Group Title: Madison enterprise-recorder.
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00313
 Material Information
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate Title: Madison enterprise recorder
Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Madison enterprise-recorder
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison, Fla.
Madison Fla
Publication Date: February 8, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028405
Volume ID: VID00313
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
 Related Items
Preceded by: Enterprise-recorder

Full Text



www.greenepublishing.com



SIntrrise0

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Our 143rd Year, Number 23


Friday, February 8, 2008


.AAA......A*k**..k.-*^ALL FOR ADC 320
Univei sity of Florida Library
Dept. o Special Coll. Fla History
210 Smathers Library
er Oninc--viltl FL 320511




Ceco rOer


Madison, Florida


Sexual Predator


Changes Address

By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A sexual predator has changed his
address.
According to the Madison County
Sheriff's Office, Robert Lee Baynard,
60, a 5'11" tall,
244-pound
black male,
has registered
with a new ad-
dress listed at
269 SW Suma-
tra, Apt. 7, in
Madison.
Bay-
nard's former
address was
345 SE Scars-
dale Way in
Lee.
Robert Lee Baynard Baynard
filed the new
address on Tuesday, February 5.
His qualifying offense was sexual
battery by an adult on a victim under
12 years of age.
Jacob Bembry, editor, can be
reached by e-mail at jacob@greenepub-
lishing.com.


NFCC Announces

Mildred Smith

Bruner

Scholarship

Former legislator Ken Smitg
establishes fund to honor sister
The North Florida Community Col-
lege Foundation announced the estab-
lishment of the
Mildred Smith
Bruner En-
dowed Scholar-
ship, honoring
charter faculty-
member and ad-
ministrator
Mildred Bruner
of Madison.
Bruner's broth-
er, Kenneth B.
Mildred Smith Smith, busi-
Bruner nessman and
Bruner former state
legislator established the scholarship
fund.
Bruner's professional career spans
more than forty years, beginning in
1937 in Alabama and bringing her to
Madison County
A native Alabamian, Bruner holds
a B.S. from Montevallo College for
Women, a master's degree from
Auburn University and a Ph. D. equiva-
lent degree in education from Florida
State University She and her husband,
Cecil Bruner, relocated to Madison,
Fla. in 1945. She taught 13 years at
Madison County High School, and was
assistant principal of the school from
See Bruner, Page 2A


,Groundwater levels are at the lowest levels since the Suwannee River Wa-
ter Management district was formed 35 years ago.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
According to Don Curtis, Govern-
ing Board Member of the Suwannee
River Water Management District
(SRWMD), the area is now in Phase II
drought status. "It's the worst
drought conditions we've experienced
in the 35 year history of the SRWMD.
Of course, we do expect a correction.
But in the mean time, we have to take
steps now to conserve," Cui-tis stated.
"On February 14, we will speak to
the municipalities and execute a 90-
day public education plan. Southern
Florida counties, like Pinellas for in-
stance, have been in this situation be-
fore. So although it's not new to us,
and we certainly don't want the peo-
ple of Madison to be overly worried,
considering the substantial agricul-
tural demands, restrictions may need
to be introduced to preserve water for
everybody" he explained. In contrast,
Phase I just involves voluntary con-
servation.
By the numbers, the SRWMD has
a 12-month rainfall deficit of 15.1
inches and a 24-month deficit of 28.7
inches, causing alarming groundwa-
ter levels that measure only ten per-
cent of normal. Perhaps more alarm-
ing on a community and regional lev-
el though, is that over 100 Dry Well


Permits have been issued in the last
eight months. "Ten percent of the
permits we're issuing at SWRMD are
Dry Well Permits," Curtis went on to
say.
In December, SRWMD representa-
tives spoke to the major agriculture
water users and in January forestry
and major water users like Nestle
were addressed. The process has also
encountered an extra challenge, as
the drought has coincided with the
resignation of District Director, Jerry
Scarboro. And although a front-run-
ning replacement, David Still, has
been selected, the position requires
approval of both the Governor and
Senate.
There are several levels more crit-
ical than Phase II. Phase III entails
even more stringent conservation and
the final phase includes an Emer-
gency Order. Curtis gave no indica-
tion that those levels were eminent
and remained confident that Scar-
boro's resignation poses no opera-
tional problems. The Phase II decla-
ration is simply the first formal an-
nouncement and will hopefully go no
further with appropriate community
cooperation.
Staff writer Michael Curtis can be
reached at michael@greenepublish-
ing.com.


Sex Offender

Registers With


New Address


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A registered sex


offender has


moved to a
new address.
Accord-
ing to the
NI a d i s o n
Madison
County Sher-
iff's Office,
Anthony D.
McGhee, a
black male,
born June 29,
1968, changed
his address on
Friday, Febru-
ary1.
McGhee's new
Anthony D. McGhee address is 277
SW Hall Street in Madison. His previ-
ous address was 234 SW Adelie Trail in
Madison.
McGhee stands 6'4" tall and weighs
229 pounds.
McGhee was adjudicated guilty in
August 2002 on a charge of sexual bat-
tery/injury not likely.


Louis Thompson,

Former NFCC

Athletic Director,

Dies
Former
North
Florida Ju-
nior Col-
lege Athlet-
ic Director
and Coach
Louis
Thompson
died Mon-
day, Janu-
ary 28, af-
ter a brief
illness.s A Louis Thompson.
special
memorial service will be held Saturday,
February 9, at 4 p.m. at Grace Presby-
terian Church.
Thompson joined the North Florida
Junior College staff in 1959. He was
born in Greensboro, North Carolina,
where he participated in all high
school athletics. When World War II
broke out in late 1941, he was bound for
basic training two days after Pearl Har-
bor. An ordinance instructor in the
US. Air Force at Marshall Field,
Kansas, Thompson was a member of
the Second Composite Air Force track
team, competing in the 440 and the
half-mile runs.
After his military service, Thomp-
son entered Kansas State University on
a tennis scholarship and was first seed
on the KSU tennis team. He taught
classes in political science and helped
coach tennis and track, graduating
See Thompson, Page 2A


Two Injured: Man Critical, Woman Serious


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A man was critically in-
jured and a woman was seri-
ously injured in a wreck ear-
ly Thursday morning, Febru-
ary 7.
According to a Florida
Highway Patrol report, Sean
P. Robinson, 36, of Madison,
was traveling eastbound on
Interstate 10 on the 251-exit
ramp at State Road 14 in a
1995 Buick.
Robinson lost control of


Around Madison County
Church
Classifieds
Obituaries


his car and collided with a
steel guardrail. He bounced
off the guardrail, crossing
the exit ramp lane and
struck a large pine tree on
the north side of the road-
way
The car bounced off the
pine 'tree and struck a sec-
ond pine tree before coming
to a final rest.
Robinson was flown by
helicopter to Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital in Talla-
hassee with critical injuries.


2 Sections, 34 Pages ,
5-6A | Legals
9A Outdoors
16A Sports
5A Viewpoints


Robinson's passenger,
Shalonda Rowe, 20, of Madi-
son, was taken by ambulance
to Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital, with serious in-
juries.
Robinson nor Rowe were
wearing their seatbelts.
FHP Trooper Tom Roder-
ick investigated the accident,
which occurred at approxi-
mately 3:45 a.m.
Jacob Bembry, edito, can
be reached by email atja-
cob@greenepublishing.com.


14A
15A
12-13A
2-3A


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


A 1995
Buick was
totaled and
its driver,
Sean P.
Robinson,
and passen-
ger, Shalon-
da Rowe,
were injured
in a wreck
early Thurs-
day morn-
ing, Febru-
ary 7. Nei-
ther Robin-
son nor
Rowe were
wearing
their
ibruary 6, 2008 seatbelts.


- . 11 11 11 Y40M
ddligbob6l,
gamordod"
mwmdmmd
"Ffttavsw4vftwdlhL
kv" rammadmd"


Major Drought Declared


V"Lawosaine"SUN Lost-
.- ., Low










2A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



O iewpoints& Opinion.


Friday, February 8, 2008


7~~jN\


Jacob's Ladder'
Jacob Bembry
Columnist



Clark Kent Is A Wimp

I have decided what I am. I have tried to cover it up
for years, but I guess it's time that I admit it to myself
and to everyone else. I'm sure that the secret will shock
many, but to some, they'll just shrug their shoulders and
say, "Oh, that's all! I already knew that!"
What I am is a wimp!
I decided for sure that I am a wimp on Tuesday, Feb-
ruary 5, 2008. It wasn't a fight with another person that
made me decide I was a wimp. It was a fight with my
body, wracked with pain.
My friend, Rob Covell, calls me Clark Kent. I kind of
get a kick out of that, because everyone knows that
Clark Kent is Superman's, true identity It makes me
think that I'm Superman, even though I know the only
reason that Rob calls me Clark Kent is because I work
for a newspaper.
Last week, I missed three days in a row because of
the pain, but I still didn't think I was a wimp. Nope.
Clark Kent is Superman and that was what I was. I was
faster than a speeding bullet, strong enough to stop a
speeding locomotive...Look, up in the air, it's a bird, it's
a plane... it's Jacob and he's a wimp.
I returned to work this past Monday, still in pain, but
knowing that I needed to work and knowing that I was
needed at work. I was Clark Kent and I could get the job
done.
The pain seemed to be slowly going away until Mon-
day night, when it began. to eat and gnaw at me again.
Tuesday morning, my body, screamed at me not to go to
work, but my firm resolve refused to listen.
"You don't tell Superman what to do," I told the pain.
In the office, disguised as mild-mannered reporter Clark
Kent, my firm resolve began to ebb and the pain began
to increase.
"I AM A WIMP!" I feel like crying out, but I don't.
Maybe the pain hurts too bad for me to scream.
With God's help, Clark Kent (Jacob Bembry) is still
at work, realizing that he's not Superman. I have a call
in to my doctor, but my plans are to stay at work. Clark
Kent may have wimped out, but there's still enough Su-
perman left in me, thanks to my Lord Jesus Christ, try
and make it through another day of pain.

S Pres s Arss -



Award Winning Newspaper

ic fbmabis on

Enterprise-Recotber
P.O. Box 772 Madison, FL 32341
1695 S SR 53 Madison, FL 32340
(850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121
greenepub@greenepublishing.com
http://www.greenepublishing.com
PUBLISHER
Emerald Greene Kinsley
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER
Ted Ensminger
EDITOR
Jacob Bembry
PRODUCTION MANGER
Lisa Greene
STAFF WRITER
Michael Curtis and T\rra Meserve
GRAPHIC DESIGNERS
Jessica Higginbotham and Heather Bowen
TYPESETTER/SUBSCRIPTION
Brvant Thigpen
ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES
Mary Ellen Greene. Dorothy McKinney,
Sharon Bedingfield and Jeanette Dunn
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS
Debra Lewis
Deadline for classified is Monday at 3:00 p.m.
Deadline for Legal Adiertisement is
Monday at 5pm.
There will be a '3"charge for Affidavits.
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Sheree Miller
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
In County $30 Out-of-County $38
(State & local taxes included)
-Since 1865-
"Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity".-
'Cbe miaoison 6nterprise-Recorber
Madison Recorder established 1865,
New Enterprise established 1901,
Consolidated June 25, 1908
Published weekly by Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695 S. SR 53,
Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post Of-
fice 32340. Publication No. 177.400.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison En-


terprise-Recorder, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement,
news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the manage-
ment, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the own-
ers of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submit-
ted.
All photos given to Greene Publishing, Inc. for publication in
this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be
responsible for photos beyond said deadline.


Bruner


cont from page 1A


1956 to 1958.
Bruner was among the founding faculty members of
North Florida Junior College when it opened its doors
in 1958. She taught biology, history and social science
and was the first director of financial aid. She later
served as college registrar, director of admissions and
advisor to foreign students.
A Feb. 16, 1959 article from The Timuquana Trail-
blazer described Mildred Bruner as someone who "con-
siders it a privilege and a challenge ...bringing out the
potential abilities and helping... students to attain max-
imum achievement."
Upon her retirement from NFJC in 1981, she said, "I
saw the need for an institution of higher education in
this area. It is a dream come true. Helping to lay the
groundwork was a gratifying experience. I leave with
the feeling that NFJC has performed great services to
the area."
She continues to support the educational dreams of
young people through an endowment gift dedicated to
scholarships for Take Stock in Children students who
will attend NFCC, providing a continuous source of
scholarships for years to come.
Bruner takes special pride in recognizing the poten-
tial of young people and revels in the successes of her
many students through the years. She has seen former
students become teachers, legislators, attorneys, judges,
ministers, business, military and community leaders,
including current NFCC president, Morris G. Steen, Jr.
She has been active in the Madison community
through the Madison County Historical Society, Madi-
son County Memorial Hospital Pink Ladies, Madison
Woman's Club, Garden Club, Delta Kappa Gamma and
the Madison Education Credit Union. She is also a dedi-
cated member of the Madison First Baptist Church.
What's more, she has traveled extensively, including a
European tour at the age of 80.
The Bruner Scholarship will be awarded annually in
May to students seeking an associate in arts degree at
NFCC. Students must be residents of Taylor, Madison
or Jefferson counties, be full-time students and main-
tain a 2.5 GPA.
For more information about this or other scholar-
ships and giving opportunities, contact Foundation Ex-
ecutive Director Gina Rutherford by telephone 850.973-
9414 or email rutherfordg@nfcc.edu. Scholarship infor-
mation .is available on the NFCC website at
www.nfcc.edu.


Thompson


cont from page 1A


with honors in political science. He earned a bachelor's
degree and master's degree from KSU and began teach-
ing at the undergraduate level in Kansas.
Thompson served as athletic director and coached
basketball, cross-country, track, golf and his great love -
Iteftis. He taughtAn-erican' and Russian history eco:
nomics, government and current events.
Thompson was instrumental in helping establish
tennis and cross country competition at the junior col-
lege level. Highlights of his coaching career are the 1970
Division II tennis championship and assisting as coach
to the North Florida Junior College Sentinel basketball
team that led the nation in scoring.
Thompson retired from NFCC in 1987 and was listed
in the annual NFCC catalog as professor of physical ed-
ucation emeritus.
In a nomination letter for the Florida Community
College Athletic Hall of Fame, NFCC President Morris
G. Steen, Jr. wrote, "Coach Louis Thompson came to
NFJC with a strong background in tennis and a healthy
passion for all sports. As our basketball and track coach
during the 1960-61 season, Coach Thompson single-
handedly recruited players, scheduled games... conduct-
ed practices, provided transportation... paid for away
game meals out of his own pocket, managed, super-
vised, and coached the teams. Coach Thompson did all
of -this without an assistant coach."
Fellow instructor, Joe Akerman, NFCC history in-
structor, described Thompson as "in every way the com-
plete teacher."
Thompson's wife, the
former Virginia Glotzbach
of Marshall, Kansas, also
was employed by NFCC
and retired after 22 years
of service.
The Thompsons had What d(
two sons, Stewart and
'Andy ab
Thompson, an avid ten-
nis player, continued to
give tennis lessons to chil- .. RobertI
dren of the area on the old
NFCC tennis courts. "One thi


U7ILPPIE6
YSA L E






GREENE
Publishing, Ic


.9een TIliind
Sheree Miller
-conmnst .



