Group Title: Madison enterprise-recorder.
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00387
 Material Information
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate Title: Madison enterprise recorder
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Madison enterprise-recorder
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison, Fla.
Madison Fla
Publication Date: July 10, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028405
Volume ID: VID00387
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
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hce maoison est. 1865


1ntetptisee IccotOcr


Our 144th Year, Number 45


Friday, July 10, 2009


46 + 4 Tax=50O






To I sISp iS o

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Madison, Florida


Five Arrested On Drug Charges


CHARLYE SANFORD


GREGORY GRAHAM


MARVIN DAVIS RASHAD JAMES


On Monday, July 6, the Madison
County Sheriff's Office Drug Task
Force executed a search warrant on
the residence of 637 W Pinckney St.,
Madison. The residence was occupied
by Charlye Sanford (B/F, DOB:
03/13/1949) and Gregory Graham
(B/M, DOB: 02/19/1971). The Madison
County Sheriff's Office Drug Task
Force conducted an investigation that
resulted in obtaining the search war-
rant and arrest warrants for the occu-


pants.
Charlye Sanford: Arrested and
charged: Trafficking Controlled
Substance: Hydrocodone
Gregory Graham: Arrested and
charged: Possession with intent
to sell crack cocaine and Sell of
Crack cocaine.
On Tuesday, July 7, The Madison
County Sheriff's Office Drug Task
Force started executing arrest war-
rants that were obtained from under-


cover drug buy investigations. Arrest-
ed and charged were the following:
Marvin Davis (B/M, DOB:
07/21/1970) of Madison: three
counts of Possession cocaine
with intent to sell, two counts of
sell of cocaine and one count of
possession of marijuana,
Rashad James (B/M, DOB:
07/10/1988) of Madison: one
count possession with intent to
sell crack cocaine, one count sell


of crack cocaine, one count pos-
session intent to sell cocaine,
one count possession of drug
paraphernalia and resisting ar-
rest without violence.
Brian Hill (B/M, DOB:
06/21/1987) of Madison: one
count of possession of crack co-
caine with intent to sell and one
count of sell of crack cocaine.
Additional arrests and/or charges
are pending.


Motorcycle Crash

Claims Life Of

Former Cowboy
By Angela Castellucci
Special From The Perry News-Herald And Taco Times
Speed could be a factor in an accident that killed
a 22-year-old Greenville
man Sunday at an in-
tersection that claimed
another life more than a I
decade ago in a similar
motorcycle crash.
Broderick Blue was
pronounced dead after
being transported from
the scene at Warner Av-
enue and Walnut Street.
Perry Police Depart-
ment Ptl. Garrett Camp-
bell is the assigned BRODERICK BLUE
traffic homicide investi-
gator and results are pending the finalization of his
investigation.
The crash occurred around 4:30 p.m. as Blue was
traveling south on Warner Avenue. A four-door Mer-
cury car, driven by Eric King, 35, was turning onto
Warner from Walnut Street when Blue apparently
Please see Blue, Page 4A


Madison County Babe Ruth 12U All-Star

Softball Team Runners-Up in Florida

State Championship Tournament


The Madison
County Babe Ruth 12U
All-Star Fast Pitch Soft-
ball Team traveled to
Ponte Vedra, July 1-6,
to compete in the 2009
Florida State Babe
Ruth Championships
in their age division.
The team competed
against 13 other teams
from other districts
throughout the state.
In the first round of
play on Wednesday,
July 1, Madison defeat-
ed Waldo, 15-0. Next,
Madison faced Jack-
sonville's Argyle,
defeating them, 9-6.
On Saturday, July 4,
Madison faced Ocala
and Oviedo. Madison
Please see Softball,
Page 4A


Kneeling: (left to right) Whitney Stevens, Hannah Odiorne, and Lyric Mat-
tair: Standing: (left to right) Coach Rick Davis, Laquasha Ward, Kaitlyn Hen-
derson, Ke'ana Curry, Nicole Davis, Hope Smith, Courtney Richardson, Coach
Rusty Smith, Magan Jennings, Olivia Murphy, Kelli Garner, and Head Coach
Todd Richardson.


Madison Woman Arrested

For Drug Possession


Jimmy Lee Bryant Arrested

For Aggravated Assault


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A Madison woman
was arrested for disor-
derly conduct, posses-
sion of paraphernalia
and possession of a con-
trolled substance on
Tuesday, June 30.
According to a
Madison Police Depart-
ment report, while on
patrol, Sgt. Chris Cooks
noticed a car on Bentley
Ave. turning left onto
Lee Ave. fail to use a


LISA CAROL ROLAND

turn signal. The driver,
Lisa Carol Roland, 29,


then made a left onto
Ohio Avenue.
Cooks conducted a
traffic stop and noticed
that Roland had an open
container in the car
with her. He asked her
for consent to search
the vehicle. She refused.
Cooks told Roland
that he was going to is-
sue her a citation for the
open container. She be-
gan to curse and use
Please see Roland,
Page 4A


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A Madison man,
not long released from
prison, ended up back
in the pokey after be-
ing arrested for aggra-
vated assault and for
throwing a deadly mis-
sile.
According to the
Madison Police Depart-
ment, on Saturday
evening, June 27, Offi-
cer Ruth Parks re-
sponded to a call about


JIMMY LEE BRYANT

criminal mischief on
Parramore Avenue.


When Parks ar-
rived, she spoke with
the victim, who told
her that she had gotten
into an argument with
Jimmy Lee Bryant,
who was upset because
she was talking to an-
other man. He threw a
brick through a win-
dow, then walked down
the street.
As Parks was
speaking with the vic-
Please see Bryant,
Page 4A


Woman Arrested For

Battering Senior Citizen


Greenville Man Arrested

For Georgia Robberies


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A Madison woman
was arrested Monday
evening, July 6, for bat-
tery (domestic violence
on a person age 65 or
older), escape and resist-
ing with violence.
According to a
Madison Police Depart-
ment report, Officer
Ruth Parks responded to
a call on SW Horry
Street in reference to a
domestic disturbance.


AMY NUSBICKEL


Upon Parks' arrival,
she spoke with Amy


Nusbickel, who claimed
she had been hit and
had her hair pulled by a
friend she lives with.
Parks checked Nusbick-
el for physical injuries
but could not find any
Parks spoke with
the friend, who stated
that he had allowed Nus-
bickel to borrow his car.
He said that she did not
return for two hours
and when she arrived
Please see Nusbickel,
Page 4A


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Madison County
Sheriff's Deputy Alan
Whigham arrested
Adam Lee Simmons, 30,
of Greenville, at his
home on Tuesday, July
7. Simmons was arrest-
ed on warrants for al-
legedly robbing a Pizza
Quick restaurant and a
Subway restaurant in
Valdosta, Ga.
In both robberies,
authorities say, that


ma


ADAM LEE SIMMONS

Simmons threatened
the people with a


weapon. He did not
show the weapon, the
Valdosta Police Depart-
ment said, but he did
make threats to use it.
Authorities were
able to identify Sim-
mons from a surveil-
lance video.
Law officers have
also linked Simmons to
the robbery of a Gap
Outlet in Lake Park, Ga.
Stride Jones, of the
Please see Simmons,
Page 4A


1 Section, 16 Pages Fri Sat 91/72 Sun 92/75 Mon /7
Around Madison 6-7A Obituaries 5A 7/10 -. 7/11 7/12 .- 7/13 .
Classifieds 14A Chrismas in July 12A Str'Ze 8N 7
Cl fs 15A Church 8Ai Scattered thunderstorms. High A few thunderstorms possible. Isolated thunderstorms. Highs in Scattered thunderstorms possible.
HistLegalory 1A school A 87F. Winds NE at 5 to 10 mph. Highs in the low 90s and lows in the low 90s and lows in the mid
History 10A School 11A the low 70s. 70s.


BRIAN HILL





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2A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Uicwpoints & Opinions


FridayJuly 10, 2009


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper


Our Future? Which Way?


July 4th! Our day of a Declaration of Indepen-
dence.
That Declaration put legs to the October 21,
1774, "Address to the People of Great Britain," in
which the Deputies for each Colony, meeting in
Philadelphia, proclaimed that they would not be the
"Hewers of wood and drawers of water," for anyone.
(Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789, Li-
brary of Congress Edition,1904. Vol. 1, page 89).
That they would not suffer the supplecants role
of the debtor: "hewers of wood and drawers of wa-
ter," as set forth in Joshua 9:21.
For a long time, the one thing we always saw
hovering-was a crisis. And, now even a blind man
can see that we are on that slippery slope.
To put it bluntly, the fiscal policy of these united
States is unsustainable. Debt is ballooning faster
than gross domestic product. The recent Congres-


sional Budget Office report estimates that from 2008
to 2019, the publicly held long-term debt will reach
82 % of G.D.P
This hugh mass of debt is a tsunami stifling
both economic growth, and our standard of living.
In Federalist # 29, Alexander Hamilton worried
about the budget. He said federal expenses could
eventually equal the annual taxes of the States.
That to "abridge the mass of labor and industry to
so considerable an extent, would be un-
wise,...because it would not long be endured."
Hamilton, and our other forefathers, could
hardly respect us if they saw us now.
May our generation boldly act and stop this
rush to the poor house.
Respectfully
Nelson A. Pryor
Lee, Florida


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P.O. Box 772 Madison, FL 32341
1695 South SR 53 Madison, FL 32340
(850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121
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Publisher Classified and
Emerald Greene Legal Ads
Laura Little
Editor Deadline for classified
Jacob Bembry is Monday at 3 p.m.
Deadline for
Production Manager Deadlinefor
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Wednesday at 5 p.m.
Staff Writers There will be a $3 charge
Michael Curtis and for affidavits.
Bryant Thigpen
Circulation
Graphic Designers Department
Stephen Bochnia Sheree Miller and
and James Sutter Bobbi Light
Advertising Sales Subscription Rates:
Representatives In-County $30
Mary Ellen Greene, Out-of-County $38
Dorothy McKinney, (State & local
Jeanette Dunn taxes included)
and Chelsea Bouley

-Since 1865-
"Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity."
tbe labtison Enterprise-RecorDer
Madison Recorder established 1865
New Enterprise established 1901
Consolidated June 25, 1908
Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S
SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at
Madison Post Office 32340. Publication No. 177.400.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison
Enterprise-Recorder, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
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This newspaper reserves the right to reject any adver-
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the management, will not be for the best interest of the coun-
ty and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate
any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publi-
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Mail To: Greene Publishing, Inc.
P.O. Drawer 772 Madison, FL 32341
Name:
Address:
Phone:


Same Message,

Different Singer
And the tongue is afire, the very world of iniqui-
ty; the tongue is set among our members as that which
defiles the entire body, and sets on fire the course of our
life, and is set on fire by hell. James 3:6
My brother underwent triple bypass surgery on
Monday. The surgery lasted two hours longer than
they thought it would because it was not as easy as
the doctor had thought it would be. My brother had
a lot of inflammation in his heart and they found
out he had coronary artery disease, which he proba-
bly inherited from my grandfather Gene Bembry
They also thought he would have to go back into
surgery later that day, which, thank the Lord, he did-
n't.
While speaking with Danny on Tuesday, he told
me and my father a lot of things that had hurt him
over the years. He told us about some of his class-
mates hurting him, he talked about things others
had said to him over the years that hurt him and he
told us about how we had hurt him with words that
had gone straight to his heart. He had not been hurt
physically Words had hurt him.
So many times we say things that we don't really
mean to people that we really love. We shouldn't say
things like that to him. We work all day and then go
home and grouch at our families. We shouldn't be
grumps at home or at work. We need to learn to con-
trol our tongues.
Ernie Dawson, lead singer for the gospel group
Heirline, wrote the following words:
Words
all their power is real,
They can hurt or they can heal,
Can't be touched but you can feel,
Words,
there is strength in every one
And when all is said and done
Wars are lost and battles won
With words.
Ernie had been hurt with words as a child. The
message in his song and in what Danny told me on
Tuesday is the same. We should not use our words
as a hammer to hurt others. We should use them to
heal and to lift others up.
Job 34:3 tells us:
"For the ear trieth words,
as the mouth tasteth
meat." If the meat is no
good, it makes us sick
just as words, which are
S no good, will also make
us sick.
I know that I will
have a hard time not us-
I s ing my words as a
weapon but I am going to
try and bridle my tongue
and use it only to uplift
others, especially my
family and my friends,
the people who are most
important to me and I
am going to try and not
hurt anyone else with
my tongue. I encourage
others to do the same.
Please continue to
remember Danny in
your prayers!


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Friday,July 10, 2009


icpoints & Opinions


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A


Mladison County i
Extension Service E:.

Diann Douglas |
Guest Columniist
i--


Eat Well When


Traveling
Summer vacations often find you ordering at a
fast food or restaurant. Although these foods are
quick to order, they are often high in fat and calories
and leave you short on some of the major food
groups. When traveling, don't leave your healthful
eating plan at the house when you hit the road.
The next time you dashboard dine, the Ameri-
can Association of Dietitians suggest you use the
following healthy suggestions:
If you order tacos or burritos, ask for salsa
and skip the cheese.
Top a pizza with chicken, Canadian bacon or
lean ham and add vegetables. Try bell peppers,
onions, mushrooms, tomatoes, broccoli,
spinach, artichoke heart.
Ask for a grilled chicken sandwich instead of
the fried version.
Drink water or skim milk instead of a soft
drink.
If you order a burger, make it a smaller-sized
version, add lettuce and tomatoes and skip the
mayonnaise based sauces.
If you order fries, share them with a friend or
better yet, find a substitute for fries. Many
restaurants now offer an alternative such as a
baked potato or a salad.
A great option when taking short trips is to pack
your food. Most major highways have picnic tables
by restroom facilities. This means you pack a cool-
er with adequate ice to keep any perishable foods
safe. To avoid the vending machine trap, foods that
don't need refrigeration may be packed for snacks.
Try these quick, safe and easy foods to take on the
road.
Single-serving boxes of cereal, trail mix, en-
ergy bars, granola bars, bagels, muffins or
crackers.
Raw fruit and vegetables including carrot and
celery sticks, grape, single-serve applesauce or
mixed fruit. Any whole fruits such as apples,
peaches or bananas are a convenient snack.
Peanut butter can be used for sandwiches,
take along a loaf of bread and single serving jel-
lies or honey. It also works well as a snack when
spread on celery or apples.
Don't forget nuts and single-serve packages of
cheese and crackers.
Bottled water and juice boxes also travel well.
For more information on healthful eating, con-
tact the Madison County Extension Service.
The University of Florida Extension Madison
County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affir-
mative Action Employer authorized to provide re-
search, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function
without regard to race, color sex, age, handicap or na-
tional origin.


