food stored in
the refrigerator and freezer during long periods of
power loss and it can have a significant drain on
your wallet if you have to replace all that food. If
you find yourself in a situation where the power is
out, USDA has recommendations you can take to
safe guard your refrigerated and frozen food.
If the power fails, do not open the freezer. I know
it is hard to resist, but, keep the door closed! Our
first instinct is to check on the food, but opening the
door will raise the internal temperature and speed
up thawing. Food stays frozen longer if the freezer
is full, well insulated and located in a cool area. A
half-filled freezer will keep foods frozen only about
24 hours. Cover the freezer with blankets to help
hold in the cold; but don't cover the air vent.
If power is not to be resumed within one to two
days, or if the freezer is not back to normal opera-
tion in that time, use dry ice to keep the temperature
below freezing and to prevent deterioration of
spoilage of frozen foods. To locate dry ice, check
with companies that transport food. When dry ice is
obtained quickly after a power interruption, 50
pounds of dry ice should keep the temperature of
food in a full 20 cubic for freezer below freezing for
three to four days.
Refreezing Thawed Food
The first rule of thumb is, "When in doubt,
throw it out." It is not unusual for me to get calls
each summer concerning a freezer crisis and half
frozen food. Some partially thawed foods can be re-
frozen; however, the texture will not be as good. Ex-
tension Specialist in food safety recommends the
following:
Meat Refreeze meat and poultry only if the
temperature is 40 F or below and if the color and
odor are good. Check each package and discard if
signs of spoilage such as an off color or order are
present.
Vegetables Refreeze only if ice crystals are
still present or if the freezer temperature is 40OF or
below.
Fruit Refreeze if they show no signs of
spoilage. Thawed fruits may be used in cooking or
making jellies, jams and preserves. Fruits survive
thawing with the least damage to quality
Cooked foods and shell fish Refreeze only ice
crystals are still present or the freezer is 40OF or be-
low. If the condition is questionable, throw the food
out.
Ice cream If partially thawed, throw it out.
The texture after thawing is not acceptable. If its
temperature reaches above 40OF it could be unsafe.
During the summer months, it may be a good
practice to lower the temperature of your freezer to
make sure food is frozen and at a colder tempera-
ture. This will give you more time if the power does
fail.
For more information on food storage and food
safety, contact the Madison County Extension Ser-
vice at 973-4138.
The University of Florida Extension/IFAS -
Madison County is an Equal Employment Opportu-
nity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to pro-
vide research, educational information and other
services only to individuals and institutions that
function without regard to race, color, sex, age,
handicap or national origin.


NOBODY

9mmb 1m


Thuacnk
The family of
Charlie H.
Moore, Jr. would
like to thank
everyone for
their kindness
during his
illness and
demise.
Whatsoever you
did, prayers,
phone calls,
visits and food,
we truly thank you.

The family of Charlie


Yoi


H. Moore, Jr.


THIS SATURDAY
,Get an Eye Exam
for Only
Plus all Glasses are
Buy 1 Pair and Get 1 Pair Free


LED
F Fr

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Call For Appointment (229)444-7259
We accept walk-in and
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We have the best prices in S. Georgia and
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Located 2031 N. Ashley Valdosta, GA 31601


Thanks To Readers
Dear Readers, I really don't know what to write
about today-I had a fall that must have thrown
everything out of my head! So please bear with me
as I try to recover some of it.
First, I would like to thank several readers
who have, over the last few weeks, called to thank
me for writing my column and expressed their ap-
preciation. First, there was a lady in Cherry Lake
who seemed really to read like my column and we
had a very nice conversation. The next was a lady
in Pinetta who expressed practically the same
thing.
Also, a black lady schoolteacher her de-
scription who said I really got it right when
writing about the political arena. And last, but not
least, a man in Jacksonville who said his name was
Steve Thompson called. Steve said he lived in Cher-
ry Lake a very long time ago and, as I remembered
all about how Cherry Lake originated, we had a
very long conversation about it Steve, who is also
about my age, gave me his address and phone num-
ber so perhaps we will find that we are related!
Thanks also to Joe Peavy, who put some of my
columns in a memory book for his grandchildren,
and to the radiologist at the hospital who told me
he reads and enjoys my column. Many thanks to
all of you writing about all of you will help me to
get over my fall! And perhaps I'll be able to write a
better one next week.
A fond farewell to all of you nice people!


Yout Axte TIkt

App fe Of MI EIPt


It was a great
theme for a party -
Apples to Apples! r
If you've never
played, it's super
fun! Like cha-
rades, it makes for
lots of laughter bKarld
and great group
participation. But (Why We Say The T
with my gang, it also makes for a re-
hash of every apple expression ever
invented such as: apple pie order, an
apple a
day...or that
all time clas- '
sic: Apple of "
My Eye.
As for apples
and order, well
that's about pio-
neer housewives
who did their
baking on the
first day of the .
week. Placing
pies on the shelf (ot -
in a pie safe, as \' s
often the case thIen i-i
having things in apple p-le
order meant you put fore-
thought into planning your week
ahead.
As to apple of my eye? The ref-
erence is to one held dear. It sug-
gests that the one you're talking
about means the world to you (often


..- parents about a child
S they adore.)
S reference to this one,
don't reach for your
baby books. Instead,
pull out your Bible, as
the first "apple of my
eye" comes from
Things We Say) Deuteronom (32:10)
wherein we read:
"He found him in a desert land,
and in the waste
,-.-,-.; howling wilder-
5s; he led him
about, he in-
Sstructed him, he
Sept him as the ap-
ple of his eye."
The "him" in
this passage is Ja-
cob (grandson of
S'. Abraham, son of
Isaac, whose name
S / later changes to Is-
S/ rael). The baby? That
w' would be God's chosen,
.L better known as the chil-
Ireh-n of Israel. The eye?
G'Y 'I\ ey e ver watching over His
own.
The metaphor is referenced no less
than five times in the Old Testament as
the nation of Israel evolves, reinforcing
the notion that when it comes to God's
children (in this case, the nation of Is-
rael), they are adored and ever under


spoken by parents or proud grand- the watchful eye of a loving Father.


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Law enforcement & Firom page One


Friday, August 7, 2009


Trafficking

cont from Page 1A
fleeing into the woods.
Deputies obtained a partial
description and began to set up a
perimeter around the area, sta-
tioning themselves on Thomas
and Blue Lake Roads. Deputies
put out the word of what was go-
ing on to Noble's Pecan Stand, in
case the suspects were spotted in
the area.
At 8:30 a.m., tracking dogs
from Border Patrol, FHP and the
Department of Corrections were
brought in to track the suspects.
An FHP plane was also dis-
patched to the area.
Law enforcement continued
canvassing the area until FHP
called off the search at approxi-
mately 10:30 a.m. At 12:35 p.m.,
the 911 dispatcher received a call
reporting a champagne colored
SUV pulling over to the side of
they road at the 236 mile marker,
westbound, and several Hispanic
males ran out of the woods and
got inside of the vehicle. The par-
tial description given by the
caller, matched the partial de-
scription deputies received earli-
er.
Deputies spotted the possible
suspect vehicle at the 225-mile
marker, westbound and tried to
catch the vehicle, which would
not stop. As the vehicle ap-
proached Leon County, FHP was
advised of the pursuit and Leon
County was also advised, but
Leon County advised that they
would not put out a BOLO (be on
the look out) for the vehicle with-
out probable cause.
Deputies opted not to cross
into Leon County in pursuit of
the vehicle because FHP had
caught up with them, eventually
pulling them over at the 212-mile


Madison County... __


marker.
Deputies returned to the 236-
mile marker, westbound, meeting
with FHP and Border Patrol, to
further canvas the area. A re-
quest for assistance from Madi-
son County also went out and
Madison met with officials al-
ready on the scene. The addition-
al search of the area yielded no
more suspects.
The driver of the SUV was ar-
rested and charged with human
trafficking. The four illegal His-
panics inside will be sent back to
Mexico. Guzman said the names
of the aliens and the driver would
not be released pending further
investigation into the case.
On Friday morning at approx-
imately 8:25 a.m., FHP Trooper JC
Lemery and Border Patrol
stopped a 2005 Ford SUV at the 227
mile marker, westbound on 1-10
for three moving violations. The
trooper made contact with the
driver, Jaime Farias, 28, of Ocoee,
and backseat passenger Pedro Al-
varez-Pena, 25, of Dade, FL and
noticed that both appeared very
nervous as they explained their
trip from Texas to Florida.
During the traffic stop, sever-
al indicators of criminal activi-
ty were noticed and K-9"Blek"
was utilized by Trooper J.D.
Davis. "Blek" alerted forward
of the driver's door and to the
undercarriage of the Expedi-
tion, and a probable cause
search revealed one kilo sized
package and a smaller 1/4 kilo
sized package concealed be-
tween the heat shield and the
bottom of the floor, above and to
the left of the transmission.
Both packages were reported to
be in pristine condition. The


kilo size package was wrapped
several times with several dif-
ferent kinds of material in an at-
tempt to conceal the odor of the
cocaine.
The smaller package was
also wrapped but not to the ex-
tent of the kilo package. The to-
tal packaged weight was
approximately 1.25 kilos and
field tested positive for cocaine.
Alvarez-Pena invoked his
rights and Farias denied and
knowledge of the cocaine.
Farias was arrested and
charged with cocaine trafficking
28 grams, less than 150 kilos; co-
caine possession with intent to
sell, manufacture, or deliver; co-
caine trafficking and conspiracy
to engage in trafficking; intro-
duction of cocaine into the state
of Florida; and narcotics equip-
ment, possession and or use.
Bond was withheld and he re-
mained at the county jail Aug. 3.
Alvarez-Pena was arrested
and charged with cocaine traf-
ficking 28 grams, less than 150
kilos; cocaine possession with
intent to sell, manufacture, or
deliver; cocaine trafficking and
conspiracy to engage in traffick-
ing; introduction of cocaine into
the state of Florida; and nar-
cotics equipment, possession
and or use. Bond was withheld
and he remained at the county
jail Aug. 3. A Federal hold was
also placed on him by Border Pa-
trol for immigration violation.
FHP does not have a total of
arrests yet but troopers say dur-
ing the week they've made sever-
al drug busts, along with the
arrest for human trafficking.
Those results should be available
this week.


7/29/09
Christopher Keith
Dyess VOP (circuit)
7/31/09
William Piper Wal-
ton, Jr. DUI
Michael Wayne
McIntosh, Jr. Aggra-
vated battery
Nathaniel Carter -
VOP (county), driving
while license suspend-
ed
8/1/09
Terry McDaniel -
Criminal registration
8/2/09
Vanessa Marie
Francois Aggravated
assault
Ralph Hall Fail-
ure to appear (arraign-
ment)


Antwon An-
dropolist Wright VOP
(circuit)
Stacey Carolyn Ed-
wards Battery
8/3/09
Kenneth Sermons
- Possession of mari-
juana over 20 grams,
driving while license
suspended or revoked
Jeremy Moore -
Criminal registration
8/4/09
Kaiser Solomon -
Disorderly intoxica-
tion
Andre Malloy Mor-
rison Dealing in
stolen property
Jason Conrad Bon-
ner Dealing in stolen
property


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Friday, August 7, 2009


Alouno mabio County


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5A


Way 1BackV Whenwv...


August 5, 1949
Dial telephones are installed in
Madison by Southeastern Tele-
phone Company.
James Hardee, Lions District
Governor, made the main address
at the Greenville Lions Club
Ladies Night program Monday
night.
L.F. Terry, International Har-
vest dealer for refrigerators and
home freezers, cordially invites
the people of this county to attend
a free frozen food demonstration,
which is sponsoring, at the Pinetta
School lunchroom at 8 o'clock next
Wednesday evening, August 10.
Among those who had perfect
attendance at the New Oakland
Presbyterian Vacation Bible
School were Victor Hutchinson,
Carol Johnson, Sandra Tibbals,
Margaret Ann Walker, Robbie
Cruce, Donnie Johnson, Bonnie
Jean Sumner, Charles Tibbals and
Estelle Walker.
August 7, 1959
Thed Fraleigh is at home after
serving a term of duty in the
Army at Ft. Jackson, South Caroli-
na.
Making the Dean's List at
Florida State University were Car-
olyn Ann Mugge, of Greenville;
Mildred Almand, Fredrick R. An-
drews, of Lee; Shelton C. Davis,
Clayton W Jones, Janice Ethel
Lamb, Joyce E. Littelton, Carol
Jean Ragans, of Madison.
Miss Carolyn Ann Mugge,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene
Mugge of Greenville, became the
bride of Randell Hendricks Rowe,
Jr., of Madison, in a four o'clock
ceremony, Thursday, July 30, in
the Greenville Baptist Church.
Miss Peggy Marie Overby was
married to George Frank Rykard,
Jr., of Madison, at noon Sunday,
July 19, in Gethsemane Baptist
Church in Greensboro, N.C.
August 8, 1969
WC. Burnett was elected man-
ager of Tri-County Electric Coop-
erative, Inc. by the Board of
Trustees, Evans Waldrep, presi-
dent, said Wednesday. Burnett will
fill the vacancy created by the
passing of WV. Dunbar on July 22,
1969.