Valentine'


Day


Love is in the air this week as many are thinking
about their loved ones and preparing for Valentine's
Day. For some, this holiday is just another day. Others
may be celebrating an anniversary. Some may be expect-
ing extravagant gifts like long-stemmed roses or dia-
mond jewelry Some may expect gifts like candy, a spe-
cial dinner out, or simple gifts.
Myself, I don't really expect any extravagant gifts.
My husband's gifts are usually more practical, like
small appliances or something for the house that I would
like to have. Sometimes, he buys me some bedding
plants for my flower beds. As they will continue to strive
and survive for months or years, instead of dying with-
in a week or less.
We have celebrated more than 30 Valentine's Days
together. In the early years, he would buy fancy heart-
shaped boxes of candies, he also let, the children help
him pick them out. I admit they were always pretty, but
I never really cared for chocolate candy too much,, so he
and the boys would eat the chocolate and I would save
the pretty boxes I don't ever recall receiving diamonds
or roses for Valentine's Day. My husband knows how
much I enjoy my gardens, so I was always pleased with
his tradition of buying me bedding plants, hanging
plants or rosebushes. I know I'm loved when he wants
me to be reminded by new flowers blooming every time
I walk out my door, not just on Valentine's day. I have
also been taken out to eat on Valentine's Day over the
years.
Love, in the traditional sense, has always been an
important part of our marriage, and has always been in
our home. Although love and marriage in this day and
age is different, there is love in everyone's heart, it is
meant to be given and shared with others, as many do.
Love comes from the heart, not the mouth.
Part of love is forgiveness, you will always have ups
and downs in any relationship, with spouses, significant
others, parents and children. The arguments and mis-
understandings, and disagreements, are all part of the
Love. They will all make the Love stronger. No one has a
perfect marriage, there is no such thing, but there is a
lot of strong love in this world and that's the best we can
hope for. My husband Kevin and I never claimed to have
a perfect marriage but our hearts have become one and
we are happy still, even after celebrating 30 plus "Hap-
py" Valentine's Days together and we feel we still have
more to come.
My Happy Valentine's Day wishes go out to my hus-
band Kevin, my children, my grandchildren and my ex-
tended family, as well as my readers and co-workers. So
,go out and catch some of that Love and pass it on to
everyone you see this week.
See You Next Week!!
I Hope Everyone Has A
Very Happy Valentine's Day!!


SDoanny Ryaols

T ITA I DE RMY
7285 County Road 795
Live Oak, FL

3 86.3621620
(: "Over 30 Years Experience"





By: Tyrra Meserve
) you think is the best thing
out living in Madison?


Roumillat

ingthat isn't


F' ~


Sarah Pike
with sons
Fisher and
Marshall

"The Christian
community."


Francine
Williams

"My friends, family
and the people.
Everyone is so nice."



Jockory Smith

"Everybody staying
out of trouble"


good, I moved here
because of the lower
taxes and they just
raised them. "


Barbara
Anderson

"The nature and the
people. If you ever need
something, everyone is
right here to help."


Cutler
Richardson

"There's hardly any
traffic. "








www.greenepublishing.com



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Friday, February 8, 2008


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A


Extension Service
Diann Douglas
Guest Columnist n


Focus On The Positive For
National Heart Month
February is National Heart Month, so this month I will
be focusing on food and lifestyle changes to help you and
your family reduce the risk of heart disease. Although we
have made improvements in recent years; the American
Heart Association is proud the number of deaths due to
heart disease has declined in recent years.
Heart disease is still the leading killer of all Ameri-
cans. We have always assumed that heart disease is a
man's disease, yet it claims nearly 500,000 women each
year more than the next seven leading causes of death
combined.
There are several risk factors that increase your
chances of heart disease such family history, smoking,
high cholesterol, diabetes, high blood pressure and excess
weight. A family history of heart disease is a risk factor
you can't do anything about, but there are several risks
you have control over. Healthy food habits can help reduce
three of the major risk factors for heart disease choles-
terol, blood pressure and weight.
The American Heart Association recommends the fol-
lowing to help you achieve and maintain healthy eating
habits.
Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables. Choose 2 or
more cups per day
Include fat-free and low-fat milk products, fish,
legumes (beans) skinless poultry and lean meats.
Choose fats with 2 grams or less saturated fat per
serving, such as liquid and tub margarines, canola oil and
olive oil.
Balance the number of calories you eat with the num-
ber you use each day There is no magic formula it is calo-
rie in and calorie burned. Taking in more calories than
you burn will cause a weight gain. If you want to lose
weight, cut back on your food intake and increase your
physical activity A combination of the two will keep you
from having a hungry feeling all of the time while losing
pounds.
Maintain a level of physical activity that keeps you fit
and matches the number of calories you eat. Walk or do
other activities for at least 30 minutes most days of the
week. Limit your intake of foods high in calories including
foods like soft drinks and candies that are high in sugar.
Consume less salt. Use herbs and other spices to fla-
vor your foods. ,
These guidelines will not only 'improve your heart
health, but reduce your risk for other chronic health prob-
lem.
For more information on eating for healthy and nutri-
tion, contact the Madison County Extension Service.
The University of Florida Extension/IFAS Madison
County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative
Action Employer authorized to provide research, educa-
tional information and other services only to individuals
and institutions that function without regard to race, col-
or, sex, age, handicap or national origin.





NO EMERGENCY


Good golly, Miss Molly!
Oh, boy, gosh and gee whiz!
What a game! The XLII Su-
per Bowl, that is, for all of
you non-aficionados of
football. The number of
those who are seems to be. ..
increasing more year after
year. Daughter Mona '
called us after the game
started and said she wanted to place a small bet on the
Patriots but couldn't find anyone to bet on the Giants
and would we so we took her on. We believe that Tom
Brady was so confused by all those sacks (since he was
usually so well protected) that he was thrown off his
usual complacence. We've never before seen him rattled
but he came close this time. We really would have liked
to see Kyle Brady a great Jaguar for many years win
a Super Bowl ring, though. Kyle is just a really nice guy
as well as still being an asset to the Patriots as he was to
the Jaguars.
We're sure you'll be glad to hear that, after a-rocky
start, Lee's Homecoming festival is off and running
with most all of its many facets now in good hands.
Cheryl and Janice didn't get off the hook, though no-
body wanted to be Chair and Co-Chair but with a real-
ly good supporting cast, their work load will be lighter
this year.
The following areas are in good hands:
PARADE Jason Archambault & Jennifer Kervin
PROGRAM AND ADVERTISING Jacob Bembry
BLUE RIBBON & COUNTRY STORE -
Mary Ann Wicker (971-5119)
COUNTRY STORE -
(15% of proceeds goes to Lee Day)
All Blue Ribbon entries are $1.00 per category
Only entries into the Blue Ribbon contest are eligible to
be put into the Country Store
VENDORS Tammy Webb (971-5293) and Ellen Blesy
CHILDREN'S ENTERTAINMENT Sandy Bacot
(971-5151), Michael Curtis, Greene Publishing, Inc., and
Perry Michael (971-5287.) (Any local candidates interest-
ed in backing any of these events, please call)


I.



Cet lead nnies,
dassifieds,
the community
(alendar
&
so much more!
-I ' I I


FEELS


MINOR WHEN IT'S YOURS.


/




/.


/


We Put You On The Fast Track
From bumps. bruises and bug bites, to flu and fever, you never
know when you'll need medical attention. But whenever you do.
the Fast Track program in the newly expanded Shands Live Oak
Emergency Department makes it easier to get that care. quickly.
Available from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m seven days a week. Fast Track has
its own dedicated patient space and special medical team ready to
treat your minor injuries and illnesses. So you can get the care you
need and get on your way with less worry because no emergency
feels minor when it happens to you or someone you love.


Shands


386.362.0800
1100 SW llth Slreet


Id
.11 1,


FUN RUN Bruce & Lisa
Jordan (971-5870) and
Sylvia Linton
MCMULLEN HOUSE -
helma ThIm oma -'r Pat Mess (971-7249) and Au-
..e.a ,ost^ .drey Land (971-5431)
,, C(Robert McCloskey & his
instruments)
PANCAKE BREAKFAST -
Frances Mercer
PAGEANT AND FRIDAY EVENING DANCE Char-
lene Rye (850) 694-0814
PET SHOW Suwannee Valley Humane Society (971-
9904) Dogs, Cats, and Exotic Pets
SPONSORS AND ENTERTAINMENT Thelma
Thompson (971-0011)
SENIORS BOOTH Mary Hamilton (971-5464) Call
her if you can help
QUILT AUCTION Reese Thomas (971-2720)
TRASH PATROL Phillip Register Need more vol-
unteers for this department clean-up after also
PARKING-LVFD SET-UP COMMITTEE Greg Marr
and Mike Bennett and the Lee United Methodist Youth
House.
An added attraction will be Douglas Doty's remote
control cars and the Lonnie Jolson Band, and also
singer Lee Ellison.
The next Lee Day meeting will be on Monday, Feb.
11, 2008 at 7 p.m. in Lee Town Hall.
Also, remember the blood drive there on Friday, Feb.
22nd from 2 to 7 p.m. Call for your appointment time and
you won't have to wait.
Then on March 1, be sure to browse through LVFD's
big garage sale where you'll find oodles of bargains.
Our sincere condolences go out to the Thurston Don-
aldson family that family has had quite a load to bear
over the last few years. Thurston was a good friend and
delivered groceries for us from the old Blue Front Gro-
cery when he was the proprietor.
We received good news, though, concerning the Kin-
seys-Ernestine reports that she is doing well and that Si-
mon is much better.
And on that good note, we bid you 'au revoir' for a
while.


%cm endt 94Io e'

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"WE ARE ALL LIKE ONE-WINGED ANGELS. IT IS ONLY WHEN
WE HELP EACH OTHER THAT WE CAN FLY."
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4A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


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Lao rnEfotrcemcnt & Rcgional Crimc


Friday, February 8, 2008


Big Rend

rime Stoppers

adison County


Man Arrested For

Battering Woman
A man was arrested
for battering a woman in a
fight that allegedly started
over a spilled drink on
Tuesday afternoon, Febru-
ary 5.
According to a Madi-
son Police Department re-
port, Carrington A.
Boykins, 18, of Tallahas-
see, had a physical alterca-
tion inside a car with an
18-year-old woman over
some spilled drink.
Boykins reportedly
struck Gaymon several
times in the head and
grabbed her in the neck
area.
MPD Inv. Nathan Cur-
tis was the arresting offi-
cer.


Donald Williams
25 Year Old Black Male
On 8/1/87, the victim was
found murdered in the car-
port of 702 Campbell St. in
Madison County. Initial
investigation revealed Wil-
liams collapsed in the carport
of this residence but the ini-
tial struggle with the assail-
ant(s) occurred away from
the house. Evidence sug-
gests a suspect was injured
during the confrontation.
If You Have Any Information
Regarding This Case
Call Big Bend Crime Stoppers
(850) 574-TIPS (8477)
1-888-876-TIPS(8477)
Paidforbythe Oftkeofthe Attorney General
Crime Stoppes Tnt Fund


1/30/08
Joshua Wayne Odom Child abuse, domestic
abuse/aggravated battery
Gregory Cecil Player Grand theft, petit theft, mo-
lestation of a coin-operated machine
Antonio Shavez Johnson Battery (touch or
strike)
1/31/08
Anthony Diego McGhee Criminal registration
2/1/08
Jeffery Jackson Criminal registration (sexual of-
fender)
Audrey Pearl Beasley VOP (county)
Dawnmarie Ann Snedeker Driving while license
suspended, revoked or cancelled
Corey Raynard Jackson VOP (county)
Jothi Tyrell Williams VOP (county)
Julio Cesar Morales-Garcia No valid or expired
drivers license
2/2/08
John Lee Jackson Contempt of court
Eugene Heatly Possession of drug paraphernalia
Cody Dewayne Lee Possession of drug parapher-
nalia, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, no
valid or expired drivers license
Renal Desir Possession of marijuana less than 20
grams
Robert Gerald Laney VOP, possession of con-
trolled substance (methamphetamine), expired dri-
vers license
2/3/08


2 "il


I


Michael Scott Shipley DUI, driving while license
suspended (habitual offender)
Leroy Mayhue Criminal registration
Joseph Lewis Williams Criminal registration
Zorrie Latoya Fashaw Driving while license sus-
pended, revoked or cancelled
Aurelio Miranda DUI, no valid or expired drivers
license
Michael Ray Thigpen Domestic vio-
lence/aggravated assault
2/4/08
Aurelio Miranda Leaving the scene of an acci-
dent, reckless driving
Anthon Sharod Simpo Resisting an officer with
violence, possession of cocaine
Robert Lee Baynard Criminal registration (sexu-
al offender)
Tammy Livingston Driving while license sus-
pended, revoked or cancelled
2/5/08
Helen June Doggett Driving while license sus-
pended, revoked or cancelled
Carrington Alexander Boykins Battery (touch or
strike)
Ashley Latoya Mobley VOP (circuit)
Jovan M. Thompson VOP (county)
2/6/08
Aldolpho Moreno Ramirez Lewd battery on a
child (two counts), interference with custody
Jesse James Neiman Burglary of a structure,
grand theft


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rouno maiso Count?


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5A


Helen "Nancy"

Alleen Brady


Mrs. Helen "Nancy"
Alleen Brady, 86, of
Greenville, passed away
Monday, February 4, 2008,
at her residence following
an extended illness.
A native of Chula, Ga.,
Mrs. Brady has lived in
Greenville most of her
life. She was a member of
the Reapers of the Har-
vest Church where she
was regarded as the
Grandmother of the
church. Mrs. Brady
served as a custodian of
the Greenville Middle
School for many years. In
her spare time, she en-
joyed spending time with
her family and attending
church.
Mrs. Brady was pre-
ceded in death by a daugh-
ter, Margie Register.
She is survived by a
son, Nelson "Nick" Brady
and wife Sherry of Perry;
a daughter, Lyvone Taylor
of Greenville; two sisters,
Ruby and Jimmie; eight
grandchildren; a special
grandson, Andy Hagan;
and several great-grand-
children.
Funeral services were
conducted at 2 p.m.,
Thursday, February 7,
2008, at the Reapers of the
Harvest Church with Pas-
tor Samuel Bass officiat-
ing. Interment followed in
Evergreen Cemetery
The family received
friends one hour prior to
the service.
A special thank you to
Ronnie and Sandy Lee for
caring for her so well. In
lieu of flowers, donations
may be made .to her funer-
al service fund.
All arrangements
were under the care of
Joe P. Burns Funeral
Home in Perry.


