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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00146
 Material Information
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title: Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title: Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Creation Date: November 2, 2007
Publication Date: 1933-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID: UF00028405:00146
 Related Items
Preceded by: Enterprise-recorder

Full Text



www.greenepublishing.com


Zthe fmlaison



nterptiseL
Our 143rd Year, Number 9 Friday, November 2, 2007


.... ***..*ALL FOR ADC 320









Madison, Florida


Madison Couple To Take Part In Production Of HBO Movief


HBO will begin shoot-
ing Recount this weekend
in Tallahassee and at least
two Madison people will
have part in the produc-
tion.
Randy Howe, who
works at 'the Florida
Supreme Court in Talla-
hassee, will be on hand to
help with maintenance
for the film. Randy's wife,
Jessie, is scheduled' to be
one of the extras in this
weekend's shooting.
Two-time Oscar win-
ner Kevin Spacey (Ameri-
can Beauty, The Usual
Suspects) leads the cast of
HBO Films' Recount, a
Spring Creek/Mirage pro-
duction in association
with Trigger Street Pro-
ductions and, Everyman


Pictures.
Emmy winner Paula
Weinstein (HBO's Tru-
man), Oscar winner Syd,
ney Pollack (Out of
Africa), HBO, Films Se-
nior Vice President Len
Amato (Blood Diamond)
and Jay Roach (the
"Austin Powers" films) ex-
ecutive produce.
Directed by Roach
from a script by Danny
Strong, the film revisits
the 2000 election turmoil
in Florida, one of the
most dramatic events in
U.S. history.
Bob Balaban (For
Your Consideration), 'Ed
Begley, Jr. (Living with
Ed), Laura Dern (Inland
Empire), John Hurt (The
Elephant Man), Denis


Leary (Rescue Me) and
Tom Wilkinson (Michael
Clayton) also star.
Recount is currently
in production, with film-
ing taking place in Talla-
hassee and Jacksonville,
and will debut on HBO in
2008.
The film follows the
Florida recount from
Election Day in Novem-
ber 2000 through the
Supreme Court's ruling
in favor of George W.
Bush over Al Gore five
weeks later. Recount
pulls back the veil on the
headlines and explores
the human drama of
characters involved in
events that would deter-
mille the leadership of
the country.


Spacey portrays Ron
Klain, Vice President Al
Gore's chief of staff. Bal-
aban portrays Ben Gins-
berg, lead attorney to the
Bush-Cheney campaign
in the 2000 election. Beg-
ley portrays attorney
David Boies, who repre-
sented the Gore campaign
before the Supreme Court.
Dern portrays Katherine
Harris, Secretary of State
of Florida. Hurt plays
Warren Christopher, Sec-
retary of State to Presi-
dent Bill Clinton. Leary
plays Michael Whouley, a
Democratic pollster Tom
Wilkinson portrays James
Baker in, who was previ-
ously Secretary of State to
President George H. W.
Bush.


Jessie Howe is scheduled to take part as an extra in
the HBO movie Recount.


Woman Arrested For


Grand Theft Aid


Credit Card Fraud


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
According to the Madi-
son County Sheriff's Of-
fice, Hilary Kathryn Allen
was arrested on October 24
after using a stolen credit
card number to commit
fraud.


Hilary Kathryn Allen


-rw


Man Arrested


For Carrying A


Concealed Firearm


Corporal Josh Harris
contacted Allen in refer-
ence to fraudulent use of
credit cards and grand
theft. In his report, Harris
stated that Allen did un-
lawfully and with intent to
defraud, use a credit card
obtained or retained in vi-
olation of the State Credit
Card Crime Act.
Harris also stated that
Allen used the card to ob-
tain money goods, or ser-
vices equal to $596.07. The
credit card was used three
or more times in six
months.
Allen was arrested for
fraudulent use of credit
cards and grand theft. She
was transported to the
county jail.


Catholic' Church Hosting

Fundraiser For Newborns


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, October 27. 2007
Brittany Bezick, left, a member of St. Vincent DePaul
Catholic Church, presents raffle tickets for afghans that she
sold to Heather Bowen, graphic designer for Greene Pub-
lishing, right, on behalf of the Knights of Columbus.
St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church in Madison and
St. Margaret's Catholic Church in Monticello will be
hosting a fundraiser for A Safe Haven For Newborns on
the Madison courthouse lawn on Friday, November 2.
They would like to invite the Christian Community to
help make this endeavor a success.
The Knights of Columbus will be cooking their deli-
cious grilled chicken leg quarters, baked beans, cole
slaw, roll, dessert, and tea. The price will be $6.00.
All proceeds will be given to A Safe Haven for New-
borns, whose mission is to assist in saving the precious
Please See A Safe Haven, Page 4A


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, October 27, 2007
Carlton Burnette, shown with son C.J., has built a
proud heritage providing plumbing and well repairs
throughout Madison County.

Taking Care Of

A Precious Resource


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Ranking the impor-
tance of resources from
highest to lowest, arguably
water, both in its availabil-
ity and quality, is right at
the top of the list. For
those not thinking about
it, everyone should be re-
minded that the drought is
still at hand. In fact, over'-
the last six months, at
least three residential
wells have gone dry in the
area.
"The water table is
down, but I wouldn't want
people to worry. It's a very
cyclical process. But
drought conditions still
exist, so we do continue to
urge conservation," ex-
plained Jon Dinges, Direc-
tor of Resource Manage-
ment, Suwannee River Wa-
ter Management District.
"There are groundwa-
ter monitoring wells
throughout the district, in-
cluding Madison, where


we check water levels and
quality. Regarding these
hydrologic conditions in
September, three wells
measured at historic lows,
but again we believe it will
definitely reverse," Dinges
added. "The Floridan
Aquifer is the main source
of well water, and is a re-
source we must protect,."
he went on to say.
Local plumbing con-
tractor, Carlton Burnette,
agrees. "I wouldn't say
there's a crisis, but water
levels are definitely down.
My plumbing work some-
times includes parts of the
well, and I've gotten calls
about dry wells. There
aren't very many, but I
haven't seen this much be-
fore," Burnette said.
Tina Gaylord, from
Gaylord Pump and Irriga-
Please See Resource,
Page 4A


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing. Inc.
According to the Mad i-
son Police Department.
Michael Maurice Robin-
son was arrested for carry-
ing a concealed firearm
and possession of a
firearm by a convicted
felon on October 31.
Patrolman Joseph Ag-
ner stated that he was run-
ning moving radar when
he clocked a white Chevro-
let Caprice traveling at 46
miles per hour in a 30
miles per house: speed
zone.
Agner conducted a
routine traffic stop, and'
made contact with the dri-
ver of the vehicle. While
he was writing a citation,
Deputy Mike Maurice re-
sponded in assistance.
Maurice asked for consent
to search Robinson's vehi-
cle.


Michael Maurice Robinson
Agner asked Robinson
twice if he had any
weapons in the vehicle,
and was told no, twice.
During the search, Dep.
Maurice located a .32
Smith and Wesson re-
volver out of its case un-
der the driver's seat of the
car.
Robinson was arrested
and transported to the
county jail.


UPCOMING


VETERANS SALUTE
S Greene Publishing. Inc., is plan-
ning a special tribute to our veterans
, in our Friday. November 9, edi-
tion of the Madison Enterprise
Recorder and we need your help.
Please send us photos along
with name, branch of the ser-
vice, rank and location (if not,
classified), of all of those who
you know that are currently
serving on active duty in the
Armed Forces.
Additionally, we would like to
hear from you if you know of a ]
veteran who lives in our area
that is currently inactive or has
finished their tour of duty
Deadline is Wednesday, No-
vember 7. at noon. Informa-
tion may be dropped off at
Greene Publishing on High-
way 53 South.
way .-r


Index


Around Madison County .5-8A
Church 11A
Classifieds/Legals 16-17A
Farm 14A
Greenville News 9A


3Smcienf,85Pages
Jail Report 4A
Outdoors 15A
Real Eslate '12A
Remote Guide C Section
Viewpoints 2-3A


, r eat Sun
11/2 11/3 1114

77/49 72/47 73148
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BANQUET SPACE FOR UP TO 40M
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2A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www. greenepublishing. corn



Uicpoint & Opinions


Friday, November 2, 2007


Being A Hunter's


Widow


The Game
I remember The Game. I had to listen to it on the radio
that day because I was at work so I couldn't watch it on TV
The Game was not a national championship game. It
was not a game featuring the Seminoles against the
Gators or the Hurricanes. This game featured the Semi-
noles against the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets.
Listening to The Game, I almost developed ulcers. It
seemed like the Seminoles were going to lose. After all,
they had a quarterback who had a tendency to throw as
many interceptions as he did touchdown passes. It seemed
to me that Charlie Ward would never amount to anything.
Why didn't they just let him be the punter again?
I believe The Game "made" Charlie Ward. He led the
Seminoles as they roared back and won. The following
year, Charlie Ward dispelled any doubts that I ever had
about him as the Seminoles won the national champi-
onship and Ward won the Heisman Trophy.
Charlie Ward remained undaunted in the face of ad-
versity in The Game. Many times in life, we find ourselves
facing adversities that either make us or break us.
I have had several experiences lately that I have faced.
The Game is not over for me yet, but I feel like I can do like
Charlie Ward did and pull through. I have also seen sever-
al others (such as my father) face adversity in their own
lives.
How a person handles the adversities and challenges
will show what type of a person they are. Are they a win-
ner or a loser or are they simply tired and can't carry on?
(As my pastor says, "Some people make excuses. Some
people have reasons.") Being tired is not losing. It is sim-
ply God's way of saying, "You need to rest." Many times, I
simply just have to rest.
Many times, however, rest is not an option. We just go
ahead and fight on, braving the elements, battling the en-
emy shielding ourselves against darts and arrows fired at
us. In the battle, however, we have help. Just as Charlie
Ward had the other guys on the football field with him, we
also have help. We have friends and family who help, but,
most important, if we are Christians, we have God there
to help us.
He will help us win The Game!

orida Press Asroci.Ao


2007
Award Winning Newspaper


Cbe a fllionso

Enterprise-Recort er

1695 S SR 53 Madison, FL 32340
(850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121
greenepub@greenepublishing.com
http://www.greenepublishing.com

PUBLISHER
Emerald Greene Kinsley
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER
Ted Ensminger
EDITOR
Jacob Bembry
STAFF WRITERS
Michael Curtis and Jessica Higginbotham
GRAPHIC DESIGNERS
Carla Barrett and Heather Bowen
TYPESETTER/SLUBSCRIPTION
Bryant Thigpen
ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES
Mary Ellen Greene, Dorothy McKinney,
Lettie Sexton and Jeanette Dunn
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS
Deadline for classified is Monday at 3:00 p.m.
Deadline for Legal Advertisement is
Monday at 5pm.
There will be a '3'" charge fof Affidavits.
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Sheree Miller
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
In County $28 Out-of-County $35
(State & local taxes included)

-Since 1865-
"Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity"
ti4i JA abison utcrpris c orer
Madison Recorder established 1865,
New Enterprise established 1901,
Consolidated June 25, 1908
Published weekly by Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695 S. SR
53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison
Post Office 32340. Publication No. 177.400.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison
Enterprise-Recorder, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertise-
ment, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the
management, will not be for the best interest of the county
and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any ad-
vertisement submitted.


All photos given to Greene Publishing, Inc. for publication in this
newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they
are dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for
photos beyond said deadline.


Being a Hunter's wid-
ow can be good and bad.
Hunting has been a
part of my whole life. As a
young child I remember
my dad heading out on his
hunting trips during the
whole big game season. I
believe my grandpa
Ruback enjoyed some
hunting as well. Although
my memory is vague, as I
lost my grandpa when I
was 14 and my dad when I
was 15, I do remember
them both sporting those
red and black plaid pat-
tern wool outfits.
In upstate New York,
in the foothills of the
Adirondak mountains,
where I.grew up, hunting
was a favorite pastime of
a lot of men and boys. One
of my three brothers, Ar-
liegh, always enjoyed both
small and big game hunt-
ing. He is still an avid
hunter today with his two
boys hunting by his side
since they were about
four-years-old.
Now, New York State
hunting is a lot different
from Florida big game
hunting. Up north you
stay on the. ground sport-
ing some red or orange in
your attire. One group of
hunters will drive (walk
and spook) the deer out
and running as the other
group stands: ready to
take their best shots. But
most of the season, it's
freezing and there's snow
on the ground, so deer are
easier to track. And, if
your best shot only
wounds the target, then
it's easier to follow the
blood trail and get your
deer.
As luck would have it,
I married a hunter, trap-
per, and fisherman. My
husband Kevin's hunting
skills date back 30 or more
years. Before we were
married' I remember
Kevin and my younger
brother Arliegh, trapping
raccoons to sell their-
hides, back when they
were 12 and 13-years-old,
and small game (squirrel
and rabbit), hunting down
by the railroad tracks and
spearing frogs down at a
local place called "Frog'
Hollow," while us girls
were playing with Barbies
and baby dolls.
Most of Kevin's fami-
ly (his dad, uncles, grand-
pa, and brothers), were all
good hunters. Back in that
day, there were lots of
open spaces, farms, corn-
fields, ,acreage, and deep
woods in which to hunt in
New York State. When we
moved to Florida 'in 1990,
we found out it's a whole
different way of doing it.
Besides, the deer were
much smaller here. You
have to wear total Real-
tree camouflage and no
bright orange or red. You
don't dare walk on the
ground, unless you want
to be a target. You get up
at 3 a.m. and are in the
woods by 4:15 a.m. You
proceed to climb a tree 20
ft. up in the air and sit on
a branch or in a home-
made or store bought tree
stand. Get settled and sit
there quietly, sometimes
freezing until daylight
and wait for the deer to
walk under or in front of
you, while you're trying
not to fall asleep and fall
out of the tree (don't
laugh, some members of
this family have done
that). Not my idea of fun.
I told my husband I
could go with him only if
I could shoot pictures
with a camera, not a gun.
Because that would scare
them away, I have not
been allowed to go hunt-
ing with him.
Out of my three boys,
the oldest, Kevin Jr., is the


only one who lives for the
opportunity to hunt as of-
ten as possible and has
even taken a few with bow
and arrow, a feat even his
dad hasn't accomplished
yet. He has always been


l U 16now I'Ve

R-en Thinking
Sheree Miller
s-. Columnist |


Photo sujDminte dy neree Miillte
My brother, Arliegh, who didn't make this Col-
orado trip this year, had plenty of luck here in Madi-
son County. He got himself a nice 11 point buck this
past week.