Attending 4-H Congress in
Gainesville this week were Frank
Mercer, Mack Primm, Tommy
Surles, Nita Webb, Ramona Vick-
ers, Cliff Ebersole, Virginia Jean
Adams, Peggy Davis, E.R. Scott,
Sheron James, Emanuel McGhee,
Betty Luster, Shirley Lavarra and
Gwen Thompkins.
Mr. and Mrs. John Cherry
were genial host Tuesday evening
at their home at their annual fish
fry, honoring the tobacco buyers
and associates here for the season.
The highest price on the Madi-
son tobacco market on Wednesday
was 83 cents; however, most of it
sold for 80 cents. A large amount
was sold.
August 10, 1979
Mrs. Viriginia H. Adamason
celebrated her 98th birthday at
her home. She was born August 1,
1881 in Pernanbaco, Brazil, daugh-
ter of missionary parents. In
those days, in Brazil, life was not
even for Protestant missionaries.
One time, her father was even
stoned.
Larry Joe Johnson pled not
guilty Tuesday on charges of the
first-degree murder and robbery
of Mac Hadden at a service sta-
tion on Interstate 10 in Lee on
March 16, 1979. Johnson was in-
dicted by a grand jury in April and
returned from a jail in Kentucky
last week. Public Defender Jim
Hunt will be his counsel in the tri-
al, set to begin September 25.
Madison County Judge Wetzel
Blair completed the Non-Lawyer
County Judge Training Program.
The two-year legal education pro-
gram was conducted at the Uni-
versity of Florida College of
Law.
PFC Jerry Anderson, 19, of
Madison, died July 28 in Korea,
where he was serving in the U.S.
Army. He was born in Madison
and was a lifelong resident. He
was a member of Bethlehem Bap-
tist Church. Funeral services
were held Saturday, August 4, at 2
p.m. in the Bethlehem Baptist
Church in Madison. Full military
honors with the U.S. Army, Ft.
Benning, Ga., were held grave-
side at Bethlehem Cemetery.


August 15
LifeSong's Homecom-
ing 2009 will be held at
Yogi Bear's Jellystone
Park in Madison on Sat-
urday, August 15, at 7 p.m.
This evening will be a live
recording, and will fea-
ture the Bradys, LifeSong
and Stephen Jones. Ad-
mission is free. A love of-
fering will be received
during the concert. For
more information, call
(850) 464-0114 or (904) 472-
7865, or visit www.lifes-
ongmusic.org.
August 15
Excellence Dance
Studio Inc. presents King
of the Grill showdown
and Art on Wheel Exhibi-
tion, Aug. 15, noon-4 p.m.,
Madison County Recre-
ation Center, Hwy 360A.
For more information,
call (850) 322-7673.
August 29
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park
will host a Container Gar-
dening Workshop on Sat-
urday, Aug. 29.
Participants will learn
how to avoid many of the
pests and diseases associ-
ated with summertime
gardening in containers
and explore warm weath-
er flower and vegetable
gardening. The class will
cover proper grouping of
plants, choosing the right
container, selecting the
right plants to grow for
each season and touch on
annuals, perennials and
ferns. Bring your pruners
and take home some cut-
tings. This is a hands-on
workshop and fees are $5
per workshop, including
park admission. For addi-
tional information or to
register for the work-
shops, please call (386)
397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.or


A major name brand hearing aid provider wishes to field test a
remarkable new digital hearing instrument in the area. This offer is free
of charge and you are under no obligation.


These revolutionary 100% Digital instruments use the
latest technology to comfortably and almost invisibly help
you hear more clearly. This technology solves the "stopped up
ears", and "head in a barrel" sensation some people experience.


If you wish to participate, you will be required to have your hearing
tested in our office FREE OF CHARGE to determine candidacy and
report your results with the hearing instruments after the trial period. At the end of the period,
you may purchase your instrument, if you so desire, at a reduced charge. Otherwise, there is
no charge whatsoever for participating in this field test. Special testing will be done to determine
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Henry "Hank" Fead
Henry "Hank" Fead, 69, of Greenville, died on
Thursday, July 30, 2009, in Madison.
Funeral services will be at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Au-
gust 8, at Allen Chapel A.M.E. Church in Greenville.
Burial will follow at the Young Reaper Cemetery View-
ing/visitation will be on Friday, August 7, from 2:30-4:30
p.m. at Tillman Funeral Home in Monticello and from
6-7:30 p.m. at Allen Chapel AME Church in Greenville.
Mr. Fead was a member of Allen Chapel AME and
retired as a supervisor with Florida Plywoods after 39
years of service.
Survivors include his wife, Louise Randolph Fead;
sons, Donald (Amy) Fead, Clarence (Janice) Fead and
Henry (Latara) Fead; daughter, Shaunta Hopkins; step-
sons, Kenneth Johnson, Martice (Leola) Seabrooks and
Jeffrey Jackson; step-daughters, Sharon Williams,
Alma Ingram and Desiree Turner; brothers, Jim, John
Henry, Ervin, Earl, James and Elijah Fead; sisters,
Mamie Fead, Ruby Crumity and Virginia (Joseph)
Jones; 27 grandchildren; 21 great-grandchildren; and a
host of other relatives and friends.

Vonda Bennett

Pearce
Vonda Bennett Pearce died Monday, July 27,2009, in
Tallahasseee.
Funeral services were held Thursday, July 30, 2009
at 11 a.m. at Beggs Funeral Home, Madison Chapel,
with burial at Cherry Lake Baptist Church Cemetery
The family received friends Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. at
Beggs Funeral Home.
Donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308.
Vonda Pearce, Ms. Vonda to many, was born in
Cairo, Ga. on February 24, 1944. She loved to cook and
fish. Her favorite place was the beach and she was a
huge fan of Jeff Gordon. She had a great big heart and
will be missed by all who knew her. She has been a res-
ident of Madison County for 40 years and was a home-
maker. She was employed by ITT Metal Products for
over 20 years and the Dept. of Corrections for nine
years.
She is survived by her loving husband, Jimmy
Pearce; her mother, Myrtle Bass Bennett; two daugh-
ters, Donna Lisa Samaan and (Sam) of Tallahassee, and
Wendy Miller and (Shawn) of Dillard, S.C.; three grand-
sons, Matthew Shannon Samaan, Finn Miller and Hen-
ry Miller; two sisters, Vivian Osborne and (Doug) and
Linda McCullers and (Larry); four brothers, Davis Ben-
nett and (Helen), Ronnie Bennett and (Diane), Dink
Bennett and (Margaret) and Jeff Bennett and (Jan).
She was preceded in death by her son, Shannon
Rodgers; her father, C.D. Bennett; and her beloved
grandmother, Vassie Bass.


l;---&A,.-Beltone,
I felping the ,vorld hear better. I





www.greenepublishing.corn


6A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Alouno Aaio Countp


Friday, August 7, 2009


-I -


Big Bend Hospice hosts its Fifth Annual Be-
reavement Conference, "Seasons of Grief" on
September 25, 2009 from 8:00 4:30 p.m., at the
Tallahassee Community College Center for Eco-
nomic and Workforce Development.
The conference creates a forum in which
professionals and other helpers can explore cur-
rent bereavement practices; network and con-
nect with other providers in a nurturing and
uplifting environment; promote self-care and
highlight bereavement services/expertise at Big
Bend Hospice and in the community. "Seasons of
Grief" will offer practical strategies to help sup-
port clients through the grief process. Coun-
selors and Mental Health Professionals,
Therapists, Health and Hospice Providers, Advo-
cates, Clergy, Educators, Emergency Respon-
ders, Law Enforcement, Military Personnel,
Funeral Directors, Nursing Home Staff, Stu-
dents and anyone providing support to the be-
reaved are invited to attend this important
conference. Topics include suicide loss and pre-
vention, grief in adolescents and college stu-
dents, spirituality, sibling loss, sudden and
traumatic death, and use of creative arts, music,
and therapeutic activities with the bereaved and
for self- care.
The cost of the conference is $69 with special
rates for students, or four or more from the same
agency. 6.5 Continuing Education Units will be
offered. Late registration after September 14th
will add $10 to each category. Contact Lisa
Baggett, 309-1628, X433 or Lisa@bigbendhospice
to register or for more information.


Madison Nursing Center


Showcases Facelift


At Chamber Mixer


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
JoAnn Gnewuch, ad-
ministrator of the Madi-
son Nursing Center, was
pleased to welcome fel-
low members and guests
to the Madison County
Chamber or Commerce
and Tourism mixer held
on July 21 in the nursing
facility dining hall.
Founded by Dr. Adol-
fo Dulay in March 1985,
the management of the
facility was turned over
to Summit Care II in
1988, with Dulay remain-
ing as Medical Director.
Focusing on short-
term rehabilitation,
long-term care, and end


of life, the center is com-
mitted to give each and
every resident the best
care available.
"Our medical team
of physicians and staff
work together continual-
ly striving for excel-
lence. The dining room
is the beginning of a
planned facelift for our
building and will contin-
ue throughout this year.
We will also be working
to restore the pond and
surrounding area to be
able to offer a recre-
ational fishing area,"
Gnewuch explained.
"The therapy area of
the facility is open for
viewing," she also noted,


'And we look forward to
visitors anytime for a
tour."
A big "thank you"
was expressed to
the Dietary Department
for the food and bever-
ages they provided, with
huge mega-kudos going
out to Chef Kendra
Hensley who was visit-
ing from Texas and put
together some of her lus-
cious desserts.
The gathering was
very well attended, and
Chamber Executive Di-
rector Ted Ensminger
was very appreciative of
the support members
gave the mixer. "We are
working to get and keep


our members connected,
as we constantly search
for new ways to grow
and attract local busi-
ness. The food was be-
yond good, and the
desserts were so good I
thought I saw some
members crying. Seri-
ously, it was a great turn
out and we look forward
to many, many more."
For more informa-
tion on upcoming
events, membership or
comments, contact the
Chamber office at (850)
973-2788.
Michael Curtis can
be reached at micha-
el@greenepublishing.co-
m.


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Photo submitted
Members and visitors gathered at Madison Nursing Center on July 21 for a
very successful Chamber mixer. Pictured left to right: Michael Curtis, Madison
Media Group; JoAnn Gnewuch, MNC Administrator; Ted Ensminger, Chamber
Executive Director; Cherie Blue, PTA, Rehab. Manager; and Melody Mullins, MA
CCC/SLP



Recycling For

Charity Continues


The Solid Waste and
Recycling Department
entered into its first "Re-
cycling For Charity"
venture for one year
with The Junior Auxil-
iary of Madison County
in May of 2007, identi-
fied as "Cans For Kids."
Thanks to Mrs. Lisa
Flournoy, the venture
was extremely success-
ful.
At the end of that
year, the Board of Coun-
ty Commissioners agre-
ed to advertise for other
not-for-profit organiza-
tions to apply to contin-
ue the charitable
venture. The "Needy
Families of Madison
County" was selected to
be the recipient of the
venture, chaired by Mrs.
Judy Dean and Mrs.
Christy Grass in July of
2008. The venture was
also successful for "The
Needy Families of Madi-
son County" resulting is
the purchase and dona-
tion of toys for needy
families in the county
At the July 15th
meeting, after a brief
presentation by Jerome
Wyche, Coordinator, Sol-
id Waste and Recycling,
the Board of County
Commissioners agreed
to continue the charita-
ble venture and adver-
tise for other
organizations to apply
Organizations
choosing to apply to be
the next recipient may
apply by accessing the
county website (Madis-


onfl.com) and scroll to
Solid Waste and Recy-
cling where an applica-
tion may be downloaded.
Applicants may also
visit the Solid Waste and
Recycling Department to
pick up an application.
Applications must
be completed and re-
turned to Coordinator
Wyche by August 12,
2009. Further informa-
tion may be received by
calling 973-2611. The fol-
lowing criteria and re-
quirements will apply to
the applicant chosen for
the next venture:
Must have a valid
501 (c) 3 (not-for-profit)
document/certificate
Must be willing to
appoint a chairperson to
serve for one year re-


porting to the Coordina-
tor, SWRD
Must be willing to
sign a one year contract
and physically retrieve
aluminum cans from all
collection centers
Must host at least
one organizational meet-
ing and present the re-
sults to the SWRD
Coordinator outlining
quantities for an update
to the BOCC
Must be amiable to
cost sharing for recepta-
cles and advertising.


