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The Madison enterprise-recorder
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00140
 Material Information
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title: Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title: Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Creation Date: September 21, 2007
Publication Date: 1933-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID: UF00028405:00140
 Related Items
Preceded by: Enterprise-recorder

Full Text
"ORIGIN MIXED ADC323
University of Florida Library DC
DePj. or Special Coll. Fla History
21 nmathers Library
Gainesville FL 32611
" *E 4-U-.


www.greenepublishing.com


ter mabison



flteflmiB


Friday, September 21, 2007


America's Most-Requested

Young Speaker To Appear

At Central School
By Jacob Bembfy .-' ...
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Shannon Pickard,
America's most-re-
quested young
speakerwho is a '
best-selling author
and TV show host,
will be at the Madi-
son County Central,
School Gymnasium
on Wednesday, Sbp-
tember 26, at 7 p.m.
Pickard performs
more than 200 shows
a year and is'an offi-
cial spokesperson .
fTr the Chicken ",. r
Soup for the Soul Se- ..
ries. He is a writer,. '
producer and co- '.
host of a Weekly TV
show called Teen
Tbak on the WB and
a series regular on
TLC's For Better Or Fr"
sity Blues and Walker, Texas Ranger,
Pickard will be addressing teen drivers, prospective drivers and their
parents.
Pickard uses inspirational improve (like the improvisation seen on
Drew Carey's Whose Line Is It Anyway?) to get his points across.
Pickard will be available for a book signing of his bestseller, The
Choice Is Yours: A Formula for Success, following the program on
Wednesday evening.
The event is said to be one of the most entertaining, motivational and
powerful events one will ever attend. .
Pickard will also be speaking to students during the day at the Cen-
tral School on Wednesday and to students at the high school and Excel
School on Thursday,
Pickard's performance is paid for by a grant from the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation.


Three Injured In


Head-On Collision


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Three people were injured in a
head-on collision on Wednesday,
September 12, on State Road 53
South at the entrance ramp of In-
terstate 10.
According to a Florida High-
way Patrol report, Jose Gonzales,
47, of Madison was traveling
north on State Road 53 at approx-
imately 5:20 p.m. At the same
time, Patricia D. Welch, of 66, of
Lee, was attempting a left turn
onto the eastbound entrance
ramp of 1-10 in a. 1997 Chevrolet.
As Welch attempted the turn,
she entered the path of Gonzales'


1996 GMC.
The front of Gonzales'. 1996
GMC struck the front of Welch's
car.
Welch's car rotated counter-
clockwise 36 degrees before com-
ing to a final rest in the north-
bound lane of State Road 53.
Gonzales' vehicle left the road
on the east shoulder, coming to a
final rest as itstruck a tree.
Gonzales and his passenger, Is-
abel Gonzales, 45, of Madison,
suffered non-incapacitating in-
juries in the wreck.
Welch was taken to Tallahas-
see Memorial Hospital, where
she remains after receiving nu-
merous surgeries.


Lettie Sexton Joins

Greene Publishing, Inc.


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Lettie Sexton has
joined the Greene Pub-
lishing, Inc. staff as an
advertising sales rep-
resentative.
Lettie, whogrew up
in Lee, is the daughter
of Malcolm and
Gladys Sexton. She is
also the granddaugh-
ter of Joyce and the,
late Ed Smith and the
late Dorothy Sexton,
also of Lee.
While growing up,
Lettie participated in
the North Florida
Livestock Show and
Sale and won the gain-


Lettie Sexton


in-weight division two
years in a row.
Prior to working at
Greene Publishing,
Inc., Lettie was em-
ployed at Ken's Barbe-
cue and at Nestle Wa-
ters in Lee.
Away from work,


Lettie's hobbies in-
clude hanging out
with friends, dirt bike
riding, fishing and
sports in general.
Lettie said her fa-
vorite part of the job
is working with the
staff in the office and
getting to meet won-
derful people over the
telephone.
If anyone would
like to advertise in
The Madison Enter-
prise-Recorder or The
Madison County Car-
rier, they may contact
Lettie or any of our
other advertising
sales associates at 973-
4141.


Greenville Council Lowers Millage


And Votes A Pay Raise For Employees


'By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.


The Greenville Town Council voted 3-2 to adopt
a tentative millage rate of 8.09 mills and give
town employees a five-percent across the board
raise.
Mayor Elesta Pritchett and Council Member
Jamie Scarboro cast the dissenting votes.
The Council approved a contract with the
Florida Department of State Historical Resources


for renovation of Ray Charles' childhood home.
A public hearing was held on a USDA grant to
complete the town's sewer system. There was no
comment from the' public and no vote on the mat-
ter. ,
Discussion was held on a new town website. Tr-
ish Hinton and Justina Cone will be volunteering
their time to keep the site up.
A discussion on sale of property to Ernest
Pritchett was postponed when he didn't show up
for the meeting:


School Board Discusses Property


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc
The Madison County School Board handled mat-
ters at their Tuesday, September 18, meeting.
One of the items on the agenda included re-
questing an educational plant survey be done for a
proposed new library for the Town of Lee. The
Madison County Commission is requesting to have
a portion of land next to the Lee Elementary School


For Lee Library
be set aside for the new library.
The board also agreed to pay a supplement for
four assistant principals at Madison County Cen-
tral School who have assumed the duties of Sam
Stalnaker, the principal of the school, while he is,
deployed to Afghanistan with the U.S. Army Re-
serves.
The board voted to approve a Merit Award Pl4n.
Out-of-field teachers for the 2007-2008 school year
were approved.


By Jacob Bembry Howard
Greene Publish- Phillips
ing, Inc.
The Madison
County Commis-
sion approved
bond for two
new members to .
the Madison
County Memori-
al Hospital
Board of Direc-
tors.
MCMH CEO ,.: .' '"
David Abercrom-
bie appeared at :,. ,'
the meeting, re- ;' I *. -.,
questing $5,000 &.,t.t'
in bond for l ..J
Howard Phillips and Oliver Bradley Abercrombie
said that Gov. Charlie Crist had appointed the.two
men to the MCMH Board of Directors.,
Phillips is employed by Madison County Commu-
nity Bank as a vice-president. Bradley is the Veter-
ans Service Officer for Madison County and is the
pastor of Morningstar Missionary Baptist Church.:
County Attorney Tom Reeves said that the board
had previously approved bond for Jim Sale as an
MCMH board member for only $2,000.
Commissioner Ronnie Moore made a motion to
approve the two men for bond in the amount of


Travis New Officer At

Madison Police Department
By Jessica | home, and I feel more
Higginbotham welcome here."
.Greene Publishing, Inc. '* Travis is the only


A native of Quin-
cy, Tiffany Travis is
the newest addition
to the Madison Police
Department. She's
been at the MPD for
three weeks now, fol-
lowing a six-month
tenure at the Talla-
hassee Police Depart-
ment. Travis gradu-
ated from Pat
Thomas Law En-
forcement Academy.
The 22-year
old decided to ap- P
ply to MPD after '*
she heard good


Tiffany Travis


things about the
force. Travis said
that in Madison, "the
officers know every-
one. It feels like


Oliver $2,000. His
Bradley motion was
Commission-
er Wayne
Vickers and
passed 4-0,


._. fred Martin
I and Commis-
sioner Ricky
c w e Henderson
casting the
,. two addition-
S r alnvotes.
ii ( Commis-
da i 9 s witsioner RoyEl-
S ": lisrecently
had surgery and was unable to attend the meet-
ing.
In other business, the commission approved a
contract with the Madison County Health Depart-
ment and allowed EMS Director Juan Botino to
apply for a total of $84,674.44 in grants.
The grants will be used for lighting protection,
mapping maintenance, a cooling system, regional
connectivity (which will connect all North Flori-
da region 911 systems with each other in order to
provide back-up and redundancy in the event of
system failures) and a logging recorder upgrade.