Photo submitted by Stieree Miller
Mike Reader of Lee, was proud of his 5 by 5,
(that's what they call a 10 point Colorado Bull Elk),
that he took down while on the Colorado hunt with
Kevin and the guys last week.


on these hunting trips at
his daddy's side for years.
Now Kevin Jr. has a son of
his own, Karic, who is
only three-and-a-half-
years-old and has already
been in the woods with Jr.
and his Poppy Together
they plan to purchase a
lifetime hunting license
for Karic before he turns
four.
My other two boys,
Thomas and Chris, don't
show as much interest
right now. Thomas did
have a dream to go to New
York and hunt bear with
dad. Maybe the opportuni-
ty will come up so that
they can make this trip
someday soon. Chris has
been out with Jr. and dad
a couple of times. His
young family needs him
to spend quality free time
with them right now. I'm
sure he'll grow into it
soon.
For the last few years,
Kevin Sr. has been going
on ten-day Elk hunting
trips in Colorado with a
group of guys. Jr. goes on
these trips when he can.
Well, this year Kevin
got his Colorado trip in
October, and plans on a 7
day hunting trip in New
York in November. A cou-
ple of days after Christ-
mas he'll be heading to
South Carolina for anoth-
er hunting excursion for 5
days, and then going into
North Carolina for a four-
day Ski trip. All this after
a summer of fishing and
scalloping. So you must
understand why I feel like
a "Hunter's Widow."
It's not all bad though.
See, I like having alone
time every now and then,
it gives me a break from
waiting on the husband
hand and foot, I don't have
to worry about cooking
.dinner, and there's 4ess
laundry and cleaning to
do. Each year on his Octo-
ber trip I get a chance to
go to, New Port Richey,
"my real Florida, and
help my sister celebrate
her birthday in style.
I feel lucky that I don't
have to watch endless
hours of baseball and
football on TV each year,
as Kevin has never been a
beer guzzling sports fa-
natic. Between all the
fishing and hunting trips,
and beef cows, we are
raising to eat, at least we
won't be going hungry for
the next twelve months.
And, he's feeling so guilty,
he booked us on a four-day
Caribbean cruise in May. I
can handle that. I'm look-
ing forward to this; no
fishing or hunting, just
us.


See You Next Week!!





What do you think Heaven looks like?
Greenville Elementary School students in kindergarten, first, and second
grades. were asked to tell what they think Heaven looks like.
''' * M ~ i~rilM '" |
I *. ^BH Ib


Kindergartener
Johnquez Grayer:


I think it's pretty, like a
heart. There are flowers,
and it's happy.


Kindergartener
Bradley Neal:

Blue, and I think it'll be
happy. I'll see God and
Jesus, and a house!

First Grader
Joe Price:
Beautiful, and it has lots
of nice people. It's hap-
py, and houses, and
small babies that might
have died when they
were little will be there.


Id-


First Grader
Samantha McGuire:

I think Heaven is pretty
with houses and Jesusl


Second Grader
Tia Young:
Heaven probably looks
like a playground for kids
and a church for kids and
other people to go to. I'll
see God and my friends
when I diel

Second Grader
Brishouna Conner:
I think Heaven is clear
and pretty. Jesus and
people in my family will
* be there. And there will
also be the stars
and the moon.


I











Friday, November 2, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A


Enjoy Fall's Harvest


Fa ll
brings a
change of
season, the ..
air feels | `T extension Sei
crisp and we Z.-.


energy. For
those of us
in the field of nutrition, we measure the
seasons by food. Autumn foods bring
rich colors, add texture and flavor to the'
table as well as an abundance of.nutri-
ents for health. Here is a list of foods to
include in your fall meals.
Pumpkin A member of the squash
family, these bright orange vegetables
are a symbol of Thanksgiving. Where
would we be without pumpkin pie? A
great source of vitamin A, they can be
used in a variety of dishes. Try combin-
ing pumpkin in recipes calling for win-
ter squash or sweet potatoes. For a
change, try pumpkin, soup or use it in
recipes for muffins, sweet breads or pan-
cakes.
Pumpkin is highly perishable, so if
you are planning to carve a pumpkin,
the pulp must be cooked the day it is cut
open. To cook fresh pumpkin: cut a
pumpkin in half vertically, discarding
the seeds and stringy pulp. Place the
pumpkin sliced side down in a large bak-
ing dish, add water so there is /" and
bake 350 for one hour. The pulp should
be chilled immediately. Use the pulp
within 36 hours or store in the freezer.
Sweet potatoes A good source of
vitamin C, % cup. also contains more
than a day's supply of vitamin A. To
keep moisture in, bake them wrapped in
foil. Try eating sweet potatoes without
sugar or butter; you'll discover a won-
derful flavor. Try cooking them in or-
ange juice and add cinnamon for a dif-
ferent flavor. Make a sweet potato pie or
use them as an ingredient in sweet
breads or muffins.
Butternut Squash A winter


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The McCormick Fami-
ly Singers will celebrate 26
years as a gospel group on
Friday, November 2, dur-
ing a sing at Lee Worship
Center.
Allen and Brenda Mc-
Cormick formed the group
along with Allen's brother,
the late Mac McCormick,
in 1981.
The group is currently
composed of Allen and
Brenda McCormick, along
with Brenda's brother,'


squash,
many cooks
avoid using

vice table be-
cause most
cooking rec-
ad omme nda -
tions re-
quire that
you bake them in the oven. They can be
cooked in the microwave and will be
ready to serve in less than 15 minutes.
This squash makes a flavorful soup and
it can be substituted for sweet potatoes
in any recipe. Bake buttermnut squash
and apples with cinnamon and brown
sugar for a side dish to ham or poultry.
Pears Available from September,
through December, popular varieties in-
clude Anjou', Bos and Red. They can be
eaten raw for a snack or added to salads
for an interesting texture and flavor.
Pears can also be baked in pies or cob-
blers for a dessert. If you are fortunate
to have a pear tree in the back yard, you
may consider preserving some for use
throughout the year or make jams or jel-
lies. For a copy of USDA preservation
directions, call the Extension office.
Apples'- Although apples are avail-
able your round, they are considered a
fall fruit. Baked, stewed or eaten whole,
apples add color to any meal. Oh, don't
forget candied or caramel apples, they
are always a part of fall festivals. To
save time, make a caramel sauce to dip
apple wedges in as a snack or when com-
pany is over.
Next trip to the grocery or road side
stand,'take time to look at the wide vari-
ety of produce available during the sea-
son. Make a point to take home some-
thing new to prepare for your family.
There is no better time than ,your next
meal to enjoy the foods that come with
the change of season.
For more information of food, nutri-
tion and meal preparation, contact the
Madison County Extension Service.


Trent, and sister-in-law,
Suzanne Agner.
Other personnel who
have been part of the Mc-
Cormick Family during
the years include: Mike
Register, Rodney' Wind-
ham, Mike Keeler, Bryant
Thigpen and Jed and
Ridge McCormick (Allen
and Brenda's sons).
In addition to the Mc-
Cormicks singing that
evening, there will be an
open microphone gospel
sing.
The fun begins at 6:30


Madison Dental Associates
~Family Dentistry-
Clint A. Rogers, DMD PA
Robert E. Baldwin, DDS Matt J. Allen, DMD


p.m. Friday evening.
Lee Worship Center is
located south of the old
Lee School on Magnolia
Drive.


The leaves they
are afallin'
Fallin', falling falling'
And the trees are
getting' bare-
Why does Mother Nature
Unclothe her little children
When winter time is near?

It must be quite near -
we awoke this morning to
a cold house. The remodel-
ing of our
home is fin-
is hed,
thank the
Lord, but
we have not
masteredI
the digital
controls of
our new
heating and air condition-
ing unit (which, by the
way, works wonderfully
well as we found out when
daughter Sharon came in
and set it on heat!) Since
we had already given our
window air unit and big
gas heater to Mona, we
were about to give up and
turn on the gas stove oven.
We are so happy to
have our home looking so
much nicer, (and there are
so many people to thank).
And it's quite colorful -
the house is yellow, the
roof evergreen, the carpet
rich burgundy, walls deep
rose, the kitchen green,
and kitchen and bath
linoleum a nice tan mix
pattern (the bath is not yet
painted).
Those to thank for all
this are first, several from
the Live Oak Suwannee
River Economic Council
office Betty Morgan, Ce-
cil Westbrook, "Bill
Sheffiell and Mike Vostal
who stopped by often to
check on the work and on
Lus), all extremely nice pe'o-
ple; secondly, James Regis-
ter the contractor, with his
two workers, Michael
Montroy and Thomas
McGee, and the electri-
cians, air conditioning
men and flooring installa-
tion crew, all these people
did everything they could
to make my 'incarcera-
tion' in the family room as
comfortable as possible


while the work was going
on, especially James,
Michael and Thomas.
Thanks also to our build-
ing inspector, Chuck
Hitchcock, for the part he
played although he was
very ill for a few days.
We offer a second
thank you to James Regis-
ter for his patience and for
really wanting to do more


Around The
Thelma Thomp
Guest Columw
, r --


than the grant allowed and
to his two men also for
their hard work and pa-
tience.
And now .for a few
words on 'Around the
Town';
Did you know that
Sandy of Horse Tales gives
riding lessons? If you are
interested in things eques-
trian, give her a call at 971-
5151 or, better yet, stop by
and get the info 'from the
horse's mouth'. And while
you are there, inquire
about selling your 'white
elephants' on E-Bay from


Sabrina who does just that
from her little office in the
Horse Tales building. The
business is Sales Source 1
and has the same phone
number. We are glad to
know someone is offering
that service here and we
welcome her to Lee.
We keep hearing that
Archie's is going to open
again but still haven't
found out
when we do
S.' hope it won't
owI i be long..
Do you re-
?son alize that
t Thanksgiv-
ing is only
three weeks
away and
Christmas is close on its
heels?! Is it just us or is
time really passing faster
than it once did?
Also, what has hap-
pened to the Ginger Jar -
did some one steal the gin-
ger? We really miss it.
Last but not least, will
someone volunteer 'to
!paint the town red' for
Christmas that is, of
course, decorate it? Any
volunteers? We know some
people who can do it -
maybe they will. Think
about it and give me a call
at 971-0011. Thank you.


November 3. 8:30 3:00
265 SW Bunker St. Madison

10' x 20' tent (great for outside
BBQ's), 7' wide wall unit (china
cabinet/display), antique Eastlake
Organ, pretty dresses for little girls,
misc..antiques, household items
and LOTS OF FREE STUFF
(sheets, towels, curtains, dishes)


CMcCormicks To Host



Anniversary Sing


Certificates of Deposit

Provided by Keith Hargrove, State Farm
FIXED RATE
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT
Effective from Annual Percentage
10/31/2007 -11/06/207 Interest Rates ld (APY)
90-dai* 4.59% 4.70%
180-day** 4.59% 4.70%
1-year 4.55% 4.65%,
2-year 4.40% 4.50%
3-year 4.55% 4.65%
4-year 4.59% 4.70%
5-year 4.59% 4.70%
*Jumbo CDs are available. **IRA Certificates of
Deposit are not available in 90 and 180-day terms.
JUMBO FIXED RATE
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT
Effective from Interest Rates Annual Percentage
110/31/2007 11/06/2007 Yield APYI
90-day** 4.59% 4.70%
180-day** 4.59% 4.70%
1-year 4.64% 4.75%
2-year 4.40% 4.50%
3-year 4.55% 4.65%
4-year 4.59% 4.70%
5-year, 4.59% 4.70%
Minimum opening deposit required for a Jumbo CD is $100,000.
** IRA Certificates of Deposit are not available in 90 and 180-day terms.





STATE FARM SELECT AGENT
KEITH G.

HARGROVE
200 W. Base St.
O(850) 973-6641










4A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



Eaw Enforcmenct & Rcgional Crime


Friday, November 2 2007


ANNMU REWRD


M GILITE YOU GET THE TURKEY
WE'VE GOT THE POTS.
GET YOURS BEFORE
THEY'RE GONE!


204 E. Central Ave. Valdosta, GA
.40=i 229-242-5945


cont from page 1A


tion, shed additional light on the subject. "All the re-
ports we're getting on dry wells are two-inch wells.
These wells have the pump above ground and are
drilled shallower than four-inch wells," she noted.
The Department of Environmental Protection
governs the treatment and distribution of community
water, however when it comes to residential wells, no
public monitoring is conducted. For more informa-
tion about the Suwannee River Water Management
District, visit their website at www.mysuwanneeriv-
er. com.


cont from page ,A


lives of newborns in danger of abandonment and to
help preserve the health of their mothers and future of
their mothers and fathers and to eliminate infant aban-
donment in Florida thru education, prevention and
community involvement and to assist pregnant
girls/women to realize a productive future. So far, 84 ba-
bies in Florida have been saved since the year 2000!
In addition to the dinner, raffle tickets are being sold
for a $300 Visa gift card, and also for 2 afghans-just in
time for the. holidays. Tickets for the raffle are $1.00 each
or 6 for $5. To purchase these, contact the church recto-
ry


Man Arrested For


Madison County...
11 rT-







10/24/07
Hilary Kathryn Allen Grand theft, fraudulent
use of credit card
Monica Sherelle Wilson Battery (touch or strike)
Jose Louise Mejia No motor vehicle registration,
no valid or expired drivers licefise
10/25/07
Irma Andres-Wences No valid or expired drivers
license
James Wesley Kiefer-VOP (circuit)
William Robert Tarver Failure to appear (pre-tri-
al)
Lucilla Diana McGill-Out of county warrant


10/2/U07
P t I John Randall Connell-No valid or driver's license
Pet it Retai Theft 10/27/07
Jose Fernando Ramirez Driving while license
By Jessica Higgbotham n suspended, revoked or cancelled
Greene Publishing, Inc. Ira Lee Denson Aiding and abetting
According to the Madi- Carlos Djuan Murray Aiding and abetting
son Police Department, 10/28/08
Vinson Emanuel Allen vIra Lee Denson VOP (circuit)
was arrested on October 30 Tracy Lamar Durrant Trespass after warning
after attempting to steal Kevin Lamont Aikens DUI, driving while license
from a local retail store. suspended, revoked or cancelled
Allen was observed in Carmen Denise Napoli Worthless checks
a local store and recorded
a local store and recorded Alberta Mata Castaneda No valid or expired dri-
by video trying to steal W M.:. vers license
boxers and socks ,by con- lic 10/29/07
ceiling them in a plastic -Robert Gene McIntosh Criminal registration
bag. Allen was questioned Brian Edward Kennedy Criminal registration
by an employee, and fol- Taledo Mykal Hill Driving while license sus-
lowing the conversation, pended, revoked or cancelled
he placed the unpaid for Terry Lee Deiison'- VOP (circuit), attempted mur-
items on the couter and Vinson Emanuel Allen det; aggravated battery
walked out.
Allen returned to the store when police arrived. George Kevin Cook VOP (circuit)
Alen returned to the store when police arrived. Dallas Mario Akins Sexual performance by a
Sergeant Investigator Nathan Curtis stated in his re- child /
port that due to a spontaneous utterance, Allen admit- Richard Diamond Harris Out of county warrant
ted to trying to steal the' items. He added that he knew 10/30/07 -
it was wrong, but he didn't leave the store with the stuff. Lacey McLeod Jones- VOP (county)
A trespass notice was issued against Allen, and he Darren Laron White- criminal registration
was arrested and transported to the county jail. Vinson Eanuel Alen Petit theft


Seven Defendants Indicted On Charges Of Conspiracy To Possess And

Intent To Distribute Oxycodone And Other Controlled Substances


* SATURDAY, November 3
SATURDAY MATINEE DISCOUNT
& SENIOR DAY
12 pm to dose $5 admission/Seniors
Admitted Free ,
12 pm-6 pm Matinee- S10 armband with
$5 coupon for all rides
6 pm to close S15 Armband for all rides
'L ,aAP


WEDNESDAY, November 7
SCHOOL DAY
5 pm to close $5 admission or
persons under the age of 18 admitted
free
5 pm to close $13 armband
with $2 off school coupon


I- mu I


SUNDAY, November 4
FAMILY DAY
Noon to close $15 includes
admission & armband for all rides
OR Fair Admission $5 Only,
No Armband


MONDAY, November 5
BUDDY NIGHT
5 pm to c.ose $5 admission,
one ,erson oa's
the ot-ier gets in' ree
5 prm to close -$15 arnband or
two armbands for $20 and your
buddy will get one too.