aYl~lllllld


ThTidit T,4KR


Dear Savvy Senior,
Over the years, my
husband and I have ac-
quired a house and
garage full of stuff, and
would like to start down-
sizing before we get too
old. To do this we would
like to sell off what we
can. So my question is,
what is the best way to
get the most money for
our possessions?
Retired Packrats
Dear Packrats,
Selling off old items
that you don't want or
need anymore is a great
way to downsize, de-clut-
ter and pad your pocket-
book. Here are some top
options to help you pedal
your stuff.
Online Selling
If you have the time
and access to the Internet,
the best way to get top dol-
lar for your old unwanted
possessions is to sell them
on the World Wide Web.
Online selling provides
literally millions of po-
tential customers, so your
odds of getting more mon-
ey for your stuff is much
greater than you'd get at a
garage sale or through a
consignment store. While
there are lots of sites that
will help you sell your
stuff, the two biggies who
draw the most visitors are
Craigslist and eBay
Craigslist
If you're not familiar
with Craigslist.org, it's a
huge classified ads site
that serves more than 550
cities and attracts some 50
million visitors each
month, and it's free to use.
It works just like putting
an ad in your local news-
paper. You list the item
you want to sell including
a brief description (pic-
tures too) for the price you
want. Interested buyers
will then contact you di-
rectly via e-mail, and the
rest is up to you. Larger
items that are difficult to
ship sell well on Craigslist
like furniture, appliances,
exercise equipment and
even vehicles.
eBay
With around 85 mil-
lion active members,
eBay.cor is by far the
biggest selling site on the
Web. Almost anything can
be sold on eBay The down-
side however is their fees
which cut into your prof-
its. EBay charges a non-
refundable listing fee
between 10 cents and $4


per item, depending on
the asking price. And if
it sells, a closing fee of
8.75 percent of the sale
price up to $25, with de-
clining percentage paid
on larger sells.
EBay can also help if
you don't have the time, or
don't want to do the sell-
ing yourself. Just go to
ebaytradingassistant. corn
where you can find a trad-
ing assistant in your area
who will do everything for
you. They typically
charge between 15 and 40
percent of the selling
price.
Easy To Use
If you have concerns
about learning how to ma-
neuver these selling sites,
you'll be happy to know
that they are all pretty
user-friendly and offer
step-by-step instructions.
Once you sell a few items
you'll feel like an old pro.
You also need to know that
if you're planning to sell a
lot of items, a digital cam-
era is a must. Pictures are
essential to selling on the
Web, and a digital camera
makes it easy to transfer
your photographs to your
computer so they can be
uploaded to the sales site.
Price Setting
When it comes to fig-
uring out how much to
charge for your stuff, you
can get a ballpark idea by
doing a search for items
that are similar to yours
on the sales site you're
planning to use. If howev-
er, you suspect you have a
rare or extremely valu-
able item, you should get
it appraised. Check with
a local auction house to
see if it offers free ap-
praisals. If not, for a fee
you can hire a profession-
al appraiser (see
www.appraisers.org) or
call a reputable dealer to
assess your possessions.
Other Options
If online selling does-
n't appeal to you, have a
garage sale (see
www.yardsalequeen.com
for tips), or see what your
nearby consignment store
will sale for you. While
neither of these options
will make you as much
money as the Web, they're
still great ways to get rid
of old stuff and make a
few bucks in the process.
And the stuff that
doesn't sell can always be
donated to a charity for a
tax deduction.


CHARLIE MOORE
by Joe Boyles
My friend Charlie
Moore passed away re-
cently. Tomorrow he
will be laid to rest. In
his own quiet way, Char-
lie Moore was a great
man.
Charlie bridged the
gap between the segre-
gated South and inte-
gration. He once
commented to me that
nothing had held the
South back more than
segregation, and I think
he was right. Look at all
of the great athletes
that segregation drove
away from the South to
far away places like
Washington State. Once
we got over the hump,
southern teams began
to win championships
that were beyond their
reach before.
At 18, when Charlie
joined the Army in 1944,
our military was segre-
gated. Black soldiers
like Charlie were pro-
hibited from joining the
combat arms. Instead,
they built roads and
communication lines
and drove the trucks of
the Red Ball Express
that kept our combat
units supplied. Without
the contributions of
African-Americans in
World War II, victory
was not possible.
After the war, Char-
lie came back to his na-
tive Madison County It
would have been easy
for him to turn his back
on the land of his birth,
but that wasn't Charlie's
way. He toiled from the
inside to make things
better for his children
and grandchildren ..
and all the rest of us.


Charlie was an Ameri-
can hero in his own way.
To me, he was always
"Mr. Charlie" out of my
profound respect for
him.
Charlie Moore was a
"joiner." He joined
boards and a variety of
civic endeavors to pro-
vide the all-important
insight from the Black
Community. That was
invaluable to our com-
munity as we tried to
put our racial history
behind us and enter a
more united and repre-
sentative 21st Century.
I'll always remem-
ber Charlie for his
warm smile and infec-
tious laugh. An en-
counter with Charlie
Moore brightened my
day and for that, I'll al-
ways be grateful.
On a bright Septem-
ber morning eight years
ago, Charlie walked into
my office at the Cham-
ber of Commerce. "Did
you hear that an air-
plane just flew into the
World Trade Center in
New York," he asked.
That got my atten-
tion. I quickly found the
story on the Internet
and together, we
watched in both fascina-
tion and horror. That
moment, those circum-
stances are frozen in my
memory forever.
I'm a better man be-
cause I knew Charlie
Moore, and I'm not
alone.


91.7 FM
www^wapb^ne


I C *L /. / L. '
Thelma Thompson
Guest Columniist
I


America Grows

A Year Older
Once I was young, fair sprightly and gay
And thought this world was made just for me.
I cavorted thru life each night and each day,
No work and no worry, just completely carefree.
Then suddenly awoke it had all been a dream
And reality struck like a piercing sunbeam.
No longer was I enthroned like a queen.
Instead, just a poem who worked for each meal.
But now my life's ship is on an even keel,
And now I am happier than I've ever been,
With life uncluttered in my simple den.

While writing this on our nation's birthday, I
spoke thusly to the empty air, "Happy, happy birth-
day, fair and beautiful America! May your freedom
ever ring!" A few desultory firecrackers could be
heard from down the road. At 10 a.m., it's rather ear-
ly on Saturday morning for celebrating, I suppose.
I know the majority of America's populace will
be mentally, at least lifting their hats to Miss
Liberty and thanking God for this day and, most of
all, to those who, down the years, have made the ul-
timate sacrifice for freedom possible.
My fervent prayer to those who work today -
first of all, our military personnel; then all our law
enforcement, especially those highway and inter-
state officers who are doing everything in their pow-
er to keep reckless and over-imbibing speed demons
from killing both themselves and others; next, all
EMTs, doctors, nurses and other hospital personnel
and our wonderful firemen. Then, of course, those
too many to name who keep our stores, restaurants,
theaters and other places available for our needs and
pleasures.
There will be speeches all over our fair land,
both pompous and vacuous, as well as those ringing
sincere.
And there will be fun and food. The entire coun-
try will smell of barbecue, as men especially try to
outdo each other with the latest (and most expen-
sive) equipment and special recipes. And there will
be dancing and singing. And there will be fire-in-the-
sky extravaganzas as every city lights up America
with its own big fireworks show.
Were you among those who were able to enjoy a
typical 4th? I hope so. And were you happy that
America has aged one more year?
I hope she continues to age, gracefully, beauti-
fully and with prosperity. Amen.
I must add this: I read Regina Brett's Help for
Celebrating Life and loved it. I also will be 90 in Au-
gust and would like to add No. 46: Tend to your own
business; it's a full-time job.


"Copyrighted Material


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4A Enterprise-Recorder


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am Enfotrcmcnt, Crime rom page One


Friday,July 10, 2009


Blue

Continued from 1A


Madison County... _


Man Arrested For


Battering Barber


A Madison man was
arrested for simple bat-
tery on Friday morning,
June 26.
According to a
Madison Police Depart-
ment report, Patrolman
Jeffrey Rosenberg was
dispatched to Lifetime
Cuts Barbershop in ref-
erence to a physical al-
tercation.
Upon Rosenberg's
arrival, he made contact
with the complainant,
who advised him that


Travis Irvine had en-
tered the business and
began hitting him with
clenched fists.
Rosenberg made
contact with Irvine at
the Madison Police De-
partment.
Irvine declined the
opportunity to make a
statement.
Rosenberg placed
Irvine under arrest and
transported him to the
Madison Police Depart-
ment.


ran into the car.
Blue was ejected
from the motorcycle
onto the roadway after
hitting the car.
He was not wearing
a helmet.
The intersection at
Warner and Walnut is
marked by a three-way
stop, with signs on the
north and southbound
lanes of Warner and a
sign at Walnut and
Warner.
Deputies from the
Taylor County Sheriff's
Office assisted at the
scene Sunday and "their
help was greatly appre-
ciated," PPD Capt.
Jamie Cruse said.
The investigation is
ongoing.
The intersection
was the scene of anoth-
er deadly motorcycle
crash more than 10
years ago, just two days
before Christmas, on
Dec. 23, 1998.
Speed was a factor
in that crash, which
killed Albert Rivers, 29.
"The circumstances
were very similar. The
motorcycle (driven by
Rivers) was southbound
on Warner Avenue when
it hit a truck that was


tim, Bryant began
walking towards them
in the middle of the
road. Parks advised Pa-
trolman David Meyers
to apprehend Bryant
and bring him to the
scene.
Bryant told officers
that he threw the brick
through the car's win-
dow, because he was up-


turning onto Warner
from Walnut Street.
The investigation
determined that the
cause of the crash was
excessive speed by the
motorcycle. At the time
of impact, the motorcy-
cle was traveling ap-
proximately 70 miles per
hour. Prior to the bike
going into a skid, it was
estimated that the mo-
torcycle driver's speed
was in excess to 90 miles
per hour. The motorcy-
cle hit with enough force
to push the truck back
26 feet," Cruse said.
The 1998 crash hap-
pened before the inter-
section was made a
three-way stop.
Blue was a 2004
graduate of Madison
County High School. A
blue chip recruit, he
signed a scholarship to
play football at the Uni-
versity of North Alaba-
ma in Huntsville, Ala.
He played football at Val-
dosta State when he
died.
Blue is survived by a
two-year-old son.
Blue's funeral will
be at 11 a.m., Saturday,
July 11, at NFCC's Van
H. Priest Auditorium.


set that the victim had
another man in the car
with her. Parks asked
Bryant if anyone was
in the car when he
threw the brick. He
stated that the victim
was.
Bryant was arrest-
ed and transported to
the Madison County
Jail.


Roland

Continued from 1A


profanity.
During the vehicle search, Cooks located a pill
bottle with a mixture of pills and there was also a
pipe.
Roland was arrested and taken to the Madison
County Jail.



Simmons


7/1/09
Carlos O'Neal
Peace Drug traffick-
ing (cocaine)
Clarence Wilbert
Sears Trespass after
warning, resisting an
officer without vio-
lence
Remia Powell Do-
mestic violence (bat-
tery)
Joshua Nicholas
Blanton Writ of bodi-
ly attachment
Gregory Sean Coo-
ley Burglary of an oc-
cupied dwelling, grand
theft
Archie Smith Wil-
son III Burglary,
grand theft
7/2/09
Charlie C. Carter -
Resisting without vio-
lence, possession of co-
caine
Errol Alexus Nibbs
VOP (circuit)
James William
Wagner Criminal reg-
istration
Emanuel Francis-
co Camacho Driving
while license suspend-
ed
7/3/09
Samuel Leon
Kleckley Criminal
registration
Glennell Witcher -
Driving while license
suspended, VOP (cir-
cuit)
Lugene McQuay,
Jr. Trespass after
warning
Donovan Malachi
Gonsalves Trespass
after warning, VOP
(county)
7/5/09
DeAngelo Gallon -
Possession of marijua-
na less than 20 grams,
no valid drivers license
Demetric Joseph -
Battery
Betty Jean Barnes
Criminal registration
7/6/09
Kwamaine Prime -
Possession of marijua-
na less than 20 grams
Tricia Anderson -
Distribution of con-



Softball


trolled substance
Kwane White -
Possession of marijua-
na less than 20 grams
Derenza Marcel
Cherry Aggravated
child abuse, felony bat-
tery
Earl Dewayne
Davis Possession of
cocaine with intent to
sell, sale of cocaine
Charlye Mae San-
ford Possession of il-
legal drugs, sale of
controlled substance
(hydrocodone)
7/7/09
Michael Tyrone
Montgomery Viola-
tion of probation (cir-
cuit), battery,
possession of drug
paraphernalia
Kenneth Michael
Placzkowski VOP
(circuit)
Brian Charles Hill
- Aiding the sale of co-
caine
Adam Lee Sim-
mons Fugitive (out of
county warrant)
Rashad Antonio
James Drug/cocaine,
drug/equipment, re-
sisting without vio-
lence, possession with
intent to sell crack co-
caine, sell of crack co-
caine
Marvin Leon Davis
- Drug/cocaine with
intent to sell, drug/
marijuana, possession
with intent to sell
crack cocaine, sell of
crack cocaine, posses-
sion with intent to sell
crack cocaine, sell of
crack cocaine
Dolores Yvonne
Murray Violation of
community control
Alvin Humphrey -
VOP/warrant
Gregory Reshawn
Graham Possession
of crack cocaine with
intent to sell, sell of
crack cocaine, sell of
crack cocaine with
1,000 foot of a church,
sell of crack cocaine
within 1,000 foot of a
park


Continued from 1A


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Lowndes County Sheriff's Office, said that his de-
partment is investigating some robberies in Lake
Park that they believe Simmons might have commit-
ted.
Simmons was extradited to Lowndes County,
Ga., from the Madison County Jail on Wednesday
evening, July 8.



Nusbickel


Continued from 1A


she smelled like alcohol.
The man said that
Nusbickel admitted that
she had been drinking
and she began picking
items up off the coffee
table and throwing
them. She busted glass
in a figurine case.
The friend said that
he was trying to stop her
from throwing anything
else and she hit him in
the mouth with a fig-
urine and busted the in-
side of his mouth open.
Parks observed a
small cut on the inside of
the friend's mouth,
along with the blood. He
refused to be treated by
EMS.
Parks placed Nus-
bickel under arrest. As
Officer David Myers was


handcuffing Nusbickel,
she became belligerent
and began swinging her
right arm around, en-
dangering the officers.
She had to be restrained
by Myers and Parks in
order to be handcuffed
and placed in the back-
seat of the patrol car.
Nusbickel began hit-
ting the window with
her hands. As the offi-
cers opened the back
door, they noticed she no
longer had the handcuffs
on her. They took her out
of the vehicle to put the
cuffs back on her.
Nusbickel was re-
portedly screaming,
yelling and cursing at
the officers and refused
to cooperate with the in-
vestigation.


defeated Ocala, 10-4, and
during a late night
game lasting until mid-
night, defeated Oviedo,
4-3.
On Sunday, July 5,
Madison faced Alta-
monte Springs for the
championship game,
losing their first game
in the tournament, 13-7.
With both teams having
lost one game in the
tournament, a second


championship game
was played on Monday,
July 6. Madison lost
their second game to Al-
tamonte Springs, 17-7.
This is the first time
a Madison County Babe
Ruth Softball Team has
placed in State Champi-
onships, and is now eli-
gible to continue to the
Southeast Regional Fi-
nals, being held July 16-
19 in Varina, Va.