Nominations

Being Accepted

For Impact

Teacher Awards
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Greene Publishing, Inc. is ac-
cepting nominations for the Im-
pact Teacher of the Month.
Each month, the Impact
Teacher: of the Month will be
chosen and each nominee will
. be considered for the Impact
Teacher of the Year Award. The
award is different than the Gold-
en Apple Teacher of the Year
Award, presented by the Madi-
Please see TEACHER, Page 3A


child in a tight knit
family, and she's the
first person in her
family to go into law
enforcement. Travis
graduated from
James A. Shanks
High School in Quin-
cy .
Recently, Travis
participated in an
undercover opera
tion with the MPD
Please see TRAVIS,
Page 3A


Index
Around Madison County


2 Sections, 32 Page


5-8A Jail Report


0Yu Loa ete
9121 9122 9123


Church .9A
Classifle~dslLegals l1&19A
ComimubhlyCalndor 6A
FpruilOuiooys 16-17A


Real Estate I IA
Regional Happenings 10A
Remote Guide B Section
Viewpoints !-3A


Our 143rd Year, Number 4


eEst 1865



Cecotbe


Madison, Florida


County Commission Approves


Bond For Phillips, Bradley


88,71
1. riimi.K i '


87171
' .,r l ,1, ,'-.
- --6 WOh II ,; jU


90(71
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2A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


Uiepoints & Opinions


Friday, September 21, 2007


A Good Pastor


And he gave some, apos- ,
ties; and some, prophets;
and some, evangelists; and 8a
some, pastors and teach-
ers; For the perfecting of
the saints, for the work of
the ministry, for the edify- ,.; -..
ing of the body of .,
Christ...Ephesians 4:11-12 t
My pastor, Retis Flow-
ers, has been ministering to the congregation at Mid-
way Church of God for approximately 35 years. With
the workload that he has encountered in those 35 years,
I'm surprised that he hasn't found a fishing hole some-
where and decided to catch fish, instead of being a
"fisher of men" as the Lord commanded.
Not only has Brother Flowers been a minister dur-
ing his tenure at Midway COG, he has been a school-
teacher and a member of the National Guard. More im-
portantly, he has been a husband and a father.
Many people think that the only role a pastor has is
to stand behind the pastor's desk and preach on Sun-
day. A pastor has roles that are extended far beyond
that and I believe that Brother Flowers handles those
roles admirably If you try calling your preacher and
he's not at home, call his cell phone and you might find
him at the hospital, nursing home or funeral home vis-
iting with the sick, elderly and bereaved. If your pastor


Jacob Bembry
Columnist .
.;.':.. -*~~


is not there, there is a
good chance that'my pas-
tor will be.
I also know people
whom Brother Flowers
has helped through coun-
seling and benevolence.
A few weeks ago, I got
very sick on the job and
was taken to the doctor's


office. Someone had called my father and told him that
I was sick and had to go to the doctor. While I was at
the doctor's office, my pastor showed up. A couple of
weeks later, I was told by my co-worker Bryant Thig-.
pen that Brother Flowers had been the first person to
call and check on me.
"That's a good pastor," Bryant said.
I couldn't agree with Bryant more. I do have a good
pastor. He would have done the same thing for any,
member of the congregation or the family of a church
member. He does it not because he is the pastor, but be-
cause he cares.
I hope that everyone has a good pastor like I do. If
you don't, the .church doors at Midway Church of God
are always open and I think that Brother Flowers will
be around a few more years at least to welcome you
there.


You Ain't Gonna Like L


President Bush. did
make a bad mistake in the
war on terrorism. But the
mistake was not his deci-
sion to go to war in Iraq.
Bush's mistake came in
his belief that this country
is the same one his father
fought for in WWII. It is
not. Back then, they had
just come out of a vicious
depression. The country
was steeled by the hard-
ship of that depression,
but they still believed fer-
-Since 1865-
"Telling it like it is with hon-'
esty and integrity"
S Cbthe 'fmaboirOt0-w
Senterprise-
Recorber
Madison Recorder established
1865,
New Enterprise established
1901,
Consolidated June 25, 1908
Published weekly by'
Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695
S. SR 53, Madison, FL 32340.
Periodicals postage PAID at
Madison Post Office 32340.
Publication No. 177.400.
POSTMASTER: Send ad-
dress changes to The Madison
Enterprise-Recorder, P.O.
Drawer 772, Madison, FL
32341-0772.
This newspaper reserves
the right to reject any adver-
tisement, news matter, or sub-
scriptions that, in the opinion
of the management, will not be
for the best interest of the
county and/or the owners of
this newspaper, and to investi-
gate any advertisement submit-
ted.


vently in this country
They knew that the people
had elected their leaders,
so it was the people's duty
to back those leaders.
Therefore, when the
war broke- out the people
came together, rallied be-
hind, and stuck with their
leaders, whether they had
voted for them or not or
whether the war was going
badly or not. And war was
just as distasteful and the
anguish just as great then
as it is today
Often there were more,
casualties in one day in
WWII than we have had in
,.-the. eptire- Ira qwa. But
that did not matter. The
people stuck with the Pres-
ident because it was their
patriotic duty. Americans
put aside their differences
in, WWIarid worked to-
gether to win that war.
Everyone from every stra-
ta of society, from young to
old pitched in. Small chil-
dren pulled little wagons
around to gather scrap
metal for the war effort.
Grade school students
saved their pennies to buy
stamps for war bonds to
help the effort. Men who
were too old or medically
4F lied about their age or
condition trying their best
to join the military
Women doubled their
work to keep things going
at home. Harsh rationing
of, everything from gaso-
line to soap, to butter was
imposed, yet there was
very little complaining.