THURSDAY, November 8
S&S FOOD STORES
5 pm to close 55 admission or free
gate with S&S Coupon
5 pm to close
$15 armband for all rides


FRIDAY, November 9
MIDNIGHT MADNESS
6 pm to close $5 admission
5 30 pm to 8 30 pm D scout Tickets
Early Bird Madness from 8 30 pm
to 2 am 520 for al rides
Midnight Madness from 10 pm to 2 am
$15 armband for all rides


R. Alexander Acosta.
United States Attorney for
the Southern District of
Florida, Jonathan I.
Solomon, Special Agent in
Charge, Federal Bureau of
Investigation. Douglas
Colon, Special Agent in
Charge, Atlanta Region,
United States Department
of Labor, Office of Inspec-
tor General, Office of La-
bor Racketeering and
Fraud Investigations, and
Al Lamberti, Acting Sher-
iff, Broward Sheriff's Of-
fice, announce today the
unsealing of a three-count
Indictment charging de-
fendants James Modica,
- Marc Brainger, David
William Brock, Donald
Louis Colbert, Jr., James
Mitchell, David Herman,
and Lawrence Goldstein
with conspiracy to possess
oxycodone and other con-
trolled substances with in-
tent to distribute, in viola-
tion of Title 21, United
States Code, Section 846,
and possession of oxy-
codone and other con-
trolled substances with in-
tent to distribute, in viola-
tion of Title 21, United
States Code, Section 841. If
convicted, each of the de-
fendants faces a statutory
maximum term of impris-
onment of 40 years and
- fines of up to $2,000,000.
According to the In-
dictment, from approxi-
mately January 2005, de-
fendant James Modica led
an oxycodone distribution
ring. Modica and others
would recruit patients to


visit various doctors' of-
fices in South Florida to
obtain prescriptions for
oxycodone and other con-
trolled substances. Modi-
ca would advise co-con-
spirators on what they
should say to be the physi-
cians in order to obtain
prescriptions for the
largest possible amount of
oxycodone. Modica would
provide money to co-con-
spirators to pay the fees
for the medical examina-
tions and/or the filling of
the prescriptions. The de-
fendants allegedly would
go to several doctors each
month to obtain prescrip-
tions for as many con-
trolled substance pills as
possible. Through this
scheme, the defendants re-
ceived a total of more


than 150,000 pills during
the conspiracy. Defendant
Modica would distribute
the oxycodone and other
controlled substances out-
side the State of Florida,
including to. defendant
David Brock in Massachu-
setts.
Acosta commended
the investigative efforts of
the Federal Bureau of In-


yestigation, the U.S. De-
partment of Labor, Office
of Inspector General, Of-
fice of Labor Racketeer-
ing and Fraud Investiga-
tions, and the Broward
Sheriff's Office for their
work on this case. The
case is being prosecuted
by Assistant United States
Attorneys Jeffrey N. Ka--
plan and Paul Schwartz.


F.M. Guess

Pecan CompI

201 South Lee Street
Valdosta, Georgia 31601
229-244-1421


Resource


Safe Haven


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A oun maf soo Countp


Friday, November 2, 2007


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5A


Look 'Who's New...


Aleshia Michelle Lewis












.* I















b of .:




Alexis Marie Lewis wouCdlCike to announce the
birth of her new baby sister, Aleshia MichelCCe
Lewis. The precious bundle weighed in at 6 Cbs., 6
ounces, andiwas 18 Y inches Cong. She was born on
October 22, 2007 at 6:45 p.m.
The proud parents are George and Samantha
ewis of Cherry Lake. The proud grandparents are
GeraCdand'Debbie Lewis of Cherry Lake andCathy
Ciomiotta of Cherry Lake. The great-grandmother
is BCanich Johnsont of PhifCCpsburg, N.J.
She has five cousins and many aunts andcun-
cCes.


Betty Martin

Jones
Betty Martin Jones, 70,
of Madison, passed away
Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2007 at
Smith Northview Hospital
after a lengthy illness.
Funeral services will
be held Saturday, Nov. 3,
2007 at 11 a.m. at the Quit-
man Church of God with
Rev. Gwin Jerriel and Rev.
Greg Parker officiating.
Burial will follow in Cher-
ry Lake Cemetery.
The family will receive
friends at the funeral
home Friday, Nov. 2, from
6-8 p.m.
Born in Statesboro Ga.,
she was the daughter of
George and Ida Mae Mar-
tin.
She was a homemaker
and a member of the Quit-
man Church of God.
She is survived by her
husband, Willie C. Jones
of Madison; two daugh-
ters, Della (Steve) Lann of
Hamilton, Ala., Lesia
Corvin of Madison; three
sons, Jerry (A.J.) Martin of
Heron, S.D:, Michael Shea
of Heron S.D., and Willie
(Margie) Jones, Jr. of
Hahira, Ga.; nine grand-
children; four great-grand-
children; two sisters, Nao-
mi Williams of Mullins,
Tx., Ann of Tx.; and two
brothers, George Martin of
LaGrange, Ga., and Jesse
Martin of Rollie, Mo.
Condolences may be
conveyed online at
www.maxwellmillerfuner-
alhome.com.
Maxwell-Miller Funer-
al Home is in charge of all
arrangements.


November 1, 1957
Mr. and Mrs. WJ. Amos and baby Connie of Madison were visiting Mr. and Mrs.
S.P Odom Thursday afternoon. Mr. Amos and Mr. Odom are taking a Life Under-
writer Training Council Course in Valdosta, Ga.
Mr. Henry Littleton of F.S.U., spent the weekend here with his mother, Mrs. Rubye
Littleton, and family.
Mr. and Mrs. R. Dugger of Ft. Pierce were weekend guests of Mr. and Mrs. O.V
Clyatt. They were en route to Macon, Ga. for a week's visit, and will stop with the Cly-
atts for a few days visit this weekend.

November 3, 1967
Mr. and Mrs. WC. Copeland III had as weekend guests Mr. and Mrs. Wendell Jar-
rard and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Rollins of Deland. Mr. and Mrs. Copeland and guests at-
tended the football game in Tallahassee Saturday They entertained their guests at
lunch Saturday at the hunting lodge.
Jack Woodard, Jr. has accepted a position with the C & S Bank in Atlanta, Ga. and
began the training program for new employees Oct. 30. Mr. Woodard holds a B.S. de-
gree from the University of Florida with a major in banking and finance. He is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Woodard of Pinetta.
Mr. and Mrs. A.L. Taylor have their son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Lester
Taylor and son, Todd,.of Brookport, IL. For a two-weeks visit.

November 4, 1977
The marriage of Miss Sara Patricia Groover to Mr. Russell Newsome will be sol-
emnized-at the Unity Southern Methodist Church in Hanson at seven o'clock in the
evening, November 12, 1977. All friends and relatives of the couple are invited.
Miss Helen Lucile Wilson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilson, whose mar-
riage to Mr. Ricky Raines will be an event-of November 27 at the First Baptist Church,
was the honoree at a beautiful tea given at the home of Mr. and Mrs. R.D. Baker re-
cently.
Mrs. Delma Beck and daughter, Mrs. Stan Pickles honored Miss Sara Groover,
bride-elect, with a shower Thursday evening, Oct. 27, in the Florida Power lounge.
Miss Groover's wedding to Mr. Russell Newsome will be on Nov. 12 at Unity Southern
Methodist Church.

November 5, 1987
Jerome Dixon, formerly of Madison County, a 1985 graduate of SUNY College at
Brockport, is the latest addition to the admissions staff at the college.
Work on the new Madison Prison Work Camp is pro-
gressing, with two dormitories presently under con-
struction. Minimum/medium security inmates from
Mayo Correctional Institution commute daily to Madison
to construct the new prison. Prison officials hope for a
r : December opening date for at least one of the dorms.


ik i'poodle173NrnDiv
Suite FE Valdosta
(229)2 19,7503
Pffm-Peuliw -NGrse ~Azea~rie,% ift BLukels Ar
s llafer Ca Ls ult [,,j,, *- Haiir 9)m -y
I.mgg~ae Limp, -Centet Piecrs -rl~uu MiuJi tre!


^IWNNIf MIL0


November 2
Lee Worship Center will
host The McCormick Family's
26th Anniversary concert and
gospel jam on Friday, Novem-
ber 3, starting at 7 p.m., A pot
luck supper will be served.
Anyone interested in perform-
ing, please call (850) 971-4135.
November 3
The annual family reunion
of W.T. Taylor and Luella
McLeod-Taylor will be held
November 3 beginning, at 10
a.m. with dinner at 12 p.m. at
the Suwannee State Park cabin
area (follow signs). As always,
the extended families of Isacca


Newton Lamb, Daniel Webster
McLeod, and David Walker are
cordially invited to attend.
Bring any old photographs of
family.
November 3
The date for the American
Cancer Society of Leon Coun-
ty's 7th Annual Cattle Barons'
Ball has been set for Saturday,
November 3. The event will be
held at Shiloh Farm, located at
1500 Benjamin Chaires Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32317.'The
festivities will begin at 6 p.m.
and end at 11 p.m. Full catering
will be donated by Tallahas-
see's award-winning Klassic
Katering. World-renowned pi-
anist Marvin Goldstein is the
honorary chair for the event.
Additiofial release with more
information and a list of key
sponsors of the event will fol-
low.
November 3
St. Mary's Episcopal
Church's bazaar yard sale will


Lake Park :'
Family & Cosmetic..:



Waterlase Laser De ,ys
Bleaching
Crowns & Brldges
Porcelain Veneers
+* Tooth Colored
S* Root Canals
.,' Dentures & Paria
In House Dental Lab].'
Custom Smile Des

EMERGENCIES WELC
New Padents Welcome

229-559-470

Fitancing iladable with CareCredl i
3012 Hwy 41 South Lake Park. GA 3UI -


be held November 3, from 8
a.m. to 1 p.m. Baked goods,
canned preserves, crafts, and
more! For more information,
please call (850) 929-4908.
November 3
GFWC Greenville
Women's Club will be having a
yard sale on Saturday, Novem-
ber 3, from 9 a.m.-till. For more
information, 'please call (850)
948-3951.
November 3
Diabetes overview, psy-
chology, and exercise, present-
ed by Bonnie Gobar Mathis,
Senior Health Educator with
the Madison County Health
Department. Diann Douglas,
Director of the Madison Coun-
ty Extension Office, will pre-
sent a session on food portion
control. Each participant will re-.
ceive a free
pedometer (a great device to add
to your exercise tools that counts
the number of steps you take
each day) and free recipes to take
home after completing this class.
November 4
You are invited to attend
Faith Baptist Church for their
42nd homecoming on November
4, at 10:15 a.m. Pastor Delbert
Redditt will bring thea message,
with special music by Last Call
and Traci, Terra, and Cheyenne
Redditt. Dinner of the grounds
will follow morning worship. Go
help them celebrate.
November 10
Medical aspects of diabetes
including: medications, blood
glucose monitoring, foot care,
and complications of diabetes,
presented by Bonnie Webb, Lin-
da O'Brian, and Mary Ellen Jor-
dan, nursing team members of
the Madison County Health De-
partment. A free copy of "Take
Charge of Your Diabetes" book-
let produced by the United States
Department of Health and Hu-
man Services, Center of Disease
Control and Prevention, 3rd Edi-
tion, will be awarded to each
participant that completes this
class.


Gift if Sht


sr


Have you been turned down
for Social Security or SSI?
Need help with your appeall
Smnniv IOng
Disability Consultant -30 Yrs. Exp,
"No fee miless vou are approved"
CALL,140.952-8667
For Free Consultation









6A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



lrouo maoio Count9


Friday, November 2, 2007


"New Opportunity"


On The Menu At Chamber Banquet


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison Chamber
of Commerce is holding
its annual banquet on No-
vember 5 at 6:00. This
year's event will be located
at the North Florida Com-
munity College Student
Center, building nine. Di-
vine Events is catering the
banquet, so the menu is
sure to satisfy any ap-
petite. There is another
item sure to be a hit to all
in attendance as well; new
opportunity.
Turning ideas into ac-


tion can be challenging, as
is the prospect of attract-
ing new business and
growing existing business.
The formula of uniting
business owners sharing a
common goal is obvious,
but getting these stake-
holders to "buy-in" is an-
other task altogether. The
practical side of the ban-
quet is geared to this ob-
jective, and to set the stage
for 2008.
The Chamber's Chair-
man of the Board, Ray
Griffin, recognizes these
challenges and the impor-


Roebuck's
:= i Beauty & Barber Shop


422 S. Range St. Madison, FL
Hours: Tues. Fri. 8am-5pm, Sat. 8am-1 pm

850.973.6588


rlw~s








'gmxA cessnes. ~f r!7 Qi1 (, \v l@:( d


c 9ry 0obt:% 'Div


tance of supporting local
business and attracting
new commerce. As the
President of PBC Finan-
cial, and soon to be Presi-
dent of the new Citizens
State Bank opening in
Madison, Griffin shares
the same goals as the com-
munity "Coming off a
year of reorganization
and rebuilding, the Madi-
son Chamber is excited to
usher in new leadership,
and introduce fresh strate-


gies, for the coming year,"
Griffin noted.
"The Chamber has
been through a growing
period. It previously had
difficulty bringing busi-
nesses together in a win-
win scenario suitable for
old and new. When you
add the responsibility of
promoting Madison for
new investment and
tourism to the existing
goal of supporting what's
already here, it has to be


done right," explained
Griffin.
"Since last spring, the
Chamber hasn't had a full-.
time Director. Office Man-
ager Terri Shefbuch has
done an incredible job
keeping things running
smoothly She's been able
to handle the requests and
cover the office very well,
but now it's time to get the
Chamber back to being a
meaningful asset to both
businesses and the com-


munity As we approach
the New Year, a Director
will. be selected that can
make that happen," Grif-
fin added.
This year's banquet is
being laid out to showcase
participating businesses,
while providing an easy
exchange among guests.
Tickets are only $25. Mem-
bers and guests are urged
to contact Terri Shefbuch
at 973-2788 for event details
and tickets.


Lee Elementary Fall Festival


Fun For Entire Family


enjoy the event.
Principal Larry Alderman.had
tremendous support from staff
and volunteers, making it fun for
kids of all ages, from toddlers to
grandmas. Thanks to the gener-:
ous donations and ticket sales, the
event raised critically needed re-
sources as well.
The highlight of the event, as
evidenced by the "screaming


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
From the cakes to the pig kiss-
ing, the Fall Festival at Lee Ele-
mentary was a huge hit. Hun-
dreds of parents,: kids and invited
guests, including' some local offi-
cials like Madison Police Chief
Rick Davis and Madison County
Clerk of the Court Tim Sanders;
came together for a few hours to





Future
Lee Ele-
mentary
student,
Isaac Cur- .
tis, enjoys -
the candy
rewards .,
among oth-
er treats at
the Fall
Festival.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, October 26, 2007


mob," was the pig kissing. Fifth
Grade Teacher Susan Phillips was
expected to kiss the honored ham
directly on the snout because her
class raised the most money,
which she respectfully obliged.
Although a fair maiden, Phillips'
kiss failed to turn the swine into a
handsome prince. However, she
did take the celebration to a fan-
tastic finale.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, October 26, 2007
Tiffany Szoftek (left) and Linda Bass made .sure
everyone enjoyed the festival with plenty of tickets for
fun and games.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, October 26, 2007
Games and booths filled the schoolyard at the Lee El-
ementary Fall Festival.