Lou Ella

Lynch Rye
Mrs. Lou Ella Lynch
Rye, 83, died Thursday,
January 17, 2008, in Madi-
son.
A memorial service
will be 2 p.m., Monday, Feb-
ruary 11, 2008, at Macedo-
nia Baptist Church in Lee.
Rev. Gene Stokes will be of-
ficiating.
Donations may be
made to Macedonia Baptist
Church Music Fund, c/o
Junior Smith, Treasurer,
704 NE Yellow Pine Ave.,
Madison, FL 32340.
She was born in Apop-
ka where she had lived
most of her life before
moving to Madison County
in 1975. She was a grey-
hound bus agent and also
an office manager for a gas
company. She was a mem-
ber of the Madison County
Historical Society, Madi-
son County Geneological
Society and was also the
church historian at Mace-
donia where she was in-
strumental in restoring
the old church organ.
She is survived by a
step-son, Henry Rye of
Madison; two step-daugh-
ters, Phyllis Young of
Pittsburg, Va., and Linda
Rohn of Winter Park; sev-
eral nieces and nephews
among those Roger Meyer
of Apopka, Sonya "Sun-'
nie" Branch of Lafayette,
La., and Buddy Mc-
Cormick of Sevierville,
Tenn., Barbara Johnson of
Apopka, Charles Ed Lynch
of Colorado, Becky Messer
of New Smyrna Beach,
David Barber of Tampa,
Kathy Kuhlman, Mary
Thomas, William Stricker,
all of Cincinnati, Ohio;
great-nieces and nephews;
great-great-nieces and
nephews; step-children;
step-great-grandchildren;
and step-great-great-
grandchildren.
She was predeceased
by her husband, Harvey
Rye; and step-son, Harvey
Rye, Jr.; also a sister, Leota
Meyer.


February 8
The Mark Trammell
Trio will be in concert at
Yogi Bear's Jellystone
Park on Friday, February
8, starting at 7 p.m. Mark,
Trammell is known for his
days with Gold City, Cathe-
drals, Kingsmen and
Greater Vision. Admission
is free, however a love of-
fering will be received. For
more information, please
call (850) 973-4622 or (850)
464-0114.
February 12
On Tuesday, February
12, the Suwannee River
Water Management Dis-
trict's Governing Board
will meet at 9 a.m. at Dis-
trict Headquarters in Live
Oak. All meetings, work-
shops, and hearings are
open to the public.
February 13
55 Plus Club will meet
at 12 noon at the UMCM
Center in Hanson. Guest
speakers will include the
Madison County Health
Department. Everyone 55
and up is invited.
February 14
Christian Heritage
Academy will be hosting a
Valentine's Day Banquet
on Thursday, February 14,
starting at 6:30 p.m. A sug-
gested donation of $10 is
requested for adults and $5
for children. Please RSVP
by Feb. 8, by calling 948-
2068. Great food, entertain-
ment, door prizes, and
The Pine Tree Quilters
Annual Brunch and Quilt
Show will be held from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Co-op-
erative Methodist Min-
istries Meeting Hall. There
will be a drawing for 2 door
prizes, delicious food, and
crafts and quilts for sale.
Donations go to help their
mission to keep as many
needy babies warm as we
can.For more information,
please call (850) 973-4266 or
(850) 929-4938.
February 17
Madison County His-
torical Society will meet
Sunday, February 17, at
2:30 p.m. at Elmer's Gene-
ology Library.


February 18
The Madison County 4-
H Relay for Life Team will
be sponsoring a booth at
the Annual North Florida
Livestock and Sale held at
the Agricultural Center in
Madison. They will be
there starting at 6 p.m. on
February 18-21. All pro-
ceeds. go to the Madison
County Relay for Life
Event.
February 19
There will be a
medicare presentation giv-
en by Lee Harvey on Tues-
day, February 19, at 3 p.m.
The meeting will be held at
the Senior Citizens Coun-
cil building in Madison.
Come and learn more
about becoming a savvy
grocery shopper. For more
information, please call
(850) 973-4241,
February 22
"Girlfriend to Girl-
friend: Lovin' Ugly Betty"
Women's night out will be
.held February 22, from 6-9
pin. Guest speaker will be
Dr. Sylvia Tomberlin. Spe-
cial guests for the evening
will be. Cooshie Mae Dan-
galanger. Childcare not
available.
February 23
Apalachee Beekeepers
Assn. will sponsor an Intro-
duction to Beekeeping
short course on Feb. 23, at
the Leon County Extension
Office. Learn the basics to
get started in this fascinat-
ing hobby Cost is $20 per in-
dividual or $25 per family
For more information, call
(850) 997-3974, or online at
http:/ /apalac-hee-
bee.googlepages.com.
February 23
Tipelo's Bakery and


I Obitsixetses I


Cafe in Monticello will of-
fer a basic bread baking
class featuring rustic
breads. It is "hands on" so
bring an apron. You will
take-home recipes and tips
plus your fresh baked
bread loaf. $50 non refund-
able class fee. For more in-
formation, call (850) 997-
2127.
February 28
Day Hike with the
Suwannee Chapter of the
Florida Trail Association
on Feb 28, for either 3 miles
or 6 miles on the Ellaville
Section of the Florida Na-
tional Scenic Trail's Black
Tract and Mill Creek sec-
tions. This hike will be in
celebration of Florida Hik-
ing Trails Month. Contact
Andre Marcil at (386) 362-
7308 for details where to
meet.
March 29
ReignSong of Chat-
tanooga, Tenn. will be in
concert at Yogi Bear's Jelly-
stone Park on Saturday,
March 29, at 7 p.m. Admis-
sion is free, however a love
offering will be received
during the concert. For
more information, please
call (850) 973-8269.
Every Tuesday -
Saturday
The Diamonds in the
Ruff Adoption Program at:
the Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society is open every
Tuesday through Saturday
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is
located on 1156 S.E Bisbee
Loop Madison FL, 32340.
For a healthy lifestyle,
adopt an animal and they
will make your life more
fulfilled. For more informa-
tion, or directions, call (866)
236-7812 or (850) 971-9904.


9 INC.


10Caita CrleN


Reality Versus Perception Teenage Drinking


The idea that local
teenagers drink regularly
is a myth. The Florida Cen-
ter for Prevention Research
(FCPR), partnered with the
Panhandle Area Education
Consortium (PAEC), con-
ducted a Teen Norms Sur-
vey over a 12-county area in
North Florida at the begin-
ning of the 2007 spring
term to evaluate the social
norms of local high school
students. The positive re-
sults of the survey will be
promoted during the 2007-
2008 school year to expose
students to their peers' true
attitudes toward teenage al-
cohol use in order to influ-
ence even more healthy be-
haviors.
The Teen Norms Sur-
vey given to students was
structured to determine ac-
tual student behaviors and
also what they perceived to
be 'typical' student behav-


iors. The actual students be-
haviors indicated statistics
such as: The majority of
students has not used alco-
hol in the last 30 days, plans
to date a non-drinker and
thinks it is wrong for people
under the age of 21 to
drink. An overwhelming
majority, in the 80 to 90 per-
cent range, cited that they
consume non-alcoholic
drinks when hanging out
with their friends.
The survey also con-
firmed that what students
considered 'typical' student
behavior was far worse
than the reality Students
were inclined to think that
most of their peers- were
drinking alcohol on a regu-
lar basis and thought it was
alright for people their age
to drink. Not so.
"This school year's so-
cial norms campaign seeks
to correct the mispercep-


tions high schools students
have about what 'everybody
is doing,' so that they are
aware their own good
habits and sound judgment
are the norm," said Rick
Howell, FCPR's project
manager for this high
school social norms project.
The common goal of all par-
ties involved in this cam-
paign is to ensure students
comprehend what their
true behaviors are in order
to effect healthy changes for
our area's youth.
The Florida Center for
Prevention Research devel-
ops and executes numerous
health care and youth pro-
grams throughout the state.
Originally funded by a por-
tion of a tobacco settlement
won by the State of Florida,
FCPR was established in
1998 through Florida State
University to support the
Florida Tobacco Pilot Pro-
gram, aimed at reducing to-
bacco use in Florida's
youth. Today, with the help
of other state government
entities, FCPR has expand-
ed its mission, "To provide
innovative research, educa-
tion, training, and techno-
logical solutions to address
the challenges of substance
abuse prevention and other
social issues among Flori-
da's population.
To learn more about
this campaign and high
school social norms, please
visit www. teen-bench-
mark.com.


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The kind expres-
sions of sympathy on the
death of my husband,
Capt. William H. Green,
have deepened my appre-
ciation of the good folks
who live here. We are a
community where peo-
ple who may have only
seen you out and about
have a respectful regard
and a reservoir of good
wishes for your well-be-
ing. I have welcomed
your caring expressions
of concern, and am truly
grateful for the contribu-
tions in his honor to the
U.S. Naval Academy
Foundation.
Marianne Green,
for the Family



TABLES
19 95 p.set
^f p-S;I


- 1
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_J










6A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.corn


, touo maion County


Friday, February 8, 2008


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1/
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North Florida Paws


By Tyrra B Meserve
Greene Publishing, Inc.
"Please don't litter,
fix your critter" is the
motto at North Florida
Paws, a non-profit corpo-
ration dedicated to help-
ing the community ease
the burden of unwanted
pets.
Helping Madison
County residents join
other counties in the
fight against litters with-
out homes, President of
North Florida Paws,
Katie Rooney, has dedi-
cated herself to the work
of helping out the pets'
health and behavior.
With no income or resi-
dency requirements,
North Florida is a low-
cost spay and neuter
clinic that is a lot more
than meets the paw.


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Located in Hamilton
County, North Florida
Paws first opened their
doors November 27.
Their mission is to
end the overpopulation
of pets while promoting
the humane treatment of
all animals. With ap-
proximately 40 to 60 pets
being treated each week,
Paws has already pre-
vented thousands of un-
wanted animals from be-
ing born only to be
turned lose or anes-
thetized.
"People can't take
care of all these un-
wanted litters," informs
Rooney, "not because
they don't want to, but
because they can't af-
ford to."
Animals that are
born to these families
who can't raise them are
either taken to the
pound where, if they
don't find homes, are
usually put to sleep or
they end up becoming
strays. Then, they be-
come feral and a nui-
sance to the community
"The vast majority


of cats we've seen so
far," Rooney states, "are
stray themselves. They
end up on someone's
doorstepthat takes them
in but can't let them
continue breeding only
to add to the growing
problem."
Keeping their cost
low, Paws allows pet res-
cuers turned owners to
affordably adopt and re-
sponsibly take care of
their foundlings.. Below
the cost of ordinary vet
bills, families that are
just starting out, or just
budget tight, can also
take advantage of Paws
to keep their pets
healthy and happy.
To make an appoint-
ment, or to get more in-
formation, please call
386-938-4092, or check
out their website at
NorthFloridaPaw.org.
Help the animals
that are there not create
more that can't find
care.
Staff writer Tyrra B
Meserve can be reached
at tyrra@greenepublish-
ing.com


Mark Trammell Trio Makes
First-Ever Appearance
In Madison
By Bryant Thigpen
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Mark Trammell Trio, of Gadsden, Alabama,
will be making their first-ever appearance in Madison
on February 8, at Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park, begin-
ning at 7 p.m. Admission is free, however a love offering
will be received.
Mark Trammell is a very familiar name in South-
ern gospel music, having performed with America's top
quartets, such as Gold City, the Kingsmen, and the
Cathedrals and trio, Greater Vision. Having performed
nearly 30 years, Mark is known for his unmistakable
smooth baritone voice.
Over 25 years ago, Mark Trammell, as a member of
the Kingsmen, shared the stage with one of southern
gospel music's best-loved tenor singers, Ernie Phillips.
Today, Ernie's son, Eric Phillips, sings tenor for the
Mark Trammell Trio. Like the others, Eric is very min-
istry-minded. "It's all about the message," he states. "I
want to be an encouragement to people and to share the
Word through song to unbelievers. It's very humbling,
yet, also very rewarding when someone tells you how a
song you've sung has been inspiring to them, or helped
them in some way deal with a problem or difficult situ-
ation." Phillips has been with the trio since its begin-
ning.
The newest member of the Mark Trammell Trio is
Dustin Sweatman. Dustin is twenty-two years old and
hales from Cumming. For the past three years Dustin
sang with the Dixie Melody Boys. He is not only a very
talented lead singer, but is an awesome keyboard artist
as well.
Steve Hurst is a renowned musician, instructor and
mentor to many of today's favorite gospel artists. He
has been involved in ministry for over 30 years. Steve
loved music as a child and furthered his training
throughout his schooling. He graduated from George
Peabody College for Teachers of Vanderbilt. Following
graduation, he began working as a music instructor for
groups and soloists as well as working in music schools
around the country He started the Steve Hurst School of
Music in 1992. Steve now travels with the Mark Tram-
mell Trio singing selected songs on each program.
A rich history of southern gospel music can be
found within the roots of the Mark Trammell Trio. To
learn more about the trio, please visit their website at
www.mnarktrammelministries. com.
For more information, please call (850) 973-4622 or
(850) 464-0114.'


i1i/.
I/






www.greenepublishing.com


~:-4~5
_ .. .. .
____ I.~~ 46


Madison County Recyclin
Rocky Ford Road Madison, FL 32340

850-973-2611 1


Jerome Wyche
Director of Solid Waste and Recycling


The Madison County Solid Waste and Recycling
Department urges citizens to help protect our environment, as well as
enhancing the clean surroundings that our county enjoys. Although we
can't recycle everything, we can all make contributions. When the subject
of recycling becomes a part of your family conversation, here are some sci-
entific data that will make for some interesting discussion.