Get lead stories,

classified,

the Community

Calendar



so much more!


Bryant

Continued from 1A





www. reenepublishin. cor


Friday,July 10, 2009


Alouno mabion County


11 1


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5A


I ,,


"'ll


Gussie Norris
O'Neal-Smith, of
Greenville, age 90, died
Thursday, in Tallahas-
see. She was born Dec.
18, 1918, in Madison
County.
Funeral services
were held Sunday, July 5,
at 3 p.m., at Beggs Funer-
al Home in Madison,
with burial at Harmony
Cemetery.
Visitation was held
Saturday, July 4, 6-8
p.m., at Beggs Funeral
Home.
She was a life-long
resident of Madison
County. Her joy in life
was family, friends and
most of all, her God. She
was an active Sunday
school teacher at Har-
mony Baptist Church.
She enjoyed cooking
homemade chicken and
dumplings, coconut cake
and peanut brittle. When
she found out she had to
have surgery on her
heart, her goal was that


she would be able to
teach Sunday school and
make her chicken and
dumplings again.
She was loved by
many and will be
missed. She was a mem-
ber of Harmony Baptist
Church in Cherry
Lake.
She is survived by
one son, Jimmy O'Neal
(Dot) of Cherry Lake;
three step-sons, Russell
Smith (Joan) of Red-
lands, Calif., Glen Smith
(Florida), and Freddie
Smith (Mary Kay) of
Madison; a step-daugh-
ter, Linda Poppell (Fain)
of Madison; two sis-
ters, Lorene Darville
(Walter) of Tampa and
Louise Morgan (Harvey)
of Day; two brothers,
Donald Norris and John-
ny (Sandra) Norris of
Madison; three sisters-
in-law, Martel Norris of
Soddy Daisy, Tenn., Wil-
lette Norris of
Bryceville, and Kathryn


Norris of Huntsboro,
Ala.; two grandchil-
dren, Lynn Key (Vernie)
of Monticello and Cindy
Williams (Lee) of Madi-
son; seven step-grand-
children, Ricky Smith,
Richard Smith (Krista),
Becky McClure
(Jonathan), Ben Smith
(Juana), Margaret Ann
Bunch (Scott), Beth Pop-
pell and Melissa Quin-
ton (Lincoln); four
great-grandchildren, Ka-
lyn Key, D.J. Key, Josh
Williams and Scott
Williams; and a host of
nieces and nephews.
She was preceded in
death by her husband of
48 years, Willie O'Neal;
husband of five years,
Russell Smith; daughter,
Myrtice Marie O'Neal;
son, William Jack
O'Neal; her parents,
Reno and Mamie Lou
Norris; sister, Rilla Nor-
ris; and five brothers,
Wilbur, Charles, Billy,
James and Jack Norris.


Henry "Hank" Randell Stallings


Henry "Hank" Ran-
dell Stallings passed
away on Thursday, July
2, 2009, in Valdosta,
Ga. Mr. Stallings was
born on July 30, 1962, in
Madison.
The Service of Re-
membrance was Sunday,
July 5, at 4 p.m., at the
First United Methodist
Church in Madison.
Donations may be
made to First United
Methodist Church, PO
Box 294, Madison, FL


32341.
He worked as a car-
diovascular surgeon's as-
sistant in Houston,
Texas, and Atlanta, Ga.,
before moving to Quit-
man, Ga., in 2008. He was
a graduate of NFCC,
FSU, and two years' Sur-
gical at University of Al-
abama. He was a member
of First United
Methodist Church in
Madison.
He is survived by his
mother and step-father,


Ann and Rudy Hamrick
of Madison; a grand-
mother, Rachel Reich-
mann; two brothers, Nat
Norfleet (Monica) of Tus-
con, Az., and Mike Nor-
fleet (Nida) of Madison;
two nieces, Lindsay Fico
(Damon) and Kristen
Norfleet; two nephews,
Eric Norfleet and Tre'
Norfleet; and many other
relatives and friends.
He was preceded in
death by his father, Hen-
ry Alison Stallings.


iL/c~


B/


July 10, 1959


--. Miss Carolyn Ann Mugge, who will be married July 30 to .
Randall H Rowe, Jr., was honored Thursday at a tea given by Mrs.
Charles E. Bruhl of Houston, Texas, and Mrs. Joe S. Reams, at the
S Greenville Woman's Club.
Mr. and Mrs. R.C. Dickinson and two grandchildren, Len and
Joe Hembree, and Mr. and Mrs. James Hardee and four sons, Jim-
.. my, Sandy Cary and Larry, spent the weekend of July 4th at Indi-
an Rocks Beach on the Gulf, where they were guests of Mr. and
\\ Mrs. Peter O. Knight of Tampa, at a family beach party
\ Ann Russell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Russell, observed
S her ninth birthday with a party Wednesday evening at her home,
enjoyed with several of her girl friends. Mrs. Van H. Priest and
Miss Barbara Naughton assisted Mrs. Russell with entertaining
and serving.
July 11, 1969
Mrs. Marvin Reeves was hostess in her home recently at a
lovely miscellaneous shower feting Miss Mary Anne Cherry,
bride-elect. The refreshment table was covered with an imported
- hand embroidered linen cloth.
Mrs. Adel Hicks and Rev. WT. Rycroft were married Saturday
evening, July 5, in the home of Rev. and Mrs. R.A. Kelly, with the
' / Rev. Mr. Kelly performing the ceremony. A reception followed the
ceremony at the home of the bride.
Mr. Fred Mickler was honored at a birthday dinner June 26,
in the home of Mr. and Mrs. J.P Morrow. Enjoying the affair with
him were members of the family, including Mrs. Mickler; Mr. and
Mrs. E.P Sanders, Jr., and daughter, Suzanne; Mrs. G.L. Morrow
/ and Mrs. Mary Louise Farnell of Pinetta; Mr. and Mrs. B.M.
Smith and Rick Smith of Plant City; Mrs. C.O. Bingham; and Mr.
Sand Mrs. Guy Morrow and Mr. Robert Mickler of Athens, Ga.


July 13, 1979
Mr. and Mrs. Troy O. Rhoades of Madison, and Mr. Donald E.
S Bish of Jacksonville, announce the engagement of their daugh-
ter, Donna Suzanne, to Lee Michael Browning, son of Lt. Col.
(Ret.) George E. Browning and the late Mrs. Adda Marie Brown-
ing of Madison.
Pvt. Larry D. Smith, son of Mrs. Mary E Jones, Madison
Heights Apartments, Madison, recently was assigned as an in-
fantryman with the 9th Cavalry at Fort Hood, Texas. Smith en-
tered the Army in February 1979. He is a 1977 graduate of
SMadison High School. His father, Jack P Smith, lives on Rte 3,
Madison.
Pfc. Michael A. DeLaughter, son of Mr. and Mrs. David De-
/ Laughter, Madison, recently was assigned as a radar repairman
/ with the 218th Ordinance Detachment at Giebelstadt Army Air-
field, Germany. DeLaughter entered the Army in May 1978. The
private is a 1977 graduate of Madison High School.


S


/
I ,, /,


~~I I


U /


/ x


CO VIUNIAYCO:L PI'400:A;-.IkFr h omlteclndr*i si w *enpulsig .com.


July 11
Big Bend Horse-
man's Association's first
open all breed horse
show will be held July
11. For more informa-
tion, please visit www.
bigbendhorse.com.
July 11
LifeSong will be in
concert at Sirmans Bap-
tist Church in Green-
ville on Saturday, July
11, at 6 p.m. Admission is
free; a love offering will
be received during the
concert. For more infor-
mation, please call (850)
948-4228.
July 12-15
Madison Church of
God announces a re-
vival with Evangelist
Bennie Jones, an or-
dained bishop who has
been in full-time min-
istry for over three
decades. The revival
will be held July 12-15;
11 a.m. and 6 p.m., Sun-
day, and 7 p.m., Monday
thru Wednesday; at
Madison Church of
God, located at 771 Colin
Kelly Hwy, in Madison.
For more information,
please call (850) 973-3339.
July 13
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park


VTaI
SIWJW V


will host a painted win-
dow workshop on Mon-
day, July 13. Folk artist
Janet Moses will teach
participants how to
transform an old, cast-
off window into a won-
derful, hand-painted
work of art. All levels of
crafters will enjoy this
workshop. Fees are $35
per workshop, including
park admission. For ad-
ditional information or
to register for the work-
shops, call (386) 397-1920
or visit www.stephen
fosterCSO.org.
July 14-17
The Salvation Army
Youth V-Team Shin-
ing God's Light will
host Crocodile Dock, a
Vacation Bible School,
July 14-17, 5:30 p.m. to
8:15 p.m. A picnic supper
will begin the evening at
Greenville Haffye Hayes
park with bible school
activities in the Senior
Citizen Center for ages 5
to 95 following. Pre-reg-
ister with George or
Gale Blevins at (850) 948-
2119.
July 17
Excellence Dance
Studio Inc. presents a
youth essay challenge.
Pick up a pen during
your summer break and
earn up to $100 or studio
time. The essay deadline
is July 17. For more in-
formation, call (850) 322-
7673.
July 18
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park
will host the "Dog Days
of Summer" on Satur-
day, July 18, from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. This all-day
event will present the
following demonstra-
tions: Lake City Police
Department K-9 Unit,
Columbia County Sher-
iffs Office K-9 Unit and
Florida Service Dogs


INC. The Lake City Ani-
mal Shelter will host a
Parade of Paws and pro-
vide hamburgers and
hotdogs as a fund raiser.
Visitors can enjoy activi-
ties such as a local vet-
erinarian, the Florida
K-9 Association, pet pho-
tos and a pet spa. Visi-
tors are encouraged to
bring their dogs to the
park for a fun-filled day
of activities. Pets must
be leashed or under the
physical control of the
owner at all times; leash-
es may not exceed six
feet. This event is free
with regular park ad-
mission of $5 per vehicle
with up to eight persons.
For more information,
visit wwwfloridastate
parks.org/stephenfoster.
July 20-23
Camp Weed Summer
Camp for Children with
Parents) in Prison will
take place July 20-23.
Visit www.campweed.net
for a brochure, registra-
tion and scholarship
forms. Join in the Fun in
the Sonshine at our 85th
consecutive summer
camp. A ministry of the
Episcopal Diocese of
Florida for children and
young people of any
(or no) denomination.


Scholarships available
for qualified applicants.
For information, please
call 888-763-2602, Ext. 16.
July 25
The Evil Twin
Farms 3 D Buckle Se-
ries barrel race will be
held July 25. $100 added
money. Exhibitions start
at 9 a.m. and the show
starts at 10 a.m. The en-
try fee is $25; the exhibi-
tion fee is $3. The
remaining races in the
series will be held Aug.
22, Sept. 19, Oct. 24, Nov.
22 and Dec. 5. For more
information, please visit
www.eviltwinfarms.net/
etfbuckleseries.cfm.
July 25
The Florida DEP's
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park
will host a Summer
Herb workshop on Sat-
urday, July 25. Partici-
pants will learn how to
grow and propagate
warm weather herbs.
The second half of the
workshop will cover
cooking with herbs. Par-
ticipants will learn how
to make herb salts from
marinades. Bring your
pruners and take home
some cuttings. This is a
hands-on workshop and
fees are $5 per workshop,


including park admis-
sion. For additional in-
formation or to register
for the workshops,
please call (386) 397-1920
or visit www.stephen
fosterCSO.org.
July 26-August 1
Camp Weed Summer
Camp for Rising 5th and
6th graders will take
place July 26-Aug. 1. Vis-
it www.campweed.net for
a brochure, registration
and scholarship forms.
Join in the Fun in the
Sonshine at our 85th
consecutive summer
camp. A ministry of the
Episcopal Diocese of
Florida for children and
young people of any
(or no) denomination.
For more information,
please call 888-763-2602,
Ext. 16.
July 31-August 2
The Mosley/Hodge
Family Reunion II will
be held in Madison, July
31-Aug. 2, at the United
Methodist Church recre-
ation center. All descen-
dants and relatives of
Tom Mosley and Rosa


Hodge (of West Farm)
are invited to this event.
Contact John E. Turner
(301) 808-2693 for more
information.
August 2-8
Camp Weed Sum-
mer Camp for Rising
7th, 8th and 9th graders
will take place Aug. 2-8.
Visit www.campweed
.net for a brochure, reg-
istration and scholar-
ship forms. Join in the
Fun in the Sonshine at
our 85th consecutive
summer camp. A min-
istry of the Episcopal
Diocese of Florida for
children and young peo-
ple of any (or no) de-
nomination. For more
information, call 888-
763-2602, Ext. 16.
August 15
Excellence Dance
Studio Inc. presents
King of the Grill show-
down and Art on Wheel
Exhibition, Aug. 15,
noon-4 p.m., Madison
County Recreation Cen-
ter, Hwy 360A. For more
information, call (850)
322-7673.


Gussie Norris O'Neal-Smith


I I


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6A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com




Axoun mabison Countp


Friday,July 10, 2009


Robert McColskey Has Time For Music


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
If The Andy Griffith
Show is a favorite, one
would have to remember
the line quoted by
Briscoe Darling in the
episode "Mountain Wed-
ding." The setting be-
gins when Andy and
Barney walk in the room
while the Darlings are
pickin' some fine blue-
grass. Briscoe offers
Andy an acoustic guitar
with a string missing.
After Andy kindly de-
clines the offer, Briscoe
looks at Andy and says,
"You got time to breathe,
you got time for music!"
That's the life of Robert
McColskey.
McColskey began
playing guitar about 30
years ago, and has be-
come known in the com-
munity for his banjo and
guitar pickin'. His musi-
cal career actually start-
ed when he was in the
ninth grade, and was
taking private violin
lessons. After three
months, his instructor
passed away, and that
was the end of music un-
til he was 21.
While serving in the
U.S. Navy in Naples,
Italy, a friend of his left a
guitar in the room, and
it caught the eye of Mc-
Colskey With just a few
minutes of pickin', he
picked the tune to "Red
River Valley." He
thought to himself, "I've
got to get one of these,"
and so he made his way
to Naples and purchased
his first guitar for $5. "I
taught myself how to
play."
McColskey held on


By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Are you searching
for answers to addictions
you or your loved ones
may have? The First Bap-
tist Church of Madison
has started a support
group/informative class
that is held each Thurs-
day. The purpose of the
meetings is to provide


Robert McColskey dedicates his time and talent at local facilities playing
gospel music with his custom made banjo.


to that guitar until he
was out of the Navy in
1956. While he was in
Boston Mass., he pur-
chased his next guitar
for $11. "It was an ole
cheap guitar," he said.
"An ole boy came by and
wanted a guitar, so I gave
him my old one."
"I've went through
many guitars," stated
McColskey He has been
playing the banjo for
about 15 years, and actu-
ally built his own banjo.
"All I play is church
music," he said.
Not only is Mc-
Colskey a skilled musi-
cian, he has spent many
years serving God with
his family in church.
McColskey first got
into the Apostolic
church when he joined
the Church of the Lord


Jesus Christ in Horse-
shoe Beach. It was in
Horseshoe that he met
his wife, Myrtle, who
was a preacher.
The couple was mar-
ried in 1970, and spent
the first four years of
their marriage evange-
lizing. In 1974, they came
back to Florida and Myr-
tle began pastoring a
church in Palatka,
where she remained un-
til her death in 1979.
At that time, Mc-
Colskey then picked up
where his wife left off
and served as pastor of
the church until 1988. In
1980, he married Ruth
Mann, who was a mem-
ber of the church.
In 1988, he stepped
down and resigned the
church and moved to
Madison in 1989. His


original mission was to
form an Apostolic


biblical answers to ad-
dictions for those who
struggle with them; for
family members of those
who suffer from addic-
tions; and for those who
are interested in learn-
ing more about them.
The classes are held
in the choir room in the
1898 sanctuary of the
First Baptist Church,


and the meetings begin
at 7 p.m. each Thursday
For more informa-
tion, please call (850) 464-
9022.