Starling & Sons
tree service
Tree Trimming Tree Removal
386-590-7153

386-208-TREE
Will Starling Insured


-Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis,'Octobej 26, 2007
Fifth Grade Teacher Susan Phillips gives a pig a big
kiss for a good cause.


PERSONAL INJURY &


WRONGFUL DEATH


*Jon D. Caminez
Board Certified Cival Trial Attorney

Ian Brown
Cary A. "Bo" Hardee, III








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1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344



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about their qualifications and experience.


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txouno A mamison Count;


Friday, November 2, 2007


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7A


* *


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
If anyone has ever had
plenty of friends, it is Dot
Pridgeon, who recently re-
tired as the Town Clerk in
Greenville. She provided
50 years of service and a
wealth of knowledge to
the town. '
When she began work-
ing at the Town Hall, she
was seven months preg-
nant with her second son,
George William (known as
"G.W"). Simmie Moore,
-who was the Madison
County Sheriff at the
time, commented, joking-
ly, that Greenville was
sure "hurt up" for a town
clerk to have to hire her in
the condition she was in.
Dot commented on
Moore, "He was a fine
sheriff."
Dot and her husband,
George, were married in
February 1946.
"He was the best thing
that ever happened to me,"
she said, "bar none."
George retired from
the paper mill in Cly-
attville, Ga. after approxi-
mately 35 years. He passed
away in 1999.
Dot and George wel-
comed their first son,
George Russell (also
known as "George"), 10
months after they were
married. He was born De-
cember 18, 1946.
"I don't think he likes
his birthday being so close
to Christmas," proud mom
Dot joked.
George is married to
the former Lila Tharpe, of
Wacissa. They have two
children, George Russell


Sgjit was Thanksgiving Day and we were sitf.
citing down to eat," her son, George said.
"She had seen an elderly couple eating a pic.
nic in the park, with sandwiches, on Thanks.
.Tht .an ...iht an_


giving Day. She said,
sent me to the park to
with us."

(known as "Russ") and
Suzanne.
Russ works as a senior
classification officer pat
Jefferson Correctional In-
stitution. He served over a
year in Iraq with the Flori-
da National Guard. He was
stationed in Babylon for
most of his tour. Russ's
wife, the former Angela
Syskand of Monticello,
works for the state in Tal-
lahassee. They have two
children, George and Tay-
lor.
Suzanne works for the
Department of Education
in Tallahassee. She is cur-
rently in the DOE's fi-
nance division. Suzanne's
husband, Paul, works for a
tractor supply company in
Perry, Ga. The couple re-
sides in Monticello.
G.W. and his wife, the
former Darlene Mincey,
reside in Perry, where G.W.
works for Big Top Manu-
facturing as its sales direc-
tor. Their son, George, is at
the University of Florida,
and their daughter, Krys-
tal, is at Tallahassee Com-
munity College. She hopes
to transfer to Florida State
University in February
During the years she
was serving as the
Greenville Town Clerk,
she would get numerous
calls at home from people,


That ain't right' and
get them to come eat


wanting to get their water
turned back on.
"She never took a pay-
ment at home," her son,
George, said, "but it was
taken care of. She knew
who would pay and who
wouldn't."
One of the things that
gave Dot a lot of joy in her
life was mullet fishing.
Her daughter-in-law, Lila,
shared a story about the
time she was fishing with
Dot and Lillie Lee Nobles.
"The game warden
came up and asked us how
the fishing was going,"
Lila said. "Lillie Lee start-
ed to show him the fish
and I told her to put them
down because we had
caught too many Miss Dot
then told him the fishing
was good, but she needed
some more bait. She asked
him if he was going to Per-
ry and if she could send
some money back with
him and asked if he could
pick some bait up and
bring it back to her."
George said that one
time his mother was com-
ing back from Sirmans
with Lillie Lee Nobles, fol-
lowing a fishing trip. The
two women ran into a hog
and knocked out the bot-'
tom of the car they were
in. It scared "both of them
silly" and they had to pull


over and park the car.
In addition to fishing,
Dot loved to travel, partic-
ularly to the mountains in
North Carolina and North
Georgia.
She doesn't fish any-
more and said that she
won't be fishing during
her retirement. She rarely
travels anymore.
George said that
nowadays his mother en-
joys going to u-pick places
like Tanya Terry's, locat-
ed south of Lee off High-
way 53, or the u-pick
owned by the Doners and
the Tookes south of
Greenville.
One of the things'that
Dot Pridgeon is best
known for is her compas-
sion. George recalled a
story when he was a child.
"It was Thanksgiving
Day and we were sitting
down to eat," he said. "She
had seen an elderly couple
eating a picnic in the
park, with sandwiches, on
Thanksgiving 4Day. She
said, 'That ain't right' and
sent me to the park to get
them to come-eat with us."
George said his mama
always knew a fair deal
when she saw it and if it
seemed she was getting
something for less than
she thought it was worth,
she would volunteer to
pay more, especially if the
person seemed to be C'
serving of it.
George said that if he
and G.W had ever needed
anything, they never hesi-
tated to ask their mother
for it.
"My family is very,
very close," he said.


One thing that Dot
also liked to do was to
bake things and give them
to people she liked or
cared for.
One ritual that the
family still observes is go-
ing down, south of Ocala
the Saturday or Sunday
before Thanksgiving and
picking oranges. Of
course, Miss Dot gives
some of them away to peo-
ple she thinks would enjoy
them.
Dot was surprised
with a retirement party
on Sunday, October 28. A
number of her friends and


family showed up for the
party, including
Greenville Mayor Elesta
Pritchett, Town Council
Member Jamie Scarboro,
Tim and Mary Ann
Sanders and Judge Lean-
dra Johnson, who made a
special trip from Lake
City for the event. School
Superintendent Lou
Miller emceed the event.
"The Town of
Greenville is going to miss
Dot," Elesta Pritchett told
this reporter. "She's tak-
ing a lot of years of expe-
rience and' knowledge
with her." ,


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, October 28, 2007
Judge Leandra Johnson,- left, is pictured with Dot
Pridgeon, right, at Pridgeon's retirement party.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, October 28, 2007
The Pridgeon family joined together for Dot Pridgeon's retirement party. Pictured
seated, left to right: Darlene Pridgeon, Suzanne Tart, Lila Pridgeon, Dot Pridgeon and
Krystal Pridgeon. Standing, left to right: Russ Pridgeon, George Pridgeon, Paul Tart,
Terry Studebaker, G.W. Pridgeon and George Pridgeon.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, October 28, 2007
Jamie Scarboro, left, and Elesta Pritchett, right, are shown with Dot Pridgeon, cen-
ter, at her retirement party.


v










8A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www. greenepublishing.com



Moun faion County


Friday, November 2, 2007


NFCC Gets Creative Republicai arty


With Poetry Alive!


Performance Nov. 8

Shows are at 9:45 and 11:15

a.m. and free to the public


A Tribute to Madison Veterans included: Howard Phillips, Bubba Greene, Joe Akerman, Willis Moore, Ashley Beg-
gs, Ed Richey, J. P. Maultsby (front row); Joe Peavy, Stan McClain, Carol Ludwick, Joe Boyles, Mark Branham, John
Maultsby, Tommy Greene, Dale Wetmore (middle row); John Ludwick, Ed Meggs, Joe Hodnett, James Wetmore, Stu-
art Scott (back row).


Republicans To Democrats:


"Your Party Abandoned You"


Photo Submilled
Poetry Alive! performers Alan and Anita perform at a
local school in Asheville, NC.
North Florida Community College is thinking out
of the box by bringing in an upbeat creative team of pro-
fessional poetry performers to introduce poetry in a
whole new light to NFCC students and Madison County
residents. Poetry Alive! is scheduled to perform at
NFCC's Fine Arts Auditorium Thursday, Nov. 8 at 9:45
a.m., 11:15 a.m. and later that afternoon at the Madison
County High School. English instructor Susan Taylor
and the Office of College Advancement worked together
to bring Poetry Alive to NFCC.
Poetry Alive! was founded in 1984 after performing
its first show atMcDibb's Music Hall in Black Mountain,
North Carolina. A teacher in the audience saw the
group's educational potential and asked it to visit her
class. Since then, the group has spent time on the road
teaching students and educators poetry performance
techniques used to empower literacy and creativity in
the classroom. The performance consists of two per-
formers, Ken and Nadine Delano, who will bring the
words of world famous poets to life through dramatic
oral interpretation of selected poetry.
Show times are Thursday, Nov. 8 from 9:45 10:30 a.m.
and 11:15 a.m.-12 p.m. Performances are free and open to
the public. High school and college students are encour-
aged to attend. Seats are limited. Reserve your seat to-
day by calling 850-973-1613 or email scarborok@nfcc.edu.
Poetry Alive! is sponsored by the NFCC Artist Series An-
gels, a non-profit organization striving to provide cul-
tural enrichment opportunities to the community, while
supporting the growth.of the NFCC Artist Series. For
more information call 850.973.1613 or visit us on the web
at www.nfcc.edu.


Photo Submitted
Poetry Alive! performers Chad and Christy perform
at a local school in Asheville, NC.

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;4f Madison, FL 52340 ,
850-973-2385


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The 2007 Fall Republi-
can BBQ Dinner was full
of cheers and laughter, but
mostly it was full of pas-
sionate support for the Re-
publican Party The Madi-
son Area Veterans, and the
Honorable Charles Bron-
son, Florida Commission-
er of Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services, were the
event headliners. Addi-
tional guests included
campaign leadership from
several of the Republican
Presidential frontrnmners.
Wendy Branham.
Chairman of the Madison
County Republican Execu-
tive Committee, opened
the event to a packed
house. Held at the Madi-
son Womans Club. Guests
enjoyed a delicious dinner,
but the real treat came
from the speakers.
Beginning with Vice
Chairman, J.P. Maultsby,
who offered a warm greet-
ing to all the guests, the
unifying message became
as clear as .the unifying
mission: "Madison values
are Republican values."
Precinct Committee-
man, Lee Cherry, followed
with a punchy, yet
poignant, speech, declar-
ing, "The Democratic Par-
ty abandoned the conserv-
ative values that made this


country and county
great... it's supposed to be
freedom of religion, not
freedom from religion."
Prior to closing his com-
ments, Cherry recognized
several guests and invited
them to make a few com-
ments. *
Cherry first intro-
duced Don Curtis of Perry,
State Senate Candidate;
then he introduced Joe
Stansel of Greenville,
Madison Co-Chair of the
"Mitt Romney for Presi-
dent" campaign; and final-
ly Jon. Menendez, with
Fred Thompson's cam-
paign, spoke for a few mo-
ments. Cherry closed with
a poetic recital of Abra-
ham Lincoln's, "Ten
Guidelines."
The tenor of the event
became more resolute as
Col. Joe Boyles, USAF, re-
tired, gave the scheduled
"Tribute to Veterans."
Compelling and eloquent,
Boyles took the events of
the day, especially the
news from Iraq, and fash-
ioned a moving message of
conviction, "Support and
honor those who serve and
have served, and don't be
mislead by the reports,
and often lack of reports,
coming from the media."
Ginny Paarlberg,
Chairman of the Florida
and the Madison County



Y-
W^'.' o--^^ ^


SMIL ITARY



SCODY W. OLLINS

Army Pvt. Cody W Collins has graduated
from basic combat training at Fort Jackson,
Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of training, the sol-
dier studied the Army mission, history tradi-
tion and core values, physical fitness, and re-
ceived instruction and practice in basic com-
bat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare
and bayonet training, drill and ceremony,
marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and un-
armed combat, map reading, field tactics, mil-
itary courtesy, military justice system, basic
first aid, foot marches, and field training exer-
cises.
He is the son of Wade Collins of Sandridge
Church Road, Grand Ridge, Fla., and grand-
son of Betty Collins of N.E. Cherry Lake Cir-
cle. Madison, Fla.
Colins is a 2007 graduate of Sneads High
.- School, Fla.
-low-


Women's Committee, then
introduced Charles Bron-
son'as the keynote speak-
er. "My family has been in
agriculture since the
1600s, and although some
things have changed, core
beliefs haven't. Many of
us started as conservative
Democrats, but the Demo-
cratic Party's liberal shift
caused me to become a Re-
publican years ago, and
.


.^ ** '^


I've never regretted my de-
cision for a moment,"
Bronson stated.
As the event closed,
the marching orders were
clear. Madison is chang-
ing, but the values that
make it great must not
change. And, the Madison
County Republican Party
is committed to. preserv-
ing those values, one voter
at a time.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Michael Curtis, October 25,

Keynote speaker, the Honorable Charles. Bronson,
Commissioner, Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services,


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www.greenepublishing.com


6rccoillc flews


Friday, November 2, 2007


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A


Christian Heritage

Academy News
Christian Heritage Academy had a winning volley-
ball season their last game was on Thursday against
Corinth.
Friday, November 2, CHA is holding their Fellow-
ship Dinner, which is free of charge. At 7 p.m. the
church is serving fried turkey and ham.
On the night of Saturday, November 3, CHA is spon-
soring a talent show and dinner theater. The supper and
show will be held at the Greenville Baptist Church Fel-
lowship Hall. Tickets for the event are $20, and a full
course meal will be served. Call for more information at
(850) 948-2068.
Progress reports are going out to parents of CHA
students on November 20.
The Boston Butt fundraiser will be over on Novem-
ber 21, just in time for Thanksgiving. For $25, you can
choose from turkey ham, or Boston Butt, pre cooked and
ready to eat! Call (850) 948-2068 for more information.












Deborah Howard



Cooks Up Smiles!


SJada Woods Williams
} Supervisor of Elections
,I: (850) 973-6507 I

P aroud iupp rtT "

' I -, U
)4a*,-* G & AJ4 I


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessica Higginbotham, October 31. 2007
Sherry Roland was hired as Greenville's deputy clerk
on October 16. She was born and raised in Madison
County.


h~- xc~ r a J
a a aSim
a a a * ET
I -- _______


SBy Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On October 16, Sherry Roland was hired to replace
Dot Pridgen as the deputy clerk at Greenville City Hall.
As the new deputy clerk,' she's got big shoes to fill.
Roland's predecessor had a knack for her job.
Roland was born and raised in Madison County She
moved to Texas a few years ago,. and spent four years
managing a resort called Lajitas. Her experience as a
clerk is probably Roland's greatest ally in acclimating to
her new position.
While in Texas, Roland worked at a five star resort.
Before that, she owned S&J Deli in Greenville. "I have
experience dealing with people," Roland said.
Since Roland has been with the City, she and clerk
Marsha Bass have done a lot of reorganization, so that
the office "runs more efficiently" Roland hopes to re-
connect with the community and get'to know people.
Roland shared that since being appointed to the po-
sition, she's received much praise from residents of
Greenville. "I just came from the store, and everybody
thinks I'm really good at my job," she stated.
"Sherry used to work at Tri-County with the com-
munity here in Greenville. People know her here." com-
mented Bass.