WHEN WILL TH K i: THINGS DECOMPOSE?
* Banana peel 3-4 Weeks
* Paper bag 1 month
* Cotton rag/wool socks 5 months 1 year
* Wood & wood products 10-15 years
* Leather shoes/leather products 40-50 years
* Tin cans 80-100 years
* Aluminum cans 200-500 years
* Disposable diapers 500-600 years
* Plastic jugs 1 million years
* Glass bottles/containers unknown
* Styrofoam "clam shells" eternity


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7A


Friday, February 8, 2008







8A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.comrn


Friday, February 8, 2008


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Church


Friday, February 8, 2008


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A


Catch the Spirit At Madison First United Methodist Church


By Lilla Howerton
Isn't God magnificent? HE has been
loving, protecting and serving us for all
the years of our lives! This is so exciting


and all we have to do is receive HIM as a
gift, just like a child. We are no longer in
charge, (not that we ever were) God is, oh
how freeing... "The battle is not yours,


Hapnig ms~uu'AtuFirs Bpisit Curch Ou f M adSJ~ FGisfon


By Nell Dobbs
"Love one another" as Jesus taught.
Such beautiful flowers were placed in
church Sunday by Jean and Buddy
McWilliams in honor of the members of
the Senior Adult Choir and in apprecia-
tion for their nursing home ministry
Amen!
Thoughts of special people in our lives
brighten our days and warm our hearts.
We are so blessed to have so many loving,
caring, giving, praying people in our lives
- all Hospice people, all our family mem-
bers who love and help us and friends.
Debbie Bass blessed us, singing "How
Great Thou Art" with the words on the
screen. Will Rutherford, Deacon of the
Week, read Scripture and then gave the of-
fertory prayer. Lex Webb played "His Eye
is On the Sparrow" on the organ and it
brought to mind how Mother loved that
song. It was sung at her funeral by our sis-
ter Nancy's son, Stephen. Chancel Choir
sang, "In Christ Alone."
Mikenzi Plain became a member of
the church Sunday
Preacher's message was "Love One
Another" from John 13:33-35. We are to
reach out others, be gracious, be tena-
cious, be near to help as we can, for people
matter to God. Our lives do touch others.
The reading, "The Touch of the Master's
Hand" impresses us of the changes that
are wrought by the touch of the Master
and since He has no hands but ours, we
are to touch others. We are so blessed to
have our present preacher, while giving
thanks for all those we have had.
Wednesday, SAM group went to Jack-
sonville to visit the Blount Island Seaport
(the Seaman's Ministry), taking clothes
and items of need.


Tonight, the Youth Group will leave
after school for a "Winter Jam" in Jack-
sonville.
Happy birthday and blessings to: Han-
nah Zimmerly, February 1; Bill Raines,
Febraury 3; Cathryn Carver, February 4;
Datwan Siplin, February 7; A.J. Hudson
(101), February 8; Lauren Ragans, Febru-
ary 8; Evie Lamb, February 9; Paul Ra-
gans, February 9; Chase Fico, February
10; Betty Jean McLeod, February 10; J.C.
Price, February 11; Pearl Raines, Febru-
ary 11; and Rhett Rutherford, February
11.
Remember the baby shower Sunday at
2:30 p.m. for Lesley (Putnal) and Sis Bon-
trager a boy!
On Sunday, February 10, there's to be
a special Sunday School teachers (and
substitute teachers) meeting from 8:30-
9:30 a.m.
'"Love one another." Love is shown by
the Youth group as they sponsor the
Valentine Friendship Banquet at 6 p.m.
"Love one another." There are so
many ill among us ;and we pray for God's
will in their lives, in our lives...
Sue Raines, still in Madison Hospital;
Barbara Whittle, still in Shands, improv-
ing; our brother, Lew, in Cantonment,
having a pacemaker, put in today (as we
talked one day about friends a special
one to talk to in answer to my question,
he said he talks to God and I said how
great that is!) and all others.
Bless all sad ones as Death has come
among them the Louie Thompson fami-
ly what a wonderful life he lived.
Dear Lord, may our heart always be
filled with the music of worship...the
melody of praise...the message of love!
Amen!


but God's." II Chronicles 20:15 He is the
Christ, the Son of our LIVING Lord.
Let's listen to Him, worship Him and
praise His name. "For the Lord your God
is with you wherever you go." Joshua 1:9
It is hard to believe that Lent has al-
ready begun. Lent began Wed. Feb. 6 and
Lent means "spring." It is a season of 40
weekdays which prepare us for the cele-
bration of Easter Sunday Sundays are
always "Little Easters," and the spirit of
Lent should be our joyous expectation of
the Resurrection.
Tonight you have the privilege of fel-
lowship with our church family at our
Adult Valentine Social at Divine Events
from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m.
We invite all the men to our work day
at the church on Sat. Feb. 9 from 9 a.m.
until noon. Bring your yard tools and
come help.
Each Sunday is special because you
can worship with us at 8:30 am, 11 am or
by radio at 12:30 a.m. In addition to be-
ing spiritually fed by our Shepherd, Pas-
tor Bob Laidlaw, the music is wonderful
as it prepares us to worship our Lord and
Savior. We offer singing in the choir, gui-
tar lessons, playing the handbells and be-
ing a part of the Alpha Singers.
Youth Pastor, Brian Sanderson,
Chris Day, Caitlin Griffin and five others
from the Madison Community will travel
to Haiti from March 7th 15th to build a
roof on a church. Please be in prayer for
them. We invite you to the fundraiser
dinner on Sunday, Feb. 10 at noon in the
Fellowship Hall. All donations for the
meal will go towards this mission trip.
The 55 Plus Club invites you to their
monthly luncheon and program on Wed.
Feb. 13 at noon at the United Methodist
Cooperative Ministries Center. This in-
teresting program will be presented by
David Abercrombie, the Madison Coun-
ty Memorial Hospital Administrator
and Dr. Daniel Perkins.. Exciting things
are happening, so go hear about them.
Please pray for Tommy Hardee,
Steve Odiorne, Jenny Andrews, Jerry


Borgert and Bob Odiorne. They leave on
a mission trip to Brazil on Feb.14 for two
weeks.
SOn Saturday, Feb .16, the Pinetree
Quilters invite you to their annual
brunch at the United Methodist Cooper-
ative Ministries Center from 9 am until 1
pm. Your donations go to help them in
their mission to keep babies warm.
The United Methodist Men provide a
vital ministry for our church. We invite
you to attend their breakfast and meet-
ing Sun., Feb. 17, at 8 a.m. in the Fellow-
ship hall. They have a delicious break-
fast, excellent speaker and good fellow-
ship.
We invite all the teenages and their
parents to our Sanctuary on Wed. Feb. 27
at 6:30 pm to hear Chris Deltano, Christ-
ian Comedian, to talk on 'Abstinence"
and peer pressure. Come fill our church
and defy conformity.
How about experiencing a "Weekend
to Remember?" Many of our married
couples are planning on attending this
marriage conference on April 4 6 in Du-
luth, Ga. This conference renews and
restores marriages by clearly communi-
cating God's plan and purpose for your
marriage. Pick up your registration
form before March 17 and experience
God's truth.
The Madison County Ministerial As-
sociation will be reading the Bible pub-
licly at the gazebo the week before the
annual Four Freedoms Festival in
April. The Bible reading will begin
Mon. April 21 at 6:30 p.m. and continue
until 6:30 a.m. Fri. April 25. Be a part of
sharing His Word by praying and sign-
ing up for a time period to read our
Bible. "Thy Word is a lamp upon my feet
and a light unto my path." Psalm 119:105
God is doing many magnificent
things at Madison First United
Methodist Church. This month we have
five Bible Studies meeting weekly to
learn more about following God's will
for our lives and we invite you to come
and "Catch the Spirit."


Blessed [is] the man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sin
delight [is] in the law of the Lord; and in his law doth he meditate day and night. And he shall
bringeth forth his fruit in his season; his leaf also shall not wither; and whatsoever ht


Madison C nr h of God
771 NE Coin ly.Nadiso6, FL
850-971-5165 :' ovle-Glu,. Pastor
Sunday School ,;.....;.10:00 a-.m.
Morning Worship '11:00 aaIn.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study 7-00 p.m.


Barbara Memorial Church
Of The Nazarene
Highway 254 850-973-4160
Re\": obertAgner '
Sunday School........... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .................11M:00 amn.
Evening Worship :30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study 7:30 p.m.

Reapers Of T' e Harvest Church
3 miles wesA;-_renvie. -.FL, ,Hwy. 90
3r -Pastor
Sunday School....-' :i 10:00 anm.
Morning Worship'.....',..... ........11:00 am.
Evening orsp .-.. ,, ...........6:00 pn.
Wednesday Night SeVe. ...;............,.7:30 p.m.
nJ hlien the. cdy if Peeo tiwsfully co1e,.
ihe\ ere allt with ne, accord in oin place." t, 2.:1
...... I.....'. ... .:
EVERYONE i ALWAYS WELCOME!

St. Vinceo$ DePauil Roman

Cathic Chcurch
Meeting & SuYnterSt 850-973-2428
Rev. JoJl J Gordon, OMI
Sunday. ............................. 9:00 a.m.
Mon.. Tues., Wed. Mass 7:30 am.
Thursday Mass 7:30 a.m.
Saturday Mass .5:30 p.m.

St. Mary's Episcopal Church
140 NE Horry A% MNadJion. FL- 850-973-8338
Tihe Rei Be.n Ptcil -icar Joe Bov'lei Senior Warden
Sunday Church School ,.....;.10:00 ajn.
Eucharist Mass 10:00 a.m.
Mission Board 2nd Sunday 11:00 a.mn.
Episcopal Church Women 3rd Sundnu.......11:00 a.m.
isitor.'a (lit '. i\'itch

Hanson United Methodist Church


290 NE D.ii", Sireci Han,.:nr. FL
(7.5 miles from Maitdioonn H.', 145. turn right on D.as)'
Rei itw MAlbert,, ii. Pa,t,.n
Sunday School 10:00 a.n.
Morning Worship 11:15 a.m.
Sunday Evening Bible Sludy .6:00 p.m.
Choir Practice Sunda% Evening q:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Praner Service...............7:00 p.m.
All Are Welcome. Please Come!



Greenville Baptist Church


1365 SW -lain 'i Grecri. Ile. FL 851).9-'4S2353
Sunday School -All Ages 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship, 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Pre-school. Students. and
Adults Choir Rehearsals q:30 p.m.
Wednesday Pre-schuol children,
Youth & Adult Bible Studies 7:00 p.m.
-All InviicJd-


Lee United Methodist Church
Hwy 255 S l.ec. FL* 850 971-5585
Richard Quackenbush. Pastor
Morning Worship 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 aJn.
Sunday Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Men's Fellowship Breakfast
Second Sunday .8:00 a.m.
Muh"ple Wrekl% Bible Studies/Activtics
C .'r'i..ting Trhe Communit ti 1th Christ"


First United Methodist Church
Sin-i I 'mi lIlHoi .tu Rutledge Si 850-973-6295
Re i Robert Fr ..Ladl
[3,.m .i d lit *.* t,'lathJ Po ti...- Iln C i,i, -In l __..,I l
Service of Word & Tlablc 8:30 an.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday All Youth Igrades 6-8).......5:00-6:00 p.m.
Youth (grades 9-12) 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Men's Fellowship Breakfast (3rd Sun.)........8:00 amn.
Women's Meeting & Lmch i(1st Mon.).....12:00 noon
S- dt.aj1 l7nm n |1 ,A'-", (n 11 It I t 1 13 1t I
] ,ti i *, n i 1, i/ h *rlitl i ,,/f ,,.1 lli


ners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful. But his I
be like a tree planted by the rivers of water, that
e doeth shall prosper. -Psalms 1:1-3















Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church
221 Martin Luther King Drive Madison. FL
P.O. Box 242 Madison, FL
850-973-3127
Email: shilohonadison@yahoo corn
Marcus Hawkins, Sr. Pastor* Josie Graham Assistant Pastor
Sunday School........9:30 a.m.
Worship Service......11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Night Bible Study .....6:00 p.m.
"We Walk By faith. Not By Sight."
I! Corinthians 5:7

Grace Presbyterian Church
A Congregation of the Presbyienan Church in Ameri.n
Rev. John Hopwood
688 North Washington Ave Madison, FL 973-2692
Sunday School For All Ageo 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Fellowship Supper/Bible Study........6:00 p.m.
Youth Groups 1st 12th Grades.............6:30 pan.
(faorfactice........... 7:30 p.m.
Friday'Men-s Priyer Breakfast.................7:00 a.m.
'o.iw ship 4nd.Serve 1With Us'



Mt. Zion A,M.E. Church
"A Friendly Church"
Cherry Lake, FL 850-929-4355
Rev. Nathaniel Robinson, Jr., Patoi
Church School 9:45 ajm.
Worship Service 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study 7:00 p.m.



Fellowship Baptist Church
One mile north of Madison on 145
Steve McHargue. Pastor
OnGay Gazday, MusiDc Directr .Jackil Witii. .Sd/it ,it Piji'-.'
Youth & Children's Miniait.ies, Aciive Young Adulti Mitn-i,,
Office: 850-973-3266
TMorning Worship.................J..8:00 aan., 9:30 n.m. & 11:00 an.m.
Sunday School .9:30 an.m.
Wednesday: Family Night.............Call for schedule
"A Family of Families "Contrinpoair ,'. ,, ',h""
If inrereresd in a home group, call S50 -.'^'
nialM ir m, Rap". -uink.Wml. lh'ilr il"PrlA n %.* -oI I ll.r P-I.... ......
'Where Lovet Has No l.niir%"


po


TS lb 1-1i",











1 OA The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www. greenepublishing. corn



Ri[ Estate


Friday, February 8, 2008


Tips To Boost Property Value


By Tyrra B Meserve, curb appeal by bringing
Greene Publishing, Inc. flowers. Bright pansies an
With the real estate market softening, property own- time of year. Inside, mak
ers look for ways to give their homes a little extra boost paint and touch-ups. Any
to increase the value when it comes time to sell. There that make the different."
are a number of inexpensive ways that homeowners can First on the list are o0
up the value of their home without putting in a lot of prospective buyer quicker
extra money From tidying up, to a couple coats of paint, When living in a house, r
these are some tips to help the house on the market the odors and no longer n
stand out in a crowd. on the other hand, smells
There are a number of ways to increase property that can change how they
value which require larger investments that go the dis- pet odors or food and spice
tance. The average homeowner, however, need not spend creases a property's value.
a great deal of money to get their home to sell quicker A fresh coat of paint a:
and at a better price. A few touch-ups can increase prop- glimmer in a perspective
erty value with the homeowner spending less time as lived in, the paint begins
well as money According to Lynette Sirmon of All Re- and dull. To bring that tw
alty, anything that can be done cosmetically will help. weekend touching up there
'"Anything you can do to improve the instant deci- looking new, fresh and ma
sion-making process, making it more positive," Sirmon Replace any fixtures 1
informs "is going to improve the value. Increase the run down looking. Shiny, 1


Ten Things New


Homeowners Need To Know


color with potted, blooming
.d petunias are great for this
e it brighter and clean with
one can do the little things

dors. Nothing drives away a
r than the smell of wet dog.
residents grow accustomed to
otice them. A hopeful buyer,
right away and it is that odor
see the house. Whether it is
s, eliminating those odors in-

lso goes a long way to leave a
buyer's eye. As the house is
to fade leaving it looking old
inkle back, try spending the
paint. It will leave the house
rketable.
that have become worn and
new fixtures give the impres-


sion of looking cleaner and brightens up an otherwise
dingy or dark bathroom and kitchen. Here is a great ex-
ample of how a small example can reap big rewards.
Adequate closet space is a must on the list for most
buyers. If the home lacks closet space the owner can ei-
ther, add more or, simply put in a few additional
shelves. Adding space increases the value of the home
in the sight of the buyer.
Good lighting brightens a home and makes it look
more inviting on the market. Touch up a dark house
with sheer curtains and some strategically placed
lamps to give the home a touch of something special.
While brightening, also remember to remove dust kit-
ties and tuck away those family mementoes. Future
buyers should see themselves living there, not the old
homeowner.
In so many ways, it is the little things that count. By
adding a few simple touches, a home can sell quicker
and for more money than if it were to go on the market
"cold." In today's housing market, it is the little things
that can make a world of difference.