F 17F

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Friday, August 7, 2009


Alouno mabi Countp


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7A


acmerican Segion


Aeceipes Stim ufuws


!yatri


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
"I have never taken
anything from the govern-
ment and I'm certainly not
going to start now," Tom-
my Greene explained to
Oliver Bradley, veteran's
affairs offi-
cer for
Madison
County :
Greene
made this
declaration .
after find- .
ing $250 had
been de-
posited into
his bank ac-
count,
which he
later deter-
mined was
part of the
federal
stimulus
checks sent Green
out to se- Tommy
niors as ing $250 to
part of the American L
Recovery funds were
Act. Stimulus fui
In an bank accour
effort to put to "give ba
the money "saved Ame
to an "ap-
propriate" use, Greene pre-
sented Bradley four checks
for $62.50 to go to each of
the four American Legion
Posts in Madison County
- Greenville #131, Cherry


15 0 C a it l ir l e N
TasVISA


M


dtic Obfector
Lake #224 (Greene's Post), going after the wh
Madison #195, and Madi- goose," he added.
son #68. In a letter accom- Many conservative
paying the checks, including several gov
Greene wrote: nors across Ameri
"Please find enclosed share Greene's view a
a check for $62.50. This also refused Stimu
amounts to one-fourth of funds, albeit few as col


ie ruuilisin, Inc. riuluo y MinuaeI i urnls, July C2, /UU
Greene (left) presents four checks total-
Oliver Bradley in support of the four
egion Posts in Madison County. The
from the "unsolicited and unwanted"
inds that were direct deposited into his
it without his knowledge. Greene wanted
ck" to the men and women he feels
rica."


an unsolicited and un-
wanted Stimulus check
that was, unknowingly to
me, deposited into one of
my bank accounts. I know
of no one better to give it to
than the four American
Legion Posts of Madison
County Thanks for caring
for our freedom and serv-
ing."
Greene further ex-
plained that there were nu-
merous opportunities over
the years for him to accept
government money of-
fered in the form of farm
subsidies and other agri-
culture incentives, but that
he had not and would
never accept money from
any level of government.
"They're no longer
content just taking the
golden eggs; now they're


low veteran.
Michael
reached at


ole
ves,
ver-
ica,
and
lus
lor-


fully And,
although
Greene was
pleased to
put the
money to
good use, he
fi rm 1 y
stands on
the belief
that current
fiscal poli-
cy will con-
clude in
disaster,
perhaps
even a ma-
jor shift to-
ward
socialism.
Regard-
less of the
politics,
Bradley
was grate-
ful to ac-
cept the
gesture
from his fel-
Curtis can be
michael@gr-


eenepublishing.com.


Kids Incorporated

Seeks Volunteers
By Bryant Thigpen p.m.
Greene Publishing, Inc. E a c h
Kids Incorporated, 1v volunteer
Inc. of Madison is seek- will be pass-
ing volunteers for the ing out
King of the Grill and brochures to
Family Fun Day Festi- -conduct the
val, which will be held INCOr r4 3T1d children's
August 15. activities.
This event, hosted To vol-
by Excellence Dance Stu- u n t e e r,
dio, is seeking for people please call Beat-
who will volunteer to work a rice Samson at (850)
shift that will be available from 11 414-9800 ext. 112, or email bsam-
a.m.-1 p.m., 12-2 p.m., and from 2-4 son@kidsincorporated.org.


Big Bend Hospice


Announces lew Web Site


Big Bend Hospice announced the
launch of a brand new Web site this
month. The new website has in-
creased the amount of information
available on line and offers new fea-
tures to provide increased responsive-
ness to those seeking information on
Hospice care.
We
are so
pleased
with the
communi-
ty's re-
sponse to
our new
website,"
said Diane Tomasi, Community Rela-
tions Director at Big Bend Hospice. "It
has many new features and is more
user friendly than our previous site."
Visitors are now able to take a pic-
torial tour of the Margaret Z. Dozier
Hospice House as well as see photo gal-
leries from recent events; share their
Hospice story; sign up to be a volun-


S4annon Keel
S/y/Lst /A l rh/
850-971-4450
7 44 EHWY. 90
Lee, FL 32059


teer and find out about employment
opportunities. Also, those wishing to
make a donation can do so online, and
a separate link provides information
on additional giving opportunities.
Special features of the website
also include a quiz to see if Hospice
care is appropriate for you or a loved
one as well as
a form to re-
quest a free,
no obligation
in-home visit
to explain Big
Bend Hospice
services.
"We con-
tinue to welcome community input
on our website and hope these new
features provide a way for family
members from outside the area, as
well as the local community, to get
more information on our agency,"
added Tomasi. The web address re-
mains the same: www.bigbendhos-
pice.org.


Carl Joseph &
Madison High School
N .- 1970s events.


kevinkadin@yahoo.com
or call (352-377-2178)


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Combine any of the 2 above ...$10.00
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Above served with hushpuppies and
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8A Madison Enterprise-Recorder www.2reenepublishin2.com


The City Of
Madison &
City Manager
Harold Emrich


L~I~JLI I

Lu


IUL EVIL4IJSI 11 *.
ournament!


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Service Center
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24/7 Emergency Service Tires .
Oil Changes Towing Used Cars
Congratulations
to all the players at the
Masonic Golf Tournament!
:....................................................:.


Friday, August 7, 2009 Friday, August 7, 2009


asonic Golf Tournament Packs The Country Cl
By Michael Curtis over Florida, and to extending this criti- Dozens of local golfers, as well as Dr John Lewis Madison
Greene Publishing, Inc. cal work by building national and inter- many from surrounding areas, all of who Veterinary Clinic
As the incoming District Deputy national collaborations." provided support and donations to the Wallace Automotive
Grand Master for the 8th Masonic Dis- It goes on to say, "The mission of the event, enjoyed the tournament and a bar- Johnson & Johnson Yellow Pine
trict, which includes both the Madison Byrd Alzheimer's Research Center is to becue lunch. Waffle House
--A -A -- ),-,4---A l-1 l- A4 T -1 - - 41-4 A -4- A _-'


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, July 31, 2009
John Sirmon, district deputy grand master of the 8th Masonic District, was
pleased to sponsor the Masonic Golf Tournament at the Madison County Coun-
try Club on July 31. Dozens of businesses and helpers, including his wife
Lynette (left) and Sybil Day (right), joined Sirmon to ensure the success of the
fundraiser.


and Greenville Lodges, Rignt worsnipuil
John Sirmon established several goals for
the district. Among his priorities is rais-
ing public awareness of the fraternity and
raising funds for the charitable programs
of the Grand Lodge of Florida.
In the first of four community
fundraisers, Sirmon sponsored the Dis-
trict 8 Masonic Golf Tournament on July
31 at Madison County Country Club. Two
flights went out, one at 9 a.m. and the oth-
er at 1 p.m., in a day that brought brothers
and friends together for a worthwhile
charity The Johnnie B. Byrd Sr.
Alzheimer's Center & Research Institute
in Tampa.
According to information outlined on
their website, "The Johnnie B. Byrd, Sr.,
Alzheimer's Center & Research Institute
is dedicated to helping and coordinating
the tremendous research expertise, expe-
rience, and
Creative vi-
Ssion of labo-
ratories all


prevent and cure Alzheimers disease.
The prevention and cure of Alzheimer's
disease will only be found through re-
search in the laboratory and in the clin-
ic."
For years, clinicians were unaware of
the true nature and causes of
Alzheimer's, often just accepting it as part
of the aging process. It is progressive neu-
rological condition that results in cogni-
tive problems and dementia as it attacks
the brain. And although there are treat-
ments and social activities designed to
slow the progression, it is still deemed in-
curable.
Alzheimer's affects more than 4.5 mil-
lion people in the United States, but due to
its large senior population (about two mil-
lion over 65), Florida has approximately
10 percent of all Alzheimer's cases.
"Estimates are that by 2010 almost a
half a million Floridians will be living
with Alzheimer's. In another 20 years,
(2030) there will be almost 1 million
Floridians affected," it goes on to say


Local businesses mat donated money
or goods receiving special thanks are:
Madison Engineering
Madison Sporting Goods
Davis, Schnitker, Reeves &
Browning, P.A.
Briggs, Washington, & Thompson
Surveying
Archie's
Quitman Country Club
Francis Lake Golf Course
Suwannee Country Club
Madison Co-op
Justin Davis Enterprises
Roebuck Barber & Beauty Shop
Florida Farm Bureau
Timberland Ford of Perry
Shelby's Restaurant
The Spaghetti House
Ken's Barbeque
One Eleven Grill
The Wild Plum
Jimmie's Firestone
Badcock Home Furnishings
Hall's Tire and Muffler


iviaaison County Community Bank
Citizens State Bank
Capital City Bank
Winn Dixie
"I would like to thank all who partici-
pated in the golf tournament and those
who came out to just eat lunch and buy raf-
fle tickets for the benefit of the Madison
Lodge No. 11/Madison Shrine Club Raffle
and the Ladies of the 8th & 9th Masonic
District Raffle. Almost $1500 was raised to
benefit the Byrd Institute and $300 was
raised for the Grand Lodge of Florida
Child ID Program," the District Deputy
Grand Master noted.
The winners of the tournament were
the team of Jeremy Denmark, Joe Lyles,
Lance McCray, and Daniel McLeod. The
team of Chase Day, Luke Page, Scott Prine,
and Davey Walker took Second Place, with
the team of Bill Bozeman, Justin Davis,
Jason Groover, and Stoney Smith placing
third.
Michael Curtis can be reached at
Michael@greenepublishing.com


ub


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, July 31, 2009
Bert Waldrep, officer at Greenville Lodge No. 28 F&AM, is joined for lunch
by his grandson, Robert Waldrep during the Masonic Golf Tournament.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, July 31, 2009
Brent Whitman, Gary Williams and David Ballenger, pic-
tured here left to right, were among the teams that competed
in at the Madison County Country Club on July 31 as part of
the District 8 Masonic Golf Tournament.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, July 31, 2009
Dennis Miller shows off his decorative fish
prize during the District 8 Masonic Golf Tour-
nament held on July 31 at the Madison Coun-
ty Country Club.


uil nI ruuIIniinigy, Incl. rnuLu Dy ImiuIIdUI unl, dJuly 01, UU
Family and friends have lunch during the District 8 Masonic Golf Tournament held on July 31 at the Madi-
son County Country Club. Pictured left to right: Forest Greene, Tommy Greene, Eric Daniels, William Greene
and John Deere "Matty" Greene.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, July 31, 2009
Among the foursomes who competed in the Masonic Golf Tournament were, pictured left to right:
Hensec Nelson, Larry Bell, Bobby Haskell and Richard Newman.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, July 31, 2009
Timberland Ford generously provided a truck that was to be awarded to any golfer getting hole in one
on the third hole, an uphill, 160-yard par three, although no one won this time around. Standing with the
prize, left to right, are Jason Stanley, Ben Jones, John Sirmon and Bill Kerr.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, July 31, 2009
A few fine firearms were awarded as part of the fundraiser held during the District 8 Masonic Golf Tour-
nament held July 31 at Madison County Country Club. Pictured left to right: Jason Stanley, Roger Pittman,
Brent Whitman (back), Jim Campbell and Bill Bucholtz.