THE ~RSCRIPTIO NFOR |
; / R-1r


hama


2,-U!/vl jvvv


C ^Danny Jackson, I

SJackson's Drug Store
1308 SW Grand Street Greenville, FL
850-948-3011
Emergency 850-997-3977
S. ,-"""" .: ... t <0 0


R.Ph t


It's Wiggle Time At G.E.S.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessica Higginbotham, October 31, 2007
Deborah Howard is all smiles as she explained that
her job gives her opportunities to mingle with students
and staff and to help in any way she can.
By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Deborah Howard has been working for Madison
County schools since 1979. She's made the rounds to Lee
Elementary School, the old Greenville Elementary, and
to 'Madison County Central School. Deborah isn't a
teacher, though. She's the kitchen, manager in the
school cafeteria.
As the kitchen manager, Deborah has to cook, clean,
and order groceries. She has to make sure that the
school has the right amount of food for portions. She
also has to talk to the students and give them advice
when it's needed.
Deborah always has a smile on her face. She says
that being with the children and cooking are some of
her greatest joys, and she tries to help in any way that
she can. "It's who I am. It's because of who I am in the
Lord. Without Him shining in me, I wouldn't be able to
shine."
During the summers, Deborah works at the 4-H
camp. She also works as a short order cook at the Jef-
ferson County Kennel Club in the poker room.
Deborah is an active member of Allen Chapel AME
Church in Greenville.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessica Higginbotham, October 31, 2007
Linda and the students at GES danced to start out the story time program. They danced "The Wiggle!" All the
students, and even a few teachers, joined in on the fun.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessica Higginbotham, October 31, 2007
Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessica Higginbotham, October 31, 2007 Linda Hesketh, activities coordinator for the Suwan-
Librarian Freda Halley (left) and Activities Coordina- nee River Regional Library, reads a Halloween story to
tor Linda Hesketh told a story about monster stew. Stu- the students at Greenville Elementary School. Her ani-
dents put ingredients into a pot for yummy monster stew. mated personality made for an enjoyable show.


Roland Hired As


Greenville Deputy Clerk










1 OA The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



lroun fadison Count V


Friday, November 2, 2007


MADISON FOLKS ENJOY FLORIDA FOREST FESTIVAL


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Kinsley, October 27, 2007
Eric Powell drove a fire engine for Madison Fire and Rescue in the Florida Forest
Festival Parade in Perry.


IJWCF


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Kinsley,
I October 27, 2007
Robin Ellison, Miss Lee, rode in the
Florida Forest Festival Parade in Perry
last Saturday.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Kinsley,
October 27, 2007
Miss Madison County, Kristin Sirmon,
rode in the Florida Forest Festival Parade
in Perry. Her grandfather, Franklin Carroll,.
drove the car she was riding on.


Greene PuDlisnlng, Inc. roPot oy tmeralo lnsley. uclul
Progress Energy was represented well at the Florida Forest Festival.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Kinsley, Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Kinsley,
October 27, 2007 October 27, 2007 .
Miss Florida, Kylie Williams, was the Madison County's Teen Miss, Cheltsie Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Kinsley. October 27. 2007
grand marshal for the Florida Forest Fes- Kinsley, is all smiles during the Florida Members of the Marzuq Shrine pose for a photograph at the Florida Forest Festi-
tival Parade. Forest Festival Parade. Forest Festival Parde val. ... : '


I Landscape Makeovers I


L I I


FARMly

-URA







www.greenepublishing.com



Church


Friday, November 2, 2007


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11A


R(


New
church w
IPovember
lTuesday)
Clyde Ann
portrays B
through d
an drami
messages.
meeting yo

| Servic
lay Nov 4
mid Tuesd
plans to a
taking dra
rings SC
through t
Biblical
Ignore inform
Annandale
below and
kite at:
dalechris
For more i
,he reviva


revival Through Christian Drama

At New Home Baptist Church
Home Baptist 4965 or 973-4624. The pastor King David for Benj
ill host a revival and congregation invites Netanyauh at the 50t]
r 4-6 (Sunday everyone to this exciting re- niversary of the state
with the popular vival meeting. of Israel. Clyde port
aandale, one who About Clyde Annandale Jesus before the May
biblical characters Few, if any entertainers Jerusalem and five
rama. It is Christ- in the Atlanta area ap- sand of his friends ii
a with powerful proach show business like Jerusalem Convel
It will be a revival Clyde Annandale. He writes, Center. He traveled
u will not want to directs, produces and per- Bosnia as the war end
forms his own plays and sto- research and write Ta
e times are Sun- ries. WSB TV did a feature Medjugore, named
at 6 PM; Monday story on this one of a kind Dramatic Production 1
ay at 7 PM. Make storyteller. Annandale mas- Atlanta Playwright in
ttend this breath terfully portrays fifty-two also receiving coverage
ma as Annandale distinct characters ranging the popular TV S
scripture to life from his well-known one- 20/20.
he portrayal of eyed seaman in Horses to Je- But Clyde makt
characters. For sus in The Upper Room. clear that his acting sl
rmation on Clyde Twenty-seven of his the tool he uses to r
e see press release stage plays have had suc- ture the raw power o
/or visit his web- cessful runs during the life of Jesus. Clyd I
www.clvdeannan- decade since Clyde's return performed, and reseal
tiandrama.com. home from 15 years in Los in Jerusalem much of
information about Angeles. His work has taken 2001. He wrote many c
d, please call 973- him far and wide. He played scripts sitting on the s]


NEW HOME BAPTIST CHURCH
1100 SW Moselcy Hall Road Hwy. 360
Madison. FL 973-4965
PRESENTS
REVI-,4UL THROUGH
CHRISTIAN DR.4 AM.4
WITH THE POPULAR "
CHIRISTIAN DRAMA

CLYDE
ANNANDALE

November 4-6
Sunday Night ra 6:00 PMi


amin
ih an-
ehood
rayed
or of
thou-
a the
nation
d to
Led to
ale of
Best
by an
1997,
ge on
Show,

es it
kill is
:ecap-
f the
lived,
rched
1998-
of his
hores


of the Sea of Galilee and in
cafes in Jerusalem. His por-
trayals evaporate two mil-
lennium of theological dis-
cussion and suddenly the
audience is shoulder to
shoulder with a band of
salty fisherman staring
into the face of the mysteri-
ous renegade Rabbi.
Clyde also carries his
performances into the
homes of those desiring
unique entertainment for
living room gatherings.
With one light on his face
and the sound tracks pro-
viding compelling mood'
background Clyde under-
t-i fd ranh Qtnd roqrvqrP


Happenings At



Madison First Baptist


By Nell Dobbs
Another wonderful day! A wonderful
week! Another wonder to know we are
part of the family of God!
We are taught to be honest, and peo-
ple of our word, and to let our speech be
seasoned with salt because "a word fitly
spoken is like apples of gold in pictures
of silver."
In Florida, Fall 2007, News for Alum-
ni and Friends of the University of Flori-
da, there's an article "On Your Honor-
UF's Honor Code Expected to Do Right
and Be Good Without Supervision-Five
Characteristics .and Traits of Men Stu-
dious, Loyal, Cooperative, a Gentleman
(Only Men Attended Prior to World War
II) and First and Foremost, Honest."
Pastor expressed appreciation for all
flowers of each service and then com-
mented on such beauty this day by W C.
and Frances Copeland and family in
recognition of Breast Cancer Awareness
Month and in honor of all cancer sur-
vivors. The Lord's Supper Table was cov-

ered with lace cloth over a full cloth with
pink ribbons pinned on each end and two
in the middle. Simply beautiful with pink
arrangements in an old-time pitcher and
bowl.
David Fries blessed us, singing, and
Chancel Choir sang "Breathe." Pastor
said in the staff meeting it came up about
Reformation Sunday a very important
day as Martin Luther came to know sal-
vation cannot be bought, that God for-
gives each of us and we ourselves go di-
rectly to Him the Princesses of Believ-
ers. He sang, "A Mighty Fortress Is Our
God."


Walker in Madison Hospital; Martha
Davis in hospital in Jacksonville very ill;
Hazel Woodard, Sue Quick's grandsons-
Patrick Blanton and Jeremiah Quick;
both of Billie Hamrick's parents-her dad
at home-her mother in Lake Park; both of
Dyan Blanton's parents her mother at
home and her dad at Lake Park Nursing
Home; bad wounded Catlin Mixon and all
wounded service people.
There's sadness by death the family
of Dwaine Williams; the family of
Preacher and Mrs. Jake Phillips in the
death of his brother in North Carolina;
the family of Thomas and Sandra Shan-
non in the death of his mother and they
all need to be remembered.
Happy birthday to Todd Gordon,
10/28; Eddie Bell and Jordan Robinson,
10/29; Butch Baker, 10/30; Mikey Wilson,
11/1; Madison Macarages, 11/2; William
Hamrick, 11/3; Elaine Hpnderson, 11/4;
Sam Lamb, 11/6; Andrew Martin; 11/7;
Hank Martin, Joe Peavy and Marissa
Scanlon, 11/8; Keith Gordon and Lester
Plain, 11/9; and Boogie Schnitker.
Sunday night was family night and a
surprise Pastor Appreciation present for
our pastor, and were they surprised!
May God give us desires to be in
church whenever its possible and bless
us when we cannot be.


Christian Drana with Powrful Aeages changes (eye patch, false to pray earnestly for them: Dorothy Knit- & -
through Portrayal of Biblical Charaters chants all with his highly ter twice in one week; Sharon Fletcher; so much more!
For more info el 973-4965 or 973-4624 stylized adventure, ro- home after surgery; Teresa Gallegos, a Ha l
home and about after surgery; Mrs. Hazel

Blessed [is] the man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful. But his I
delight [is] in the law of the Lord; and in his law doth he meditate day and night. And he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water, that
bringeth forth his fruit in his season; his leaf also shall not wither; and whatsoever he doeth shall prosper. -Psalms 1:1-3













Madison Church of God Hanson United Methodist Church Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church
290 NE Dai, Street Hanson. FL 221 Martin Luther King Drine Madison. FL
771 NE Colin Kelly HIwy., Madison, FL (7.5 nules from .Madion on HA ,. 145. turn right on DaJ i p.0 Bo 242 Madiscn. FL
850-973-6307 Rev. Doyle Glass, Pastor Re, i a ne Alb irr-.n. Pasior 850-973-3127
Sunday School 10" 00 am. Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Email: sxiilhofmadison@yahoo corn
Morning Worship 11:00 a.n. Morning Worship 11:15 a.m. Marcus Hawkins, Sr. Pastor Josie Graham As instant Pastor
E ning Worship A:00 pM. Sunday Evening Bible Study .6:00 p.n. Sunday School...........9:30 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.". Choir Practice Sunday Evening :00 pn.m.
Wednesday Evening Pra.er Serice..............7:00 pn.m. Worship Service.......11:00 an.m.
All Are Welcome. Please Come! Wednesday Night Bible Study.....6:00 p.m.
Barbara Memorial Church "We Walk Bv faith, Not BY Sight.'"
II Corinthians 5:7
Of The Nazarene
Hiha v 254 850-973-4160 Greenville Bantist Church Grace Presbyterian Church


Rev. Roberrt 4 fer


l . .. . 1 1365 SV M ain Si ( reen, ille. I-L ,S4 .0 18-2 '31 3 ,- l, I .-. -, S C .. .. ... .... ........... ..-
MorSunday School 10:00 an.m. Sunday School -All Ages 10:00 an.m. Re John Hopwood
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. 6S8 North Washington Ave. Madiso,:,n. FL -* 73-2692
Evening Worship b:30 p.m. Sunday Evening Worship 7:00 p.m. Sunday School For All Ages..................9:45 aJn.
Wednesday Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Sunday Pre-school, Students, and Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Adults Choir Rehearsals ;:30 p.m. Wed. Fellowship Supper/Bible Study........6:00 p.m.
Reapers Of The Harvest Church Wednesday Pre-school children. Youth Groups st 12th Grades................6:30 p.m.
Reapers Of The Harvest Church Youth & Adult Bible Studies 7:00 p.m. Choir Practice 7:30 pm.
3 miles west of Gre0oville, FL -Hw-. 90 -All Invited- Friday Men's Prayer Breakfast................7:00 a.m.
SaWmuel Bass. Sr. 4Pastor Come' Worship And Senre Itith LiUs!
Sunday School..., ................ 00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 nm.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Lee United Methodist Church
Wednesday Night Service 7.30 p.m. H-y. 255 S. Lee. L 850-971-5585 M t. Zion A.M ,E. Church
"And when the day of Pemnecost, wis llv come. Richard Quackenbush. Pastor "A Friend-
thei nere all with one accord in o's place." Ats i2:1 Morning Worship 9:00 a.m. Friend Church
Sunday School 10:00 am. L 850-929-35
EVERYONE IS ALWAYS W LCOME! Morning Worship 1100 an.m. Rev Nathaniel Robinson, Jr. Pastor
Sunday Evening Worship 6:30 p.m. Church School 9:45 an.
St. Vincent DePaul Roman Men's Fellowship Breakfast Worship Service 11:00a.m.
Second Sunday .8:00 ajsb. WoSu Sy I 1 a,
Catholic Church Multiple Weekly Bible Studies/Activites Wed. Nigh Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
C.,,.,.,t The Communiy' With Chrisr'
Meeung & Sumter St 850-973-2428
Rev. Jolm J. Gordon, OMI
on.. Tes., Wed.Mi 9:30n. First United Methodist Church Fellowship Baptist Church
Thursday Mass 7:30 a.m. Since 1'3'1 Horrn at Rutledge St. 850-973-6295 One rmle north of Madison on 14i
Saturday Mass 5:30 pn.m. R.- Robert E Laidlaw Stcv McHarguie, Pai'or
Brta, )aih' ro,)nYouth Pas,. .* ,i Cairr n. Lit LL i, r Gan' Gazlai, Musi, Director JacAite" u;' S,,udeit Paui.r
Youth & Children', MNinismrs. Acue Youne lJull Minisut
St M ar Episcopal Church Service of Word & Table .8:30 anm. Office. 850-973-3266 "
St. M ary's Episcopal Church Sunday School 9:45 am. Morning Worship............... 30 a. & 11:00 a.m.
140 NE Horry A.e..* Madison. FL- 850-973-8338 Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 amn. Sunday.School 10:00 a.m.
The R-. Ben Plril lhicar, Jr., BodIes Senor Warden Wednesday All Youth (grades 6-8)......-5:00-6:00 p.m. Wednesday: Family Night................Call ror schedule
Sunday Church School 10:00 a.m. Youth (grades 9-12) 6:30-7:30 pn.m. "A Family of Familihes" "Comiemporar. \I:.rship'
Sunday Holy Eucharist 10:00 a.m. Men's Fellowship Breakfast (3rd Sun.)........8:00 a.m. If'intrreo red in a home group, call SO-- 3 326e,
Mission Board 2nd Sunday 11:00 an.m. Women's Meeting & Lunch (lst Mon.)....12:00 noon BaumBH-...h.M&..- i t'. I ri..,.-. .-... i
Episcopal Church Women 3rd Sunday...... 1:00 a.m. S,,,ndaa,, ti Ser.cer ,1'V On .1f 1 IF 1230 "' 3l'he,,e L,.ve Ht ,V, Limit
L'riour' nu u ecornm .t u aln 'an.'
I isilors av al'vs it erom e'


af


I


- -~___.1~--_ --:T -1- -.. _.II I~ -


A oizeaio.ofte rsviin hrh nAmrc









12A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www. greenepublishing. corn


Real Estate


Friday, November 2, 2007


71


EARCY APPRAISAL


SERVICES, INC.