It's easy for new home-
owners to get caught up ex-
perimenting with wall col-
ors, new kitchen appli-
ances or exciting rec room
features.
But what happens
when a structural or elec-
trical problem arises in
your new house and a fresh
coat of paint just won't do?
Whether it's new construc-
tion or a century-old inher-
ited family home, no prop-
erty is exempt from interi-
or and exterior repairs or
dreaded tax assessments.
"New homeowners and
first-time buyers alike can
soon be faced with a virtu-
al money pit of unexpected
home repair and mainte-
nance bills," says-real es-
tate expert ..ida,Davis, au-
thor of the new bodk ";'The
First-Time Homeowner's
Survival Guide: A Crash
Course in Dealing with Re-
pairs, Renovations, Proper-
ty Tax Issues, and other Po-
tential Disasters."
"The more new home-
owners know about poten-
tial problems to look for
and what solutions to em-
ploy, the better prepared
they are 'to save buckets of
sweat, tears and money,"
stresses Davis.
Here are ten things
every new homeowner
should know:
If you didn't get a pro-
fessional inspection when
you bought the home, get


one ASAP to uncover prob-
lems lurking in unexpected
places. You can then plan
and budget appropriately.
Take an aggressive
and proactive approach to
problems that can let water
seep into the home. Small
leaks in the roof, siding
and foundation can quick-
ly escalate and max out
your credit card if not cor-
rected.
If your inspector
comes back with a list of
problems, first fix those
that can escalate and cause
more damage. Unfortu-
nately, many homeowners
tackle fun cosmetic items
first and let important
items like a bad roof slide.
Avoid cheap materi-
.s,. Quality primer and
paint, for instance, not
only goes on easier but
looks better and lasts
longer. This also applies to
flooring, tile, fixtures and
appliances. Quality is
much cheaper in the long
run.
Map out your electri-
cal system. This is espe-
cially important on older
homes. You need to know
what fixtures and appli-
ances are on which cir-
cuits. Overloaded circuits
are a leading cause of
home fires. Never' use a
higher rated fuse than the
circuit calls for in older
systems. Know where your
main disconnect switch is
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located.
Walk around your
home in a heavy rainstorm
and note where the water
flows. Look for clogged
rain gutters, downspouts
and extensions that don't
route water away from the
foundation. This is a big
cause of flooded base-
ments, window wells or
crawlspaces.
Pay careful attention
to how your landscaping
routes water. It should flow
away from the foundation.
Make needed changes to
keep water away from the
home.
If you have an older
sewer system, have a
plumber visually check
lines with a small camera
.for. reaks,,. invasive .roots
or other problems. This is
especially important if you
have a full basement where
water backing up can
cause expensive damage.
For septic systems have a
professional inspection
and contract with a reli-
able contractor to have the
tank pumped as often as
needed.
Check hot and cold
water pipes for corrosion,
temporary repairs or other
potential problems that
can cause expensive dam-
age., Every few months
check the water heater,
washer hoses and connec-
tions, turn-offs for toilets
and sinks. Know where
your main water turn off
is located and keep it easy
to access.
In climates that have
freezing winters, make
sure cracks in concrete or
asphalt are repaired
promptly. Freezing water
will infiltrate cracks in
walks, driveways and
porches and cause exten-
sive damage.


No matter if you're looking to spruce up an older piece of worn wooden fur-
niture or impart your own unique style to an unfinished piece, you can bring
out the beauty of wood with accent stains.
"Staining adds color and character to woodby bringing out its natural beau-
ty, and you don't even need to be' an accomplished do-it-yourselfer to do a great
job," says Rich Morrell, brand manager for Cabot Stains.
"Used properly, stains accentuate wood, enhance the grain pattern, change
its appearance or even make it look like another type of wood to emphasize the
finer points in furniture, cabinets, moldings or other wood around your home,"
Morrell points out.
Accent staining in particular is a good technique to use when you want to
draw attention to the unique details of furniture or to highlight the variety of
wood species used on a particular project.
To help you get started on your wood staining project, Morrell and the ex-
perts at Cabot Stains are offering these helpful tips:
When applying an accent stain, try using a soft, lint-free cloth for maxi-
mum control in spreading the stain color onto the wood. Begin by dipping the
cloth into the stain and then apply the stain to the wood using a circular mo-
tion.
Finish by wiping the area with a clean cloth to get rid of excess and be
sure to wipe in the direction of the wood grain. After you wipe, if the piece of
furniture doesn't look dark enough to your liking, apply more stain, but be sure
to wipe again when done.
Choosing g a color, can be a daunting task but can be equallyrewarding.
From the rich warmth of wood tones, to the nature-inspired blue and green
stains, and even the popular and vibrant reds, the color possibilities are end-
less.
By combining traditional stain choices with exciting, new accent colors,
you can transform your woodworking project into a one-of-a-kind treasure.
"For a truly unique accent look, try blending colors together to create your
own special finish. Experiment with various colors and mixes, and be sure to
test the color on a sample piece of wood before you begin.
"When staining your own furniture you should make sure to choose a high
quality stain that will penetrate the wood evenly and ensure professional qual-
ity results. We developed Cabot Interior Wood Stains by blending the finest
grade oils, resins and pigments to always offer a consistent appearance and su-
perior depth of color that's easy toapply and control," said Morrell.
For more advice on how to stain, as well as how to prepare and choose a col-
or for your furniture, visit www.cabotstain.com.


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Friday, February 8, 2008


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www. rteenepublishing. corn


12A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Friday, February 8, 2008


Sports


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NOTICE OF LAND USE CHANGE

The Board of County Commissioners of Madison County, Florida, proposes to change the use of land
within the area shown on the map below, by amending the text of the Madison County Comprehensive
Plan, hereinafter referred to as the Comprehensive Plan, as follows:
CPA 07-8, an application by the Board of County Commissioners to amend the text of the
Comprehensive Plan by adding a Public School Facilities Element to the Comprehensive Plan,
by amending the Intergovernmental Coordination Element of the Comprehensive Plan to add a
policy concerning coordination with the School Board and by amending the Capital Improvement
Element of the Comprehensive Plan to add public school facilities level of service standards and
to amend the Five-Year Schedule of Capital Improvements.
MADISON COUNTY













The first of two public hearings concerning the amendment will be conducted by the Board of County
Commissioners on February 20, 2008 at 5:30 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the
Courthouse Annex, Board Room, located at 229 Southwest Pinckney Street, Madison, Florida.
The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any interested party shall be advised
that the date, time and place of any continuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the
public hearing and that no further notice concerning the matter will be published.
The public hearing is being conducted by the Board of County Commissioners to consider transmittal of
the amendment to the Florida Department of Community Affairs and to consider on first reading the
ordinance adopting said amendment, which title reads, as follows:
AN ORDINANCE OF MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE MADISON
COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; RELATING TO AN AMENDMENT TO THE TEXT
OF THE MADISON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, AS AMENDED, UNDER THE
AMENDMENT PROCEDURES ESTABLISHED IN SECTIONS 163.3161 THROUGH
163.3215, FLORIDA STATUTES, AS AMENDED; PURSUANT TO AN APPLICATION,
CPA 07-8, BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS; PROVIDING FOR ADDING
A PUBLIC SCHOOL FACILITIES ELEMENT TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN,
AMENDING THE INTERGOVERNMENTAL COORDINATION ELEMENT OF THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TO ADD A POLICY CONCERNING COORDINATION WITH
THE SCHOOL BOARD AND AMENDING THE CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT ELEMENT OF
THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TO ADD PUBLIC SCHOOL FACILITIES LEVEL OF
SERVICE STANDARDS AND TO AMEND THE FIVE-YEAR SCHEDULE OF CAPITAL
IMPROVEMENTS; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY; REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES IN
CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE
At the aforementioned public hearing, all interested persons may appear and be heard with respect to the
amendment, and the ordinance adopting said amendment on the date, time and place as referenced above.
Copies of the amendment and the ordinance adopting said amendment are available for public inspection
at the Courthouse Annex, Office of the County Coordinator, located at 229 Southwest Pinckney Street,
Madison, Florida, during regular business hours.
All persons are advised that, if they decide to appeal any decision made at the public hearing, they will
need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based.


NOTICE OF ZONING CHANGE.

The Board of County Commissioners of Madison County, Florida proposes to amend the text of the
Madison County Land Development Code, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Land Development
Code, within the area shown on the map below, as follows:
LDC 07-9, an application by the Board of County Commissioners to amend the text of the Land
Development Code by changing the name of the land use district of Rural Development (RD) to Rural
Development-1 (RD-1) and adding warehousing and distribution facilities as a permitted use within the
Rural Development-1 land use district and adding a new Rural Development-2 (RD-2) land use district
and providing for warehousing and distribution facilities, and manufacturing facilities as permitted uses.

MADISON COUNTY










SGreenville I' fo l w 5






C A

The first of two public hearings on the amendment and to consider on first reading an ordinance
adopting said amendment will be held on February 20, 2008 at 5:30 p.m., or as soon thereafter as-the
matter can be heard, in the Board Meeting Room, Courthouse Annex, 229 Southwest Pinckney Street,
Madison, Florida. The title of said ordinance reads, as follows:
AN ORDINANCE OF MADISON COUNTY, Fl lKlUI)A. .\NIENDINMi THE MADISON
COUNTY LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE, AS AMENDED; PURSUANT TO AN
APPLICATION, LDC 07-9, BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS;
PROVIDING FOR CHANGING THE NAME OF THE LAND USE DISTRICT OF RURAL
DEVELOPMENT (RD) TO RURAL DEVELOPMENT-I (RD-I), AND ADDING
WAREHOUSING AND DISTRIBUTION FACILITIES AS A PERMITTED USE WITHIN
THE RURAL DEVELOPMENT-1 LAND USE DISTRICT AND ADDING ANEW RURAL
DEVELOPMENT-2 (RD-2) LAND USE DISTRICT AND PROVIDING FOR WAREHOUSING
AND DISTRIBUTION FACILITIES, AND MANUFACTURING FACILITIES AS.
PERMITTED USES; REPEALING ALL ORD)IN .NCES IN CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING
AN EFFECTIVE DATE
The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any interested party shall be advised
that the date, time and place of any continuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the
public hearing and that no further notice concerning the matter will be published.
At the aforementioned public hearing, all interested persons may appear and be heard with respect to the
amendment and the ordinance adopting said amendment on the date, time and place as referenced above.
Copies of the amendment and the ordinance adopting said amendment are available for public inspection
at the Courthouse Annex, Office of the County Coordinator, located at 229 Southwest Pinckney Street,
Madison, Florida, during regular business hours.
All persons are advised that, if they decide to appeal any decision made at the public hearing, they will
need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is
to be based.


awbe"


I ddkmm








www. reeneDublishinr,.com


Friday, February 8, 2008


Sports


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A


Corinth


Big Win
Corinth Christian
Academy Warriors men's
and ladies' basketball
teams opened their district
basketball schedule with
victories over Tabernacle
Christian School at Lee
Gym on Friday, January 18.
The ladies started the
evening with a convincing
33-3 victory over the Taber-
nacle girls team. Using a
tenacious trapping defense
and aggressive inside play,
the Warriors forced the
Crusader offense to shoot
from the perimeter. Despite
a spirited effort from the
Crusader girls, they were
not able to keep pace with
the Warriors.
The Lady Warriors were
led by Tiffany Phillips with
17 points and 8 rebounds.
Andrea Abbott had 8


Opens Season With

s Over Tabernacle


Photo submitted
Andrea Abbott's jump
shot goes towards the' bas-
ket.


points, 2 steals and 2 re-
bounds. Kayla Rye had 2
points and led the team
with 4 steals.
The men's team used a
20-2 run to open the game.
However, the Tabernacle
men fought back to close
within 12 at the half. At the
start of the second half, the
Warriors pulled away.
Guards Mike Rye and
Aaron Goyette combined
for 11 steals to finish off
the Crusader men, 65-29.
The Warriors were led by
6'3" sophomore Aaron
Goyette with 36 points and
14 boards. Freshman Mike
Rye had 14 points to go
with his 6 steals and 5 re-
bounds. John Barrs, Jr.
scored 4 points and 5 as-
sists in his first start at
point guard.


By Tom Parks,
Corinth Christian Academy
Playing a local rival on a rainy Thursday evening, January 24, the Corinth Christian
Academy Warrior men's and ladies' basketball teams defeated the Latma Academy
from Madison at Lee Gym.
The ladies played first and once again jumped out to an early lead, using a 9-0 run
to dominate the~first quarter. However, the Latma ladies fought back in the second
quarter, closing the gap to 15-9. An offensive effort by the Warrior girls closed out the
first half with Corinth on top 19-9.
Latma opened the second half with a long 2 pointer, and forward Kayla Rye was in-
jured in a collision with another player shortly afterwards. An inspired Warrior team
rose to the challenge, dominating the inside game, forcing Latma into shots from the
perimeter.
Led by freshman Tiffany Phillips with 12 points and 13 rebounds, Corinth cruised in
the second half to a 43-17 victory. Sophomore Alayna Abbott contributed 10 points,
and Sharon Bontrager had 6 assists to go with 4 points.
After the girls game, the men took the floor for one of the most exciting games of
the year. Latma scored early and often, leading by as many as 7 points in the first half.
However, early foul trouble forced several of Latma's players to play conservatively,
and the Warriors stepped up their game, allowing Corinth to regain the lead for good
with just a few minutes to go in the game. Junior Jeff Taylor's key rebound of a
missed Latma three-point attempt sealed the game, with Corinth winning 66-61.
Sophomore guard Aaron Goyette had a career night, pouring in 50 points on 15 of
19 shooting and 20 of 34 free throws. Goyette also pulled down 19 rebounds. Freshman
Mike Rye had 9 points and 5 steals, while senior Aaron Beck had 5 points.