MCHS

Class Of

'89 Plans

Reunion

The Madison County
High School Class of
1989 will be holding its
20th Class Reunion at Di-
vine Events on August 1
at 6:30 p.m.
Organizers gra-
ciously request to please
R.S.VP by July 20 to one
of the following con-
tacts:
Rhonda (Bass) Gore
at the "Madison County
High School (FL) Class of
1989" Facebook Page, or
call Annette (Houser)
Johnson at (850) 973-7172,
or Donna (McLeod)
Leslie at (850) 929-4266.


Madison Coun-
ty teacher Peggy
Ross recently joined
other fifth grade
history teachers
from 11 school dis-
tricts in the pan-
handle of Florida
for the 2009 Patriot
Project Summer In-
stitute, held at the
Panhandle Area Ed-
ucational Consor-
tium (PAEC) in
Chipley, June 9-12.
The PAEC Pa-
triot Project is a
three-year program
that provides inten-
sive training for
Grade 5 history
teachers and their
mentors in both the
content and peda-
gogy involved in
teaching American


church here, but instead
became a supporter of
apostolic churches
forming around the re-
gion.
"Johnny Johns was
starting a church in Live
Oak, so I went there to
be with him," Mc-
Colskey said. "Things
were going along great
for him, so I then started
going to Perry, where
Brother Jimmy Box was
starting a church."
He remained in Per-
ry for close to five years,
before moving member-
ship to a church in Lake
Park, Ga. It was here he
remained until the pass-
ing of his wife Ruth in
2002. He then switched
his membership to As-
sembly of the Lord Je-
sus Christ in Wellborn,
where he currently at-
tends.
"When the door
opens, I go and help," he


history. Re-


sources, materials and field experi-
ences are also part of the project,
which seeks to improve student
achievement by increasing teacher
content knowledge.
The first three days of the Insti-
tute featured training by Dr. Sarah
Drake Brown, who discussed the 13
Habits of Mind that make the teach-
ing of American history a more ac-
curate discipline, as well as more
meaningful to students. Brown's ex-
amples, lectures and activities gave
participants insight into ways to im-
prove both their teaching and their
own understanding of history
The last day of the Institute was
conducted by nationally known sto-
ryteller and actress, History Alive!
speaker, Sheila Arnold. Her presen-
tation, entitled "Healing the Sting:
Teaching African American History
to Culturally Diverse Audiences," fo-
cused on slavery and civil rights.
Arnold's portrayal of Oney


said. He has used his
teaching abilities to help
churches that were get-
ting their start, and still
today, he uses his talent
to uplift people wherever
needed.
On a regular basis,
McColskey volunteers
his time and talents to
the residents at the
Madison Nursing Cen-
ter, the seniors at the Se-
nior Citizens Center and
the Celebration House in
Lee. "I also play every
Sunday at church."
Robert McColskey
was born in Tampa on
April 22, 1925, to Mar-
garet McColskey and
Willie Neil, and was
raised in Pasco County
McColskey is the fa-
ther of three children,
James McColskey of
Virginia, Joseph David
McColskey of Colorado,
and Pamela Gay of Ten-
nessee.


Judge, maid-servant to Martha
Washington, illustrated how story-
telling and character acting can be
an immensely effective way to allow
students to relate to Americans who
have gone before and the circum-
stances in which they lived.
PAEC Patriot Project Director
Tony Anderson and Managing Con-
sultant Mona Ramirez were ex-
tremely happy with the progress
made by the Patriot participants
and American history they learned
during the Institute. Although the
sessions were intended solely to im-
prove teacher content and pedagogy
knowledge, everyone also received
materials and lesson ideas that can
be used to enhance students' class-
room experiences.
Next on the agenda for Patriots
is a historical field tour of Colonial
Williamsburg, Jamestown, York-
town, Richmond and various histor-
ical sites in the Virginia area, June
23-28.


ozot (5eacn MO -r", r-L 3Z,340


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Madison County
Community Bank

"Understanding This Financial Market"
Workshop
You are invited to a FREE workshop on
understanding current financial markets.

Thursday, July 16, 2009
6:30-7:15pm
Madison County Community Bank
Boardroom

RSVP requested, but not mandatory
850-973-2400
Willy Gamalero
Financial Advisor

Light Refreshments Provided


Madison County


Teacher Participates In


PAEC Patriot Grant


Summer Institute


Redemptive Recovery

Meetings Held Every Thursday


Photo Submitted
Madison County teacher Peggy Ross (left) at-
tended a Summer Institute for teaching American
history. One of the presenters was nationally known
storyteller and actress, Sheila Arnold (right), who
portrayed Oney Judge, Martha Washington's maid-
servant, in order to talk about slavery and civil
rights.


.wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww








Friday,July 10, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com




Axoun mabison Countp


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7A


Senior Citizen Supporters


Celebrate Groundbreaking


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Senior Citizens
Council of Madison
County will be receiving
a new address next year.
The move has been a
while coming, and now
that it's here, there are a
lot of people that admin-
istrators want to thank.
On June 25, staff and
volunteers from the cen-
ter joined supporters
from virtually every
civic and governmental
agency in the county to
celebrate the ground-
breaking of the coming
million-dollar-plus facili-


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, June 25, 2009
The June 25 groundbreaking of the new Senior Citizens Center was cele-
brated by hundreds that contributed to its development and funding. Pictured
left to right: Howard Phillips, Charles Corley, Betty Vann, Rosa Richardson, Joe
Peavy, Early Anderson, James Ray, and Elesta Pritchett.


ty Located on the corner
of Harvey Greene Drive and State Road 14, the new
facility will feature much more than new carpets
and furniture...a lot more.
There are hundreds of county residents who de-
pend on the services of the council. Some simply
need access to a hot meal. Others just need a few mo-
ments of companionship.
Recognizing these social priorities, Executive
Director Rosa Richardson has been attempting to
expand and improve services for years, only to run
into a stonewall, literally. The stonewall was the lim-
ited space, which translated into limited programs.
Of course, there were also limited funds. Well, that's
all changed.
Thanks to a grant from the Florida Department
of Elder Affairs, and several key contributions from
the city and county, the new Senior Center will allow
programs and activities to reach more people and be
delivered more effectively. For the fortunate recipi-
ents, many of who have no family or financial alter-
natives, these services prolong life, as especially the
quality of life.
Following an introduction by Board Director
Howard Phillips, and an invocation from City of
Madison Mayor Jim Stanley, the microphone was
turned over to Charles Corley, deputy secretary of
the Florida Department of Elder Affairs. Corley
praised Richardson, the board and the community
for their political, professional and personal sup-
port, saying, "I've seen all the hard work being done
here is Madison County. The grant was one of only


a few of its size, and we are very pleased for the com-
munity"
Board President Betty Vann spoke a few min-
utes as well, echoing the sentiments of her col-
leagues. "It is such a pleasure for us to provide this
facility to the seniors of Madison County Since I've
been working with this great group of people, we
have faced challenges and worked to support Rosa
wherever we could. This new center shows what can
be done when dedicated people work together."
Richardson was very modest in accepting the
praise, instead taking the opportunity to thanks all
who contributed to the historic milestone. Literally
going down the list to make sure she didn't leave
anybody out, the executive director thanked the
board, the advisory council, city and county offi-
cials, state and federal officials, civic leaders, health
leadership and corrections, along with a host of in-
dividual and business supporters, not to mention
the churches. True to her nature to give credit
where credit is due, she graciously thanked the hun-
dreds that made the dream a reality
"In addition to improvement in size, we will be
able to expand the level of services that we current-
ly provide through enhancing our programs, as well
as implementing new, innovative programs that fo-
cus on expansion of health and wellness programs,
educational programs, recreation, caregiver assis-
tance, physical fitness and a variety of other pro-
grams that improve quality and length of life. We
are truly blessed."


Madison Author


Helps Kids Find


Special Gifts Within


Photo submitted
Melissa J. Burke and her son, John, sign the con-
tract for her new book, titled "Johanna Pig and the Dia-
mond Kids."


Madison author
Melissa J. Burke is re-
leasing a new children's
book nationwide this
week, titled "Johanna
Pig and the Diamond
Kids."
Burke's book tells
the story of Johanna
Pig, who knows she has
a special gift to give the
world. Her lovely
singing voice seems to
be just the thing, but af-
ter helping some disad-
vantaged animals with
creative projects, she
discovers an ability to
uncover their personal
beauty. Johanna must
now decide which gift is
the gift.
Readers Tom and
Carol Baron describe
the story as "a truly de-
lightful and refreshing
work ... shows that
through love and cre-
ativity, you can bring
the world together."
Published by Tate


Publishing and Enter-
prises, the book is avail-
able at any bookstore
nationwide or can be or-
dered through the pub-
lisher at www.
tatepublishing.com/
bookstore or by visiting
barnesandnoble.com,
amazon.com or target
.com. This is also an
eLIVE title, meaning
each copy contains a
code redeemable for a
free audio version from
TatePublishing.com.
eLIVE Listen, Imag-
ine, View, and Experi-
ence!
Burke, mother of
six and grandmother of
one, teaches creative art
to persons with develop-
mental disabilities.
For more informa-
tion, please contact Jim
Miller, Marketing Rep-
resentative, at (888) 361-
9473 or send an email to
jim@tatepublishing.com.


Di re tory


Design
j it. Sod or Seed
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Light Debris Clean-Up
Tree Spade Transplanting
Over 35 Acres In Production
30 Years Serving This Area

Peacock's Landscaping
sensed & Insured (850) 973-2848
Toll Free 1-800-9PEACOCK


Serving Madison, Jefferson,
Taylor & Lafayette Counties
Auto, Life, Health, Home
Freddy Pitts, Ageny manager
Jimmy King, Agent Glen King, Agent
233 W Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071
Freddy Pitts
24/7 Claim Service: 105 W.Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-2213
1-866-275-7322
Freddy Pitts *Ryan Perry
Helping You 813 S. Washington St. Perry. (850) 584-2371
"Helping You
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U ABISS 041T1

Chosen one of Florida's Three Outstanding Newspapers
MI4t4RUMMORB

not- tgMto t


973-4141


,""No


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8A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com




Church


Friday,July 10, 2009


Beulah Baptist To Host

Boomerang Express VBS


Take a ride down under on the
Boomerang Express. The train will
pull into Beulah Baptist Church, lo-
cated east of Lee, on Sunday morn-
ing, July 12, following the morning
worship service.
Guests will enjoy lunch and
then the train will take everyone on


a round trip each evening, Monday,
July 13, through Wednesday, July
15, from 6-8 p.m.
Boomerang Express is the name
of the Vacation Bible School being
hosted by Beulah Baptist Church.
Both adults and children are wel-
come to attend.


Jfappenings

At Madison First

Baptist Church o

By Kristin Finney Madison First Baptist youth and lasts until 8
"God Bless America, include: The Youth p.m.
land that I love!" What a group has been in Ken- Our prayers this
beautiful Fourth of July tucky for this week, we week go to our Youth
service Madison First pray that their trip was group and to everyone
Baptist had. We began prosperous and a bless- that they helped lead to
service with "The Star- ing to Christ as well as Christ in Kentucky over
Spangled Banner" this to each of their lives, the past week. Whether
was followed by 'Ameri- There will be a Chil- through service or back-
ca, The Beautiful." This dren's Ministry Confer- yard bible schools, every
was followed by the chil- ence July 25th from 8:30 small action can lead to
dren of the church a.m-4 p.m.There will be someone to Christ. We
singing and performing a Beth Moore Living also continue to pray for
the theme song from Proof live simulcast Au- all of those who attend-
VBS, "Boomerang Ex- gust 28-29. If you are in- ed or helped with our
press." The worship terested in placing VBS program, and
choir then sang "Give flowers in the front of would like to thank the
Me Jesus" which is a the church contact San- workers for all of their
piece written and com- dra at the church office. help.
posed in honor of Sep- We would like to in- This week would
tember 11. Pastor Ferrell vite you to join us for also like to say a very
spoke from Jude: 1-4 fo- our services! Our wor- special Happy Birthday
causing on verse 3. He ship schedule is as fol- to Mr. Jack McLeod,
spoke that we are "pre- lows: Sunday school July 3. Mr. McLeod cele-
served in Jesus Christ" 10-11 a.m. Sunday Morn- brated his 80th birthday
that we now have the ing Worship 11 a.m.-12 and we would like to
promise of eternal life noon. Sunday Evening send a very special
which is secured by our Worship 6-7 p.m., fol- thanks to him, for all
salvation. He also stated lowed by youth dinner that he does in our
that we much compete and fellowship until 8 church, as well as the
with a strong desire for p.m. Wednesday evening community He is truly a
our faith, services begin at 6 p.m. blessing to our lives!
Upcoming events at for both the adults and God bless!