RESIDENTIAL + LAND + FARM 4 COMMERCIAL

Vivian Searcy Values Real Estate And Relationships,


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Vivian W. Searcy, operating as
Searcy Appraisal Services, Inc. (SASI),
is a State Certified General Appraiser
providing services for residential, land,
farm and commercial property. More
than that though, she is a professional
dedicated to building committed rela-


tionships.
Located at 148 East Base Street,
Madison, SASI has experience in over
4000 appraisals in the last five years
alone. "We believe the dedication, com-
petency and quality we offer our clients
will serve their need to establish realis-
tic property values. We look forward to
working with, and growing with, the


community," Searcy noted.
"We have a fast, reliable turnaround
time, normally two business days for
residential and land appraisals, and ten
business days for commercial and farm
appraisals," Searcy added.
Moving from a teaching career,
Searcy became an Appraiser and Realtor
in 1989. Certified in both Florida and


Georgia, including FHA, Vivian Searcy's
education and experience is notable, but,
her appreciation for her community and
clients is just as impressive.
For more information, just drop by,
the office, visit the company website at
www.searcyapp.com, email at
SearcvApp(embarqmail.com, or simply
phone at (850) 973-4049.


Madison County Community Bank Announces Participation'

T-i TICA VTifinn iBmknm ont Winklz4nrtamw XM p ,


In a'jL1 i o4aLIj

Visit Yoi
Madison County Community Bank announced it is
participating in the Independent Community Bankers
of America's (ICBA) National Community Bank Mort-
gage Week, Nov. 5-9. Nationwide, local community
banks will review the mortgage documents of current
homeowners, as well as discuss financing options with
first-time homebuyers who see an opportunity to own
their own home.
"We're inviting local homeowners and first time
homebuyers to come to Madison County Community
Bank, to let us review your loan documents and dis-
cuss financing options," said Deidra Newman / Busi-
ness Development Officer.. "Visit us at our 301 E. Base
Street in Madison Monday, November 5 Thursday, No-
vember 8, 9 a.m. 4 p.m. and Friday, November 9, 9.am
to 6 p.m. a mortgage expert will be available. Can't
make those hours? Call us for an after hours appoint-
ment while appointments last.
There is a lot of confusion about mortgages and
home buying right now. Community banks want to
help clear up some of,that confusion. ICBA National


11 ommuniiIU my .utanf iv

ir Local Community Bank I
Community Bank Mortgage Week is a great time for
homeowners and prospective homebuyers to come into
their participating local bank and discuss financing
options.
Mortgage holders can visit their participating
community bank for a review of their mortgage docu-
ments. Community banks want to help the borrower
understand what type of mortgage loan they have if
it's fixed-rate or adjustable-rate -:and if it is an ARM,
when the next reset will occur. Community banks are
placing a special focus on reaching out to borrowers
who have mortgages with terms they don't understand
and wish to have explained by a loan officer they can
trust, have An adjustable rate mortgage that is about to
reset and need to discuss refinancing options or are
considering making their first home purchase.
"Community banks are Well run, highly capitalized
and highly regulated institutions that are not general-
ly experiencing the credit and funding problems we're
hearing about these days," said Newman. "We're en-
couraging people to come talk to common sense


Nov. 5-9
lenders who have steadfastly observed quality under-'
writing and will help borrowers find a mortgage that is,
right for them."
ICBA salutes our business partners for ICBA Na,,
tional Community Bank Mortgage Week who help'
community banks serve their customers: Fannie Mae
the Federal Home Loan. Banks, Freddie Mac, Taylor
Bean & Whitaker, as well as our national non-profit,
partners NeighborWorks America and the Homeown'-
ership Preservation Foundation.
Find out more about ICBA National Community,
Bank Mortgage Week at www.icba.org/mortgageweek.
About ICBA
The Independent Community Bankers of America^
the nation's voice for community banks, represents
5,000 community banks of all sizes and charter types
throughout the United States and is dedicated exclu-
sively to representing the interests of the community;
banking industry and the communities and cus'
tomers we serve. For more information, visit
www.icba.or. .


Bring Your Mortgage

and Join Us for a FREE Checkup


There's a lot of confusion about mortgages right n'ow
and we want to help you understand yours
no matter who you are financed with.

National Community Bank Mortgage Week.
N Izjaber 5- 9, 2007




efikance a curreitm taeo
tt better undertan ourIQt ge ..
.and disfcU S S. 7.t' s0- -.$


k d4 Jp .......F:Vtid-
,....... -w. :el! ,rrr./ IF edt


fl1 ~ Ewtg ~c9-e g~cl i hs~


U/il


People You Know.
A Bank You Can Trust.
Madison County Community Bank


Me s b e r
FDRI


Madison County Community Bank
301 E. Base Street P.O. Box 834 Madison, FL 32340
Phone 850-973-2400 Fax 850-973-8161 info@mccbflorida.com


EQUAL HOUSING
LENDER


I











Friday, November 2, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com



Sc 00ool & Eoucatioo


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A


Aucilla Christian Academy

Holding Annual Raffle


Aucilla Christian
Academy is having its an-
nual raffle on Saturday,
November 10 at 6 p.m. in
the Wilmer Bassett Gym-
nasium.
The purchase of a tick-
et for $100 includes dinner
for two and automatically
enters you to win.
The prizes are a blue


topaz and diamond ring, a
Kawasaki ATV, $1,000
cash, a 32" TV/entertain-
ment package, or a truck
toolbox and accessory
package.
Katriia Walton and
Cristi Beshears. will be
catering a dinner featur-
ing prime rib and shrimp,
potato, salad and dessert
to be served by the ACA
cheerleaders.
Tickets can be pur-
chased from any Board
member or from the front
office.
There is no limit to the.
number of tickets you may
purchase and you need not
be present to win. Call 850-
997-3597 for more informa-
tion.


The

ish Net
Restaurant

Fall Seafood Specials

Thuirsdavs Popcorn Shrimp
V $2.00 Fridays Seafood Platter
OFF Satudays Catfish Filets
Conme ii ti ah d i bar and tllhe iInI.iiq, ~
Prices fkod throuL z Thanktsgliiin
and aippliev to fil entrees tonkL.
TIIURSDAY & FRIDAY 5:00PM-9:30PM
SATURDAY -4:30PM-9:30PM
loI tied iffl4 o t'hlaurel Rd
on Spor/itsman (C,'u Rd
L&aJ. PARK. GEORGLA
229-559-5410i


Stephanie Dobson Has Been Named

A "Commended Student" In The

2008 National Merit Scholarship Progra.m.
... *J- *: "1


Richard Finlayson, the principal of Aucilla Chris-
tian Academy, recently announced that Stephanie
Dobson has been named "Commended Student" in the
2008 National Merit Scholarship Program. A Letter of
Commendation from the school and National Merit
Scholarship Corporation (NMSC), which conducts the
program, will be presented by the principal to this
scholastically talented senior.
About 34,000 Commended Students throughout
the nation are being recognized for their exceptional
academic promise. Although they will not continue in
the 2008 competition for National Merit Scholarships,
Commended Students placed among the top five per-
cent of more than 1.4 million students who entered
the 2008 competition by taking the 2006 Preliminary
SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test


(fAT "NMSQT). -
"The young people named Commended Stf
in the 2008 National Merit Scholarship Program
distinguished by their strong academic perfortxm
in this rigorous competition"- commented spokeSl
son for NMSC. "Our nation's pursuit of eduifct
excellence can be furthered -by publicly h0nf
these outstanding students and by acknowle.i
important role schools play in fostering theirt e'
ment. We hope that this recognition will eari.i.i
their educational opportunities agd 61Xoaigo
dents to strive to realize their potential, "'.
"We 'are proud of Stephanie fof thi g,.
ment. She is an outstanding stu1eint anda46id .I
ing young lady We arecblifident that er1:f
very bright," said principal Richard.FtinlaysoW


Victorian Age Comes Alive In


NFCC Humanities Class

Dr. Rebecca Burkart's students
4 socialize in a 19th century "salon"


Students of Dr. Rebec-
ca Burkart's music hu-
manities class at North
Florida Community Col-
lege got a glimpse of what
life was like in Eturope of
the 1800s dtu-ing a "salon"
event held Oct. 24 and 25.
It was a time of Queen
Victoria, Brahms, and the
romantic poets. Students
described "salon" activi-.
ties as "different and
fun."
Burkart used the


unique "salon" solution
to bridge the cultural gap
between then and now.
"In the 19th century salon
people gathered to read
poetry, listen to music,
dance and play word
games. Understanding
music is understanding
its relation to the culture
in which it was written,"
she said. Burkart, an ac-
complished musician,
demonstrated by playing
a selection from "Re-
quiem" by German com-
poser Johannes Brahms,
known for his romantic,
sweeping waltzes. .
Burkart directs the
NFCC Sentinel Singers,
Jazz Ensemble and the
Community Chorus. Up-
coming performances in-
clude a Community Cho-
rus concert Drs. Rebecca,
and Arnold Burkart are
residents of Monticello.
Students in Burkart's
MUH 2011 class joined in
the spirit of the occasion
by reciting poetry and
playing parlor games pop-
ular during the 19th c.
era. Qi Chen of Monticel-
lo said it was "fun and in-
teresting." Amanda Eich-
horn of Perry said, "It's a
lot like today where you
get together eat, laugh,
talk and play games."
"The salon was an ex-
cellent way for students
to experience another
time and culture," said
Burkart. The class helps
fulfill a nine-hour human-
,ities requirement for an
associate in arts degree.
For more informa-
tion, contact Dr. Burkart
by telephone: 850/973-1643
or email
burkartR(@nfcc.edu.


.- a'
PLUS GET READY FO


MUCH MORE TO COME IN



2008
All Concerts and Events are FREEwith park admission


Reg.Admlssion $44,95 per person, plus tax, parking additional. Obtain 2nd day ticket by exchanging 1st day ticket at the upgrade center
on the first day's visit. 2nd day ticket must be used within 6 days and is non-transferable.
229.219.7080 1-75 Exit 13, Valdosta, GA wildadventures.net


I











14A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.cor



Farm


Friday, November 2, 2007


Madison County


Extension



Service Going



To The Fair


Photo submitted by Madison County Extension Service
Jennifer Stewart gets ready to show her steer at a 4-
H Livestock Show.
By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison .County Extension Service, along
with many of their 4-H Youth, will be represented in
shows throughout the day on November 17, which is.
"Youth and Seniors' Day," at the North Florida Fair.
All registered 4-H members get in free. The NFF
runs from Nov. 8-18 in Tallahassee, at the fair-
grounds on US 27, south of town. Among other ac-
tivities on the 17th, 4-H is also holding the "Share
the Fun" talent show. Children from 14 counties are
invited and those interested should contact their lo-
cal Extension Office to sign up. In Madison, contact
Diane Douglas,. County Extension Officer, at 973-
41.38. Additionally, Madison 4-H will be continuing
their proud heritage of participation in the' Live-
stock show.
4-H Clubs in Madison may be formed at any time,
and existing clubs welcome new members. New
clubs require five children and an adult volunteer.
Membership begins at age five with "Clover Bud"
clubs, and continues to age 18. 4-H also provides on-
going support for numerous youth and after-school
programs
The Madison County Extension Service is a part-
nership between the University of Florida Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS), the
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA),
and Madison County Government in order to pro-
vide scientific knowledge and expertise to the public
through non-resident educational programs. The
three main program focus areas are Agriculture,
Family & Consumer ,Sciences, and 4-H Youth Devel-
opment.


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Tree Trimming Stump Grinding
ALAN DEACON, OWNER Guaranteed
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Savvy Producers Can Survive
Management plans
that include alternative
feeding strategies for live-
stock and horses will be
the key to survival for pro- .. -
ducers facing severe hay .
shortages this year. "'
A dry spring followed
by an early summer
drought caused producers
to miss several hay cut-
tings, says Jane Parish,
beef specialist with the :
Mississippi State Universi-
ty Extension Service. Rain
in some pastures after July -.
1 renewed producer inter- |
est in making a hay crop,
but dry conditions swiftly
returned later in the
month in many areas of .*AT
the state. Hay harvests and yields varied throughout *ive," Lemus says.
Mississippi because of varying moisture conditions, quality of the fora
she notes. Another avenue
"Producers in eastern Alabama experienced even from soybean and
more severe lack of rain, and some Mississippi produc- tritional deficienc:
ers sold them hay," Parish says. "It's a situation where other' problems, p
some people have plenty of hay and some don't." .crop residues for
Despite the good fortunes of some producers, the ,animals,
amount of hay available to carry through the winter is Producers sho
limited, says Extension forage specialist Rocky Lemus. ;age groups and as
Producers in the state who need hay have had to travel the animals that a
as far away as Arkansas, Missouri and Texas to secure or those that exhil
supplies., i serve hay for top
"Having to purchase hay from out-of-state suppliers says.
impacts production for our growers because purchase "Younger cows
and transportation costs can be expensive," he says. requirements, so
Producers have several alternatives available to grazing," she says
minimize problems the hay shortage causes. Because age and feed of les


Hay Shortage
feed prices are less expen-
sive in summer, producers
can buy feed in bulk and
stock up, for the winter,
Lemus says. They also can
employ the practice of
stockpiling by allowing
cattle and horses to graze
forages, such as tall fescue
or bermudagrass, through
the fall until small grains
and annual ryegrass crops
become available in Ie-
cember.
Producers could find a sil-
ver lining' in relying )n
stockpiling.
"A dry situation causes
many forage .plants to
grow slowly and store e
nutrients they have to sl-
S"While the yields may go down, the
ge goes up." ,'
ie for producers is :to use resid s
corn crops for feeding. To avoid iiu-
ies, incidents of nitrate poisoning r
producers should, submit samples opf
analysis before feeding these to their

uld group livestock and horses ir'to
ssess the animals' marketability. Cll
re non-pregnant, the poor performs
bit bad temperaments. This will cdh-
performers in the operation, Parish

s and calves have higher nutritional
they need 'the 'best quality hay aid
. "Mature animals can get by ,on fr-
iser quality"


This Year's Big Corn Crop Will Strail


The Grain Transportation System


As producers harvest
this year's massive corn
crop, the transportation net-
work that shuttles ,grain
from the field and delivers it
to its final destination will
experience significant chal-
lenges.
It's a matter of the sheer
amount of .grain. Last year
the combined corn and soy-
bean yield topped out at 13.7
billion bushels. This year,
the USDA's August esti-
mates put the corn crop at
13.1 billion bushels, a 24%
increase over 2006. Then
add expected soybean pro-
duction of 2.63 billion
bushels (down 18% from
last year), and you have
more than 2 billion bushels
of additional grain in the
U.S. grain marketing sys-
tem.
Although storage capac-
ity has increased across the
Midwest, and suppliers of
grain-handling equipment
have enjoyed a banner year,
there's still a massive
amount of grain that will
continue to work through
the system, well after the
last combine rolls out of the
field.
Filled to capacity
Grain elevators in
North Dakota have reported
that wheat there is being
stored on the ground due to
railcar delays. And a sharp
rise in 75 to 110 grain car
shuttle bids this fall sug-
gests that grain shippers ex-
pect a tight market for rail-
car deliveries into and dur-
ing harvest.
Add one more wrinkle:
Low water levels and sched-
uled lock maintenance and
repair could lead'to lighter
barge loads, narrower chan-
nels, fewer barges per tow,