Corinth Christian Academy Men,

Women Declaw Grace Lions


By Tom Parks,
Corinth Christian Academy
On a night where the ball seemed big-
ger than the basket, Corinth Christian
Academy men's and women's basketball
teams proved once again that defense wins
games. Both the men's and women's bas-
ketball teams defeated the Grace Christian
Academy Lions at Lee Gym on Friday
night.
The women's team played first, and de-
spite not shooting well, led 12-1 at the end of
the first quarter. Kayla Rye blocked a shot
early in the second quarter, which ignited a
17-2 run for the Warriors. The first half
ended 30-5, and the Grace Lions never
threatened in the second half, due to the
tenacious defense that the Warriors have
shown all season.
The Warriors were led once again by
Tiffany Phillips, who recorded her third
straight double-double, scoring 18 points.
while hauling in 14 rebounds. Andrea Ab-
bott scored 12 points and dished out 4 as-
sists to go with 4 steals. Sharon Bontrager
and Kayla Rye had 6 points each, while se-
nior Marti Bray grabbed 12 rebounds to go
with 4 points.
The men's game was a dogfight from

Madison C


the start, with neither team able to main-
tain a lead. A tough Grace Lion zone de-
fense made it difficult for the Warriors to
use their inside game, and the Warriors
couldn't get a shot to drop. Despite shooting
only 31 percent from the field in the first
half. CCA led 25-19 at the break.
That lead evaporated in the second half
as both teams traded basket after basket.
With four seconds left in regulation, Aaron
Goyette sank a free throw to tie the game.
Goyette then saved the game for CCA when
he blocked a lay-up at the buzzer to send the
game to overtime.
The overtime period was just as hard
fought but the Warriors never quit. The
buzzer sounded with CCA in possession of
the ball, the lead, and the game, 53-51.
CCA was led by Aaron Goyette with 25
points, 14 rebounds and 8 assists, while se-
nior Aaron Beck scored 12 points to go with
4 steals. Mike Rye, Jeff Taylor and Jared
Nichols each had 4 points, while Taylor and
Nichols pulled down 9 and 11 boards re-
spectively
CCA improved their records to 3-0. The
Warriors now hit the road'for their next
three games, starting February 7 at the Col-
isetun in Live Oak at 6 p.m. See you there!

)unty High


School Cowboys Wrap Up

Basketball Season


By Eddie Richie, MCHS
Varsity Basketball Coach
Overall Record 8-16
District Record 2-4
We had a tough year as
a team and personally as a
coach. We devoted a lot of
time and energy in the off-
season. We hoped for a bet-
ter outcome for our season
record, but we are ready for
the post season. Every day,
whether it's practice, off-
season conditioning, or a
team meeting, we always
would end it with a prayer
and then say "Champi-
onship."


Our goal all year has
been to win district cham-
pionship and make the
playoffs. That goal is still
very attainable.
We play Florida High in
the first round of the play-
offs Friday, February 8, at 6
p.m. at the Hamilton Coun-
ty Gym. If we win, we play
the winner of Hamilton
County and Taylor County
Saturday at 7 p.m. for the
district Championship,
also at Hamilton County
Gym, I have full confidence
in our.team that we will put
our best effort and play


with heart and emotion. If
we do that, we can't lose.
Stat leaders
Points -Xavier Till-
man 290; DeAngelo Tucker-
262; Mar'Terrius McDaniel-
221
Assists- DeAngelo
Tucker- 93; Mar'Terrius
McDaniel 52; Xavier Till-
man & Areleius West- 50
Rebounds- Xavier Till-
man- 224; DeAngelo Tuck-
er- 107; Solomon Griffin-
103
Blocks- Xavier Tillman-
86
Steals- DeAfgelo Tuck-
er- 85; Xavier Tillman- 44;
Arelius West- 41
3 pointers- Brad Bru-
ton- 37; DeAngelo Tucker-
35


229-263-55037


/,219-H East Screven St. *Quitman


Hair Cuts
Color
Highlights
Perms
Facial Waxing
Updos


Tiffany Phillips, Aaron Goyette Stellar

In Corinth Victories Over Old Plank
Old Plank Christian School's.bus broke down while travelling to Lee gym to take on
the Corinth Christian Academy in basketball on Friday night. Then came the games.
By the end of the evening, the ladies' and men's teams from Corinth had improved
their district record to 2-0 after impressive victories over the Defenders from Jack-
sonville.
The lady Warriors played first and quickly demonstrated that they were on top of
their game. A 21-2 run early in the contest allowed coach Boatwright to substitute
freely, and all players saw lots of playing time. The lady Warriors have played excel-
lent defense all year, and continued to do so in this game, keeping Old Plank from dri-
ving to the basket. Although they played their best through out the game, the lady De-
fenders were defeated 63-17.
The Corinth Lady Warriors were led by Andrea Abbott, who scored 18 points on 9-
15 shooting, and also contributed 4 steals and 2 assists. Sophomore Alayna Abbott
scored 13 points, while Tiffany Phillips, Sharon Bontrager, and Miranda Mulkey each
scored 10 points. Both Miranda Mulkey and Tiffany Phillips reached double figures in
rebounds, with Mulkey grabbing 11 and Phillips getting 10.
Phillips also led the team with 7 assists.
The mens team played next, with Corinth breaking out on top with a 12-0 run. Sub-
stituting frequently, the Warriors maintained their advantage at the half, with the
half time score of 41-18. The Defenders never quit, and chipped into Corinth's big
lead. However, time ran out on the Defender effort, and Old Plank was defeated 59-44
on a cool Friday night in Lee Gym.
Sophomore Aaron Goyette continued his stellar play, scoring 28 points, including 8
for 8 from the charity stripe. He also distributed 6 assists, while snaring 11 rebounds.
Sophomore Jared Nichols pumped in 16 points, shooting 4 of 5 from the line, and
grabbed a team high 13 rebounds. Sophomore Zac Rye grabbed 10 boards, and fresh-
man Mike Rye picked the Defenders for 6 steals and four points playing in place of in-
jured point guard John Barrs Jr. Jeff Taylor and Austin Leslein also contributed 4
points to the total team effort.


Yx L 9 L3 IV X kx .I ., 1L, .I t, N. N. X^J,.C.,L- A. l P
SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS!
We Inake tihe contacts
with Social Security for you.


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380) N-Id Ici ,4)iiSt. N4()flticell~o, Fd-
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'Ill 1 l ) Bg40f ,ni I Iit a v er sIIi cki ll, t frill 't d (Iciri)VA tflank t o t4u 11 i.0 1,'toslm
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Corinth Christian Men,

Ladies Beat Latma Lambs


4D UP












14A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www. greenepublishing.corn



Svouno flMaison Countp


Friday, February 8, 2008


The


Battle


of


Olustee


Early in the morning of February 20, 1864, General
Seymour's army left Barbers' Station and moved west-
ward towards Lake City Because of the necessity of post-
ing garrisons at Jacksonville and elsewhere, the Union
force consisted of between 5,000 and 5,500 men. The small
army was divided into three brigades of infantry. one
brigade of motuted troops. and supporting artillery
The Federals advanced in three columns along the
Lake City and Jacksonville Road, which ran roughly par-
allel to the Florida Atlantic and Gulf-Central Railroad.
The Federal cavalry was in the vanguard, followed by the
slower-moving infantry. By mid-day the Federals had
reached Sanderson, where they briefly stopped for lunch.
While it Sanderson. Seymotur and his staff were warned
by a defiant southern woman: '"You will come back faster
than you go."' The Union officers were amused at her
boldness.
In the early afternoon of February 20, a few miles
west of Sanderson. the advance elements of the Union
cavalry began skirmishing with a few southern horse-
men that appeared to their front. This skirmishing was
maintained for several miles, with the Federals driving
the Confederates westward towards the railroad station
at Olustee. about ten miles east of Lake City Southern re-
sistance intensified as the Federals neared Olustee.
In the days since the February 11 skirmish at Lake
City, General Finegan had moved his force to Olustee Sta-
tion. located about ten miles east of Lake City There the
Confederates found one of the few defensible locations in
the area where the railroad passed through a narrow cor-
ridor for dry ground that was bordered by impassable
swamps and bays to the south and a large body of water
known as Ocean Pond to the north. The Southerners
built strong earthworks and awaited the Federal ad-
vance. When Finegan learned of the enemy's approach
on February 20, he ordered his cavalry forward to skir-
mish with the Federals and to drive them towards his
main line. Unfortunately for Finegan. the fighting east of
his main line intensified, forcing him to send out addi-
tional troops to help those already deployed. A major en-
gagement soon developed about two miles in front of the
Confederate line.
As the skirmishing intensified, both Finegan and
Seymour fed additional troops into the battle. Finegan
advanced first the 64th Georgia and part of the 32nd
Georgia, followed by the 6th. 19th and 28th Georgia Regi-
ments, and Gamble's Florida Artillery. General Colquitt
commanded the detached units, while Finegan remained
behind with the main body General Seymour brought
forward the 7th Connecticut, followed by the remainder
of Hawley's Brigade, the 7th New Hampshire and the 8th
United States. By midafternoon the skirmishing has es-
calated into a major battle.
The battle threatened to turn rapidly into a rout for
the Federals. While Colonel Hawley was positioning the
7th New Hampshire, a wrong command was given and
the unit fell into confusion. The 7th soon collapsed, with
some men running to the rear and others milling about
in a disorganized mob.
The collapse of the 7th New Hampshire directed
southern attention towards the 8th United States Colored
Troops. which occupied the left of the Union line. The 8th
was an untried unit. having been organized only several
months before. Prior to Olustee the regiment had seen no


combat, and in fart the men were not even completely
trained. Colonel Charles Fribley tried to steady his men,
but he soon fell mortally wounded. The raw troops of the
8th held their ground for a time, suffering more than 300
casualties. Finally, however, they retreated in some con-
fusion. leaving the Confederates in virtual command of
the battlefield.
With the dissolution of Hawley's Brigade, General
Colquitt ordered the Confederate forces to advance. Since
the beginning of the engagement Finegan had sent addi-
tional units (the 6th Florida Battalion; the 1st. 23rd. 27th,
and the remainder of the 32nd Georgia Regiments: and
the Chatham Artillery) to Colquitt's support, so by now
the Confederate lines stretched for about one mile. north
to south. Colonel Harrison commanded the Confederate
left, and Colquitt the right, although the units of their
brigades were somewhat intermingled.
To stop the southern advance, General Seymour
hastily ordered forward Colonel William Barton's
Brigade of the 47th, 48th and 115th New York. The New
Yorkers stopped the Confederate advance, and the battle
lines stabilized for a time The Union commander would
later be criticized for reacting slowly to an increasingly
dangerous situation, and fordeploying his forces piece-
meal into the battle. In fairness to Seymou,; the battle-
field's terrain somewhat limited his options. The Feder-
als lines were bordered by swamps on both flanks so
there was little room to maneuver, and the field itself was
an open pine barren with little cover.
The fighting during this middle period of the battle
was particularly severe, with each side suffering heavy
casualties. During this seesaw combat, the Confederates
captured several Union artillery pieces and threatened to
overwhelmhn the Federal infantry Although the Yankees
were under intense pressure, at a critical moment the
surging Confederates began running low on amnununi-
tion. Men searched the pockets and cartridge boxes of
their wounded and dead comrades to obtain additional
rounds, but still the southern fire slackened. Several reg-
iments held their place in line despite being completely
out of ammunition. After what seemed to be an inter-
minable delay, ammunition was brought forward from
Olustee, along with the remaining reserves: the 1st Flori-
da Battalion and Bonaud's Battalion. General Finegan
also reached the battlefield at about this time.
With the arrival of these reinforcements, the Confed-
erates again began advancing. By late afternoon, Gener-
al Seymour had realized the battle was lost. To prevent a
rout and to cover his retreat, he sent forward his last re-
serves, Colonel James Montgomery's Brigade, which con-
sisted of the 35th United States Colored Troops and the
famous 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.-Mont-
gomery's Brigade stopped the Confederates for a brief
time, enabling Seymour to begin withdrawing his other
forces. One white veteran of the battle states: The col-
ored troops went in grandly, and they fought like devils"
By dusk, the Union forces had begun their long re-
treat back to Jacksonville. The 54th Massachusetts, the
Federal cavalry, and part of the 7th Connecticut covered
the withdrawal. Many wounded and a large amount of
equipment had to be abandoned in the hasty retreat. For-
tunately for the Federals, the Confederate pursuit was
poorly conducted, enabling most of the Yankees to es-
cape.


The southern cavalry led by Colonel Caraway Smith, was
particularly criticized for its lackluster performance.
That night the Federals retreated all the way back to Bar-
bers,. where they had begun the day. By February 22, Sey-
mour's battered army was back in Jacksonville.
The casualties at Olustee were staggering compared
to the niunbers that fought there. Each side had about
5,000 men present. Union casualties were 203 killed, 1,152
wounded, and 506 missing, a total of 1.861. Confederate
losses were 93 killed, 847 wounded, and 6 missing, a total
of 946. This works out to about 400o for the Federals and
20".. for the Confederates. The 47th New York had 313 ca-
sualties and the 8th U.S.C.T. 310. Among the Confederate
units. the 32nd Georgia lost 164 men and Bonaud's Bat-
talion 107. For the North, the casualty percentage was
among the highest of the war, aid Olustee ranks as the
third bloodiest for the Union when comparing the casu-
alties to the number on men engaged. Letters and diaries
from the men involved indicate that the battle was the
equal of. if not worse than, the savage fighting a number
of the veteran regiments had experienced in the cam-
paigns in Virginia or the Western theater.
A regrettable episode in the aftermath of the battle
was the apparent mistreatment of Union black soldiers
by the Confederates. Contemporary sources, many
from the Confederate side, indicate that a number of
black soldiers were killed on the battlefield by roaming
bands of southern troops following the close of the
fighting.
The Olustee defeat ended Union efforts to organize
a loyal Florida government in time for the 1864 elec-
tion. The Federals were somewhat more successful in
meeting the expedition's military objectives. Jack-
sonville remained in Union hands until the end of the
war, open for trade with the north; the operation had
undoubtedly disrupted the supply of Florida cattle and
other foodstuffs to the rest of the Confederacy; and the
increased area of Federal control made it easier for
Florida blacks to reach Union lines and for recruits to
fill the ranks of northern military units. Of course, all
of these objectives could have been met simply by the
occupation of Jacksonville and without the nearly 2,000
casualties suffered at Olustee.
Military operations continued in Northeast Florida
throughout the remainder of the war. Union troops fre-
quently raided out from Jacksonville to harass Confed-
erate supply operations. Captain J.J. Dickison of the
2nd Florida Cavalry earned fame during the period as
the "Swamp Fox" of Florida. In a series of minor yet
spectacular victories, and with only a small force under
his command, Dickison was able to thwart many of the
Union drives'into the-interior of the state., although the
Federal handed him a stinging defeat at the first "bat-
tle" of Gainesville. Despite Dickison's successes, by ear-
ly 1865 it was obvious that the defeat of the Confedera-
cy was near. In early March, 1865, the last military op-
eration of any significance in Florida took place. At the
Battle of Natural Bridge, a scratch force of Confederate
militia and home guard units, along with a few regular
troops, stopped a Union raid against St. Marks, on the
coast south o0 Tallahassee. When Tallahassee was final-
ly occupied by Northern troops in early.May, it was the
last Confederate capital-east of the Mississippi to fall into
Union hands. The Civil War was over. Thank God.