You never heard promi-
nent people on the radio
belittling the President. In-
terestingly enough in
those days there were no
fat cat actors and enter-
tainers who ran off to visit
and fawn over dictators of
hostile countries and com-
plain to them about our
President. Instead, they
made upbeat films and en-
tertained our troops to
help the troops' morale.
And a bunch even enlisted.
And imagine this:
Teachers in schools actual-
ly started the day off with
a Pledge of Allegiance, and
-with prayers for our-eoun-
try and our troops!
Back then, no rewspa-
per would have dared point
out certain weak spots in
our cities where bombs
could be set off to cause
the maximum damage. No
newspaper would have
dared complain about
what we were doing to
catch spies. A newspaper
would have been laughed
out of existence if it had
complained that German
or Japanese soldiers were
being "tortured" by being
forced to wear women's un-
derwear, or subjected to in-
terrogation by a woman,
or being scared by a dog or
did not have air condition-
ing.
There were a lot of
things different back then.
We were not subjected to a
constant bombardment of
pornography, perversion
and promiscuity in movies


losing!
or on radio. We did not
have legions of crack-
heads, dope pushers and
armed gangs roaming our
streets.
No, President Bush did
not make a mistake in his
handling of terrorism. He
made the mistake of be-
lieving that we still had the
courage and fortitude of
our fathers. He believed
that this was still the coun-
try that our fathers fought
so dearly to preserve. It is
Anot!the same country, It is
now a cross between
Sodom and Gomorrah and
the land of Oz. We even
have the wicked witch of
the west as the newv'Sfpak-
er of the House of Repre-
sentatives.
,We did unite for a short
while after 911, but our at-
titude changed when we
'found out that defending
our country would require
some sacrifices.
We are in great danger.
The terrorists are fanatic
Muslims. They believe
that it is okay, even their
duty, to kill anyone who
will not convert to Islam.
It has been estimated that
about one third or over
three hundred million
Muslims are sympathetic
to the terrorists
cause...Hitler and Tojo
combined did not have
nearly that many potential
recruits.
We either win it or lose
it and you ain't gonna
like losing.


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Located In Beautiful
"Douwntown Valdosta"
.... ww. a langdaleford.com .


By Jessica Higginbotham
Have You Ever Had A Membership To A Gym Or Fitness Club?
If So, Which One?


Faye Browning:
"Yes! I go to Curves."





Martha McLeod:
"I did go to Curves for a
while, but I don't go any-
more."




Phil Hinds:
"Yes, I went to Fit Club
at one point."


Renee Lusk:
."I went to Lifestyles in
Lakeland, but I don't live
there anymore."


Michael Hewiett:
"HNo."






Lee Williams:
"No, I've never had one."


"." CTing p i




Tax Boondoggle Seems Unfair?

Maybe Not
The City of Tallahassee is cutting several million
dollars from its budget in an attempt to hold taxes
down. Meanwhile, Tallahassee Mall has asked the city
'to help fund $47 million in refurbishing to attract new
stores and jobs. What is a city to do?
In Jacksonville, the city and school district have
slashed millions from their budgets. Meanwhile, Mayor
John Peyton has proposed garbage collection and other
fees for residents to offset some of those shortfalls.
; ,What is a city to do?
On the new television game show Power of Ten, one
question was "What percentage of Americans said
they would not want to pay higher taxes to underwrite
universal health care?" The percentage was pretty
high. What is a country to do? .
Taxes'- a two-edged sword if ever there was one.
Every tax has its advantage and disadvantage.
Gasoline taxes? We get smoother roads and more of
them.
Cigarette taxes?We get health care for people with
lung cancel; in addition to an anti-smoking campaign.
Sales taxes? We get city, county, and state officials
and employees. Bed taxes? We get tourists, who spend
their money in our area. You name the tax the money
comes around to the people sooner or later.
In the case of the Tallahassee Mall, the renovations
would attract about 250 jobs.
Those jobs would result in more income for area
businesses and perhaps fewer people on welfare. In
Jacksonville, the fees would buy newer garbage-collec-
tion trucks and help pay the employees a better wage.
On the health-care issue, we would save the cost of
private insurance (premiums are skyrocketing now)
and still be guaranteed health care, even if we had to
pay higher taxes. In addition, the health care would
reach to everyone, not just to those who could afford in-
surance.
Certainly we will always have some citizens who
protest against certain taxes; In that case, they should
be as brave as folk singer Joan Baez, whb did not want
to fund military enterprises. So she figured out how
many other tax.dollars went to the military'subtracted
that fronom her tax bill. and paid the rest. She.went to jail
for it, but she waswilling to sit behind bars ifowhat-
she believed.
No matter what Tallahassee, Jacksonville, and other
governments choose to do, we all can clearly see that
our tax system needs a complete overhaul. Until that
day dawns, however, we can pay-what we choose,
protest what we will, and vote for representatives who
will make some changes.
In every society, the people make some provision for
the distribution of goods and wealth so that everybody
has something to offer and everybody reaps some bene-
fit. In our system, taxes provide that give-and-take.
What is a citizen to do? It's a puzzle, and one we will
be working on for years to come.



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Friday, September 21, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com




Viewpoints & Opinions


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A


TRAVIS


S Y I. .. !Associate ruous1 -2.,

Try this one on for size, Straight Talk with no hidden
agenda. No politics, no buddy-buddy, no leaning left or
right. Just what I know or at least, what I think I know.


Where Have All The Children Gone?
I remember the story of a young lad that was asked
by Santa Claus what he wanted for Christmas. He
quickly replied with wide eyes and a big grin, "EVERY-
THING!!" I don't believe the youngster was being
greedy. He was just being a kid. I mean why not. If
somebody is going to ask you what you want, why not
ask for all of it, right?
It is in this same regard that life here in Madison
County can be compared. I mean, for most of us who
live here, who have our homes and businesses and fam-
ilies here, living in Madison is almost like having
"everything'. There are umpteen reasons why we
should get down on our knees every day and thank the
Good Lord for all the blessings that we have and for
some of the things that we don't have.
However, during the past couple of weeks, I have not-
ed a pattern of concern emerging. While having three
separate conversations with three different ladies in
various parts of the county, one singular, somewhat
disturbing theme surfaced each time. And here's a
clue. All three of the ladies are mothers.
Here's the given. Madison is a wonderful place to
live. No traffic, crime is only slightly an issue, educa-
tion at all levels and degrees is readily available, and
churches are abundant. What a remarkable environ-
ment in which to raise children. Friendly and personal
professional service exist and if there is anything on
anyone's wish list that's not available here, chances are
good that it's easily accessible by making short jaunts
to Valdosta, Tallahassee or wherever.
But, with all that Madison is and all that we have
and all that we have to offer to our residents, the ques-
tion looms. Where have all the children gone?
It seems that Madison just might be one of the best
places on the planet to raise a family, but once the
youngsters are out of the roost, do we have what it
takes to keep them here? Well according to these three
ladies, the answer is a resounding "No!"
Because what it takes to keep them here is work,
pure and simple. And the good jobs, most of them at
least, are taken. And those who have these good jobs
are very likely to keep them for many many years. Be-
cause they too know that finding good employment op-
portunities here in paradise is a big grizzly bear. And
how many of our residents would you guess are forced
to work in larger nearby communities? Doing it be-
cause they want to is different than doing it because
they have to.
So is it wrong to be like the kid at Christmas? Is it
wrong to ask for everything? Why can't we have a
great place to live and to-raise our families PLUS have
a community where young adults want to stay and can
stay to develop their business skills and to start fami-
lies of their own? Sure, there is going to be a certain
percentage of our kids that are going to be able to get
involved in their family's business or might be able to
start a business on their own. But still, the fact re-
mains. We've got a problem.
Here's the catch 22 that everyone seems to be afraid
of, or at least, they constantly seem to have on their
minds.
Progress brings change, change brings jobs, and jobs
keep people here and bring new people here. More peo-
ple could mean more traffic, more crime, less service
attention and a lower quality of life. There are some
that fear that the new Wal-Mart that is coming is the
beginning of the end, or that we are on our way to be-
coming another Lake City with traffic lights galore.
Soon, paradise is lost. And soon those people who are
still living here start thinking about moving to south-
ern Mississippi to rediscover their rural paradise, and
then the whole cotton-picking thing starts all over
again!
Perhaps the answer to this dilemma lies in using one
of the smallest, yet most powerful words in the English
language and being almost scientific about when to use
it. We do not want all growth. We do not need just any
growth and we do not need'to grow just for growth's
sake. And because of this, we need to learn how to,
and when to, say "no." But we do need the kind of
growth that brings to our community companies that
are good neighbors and bring more solutions with
them than problems.
And if the process does not exist to determine who
these businesses are and how we are going to aggres-
sively go after them, then this process needs to be de- .
veloped, post haste,because it might not be much
longer before Santa Claus stops asking us what we
want and starts telling us what we're going to get.