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www.ureenepublishinu.com Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A


ULFORD FAMILY *

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AMonticello, Florida ti
Congratulations To The t
Masonic Golf Tournament Participants
Producers of green peanut.
for boiling since 1945
Gary Fulford (850) 997-3780
Stephen Fulford (850) 997-3733
Bury Fulford (850) 997-29822w
Ernest Fulford (850) 997-112273


FI/-,Cn W.
00 er
RES


r We asIT01,1117olled I


r)i.qtrirt Mq.qnnir (







10A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



Around Maison


Friday, August 7, 2009


NFCC Announces

2009-2010

Artist Series

Performances
The North Florida Community College Artist Se-
ries proudly announces its performances for the 2009-
2010 season. Shows, held at Van H. Priest Auditorium on
the NFCC campus in Madison, include "Earth Beat" by
Vanaver Caravan (dances and music from around the
world) on Sept. 12; the harmonic voices of Brotherhood
a cappella quintet on Oct. 15; Davis and Dow Jazz Duo
on Nov. 19; holiday favorite "The Nutcracker" by Dance
Alive National Ballet on Dec. 12; Corky Siegel Chamber
Blues on Jan. 21; chamber music by Intersection featur-
ing violin, cello and piano on Feb. 18; and the Land-
sharks performing a Jimmy Buffett tribute on March
11.
The NFCC Artist Series has traditionally provided
quality entertainment at an extremely affordable price
and this season, the NFCC Artist Series' 50th anniver-
sary season, is no exception. This year season pass hold-
ers will enjoy more performances seven shows at the
same low price as last year, only $45 open seating or $55
reserved seating.
The NFCC Artist Series is one of the best enter-
tainment deals in North Florida, offering exceptional
talent and variety Just look what NFCC Artist Series
patrons are saying "The Artist Series is a cultural
feast! We look forward to every performance and always
leave with a happy feeling having had a great evening."
and "Wow! What fun we had enjoying each perfor-
mance. Great variety, excellent quality, close to home,
pleasant in every way!"
People travel from all over North Florida and be-
yond to enjoy the performances "You just can't beat the
quality programming" and guests of the Artist Series
rave about the shows and low ticket prices "Top quali-


WWW.NFCC.EDU
Associate Degrees
Get an A.A. or Associate Degree
Allied Health
Be a Nurse, a PCT or a PN
Business Operations
NEW Certificate Programs
Computer I Networldnug
Variety of Certifications
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College s Possible!
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FALL TERM 2009
Classes Begin Aug. 24


ty entertainment equal to
the big cities' perfor-
mances"... "Tickets are a
super value"... "Don't
ever stop doing this!"
All Artist Series per-
formances are held at Van
H. Priest Auditorium and
begin at 7 p.m.
There will also be op-
portunities to attend
NFCC Community The-
ater performances in the
fall and spring, a perfor-
mance of Alice in Won-
derland by Bits 'N Pieces
Puppet Theatre, and a fes-
tival in September to kick
off the season and cele-
brate the arts. Please note
that the Sept. 12 perfor-
mance is funded in part by
a grant from the Southern
Arts Federation in part-
nership with the National
Endowment for the Arts
and the Florida Depart-
ment of Cultural Affairs.
More information is
available from the NFCC
website at www.nfcc.edu
(keyword Artist Series) or
by contacting the NFCC
College Advancement Of-
fice at (850) 973-1653 or
ArtistSeries@nfcc.edu.


KN



AUG UST.1 5.2009




MADISON, FL
12:00PM TO 4:00PM



$35 PRE-REGSTRA1 $40 DAY OF EVENT
TROPHY PRIZE TO BEST BAR-B-QUE


James Brown Attends Food

Science And Safety Workshop


Photo Submitted
Dr. James Brown (pictured third from the right, top row) was selected for the second consecutive year
to attend the Food Science and Safety workshop at FAMU as part of their Continuing Education Program.
The college of Engineering Services, Technology and Agriculture selected teachers from several North Flori-
da schools to inform them about 1) careers and occupations in food science 2) developing lesson plans in
their respective disciplines utilizing the Florida State Sunshine Standards and 3) to understand the role of
the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services as it pertains to Food
Science.


Cowboy


Cards


On Sale
By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County
High School football athlet-
ics staff went business to
business on Thursday, Au-
gust 6, raising money for
the expenses of the
Madison County Cow-
boys. The coaches are
selling the popular
cowboy cards, which
offers phenomenal dis-
counts to local restau-
rants and retail stores.
The cost of the card is


To purchase a
Cowboy card to sup-
port the Cowboys,
you may reach Coach J
Frankie Carroll at
(850) 973-5061.


MCHS


Cheerleaders


To Host


Fundraiser
By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County High School JV
and Varsity Cheerleading squad will be
holding a car wash on Saturday, August
8, from 9 a.m.,-2 p.m. at O'Reilly Auto
Parts in Madison. There is no set
amount for a car wash, but generous
donations will be welcomed.
Ruth Ann Latner has recently
stepped up as the new Varsity Cheer- $
leader sponsor, and Tammy Brown
will be teaming up as the sponsor for 4E
the JV team.
The teams are holding this
fundraiser to raise money to buy new
uniforms for the upcoming school year.
For more information, please call
Ruth Ann Latner at (850) 973-4650 or (850)
464-0236.


The Madison County Solid Waste and Recycling Department is in search of two
acres of property along highway 150 North, AKA as Lovett Road. Parties
interested in the sale of such property should contact Allen Cherry, County
Coordinator at (850) 973-3179 or Jerome Wyche, Coordinator of Solid Waste
and Recycling at (850) 973-2611, no later than August 14, 2009. The property
must meet the following criteria:
Must be available immediately
Must be free of lien or mortgage; preferably individually owned
Must be adjoining highway 150 with no requirement to construct a road
for additional access
Must not be classified or listed as wetland


Ifs lime f10r1I


Would you like to give up the name tag for a business card? Ready to sell
that old TV to make room for a new one? Well, this is your chance.
Check out the Classifieds today!


THE MADISON r
ENTERPRI S CORDER
is 18(i


Calust sbi t
yorclsifida t


Chmen w or flords Tom Oulmanding Nmpipm







Friday, August 7, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com



Church


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11 A


Ca tch the


j Spirit (
c.


By Lilla Howerton
Vacation Bible
School at Madison's
First United Methodist
Church was a huge suc-
cess. It was directed by
Ruth Ann Latner, who
also leads the Wonderful
Wednesday for our chil-
dren. Claire Maultsby,
an eight-year-old, who
attended Vacation Bible
School, wrote an ac-
count of 'A Day at Vaca-
tion Bible School." Here
are some excerpts:
"Monday, July 20
was the first day of
Camp EDGE Vacation
Bible School. EDGE
stands for Experience
and Discover God
Everywhere.
The first thing my
group did was go to
Bible story time. We
learned about the ark of
the covenant.
After story time was
music. We learned the
EDGE song.
Next we went out-
side on the playground
and played soccer with a
huge ball that came up
to my waist.
Then we went to
snack. It was delicious!
Next we went to art.
We made the ark of the
covenant. Here's how:
We had a gold box and
we glued two long gold
corndog sticks to the
sides. Then we took a
piece of paper with a
Bible verse on it and
glued it inside the box.
The verse was Isa-
iah 41:10 'Do not fear for
I am with you. Do not be
afraid for I am your
God.'
After art we did dis-
covery We took a bowl of
water, a straw, some
baby powder and some
soap. You can try this at
home. Shake some baby
powder in the bowl of


water. The powders
stands for a river. Take
your straw and put it in
the bowl. Nothing hap-
pens except the powder
moves around a little.
This is like your life
without God.
Then take your
straw and dip it in the
soap. The soap stands
for God. Dip the straw
inside the bowl of water
with the baby powder.
All the baby powder
goes away! It's like
when God parted the
Red Sea for Moses!
Last of all we went
to the fellowship hall for
closing. It was a very fun
day! I can't wait until to-
morrow!
Camp EDGE Pledge
God is with me.
I will stay close to God.
God guides me.
I will follow.
God teaches me.
I will learn.
God loves me. I will love
God and others.
God sends me.
I will go.
The next week, Mon-
day, July 27, thirty
two campers attended
the Warren Willis Unit-
ed Methodist Camp in
Leesburg. Each day had
a different theme center-
ing around prayer. Ja-
cob Johnson, a 10 year
old camper, shared his
experience of one day at
church camp. "Church
Camp was really fun.
When we got there it
looked like it was going
to be a great week and it
was! The food smelled
good and it was deli-
cious. We played fun
games. We talked to God
and danced to Jesus. In
the rec. hall we prayed
to God. We got to draw
pictures or write scrip-
ture on rocks. We also
got to skate and play fun


games in the rec. hall.
Our cabins were nice
and we had cool coun-
selors. After dinner, we
had Praise Time and
Pastor Louie showed
us about God in magic
ways. We got to go to the
camp store. At Small
Group Time, we put
scripture in balloons,
popped them and put it
back together in 4 min-
utes! We got to go to the
Secret Beach, which is
on a 600 acre lake and it
has a cross floating in
the middle of the lake. I
had a great time at
church camp." Aren't
our young people awe-
some?
Today our ladies, in
the Audrey Newman
Circle, are having din-
ner at 6pm at Shelby's
Restaurant.
Brian Sanderson is
collecting sleeping bags
(needs 10-15) or dona-
tions to purchase them.
He is starting a new
camp and retreat min-
istry to motivate, en-
courage and inspire our
Madison young people.
On Sunday, 8/23,
there will be a baby
shower for Kaila Hardee
in the fellowship hall
from 2-3pm. Come join
us in showering Kaila
with gifts and love.
We invite you to attend
one of our meaningful
worship services at
8:30am or 11am. The
music is fantastic,
which sets the stage for
Pastor Bob, who will in-
spire you with his gen-
uine and enthusiastic
love for Jesus Christ.
The First United
Methodist Church in
Madison is a church
where you're invited by
Jesus Christ to come
and "catch the spirit."


Midway Baptist Church

Celebrates 65th Homecoming
By Bryant Thigpen had many articles pub- as a contributing author
Greene Publishing, Inc. lished in Florida Baptist to several different pub-
On Sunday, August Witness, and has served locations. He has also
16, Midway Baptist held many positions
Church of Madison will with the State Board of
be celebrating its 65th Missions, as well as the
Anniversary celebration Florida Baptist Conven-
and homecoming, with
special guest Dr. Olin :" He has been on
Charles Horton. Sun. many mission trips
day school will begin to Panama, Ja-
at 10:30 a.m., Morn- maica, Haiti, Ba-
ing worship at 11:30 hamas, Ecuador,
a.m., and lunch at 1 c India and Europe,
p.m. preaching the
Dr. Horton has gospel.
been in the min- Dr, Horton is
istry for 52 years married to Carolyn
and was ordained at Deloach and they
New Home Baptist have two children
Church in Perry. At. : nd four grandchil-
tending New Orleans Iren.
Baptist Theologioil Midway Baptist
Seminary, he received : Church is located nine
doctorate of ministry 3-le. minules south of Madison
gree. off Hwy 53 on Midway
Dr. Horton has also Dr. Olin Charles Horton Church Road.


Jfappenings


At Madison First dl

Baptist Church k


By Kristin Finney
Sunday morning be-
gan in the most glorious
way, with two baptisms.
We would like to wel-
come Dakota and
Cailtlin Hardin into our
church family, and more
importantly, the family
of God. Debbie Bass
sang the Message in
Song entitled "Do They
See Jesus in Me?"
Archie Davis gave
the offertory prayer, fol-
lowed by the worship
choir singing "Eastern
Gate." Pastor Ferrell
spoke from several
books including; 1st
Corinthians 15:10,
Matthew 5:13-14, John
1:12 & 15:1-5, and John
15:15. He spoke that we
should strive to see our-
selves as Christ sees us.
We are created in His im-
age.
The following events


will be happening for
Madison First Baptist in
the next month: Our
church began its work-
days this past Saturday,
we would like to thank
everyone that helped. We
would like to invite any-
one who will to attend
these work days for the
next two Saturdays, Au-
gust 8 and 15. Children's
choirs began on August
2nd and will continue
every Sunday at 6 p.m.
Children from three-
year-olds-sixth graders
are invited to attend. On
August 13, 2 p.m. at Lee
First Baptist there will
be a Senior Adult Ice
Cream Social. Madison
First Baptist still is in
need of more AWANA
helpers. If you are inter-
ested please contact
Becky or Heath Drig-
gers.
We would like to in-


vite you to join us for
our services! Our wor-
ship schedule is as fol-
lows: Sunday school
10-11 a.m. Sunday Morn-
ing Worship 11 a.m.-12
noon. Sunday Evening
Worship 6-7 p.m., fol-
lowed by youth dinner
and fellowship until 8
p.m. Wednesday evening
services begin at 6 p.m.
for both the adults and
youth and lasts until 8
p.m.
Our prayers this
week go to the coming
school year. Students
and teachers remain in
our prayers. We hope
that Christ can remain
strong in our county.
Though the schools have
faced several challenges
due to our commitment
to praise God openly, let
us stay strong in our
faith and never doubt
what He can do for us.