Catch the


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By Lilla Howerton
I don't need to re-
mind anyone that our
country has been on a
slippery slope for some
time. If you look around
you will fine corrup-
tion, greed, moral decay
and a steady move away
from the foundations
that made us great. The
principles upon which
this nation was founded
are no longer our back-
bone. Ronald Reagan
said many years ago, "If
we forget that we're one
nation under God, then
we will be a nation gone
under However, we
can reverse this trend.
In God's Word He states,
"If my people who are
called by my name will
humble themselves and
pray and seek my face
and turn from their
wicked ways, then I will
hear from heaven and
will forgive their sin
and heal their land." II
Chronicles 7:14
I am convinced that
we must pray for our na-
tion and its leaders and
ask for forgiveness. So I
ask you to join us in this
plea to our Lord. Re-
member, that our forefa-
thers, who founded this
country, made the deck
of the Mayflower an al-
tar of the living God
and whose first act, on
touching the soil of the


new world, was to offer,
on bended knees,
thanksgiving to
Almighty God. So, set
aside some time today to
humbly pray, according
to God's will, for our
country.
Also be in prayer for
our mission team:
Corey Borgert, Kim
Borgert, Chris Day and
Caitlin Griffin, who will
be flying home from
Peru on Sat. 7/11.
Have you visited the
Gathering Grounds? It's
located inside the One-
Eleven Grill and it is
open from 9-4:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
This is a great place
for people, of all ages, to
come fellowship and
build relationships. In
addition you can enjoy a
wide selection of soft
drinks, gourmet coffees,
juices, fruit smoothies
and a variety of tempt-
ing sweet and salty
snacks.
Calling all children
to make plans now to at-
tend our Vacation Bible
School. It begins Mon.
7/20 though Fri. 7/24
from 8:30 until 11:30 a.m.
The title for this
year is "Camp Edge," an
action-packed, adrena-
line-filled expedition to
an Extreme Adventure
Camp! E.D.G.E. is Expe-
riencing and Discover-


ing God Everywhere!
Please pray for our
youth, especially while
they are attending Sum-
mer Camp from July 27-
August 1 this year. Our
young people have
worked hard to raise the
$365 per camper and
they still need more
money to allow all 31
young people to attend.
Did you know that
our young people are
looking for community
mission work? If any-
one needs help with
yard work, mowing or
other odd jobs, please
contact Brian Sander-
son, our Youth Minister.
Brian does an outstand-
ing job with our young
people and we thank
God for him.
We are so blessed to
have Pastor Bob Laid-
law for our minister. If
you haven't heard him,
we invite you to attend
either our 8:30 a.m. or 11
a.m. worship ser-
vice. You can also hear
him online at
www.radiowmafcom or
by radio at 1230 AM.
As you can tell,
First United Methodist
Church of Madison is
alive and on fire for lov-
ing and serving Jesus
Christ. We invite you to
join our family of faith
and to "catch the spir-
it."


Summer Special First Month

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NORTH AMERICA
Madison Bottling Plant


www.greenepublishing.com

"Congratulations Tuten Farms"


GREENSOUTH


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7:30 am -4:00 pm NOTHINGRUNSLIE AEER


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A


Gordon Tractor, Inc.
Come See Us For Sales & Service of
New Holland Equipment

Congratulations To All Our
Area Farmers Who
Received Recognition

491 SW Range Ave. Madison, FL

850-973-2245
S NEWHOLLAND


THE TUTENS ARE NOT JUST FARMERS,


THEY'RE NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGERS


Life around the
farm is about more
than plowing the field
and planting crops
these days. Technologi-
cal advances to irriga-
tion and fertilization
help take the guess
work out of crop pro-
duction. And they help
save the environment,
too.
Just ask Timmy
and Mickey Tuten, of
Madison County Their
farm was one of 26 rec-
ognized this year for
environmental steward-
ship as part of the
County Alliance for Re-
sponsible Environmen-
tal Stewardship
(CARES) program. The


Whether planting
potatoes, tomatoes,
onions or squash, the
Tutens use low-pres-
sure center pivots and
drip irrigation. The sys-
tems not only help con-
serve water but are also
cost-effective for the
farmer.
Joel Love, of the
Suwannee River Part-
nership, said low-pres-
sure irrigation gives a
more efficient, uniform
application of water.
"There are less evapo-
rative losses because
you don't get the mist as
with a high-pressure
system," Love said,
adding some of the new
low-pressure nozzles


their crops are getting
the right amount of wa-
ter, the Tutens can hook
up a laptop to a soil
moisture probe that
reads moisture levels
for certain areas of the
field. They also use
portable devices to test
moisture levels any-
where on the farm.
Love said applying
the right amount of wa-
ter is key. Over water-
ing can wash fertilizers
away and result in ni-
trate pollution to
groundwater. But not
applying enough water
can result in crops not
utilizing fertilizers that
have been applied.
Eventually those fertil-


Mike Coggins of Coggins Farms cuts a fresh tomato from his field that was
grown by using the method of drip irrigation.


Timmy Tuten uses a soil moisture probe that reads moisture levels on his
Madison County farm. Timmy and Mickey Tuten's farm was one of 26
recognized for environmental stewardship at the Ninth
Annual CARES dinner on June 25.


The Coggins family
of Coggins Farms, in
Hamilton County, feels
the same way. Managing
natural resources is just
as important to them as
tending crops. That's
why, theirs, too, was des-
ignated this year as a
CARES farm.
A worker manning a
machine that fertilizes
crops can be seen dri-
ving through rows of
peas at Coggins Farms.
But it is not just any
sprayer. It's fitted with
GPS equipment which
determines which crops
have already been fertil-
ized and which ones
have been skipped over.
"It maps the field
and if you overlap, it


out the next week," said
Gerald Coggins.
The Tutens and the
Coggins family were
recognized at the 9th
Annual CARES dinner
held at the Dwight
Stansel farm in Suwan-
nee County on June 25.
Other Suwannee and
Santa Fe River Basin
farmers and ranchers
that were recognized in-
clude the following:
Michael Dukes, Union;
David Echeverria, Levy;
Gary Jones, Dixie; Jack
Meeks, Levy; John Par-
rish, Levy; Roland Par-
rish, Union; Kelly
Philman, Gilchrist; Don
Spradley, Columbia;
James Tallman, Brad-
ford; Big Trees Planta-


cent of dairies and 70
percent of crop farmers
have agreed to adopt
BMPs for fertilization,
irrigation and waste uti-
lization practices. Part-
ner-
ship members, which
include various agen-
cies, residents, farmers,
scientists, educators
and businesses come to-
gether to protect the nat-
ural resources in the
Suwannee River Basin.
Love said managing
natural resources is a
balancing act. You don't
want to over water or
under water and you
don't want to over fertil-
ize.
Striking that bal-
ance can be challenging.


Florida Farm Bureau
and the Suwannee Riv-
er Partnership created
CARES to highlight ef-
forts by farm owners to
improve natural re-
source management in
the Suwannee River
Basin.
The Tutens are
committed to improv-
ing the environment by
implementing Best
Management Practices
(BMPs). BMPs help con-
serve water and reduce
nitrate pollution in
groundwater that can
result from animal
wastes and from fertil-
izers that aren't applied
properly.


simulate rainfall.
Drip irrigation can
also be used to apply
fertilizer. It spoon feeds
the crop near the root
and applies just the
right amount of water
and fertilizer needed.
This ensures that nitro-
gen from fertilizers is
efficiently used by the
plant so little excess
will be left to enter the
groundwater.
"I love drip irriga-
tion because I'm target-
ing where I want to
water," said Timmy
Tuten. "You save on fer-
tilizer and you save on
water."
To gauge whether


izers will also get
washed into the aquifer.
The Tutens want to
ensure visitors who
come to their farm to
pick produce that they
care about the crop and
the land in which it was
grown.
"I see people face to
face every day," said
Timmy Tuten. "When
they ride up and you got
a pretty crop, it sells it-
self. Participating in
the CARES program, I
want people to know
that I care. That I care
about them and that I'm
conscientious in being
a good steward of the
land."


Joel Love, of the Suwannee River Partnership, left, and Timmy Tuten observe
bell peppers that were grown on Tuten's farm by using drip irrigation.


A worker at Coggins Farms fertilizes peas with a sprayer that is fitted with GPS
equipment. Coggins Farms, in Hamilton County, was one of 26 recognized for envi-
ronmental stewardship at the Ninth Annual CARES dinner on June 25.


cuts the nozzles off,"
said Mike Coggins.
"That's a big savings."
Not only is it a sav-
ings to the farmer, it also
saves our waterways
and the aquifer.
Love said the more
fertilizer that's put out
at one time, the greater
the risk a heavy rain
will come and wash it
into groundwater.
Workers at Coggins
Farms also field test for
nitrate concentration.
All it takes is just clip-
ping some of the plants'
leaves and sending them
off to a lab. After the ni-
trate levels are read,
workers know whether
they need to apply more
fertilizer or less.
"We get tissue sam-
ples each week and then
we prescribe that week
what we're going to put


tion, Inc., Alachua; Bud
and Judy O'Quinn, Co-
lumbia; Ross, James and
William Terry, Colum-
bia; Bryan and Wendi
Jennings, Columbia;
John and Donna Risoli,
Madison; Corrence
Fields, Madison; Jerry
and Vicki Fletcher,
Madison; Jesse and Beu-
lah Cone, Madison; Paul
and Almera Blount,
Madison; Mike and De-
bra Knowles, Madison;
WH. and Emogene
Fletcher, Madison; Hen-
ry and Tanya Terry,
Madison; Irma and Fi-
denacio Torres, Madi-
son; Harold and Troy
Platt, Madison; and
Howard Mobley, Suwan-
nee.
Since the Suwannee
River Partnership be-
gan in 1999, 99 percent of
poultry farmers, 90 per-


But some CARES farm-
ers have received be-
tween 25-85 percent cost
share from state and fed-
eral agricultural agen-
cies for technology and
equipment needed to
implement BMPs.
Love said the
CARES program bene-
fits both the Partner-
ship and the farmer.
"BMPs are economi-
cal and they help save
the environment," he
said.
For more informa-
tion about the CARES
program, call the
Suwannee River Part-
nership at 386-362-0431.
You may also call your
county Farm Bureau of-
fice or Scot Eubanks,
Florida Farm Bureau
Federation, at 352-384-
2633.


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WE HAVE IT!

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FARM BUREAU A
Serving Madison, Jefferson, Taylor & Lafayette Counties
Freddy Pitts Agency Manager
Jimmy King *Agent Glen King Agent
233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071
Freddy Pitts
105 W.Anderson St. Monticello* (850) 997-2213
Freddy Pitts Ryan Perry, Agent
813 S.Washington St.* Perry (850) 584-2371
Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County. Mayo, FL (386) 294-1399
24/7 Claim Service: 1-866-275-7322
Helping You Is What We Do Best."





1 OA Madison Enterprise-Recorder




Share


www. reenepublishin. cor


the


St. Vincent De Paul Catholic Church


By Alfa Hunt
Greene Publishing, Inc.
For most of the area's history, Catholicism has
been a major piece of Madison County history His-
torians report that the denomination arrived in the
area along with the Spanish. Shortly after the estab-
lishment of St. Augustine, Spanish priests set out to
Christianize the natives, creating a line of missions
extending to the Northwest. By 1630,
the missions had reached beyond the
Aucilla River. There were five Spanish
missions in the Madison County area.
The mission of San Juan de
Guacara was established on the :
Suwannee County side of the Suwan- .
nee River. Apparently, the name
Suwannee was the way the natives pro-
nounced "San Juan."
San Pedro y San Pablo de Proto-
hiriba was built near Lake Sampala.
The name of San Pedro still exists to-
day with the name of San Pedro Bay,
which is the swampy region located in
the southern region of Madison Coun-
ty and northern area of Taylor County.
San Pablo, when spoken in Spanish, is
pronounced with the N sounding like
an M and the B becoming silent. So,
this would leave us with the word
"Sampalo," which has been carried
over to the Lake Sampala.
Santa Elena de Machaba has still
not been found to this day, though it is
believed to have existed close to Hick-
stown Swamp.
San Matheo de Tolapatafi was built to the west of
modern day Sirmans. The site has been recognized
by the State Bureau of Historic Sites and Properties,
and a few excavations were organized in the 1950s.
The fifth and final mission in the area was San
Miguel de Asile, which was located across the Aucil-
la River in Jefferson County
A destructive blow came to the missions in
Madison in 1704 when English colonists moved into
the Carolinas. Because of the friction between the
Spanish and English, South Carolina Governor
John Moore, along with some Yamasee Indians,
launched an attack on the line of missions extend-
ing from the East Coast to Georgia. Later, he at-
tacked the missions in the Apalache and western
Timucua area, burning all of them to the ground.
The inhabitants were either taken as prisoners or
killed.
For 200 years after the missions in Madison
were burned, there was no Catholic house of wor-
ship in the county. Around the turn of the 20th cen-
tury, a Catholic priest from Tallahassee named J.L.
Hugon built a small chapel located a few miles from
Madison on what is now known as the "Brady
Farm." After several years of housing services for


the catholic community, the Brady family moved
into Madison and the chapel was eventually desert-
ed.
Finally, in 1904, a Diocesan Missionary by the
name of P.J. Breshnahan decided to establish
Catholic churches in north and central parts of
Florida. Until they were able to build a church of
their own, services were held in the private homes


Photo of the St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church.

of the members or in the county courthouse.
It is reported that no one was willing to sell land
to the Catholic community on which to build a
church because of the prejudice against the denom-
ination. Vincent de Paul Harmeling and his wife,
Charity, moved to Madison from Jacksonville and
purchased two lots, one of which had the old
Methodist Church on it.
The old Methodist church is noted as being the
first church in Madison County, and was built
around 1830. The church was originally constructed
like a barn with a high pulpit above the congrega-
tion. There were no glass windows, only shutters to
protect the parishioners from the wind or Indian at-
tacks. The church also had no finished ceiling or
walls. In 1856, the Methodist pastor, David S.
Kennedy, and the Methodist community, felt the
need for a new building. A new church was built on
the same property later that year. The new church
had a high steeple and large, floor-to-ceiling win-
dows. The newly constructed church was used by
the Methodists, until a new one was built in 1902.
According to the old courthouse records,
Harmeling sold the first lot to Bishop Kennedy for
$200, April 8, 1905. Dec. 15 of that year, Harmeling
sold the second lot and the old church to the Bishop


for $500.
In 1906, the Catholic community decided to
build its own church on the land it managed to ac-
quire. When the community finally did begin build-
ing the Catholic church, Mrs. Eugene West
Jacksonville donated generously towards the con-
struction.
The Old Methodist Church had been remodeled
into a residential house several years
before it was moved to the first lot in
1906. It was then used as a priest's
house and the St. Vincent de Paul
Catholic Church was built where the
old Methodist Church originally stood
on the second lot. In later years, the
old Methodist church was removed
and a Cherry Lake home was put in its
place.
One noted story concerning the
new church involves a black family
who had been raised in the Catholic
faith. The family went to Father
S Breshnahan and asked him to conduct
a mission to the black community of
Madison. The priest then asked them
to come each night to the church for a
week's mission. That Wednesday,
when the priest came to the church to
say Mass, he found nailed to the door a
threat warning him to cease preach-
Sing to the black community or else.
Breshnahan took the note to the
local mayor who said that he doubted
anything would come of it, but he still
promised to have the town marshal on duty close by
for the remainder of the week. For the rest of the
week, a white member was stationed near the door
with a shotgun while another was in the sacristy be-
hind the altar with another shotgun. As another pre-
caution, a pistol was hidden in the altar. No trouble
presented itself the rest of the week.
The first resident pastor of the church, Father
Antonio Diez, came to Madison from Spain in Sep-
tember 1965. In 1966, Bishop Paul Tanner, bishop of
St. Augustine Diocese, established new boundaries
in Madison and Hamilton counties.
It was agreed upon in a contract between Bish-
op Tanner and the Oblate Provincial, Rev. Thomas
Reddy OMI, signed Aug. 5, 1968, that the Oblate
priests of Mary Immaculate would take responsibil-
ity for Taylor, Lafayette, Madison and Jefferson
counties. In September 1968, the Catholic communi-
ty was entrusted to the Rev. Gerald Flater, who was
the first Oblate Pastor of Madison, Perry and Mon-
ticello.
The St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church be-
longed to the diocese of St. Augustine until October
1975, when it became part of the diocese of Pen-
sacola/Tallahassee. Bishop Rene Gracida was the
first bishop to serve the new diocese.