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cont from page 1A


and Perry Police Department. It was her first time un-
dercover, and a good learning experience. "I probably
wouldn't have gotten this opportunity at TPD this early
in my career," Travis said.
Travis is currently completing her Field Training Offi-
cer Program, and she's riding along with Sgt. William
Greene. The FTO program familiarizes the officer with the
area and with policies and procedures for the department.
Following the FTO program, Travis will be a solo officer.


TEACHER


cont from page 1A


son County Foundation for Excellence in Education.
Anyone may enter a teacher in a public or a private
school for the award. Nominations must be an essay, telling
how the teacher has made an impact in the classroom and
in the community
If the teacher does not win the first month that he or she
is nominated, the essays will be kept on file and considered
for the next month's Impact Teacher of the Month.
Education is important and it's important that teachers
be recognized. Do your part and nominate a teacher for the
Impact Teacher of the Month Award.
Essays may be dropped off at Greene Publishing, located
at 1695 South State Road 53, or emailed to Ja-
cob(,aireenepublishing.com.
The deadline for nominations for September has been
extended to Friday, September 28.



Did You KI(Now
By Ashily Bell
GREEnE Publishing, INc.



The largest human organ is the

Ssk, wth a suraceareaof about

25 square feet,


Get lead stories,
classes,
the Community
Calendar ..


so much more!

II i I I


Affordable Pump Repair
Water treatment Cornma-.
Filtration System & Residential
RE Am MakesA Models 24 Hour Service',
*rre pwmMt Available F
If you have bad water call us... --Ai.. able
We will beat any competitors price!
Office/Home Cell Phone
386-776-2982 386-288-5157




There will be a Poker Run to benefit burn victim,
Amanda McLaughlin, on

Saturday, September 22, 2007

at The 53 Bar
(located 1 mile past 1-1Oon Hwy. 53 South)
Registration: 9 a.m.
Last Bike Out: 10 a.m. Last Bike In: 4 p.m.






7T,-


- The Outsiders of North Florida

The Black Pistons of Valdosta, GA
For More Info, Contact Beverly at The 53 Bar at 850-672-0196


Budget Summary

Madison County Board of County
Commissioners Fiscal Year 2007/2008

The proposed Total Operating Budget expenditures of the Madison County
*Board of County Commissioners are 15.40% more than last year's operating expenditures.
FY2007/2008
Proposed Budget


Health


Ad Valorem Taxes

Other Taxes
Licenses & Permits
Intergovernmental
Charges for Service
Miscellaneous
Inter-fund Transfers
Reserves Used


Sub Total
Less 5%
95% Eat Revenue
Cash Bal. brought forward


8.082


41,000


General
Revenue


1,686,032


184,900
3,206,153
213,200


120,770
53,544
57,001


41,000

41,000


41,000


Total Revenues


5,521,600
(276,080)
5,245,520
462,625

5,708,146


Transportation Special Revenue Law Enforcement
Fund Fund & Corrections Fund


4,108,420


3,056,6,08
4,000
7,092,138


187,500
0
0


3,869,366

694,816
1,059,000


63,350
634,355
9,050


84,058
738,518
32,400
44,000


10,340,246 6,329,937 5,007,396
(517,012) (316,497) (250,370)


9,823,234
1,073,124


6,013,440
2,146,398


10,896,368 8,159,838


4,757,026
305,590


5,835,452

6,925,974
' 88,900
11,077,165
2,010,718
404,020
731,899
66,051

27,240,179
(1,359,959)
25,880,220
3,987.737


5,062,616 29,867,957.


Budgeted Expenditures


General Government
Court Related
Public Safety
Physical Environment
Transportation
Economic Environment
Human Service
Culture & Education
Debt Service
Reserve for Future Bond Iss.
Sub Total
Interfund Transfer Out
Total Expenditures

Reserves Remaining
Total Expenditures & Reserve


41,000



41,000

41,000


41,000


2,843,260
119,203
889,404
170,502

186,686
511,230
380,413
0
0
5,100,698
179,544
5,280,242

427,903
5,708,146


10,340,246


0
0
10,340,246
0
10,340,246


333,250
1,979,316

848,650
1,711,710

569,855
0
5,442,781
887,156
6,329,937


556,112 1,829,901
10,896,358 8,159,838


5,007,396


5,007,396
0
5,007,396

55,220
5,062,616,


2,843,260
119,203
6,230,050
2,149.818
10,340,246
1,035,336
2,263,940
380,413
569,855
0
25,932,121
1,066,700
26,998,821

2,869,136
29,867,957


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON
FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING
AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD.


NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING


The Madison County Board of County Commissioners has
tentatively adopted a budget for Fiscal Year2007/2008. A
public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget
AND TAXES will be held on Wednesday, September 26, 2007
at 5:30 P.M. in the Commissioners' Meeting Room #107
Courthouse Annex,
229 SW Pinckney Street
Madison, Florida


I I I I


Uujjwtvm


i


o ene evenuan .