THE BOOK
THAT SPEAKS
VOLUMES


I








12A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com




Real estate


Friday, August 7, 2009


Get Tax Credits By Going Green At Home


(StatePoint) It's
about time homeowners
got an economic stimu-
lus of their own.
The economic down-
turn has affected many
homeowners, but a new
law called the American
Recovery and Reinvest-
ment Act now is offering
tax credits for energy ef-
ficient home improve-
ments. This stimulus bill
is enabling homeowners
to add dollars back into
their bank accounts,
while reducing their fam-
ilies' carbon footprints.
What's Covered
What exactly is cov-
ered under the new stim-
ulus bill can be
confusing. Many are un-
sure which energy effi-
cient upgrades qualify
for tax credits. According
to Andrew Goldberg, se-
nior director of federal
relations for the Ameri-
can Institute of Archi-
tects (AIA), homeowners
should focus on three ba-


sic changes in policy to
get started:
Tax credits for en-
ergy efficient home im-
provements that would
have expired at the end of
2009 have been extended
through 2010, allowing
you more time to budget
for upgrades.
Tax credits which
previously covered up to
10 percent of costs have
been increased to cover
30 percent of costs, with
a maximum total of
$1,500 in tax credits in
2009 and 2010. This ap-
plies to existing homes
only and covers the fol-
lowing: renovations to
windows and doors, insu-
lation and roofs (metal
and asphalt), heating,
ventilation and air condi-
tioning (HVAC), non-so-
lar water heaters and
biomass stoves.
Through 2016, tax
credits also are available
at 30 percent of the cost
with no cap on the credit


you can receive for-
geotherm i I
heat pump-s.
solar pan. --
els, solar / ,
water r / e
heaters.,
sma 1 If
wind(I
energy \
systemsins
and fuel
cells t - 1
both exlsiln
homes and new
construction.
Most
importantly,
says Gold-
berg, is that
the $1,500 cap
for 2009 and
2010 now ap-
plies to any .
combination o-f
energy efficint
improvements. Ini
the past, each ren
ovation or appll.
ance had an
individual cap and
together they could


add up to a maximum of
--$1..'--'. but nit home-
,:\ ners ::re noit limunited
S- itm L \ item.
S'WhilI tlei inaxi-
InuLn i'oreldit you
"-... an r1 eeI e is
) 'till $1..-00. you
/ n':,\ ,an select a
n i Ln i lna:tin of
lnplupri '\ -emints to

SHo\ the
SStimn-
hlus
iHelps


The changes to the
policy not only give you
more autonomy in decid-
ing how to create a more
energy efficient home,
but also allow you to ap-
proach home renova-
tions from a more
holistic perspective. In-
stead of looking at one
room or one type of reno-
vation, you can take a
closer look at how the dif-
ferent rooms, systems
and appliances in your
house impact one anoth-
er and contribute to ener-
gy savings or waste.
"An architect can
help you go from a piece-
meal approach to a com-
prehensive one that
creates integrated sys-
tems, and find the most
energy savings for the
least cost," notes Gold-
berg.
For example, invest-
ing in a new HVAC sys-
tem may yield some
energy savings, but if
your house has poor in-


sulation or windows and
doors that allow for air
loss, you won't maximize
the value of your im-
provement and energy ef-
ficient potential. An
architect may recom-
mend a new HVAC sys-
tem in conjunction with
inexpensive weather-
stripping, or another cus-
tomized combination of
simple improvements
that improve your ener-
gy savings within your
budget.
To find a local archi-
tect with expertise in sus-
tainable design, visit:
http://architectfinderaia.
org.
While times are
tough, the tax credits in
the stimulus bill present
the perfect opportunity
to make smart invest-
ments in your home that
will save you energy and
ultimately dollars.
Greener living is only a
tax credit away.


Small Improvements Can Florida's Fight Against
w w 1 V%-


(StatePoint) For
years, homeowners
looked to increase the
value of their houses to
turn a profit when they
sold them a few years
later. In today's economy,
because families are
planning on living in
their homes longer
term, these living spaces
now need to become
more meaningful.
The warmer months
are a great time to get
started on small projects
to help you better enjoy
your house. For some
homeowners this means
repurposing rooms to
make them more func-
tional. For others, it's
about making outdoor
spaces focal points for
entertaining.
* During the housing
boom, people viewed
their homes as invest-
ment properties and flip-
pable," says architect
Kevin Harris, a member
of The American Insti-
tute of Architects (AIA)
and former chair of its
small projects commit-
tee.
* For most families, their
house is their largest in-
vestment, and while re-
sale value is important,
so is livability It's time
to rethink and rearrange
our houses to be homes
and use them for what
they are really for -
spending quality time
with family and friends,"
he adds.
Before embarking on im-
provement projects to
make your home more
livable, consider the fol-
lowing:
* Plan Properly: Archi-
tects who specialize in
residential renovations
can help you recognize
what works and what
doesn't. Their design
skills will ensure your
home will accommodate
your family's needs
within an affordable
budget. An architect also
can help "green" your
home, making it more
environmentally-friend-


ly and energy efficient,
resulting in ongoing cost
savings.
* Bigger Isn't Always
Better: You may not need
major improvements.
Small changes can have
big impact. One home-
owner, for example, lived
in a "railroad" style
home where you had to
pass through one room
to get to the other, which
was a hindrance during
parties. After consulting
an architect he realized
he didn't need major ren-
ovations. He simply
needed to add a doorway
so the middle room
could be accessed from
another entrance to
change the flow.
* Rethink Existing
Spaces: Sometimes you
don't need to add a room,
just rethink and repur-
pose an existing one.
Most older homes were
built with formal dining
rooms that are only used
once or twice a year.
Consider inexpensively
converting your unused
dining room into a guest
bedroom, home office,
music room or library. A
garage can become a
family room, or an out-
door storage room can
be converted into a sum-
mer kitchen. Think of
the ebb and flow of your
household, and be cre-
ative with what you
have.
* Consider Changing
Things Back: For a


while, the trend was to
create separate state-of-
the-art, theater-style me-
dia rooms. However, this
design was isolated from
the rest of the home and
family members' activi-
ties. Now, media rooms
are integrated into fami-
ly rooms to create more
of a den experience.
* Look Outdoors For
More Living Space: Out-
door living spaces easily
can be designed for year-
round use. Not only do
they increase a house's
value, they facilitate
friendship with neigh-
bors, by increasing your
ability to entertain larg-
er groups. Outdoor
spaces can include cov-
ered porches, summer
kitchens, portable BBQ
pits and outdoor fire-
places, all of which can
be outfitted to increase
your home's energy effi-
ciency A covered porch
only costs the price of
some roofing and floor-
ing, and decks can be
built with inexpensive
pressure-treated wood.
* Any home improve-
ment project should
help your family con-
nect and enjoy the house
more thoroughly And by
planning ahead with an
architect, you can keep
costs down," says Har-
ris.
For more home im-
provement ideas or to
find a local architect,
visit www.aia.org.


Iviortgage rraua


est scams the attorney violations with the num-
general noted is the in- bers are growing each
crease in mortgage res- day," McCollum added.
cue firms that take fees The best tool in the
up front from homeown- fight against con-artists is
ers facing foreclosure, education. The more the
presumably to assist people of Madison Coun-
them by modifying their ty and around the state
loans or helping revise know about these scams,
their payment schedule. the less likely they are to
These scam artists do become victims, so all are
nothing to prevent the encouraged to spread the
foreclosure, keep the fees, word. They may also visit
and let the homes fall into the mortgage fraud
foreclosure. By the time website by going to
the homeowners discover http://www.myfloridaleg
the fraud, it is too late. al.com/mortgagefraud
McCollum's office to learn more about how
continues to fight these to protect yourself and
unscrupulous individu- your family from
als. "We currently have mortgage fraud.
approximately 73 active Michael Curtis can
investigations, and are re- be reached at
viewing over 300 compa- michael@greenepublishin
nies for potential g.com.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
According to reports
released from Florida
State Attorney General
Bill McCollum on July 29,
"Florida has the second
highest foreclosure rate
in the country To make
matters worse, the in-
crease in foreclosures
statewide is coinciding
with the highest unem-
ployment rate in the state
since 1975. There is no
doubt Floridians are in
dire straits because of the
current economic crisis."
The uncertainty
caused by the current fi-
nancial climate invites
scam artists to prey on
fears and victimize fami-
lies already in financial
distress. One of the ugli-


Visit Our New Showroom & Design Center
Today For Your Free Building Consultation & Estimate!

Building Custom Homes In South Georgia and North Florida


HOMES
^ f_, 1H"


Make Your House a Home







Friday, August 7, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com



Sch ool & eucation


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A


MCHS Bands Look Forward To Great Year


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Vacation time is
wrapping up and it will
soon be time for stu-
dents to return to
school. But during the
summer, the Madison
County High School
band students have been
working hard preparing
for the 2009-2010 band
season. Here's what the
band has been up to.
During the 2008-2009
band season, the theme
for this year's half-time
show was selected. "The
theme is titled, Ramblin'
Cowboys. The story line
is that the cowboys are
looking for the best way
to get around. They
start by taking a 'Crazy
Train,' then they try to
'Come Sail Away' After
that they hop into 'Tito's
Taxicab' and finally de-
cide that the best way
for a cowboy to get
around is a 'Big Red
Horse' (by Aaron Cop-
land)," stated Band Di-
rector Geoff Hill. The


(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Bryant Thigpen, July 1, 2009)
MCHS Band was on hand at the anniversary celebration of Studstill Lumber
Company, serving hotdogs and drinks to the people. Pictured left to right are:
David Sanders, Senior (Baritone); Joseph Nelson, Freshman (Drum Line); Betsy
Crews, Band Parent; Angel Stafford, Senior (French Horn); Toby Fox, Sopho-
more (Saxophone).


band is known for bring-
ing much excitement to
the stands during foot-
ball season.
Before school starts,
each band student par-
ticipates in Band Camp,
which will be held Au-
gust 10-14. During band
camp, the band begins
developing the show for
the upcoming year, as
well as rehearsals for in-
dividual music sections.
Each music section
has an exceptional in-
structor on hand to
work with the students.
David Fries will be
working with the wood-
winds; Mark Branham
will work with the brass
section; Jared Swift will
assist with the drum
line; and Suzie Godfrey
has been named the new
Assistant Band Director
of the year.
"I truly believe that
the bands, and Madison
County High School as a
whole, will have a great
year and everyone has
worked hard this sum-


mer to improve the edu-
cational experience for
all of our students,"
stated Hill.
During the summer
break, band students
have been busy holding
fundraisers to help cov-
er the expenses of the
band for the upcoming
year.
The band is current-
ly seeking sponsors for
the upcoming 2009-2010
band season. For more
information, please con-
tact the band office at
850-973-5061 x240 or
email at hillg@madison
.kl2.fl.us. "We have
sponsorship levels from
$25.00 to $250.00 and all
levels include great gifts
from the bands," he
said. All sponsors auto-
matically get their
names printed in the
Cowboy football pro-
gram as well as all band
programs throughout
the year.
The MCHS Bands
are looking forward to a
great year.


HOW TO TEACH KIDS SAFETY SKILLS


(StatePoint) Nearly
800,000 children are re-
ported missing yearly
That's an average of 2,185
each day, or about two
children every minute.
"We can't be with our
child every minute," says
Judy Curran. "Children
need to learn effective
self-defense skills
against abusers and sex-
ual predators."
"Armed with just a
handful of hours of safe-
ty education, children
can be an integral part of
stopping violence," she
says. "Decisions made in
the first few moments
can drastically change


the outcome."
Curran stresses that it's
not enough to inform
kids about potential per-
ils. Information must be
followed with solutions
to the problems.
With young children,
every safety concept
must be followed with an
activity to reinforce the
concept. "Children
should be taught to yell,
run and to defend them-
selves if someone tries to
grab them," she points
out. "They need a founda-
tion of safety education
to build on for the rest of
their lives."
"Too many of us see


violence against children
as an unfortunate but in-
evitable part of life," says
Curran. By involving
kids in their own self-de-
fense, however, children
become empowered and
learn to replace the fear,
confusion, and panic of
dangerous situations
with confidence, person-
al safety skills, and self-
esteem.
Parents should
check if their local
schools or other organi-
zations offer well-estab-
lished self-defense
programs for children,
such as RadKids or oth-
ers.


prepgueigree
ore t SLU upon completir
Associate's Degree at NFCC:


* Psychology
* Elementary Education
* Human Services Administration
* Business Administration with a
specialization in Management
Saint Leo University admits students of any race, color, religion and national or ethnic origin.


CLASSES FORMING NOW.
Registration Begins July 6th
Classes Start August 17th
* Full-time students are eligible for the
Florida Resident Access Grant (FRAG).
* Approved for VA Benefits/GI Bill


SAINTLEO
UNIVERSITY
What you need for where you're going.
Founded in 1889


Children's Choice
SCHOOL OF THE ART
| providinS academic
enrichment {hrouh
artistic expression




Open House


"Information and Enrollment Session
for Parents and Students"

Dear Parents and Students,
We would like to invite you to Madison's newest School. The Children'd Choice School of
theArts. You are cordially invited to tour our school building and see what is in store for
all children attending this first year. Come and visit us next Sunday August the 9th,
between 3:30 PM and 5:30 PM for insights into our outstanding academic curriculum
infused with the Arts. The school is located at 203 SE Seminole St. in Madison.
This first Academic year, we will be enrolling 4K Kindergarten grade levels. Classes will
run concurrent with Madison County's public school system schedule and be held from
8:30 AM 2:30 PM each scheduled school day. Academic tuition is a flat fee per month
of $290.00. For these grade levels, all supplies, a hot lunch and two healthy snacks per
day are included in the tuition.
Once regular classes have ended for the day, the school is offering classes in Art, Dance,
Drama and Music each week for all children ages 4 12 years old. These classes will run
from 3 PM 5 PM each scheduled school day. After school classes may be attended full
time for $85.00 per month or on a per class basis for $10.00 per day of instruction. These
after school classes will also offer a healthy snack.
Class size is limited. So come, join us, for a look around and see what we have to offer as
an educational experience for your child. For additional information, call and leave a
message on the school phone at 850.973.6781, or you can send an email to us at
childrenschoicesoa@gmail.com. All messages and email will be responded to by 5 PM of
each day.
Looking forward to seeing you then,


Kevin O'Malley
Director


Florida Coastal



Cardiology

293 West Base Street, Madison

(next to Capital City Bank)



* Do you have shortness of breath?