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more towboat trips and in-
creased towboat fuel times
- all resulting in increased
transit times and costs of
shipping.
In Indiana, there's like-
ly to be an additional 90mil-
lion bushels of grain in the
system. "The entire' trans-"
portation system has
worked quite well to get
grain where it's needed,"
Dooley says. "But this in-
creased volume has: come
on suddenly, so I expect
there to be some very signif-
icant bottlenecks in the sys-
tem."
To put the amount of
grain in perspective, 1 bil-
lion bushels of grain will
fill'1,098,901 semis (each
with a 910-bu. capacity) or
357,142 jumbo hopper rail-
cars (each with a 3,500-bu.
capacity).
The Agricultural and
Food Transporters Confer-
ence of the American
Trucking Association is
working with Congress to
enhance the agricultural
exemption from the hours-
of-service rule and increase
the allowable gross weight
of trucks from 80,000 to,
97,000 lbs. with a supple-
mentary third' axle on the
trailer. "These are huge ben-
efits and will help," Whit-
tington says. "But we still
will need 'more qualified
drivers to handle the addi-
tional loads."
This spring's busy peri-
od was just a taste of what
this fall and winter will
bring, Whittington says. "I
don't know if we can really
prepare for this much grain
coming into the system," he
says. "It's going to make for
a lot of long days and
nights, but we'll work
through it."
Paul Hammes, vice
president and general man-

ager of agricultural prod-
ucts for Union Pacific, says
the company has prepared
for the onslaught of grain
that's moving into the trans-
portation system. The com-
pany has added freight cars
and is bringing more out of
storage. "We also have a
good supply of locomotives,
and the crews are ready" he
says.
Union Pacific saw a
steady increase in demand
through the late summer


and into the fall, driven ini-
tially by a wheat harvest
that was up approximately
20%. And customers are
working to secure railcar
space.
Storage shortage
Dan Mack, vce -presi-
dent"of rail trasportation
and business development
for CHS, says the additional
grain moving through all
marketing channels will cre-
ate challenges for everyone
involved, but perhaps the
biggest challenge will be the
ability to find storage for the
-graii. "The phenomenon of
more corn acres puts a sig-
nificant amount of stress on
the overall storage capacity,"
Mack says,.
But the volume of.corn
entering the system will af-
fect even traditional corn
and soybean areas. "There
will be a lot of grain moving:
through the system," Mack:
says.
As harvest progresses,
experts agree that covered'
storage will be at a premium
and a lot more temporary
storage facilities will spring
up.
Dooley expects that tem-
porary storage will be used
extensively depending on
the area of the country and
the speed of harvest.
Ethanol
It's likely going to take a
few years for the transporta-
tion system to "become effi-
cient again. And ethanbl
may, even change the dy-
namics of how and where
grain is shipped. "We could


see more localized shipping
to ethanol plants, or we
could even start to see grain
flowing up the rivers to
ethanol plants," Dooley says.
Union Pacific is adding
to its system, having spent
more than $100 million on its
infrastructure in 'Iowa anid
Minnesota, and it will invest
another $23 million to add to
the infrastructure in Ne-
braska. It not only will need
to move more grain to the
ethanol plants, it also will
need to transport the
ethanol and dried distillers
grain. "That's in addition to
our traditional feed and ex-
port markets," Hammnes
says. "We need to make sure
our system is theie to handle
the ethanol market as well'as
our current customers."
The bottom line is that
producers should map out
other options if severe bot-
tlenecks occur "There will
be grain on the ground, but
where and how much is still
an unknown," Dooley says.
Mark Orr, general man-
ager of Ag View FS in
Princeton, IL, has addhd
three more trucks to the
company's grain-hauling
fleet. The company also con-
tracts with private haulers
during the harvest season.
"There will be a lot more
grain to handle," Orr says: '
The softened demand
for rail transportation as a
whole during the past six to
12 months has freed up soie
capacity for agriculture, but
here too the value of rail
freight is on the rise.


SOUTHERN FARRIER, LLdC


M DIRECT I 850.391.4733

WEB | WWW.SOUTHERNFARRIER.COM ,I

S HOLISTIC Hoor CARE
S AL BREED I ALL DISCIPLINES
2" ea-mtmwollo 9/,fj


- I -








www. reenepublishing.com


,Friday, November 2, 2007


Outboofs


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 15A


(FWC) Officer Michelle Lawless


Whitetail Deer:


Habitat Basics
13y Mikel Williams,
Soil Conservationist, Natural
Resources Conservation Service, Madison County
SWhitetail deer are so plentiful these days in most
f parts of the country, it is surprising to some people that
they were decimated to the point of near-extinction by
Unrestricted hunting at the turn of the century.
Whitetails are found all over the North American
continent, with populations in the millions. They sur-
Vive in the big woods of northern Maine to the deep saw.
grass and hammock swamps of Florida. They thrive in
nixed farmlands, brushy areas and timber, and can sur-
Vive the desolate cactus and thorn brush deserts of
southern Texas and Mexico. Most people love to observe
Whitetail deer, but overpopulations, especially near ur-
t'Ianizing areas, can cause problems. Whitetail deer can
'be destructive to crops, fruit trees, ornamental plants
and gardens. They can also cause serious damage to for-
;!st vegetation from overbrowsing, and are a dangerto-
,,iotorists as they are commonly hit by autos.
, Food preferences. Deer eat a variety of plants, but
Sin farmland areas, cultivated crops, including corn and
,'soybeans, top the list. A major portion of the diet in the
, 'all is waste grain after harvest. The most critical food
Seed to deer is the fall and winter food supply, because
"they determine the reproductive success of the doe. In
summer months, woody browse such as buck brush,
sumac, and oak is part of the diet. Various forbs and
'' rasses are also part of the diet in the spring and sum-
;ner. Fawns slowly shift from their mother's milk to,
. orbs and grasses as the summer continues.
s Cover needs. Ideal whitetail habitat contains dense,
thickets for cover, and edges of timber and grass or crop
for food. Areas with the largest amount of timber have
the highest deer populations. Cold and heavy snow in
northern regions cause deer to concentrate in protected
areas such as heavy timber, conifer stands, brush, and
shrub swamps.
During the summer, deer can be found wherever
food, water, cover and solitude exist. In May and June,
does seek seclusion for fawning in brushy fields, heavily
v vegetated stream bottomlands, forest edges, pastures,
and grasslands. Green browvse food plots of clovers, and
alfalfa, and diverse native grass and forb mixtures offer
N' good fawning habitat.
For more information, stop by our office at NRCS-
, Madison County, 1416 East US 90, Suite B, Madison, FL
S82340, (850) 973-6595 x113, or visit the NRCS website at
$vww.nrcs.usda.gov or, visit the NRCS Wildlife Habitat
4Management Institute at www.whmi.nrcs.usda.sov.


FISHDAY

4-6" & 6-8" Channel Catfish
Largemouth Bass Black Crappie (if avail.)
Bluegill (Coppernose & Hybrid) Redear
8-11" White Amur Grass Carp ahead Minnows
We will service you at:*
Farmers Supply Co. in Madison, FL
TUES., Nov. 6 From: 4-5 PM
or To Pre-Order, call Arkansas Pondstockers,
1-800-843-4748 Walk-ups Welcome


Dies 1

Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission ,(FWC) Offi-
cer Michelle Lawless, 47,
died late Saturday, Oct.
27, when- her all-terrain
vehicle crashed during a
routine patrol in the
Rotenberger Wildlife
Management Area in
Broward County.
Lawless had been
working in the north-
west corner of the man-
agement area, near the
L5 Canal and the Palm
Beach County line, when


during Rountine Patrol


she apparently collided
with a fixed object.
The Florida Highway
Patrol is investigating
the accident.
Lawless's career
with the FWC's Division
of Law Enforcement be-.
gan on May 25, 2003. Af-
ter completing the FWC
academy, she was as-
signed to Broward Coun-
ty; where she worked un-
til her death.
"Michelle was a dili-
gent, accomplished offi-
cer. who died doing what


Fl


Michelle Lawless


she did so well: protect-
ing Florida's natural re-
sources. This is a
painful loss to the entire
agency, her family and
friends," said Major
Brett Norton, comman-
der of ,law enforcement
for the FWC's South Re-
gion.
Lawless is survived
by her parents, Tom and
April Lawless, i and
countless other family
and friends. Funeral
arrangements have not
been finalized.


FWC Moves To Combat Boat Theft
The Florida, Fish and Wildlife Conservation Comi- vast boating community take precau
mission's (FWC), Division of Law Enforcement urges coming victims of these crimes."
boat owners to protect their boats from theft and to Readers are reminded to contact ti
avoid boat title fraud schemes. office or police department to report
More than 1,200 boats have been reported stolen in suspected boat title fraud.
Florida this year. That reflects a 30-percent increase Additional information and tips
compared to the same period last year. Also, the FWC theft and boat title fraud cai
said there is a growing trend in theft of "go-fast" type MyFWC.com/Law and at the Florid
boats. gence Unit's Web site, www.FMIU.or.
"Go-fast boats, 26-39 feet long, are being targeted
with greater frequency than in previous years," said Lt. -..
John Humphreys of FWC's Investigations Section. i
"These boats are targeted by criminals because of their *
high-dollar value and for use in maritime-based smug- --
gling activities.", ,Bi T
FWC officers possess a tremendous amount of expe-
rience and knowledge relative to the boating industry a ao
This resource is available to law enforcement partners
and private industry through active partnerships with
the Florida Marine Intelligence Unit (FMIU) and 5o
through several other marine intelligence-sharing ini- N
tiatives. 8 5u84U31111702S.Byronl
"FWC provides investigative coordination and intel-
ligence analysis support to a myriad of sheriff's offices
and police departments .around the state. We offer C O
everything from assistance with identifying boats and
suspects to predicting future theft trends," Humphreys
said.
Dade, Monroe and Broward counties have the high-
est number of boat thefts; however, thefts have been re- .
ported from every county in the state. .. .
"Investigations can quickly become highly complex .. .
and involve not only grand theft, but also violations .
such as title fraud, insurance fraud, larceny, alteration.
of hull identification numbers and tax evasion,"
Humphreys said.
"Boat theft is big. business and a growing trend in :" Madison, F .
Florida," said Capt. David Bullard of FWC's Investiga- Chicken Wings ul
tions Section. "Frequently, boat thefts are linked to larg- g
er issues, such as organized crime, illegal immigration Chicken Breasts
and domestic security threats. Because of this, it's es- Leg Quarters I
sential to work with federal and local law enforcement 10 lb. Bag of Leg Quarters
agencies to combat the problem." Hand Cut Ribeyes
"Protecting Florida's boaters and waterways is vital Hand Cut Ribeyes
to FWC's mission," said FWC Commission Chairman Pork Chops |
Rodney Barreto. "It's critically important that Florida's Hnmemade Rind Bacon


HUNTERS WELCOME! GREAT FISHING YEAR ROUND!
Located In The Heart Of Nature's Recreation Ground:r
Close To Public Boot Rarnp.! Fu./-ookups 30/50 Amp Service
*."\ ^~ f. .. .\i ; .' .


Spike

Itio s to avoid be-
heir local sheriff's
t a stolen boat or
for avoiding boat
n be found at
la Marine Intelli-


ENOW

IAVE
LIVE
RABS!


Ribs Also availale
Ox Tails Mlt m
Fresh Ground Chuck Mllet Shrimp
Cube Steak Speckled Trout
Bottom Round Roast Catfish and other
Stew Meat fresh fish




Hours Hou s
Fri 9- We. &Thus. -6


aick'le~-~


I


'-1










16A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www. greenepublishing. com


Friday, November 2, 2007


Childcare in my home in Lee. Day or
night. Meals and snacks provided. Rea-
sonable rates. 'Call (850) 971-5670 or
(386) 205-9160.




TidyUI

cleaning services

Cleaning Services
Rental apartments, houses & mobile homes
cleaned after tenants move out. Thorough
and dependable. Call Carla. cell 229-834-
1110

Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Irrigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
(850) 973.2848

Excavating Work
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Removal,
Demolition, and Roads. No Job Too Small.
Free Estimates. Call Paul Kinsley at 850-
973-6326

I build sheds, decks,
exterior carpentry work, window and
door replacement.
Call Bob: 850-242-9342







Yard Sale Saturday, November 3, 9 a.m.
Variety of stuff including x-box, ipod, digi-
tal camera, household items, pocket knives,
boys clothes, DVD's, CD's, tackle, printer
and scanner, books, and much more! 1401
Cactus Ave. in Lee. Call for directions
(850) 971-2887.
One Big Sale Nov 9th & 10th
Carpenter Tools, lrrtg2iinri water r Line &,
Fittings,. Interior Decoration, Furrniture,
Sewing Machine in Cabinet, Clothing,
Shoes, Handbags, Drapes, Sears Treadmil-
11, Cook & Glassware, Grills; George Fore-
man & Kenmore, Christmas Decorations
and Many Other Items. 4000 N State Road
53.
Garage Sale
GFWC
Greenville Women's Club,
US 221 South. Nov. 3rd
9 a.m. until?
Christmas decorations, food and much
more! (850) 948-3951






Dunn's
Lawn Mower Repair
Welding
New & Used Parts
850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340






FOR SALE Antique marble top desk and
antique marble top stand. Matching, set.
Any offer considered. (850) 673-9308.


25 lbs. of

Clean Newspapers
just $2 a bundle
973-4141

2004 6x12 closed cargo trailer. Black with
flat top. Ramp back door. V-nosed front.
$2750. Call (850) 929-2074. -
Woodworking Machines
Includes Custom Tablesaw/Router Table
Combo with Commercial Biesemeyer
Fence with 54" side-rail, 6" Jointer, 6"/9"
Sander, 1"/8" Sander, and 12" planer. De-
tails and photos at:
www.3ws.us/movingsale.html
(850) 929-2074
Nintendo-64
5 Controllers
2 Meriory Cards
10 Games
Excellent Condition
$100
Call 973-3497






End of season Pond Sale!
All Water Garden plants 50%, off! Save on
all cleaning additives!
Decorative Koi buy 2 Get 1 FREE!
Creatures Featured Pet Shop
973-3488


FALL WEATHER IS HERE!
Feed your outdoor
Koi and Goldfish properly.
Cool Weather Food is now
available at
Creatures Featured Pet Shop
850-973-3488





Wanted 10-20 chickens.,
Maybe a rooster or two
also guineas and peafowls.
850-464-1165





For Rent: 2 bedroom older mobile
home. Country Living (in trailer park)
spaced very far apart. Quiet living. Rent is
$300.00 per month / $250.00 deposit. For
more information call 850-971-5856.

2 bedroom 1 bath mobile home in
park, 135/week, owner pays electric,
$300 deposit, call Erin at 850-570-0459


'RENTALS
Mobile Homes, newly renovated,
3 BR'l bath. i$3'5 ronth
Rooms $75!'% eek. ttullieCs included, 2
BR/1 bath, $135l/ eek. ,utilities included.
Call 1-800-785-7433 or 1-850-673-9564
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed. for Seniors and Dis-
abled. 1 & 2 bedrooms, HUD vouchers ac-
cepted Call 850-973-3786 TTY Acs 711.
Equal Housing Opportunity

COMMON SENSE-NO
FRILLS COUNTRY HOME,
3 Bdrm, 1 Bth,.pine floors, fire-
place, CHA, porch, no pets, no
indoor smoking, $550 .per
month plus deposit, ready
Nov 1st.
All Realty Services
850-973-9990




lenville ointe ,


lApartments

1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts.
Rental assistance may be available. HUD
vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3036.
TDD/TTY 711.192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing
Opportunity
Luxury Apartments- overlooking the
Courthouse Circle in downtown Monticel-
lo, 3BR/2BA, $1050. Monthly, Contact Ka-
trina Walton at 510-9512





Offadison Ofpartments.