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A A-t- AL A AL :u


Friday,july 10, 2009


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Friday, July 10, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com




Scoo00


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11A


k Kiwanis Present Tenth



AS Scholarship To MCFEE


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Kiwanis Club of
Madison has a rich tra-
dition of supporting
higher education in
Madison County. In fact,
this year's scholarship
contribution of $2,500,


very appropriate that
we serve the students of
Madison County by pre-
senting this check to the
Foundation to purchase
a scholarship."
Accepting the
check, Browning
replied, "We truly ap-


very successful in this
county," Browning said.
"The first graduate is
presently a teacher at
the Central School and
currently serves as a
mentor in the program.
This fall, 50 Madison
County students will be


(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, June 29, 2009)
District Deputy Grand Master John Sirmon (left) joins Worshipful Master Roy Hi-
bbs and Secretary Jim Stanley (right), both officers from Madison Lodge No. 11
F&AM, to present Gina Rutherford, executive director of the NFCC Foundation, with
checks totaling $700 for two scholarships.

Madison Masonic Lodge Awards

Two NFCC Scholarships


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
From the time
Madison Lodge No. 11
F&AM was first estab-
lished in the pioneer
days of Florida, it has
placed education in
high priority. Records
dating back to 1850 refer
to this education com-
mitment.


_I
Amanda Brown
Keeping with this
proud tradition, on
Monday, June 29, Wor-
shipful Master Roy Hi-
bbs and Secretary Jim
Stanley were joined by
District Deputy Grand
Master John Sirmon at
North Florida Commu-
nity College to present
two $350 scholarship


checks to Gina Ruther-
ford, executive director
of the NFCC Founda-
tion.
When Hibbs began
his year as "Worshipful
Master", he launched
several initiatives in-
cluding the scholarship
program. Along with
wife Ali and some key
helpers, Hibbs spon-
sored a series of month-
ly breakfasts, with
proceeds going to the
scholarship fund.
The recipients of
the scholarships are
Jessie Hall and Amanda
Brown, both recent
graduates of Madison
County High School,
and each with Masonic
family ties. Jessie is the
daughter of Brother
Darryl Hall and wife,
LeeAnne of Lee. Aman-
da is the daughter of
Mike and Vicki Brown
of Madison, and the
granddaughter of Past
Master John Wilson of
Adel, Ga.
"We are very
pleased to provide these
scholarships to two very
deserving students.
Each of these young


ladies have already
demonstrated good aca-
demics and school lead-
ership that we know
they will continue in
their higher education,"
Hibbs said. "It is also
our privilege to support
North Florida Commu-
nity College as well. We
look forward to a long
and prosperous rela-
tionship by establishing
this scholarship fund.
Masonry is very con-
cerned with children
throughout the commu-
nity," he added.


(Photo submitted)
George Willis proudly presents $2,500 to Faye Browning, president of MCFEE,
to be applied to the local Take Stock In Children scholarship program.


recently submitted by
long-standing member
and officer George
Willis, represented the
tenth such donation the
club has made to the
Madison County Foun-
dation for Excellence In
Education (MCFEE).
The foundation will
apply this donation to
the Take Stock In Chil-


preciate the support of
the Kiwanis Club of
Madison," adding,
"With this gift, the Ki-
wanis Club of Madison
has purchased 10 schol-
arships for Madison
County students."
The gathering ap-
plauded the noteworthy
achievement. Currently,
there are 77 Madison


in college and will re-
ceive tuition scholar-
ships," she went on to
say.
A large portion of
this milestone donation
was raised from a raffle
put together by the club,
which featured a unique
picnic table and grill
combo as prize. The
drawing took place at


Jessie Hall
Michael Curtis can be
reached at
michael(&greenepublishi
ng.com.


Community shows support for

NFCC Minority Leadership Program
Deloris Jones makes donation to new program at NFCC


(Photo submitted)
Kiwanis Past President Jim Holben (right) delivers the great picnic table and
grill combo prize to Lisa Wentz in Lee. The raffle raised $1,400 for the Take Stock In
Children program, as part of a $2,500 donation the club made shortly after to
MCFEE the tenth such donation of its kind for the club.


dren program, which it
supports locally, provid-
ing students two and
four-year scholarships.
Of course, students
must maintain good
grades and good citizen-
ship to receive the
award.
Faye Browning,
president of MCFEE,
accepted the $2,500
check during the Foun-
dation's Annual Meet-
ing, where Willis said,
"Kiwanis has as its pur-
pose serving the chil-
dren of the world. It is


County students who
have been contracted to
either two-year or four-
year tuition scholar-
ships, which can be
applied to technical
schools, community col-
leges and/or universi-
ties. Again, these
students must maintain
their grade point aver-
age, remain drug and
crime free, meet with
their mentors, and grad-
uate from Madison
County High School.
"The Take Stock in
Children program is


the Fifth Saturday
Farmers and Friends
Festival held on May 30,
where the lucky win-
ner's name, Lisa Wentz,
was drawn. The prize
was delivered to her in
Lee by raffle organizer
and Past President Jim
Holben, who was also
commended for his com-
mitment over the
months leading up to
the drawing.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at
michael(,greenepublishi
ng.com.


Deloris Jones visits with North Florida Community College President John
Grosskopf, left, and NFCC Student Life Coordinator Clyde Alexander, right, on
June 22 at NFCC to offer support to NFCC's new Minority Leadership Program.


MADISON, FL
Madison County's
Deloris Jones visits
with North Florida
Community College
President John
Grosskopf, left, and
NFCC Student Life Co-
ordinator Clyde Alexan-
der, right, on June 22 at
NFCC to offer support
to NFCC's new Minority
Leadership Program.
The new mentor
and scholarship pro-
gram, beginning in Au-
gust, will offer guidance
and tuition assistance
to 15 eligible minority
students from NFCC's
six-county service area
while promoting acade-
mic achievement, civic
engagement and person-
al enrichment among
participants. During a
previous meeting, Jones
challenged Grosskopf to
reach out to minority
students "NFCC Presi-


dent John Grosskopf
kept his promise and is
a man of his word," said
Jones. "I'm speechless
and very excited; this
program will not only
benefit minority stu-
dents, but everyone in
Madison County by
helping our youth be-
come better citizens."
During her visit to
the college, Jones volun-
teered to serve on the
NFCC Minority Leader-
ship Program's steering


committee and made a
donation to help sup-
port the program. Jones
is a retired home econo-
mist who worked at the
Madison County Exten-
sion office for many
years.
For more informa-
tion on the NFCC Mi-
nority Leadership
Program, visit
www.nfcc.edu (keyword:
Minority Leadership) or
contact Clyde Alexan-
der at 850-973-1609.


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12A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.cor


FIUN WA TO CiEUW TE CKS.TMAS I kMLY:


A Wonderful Way To Escape The Heat Of Summer


Why should Decem-
ber be the only month
filled with holiday joy?
Why not celebirati:
Christmas in .Jul\ as
well? When you cele-
ibriate Christmas in July,
you re 11\ do take some
of tii- stress out of your
life. It's also a wonder-
ful way to spend time
i lth kids. Even if you
just spend one t-i-eeke-nd
or even one day, cele-
brating Christmas in
July, it will be time well
spent. Here are just a
few of the fun ways to
celebrate Christmas in
July
Watch Movies


You know that spe-
cial feeling you get
when yo:u watch your
f:avorit-e holiday mn, ,le"-
That feeling dl:-esn't
have to be reserved for
December. This July,
pull out all your fa-
vorite holiday movies
and enjoy them. You
could playI one movie a
night or you O:IulMd
spend one weekend hav-
ing a holiday movie
marathon. To makn:-
your Christmas in July
experience more realis-
tic, turn down the air
conditioner and pull
out your favorite blan-
ket to curl up in. Don't


ftor':et to include holi-
day treats \when you cel-
ebratit- Chri.ltmai:. in
Jul F'or ex-ampi-. make
somine iiii- i:c a :t i ien a
batch of cream-filled
candies. When yi:iLu ele-I-
brate Christmas in July,
you should indul'e- in
all oft yo: r 0."fV:,rite h:l-11-
day treats.
Bake Cookies
Another fun way to
celebrate Christmas in
July is to bake cookies.
Even if you just bake
store bought cookie
dough, this is still a fun
way to celebrate Christ-
mas in July. D-ci:ratlt-
the cookies in a fun hol-


iday theme and enjoy
them while you watch
holiday movies. But it
doesn't have to be just
cookies. You could bake-
up any holiday treat. A
fun way to celebrate
Christmas in July is to
splurge and make treats
that you reserve for that
special holiday. You
don't have to celebrate
Christmas in July alone
either. Why not make a
holiday treat buffet and
invite your friends over
to watch the movie
marathon with you'
Go Shopping
One of' thil thlin'-
people s-eei to: hite


about the holiday\ s is all
the sh:opplin- The malls
are c:,ro -de-d You havie
ton-s i:'Lf -i2fts to buy and
I onl\ n'lmuch money to
spend. It really can
make the holidays
Strl--es'l But, a fun way
to c:elebratite Christmas
in Jull y iS to go shoIp-
ping. The malls aren't
as crowded and you can
get a head start on y:o'ur
holiday shopping. Just
think, when the holi-
days roll around. \you'll
hav:i a lot of sho:ppinll2
:alireaIdy done. Thi-. \x ill
1:allw x ou to quickly
Irun into the store, 2*t
th- la-t few items ouLI


need, and get out with-
out spending hundreds
of dollars- If \,:,u only
choose one of these fun
vayls to celebrate
Christmas in July.
:choo:,:se to go ,sho:pping
\\When the holidaIys real-
lI dN:( arri:v you'll be
l21ad that you don't have
to: s-pend mons:t of your
time stu'k in ia mall
I hi- hliy r-eci'm-
mend takin' tilh tinime to
(do on-e of these-- acti\i-
ties You really ill en-
joy the stress relief that
they brin- Also tihse
are X'Aonderful \yi-i s t:
escape the' heat I:tf sum-
mer and lust relax


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We have the best prices in S. Georgia and
N. Florida guaranteed!!!
Located 2031 N. Ashley Valdosta, GA 31601


Deaming A Green lrisma


By Caren Baginski
We're not just talk-
ing green as in -:arland
and trees thi-s ear,
Christmas de.I:Ior is go-
ing eco-frlendly with
en~-el -sa:ving products
and manulfa:ictrin2,
pro[)'e.I -e- Got a faux
tree in the basement?
This is the year to go
greener with a real
(hri'-Stmans tree, fresh
garlands and the latest
in Christmas light-.
Forget that tan-led-
mess of Christmas
lights that blq :\s out
year after ye-r LED
Christmas lihhts are
brighter, cool to the
touch and, if one goes
out, the rest stay lit.
Plus, they're entirely
eco-friendly Using tra-
ditional min-ll-ll- hts
with 500 inciandesi-'ent
bulbs will 'os-t :oLiu $.30
for energy over .0 dI a
But using th-e -ime
amount of I-2ht- in LEE)
will only cost \ ou .'$2
GKI/Bethilelhem i
known for their mini-
lights, says Shiaro:n Ep-
stein, marketing se-ricei'
manager, which they
now offer as LEDs. LED


lights are brighter, Ep-
stein says, because the
light actually comes
from inside the chip it-
self, which is manufac-
tured in a particle-free
environment to prevent
impiuritie-. A colored








cap surrounds the LED,
21ivin'2 off the ,c lored
l i:i, Look for trendy
,,olortS of iaritm whites


and ptLples- this- year in
the faceted ,:one and
blerrl shapes
While they may
cost a little more. LEDs
tend to: stay lit :for the
lifetime of the prod)iut.
which means fewer to
no replacements PIL-.
there's no: heat tran-sfer
so th-e're safer to use
on any liv\in- or faux fo-
liage.




S- i
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We Aol Ship Gift Boxes

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Valdosta, GA 31601 i,... /,.:

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(phone) 229-985-5006 (fax) 229-985-7156


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Friday,july 10, 2009








Friday, July 10, 2009


www.greenepublishing.com




Outdoors


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A


\\GOow Oak QUail





1664 BCT Gin Road Quitman, Georgia 31643
Bobwhite Quail:
Eggs Chicks Early Release


386-719-0421 ..r-


Jimmy Lyons
Lake City, Florida
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Wagon train adventure along Researchn Stocking HatcheReare ll largemouth Bass


the Suwannee to be aired on TV


LIVE OAK, FL
July 1, 2009
Television viewers
will get a chance to see
local horseback riders
on national TV next
week. The "Best of
America by Horseback"
program will feature a
wagon train ride along
the Suwannee River and
the groundbreaking cer-
emony for the R.O.
Ranch Equestrian Park.
The show is scheduled
to air on July 9 at 1:30
p.m. and July 11 at 11
a.m. on the RFD chan-
nel. RFD is currently
unavailable on cable,
but viewers who have
satellite may tune in on
channel 231 on DISH
NETWORK and on
channel 345 on DI-
RECTV
Segments of the
show may also be
viewed at
www.roranch.org. The
show was taped in 2008
and originally aired in
March.
The first segment of
the program will fea-
ture a three-week trip,


during which several lo-
cal horseback riders in
wagons traveled the en-
tire stretch of the
Suwannee River from
its headwaters in Geor-
gia to the Gulf of Mexi-
co. For John Paul
Schneider, of Suwannee
County, who led the ad-
venture, riding along
the trail was a life-long
dream that he fulfilled
with friends.
On their journey,
the wagon train trav-
eled through several
tracts of land managed
by the Suwannee River
Water Management Dis-
trict (District). Along
the route riders enjoyed
seeing the great out-
doors, as they came in
contact with deer,
turkeys and wild hogs.
The wagon train
gang didn't wind up
their adventure before
attending a ground-
breaking ceremony at
the R.O. Ranch Eques-
trian Park south of
Mayo. The R.O. Ranch is
a 2,500-acre equestrian
park being developed by


R.O. Ranch, Inc. and the
District. The park is a
long-time dream of
Frank "Red" and Olive
Schulte, who wanted to
share their love of the
environment and mules
with the public. When
the District established
R.O. Ranch, Inc., a Flori-
da nonprofit corpora-
tion, the couple gave a
$3.5-million endowment
to fund the ranch's oper-


nations.
The park is current-
ly open for day use. For
more information visit
www.roranch.org. Visit
www.mysuwanneeriver.c
om to learn more about
the recreational oppor-
tunities available to the
public on District lands.