* Do you have chest pains?

* Do you have high blood pressure?

* Do you have high cholesterol?

* Do you have a family member

with heartproblems?

* Do you have unexplained

dizziness or fatigue?




If you answered yes to any of the questions,
you may have heart or blood vessel problems
and may be at risk for a stroke
or a heart attack.

Heart Attacks and Strokes

can be Prevented!

Call 973-8600 to get an evaluation.

No referral necessary for most insurances.

You don't have to leave town to get your heart tests done!


I





www.greenepublishing.cor


14A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Friday, August 7, 2009


WI^^6vn P~be L~uc-a(


By Alfa Hunt
Special To Greene Publishing, Inc.
William Pope Duval was the first territorial gov-
ernor of Florida, serving from April 17, 1822, until
April 24, 1834.
Duval was born to Major William Duval and
Ann Pope in Mansfield, Virginia, near present day
Richmond on Sept. 4 1784. When he was only 14
years old, he left his parents home and settled in
Bardstown, Kentucky, where he began tostudy law.
When he was entertaining friends, Duval would
recount of how he left his father's home. One night
while Duval was sitting with his family and some
neighbors, his father come into the room and began
lecturing Duval over some job he had done poorly
that day. Major Duval said, "Get up from that chair,
you good-for-nothing fellow, and bring in a back log
for the fire!" When young Duval went to the wood
pile for the log, it suddenly occurred to him that
since he was a "good-for-nothing", he would go away
and make something of himself. He had his own
horse in the stables and without another word to his
family, mounted his horse and rode off for Kentucky.
Twenty years later, he returned to his father's
house for a visit. He rode on horseback and tied his
horse to the back gate. As he walked through the
yard, he stopped at the woodpile, found a back log,
and without any explanation, walked into the din-
ing room and placed the log in the fire. His parents
and the neighbors sat around the fire as they had
twenty years before, simply waiting for an explana-
tion. The now famous Duval said, "Father, there is
the back log you sent me for." His father simply
replied, "Well, you were long enough getting it."
At age 19, he was admitted to the Bar in 1804.
Later that year, he married Nancy Hynes in Bard-
stown, Kentucky.
During the Indian hostilities of 1812, Duval was
appointed to command a company of volunteers. Be-
cause of his military and law experience, he was
elected to the 13th United States Congress in 1813.
He served in this position until 1815 when he decid-
ed not to seek reelection. He returned to his Ken-
tucky home and continued to practice law.
Six years later, when Florida became a United
States territory, Duval was named the United States
Judge for East Florida district on May 18, 1821. On
April 17, 1822, he was appointed as the first non-mil-
itary governor of Florida by President James Mon-
roe, succeeding Andrew Jackson.
When he became the new territorial governor,
Duval had several problems facing him: finding a
permanent location for the territory capital, con-
trolling hostile natives, and selling lands.
In June 1822, the first meeting of the Legislative


Council was held at Pensacola and in May 1823, the
council met in St. Augustine. Since East and West
Florida were now untied under one government,
they main problem was finding a permanent capital.
The council appointed two commissioners, Dr.
William H. Simmons and John Lee Williams to ex-


amine different areas and choose a site. They were
assigned to areas between the Chipola and the
Suwannee rivers.
The commissioners agreed upon the site of the
capital being the old fields, which had been aban-
doned by the Tallahassee Indians during Jackson's
raids on the towns. The area was chosen mainly be-
cause, "every vegetable cultivated here is luxuriant,
the cotton fields exceed by half any I have seen be-
fore; the sugar cane is batter that the Mississippi
ground affords. Water is good and plentiful," wrote
Williams.
Duval's next plan of action was to divide the
nearby land and sell it at auction. Surveyors were
appointed to divide the land, starting from an initial
point at the southeast corner of the soon to be Tal-
lahassee. The land was divided into townships six
miles square with each of the squares divided into
640 acres. The Tallahassee Base Line divided the
north and south townships. This Base Line ran
through Madison County; the section of Interstate


10, just west of Highway 14 runs along it. According
to Historian Elizabeth Sims, Madison and
Greenville are about two miles north of the Base
Line while Lee was about one mile south of it. Land
sales were soon held.
The first recorded land patent was July 22, 1825
to John Taylor. Taylor was not the first settler in the
county, but he was the first to receive a patent from
the newly established Florida land office.
Duval's dealings with the Indians were mainly
peaceful ordeals and meetings with which he tried
to convince them to relocate to reservations. During
his governorship, the First Seminole War ensued.
While trying to convert the wild territory of
Florida into a thriving community, Duval is noted to
have signed the first act of legislation in Florida as
a U.S. Territory, which divided it into four territo-
ries and he established the local court system.
Duval continued to live in Florida for several
years after the end of his governorship, practicing
law. In 1848, he and his family moved to Texas,
where many of his descendants still live today. He
and his wife had eight children.
In 1834, Duval visited Washington D.C. and on
April 24, he died of paralytic shock. He was interred
in the Congressional cemetery. His life, as well as
personality, has been depicted in fiction by James K.
Paulding who portrayed him in the book "Nimrod
Wildfire." Washington Irving also wrote about Du-
val's unique character when he created the charac-
ter "Ralph Ringwood."
ira-" i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i iErMA


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Friday, August 7, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com




Outdoors


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 15A


ISm ard g lea a Ime


1 & 8 Bedrooms, Full Kitchens,
Cookhouse, Cable TV,
Spa Wireless Internet
Make Your Reservations Early!
352-498-7740
wwwstoinhatoheeplacacom .


Xolow Oak Quail




1664 BCT Gin Road Quitman, Georgia 31643
Bobwhite Quail:
Eggs Chicks Early Release


INVASIVE SPECIES THREATEN CRITICAL CHARLIE HOUDER HONORED


HABITATS; OYSTER AMONG VICTIMS


A study of oyster
reefs in a once-pristine
California coastal estu-
ary found them devastat-
ed by invasive Atlantic
Coast crabs and snails,
providing new evidence
of the consequences
when human activities
move species beyond
their natural borders.
Led by marine biologist
David L. Kimbro, now of
The Florida State Uni-
versity Coastal and Ma-
rine Laboratory at
www.marinelab.fsu.edu,
shows that in Tomales
Bay (www.tomalesbay
.net), half the population
of California's native
Olympia oyster has per-
ished because its habitat
has fallen victim to the
dysfunctional relation-
ship between native
species and non-native
ones accidentally intro-
duced.
The work of Kim-
bro, a postdoctoral asso-
ciate at the FSU
(wwwfsu.edu) lab, and
colleagues from the Uni-
versity of California-
Davis and its Bodega
Marine Laboratory has


magnified concerns that
predator-prey mismatch-
es between native and
exotic species may lead
to further losses of criti-
cal habitats that support
marine biodiversity and
ecosystems.
"What David Kim-
bro's research reveals
about California's
Olympia oyster raises a
specter for Florida as
well," said Felicia Cole-
man, director of the FSU
Coastal and Marine Lab-
oratory
"First, our state has
a remarkably productive
native oyster population
at risk in the
Apalachicola Bay" she
said. "These oysters are
sustainably harvested
and provide critically
important settlement
habitat for an amazing
array of species, so its
loss would be devastat-
ing. Second, we know
that in Florida's benign
climate, exotic species
are pretty easily estab-
lished. One need only
follow the trajectories of
lionfish, Australian
pine, Brazilian pepper


and Burmese python for
a grim view through the
looking glass."
Their study is ex-
pected to help guide
habitat management
and conservation ef-
forts, including plans
now being drawn up
along the West Coast to
restore native oysters.
"While native preda-
tor-prey interactions
that benefit oyster reefs
are intricate and took a
long time to develop, the
invasive crab and snail
don't have the historical
exposure necessary to
recreate these important
interactions," Kimbro
said. "A fellow re-
searcher likened the na-
tive crabs and snails to a
long-married couple
who have learned to co-
exist, leaving oyster pop-
ulations intact. But the
lack of experience the
invasive crabs and
snails have with each
other has led to the de-
struction of parts of the
oyster population, much
as an incompatible cou-
ple might destroy an en-
tire family."


Charlie Houder, of
the Suwannee River Wa-
ter Management Dis-
trict, recently was
selected as a fellow in
the Society of American
Foresters. Only five per-
cent of the Society's
members are awarded
the distinction.
Houder was nomi-
nated for the title by his
peers for outstanding
service to the Society
and to the profession of
forestry
"I have spent my en-
tire adult life practicing
forestry in the South-
east," said Houder. "It's
an incredible honor to
be recognized by my
peers."
Houder has provid-
ed numerous contribu-
tions to the forestry
profession over the
years. During his time at
the District he has
helped develop the con-
servation easement pro-
gram and assisted the
District in becoming the
first public agency to be


Charlie Houder


certified under the Sus-
tainable Forestry Initia-
tive.
"Charlie Houder is
the premier land manag-
er in Florida," said
David Still, District exec-
utive director. "He has
taken the District's pro-
grams to a higher level
and set the bar for other
public agencies to
achieve. I have enjoyed
working with and learn-
ing from Charlie."
Houder, a certified
forester, is a deputy exec-


utive director at the Dis-
trict and the director of
the Department of Land
Acquisition and
Management. The de-
partment oversees pur-
chases of land and
conservation easements
for the purpose of water
conservation. With few
exceptions, all of the
lands acquired are also
open for public recre
ation.
Houder has been a
member of the Society
for 32 years, during
which time he has held
numerous offices. He
will be honored at the
Society's National Con-
vention in Orlando later
this year.
Founded in 1900, the
Society of American
Foresters is the national
scientific and education-
al organization repre-
senting the forestry
profession in the United
States and is the largest
professional society for
foresters in the world.


Bronson Announces New


Oyster Harvesting Area


Florida Agriculture
and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles
H. Bronson announced
today the creation of a
shellfish harvesting area
in Wakulla County The
new St. Marks Shellfish
Harvesting Area con-
sists of a 4,111 acre con-
ditionally approved area
and a 5,264 acre prohibit-
ed area. The St. Marks
Shellfish Harvesting
Area has an anticipated
opening date of Septem-
ber 1, 2009, provided that
rainfall volumes are not
excessive.
"This is a positive
development for oyster-
men in Florida," Bron-
son said. "Our staff in
the Division of Aquacul-
ture worked with local
oystermen on the multi-
year project. While the
St. Marks Shellfish Har-
vesting Area is not a
large area, it does pro-
vide additional oyster
harvesting opportuni-
ties where none previ
ously existed."
Opening and closing
of the St. Marks shell-
fish harvesting area is
based on local rainfall


and river discharge. Too
much rain brings poten-
tially harmful bacteria
into the area, which trig-
gers temporary bans on


harvesting in that area.
Copies of the map,
legal description and
management plan for
the harvest area are


available from the Divi-
sion of Aquaculture,
www.FloridaAquacultur
e.com, or by calling (850)-
488-4033.


10455 NE Colin Kelly Hwy Pinetta, FL 32350
850-929-2600 or 850-464-5061
HOURS: Wed-Sat 10am-7pm


On~ thBauif Sit ac che
w Rivers


We accept all major credit & debit cards! Now accepting EBT.
7 Tired and don't feel like cleaning your catch?
L et us clean your catch of the day!
l we don't have what you're looking for,
SCall for special orders.
Please give 48 hour notice on large orders.