Rental assistance may be available. HUD
vouchers accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR HC &
non-HC -accessible apts. Call 850-973-
8582, TDD/TTY 711. 315 SW Lawson Cir-
*cle, Madison, FL 32340. Equal Housing
Opportunity


Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage-23 acres,
Comer lots. Fronts both Harvey Greene
Dnve and Highway 53 South. Natural
gas line. 8 inch water main, access to
ciry utilities, ire hydrant. and service
from two power companies. Property
has easy access to 1-10. via SR 53 & SR
14. Will build to suit tenant
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141

$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385


Excavating & Tractor Services
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Removal,
-Demolition, Roads, Mowing, Discing,
Box-Blading, and Tilling.
We have top soil and fill dirt
Call Paul Kinsley
850-973-6326


LOG HOMES
With as little as
$500 Down
Prestige Home Center
Lake City, Florida
1-800-355-9385

Investors Look!!!
Main house; 2 bedroom/2 bath with 4 Cab-
in rentals on over 2-acres plus income po-
tential with 700' US 90 frontage. $135,000.
Advanced Real Estate Sales
(850) 997-1691
House For Sale
Investors Special
3 bedroom, 1 bath on a: large lot, fixer up-
per. Now available. 183 SE Farm Road in
Madison. Please call (407) 252-4744.
3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995
Factory Direct
Prestige Home Center
352-752-7751







3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995
Factory Direct
Prestige Home Center
352-752-7751

$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385











Publishing, nc1

Ad Builder/Graphic Artist needed. The,
position includes designing and building
the ads. for both weekly papers. Must be
able to work well under pressure and main-
tain. a team player relationship with co-
workers. Experience and/or education in
this field preferred. Apply in person at 1695
South SR 53 or fax resume to 850-973-
4121



-1

SFOOD STORE
Assistant Managers &
Customer Sales Associates
Looking for highly motivated employees,
with retail experience for the Convenient
Store business for Madison & Greenville
areas. ALL shifts. Offering competitive
salary, weekly pay, Vacation, paid Holi-
days, Bonus and 401 K Plan.
Call Kim at 352-494-7550 or 866-539-
7685 ext 42 for more information.

Advent Christian Village
Current Jobs Line Advertisement Call
658-5627 or visit www.acvillage.net
24 hrs/day, 7 days/week

Do more than work;
join a family!

LPN direct long-term care staff
nonrestricted FL Lic. required; Experience
preferred.

CNA direct long-term care staff
FL certificate required; Experience pre-
ferred.

Competitive wages and competitive bene-
fits for FT positions (health, dental, life,
disability, supplemental insurance; 403b;
paid time off; plus access to onsite daycare
and fitness facilities.

Apply in person at Personnel Office (Carter
Village Hall) Monday through Friday from
9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax re-
sume/credentials
to (386) 658-5160.

EOE / Drug-Free Workplace / Criminal
background checks required

$ Christmas Is Coming $
Earn gift dollars
Sell AVON part time
50% earnings
Kit Only $10
Call Dorothy ISR
(850) 973-3153
Maintenance person needed at Holiday


Inn Express. 167 E. Bandit St. (850) 973-
2020. Apply in person.


PERRY FLEA MARKET
V ,'S^ Antiques Glassware Collectibles Gifts & More 4%
Yard Sale Visit the Tool Shop FRI SUN 10 A.M. 4 P.M. We Buy
Set.Up s.5-& up Hwy. 19 S. (Old Motel) (50) 838-1422 (850) 584-7124all Us


GREENEI S

Publishing, Inc.
Greene Publishing, Inc. is ,now accepting
applications for current as well as, future
position openings. Experience is preferred,
but we will train the'right mdi duals
. Working at the newspaper is fun re&% ardinr.
fast paced and requires a person that is out-
going and capable of working easily under
stressand deadlines. No l% o da\ ; are ever.
the same. Key full time or part-time posi-
tions include:
-Reporters ,
Advertising Sales Associates
Layout & Design iExperience required)

If you're a responsible adult,,punctual, and
have a great attendance record, please fax
your resume to Ted at 850-973-4121; email
to:2ted@greenepublishing.com or appl) in
person at our office on.Hwy 53, ju'si souih
of Madison. We welcome those who want
to grow with us. .

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Madison Co unri Public Works ,
Roaid Department '.-

Job Title: Machine Operator (Two Posi-
tions Aiallabhe)

Salary: Starts at $11.04 per hour
Job Duties: Miscellaneous equipment op-
eration performing routine maintenance
and minor repairs on such equipment; per-
forming other job duties as assigned by su-
pervisor, including truck driving, laborer
and semi-skilled assignments when neces-
sary to maintain work schedule or during
slack or seasonal periods. ,
Minimum Qualifications:
Minimum of two (2) years experience op-
erating, various heavy equipment and/or
heavy trlickl.. .-,r ini\ c nmhiOjnji ri of educa-
tion, traini,i jrid c\pcnerince,% hlch pro-
vides the required krn:'.. ledge. kills. and
abilities. :

High School Diploma or its equivalent pre-
ferred

Sufficient health, physical strength, and
agility to do heavy manual labor
Valid Commercial Driver's License Class B
with Air Brake Application or higher
Application Deadline: 5:00 PM, Wednes-
day, November 14, 2007

Madison County is an Equal Opportunity
Employer and a Drug Free Workplace.


U~


Senior Citizens Council
S. .of Madison County, Inc.,

'Position: OAA Coordinator, (Older Ameri-
can Act) "
Duties.include: Assessments, observation,
maintaining confidential records, and re.,
ports as well other in-home services. Coor-
Sdinate activities for seniors that-come into
the center and all services pertinent to the
frail homebound elderly.
Experience: BS Degree in social work;
psychology, sociology, nursing or related
field plus two years of work experience in
social programs. BS degree may be submit
ted for one year above depending on infor-y
nation obtain from previous employees;
: Must'have experience working with group
.activities and a valid driver's license.
No, phone calls, to obtain an application
please come by the Madison County Senios
Center at 486 SW Rutledge Street, office
.hours are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Joann Bridges Academy, a 30 bed resi4.
dential facility in Greenville FL., is look-i
ing for a Building Manager to ensure that
the physical plant, its grounds, and perime-'
ter are nairiijined so that the environment
": is, safe and secure for.youth, staff, visitors,
- and the community. A high school diploma
'and an apprenticeship or the equivalent in.
building trades preferred; plus'two addi-,
tional years work and supervisory experi-,
ence in the building trades. Must be able to
pass a background, drug screening and
physical. Please contact Ms. Mobley at
(850) 948-4220 or fax resume to (850) 948.-
4227 .


Looking for a new job,
a second job or a
6 career switch?


Check the classified
first for the most
complete, up-to-date
employment listings
in the area.


Bruce DuPuis 850-524-6194
Jay Davis 850-973-9990
Bruce Mitchell 850-933-4706
Lynette C. Sinnon 850-933-6363
Willard Keen 850-971-5388
Jack Richards 850-929-4899
Teresai Stalvey 850-673-1267
Leonard Helfand 850-973-4073


Lynette C. Sirmon, Broker

All Realty Services,
306 SW Pinckney Street Madison, FL
850-973-9990


I I -77 M,




- -- -- -- --y


RAINBOW'S END, 2/2,
riverfront, one acre, new in
2006, listed at appraised price.
$285,000







ANTIQUE LOVERS DREAM!
Early 1900's Southern Colonial Farm
House, pine floors, bead board walls/ceil-
ings, central foyer entrance, porches en-
closed, high ceilings, pickett fencing.
Expansive gardening area. Let the radi-
ance and warmth of this home inspire
you to complete the restoration.







MULTI USE LOCATION,
live where you work, corner lot,
3/2, new DW, workshop,
garage, fenced, frontage actively
used for commercial sales.
$114,900







LITTLE CABIN-BIG HOUSE,
DW with additions, storage
bays, workshop, barns, screened
summer kitchen, 1 Bdrm Cabin,
2 acres under fence, 5 miles to
Suwannee River


& enjoy more of this 1994
Fleetwood 3/2 with new metal
roof, great room concept, just
on the outside edge of town.
$69,500






VIVID HOT HUES! SIZZLIN STYLE.
Stocked Pond w/ central fountain.
14x16 wkshp. w/ loft & 8x16 concrete
pad. Rec room 23x24 + hot tub, ce-
ramic tile. Den w/ frplc, formal LR &
DR, eat-in kitchen, 2.8- ac. landscaped.
Immaculate condition.







BRING YOUR TOOL BELT,
imagination and finish to your taste. Original
home built in 1978 w/ addition built on in
1998. Old homestead setting w/ oaks, pecans,
tnr,-inr. --- I."-,-s, ,perm. pasture,
lenced/crossed fenced, equip. shed & pole
barn, close to Cherry Lake, 16.59 acres, high
rolling terrain.


0


I-~I









www. greenepublishing.com



EcaaIs


Friday, November 2, 2007


4,


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 17A


LEGAL NOTICE

THIS LEGAL NOTICE FOR THE PURPOSE OF ADVERTISING THE INTENT TO
DISPOSE OF SOME SAID PERSONAL PROPERTY BELONGING TO MS, KIM-
BERLI CRUMITY, WHICH IS LOCATED AT GREENVILLE STORAGE CENTER
14026 W. HWY. 90, GREENVILLE, FLORIDA.
TO BE PARTICULAR UNITS N, 0 & 14
LET IT BE KNOWN TO ALL THAT SAID STORAGE UNIT WILL BE EMPTIED
AND DISPOSED OF IN THE FORM OF DONATION TO A CHARITABLE ORGA-
NIZATION ON OR AFTER 9 AM ON DECEMBER 15,2007.
10/31

LEGAL NOTICE

THIS LEGAL NOTICE FOR THE PURPOSE OF ADVERTISING THE INTENT TO
DISPOSE OF SOME SAID PERSONAL PROPERTY BELONGING TO MS. KIM
ENGLISH, WHICH IS LOCATED AT GREENVILLE STORAGE CENTER 14026 W.
HWY. 90, GREENVILLE, FLORIDA.
TO BE PARTICULAR UNIT P
LET IT BE KNOWN TO ALL THAT SAID STORAGE UNIT WILL BE EMPTIED
AND DISPOSED OF W THE FORM OF DONATION TO A CHARITABLE ORGA-
NIZATION ON OR AFTER 9 AM ON DECEMBER 15, 2007.
10/31


LEGAL NOTICE

THIS LEGAL NOTICE FOR THE PURPOSE OF ADVERTISING THE INTENT TO
DISPOSE OF SOME SAID PERSONAL PROPERTY BELONGING TO MR.
ARNOLD COVACHERICH, WHICH IS LOCATED AT GREENVILLE STORAGE
CENTER 14026 W, HWY. 90, GREENVILLE, FLORIDA.
TO BE PARTICULAR UNIT 16
LET IT BE KNOWN TO ALL THAT SAID STORAGE UNIT WILL BE EMPTIED
AND DISPOSED OF IN THE FORM OF DONATION TO A CHARITABLE ORGA-
NIZATION ON OR AFTER 9 AM ON DECEMBER 15, 2007.
10/31


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FaOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
ROY F. MILLION, CASE NO: 07 -181-CA
Plaintiff,
VS.
REBECCA HOLMES: UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1;
UNKNOWNT'ENANT NO, 2; UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTERESTS BY- THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION,
OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT,
TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN
DESCRIBED: and MADISON COUNTY, a Political
Subdivision of the State of Florida,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE,

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a final Judgment of Foreclosure dat-
ed October 29, 2007, in which ROY F. MILLIRON is the Plaintiff and REBECCA
I HOLMES, UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKN WN TENANT NO, 2; UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE
ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED;
and MADISON COUNTY, a Political Subdivision of the State of Florida, are Defen-
dants. I, TIM SANDERS, Clerk of the Court, will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the front steps of the Madison County Courthouse in'Madison, Florida, at 11i00
AM (or as soon thereafter) on the 29th day of November, 2007. The following described
property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosuie:
Commence at the intersection of the Southerly right of way of the SCL Railroad (60'
from main tract) with the Westerly right of way of State Road 360 A (40' from center-
tine thereof) and run South 34 degrees 29 minutes 11 seconds West along the Westerly
right of way of State Road 360-A 223,70 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, from said
POINT OF BEGINNING, continue South 34 degrees 29 minutes 11 seconds West along
said right of way 102.30 feet, thence leaving said right of way, run North 60 degrees 54
minutes 31 seconds West 152.42 feet, thence North 51 degrees 41 minutes 08 seconds
East 0,00 feet, thence North 00 degrees 06 minutes 52 seconds West 29,23 feet, thence
South 61 degrees 33 minutes 49 seconds East 145.24 feet to the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, containing 0,32 acres, more or less:
Together with all structures, improvements, fixtures, appliances, and appurtenances on
said property or used in conjunction therewith.
Any and all bidders, parties, and interested persons shall contact the information desk
of the Clerk of Court for the exact location of said sale.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partic-
ipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact Court Administrator, P.O Box 1569, Lake City; FL 32056-
1569, Ph: 386-758-2163, within 2 working days of your receipt of this Notice, If you are
hearing or voice impaired. call 1-800-955-8771.
WITNESS my hand and the official seal of'said Court, this 29th day of October, 2007
at Madison, Madison County, Florida.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Ramona Dickinson
(Court Seal) Deputy Clerk

Scot B. Copeland (FBN 0156681)
LAW OFFICES OF SCOT B COPELAND
174 East Base Street
Madison, Florida 32340
Ph: 850.973.4100
11/2.11/9.
i-


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NOTICE OF MEETING
CITY COMMISSION
MADISON, FLORIDA

The regular meeting of the City Commission of the City of Madison, Florida will be
held Tuesday, November 13, 2007 at 5:30 p.m. in City Hall.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect
to any matter considered of such meeting will need a record of the proceedings, and
that for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the ap-
peal is based.
11/2


NOTICE OF PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCE
BY THE CITY COMMISSION
CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that proposed Ordinance No. 2007-9, bearing title as
follows, will be considered Tuesday, November 13, 2007 at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall, Madi-
son, Florida.

ORDINANCE NO. 2007-9

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA,
AMENDING ARTICLE III OF ORDINANCE NO. 2006-17 OF THE
CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF MADISON TO ALLOW
THE CITY COMMISSION TO WAIVE OR REDUCE ONE OR MORE
IMPACT FEES FOR LAND WHERE THE OWNER OF SUCH LAND
HAS RECEIVED A BUILDING PERMIT FROM THE CITY OF
MADISON FOR SUCH LAND BETWEEN JANUARY 1, 2007 AND
APRIL 2, 2007; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING
FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; AND PROVID-
ING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
A copy of the proposed Ordinance is available for public inspection at City Hall, 1adi-
son, Florida during regular business hours. At the meeting, all interested parties may
appear to be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If a person decides to ap-
peal any decision made by the City, the person may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA
BY: /S/Lee Anne Hall
City Clerk
11/2


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ANF

ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA

Classified Display M'trav Daily


(Week of October 29, 2007]


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 07-507-DR
Division:
Vondal W. Tompkins, Jr.
Petitioner
and
Rita J. Tompkins
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: Rita J. Tompkins
Suitland, Maryland
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Vondal W. Tompkins,
Jr.whose address is 445 SE Benchmark Dr. Lee, Fl. 32059 on or before 11/23/07 and
file the original with the clerk of this Court at Madison County Courthouse, 125 SW
Range Ave., Madisor, Fl. 32340 before service on Petitioner or immediately there-
after. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demand-
ed in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk
of the Circuit Court's office. You may review these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office notified of your current ad-
dress. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.
Dated: 10/19/07
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Christy R. Wilson
Deputy Clerk..
10/26. 11/2. 11/9. 11/16/07


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