F F Fa cti lt a


Neighborhood Grill & Bar

East Hwvv. 90 Lake City, FL
(386) 752-7087


VERONICA & JOHNNY
ARE HERE HELP!

Th flT *F "r4A L'I
^ I | B, 5 -.",- ii


Hours: ixfu*, Ail
11am 12pm Monday Thursday PORITABLE-BUIL5.-( ....0
11am lam Friday Saturday
1lam lpm Sunday Sales@northiloddatrallerscom




T)-41- ",l kn ~ii~innnr ca+i ln fpir ,.,~n


01ustee Festival Pageant February 2, 2008


Awards/Sponsors Reception February 12, 2008

5K Run February 9, 2008 starting at 7:30 a.m

"Civil War and Living History TBA

Civil War talk will be presented at the Allied Health
Complex Auditorium at LCCC -
February 13, 2008 noon til 1 p.m.

American Music Festival FREE to the public Audito-
rium at School Board administration on US-90 Thurs-
day, February 14, 7 p.m. till 9 p.m.

Festival Events...
Friday, February 15, 9:00 a.m. Civil War Memorial Ser-
vice, (Oaklawn Cemetery W. Franklin Street)

9:00 am 6 p.m. Arts/Crafts/Collectibles Booths Open,
Entertainment, Authentic Village Displays

6 p.m. 9 p.m. Historical Museum--"Angels of Mercy"
drama, Civil War-era hospital
Noon Official Festival Opening Ceremony
Noon Official Festival Opening Ceremony


b p.m. Battle between mthe Monitor and the v irgiia
(Merrimac) along with a Re-enactment Skirmish at
Lake DeSoto
* *
Saturday, February 16
8:30 a.m. Blue-Grey One Mile Fun Run (Awards after
the Fun Run held at stage area)

9 a.m. 6 p.m. Arts/Crafts/Collectibles, Food Booths,
Entertainment Begins, Authentic Village Displays,
Children Area

10 a.m.. 4 p.m. Historical Museum--Open house. Ex-
hibits, docents in period attire

10:30 a.m. Annual Olustee Civil War Parade (From S.
Marion St. to U.S. 90 W.)
* *
Noon Visiting Dignitaries and Special Parade Guests
to appear on Stage

7:45 p.m. Blue/Grey Square Dance

Battlefield Events...
Friday, February 15, 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Class Tours for
School Children NOTE: Admission Free to Park

Re-enactors and Sutlers arriving throughout the day


and se ung up uAeir ca mp
Saturday, February 16
8 a.m. Presentation of Colors

9 a.m. 6:15 p.m. (Open to Public) Reenactment.
Camp & Sutlers Row Admission at gate,- $4 Adult, $2
Students, Pre-School 5yrs. and under FREE
* *
1 p.m. Medical Demonstration

2:30 p.m. Period Music Concert

3:30 p.m. Battle
* *
Sunday, February 17
8:30 a.m. Presentation of Colors
* '
9 a.m. 3 p.m. Reenactment Camp & Sutlers Row-Park
open to Public

Admission at gate $4 Adult, $2 Students, Pre-School -
5yrs; and under FREE
* *
1:30 p.m. 32nd Annual Olustee Battle Reenactment
*144th Anniversary of the original battle. (NOTE:

Please No Pets Allowed At Battle site)


Nomm= '


H '








www. greenepublishing. com



Outboot ,


Friday, February 8, 2008


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 15A


TeWe The Enterprise-Recorde


Fish & Game Feeding Chart
S tHow to use: The major and mmor feeding times for each day are hsted below. The major feeding times are the best for the
S b i1 sportsman and last about 2 hours, the minor feeding tunes can also have good success, but last only about I hour.
Saudy Fe "" ....0Good luck and be careful out there.


SundayFebur02am:0p
Mondy, Fbrury 1 3:0 a~. 900 am. :20 ~m.9:30p'm


"A Cut Above"
Jerry Gray
Office 850-973-3863
Mobile 850-673-1718 60
Fax 850-973-3924 Con
Larry Hammock Exp,
Office 850-973-3863 I
Mobile 850-673-1376 Ti
Pax 850-973-3924 Ind


JAKES' Annual Event A Huge Success


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, January 2, 20uu08
Wally Davis, NWTF Director, welcomes Jacob Curtis
(right) as the newest member of JAKES, the kid's division
of the NWTF.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, January 2, 2008
Garit Poire (right), is seen here with Jacob Curtis,
gave a clay pigeon shooting exhibition at the annual
JAKES event in Madison.


iiW n IN


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Between the shooting, raffle, exhibitions, prizes, re-
freshments and just plain fun, hanging out with neigh-
bors, the annual JAKES event was a huge success for an-
other year.
Sponsored by the National Wild Turkey Federation,
the event was held at the home of Vonnie and Wally
Davis, who is the local and state NWTF Director.
"The JAKES event gives kids seventeen and under
an opportunity to enjoy and learn about hunting and the
outdoors, as well as taking care of our forests, protected
lands, and the environment in general," Davis ex-
plained. "Between the archery, BB-gun, rifle and shot-
gun shooting, we tried to make sure it was a fun day for
everyone," he added.
There were approximately 100 kids in attendance at
the Madison event and over 200 in all. Lines moved
quickly, and under the careful supervision of volun-
teers, each child was treated to virtually unlimited
turns shooting the various weapons.
Later in the afternoon, the excitement really got
thick when a raffle was held for a kid's shotgun/rifle
combination. No purchase was necessary and all kids in
attendance received JAKES' gear. The big prize winner,
though, was Tyler Andrews, and of course, Tyler's par-
ents will have to comply with all the registration re-
quirements.
The NWTF started the JAKES program as a way to
give kids the chance to explore their outdoor world
through hundreds of fun events like the one just held in
Madison. And, if the Madison event is any indication, it
will be no surprise to see the NWTF remain the largest
organization of its kind worldwide for years to come.
Staff writer Michael Curtis can be reached at
michael(3,reenepublishing. com.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, January 2, 2008
NWTF Director and local coordinator, Wally Davis (left), was pleased to award the raffle prize, a rifle/shotgun com-
bination, to Tyler Andrews (next to Davis), while dad and mom, Chris and Heather, as well as little brother Trent, en-
joyed the annual JAKES event.


Greetings to all farmers, growers, and anyone who
likes to get their earthly hands dirty. Winter is fading
into the wings as Spring's brighter light takes the
stage. Soon it will be time to clean out those planting
sheds, dawn those gardening gloves and get to seed-
ing. Madison County is warming up nicely as Sol gen-
tly prepares the soil for toiling.
From cutting pea poles to testing buds, February
has plenty to keeps those hands from becoming idle.
The weather is taking a turn for the better with
only a few scattered showers due to arrive. Along with
sunnier horizons, temperatures should also be level-
ing out, leaving the days more comfortable and the
evenings less chilly. Now is an excellent time to clean
out those winter fire places, taking advantage of left
over wood ashes that can be spread around lilacs and


roses to help their growth and blooming come Spring.
The hungry Full Snow Moon will reach its peak
February 20. Use its first two quarters to perform any
tasks that require strength, growth and fertility. Start
repotTing and grooming houseplants to grow by the
light of the increasing moon. Graft fruit trees and test
seeds to sow from last year's stash before ordering
more. It is also a good time to cut poles for beans, peas
and other climbers.. With the rain abating, the bark
can be peeled off and the poles can be set out to dry
until they are later needed.
Peaches and other sensitive fruit trees can be test-
ed for freeze damage. Bring in a few twigs that have
been cut from the trees and place them in a vase of
water where they can get some sun. If the sprigs
bloom within a couple of weeks, blossoms can be ex-
pected in the spring and there will be a crop for the
coming fall.
Watch those houseplants, as they are sensitive to
overfeeding during this time of year. Instead they
need lots of sunlight and fresh air. Bathing plants fre-
quently that took the winter hard should help them
out of their gloom.
Lastly, do not forget to start shopping early for
seeds, that way the best choice of seed varieties will
still be available. If the household gardener has a taste
for colorful salads, seeds for ruby Swiss chard, purple
pod beans and red iceberg lettuce make good choices.
Enjoy the beginning trappings of Spring. Hang
tight and plant by the full moon's light.
Staff writer Tyrra B Meserve can be reached at
tyrra@greenepublishing.com


War"Ven


Country

Style

'Meat

Market


MeeiM


Msdison, M
rhiekpn iizua


- RS 'm m I


%- vmiuen clvng T t B-
Chicken Breasts WE NOW
Leg Quarters HAVE
10 b. Bag of Leg Quarters IVE
Hand Cut Ribeyes LI
Pork Chops CRABS!
Homemade Rind Bacon
Ribs
Ox Tails ail
Fresh Ground Chuck ullet* Shrin
Cube Steak Speckled Trout
Bottom Round Roast Catflsh and other
Stew Meat fresh fish


Mea Markt FihMa
Hours HoursI
Fr. -7We. Tur41'6


St FREE 850-973-0387 con

ESTIMATES 850-948-3126 home


2
#o~


Years
ibined
erience
The
mber
lustry










16A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.cornm


Friday, February 8, 2008


Stop foreclosure!
Keep your home, keep your
credit good, call for free
consultation
850-673-9102.

FOR ALL YOUR PAINTING
NEEDS
INSIDE AND OUT
CALL BRIAN AT
850-973-4850


Public Service
Announcement

LOW-COST
SPAY-NEUTER CLINIC
NOW OPEN

North Florida PAWS' Clinic of-
fers low-cost spay and neuter
surgery for dogs and cats.
Charges range from $30 to $75.
Avoid unwanted litters, increase
your pet's health, and improve
his/her behavior.

To make an appointment or get
more information, please call
386-938-4092 or e-mail us at
"NorthFloriaPAWS @
windstream.net."
Visit our website "NorthFlori-
daPAWS.org" too.

GET A LOAN FAST
Wye can help you get a loan
quickly, easily,
Call 850-673-9102
Anytime
I build sheds, decks,
exterior carpentry work,
window and
door replacement.
Call Bob: 850-242-9342






AUCTION
FEBRUARY 9 AT 6;30PM
1693 SW MOSELEY HALL
RD.(CR360) MADISON FL
850 973 2959 CALL FOR
DIRECTIONS
LIQUIDATING A
TRUCKLOAD FROM A
LARGE BETTER QUALITY
DISCOUNT RETAILER
DO NOT MISS IT
AU691-Col.Ron Cox
AB2490







FOUND
Small dog found on Colin
Kelley Highway Saturday night
(2/2/8) running in the middle of
the road. Please call and
describe to claim.
850-973-5411 or
386-364-8140.


Lost Puppy
Chocolate Lab Puppy lost on
HWY 145 (Colin Kelley hwy)
by M & M Motors.
REWARD!
Please call 850-672-0196






MOVING SALE!!!
A little bit of everything -
furniture, shelving, appliances,
dishes, etc.
4847 NE Rocky Ford Road
Saturday, February 9
8:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m..
MOVING SALE
2290 Little Cat Rd off
Hwy. 53 North, in
Madison. Follow signs. Furniture
appliances exercise equip. misc.
EVERYTHING MUST GO! SAT
9TH & SUN 10TH 8AM 2PM.
850-459-4872




Check us out

on the Web
www.greenepublishing.com


FREE Rat Terrier 3yrs old,
15 lbs, Black & Tan, really
sweet, not good with other dogs
Free to good home only.
948-5482 or 973-0344.







MOTORVATIONS FL
Automotive Swap Meet Car Corral
and Show at Motorvations FL
806 Industrial Park Drive
Perry, FL 32348
8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Saturday, February 9, 2008
Vendor Registration only
$10.00
ADMISSION FREE TO THE
PUBLIC
Call 850-838-1168 or visit our
website at
www.motorvationsfl.com







25 lbs. of
Clean Newspapers
just $2 a bundle
973-4141






Need 10-20 chickens.
Maybe a rooster or two
also guineas and peafowls.
850-464-1165
Wanted Farm land for long term
(5+years) lease to grow perennial
native warm season grasses for
seed and hay. Excellent food and
cover for doves, quail and deer.
Contact Joe Reams, III
850-948-1709
850-879-6481
sandyford@embarqmail.com
WANTED:
BOARDER GRASS
WILL REMOVE FOR THE
PLANT
973-2848







enville Pointe

artments
1, 2_& 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible apts. Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers accepted.
Call 850-948-3036. TDD/TTY
711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal
Housing Opportunity
Home For Rent
3 bedrooms 1 bath
388 Church Ave. Greenville
Now accepting Section 8.
Contact: Mrs. Mary Washington
850-948-2540
2 bedroom/1 bath mobile home in
park, $135/week, electric included
depending on unit, $350 deposit
and first week rent in advance, no
exceptions.
Call owner at 850-570-0459
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Senior's
and Disabled. lBR ($409.)
2BR ($435.) Subsidy available
at times. HUD vouchers accepted
Call 850-973-3786
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Road, Madison
Equal Housing Opportunity

Q~uthern aZllas of
Cadison C'fpartmnents

Rental assistance may be available.
HUD vouchers accepted. 1, 2, & 3
BR HC & non-HC accessible apts,
Call 850-973-8582, TDD/TTY
711. 315 SW Lawson Circle, Madi-
son, FL 32340. Equal Housing Op-
portunity
'GARDENIA SQUARE
1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments.
Subsidy available at times.
Call 850-973-4934
TTY Acs- 711
339 SW Parramore Ave. Madison
Equal Housing Opportunity


Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage-23
acres, Corner lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Drive and High-
way 53 South. Natural gas line,
8 inch water main, access to city
utilities, fire hydrant, and ser-
vice from two power companies.
Property has easy access to 1-10,
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will build to
suit tenant.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141

$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385





FOR RENT: BRICK HOUSE
2/2, PRIVATE FARM AREA,
$750 PER MONTH ABOUT 6
MILES FROM TOWN,
ALL REALTY
SERVICES,
850-973-9990
OFFICE SPACE, SHARED BUT
SEPARATE, $350 PER MONTH
INCLUDES WATER AND
POWER ON PINCKNEY,
ALL REALTY SERVICES
850-973-9990



A 850-933-6363
A ll i 82iMVfIt vke"

Lynette Sirmon Realtor
Main Office: 850-973-9990
Fax: 850-973-9990
Mobile: 850-933-6363
Pasture Land consisting of
10.33 ac on Dusty Miller
Road $98,135

Beautiful Mobile Home /
9.98 ac on Nixon Way
$250,000

Successful Living Brick
3/2.5 Home on 2.8 ac
$289,000

Wooded Cleared 6.86 ac
mim farm with barns
$83.500

Weekend Get Away To The
Woods, 2.06 ac in Lee.
$38,000

Deal! 2/2 home \itlh two
lots right on the Withla-
coochee River. $285,000

Prime Commercial Property
downtown Greenville. Set
up as a restaurant / .26 ac.
Sell, Lease, or Rent!