Ammodump
International, LLC


formerly B& GP Enterprises


Custom built AR-15's Have it your way
Revolvers, Pistols, Always in Stock
Re-Loading Components In Stock
Winchester Primers In Stock
Hodgdon, IMR, Alliant Powder, In Stock

(850) 973-8880
ammodump@embarqmail.com
10 am to 4 pm Tues, Wed, Thur.
Call for weekend Gun Shows


BY SOCIETY OF

AMERICAN FORESTERS


R & S Sports, Inc.
"Your Sports Headquarters"
VISIT OUR NEW LOCATION
3122 N Oak St Ext. Valdosta, GA
229-253-9533
(In Between Boothill & Jungle Gyms)


SWlfOmon R (fS i


e Specialize in Team Equipment & Uniform
Other location in Albany, GA





16A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


Friday August 7, 2009


DedlneFo Casifed


Inside Treasures & More
Shops CoS. 9 Glassware
Collectables
850-838-1422 (SATISUN) Furniture
We Buy 850-584-7124 (MON/FRI)
Call Us SAT 9-3 SUN 10-4 Tools
WE'RE ON VACATION JULY AUGUST


Call Bob
850-242-9342
Now selling steel
buildings, garages,
barns and carports
6/10, rn, cc
Home Repair/Maintenance
From pressure washing and
yard care to painting and
cabinets call Curt or
Maryann @ Mac Services
850-973-4180
8/5, pd


Wanted: CnicKens, turKeys,
guineas and peafowl.
850-464-1165
rtn, n/c

BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004. IF NO
ANSWER, PLEASE LEAVE
NAME, TELEPHONE NUMBER
AND INFO ABOUT THE MILL
rtn, n/c



Diamond Plate Alum. Pick-
up truck tool boxes.
Various sizes. $50 each. Call
973-4172 8am-5pm M-F
5/6-rtn, n/c
5TH FRIDAY SALE
at Creatures Featured Pet
Shop! 7/31/09 thru 8/8/09.
Hook some GREAT deals!
Play with the Discount
Ducks! 850-973-3488
www.CF-Pet-Shop.com
7/29, 8/5, c




U PICK
Watermelons .50 cents each
782 NE Nixon Way
Madison, Fl
850-973-4459
8/5, pd
$$$
Educational Grants, Business
Loans and Bad Credit
Mortgages
850-673-9102
8/5,- 8/26, pd


AtAshlyn's Rose Petal
224 SW Range Ave
Friday 8/7/09 8:00 am 5:00
pm and Saturday 8/8/09 8:00
am 5:00 pm
8/5, c


no use ror Rnent
NW Lovett Rd (HWY 150)
in Greenville. 2 bedroom
with basement, washer and
dryer included, $400 per
month + utilities
850-584-2925
8/7, 8/12, pd
House For Rent

2 bedroom 1 bath in Lee
$375 per month, $250
Security deposit
850-971-5809
8/5, pd
Lake Front Home

2 bedroom 2 bath, includes
Kitchen appliances, lawn
maintenance and water, 1 yr
lease $800 deposit, $800 per
month 850-973-30025
8/5, rtn, pd

Clean as new. Two story, 3
BR, 2.3 baths, formal LR &
DR. 1705 Sq. Ft. New
Kitchen, Range, Ref, D/W,
G/D. Oak Floor downstairs,
Heart Pine upstairs. 2 Central
H&A. Yard maint. included.
ADULT FAMILY. No pets.
$900 rent and deposit. Good
credit req. 205 NE Shelby Ave.
Madison. Call George 973-
8583 or 557-0994.
5/8 rtn, c
FOR RENT
2 bedroom 1 bath mobile
home near NFCC, No Pets &
No Children. Non smokers
only 850-843-0980
7/29, 8/5, pd
House For Rent
3 bedroom 1 bath, quiet
neighborhood, fenced yard,
attached garage in Madison
$600/month + deposit
850-464-6091
8/5, 8/12, pd

CLEAN 3 BR, CH & CA,
new R & Refg, Oak floors.
ADULT FAMILY ONLY.
Rent $685 plus deposit.
No pets. Good credit req.
432 NE Horry Ave., Madi-
son. Call George 973-8583
or 557-0994.
rtn, c
2 bedroom mobile home
water, furnished, 1/4 mile out
of City Limits
No calls afer 8 pm
850-973-6735


Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for
Senior's and Disabled.
1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.).
HUD vouchers accept-
ed Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd,
Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and Employer



EQUAL HOUSING ncc
OPPORTUNITY
rtn'ce


1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-
HC accessible apts.
Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-
3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville
Pointe Trail, Greenville,
FL 32331.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtn, c


QSouthem lias Of

C(0adison1 Cpartments



Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR
HC & non-HC accessible
apts. Call 850-973-8582,
TDD/TTY 711. 315 SW
Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtn, c




Modular Sales
F.G.B.C. Certifying Agent,
Pat Riley, is now in Lake
City 386-344-5024
7/15, rn, c
Needs Minor Work
3 bedroom 2 bath dou-
blewide only $9,900
Call David
386-719-0044
7/15, rtn, c
NEW 32 X 80
4 bedroom, loaded
w/upgraded options. Turn
Key... ready to move in in-
cluding well, septic, wiring,
& closing cost on your own
land. $533.33 a month w/ no
money down & 620 or better
credit score Call Lynn
850-365-5129
7/15, rn, c
Trade in's & Repos Available
Call Eric for a list of our
homes available at discount-
ed prices, many to choose
from! (386) 719-5560
7/29 -8/29, c
HOME BUYERS
Let my 20 years experience
negotiate the best buy.
386-344-5024
7/15, rn, c
Want to buy a home?
call David for government
housing assistance programs
386-719-0044
7/15, rn, c

1 Acre, paved road, 3 bed-
room 2 bath workshop, fire-
place only $499.00 monthly
call David 386-719-0044
7/15, rtn,c
"Brand New""
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 to many up-
grades to list, all this for only
$42,843.00 Call Eric to set
up appointment
(386) 719-5560
7/29 -8/28, c

CASH FOR YOUR USED
MOBILE HOMES 1990
OR NEWER
386-752-5355
7/15, rtn, c
NEED A HOME?
Tired of being turned down
because you have no money
or credit score is too low but
you own your own land? I
have solutions
Call Lynn Sweat
386-365-5129
7/15, rtn,
Own your home
for less than rent and receive
up to $8,000 bonus! Infor-
mation Call
1-800-769-0952
7/15, rtn, c
"WOW"
$150.00 and your property
puts you in a home today
call Eric at
(386) 719-5560
7/9 8/28, c
$361,000 Available to loan
for home purchase at .5 LTV
386-365-8549
7/15, rtn, c


st tMe ome uyers
We have several programs to
help 1st time home buyers
plus GOUT assistance up to
$8,000 $$$
Call Eric for details
(386) 719-5560
7/29 -8/28, c
First Time Home Buyer...
Special financing program I
can help you own a home
Call Bobby at
386-288-4560
7/15, rtn, c
FOR SALE
4 bedroom 2 bath ready to
move in call
386-288-4560
7/15, rtn, c
5 Bedroom 3 Bath Home
New with zero down
$595.00 per month call
Mike 386-623-4218
7/15, rtn, c
"JULY HOT DEALS"
Land/Home easy Qualify -
$8000 Tax Credit 5% inter-
est 386-344-5024
7/15, rtn, c
28 X 80 5 Bedroom
Reduced $15,000 for quick
sale call Mike
386-623-4218
7/15, rtn, c
Work for the County or
State?
special financing for home
purchase call
1-800-769-0952
7/15, rtn, c
Repo Mobile Homes
Due to the state of the
economy, one persons' loss
is another ones gain. Save
thousands on these bank
repos. Call Rick
(386) 752-1452
7/29 -8/28, c
The Wait Is Over!
Introducing "Mossy Oak"
the most innovative, quality
and affordable manufactured
houses in the industry. Call
Mr. Mott (386) 752-1452
7/29 -8/28, c
New Manufactured Homes
Starting at $23.70 sq. ft.
Guaranted lowest prices in
North Florida. Call Rick
(386) 752-8196
7/29 -8/28, c



For Sale:
House & Lot
In the Town of Suwannee
was $135,000, Now $99,000.
2 BR/1 BA. Fully Furnished,
New Metal Roof, and New
Paint. Utility Building with
Washer and Dryer. Nice Fruit
Trees. 386-719-0421
rtn, n/c
Fantastic Lake
and Mountain Views
from this 2 Bed/ 2Bth Home.
Open and Covered Decks,
Large Screened Porch, Gas
FP, CH/A, Oak Floors & Cab-
inets, and Appliances.
Offered Furnished at
$179,900. Call BJ Peters at
850-508-1900
rtn, n/c
Completely Remodeled
3 BR/ 1 Bath, new roof,
carpet, central heat & air,
new kitchen cabinets, new
bathroom, new 200 amp
electrical, approximately
1300 sq. ft. $84,000
Oak Estates Sub Division
McWilliams Realty
(850) 973-8614
6/3,rtn, c
FOR SALE BY OWNER
Brick 3 BR, 2 Bath, and
1604 SQ. FT., Carport, Patio,
1.76 Avres, Fenced Yard,
Cement Circular Drive,
Sidewalks, recent Appraisal.
Corner lot on Houck Road
@ 3281 Sullivan Road, Per-
ry. Call for info or appt.
850-584-9486
or 407-791-0246
7/22, 8/12, pd
House For Sale
Cherry Lake Area, recently
remodeled, 3/2 1800 sq. ft.,
cypress home, new baths,
kitchen, and roof. Bamboo
flooring on 3/4 acres
$132,500 850-929-4991
8/5, rtn, pd




OFFICE BUILDING
FOR RENT
across street from
Post Office, Courthouse,
and Courthouse Annex.
(Old Enterprise Recorder Office)
111 SE Shelby St., Madison;
Newly renovated
back to the 1920's era
Call 973-4141
rtn,n/c
Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highwayfrontage.
Corner lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Dr.
& Highway 53 South.
Enterprise Zone


Natural gas line, 8 inch wa-
ter main, access to city utili-
ties, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or long term lease.
Call Tommy Greene 850-
973-4141
rtn, n/c


$$AVON$$
Earn 50%, only $10 for
starter kit! Call Today
850-570-1499 or visit
www.youravon.com/tdavies
5/13 -rn, c

Dental Assistant
Golden Opportunity! Do
you posses a sunny, energetic
attitude? Are you detailed
and organized? Our dental
practice is seeking an out-
standing individual to pro-
vide concierge level service
for our patients in the assist-
ing area. Dental or medical
experience a plus but not
mandatory. Is cosmetics im-
portant to you along with
helping others? If you have
a can-do attitude, you are or-
ganized, and self motivated
with a good sense of humor,
then you should apply. Call
290-5785 to hear a message
from Dr. Roderick Shaw's
office with more details
about the position and intruc-
tions on how to apply for this
position.
7/29, rtn, c

AMIKIDS- Functional Fami-
ly Therapy seeking qualified
Case Manager to join our
expanding program. They are
responsible for in-home
comprehensive services to at
risk youth and families. Suc-
cessful candidates must poss-
es a B.A. and require
competencies of writing, the
ability to work as a team
member as well as indepen-
dently, conducting intakes,
family assessments, meet
specific time frames and sup-
port clinical staff. Fax re-
sume to (386)755-1486
7/29, 8/5, c
AMIKIDS-Functional Fami-
ly Therapy seeking qualified
Clinicians to join our ex-
panding program to provide
intensive in-home therapy for
at risk youth and families ex-
clusively through evidence
based model. Functional
Family Therapy training and
related travel expenses paid.
Successful candidates must
posses a MSW or MA/MS in
a clinical discipline and/or
BSW/BA/BS with three
years experience working
with families. Fax resume to
(386)755-1486
7/29, 8/5, c

Now Hiring:
Experienced Medical Tran-
scriptionist RN's & LPN's
Medical Laboratory Technol-
ogists Please call
850-973-2271 ext 1906
8/5, c

Experience in Farming
I'I.iniII__ plowing, etc.), Ex-
perience in heavy equipment
use (bulldozer, excavator,
etc.), must speak english.
Please have resume. Call
850-948-9952
Drug Free Workplace
8/5, 8/12, 8/19, pd

Fulltime Grants Coordina-
tor position available at
North Florida Community
College: See www.nfcc.edu
for details.
8/5,8/12,


Call 973-4141
to Place Your Ad!


,]


SI I'i ; I1


White English/Pit Bull
puppies 1 male $100
ready now
229-221-3614
7/8, 8/5, pd

White English/Pit Bull
puppies 2 males 1 female
$100 each ready now
850-342-1162


Saturday 8:00 am until
Corner of Base & Washing-
ton Some Office Supplies
miscellaneous stuff, Lots &
Lots of stuff, too much to


8/7, c


FLORIDA PRSSERICS




INC.STATWID


Announcements

Advertise in Over 100
Papers! One Call One
Order One Payment
The Advertising Net-
works of Florida Put
Us to work for You!
(866)742-1373
www.national-classi-
fieds.com,
info@national-classi-
fieds.com

Auctions

Absolute Auction!
214+/- acre farm, house.
Pike County near Troy,
Alabama. Offered in
parcels, combinations
and/or entirety August
13, 1:00.
www.gtauctions.com
(800)996-2877. Granger,
Thagard and Associates,
Inc. Jack F Granger
#873.