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) may
be close to a break-
through with stocking
bass for better fishing op-
portunities. We hear it
all the time, "Bass man-
agement is easy, just
stock more fish." Truth
is it isn't that simple.
FWC biologists, as well
as other fishery research
experts, have understood
for years that merely
stocking fingerling bass
rarely improves fishing.
Biologists at the
FWC's Florida Bass Con-
servation Center (FBCC)
in Sumter County began
pioneering research that
enabled scientists to pro-
duce larger advanced fin-
gerling bass
(approximately 4 inches
long).
The FBCC concen-
trated on specific condi-
tions where stocking
fingerlings actually
works. For example,
stocking fingerling bass
into a new reservoir or
community pond built
for fishing, or stocking
them into a lake follow-
ing a drought, after a fish
kill, or after completion
of a habitat-restoration
program can restore a
population more quickly
than natural reproduc-
tion alone.
Biologists under-
stand that stocking larg-


NAo 411 bee Nee4 7o Te KpR i11e4


By Michel Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Before setting out to
control every six-legged
critter in the landscape,
take some time to identi-
fy what needs to be con-
trolled. One of the ways
of doing this is to bring
a sample of the insect in
question to the Exten-
sion Office.
The overuse of pes-
ticides can result in a
number of problems. In-
sects can become resis-
tant to insecticides when
a product is repeatedly


used. Because many in-
sect species reproduce
rapidly, having many
generations per year, a
resistant population can
develop in a short time.
This has happened in
agriculture and in lawns
and landscapes.
Pesticide overuse
can make some pest
problems worse. For ex-
ample, insecticides con-
taining carbaryl such as
Sevin will kill many in-
sects but will have little
or no effect on aphids or
spider mites. Repeated


In Madison on the corner of the Enterprise-
Recorder building every Wednesday.
Tilapia, Shrimp,
Spicy Shrimp, Catfish...........$7.50
Oysters, Crab Cakes,
Mullet (when available)................$8.50
Combine any of the 2 above ...$10.00
Combine any of the 3 above ...$12.00
Pork Chop or
Chicken Tenders.......................$6.50
Above served with hushpuppies and
choice of 2: Fries, Slaw, or Cheese Grits
Weekly Salad Special
We Start Serving at 11:00 am,
Weather permitting


use of carbaryl will
eliminate many benefi-
cial insects that eat
aphids and spider mites.
As a result, misuse of
carbaryl insecticides
may result in larger pop-
ulations of these insects.
Indiscriminate use
of broad-spectrum in-
secticides kills many in-
sects, good and bad, but
not all insects need to be
killed. Less than one per-
cent of all insects in
Florida are damaging to
plants. Many are benefi-
cial. In fact, beneficial
insects are really the
"good guys" of the in-
sect world. They feed on
harmful insects. So,
once one has made the
mistake of killing the
good guys, such as lady
beetles, which will typi-
cally conclude in an in-
crease in the use of
insecticides because the
good guys are no longer
there to help reduce the
harmful insects.
Conversely, if one
eliminates the bad in-
sects, beneficial insects
will not have anything to
eat. Moreover, spraying



1V I
FEED @I


every six-legged crea-
ture that exists is not a
good idea. The overuse
of pesticides can throw
off the delicate, benefi-
cial balance that exists
in nature.
Overall, it may be a
good idea to tolerate a
few pests and a little
damage. Attempting to
maintain a pest-free
landscape is not only im-
practical, but it is a
waste of money and
time and may be detri-
mental to the environ-
ment. Instead of
blanketing the land-
scape with pesticides,
use some strategy Op-
tions include: choosing
pest resistant plants,
avoiding excess fertiliza-
tion and watering, elimi-
nating a plant that has to
be frequently sprayed,
eliminating small pest
populations by hand, etc.
While pesticides remain
part of a pest control ar-
senal, care should be
taken to use them wisely
and correctly.
Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael
(,greenepublishing.com.
...- m m


Onthee tde aiutifu lacd 4e et



* 1-2 Bedroom Motel Room Rentals
(Available w/Kitchenettes)
* Boat Rentals Co ioenlasInuftoca
* Bait & Tackle Shop
* Canoe & Kayak Rentals Dunnellon, FL
* Airboat Tours 352-489-2397
* Singing River Tours www.AnglersResort.us





www.CaptBobsAirboatTours.com www.SlngingRiverourscom


Ammodump
International, LLC



rormerly B& GP Enterprises


Custom built AR-15's Have it your way
Revolvers, Pistols, Always in Stock
Re-Loading Components In Stock
Winchester Primers In Stock
Hodgdon, IMR, Alliant Powder, In Stock

(850) 973-8880
ammodump@embarqmail.com
10 am to 4 pm Tues, Wed, Thur.
Call for weekend Gun Shows


er hatchery-reared bass
results in more effective
management, since big-
ger bass can eat a greater
variety of prey. Being
bigger also is an advan-
tage because fewer
predators can eat them.
Sounds simple, but
the problems have been
significant. First, large-
mouth bass are typically
spawned naturally in
hatchery ponds, because
they don't respond well
to hormones, such as
those used to spawn
striped bass. In addition,
small bass are cannibals,
and they don't like artifi-
cial foods, which are
used in hatcheries for
catfish and trout. There-
fore, bass were histori-
cally grown in fertilized
outdoor ponds with lots
of zooplankton (tiny
floating animals such as
insect larvae). Predators,
including minnows, in-
sects and frogs, ate the
eggs and baby fish. As
the survivors grew larg-
er, other predators such
as birds began feasting
on the young bass where
they concentrated in out-
door ponds.
Consequently, the
FBCC was designed to
intensively culture
largemouth bass indoors
using state-of-the-art
technology. The FBCC
has the potential to pro-
duce more than 1 million
advanced fingerling
largemouths annually
Through research,
scientists found a way to
trick bass fry into eating
artificial food. It was dis-
covered that by crowding
fry together and feeding
them live brine shrimp
(the size of a gnat) they'd
go into a feeding frenzy
and be less choosy in
what they ate. That al-
lowed researchers to mix
in artificial food that was
about the size and color
of the brine shrimp.
Once the bass fry began
eating the artificial food,
it was easier to progres-
sively train them to take
bigger pellets as the bass
grew in size.
Other research has
improved culture condi-
tions, fish health man-
agement, handling and


hauling protocols. Now
scientists are comparing
survival rates between
hatchery fish that are
simply stocked at a boat
ramp in the traditional
manner, versus those
distributed into vegetat-
ed habitats around the
lake, so they are more
dispersed and avoid
predators more easily
One study found that
advanced fingerling
largemouth reared in
ponds on live aquatic or-
ganisms and stocked
into Lake Talquin, near
Tallahassee, fed on fishes
more successfully and
grew faster than their
wild counterparts dur-
ing their first year of life
in the reservoir. At the
end of the first year,
hatchery fish comprised
40 percent of the bass
that survived from that
year's spawn during a
year when 25 fish were
stocked per acre. Five
years after supplemental
bass stocking, hatchery
fish accounted for 20-27
percent of bass caught in
tournaments. Research
is being conducted in
Lake Talquin to deter-
mine whether pellet-
reared hatchery bass
will survive as well as
hatchery fish reared on
live feed.
The Lake Talquin
study has provided opti-
mism that stocking ad-
vanced sizes of
largemouth bass at the
appropriate time will be-
come a more widespread
and successful manage-
ment tool. Information
gained from research
and adaptive manage-
ment is critical to long-
term success of bass
stock-enhancement pro-
grams. Specific spawn-
ing strategies are being
used to protect the genet-
ic integrity of Florida
bass populations in the
state.
To be completely
successful, the FWC is
dedicated to maintaining
healthy habitats to stock
the fish, as well as mak-
ing sure anglers follow
the necessary rules to
ensure safe, sustainable,
quality recreational fish-
ing for everyone.






14A Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.comrn


Friday,July 10, 2009


DedlneFo Casifed

(80)97-44* l 'eds


f'-E Collectables
850-838-1422 (SAT/SUN) Furniture
We Buy 850-584-7124 (MON/FRI)
Call Us SAT 9-3 SUN 10-4 Tools

WE'RE ON VACATION JULY AUGUST


DUNN'S
Lawn Mower Repair
WELDING
New & Used Parts
Senior Citizen Discounts

850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340
ANYTHING LEFT OVER 7 DAYS
WILL BE SOLD
rtn, n/c
I BUILD SHEDS & DECKS
Call Bob
850-242-9342
Now selling steel
buildings, garages,
barns and carports
6/10, rtn, cc



Wanted: Chickens, turkeys,
guineas and peafowl.
850-464-1165
rtn, n/c

BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004. IF NO
ANSWER, PLEASE LEAVE
NAME, TELEPHONE NUMBER
AND INFO ABOUT THE MILL
rtn, n/c



Diamond Plate Alum. Pick-
up truck tool boxes.
Various sizes. $50 each. Call
973-4172 8am-5pm M-F
5/6-rtn, n/c

FOR SALE
Hay & Argentine bahia
grass seed
772-519-1340 or
850-973-6066
7/1, 7/8, 7/15, pd
Perry Scooters
New Motor Scooter $775,
ATV'S, Dirt Bikes, Go Carts
and Bicycle Engines
1302 N Jefferson St. Perry,
Fl 850-584-2979
7/1,7/8,c








A e
1997 Ford F-150 4x4
3 inch lift, dual exhaust all
power $4500 FIRM
850-210-2949/ 850-997-5293
5/20, rtn, nc


FREE TO GOOD H
Beagel Mix Pupp
males & female
850-971-2757

White English/Pit
puppies 1 male 1 fe
$100 each ready n
229-221-3614

White English/Pit
puppies 1 male 1 fe
$100 each ready n
850-342-1162




Mobile Home for
3/2 Doublewide Mc
home in the Lee a
$500.00
850-973-2353

Rentals
North of Perry
3 BR/2 BA D/V
2BR/2 BA D/W with
ft comm bldg.
40 x 80 horse barn w
for lease
800 sq ft comm of
Full service RV s
Call 850-838-61!


2 bedroom 1 I
home $450.00
security C
Call 850-8


Clean as new.
BR, 2.3 baths,
DR. 1705 Sq
Kitchen, Rangt
G/D. Oak Floo
Heart Pine upsta
H&A. Yard ma
ADULT FAMI
$900 rent and d
credit req. 205 N
Madison. Call
8583 or 55


Buy, Sell

In The Ch


Call 973

To PI

Your Ad


C 'outhem lf0las of

MI^adison C partments



Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR
HC & non-HC accessible
apts. Call 850-973-8582,
TDD/TTY 711. 315 SW
Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtn, c

CLEAN 3 BR, CH & CA,
new R & Refg, Oak floors.
ADULT FAMILY ONLY.
Rent $685 plus deposit.
No pets. Good credit req.
432 NE Horry Ave., Madi-
son. Call George 973-8583
or 557-0994.
rtn, c

Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for
Senior's and Disabled.
1BR ($409.)
2BR ($435.).
HUD vouchers accept-
ed Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd,
Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and Employer



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
rm,cc


1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-
HC accessible apts.
Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-
3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville
Pointe Trail, Greenville,
FL 32331.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtn, c



(2) 14x66 3 bedroom 2 bath
single wide 850-290-6192 or
386-362-1171
7/1, 7/8, c


/8, 7/15, nc 24x56 3/2 extra clean v
den 850-290-6192 (
Bull 386-362-1171
male 7
24x52 3/2
7/8, 7/15, pd 850-290-6192 or
386-362-1171
Bull 7
male 1999 28x64 hinged roo
low with Great Room
7/8,ritn,nc 850-290-6192 or
386-362-1171
7
Used Double and Sin
Rent Wides 850-290-6192
mobile 386-362-1171
irea
"Brand New""
1500 sq. ft. 3/2 to m
/10,7/15c upgrades to list, all
for only $42,843.00
Eric to set up appo
v ment (386) 719-551
200 sq 7/8

/50 ac. "WOW"
$150.00 and your prop
office puts you in a home to
,ite call Eric at
24 (386) 719-5560


6/24, 7/1,7/8, 7/15 c 7/8 7/24, c
Trade in's & Repos Available
bath mobile Call Eric for a list of our
per month + homes available at discount-
deposit ed prices, many to choose
69-0916 from! (386) 719-5560
7/8 7/24, c
7/1,7/8,7/15,
"1st time home buyers"
Two story, 3 We have several programs to
formal LR & help 1st time home buyers
q. Ft. New plus GOUT assistance up to
e, Ref, D/W, $8,000 $$$
r downstairs, Call Eric for details
airs. 2 Central (386) 719-5560
int. included. 7/8 724,
LY. No pets.
deposit. Good New Manufactured Homes
E Shelby Ave. Starting at $23.70 sq. ft.
George 973- Guaranted lowest prices in
57-0994. North Florida. Call Rick
5/8-rtn, c (386) 752-8196
7/8 7/24, c
The Wait Is Over!
Introducing "Mossy Oak"
the most innovative, quality
or Trade and affordable manufactured
houses in the industry. Call
assifieds Mr. Mott (386) 752-1452
7/8 7/24, c

3-4141 Repo Mobile Homes
Due to the state of the
lace economy, one persons' loss
is another ones gain. Save
I Today thousands on these bank
repos. Call Rick
(386) 752-1452
7/8 7/24, c


Best Cash Deals on Mobile
Homes. NO ONE BEATS
MY PRICES
386-719-0044
rtn,c
SINGLE WIDE 14X70 2BR/
2 BATH Excellent Shape;
Need Chas, Priced to sell,
Call Mike at 386-623-4218
rtn,c
Brand Spanking New
2009 5 BR/3BA; 2004 Sq Ft;
$594.31 Per month. Seller
pays $3,500 toward closing
cost. Call Mike at
386-623-4218
rtn,c
Modular Home for sale in
town. Save $20,000.00. Turn
Key Deal; Owner says make
an offer. It Must Go!
Call Mike at 386-623-4218
rtnc

PRICE REDUCED!
Spacious Mfg home with 4
BR, 3 BATH, Bonus Room
with lots of windows. Discon-
tinued floor plan. Fore More
info call Sarah. 386-288-0964
rtnc

Become a Homeowner for
the same monthly payments
you are throwing away on
rent. Call Sarah for more info.
386-288-0964
rtn,c

MUST SELL 5 BR HOME
$49,900.00
Call 386-288-4560

WE PAY CASH..... FOR
YOUR USED MOBILE
HOMES 1980 OR NEWER.
LYNN SWEAT
386-365-5129
rtn,c
First Time home Buyer
$7,500.00 CASH
IN YOUR POCKET
Call David for details
386-719-0044
rtn,c
Low Credit Scores???
I may be able to help you
buy a home.
386-288-4560
rtn,c
Need More Space
for a growing family?
2001, 5 BEDROOM, 4
BATH TRADE-IN.
Excellent condition.
For more info call Sarah.
386-288-0964
rtn,c

FOR SALE 2.68 ACRES
BETWEEN LAKE CITY
AND LIVE OAK
CAN POSSIBLY BE
ZONED COMMERCIAL
MAKE OFFER 386-365-5129
LYNN SWEAT
rtn,c

NEW 4 BR 2 BATH READY
TO MOVE IN. CALL 386-
288-4560


rtn,c
vith a HOME ONLY LOANS
or No mortgage on your land.
1, 78 Put a home on your land,
family land, state land or
rental lot. Singlewides start at
$350.00 month and Dou-
blewides at $440.00.
7/1, 7/8, c EVERYTHING INCLUDED
NO HIDDEN CHARGES
'f 3/2 Call Steve 386-365-5370
rtn,c

Home Owners.....
7/1, 7/8, c Guaranteed Financing
gle Thru B.O.T.!! PROGRAM
!eor 386-719-0044
or rtn,c
/1, 7/8,c ZERO DOWN
LAND HOME PACKAGES
any Singlewide your land $340.00
this P&I per mo, Doublewide your
Call land $422.00 P&I per mo.
S Singlewide & $30,000.00 for
int- land $520.00 P&I per mo. or
60 Doublewide with $30,000.00
for land $602.00 P&I per mo.
Our land your land or buy
land. I specialize in credit
)erty challenged customers. Appli-
day cations over the phone, credit
decision next business day.
Let me help make your new
home dream come true.