Rvidnaad Ravantion


MIiltneasr









4A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



a e6foccmnt & Rcogional Crime


Friday, September 21, 2007


Ringleader Of ID Theft Operation


Sentenced To Five Years In Prison

~ South Florida Man Used Information Stolen From Data Breach ~


Attorney General Bill
McCollum announced that
a Miami man was sen-
tenced to five years in
prison for his involvement
in an identity theft ring that
operated throughout the
state. Irving Escobar was
'also ordered to pay nearly
$600,000 in restitution for
leading the criminal opera-
tion that used personally
identifiable information
stolen from the TJX data
breach in December 2006.
Escobar and several code-
fendants were prosecuted
by the Attorney General's
Office of Statewide Prose-
cution.
"Having personally wit-


nessed the devastation iden- tect our citizens from this
tity theft can cause on so terrible form of victimiza-


Svhave pledge the ful
S strength of my offi,"e
procute these criminal ope"
proteand shut them domnso we
tions roten t our cWtzef from
this terrible form of vot.idra
tio," sait d AttorneY ergl ic"
Collun. . .


many levels, I have pledged
the full strength of my of-
fice to prosecute these crim-
inal operations and shut
them down so we can pro-


tion," said Attorney General
McCollum.
A criminal investigation
conducted by the Gainesville,
Police Department and the


Florida Department of Law
Enforcement revealed a
complex operation that was
using counterfeit cards with
stolen credit card data. Lead-
ing the operation, Escobar
coordinated the use of these
cards to purchase gift cards
at Wal-Mart or Sam's Club.
The defendants then re-
deemed these gift cards to
purchase jewelry and elec-
| tronic equipment a mod-
ern-day version of money
laundering. Authorities esti-
mated a total loss of $3 mil-
lion could be attributed to
Escobar and his co-defen-
dants on a nationwide scale.
He was arrested in March of
2007.'
In January TJX Compa-
nies, Inc., the parent compa-
ny of TJ Maxx, Marshalls,
HomeGoods and A.J. Wright
stores, reported that hack-
ers broke into a system that
managed credit and debit
card transactions as well as
checks and merchandise re-
turns. The company be-
lieves it may never be possi-
ble to determine the exact
number of individuals
whose personal information
was stolen. Authorities be-
lieve Escobar and his code-
fendants acquired the stolen
data and used it to re-code
the counterfeit credit cards
which were then used to
purchase the gift cards.
Escobar pleaded guilty to
charges of organized
scheme to defraud in
March. His codefendants
.have also pleaded guilty to
similar charges involving
organized fraud and grand
theft. Codefendants Dianel-
ly Hernandez, Julio Alberti,
Reinier Alvarez and Zenia
Llorente were all sentenced
to probation in August. Es-
cobar's mother, Nair Al-
varez, pleaded guilty in
March and was deported to
Venezuela.


Budget Summary



Suwannee River Water Management District Fiscal Year 2007 2008


Total All Funds

$26,814,936



$6,100,000
$5,901,000
$18,035,543
$416,367

$891,000
$222,300
$59,000
$407,700
$1,947,553
$40,000
$1,083,550
$1,298,205
$12,338,765
$70,000
$1,185,321
$1,785,615
$2,652,514
$213,000
$340,906
$100,000
$0
$55,088,339
$81,903,275


EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES
Salaries And Benefits
Other Personal Services
Expenses
Operating Capital Outlay
Fixed Capital Outlay
Interagency Expenditures


TOTAL EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES


Reserves


TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND RESERVES


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY
AS A PUBLIC RECORD.


$5,364,648
$17,393,921
$2,487,390
$405,040
$27,956,611
$15,276,919
$68,884,529
$13,018,746
$81,903,275


CASH BALANCES BROUGHT FORWARD


ESTIMATED REVENUES
(Millage per $1000)
TAXES (0.4399 Mills)
Ad Valorem Taxes
Documentary Stamp Taxes
Florida Forever
PERMIT AND LICENSE FEES
OTHER INCOME
INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUES
Local Revenues
Wetlands Grant
DEP Coastal Zone Management Grant
ERP Grant
Suwannee River Partnership Grant
Delineated Areas Grant
DOT Grants
Dept. of Agriculture And Consumer Services
Water Protection & Sustainability Grant
DEP Monitoring Grant
SWIM Revenue
FEDERAL GRANTS
FEMA Grants
NRCS Grants
TEA-21 Grant
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES
Interest and General Sales
Timber Sales
FUND TRANSFERS
TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND BALANCES


General Fund Special Revenue Funds


$3,235,238


$6,100,000
$0
$0
$0

$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$900,000
$0
$0
$70,000
$0
$0
$0
$0
$150,000
$0
$0
$7,220,000
$10,455,238


$2,565,863
$1,763,862
$1,242,486
$197,500
$0
$527,500
$6,297,211
$4,158,027
$10,455,238


$23,679,698



$0
$5,901,000
$18,035,543
$416,367

$891,000
$222,300
$59,000
$407,700
$1,947,553
$40,000
$183,550
$1,298,205
$12,338,765
$0
$1,185,321
$1,785,615
$2,652,514
$213,000
$190,906
$100,000
$0
$47,868,339
$71,448,037


$2,798,785
$15,630,059
$1,244,904
$207,540
$27,956,611
$14,749,419
$62,587,318
$8,860,719
$71,448,037


NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING


The Suwannee River Water Management District has

tentatively adopted a budget for Fiscal Year 2007-08.


This notice is applicable to the following counties:


All of: Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison,.Suwannee, Taylor, Union
Parts of: Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Jefferson, Levy, Putnam


A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget and TAXES

will be held on

Tuesday, September 25, 2007 at 5:30 p.m.

S.. at:


Suwannee River Water Management District

9225 County Road 49 (corner US 90 and CR 49)

Live Oak, FL


MOST WANTED


Jack Smith, Jr.

Race: White
Sex: Mate
Date of Birth: December 8, 1973
Last Known Address: 136 SW Geno Way,
Madison'
Wanted For: Worthless Checks and
Deposit Account Fraud


Man Stopped For
Suspended License,

Arrested For Possession
By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
According to the Madison Police Department, on Sep-
tember 18, 2007, Rhaun Douglass DePriest was arrested
for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Pa-
trolman Joey Agner observed DePriest driving a vehicle:
Agner was aware that DePriest's.driver's license had
been suspended.
Agner stopped DePriest and asked if he knew his li-
cense was suspended, DePriest said he had no knowl-
edge of it. There was no notification listed on FCIC or
NCIC. Sergeant Jimbo Roebuck and Officer Tiffany
Travis arrived on scene and DePriest was issued cita-
tion for a suspended driver's license without knowledge.
Agner asked DePriest for consent to search the vei-
cle. Upon search, Travis located a small baggie contain-
ing suspected marijuana above the sun visor on the dri-
ver's side of the vehicle, as well as a blunt in a Newport
cigarette box.
DePriest was arrested and transported to the county
jail.



Madison County....








9/12/07
Jason Douglas Albritton DUI, driving while li-
cense suspended, revoked or cancelled
Michael Lingerfelt-Failure to appear (three
counts)
9/13/07
Walter Gaines Lorenzo Failure to appear
George Johnson VOP (circuit)
Mary Shannon Vasvary Spears-Identity theft
9/14/07
Charles Alexander Lindsay VOP (county)
Donald Lee Colvin DUI
Robert Gerald Laney Expired drivers license
(more than four months), attaching a tag not assigned
David Sherell Robinson-Burglary, aggravated as-
sault, disorderly conduct
Sherard Omar Baynard Sell of controlled sub-
stance, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams
9/15/07
Randy Lagene Smith Criminal registration
9/16/07
Thomas James Gee Domestic violence/battery
Quentin Zebulon Gray Criminal registration
Glen Leroy Marshall Driving while license sus-
pended, revoked or cancelled
9/17/07
Zelda Denise Miller Domestic violence/battery
Andre Cornell Miller Domestic violence/battery
Walter James Blackshear Criminal registration
Henry Theodore Salmons VOP (circuit)
Tameka Renee Wooten Failure to appear (pre-tri-
al)
Monica Sherelle Wilson Attaching a tag not as-
signed, no motor vehicle, registration
Talisa Demetrius Ulee VOP (circuit)
9/18/07
Talisa Demetrius Ulee VOP (county), battery
(touch or strike), VOP (circuit)
Alejandrina Carrasco Gonzalez Grand theft II,
cheating
Rhawn Douglass DePreist Possession of mari-
juana less than 20 grams
Christine Michelle Yates Affray
Carlisa Lafaye Hampton Affray