REAL ESTATE Auction-
Luxury 12,000+/- sq ft
home, 88+/- acre horse
farm. Shelby County, Al-
abama, near Lay Lake.
Offered in parcels, com-
binations, and/or en-
tirety August 20, 1:00.
www.gtauctions.com,
(800)996-2877. Granger,
Thagard and Associates,
Inc. Jack F Granger,
#873.

Auto Donations

DONATE YOUR VEHI-
CLE RECEIVE $1000
GROCERY COUPON
UNITED BREAST CAN-
CER FOUNDATION
Free Mammograms,
Breast Cancer Info
www.ubcf.info FREE
Towing, Tax Deductible,
Non-Runners Accepted,
(888)468-5964.

Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING. 40
yr Warranty-Buy direct
from manufacturer
30/colors in stock, w/all
accessories. Quick turn
around. Delivery avail-
able. Gulf Coast Supply
& Mfg, (888)393-0335
www.GulfCoastSupply.c
om


F, ;I F f1 UCT1 1 f "


Business
Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING!
Do you earn $800 in a
day? 25 Local Machines
and Candy $9,995.
(888)629-9968 BO2000033
CALL US: We will not
be undersold!


Cars for Sale

Acura Integra 95 $500!
Honda Civic 99 $400!
Ford Taurus 01 $750!
Toyota Camry 98 $850!
Police Impounds! For
listings call (800)366-9813
ext 9275.

Buy Police Impounds!!
99 Honda Civic $400! 97
Honda Accord $500! for
listings call (800)366-9813
ext 9271

$500! Police Impounds!
cars, trucks, suv's from
$500! Honda, Toyota,
Chevy and more! for
listings (800)366-9813 ext
9499

Help Wanted

HEAT & AIR TECHS
have Recession Proof
Careers! 3WK Training
Accreditation.
EPA/OSHA Certified.
Local Job Placement As-
sistance. Financing
Available. May Qualify
For GI/VA Benefits.
(877)994-9904.

International Cultural
Exchange Representa-
tive: Earn supplemental
income placing and su-
pervising high school
exchange students. Vol-
unteer host families
also needed. Promote
world peace! (866)GO-
AFICE or www.afice.org.

Homes For Rent

4Br 3Ba Foreclosure!
$11,500! Only $217/Mo!
5% down 15 years @ 8%
apr. Buy, 3 Br $199/Mo!
for listings (800)366-9783
ext 5798


Fht~I r S' k rrh~linr


III"'l


[I l;lliJ ;.1 T :1H ; [Ii I i| I"TN ',
[ Hunt Fish Farm Invest Possibilities
*High Fence Hunting Preserve? Cattle-Horse Ranch? *Development Opportunity? *Residential Community?
SPlantation Property? *Investment/Income Property? *Commercial Land Buildings? *HighProfile Real Estate?


*u 0
Polk +/W *--n. em- emT on@it


r-q -,", -'- -" '7"-' :,= --- ,-,--=


F IU UIFFEBENT CUUNTIESllh IN NUH111H & UEN IHAL FLUHIUA1:


r I 11 1 r. 1 7...


---


l1EUl






Friday, August 7, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 17A


LEG~AL


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that LINDA VANE, the holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property,
and name in which it is assessed is as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 02-316-TD
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2002
NAME INWHICH ASSESSED: GREG BRUTON

Legal Description of Property: LOTS NO. 28, 29 and 30 of BLOCK
40, AS SHOWN BY MAP OR PLAT OF GREENVILLE INVESTMENT
COMPANY'S LAND IN THE TOWN OF GREENVILLE, FLORIDA;
SAID MAY OR PLAT MADE BY FRED T PECK.

All of said property being in the County of Madison, State of Florida. Un-
less such certificate shall be redeemed according to the law, the property de-
scribed in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the west front
door at the Madison County Courthouse on the 31ST day of August 2009 at
11:00 a.m.

Dated this 28th day of July 2009.

TIM SANDERS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
MADISON COUNTY
MADISON, FLORIDA

BY: Ramona Dickerson
DEPUTY CLERK

7/31, 8/7, 8/14, 8/21

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that LINDA VANE, the holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property,
and name in which it is assessed is as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 02-495-TD
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2002
NAME INWHICH ASSESSED: LOUELLA DAVIS & CALVIN MCQUAY

Legal Description of Property: BEGIN 145.00 FEET WEST OF
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF BLOCK 66 OF THE TOWN OF MADISON
(NOW THE CITY OF MADISON. Fl ( RIDT FOR A POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, THENCE RUN NORTH '* 4I" %" I 1' 48.44 FEET, THENCE
RUN NORTH 99.56 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 36' 30" EAST 48.44
FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 11' 30" WEST 98.90 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

All of said property being in the County of Madison, State of Florida. Un-
less such certificate shall be redeemed according to the law, the property de-
scribed in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the west front
door at the Madison County Courthouse on the 31ST day of August 2009 at
11:00 a.m.

Dated this 28th day of July 2009.

TIM SANDERS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
MADISON COUNTY
MADISON, FLORIDA

BY: Ramona Dickerson
DEPUTY CLERK

7/31, 8/7, 8/14, 8/21


IN RE: ESTATE OF

JOSEPH DARRELL ADAMS
Deceased.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER 2009-CP-059


NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION

The administration of the estate of JOSEPH DARRELL
ADAMS, deceased, File Number 2009-CP-059, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which
is Madison County Courthouse, Madison, Florida 32340. The name and ad-
dress of the personal representative is set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections
that challenge the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal rep-
resentative, venue or jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their ob-
jections with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served
within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's estate must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
All CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is the 31st day of
July, 2009.


JIM ADAMS
sonal Representative
1902 Vineyard Way
Tallahassee, FL 32317


7/31, 8/7


THOMAS E. STONE Per-
Attorney for Personal Representative
P.O. Box 292
Madison, Florida 32341
Telephone: 850-973-6560
Attorney at Law-Fla. Bar No. 212490


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION


CASE NO.: 40-2009-CA-000274
DIVISION:


BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,

vs.

TONY D. MACARAGES, JR., et al,

Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF ACTION


TO:

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:

CURRENT ADDRESS:

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:

CURRENT ADDRESS:


TONY D. MACARAGES, JR.
332 NE COFFEE WAY
MADISON, FL 323406146

UNKNOWN

ANGELA N.MACARAGES
332 NE COFFEE WAY
MADISON, FL 323406146

332 NE COFFEE WAY
MADISON, FL 323406146


ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFEN-
DANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS


LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
CURRENT ADDRESS:


UNKNOWN
UNKNOWN


YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the follow-
ing property in MADISON County, Florida:

START AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP
1 NORTH RANGE 9 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND
RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST ALONG
SECTION LINE 3293.08 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
WEST HALF OF NORTHWEST QUARTER OF NORTHEAST
QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 13 AND AT NORTHEAST CORNER OF
LOT 1; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE EAST ALONG 20 ACRE LINE
1190 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 15 SECONDS
WEST 360 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING AND NORTHEAST
CORNER OF HEREIN DESCRIBED LOT 16 AND ON WEST SIDE OF
STREET; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE EAST ALONG STREET 39.6
FEET TO BEGINNING OF A CUL-DE-SAC WITH 50 FOOT RADIUS,
WHOSE CENTER POINT IS SOUTH 37 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 12
SECONDS EAST 50 FEET THEREFROM; THENCE SOUTHERLY 50
FEET FROM SAID CENTER POINT AND THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 143 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 48 SECONDS FOR A
DISTANCE OF 124.9 FEET TO FORTY LINE; THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 38 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 248 FEET ALONG
FORTY LINE; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE WEST 129.6 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 218
FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING, AND BEING PART OF SAID WEST
HALF OF NORTHWEST QUARTER OF NORTHEAST QUARTER.

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Florida De-
fault Law Group, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 9119 Corporate
Lake Drive, Suite 300, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this
Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint or petition.

This notice shall be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in
the Greene Publishing, Inc.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 21, day of July 2009.

Tim Sanders
Clerk of the Court

By: Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk
7/24, 7/31


NOTICE

The District School Board of MadisonCounty,
florida will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, September 1, 2009, at
6:00 p.m. The meeting will he held In the School Board Metting Room
of the Superintendent's Office, 210 NE Duval Ave. Madison, Florida.

New Board Policy:

2.40 Religious Freedoms

The proposed document may be viewed at the School Board Office, 210 NE
Duval Ave, Madison, Florida.

Statutory Authority: 1001.41 (2)
IF A PERSON DECIDE TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE
BOARD, WITH RESPECT TO ANV MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS
MEETING OR HEARING, HR/SHE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE
PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, HE/SHE MAY NEED TO
ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS
MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND
EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BK BASED.

8/7





Your Local hper Has Lots Io OIer: .

Community Events Sports

Local News Classifieds


Call 73-4141 to start your sibscriptio today!


Public Notice

The North Florida Workforce Development Board announces
the availability of the (draft) local Workforce Investment Act Plan
modified for 2009-2010, for review and public comment through Sept.
11, 2009. The plan may be viewed at the Board Administration Office,
705 E. Base St., Madison, FL or on the website WWW.NFWorkforce.org
under News Releases.

8/7


IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THOMAS COUNTY
STATE OF GEORGIA


In Re: Adoption of Baby Boy Ailing
DOB: 06/30/09, by and through
An Open Door Adoption Agency, Inc.


Case No. 09-A-40


NOTICE OF PETITION TO TERMINATE PARENTAL RIGHTS

To: Arnold (Last Name Unknown), the named Biological Father, of a Child
born June 30, 2009, in Lowndes County, Georgia, to the natural mother,
Jennifer Ailing

You are hereby notified that a Petition to Terminate Your Parental Rights
has been filed in the above-styled Court by An Open Door Adoption Agency,
Inc. through its attorneys.

The mother of the child has surrendered her rights to the child to the Peti-
tioner, An Open Door Adoption Agency, Inc., and the Petitioner intends to
place the child for adoption.

Pursuant to Official Code of Georgia Annotated Section 19-8-10, 19-8-11,
19-8-12 and other pertinent laws, you are advised that you will lose all
parental rights to this child, and you will neither receive notice of nor be en-
titled to object to the adoption of the child, unless, within thirty (30) days of
your receipt of this notice, you file a Petition to Legitimate the Child, pur-
suant to O.C.G.A. 19-7-22 and give notice in writing of the filing of such Pe-
tition to this Court and to the attorney listed below. You must prosecute the
action to final judgment. You are further advised that if you intend to ob-
ject to this Petition, you must file an Answer to the Petition to Terminate
Parental Rights within thirty (30) days in the Superior Court of Thomas
County, Georgia. You are urged to immediately retain legal counsel to assist
you in this matter.

You should contact the attorney for Peitioner, Chris E. Ambrose, Silvis,
Ambrose & Lindquist, P.C., 115 Seward Street, P.O. Box 1557, Thomasville,
Georgia 31799, telephone 229-228-4258 for further information. All notices
to or correspondence with the Petitioner and copies of all pleadings or pro-
ceedings you may file in any court in regard to the above-referenced Child
should be served upon him.

Dated this 31st day of July 2009.

SILVIS, AMBROSE & LINDQUIST, P.C.

ATTORNEYS FOR AN OPEN DOOR ADOPTION AGENCY, INC.

8/7, 8/14, 8/21

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
TO ENACT AN ORDINANCE

Madison County will be holding a Board of County Commissioners Public
Hearing to consider the enactment of an Ordinance to adopt the Madison
County Evaluation and Appraisal Report (EAR) of the County's Compre-
hensive Plan. The public hearing will be held on:

August 19, 2009 at 5:00 p.m
County Annex Building
229 SW Pinckney Street
Downstairs Boardroom
Madison, FL 32340

Interested parties are encouraged to appear at this hearing and provide
comments regarding the proposed report. Copies of the EAR and the Ordi-
nance will be available for inspection at the Planning & Zoning Office locat-
ed in Suite 219 of the County Annex Building. Persons needing special
access considerations are asked to please call the Madison County Planning
and Zoning Department at (850) 973-3179..

8/7, 8/12




Woman To Start Professional

Tug-Of-War League
BEXAR COUNTY Mary Ann W. applied Thera-Gesic pain
creme to her sore shoulder and hands and felt so great she
decided to start a professional tug-of-war league. When asked
who would be the target audience for the new TOW league, she painlessly
replied, "None of your dang business!"
b Go Painlessly-
Endorsedby. L T1IEB .ESIC


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18A Madison Enterprise-Recorder www.greenepublishing.com Friday, August 7, 2009




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