Trades welcome.
Call Steve 386-365-5370
rtn,c





OFFICE BUILDING
FOR RENT
across street from
Post Office, Courthouse,
and Courthouse Annex.
(Old Enterprise Recorder Office)
111 SE Shelby St., Madison;
Newly renovated
back to the 1920's era
Call 973-4141
rtn,n/c

Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highwayfrontage.
Corner lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Dr.
& Highway 53 South.
Enterprise Zone
Natural gas line, 8 inch wa-
ter main, access to city utili-
ties, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or long term lease.
Call Tommy Greene 850-
973-4141
rtn, n/c


Completely Remodeled
3 BR/ 1 Bath, new roof,
carpet, central heat & air,
new kitchen cabinets, new
bathroom, new 200 amp
electrical, approximately
1300 sq. ft. $84,000
Oak Estates Sub Division
McWilliams Realty
(850) 973-8614
6/3,rtn, c

Fantastic Lake
and Mountain Views
from this 2 Bed/ 2Bth Home.
Open and Covered Decks,
Large Screened Porch, Gas
FP, CH/A, Oak Floors & Cab-
inets, and Appliances.
Offered Furnished at
$179,900. Call BJ Peters at
850-508-1900
rim, I/c

FOR SALE /
OWNER FINANCING
ALL LAND BELOW
IS HIGH AND DRY
5 acres Lee, North of Hwy
6, Cayenne Rd., rolling hills,
restrictions, $39,995 $5,000
down, $325/mo
10 acres Beulah Meadows
Rd, DWMH and houses al-
lowed, $49,500, $5,000 down
$459/mo
10 acres Old Blue Springs
Rd. access, DWMH and hous-
es allowed, $49,500, $5,000
down, $459/mo
25 Acres on Hwy 90, Lee,
$112,500 ($4,500/ac)
Larger tracts available
Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116
rtn,c

FOR SALE
Across from Rocky Spring
Church 1.87 Acres $22,000
Call 678-389-1859
5/6-rtn, cc
For Sale:
House & Lot
In the Town of Suwannee
was $135,000, Now $99,000.
2 BR/1 BA. Fully Furnished,
New Metal Roof, and New
Paint. Utility Building with
Washer and Dryer. Nice Fruit
Trees. 386-719-0421
rtn, n/c


Call 973-4141
to Place Your Ad!

Classifieds

$12 (for 20 words or less)
Wednesday and Friday.
Your ad will also
be on our website
FREE of charge
www.greenepublishing.com


$$AVON$$
Earn 50%, only $10 for
starter kit! Call Today
850-570-1499 or visit
www.youravon.com/tdavies
5/13 rtn, c

THIRD JUDICIAL COURT
GENERAL COUNSEL
Closing Date: July 15, 2009
For more information:
www.jud3.flcourts.org
7/1, 7/8,c

Advent Christian Village
Current JOBS Line Advertise-
ment call 658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net
24 hrs/day, 7 days/week

Be your BEST, Among the
BEST

CNA
FT / PT / long-term care set-
ting; Florida unrestricted certi-
fication required; experience
with geriatric population
strongly desired.

Marketing Specialist
PT position to assist in mar-
keting housing, services, and
venues of Advent Christian
Village; Bachelor's degree in
M 11i.u,.. Advertising, or rel-
evant field plus two to five
years proven, relevant experi-
ence required. Must possess
strong customer service and
communication skills; PC pro-
ficiency required with
experience In MS Office (in-
cluding Access); experience
with REPS a strong plus.

FT positions include health,
dentat, life, disability, supple-
mental insurance; 403b
retirement account; paid time
off, access to onsite daycare
and fitness facilities. Apply in
person at Personnel Office
Monday through Friday from
9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or
fax resume/credentials to (386)
658-5160. EOE / Drug-Free
Worbplace / Criminal back-
ground checks required.
7/1,7/8,c
Two Fulltime Positions
available at North Florida
Community College: Grants
Coordinator and Institutional
Effectiveness Coordinator.
See www.nfcc.edu for details


WORKrORCCi a\




If you are 18 or older
and have been laid-
off from your job, con-
tact us now! We can
assist you in assessing your
interests and setting career goals, as
well as looking for a new job. We
may also assist qualified individuals
with career training funds! You
may still be eligible to receive Un-
employment while in training.

A or86.37.75


15, c


























I


IAn Equal Opportunity Program. Amiuxlay aids and wnrices mre aailable upon request to indi~'duals
with d,.bifities. All voic telph- ne uber on this b-ohi-e -y be ..hed by p- sn~i~g
PllY! FDD qu~p-.rt vi. ,. Flond. Rdly S-rice t 711.1


Announcements
Advertise in Over 100 Pa-
pers! One Call One Order
One Payment The Adver-
tising Networks of Flori-
da Put Us to work for
You! (866)742-1373
www.national-classi-
fieds.com, info@national-
classifieds.com

Auctions
FLORIDA LAND AUC-
TIONS Magnolia Bay
Hunting Plantation 596
+/- acres. Jefferson Coun-
ty. July 9 10 am. United
Country Certified Real Es-
tate.
www.CertifiedRealEstateA
uctions.com (800)711-9175
AU2726 10%BP

IRS Public Auction July
10th Registration 9am
Auction 10am. Sale Loca-
tion: Orange County
Courthouse 425 N. Or-
ange Ave Ste 180 Orlando.
Auction Properties locat-
ed in Apopka and Orlan-
do. www.irsauctions.gov
or Contact Sharon W Sul-
livan (954) 654-9899
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Wednesday, July 10, 2009


www.ureenepublishinu.com


Madison County Carrier 15A


LEG~AL


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 2009-108-CA
WILLIAM L. SULLIVAN
Post Office Box 729
Madison, Florida 32341
Plaintiff,
vs. FORECLOSURE AND
OTHER RELIEF
DONALD L. REDDING AND
SUSAN A. REDDING
Post Office Box 252
Pinetta, Florida 32350
GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC
1200 South Pine Island Road
Plantation, Florida 33324
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
Internal Revenue Service
550 Water Street #701
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
Defendants.

NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN;
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered on June 30, 2009 in the above styled action, I, Tim
Sanders, Clerk of the Court, will sell at public sale the following described
real property:
LOT 4, BLOCK C, SULLIVAN STILL SUBDIVISION, AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 14, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
PROPERTY APPRAISER'S ID #07-2N-10-5891-OOC-004
The sale will be held on July 23, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., to the highest and best
bidder for cash, at the West door of the Madison County Courthouse in
Madison, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the owner of the above-described property as of the date of the lis pen-
dens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order
to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact Sondra Williams, Court Ad-
ministrator, Post Office Box 1569, Lake City, Florida 32056, tele-
phone:(386)758-2163, within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice; if
you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Dated: June 30, 2009.
Tim Sanders
As Clerk of the Court
BY: /s/ Karen Holman
As Deputy Clerk
7/3, 7/10

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR MADISON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2008-649-CA
DIVISION:
Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Edna M. Beharrie, Roosevelt Beharrie,
IF LIVING, AND IF DECEASED, THEIR
UNKNOWN SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, CREDITORS, AND ALL OTHER
PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER
OR AGAINST THEM; JOHN DOE and JANE DOE
AND ANY OTHER PERSONS) IN POSSESSION
OF THE SUBJECT REAL PROPERTY WHOSE
NAMES ARE UNCERTAIN,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to an order or a final
judgment of foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will
sell the property situated in MADISON County, Florida, described as;
PARCEL 13, BLOCK E
A parcel of land lying in Secrion 33, Township 1 South; Range 10 East,
Madison County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows:
Commence at the Southwest comer of said Section 33 and run North 01 39'
21" West 84.30 feet to the North right of way of MIDWAY CHURCH
ROAD; thence North 89 34' 42" East, along said right of way 3215.66 feet
to the POINT OF BEGINNING, from said POINT OF BEGINNING, and
leaving said right of way, run North 01 39' 21" West, 1431.49 feet; thence
North 89 43' 19" East, 613.70 feet; thence South 01" 39' 21" East, 1429.95
feet to the North right of way of MIDWAY CHURCH ROAD; thence
South 8934' 42" West, along said right of way 613.66 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, on the Courthouse
steps at the MADISON County Courthouse, 125 SW Range Avenue, Madi-
son, Florida at 11:00 a.m., on July 30, 2009. Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.

DATED this 2 day of July 2009
Tim Sanders
CLERK OF THE COURT

BY: Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk

SCHUYLER-STEWART-SMITH
G. Michael Samples, II, Esq
118 West Adams St. #800
Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 353-5884

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) NOTICE
Individuals with disabilities needing a reasonable accommodation to partici-
pate in this proceeding should contact the Court administrators office, as
soon as possible. If hearing impaired, 1-800-995-8771 (TTD) ; or 1-800-955-
8770 (V) via Florida Relay Service.
7/10, 7/17


WILLIAM L. SULLIVAN
Post Office Box 729
Madison, Florida 32341
Plaintiff,
vs.
LESLY LOUIS
1455 SW 27th Way
Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442
Defendant.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 2009-167-CA




FORECLOSURE AND
OTHER RELIEF


NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN;
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered on June 30, 2009 in the above styled action, I, Tim
Sanders, Clerk of the Court, will sell at public sale the following described
real property:
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH,
RANGE 10 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE
NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 1, AND RUN SOUTH 00
DEGREES 06 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,383.66
FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 58 SECONDS
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 945.36 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00
MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 435.02 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 1,043.25 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF NE HICKO-
RY GROVE ROAD; THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY THE FOL-
LOWING COURSES; NORTH 16 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 08 SECONDS
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 15.35 FEET; THENCE NORTH 05 DEGREES 17
MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 421.72 FEET; THENCE
LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 30 MIN-
UTES 58 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 1,000.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 10.19 ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
LESS AND EXCEPT: RIGHT OF WAY FOR COUNTY ROAD.
PROPERTY ID NO. 01-2N-10-5802-OBH-004
The sale will be held on July 23, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., to the highest and best
bidder for cash, at the West door of the Madison County Courthouse in
Madison, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the owner of the above-described property as of the date of the lis pen-
dens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order
to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance. Please contact Sondra Williams, Court Ad-
ministrator, Post Office Box 1569, Lake City, Florida 32056, tele-
phone:(386)758-2163, within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice; if
you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Dated: June 30, 2009.
Tim Sanders
As Clerk of the Court


BY: /s/ Ramona Dickinson
As Deputy Clerk


7/3, 7/10


Notice:
The District School Board of Madison County, Florldn will hold a public
hearing on Tuesday, Augustl8, 2009, at 6:00 p.m. The melting will be held
In the School Board Meeting Room of the Superintendent's Office, 210 NE
Duval Ave. Madison, Florida.
Changes to Board Policies:
6.29 Violation of Employee Code of Conduct, Policies and Procedures, Prin-
ciples of Professional Practices, the Code of Ethics or Principles of Profes-
sional Conduct. Other State Board of education Rules or Local, State and
/or Federal.
5.10 Zero Tolerance for School Related Crimes
The proposed document may be viewed at the School Board Office, 210 NE
Duval Ave. Madison, Florida.
Statutory authority: 1001.41, 1001.42
IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY
THE BOARD, WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT
THIS
MEETING OR HEARING, HE/SHE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE
PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, HE/SHE MAY NEED TO
ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS
MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVI-
DENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.

7/10



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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2009-282-CA
ARTHUR G. SMITH,
as Mortgagee,
Plaintiff,
v.
ARTHUR W. GOODE
The unknown spouse of Arthur W. Goode
any and all unknown parties claiming by, through,
under, and against the herein named individual
defendants) who are not known to be dead or
alive, whether said unknown parties may claim
an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees,
or other claimants; Tenant #1, Tenant #2,
Tenant #3, and Tenant #4 the names being
fictitious to account for parties in possession,
Defendants.
/
NOTICE OF ACTION
To the above-names Defendant(s) and all others whom it may concern
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the follow-
ing described property in Madison County, Florida, to-wit: A Parcel of land
in the SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 19, Township 1 North, Range 10 East,
Madison County, Florida, more particularly described as follows:
Commence at the Northwest corner of said Southwest Quarter of Northeast
Quarter of Section 19 and run South 89 degrees 53' 41" East 520.18 feet;
thence run South 00 degrees 07' 10" West (Base Bearing) 1294.39 feet to the
North Right-of-way line (R/W) of Stare Road No. 6; thence South 89 de-
grees 44' 29" East Along said R/W line 382.55 feet to the Southwest corner
and POINT OF BEGINNING of the herein described parcel; thence North
00 degrees 42' 16" west leaving said R/W line 764.75 feet to the southwest
corner of Cherry (O.R. Book 161, Page 732); thence North 89 degrees 58'
39" East along Cherry 253.38 feet; thence South 00 degrees 16' 17" West
along Cherry 765.88 feet to said R/W line; thence North 89 degrees 44' 29"
West along said R/W line 240.28 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; con-
taining 4.34 acres, more or less.
Has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Plaintiff's attorney and counsel of record,
THE LAW OFFICES OF MONICA TAIBL, P.L., P.O. Box 836, Madison,
Florida, 32340, within thirty 30 days after the first publication of this Notice
of Action, and file the original with the Clerk of Court, Honorable Tim
Sanders, whose address is Madison County Courthouse, 125 SW Range Av-
enue, Madison, Florida, 32340, either before service on the Plaintiff's attor-
ney or immediately thereafter. If you fail to answer, defend or otherwise
plead to this action to foreclose a mortgage, a Default will be entered
against you for relief demanded in the Complaint. This Notice of Action is
executed and published pursuant to the provisions of 49.08, et seq.. Florida
Statutes.
DATED this 26th day of June, 2009
TIM SANDERS
As Clerk of Circuit Court

By: /s/Karen Holman/s/
As Deputy Clerk
7/10, 7/17









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