I a







www. greenepublishing.com


Friday,September 21, 2007


Around mabison Counto


v7


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5A


Way Back When

September 20, 1957
Donald Dickinson has taken over the management position of the Sinclair station on the corner of
Base and Washington streets, formerly operated by Sarge Davis. Mr. Dickinson will continue his pulp-
wood business in addition to his new work.
Jimmy McIntyre, senior student at F.S.U., began his duties Wednesday night as director of the choir
- at the First Methodist Church. Mr. McIntyre, will be in Madison each Wednesday night and Sundays all
= day
=- The Sixth Grade, Section 2, of Madison Elementary School elected officers for the school year.
- ,, Wayne Weger was selected President. Wayne also served as president in his fourth and fifth grade
-= classes. Paul Cave was elected Vice-President; Susan Smith, Secretary; and Harry Copeland, Trea-
- Bi' surer. Mrs. James Hardee is the Home Room Mother for the year. Mrs. James T. Barber is the
S teacher.
September 22, 1967
Members of the Helen Parramore Circle of the Methodist WSCS visited
the guests at Mrs. Audrey Woods' Rest Home at Pinetta, from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Monday, and enjoyed afternoon tea with the resident guests of the home.
-A number of friends of Mr. and Mrs. Waldon Richardson held open house
at the Richardsons' new brick home Sunday afternoon in honor of the family's ,
- -* moving into the lovely home.
The Reverend Hazel Woodard has resigned the pastorate of the Pleasant Grove
Baptist Church in Taylor County effective October 1. .
September 23, 1977 '\.\ : ':,-
Revival services begin September 26 at Beulah Baptist :.
Church and continue each night through September 30 with
Rev. John Doman, pastor of New Home Baptist Church a
evangelist. A nursery will be provided. Services close Sunday,
Oct. 2, with Rev. Glen Lawhon, a former pastor, as speaker., r I
Jerry D. Combass, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.C.,Combass of Lee, --
has been commissioned an Army Second Lieutenant upon his
graduating from Officer Candidate School at Fort Benning, Ga.
- Mr. and Mrs. John Bullard announce the birth of their .
daughter, Valerie Joy, born September 15 at South Georgia Medical
- Centerin Valdosta, Ga. She has a brother, Johnny III, six years old.
- Valerie's grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Bullard, Sr. and Mr.
- and Mrs. Vernon Adams of Madison.
September 24, 1987
= The Madison Rotary Club did their part last week to help
- secure a baby-warmer for Madison County Memorial's new-
- born nursery Frank Ruff presented a $250 check Sept. 17 to
SErin Mould, coordinator of chapter services for the March of -
Dimes.
- Thomas Moore has been appointed chairman for the an-
- nual "Wheels for Life" Bike-A-Thon in Lee. The event is
= scheduled for Oct. 3 with a rain date for Oct. 10. This
-= ride will benefit St. Jude Christian's Research Hospi-
tal.
- North Florida Junior College is preparing.
for the inauguration of its fifth president, Dr.
William McCoy A full academic processional, ':" ..
will launch the inauguration scheduled for /
Sunday, Oct. 4, at 2:30 p.m. in the Van H. ( '-
Priest Auditorium. A reception will fol- /( -
low.in the student center. The public is cor-
'dially invited.
7fr IIIll IIIIlll llll IIIIIIII lllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIII


Lions Club Welcomes

Special Guests


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, September 18, 2007
The Lions Club had three special guests at their
Tuesday, September 18, meeting. Pictured left to right:
Circuit Judge John Peach, Bob Dawson and John
Adams.



SPECIALIZING IN GARLIC CRABS & GARLIC SHRIMP


GARLIC POTATOES
CORN ON THE COB
BOILED EGGS & SAUSAGE


David Arthur
386*362*9762

Madison Store
850-973-6134

Lake City Store
386-755-9753


John and Ginger Bullard are pleased to announce
the engagement of their daughter, Lindsay Brooke, to
Phillip Walker Hackle, son of Chuck and Mattie Hack-
le, and Tommy and Luann Barnes.
Brooke is the granddaughter of Vernon and Virginia
Adams of Madison and the late J.L. and Lula Bullard.
She is a 1997 graduate of Madison County High School
and a graduate of Valdosta State University with a
Bachelor of Science degree in Sports Medicine and
Athletic Training. She is currently employed as an Or-
thopedic Assistant by Dr. Curt Starling in Valdosta, Ga.
Phillip is the grandson of Pierce and Vera Hackle
and Harold and Catherine Dailey of Madison. He is a
2000 graduate of Madison County High School. He is
currently employed with the Madison County School
Board as an Air Conditioning and Electrical Techni-
cian.
The wedding will take place at Pine Grove Baptist
Church on January 26, 2008 at 4 p.m. with the reception
to follow at Divine Events. No local invitations are be-
ing sent. All friends and family are invited to attend.


DISCOVER A CONSCIOUS WAY OF LIFE
Madison Cointy Library 100 College Drive
Tuesday, September 25th, 7:30 9:00 pm
Additional workshops at Lighthouse Center Florida, Live Oak


CAMINEZ, BROWN


& HARDEE, P.A.

Jon D. Caminez
Board Certified Civil Trial Attorney
Ian Brown
Certified Civil Mediator
Cary A. "Bo" Hardee, III

Barry Gulker


PERSONAL INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH

Automobile, Truck & Motorcycle Accidents
Defective Products Medical Negligence/Malpractice
Slip & Fall Premises Liability Nursing Home Negligence




1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
(850) 997-8181

TOLL FREE 1-877-997-8181
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based
solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you
free written information about their qualifications and experience.