Fixer upper on 53 North, 3."2
home with 16.53 ac for only
$185,000

Ready to move in. 3/2 Home
on County Camp Road.
$99,900

Mobile Home with Cabin 2
ac. fenced. Lee. $149,900

Rocky Ford Road 3/1.5, lac,
Brick $119,000

Shady Grove Saloon or Feed
Stores 2 ac $89.900

5 ac Northwood $60,000
wooded corner lot

Near the River. 5 ac. prit ate
pine forest $43,000

Ready for Mobile home,
paved road, city lot $9,000

Two Story Downtown Brick
bldg business plus residen-
tial potential 2 500 Sq. Ft.
$199,,On

Commercial intense at 1-10
1.43 ac
$214,500


Lot For Sale
.60 Acre zoned for Commercial
or Multi Family, Thomasville,
GA $35,000.
Must Sell 229-588-6128


Pinetta 11.8 Acres+
3/2 2000 sqft Home. workshop,
pond, greenhouse, By Owner,
$275k. Call for Appt: 850-929-
2074. Details at: www.3ws.us
3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995
Factory Direct
Prestige Home Center
352-752-7751

LOG HOMES
With as little as
$500 Down
Prestige Home Center
Lake City, Florida
1-800-355-9385

For Sale By Owner

5 acres, Pinetta, Oak Hill Rd,
near Valdosta/Lake Park, restric-
tions $42,995. $5000 down
$325/mo

5 acres Lee, North of Hwy 6,
Cayenne Rd. rolling hills,
restrictions, $39,995, $5000
down $325/mo

4.7 acres Lee, county graded
road, $39.995, restrictions,
$5000 down, 325/mo.

Madison, North of Hwy 6,
Cactus Rd., restrictions
7.5ac $54,995
8.6ac well/septic $64,995
14.8ac $99,995

Larger tracts available

Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116






DWMH FOR SALE
326 SE Vera Ave., Madison, FL
1,152 sq. ft. 3 bedrooms/2baths /.50
Acre Lot. Price $30,000 or make
offer. Call (850) 402-,8015
Realtors Welcome
$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385
3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995
Factory Direct
Prestige Home Center
352-752-7751









FT Coordinator Community Life
Programs & Services Advent
Christian Village
658-JOBS (5627)
www.ACVillage.net
Must be creative, organized,
energetic, a self starter, and enjoy
working with geriatric populations
to plan, implement, and coordinate
therapeutic activities programs for
long-term care residents, incorpo-
rating nursing and social services.
Bachelor degree in healthcare,
social service, or relevant field de-
sired. Knowledge of LLTC
regulations / documentation
requirements required. HSD or
equivalent required. Prior relevant
experience desired.

Competitive wages and benefits
(health/dental/life/disability ins.,
403b, AFLAC, access to onsite
claycare & fitness facilities). EOE;
Drug Free Workplace, Criminal
background checks required.

Apply in person at ACV Personnel
Department Mon thru Fri, 9:00
a.m. until 4:00 p.m., Carter Village
Hall, 10680 Dowling Park Drive,
Dowling Park, FL fax resume to
(386) 658-5160; or visit
www.ACVillage.net


Physical Therapy

Heartland Rehabilitation
Live Oak
Build their strength and your
career. We are seeking:

PHYSICAL THERAPISTS
Full-tinme
Great bonus potential, profit shar-
ing, excellent benefits, growth op-
portunities, sign-on possibilities,
and more! Join us to see how our
focus on your success makes our
outpatient division such an
incredible place to grow.

SJoin our team today! Please
contact us today or forward your
restime to: Lori Dudley, Therapy
Recruiter, Ph: 1-866-427-2004,
ext. 116; Fax: 1-877-479-2652;
Email:
lori.dudley@hcr-manorcare.com.
Apply online at:
www.hcr-manorcare.com.
EEO/Drug-Free Employer

People. Strength.
Commitment.

Maintenance Tech
Seeking a motivated individual for
a 76 unit complex HVAC cert.
Carpentry, Electric, Plumbing,
Painting and Grounds Upkeep.
Competitive Salary. Background &
Drug Screen Required. Apply in
person 150 SW Bumgardner Dr.
Madison, FL or Fax Resume
850-973-4597 E.O.E.

$ AVON $
Start Today. Earn 50%
on your very first order.
Start-Up Kit Only $10.
Call ISR Dorothy Christ
850-973-3153


The District Board of Trustees
invites applications from innov-
ative and visionary leaders for.
the President of North Florida
Community College.
The College is in its 50th year of
serving six rural counties in
North Florida. See our Web
Site at www.nfcc.edu for details
and qualifications. EOE


Dunn's
Lawn Mower Repair
Welding
New & Used Parts
850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340
FOR SALE
MOTOR HOME
APPLIANCES


GREENE


165SPnuIishrng, i so,"

34 1,4, 1


PERRY FLEA MARKET

,, Antiques Glassware Collectibles Gifts & More
Yard Sale Visit the Thol Shop FRI SUN 10 A.M. 4 P.M. We Buy
Set-Ups $ & up Hwy. 19 S. (Old Motel)(850) 8 -1422 (850) 584-7124Call Us


HINT #11
Packing material
for moving


.. -': I .

,...d 2 .,


Once you have finished reading
the newspaper, don't throw it
away. Find another use for it.
Newspaper makes great filler for
packing household goods when
moving. As soon as everything is
unpacked, take the used newspa-
per to a recycling center near you.

Zead,
Zeuse

1ZecycLe
GREENEI


PMIAlshingnc,

Name
Address
City ST
ZIp
Phone
Mall To: $28
P.O. Drawer 772 InCounty
$35
Madison, FL 32341-0772 out or county
;' .









www.greenepublishing.com


Friday, Febuary 8, 2008


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 17A


N(I I OIC uI'LILIC MNEl IING:
The District Board of Trustees of North Florida Community College will hold its reg-
ular monthly meeting Tuesday, February 19, 2(K)8 at 5:30 p.m. In the NPCC Student
Center Lakeside Room, NFCC, 325 NW Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL. A copy of the
agenda may be obtained by writing: NFCC, Office of the President, 325 NW 'Turner
Davis Dr., Madison, FL 32340. For disability-related accommodations, contact the
NPCC Office of College Advancement, 850-973- 1653. NFCC is an equal access/equal
opportunity employer.



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

IN RE: ESTATE OF PROBATE DIVISION
JULIAN OSWALD HODGES FILE NUMBER 2007-CP-112
Deceased.

NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of JULIAN OSWALD HODGES, deceased, File Num-
her 2007-CP-112, is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is Madison County Courthouse, Madison, Florida
32340. The name and address of the personal representative is set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections that
challenge the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative,
venue or jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their objections with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date
of the first publication of this.notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE g
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is the 6 day of Februay., 2008.
CATHERINE HODGES THOMAS E. STONE
Personal Representative Attorney for Personal Representative
P.O. Box 292
Madison, Florida 32341
Telephone: 850-973-6560
Attorney at Law-Fla. Bar No. 212490

02/06/08, 02/08/08


BID NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of County Commissioners of Madison County,
I Florida will be accepting sealed bids for the following: One (1) New Air Curtain In-
cinerator and known as Bid Number 2008 01
Sealed bids may be submitted to the Board of County Commissioners by depositing
same at the Board office located in the Madison County Courthouse Annex, Room
219, 112 East Pinckney Street, Madison, Florida 32340, or Post Office Box 539, Madi-
son, Florida 32341, anytime prior to 5:00 PM on Tuesday. February 12. 2008. ANY ,-
BID RECEIVED AFTER SUCH DATE AND TIME WILL NOT BE OPENED OR
CONSIDERED. Sealed bids must be clearly marked as a sealed bid and the bid
number must be printed on the outside of the front of the envelope: One (1) New Air
Curtain Incinerator. Bid Number 2008 01. BID MUST CONTAIN A COPY OF
THE VENDOR'S MADISON COUNTY OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE WHERE AP-
PLICABLE, OR CERTIFIED STATE CONTRACTOR NUMBER TO BE. CONSID-
ERED FOR AWARD.
Bid Specifications, as well as other pertinent documents, may be obtained from Ihe
Madison County Public Works/Road Department office located at 2060 NE Rocky
Ford Road (C-591). 2 miles north of Madison, telephone # 850-973-2156. beginning
January 25, 2008. Copies of Specifications are available for inspection at the County
Commission Office during regular office hours.
Madison County reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all
bids.
Bids will be opened at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday. February 13.2008, after which all
bids will be available for public inspection. Award by the Board of County Commis-
sioners is scheduled for Wednesday, February 20, 2008 during their regularly sched-
uled meeting on that date.
January 30, February 1, 6 and 8. 2008


BID NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of County Commissioners of Madison County,
Florida will be accepting sealed bids for the following: Two (2) New Current Model
Tandem Drive Motor Graders, Heavy Duty Category: Caterpillar No. 12H or John
Deere 670D or Equivalent. and known as Bid Number 2008 02.
Sealed bids may be submitted to the Board of County Commissioners by depositing
same at the Board office located in the Madison County Courthouse Annex, Room 219,
112 East Pinckney Street, Madison, Florida 32340, or Post Office Box 539, Madison,
Florida 32341, anytime prior to 5:00 PM on Tuesday, February 19. 2008. ANY BID
RECEIVED AFTER SUCH DATE AND TIME WILL NOT BE OPENED OR CON-
SIDERED. Sealed bids must be clearly marked as a sealed bid and the bid number
must be printed on the outside of the front of the envelope: Two (2)New Tandem Drive
Motor Graders. Bid Number 2008 02. BID MUST CONTAIN A COPY OF THE
VENDOR'S MADISON COUNTY OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE WHERE APPLICA-
BLE, OR CERTIFIED STATE CONTRACTOR NUMBER TO BE CONSIDERED
FOR AWARD.
Bid Specifications, as well as other pertinent documents, may be obtained from the
Madison County Public Works/Road Department office located at 2060 NE Rocky
Ford Road (C-591). 2 miles north of Madison, telephone # 850-973-2156, beginning
February 6. 2008. Copies of Specifications are available for inspection at the County
Commission Office during regular office hours.
Madison County reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all bids.
Bids will be opened at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, February 20,2008 after which all bids
will be available for public inspection. Bid Award by the Board of County Commis-
sioners will be during their regularly scheduled meeting to be held on Wednesday,
March 5, 2008. All vendors will be notified in writing of the successful bidder.
S February 6, 8. 13 and 15. 2008




SNotice is hereby given that the Board of County Commissioners of Madison County,
'. Florida mill be accepting sealed bids for the following: One (1) New Current Model
Tand-m Drive Motor Grader, Heavy Duty Category: Caterpillar No. 12H or Iohn


Dear AND or Equivalent fo .


. Sealed hid- may be submitted to the Board of County Commissioners by depositing
ame. at lti Board office located in the Madison County Courthouse Annex, Room 219,
I 12 Eas Pinckney Street, Madison, Florida 32340, or Post Office Box 539, Madison,
Florida 32341, anytime prior to 5:00 PM on Tuesday, February 19, 2008. ANY BID
SRE ( F I ED AFTER SUCH DATE AND TIME WILL NOT BE OPENED OR CON-
SIDE RED. Sealed bids must be clearly marked as a sealed bid and the bid number
mu bhe printed on'the outside of the front of the envelope: One (1)New Tandem Drive
Motor Grader for Lease/Purchase. Bid Number 2008 03. BID MUST CONTAIN A
tOPI OF THE VENDOR'S MADISON COUNTY OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
%% H F R F PPLICABLE, OR CERTIFIED STATE CONTRACTOR NUMBER TO BE
(()CON SIDE RED FOR AWARD.
Bid Specifications, as well as other pertinent documents, may be obtained from the
Madis.on County Public Works/Road Department office located at 2060 NE Rocky
Ford Road (C-591). 2 miles north of Madison. telephone # 850-973-2156. beginning
I -hbrar) 6. 2008. Copies of Specifications are available for inspection at the County
Co.mmi.,.in Office during regular office hours.
NMadison County reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all bids.

Bid, ill be opened at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, February 20. 2008 after which all bids
nill br a ailable for public inspection. Bid Award by the Board of County Commis-
' ,oni r% will be during their regularly scheduled meeting to be held on Wednesday,
lj March 5, 2008. All vendors will be notified in writing of the successful bidder.
SIchbruarn 6.8.,13 and 15. 2008
. 4 1&4 44a ama mwisafnsoam,55SmeBmanaissmawsssvama


NN I l( I.: lit l)iit l i lik h..o l ,hnId li M lI.iion ( m lmit., l, riding ill lhuld i public
Shearing on lTuesday, March 18, 2008, ait 6:00 p.m.. Tile meeting will be held in the
School Board Meeting Room of the Superintendent's Office, 210 NE Duval Ave. Madi-
son, Florida.
Changes to the Procedure for Field Trips
Procedure P-4.43
The proposed document may be viewed at the School Board Office, 210 NE Duval Ave,
Madison, Florida.
Statutory Authority: 1001.41, 1001.42
IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD,
WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS MEETING OR
HEARING, HE/SHE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR
I SUCH PURPOSE, HE/SHE MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM
RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE
! TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
218/08 /


IN THE CIRCUIT (OURT OF I HE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASEN0.05-36-CA

GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC f/k/a
CONSECO FINANCE SERVICING CORP.
1400 Turbine Drive
Rapid City, SD 57703
Plaintiff,


Lambert Computer Service, Inc.
"Computers that work for YOU..."
Victor Lambert
Phone: 386.294.3444
Email: vlctor@lambertcs.com
www: www.lambertcs.com
Computer Repair Custom Computer Systems
Virus/Malware Software Installation
Network Installation Broadband Setup
WAN Upgrades

On-site Home Service in the North Florida Area



Whatever You Need,

Greene Publishing, Inc.


ELIZABETH A DUNBAR and STEPHANIE M. SCOTT,


Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Judgment of,
Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in
Madison County, Florida, described as follows, to wit:
Lot 14, Block B, Meadow Run, according to the map or plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13, Public Records of Madison County, 4
Florida.
TOGETHER WITH that certain 2003 72 x 28 2724 ES-1 mobile home;
VIN#11439231AB. ,
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the Madison County Court-
hoyse,.Madison, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., on the 20 day of March, 2008.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, _.
IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
2/8,2Z15t08 |


GREENE
Publishing, Inc.

1695 S. SR 53 Madison 973-4141


a yearly


subscription


will save you over newstand prices.



SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

One Year In County Subscription $28

One Year Out of County Subscription $35


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Friday, February 8, 2008




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