~-~J~7~d











6A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www. greenepublishing. com



Around maobison CouotA


Friday, September 21, 2007


rB0tiiNII 1


September 21-22
The Monticello Opera
House proudly presents
CASABLANCA, Fri. and
Sat. evenings, Sept. 21,
22, 28 and 29, with a. 3
p.m. matinee on Sun.,
Sept. 23.
.Dinner before the
show is available by
reservation. Dinner-and-
show tickets are $35 per
person, $32 for members.
Show-only tickets are
$15, or $12 for members.
The matinee tickets
are $13 and $10.'
For the evening per-
formances, the doors
open at 6:30, dinner is at 7
p.m. and the show starts
at 8 p.m. Beverages are
available. For dinner
reservations or more in-


formation, call (850) 997-
4242.
September 22
You are cordially in-
vited to a gospel concert
featuring the Purvis
Brothers/Encore Band
Saturday, September 22, at
Lamont Baptist Church.
The concert starts at 7
p.m. and refreshments
will be served after the
concert. For more infor-
mation, call Gerald Bailey
at (850) 997-3070 or (850)
997-2497..
September 22
Calling all motorcy-
cles. There will be a poker
run to benefit burn victim
Amanda McLaughlin.
Registration is at the 53
Bar on Hwy 53 South at 9
a.m. Last bike out at 10


GlANDNQP [Nlg
SEPTEMBER 20, 2007
AT 5:30 PM, IN GREENVILLE,
ON HIGHWAY 150 NORTH
Operated B) Beth & Kim King In Honor of Their Papa. Cliftbrd King
For take-out orders or to reserve a table,
CALL 850-948- 1899


Restaurant Hours:
Thurs. 5:30 9:00
Fri. (.Seafood Night) 5:30 9:00
Sat. 11:00 2:00 & 5:00 9:00
Sunday Buffet 11:00 2:00


SCi99 SJoodMlLeuPpod


a.m. Last bike in at 4 p.m.
Come out and enjoy all the
bikes, karaoke, 50/50 draw-
ings and door prizes. Spon-
sored by the 53 Bar, the out-
siders of N. Florida and
the Black Pistons of Val-
dosta, Ga.
September 22
The American Legion
Post 224 in Cherry Lake
will be hosting an Ice
Cream Social on Sept. 22
for the children of all ages
of members and guests.
For more information,
please call Regina Barber
at (850) 929-4908.
September 22
Birding walk in the
Suwannee River State
Park Saturday, September
22, at 8 a.m. at the ranger
station in the Suwannee
River State Park 13 miles
west of Live Oak on US 90.
There is an entrance fee to
the park. The walk will
take place on trails within
the park. For more details:
Contact: Beth and Walter
Schoenfelder 850 971-5354.
wbsd'swifbest. net.
September 22
The Department of
Environmental Protec-
tion's Olustee Battlefield
Historic State Park will
host its Civil War Expo on
Saturday, September 22.
Visitors can share a
camp meal with re-enac-
tors and learn about the
hardships and victories of
war during the event.The
Civil War Expo will be
open to the public from 10
a.m. until 3:00 p.m. A do-
nation of $4 per vehicle is


BUDGET SUMMARY

TOWN OF GREENVILLE
FY 2007/2008

2007/2008


Totals


General Fund Estimated Revenues
Balance Brought Forward 259,000
Ad Valorem Taxes (8.09 mils) 86,724
Sales & Use Taxes 70,000
Licenses & Permits 6,000
Municipal Revenue Sharing 50,000
Miscellaneous Revenue 18,000
Communications Services Tax 15,000
Local Option Gas Tax 103,000

Estimated Expenditures
City Hall 191,559
Fire Department 22,249
Street Department 222,171
Reserve 171,745

Water Fund Estimated Revenues
Balance Brought Forward 80,985
Charge for Services 159,000

Estimated Expenditures
Operation 150,562
Reserve 89,423

Sewer Fund Estimated Revenues
Balance Brought Forward 156,459
Charge for Services 87,500

Estimated Expenditures
Operation, 63,625
Transfer to Sanitation 31,025
Reserve 149,309

Sanitation Fund Estimated Revenues
Balance Brought Forward 0
Charge for Services 73,964
Transfer from Sewer 31,025

Estimated Expenditures
Operation 104,989


TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 1,196,657

The Tentative, Adopted, and/or Final Budgets Are on File in
the Above Mentioned Taxing Authority As a Public Record.


607,724





607,724



239,985



239,985



243,959




243,959




104,989


104,989


requested. Please call (386)
397-7005 for more informa-
tion. To learn more about
Olustee Battlefield, visit
online at:
www.FloridaStateParks.
ore/olustee.
September 22
Reserve a seat today
and receive lower insur-
ance rates. The AARP Dri-
ver Safety Program (for-
merly 55-alive) will be of-
fered Sept. 15 & 22. Classes
will be held at the Madi-
son ext. building from 9
a.m.-l p.m. and will be in-
structed by volunteer Rich
Olsen. There is a $10 fee
for books and certificates.
Upon completion certifi-
cates are awarded. Any
driver over 55 with a cer-
tificate of completion
must be given a discount
by his or her insurance
provider." State law man-'
dates this. Interestedper-
sons may contact Olsen at
973-2002 to reserve a seat
in this class.
September 22
Come out to a Meet,
Greet, and Eat with your
County's Supervisor of
Elections and Staff on
September 22, from12-3
p.m. It will be held at the
Pinetta Volunteer Fire De-
partment located on 509
NE Persimmon Drive. For
more information, call 973-
6507.
September 23
New Antioch A.M.E.
Church Pallbearer Lodge
#4 Fellowship Program
will be meeting Sunday,
September 23, at 3 p.m. We
are asking all members
that can to attend. The
speaker will be Rev. Mar-
garet E. Brown, Pastor of
Jeslamb A.M.E. Church in
Madison. Everyone is wel-
come.
September 24
TABE (Test of Adult
Basic Education) at NFCC
Testing Center (Bldg. #16),
Monday, September 24 at 5
p.m, Madison. TABE is re-
quired for acceptance into
vocational/technical pro-
grams. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration is re-
quired. To register please
call (850) 973-9451.
September 29
American Legion Blood
Drive will be held Septem-
ber 29 at the Cherry Lake
General Store from 9 a.m. 2
p.m. For more information,
please contact Dwight Bar-
ber at 929-4908.
September 30
New Zion Primitive
Baptist Church, located on
3845 Miccosukee Road in
Tallahassee, will be cele-
brating its 80th Church An-
niversary on Sunday, Sep-
tember 30, 2007 at 11 a.m.
The guest speaker will be
the Elder Dr. Robert Gaines,
Moderator of the Middle
Florida Georgia Primitive
Baptist Association and
Pastor of St. James in Ha-
vana and St. Luke in Mid-
way For more information
about this program, please
call Sister Linda Jefferson
at (850)877-7705 or Pastor E
R. Rush at 877-2273.


HfALILA


ureene rublsning, qiuc. rnuio oy .acou oweiury
Frances Ginn, chair of the Kiwanis Club membership
committee, left, inducts Margaret Poppell into the Kiwa-
nis Club.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacobn embry
Jada Woods Williams, Supervisor of Elections, was
the guest speaker at the Kiwanis Club on Thursday, Sep-
tember 13. She is pictured with Jim Holben, Kiwanis
President.


Get Back In The &
Game Today.
Sports Medicine, Upper & Lower Extremity Arthroscopic
Surgery, Hip, Knee and Shoulder Reconstruction, Hand
Surgery including Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release.

Brook G. Bearden, M D
NORTH 0 PAE D IC S U RG E R Y

Valdosta raised, orthopaedics trained.
229.333.0014
5116 Northwind Blvd. Valdosta, Ga 31605


Supervisor Of


Elections Addresses


Kiwanis Club

By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Supervisor ,of Elections Jada Woods Williams ad-
dressed the Kiwanis Club on Thursday, September 13.
Woods discussed voting procedures and some new
laws on the books, such as 16-year-olds being allowed
to register to vote: She pointed out, that while they can
register, they cannot vote until they are 18 years old;
however, they are allowed to work as poll workers.
Williams also presented club members with a trivia
list of questions about voting.
Williams reminded everyone that the Presidential
preference primary election will be held Tuesday, Jan-
uary 28, 2007. Also on the ballot will be Florida's Super
Homestead Exemption Tax Issue.


NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING

The Town of Greenville has tentatively
adopted a budget for FY 2007/2008. A
Public Hearing to make a FINAL DECISION
on the BUDGET and TAXES will be held on
September 24, 2007, at 6:00 p.m., in
Town Hall located at 154 SW Old Mission Ave.


v


Directions:
N 90 1') Glvcll dl:, hirn Rillit
15() N (1,o\m Rmd)
Look 101' PlitC,' (A) OW








Friday, September 21, 2007


www. greenepublishing. corn


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7A


Lnscp Makeover-s


SPeacock's
Landscaping & Sprinkler Systems
Residential & Commercial
Y Landiucapi De'ign & Installation Site-prep. Sodding
tding Irrigation Lawn Shrub Gravel Driveways Dnip
.: Glenn & Margie Peacock
850.973.2848


Burnette Plumbing &
Well Service
Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled
Fixtures-Faucets Pumps Replaced
Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs


125 SV Shelby Ave.
Madison, FL 32340
Lic.# RF 0058445


Drilling
&
Repairs


Carlton Burnette
Master Plumber
850-973-1404


"Affordable Quality"


)Sen ior


Family Owned & Operated
Commercial Residential


Start to FinisI
No Bullr


Sg P, o f Mobile*omes C C- i
Fm 386-497-1419 U(e,.w Bonded
Estimates U- =., 7o42 Insured Workes Comp


G a PUMP& IRRIGATION
G ", u B Sales & Service
S"Four Generations of Expenence"


lH!!dl- (
WELL7 (
F- ILL


904 NW Suwannee Ate.
Branford, FL
.IL t g 2b3'i


Gude.


"Good Water Means Good Health"
Shea's Well & Pump
Everett's
Well Drilling & Irrigation Wells
Residential & Irrigation Wells Deep Wells 4" to 8"
Sales Service
Serving The Georgia & Florida Area For Over 30 Years.
Old Quitman-Madison Road Quitman, GA
FL Lic#2153 (229) 263-4192 GALic#253


Law Offices of

Monica Taibl. P.L.


125 NE Range Ave
Madison, FL 32340
TaiblLaw@aol.com


Phone: 850.973.1477
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that
should ,,ot e based solely upon advertisements. Before
you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written
information about their qualifications and experience.


PROFESSIONAL ROOFING
Roof Inspections, New Roofs,
Re-Roofs & Repair Specialist.
CCC#1325926
Folsom Constructing, LLC

850-566-6504
We Accept All Credit Cards


HUGH'S LAWN CARE
and TREE SERVICE, LLC
Hugh Sherrod
238 NE Brickyard Pond Ave. Madison, Florida
Business: 850.445-3321 Home: 850-973-6601 e-mail: hughsl@earthlink.net
Lawn Mowing
EdLawging Hurricane a
Weed Eating Call8Fe Bad Weather
Tree Trimming EstinB l Clean Up
Bush Hogging Roads Before & After
Game Feed Plots The Storms
Watered & Maintained
We accept ATM & Debit Cards


Metal Roofing
$ $$$$SAVE$$$$$
Buy Direct From Manufacturer
Several Profiles to Choose From Over 20 Colors In Stock
with 40 Year Warranties
Call for Brochures & Installation Guides
Toll Free
1-888-393-0335
www.gulfcoastsupply.com

Serving Madison, Jefferson,
Taylor & Lafayette Counties
Auto, Life, Health, Home
E Freddy Pitts, Agency Manager
Jimmy King, Agent
233 W Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071
24/7 Claim Service: Doug Helms, Agent
1.866-275-7322 105 W. Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-2213
Freddy PItts
"Helping You 813 S. Washington St.* Perry (850) 584-2371
Is What We Do Best." Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL (386) 294-1399


1064 E. US 90 Madison, Florida
-Beside Clover Farm-


850-973-3026


owners:
Daryl &
Lee Anne Hall


RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
Fully Licensed & Insured
CC-CO58163

850-973-3441
Call For A Free Estimate!


Get Your Business Namne & 4

Sez"rvices Out There!
Place Your Business Card In Our Weekly
Business Card Directory. .

850-973-4141


Mike's Pump Repair

And Well Drilling, Inc.
610 Industrial Ave. 179 E. Base St. Suite A
Live Oak, FL Madison, FL
386-364-5360 850-973-8877
24 HR. SERVICE
EMERGENCY #
(386) 590-0888


Mike Harris
34 Yrs.
Experience
Lic# 2610
Est. 1983


nyt







ii


LPAUL KINS EY
OWNER


1











8A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



rouo Maion Countp


Friday, September 21, 2007


Property Appraiser Addresses 55 Plus Club


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Property Appraiser Leigh Barfield addressed the 55
Plus Club Meeting on Wednesday, September 12.
Barfield discussed the proposed Super Homestead
Exemption, which is tentatively on the Presidential
Primary ballot for Tuesday, January 29. She said that a
mayor of a city in Broward County had filed suit to
prevent it from being on the ballot.
Barfield explain that if the measure passes, all prop-
erty owners who have a homestead exemption on Janu-
ary 1, 2008, must choose to do one of the following:
a) Keep their existing homestead exemption and
their current Save Our Homes cap..
The homestead amount is $25,000 and the cap limits
any annual assessed value increases on that homestead
to the lesser of three percent or the change in the Con-
sumer Price Index, as long as they maintain it as their


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, September 12, 2007
Property Appraiser Leigh Barfield, left, is pictured with
Jimmy. Hardee, President of the 55 Plus Club. Barfield ad-
dressed the club and explained the proposed Super
Homestead Exemption.


homestead.
or -
b) Convert to the Super Homestead Exemption and
give up Save Our Homes.
The new Super Exemption will exempt 75% of the
first $200,000 of value on the homestead and 15% of the
next $300,000 with no cap on value increases. This op-
tion can be chosen in 2008 or in a later year, but the
choice is irrevocable.
If the amendment passes, all persons with home-
stead exemption in 2008 will continue under Save Our
Homes unless they file a form with the Property Ap-
praiser's Office to switch to the Super Exemption. All
applications filed for homestead exemption for 2009
and thereafter will be for the Super Exemption Save
Our Homes will not be available.
Nobody can guarantee which option is better for you
or guarantee that the forecasts they make will prove
accurate over time. Uncertain future variables such as
inflation, the increase in real estate values, the length
of time you will continue to live in your home and the
amount of capped value you currently have must be
considered.
If anyone is filing a new homestead for 2008, they
will have to take the Super Exemption if it passes.
Any property owner can go the Property Appraiser's
website and find their parcel and see what the Super
Exemption would be for them.


Town Of Lee And



Lee VFD Hosting



Garage Sale
vycldSCkjeLC. I
^ l i? ,*i- I
^w1^^~~ :t)i *' 'SS~f^v


BUDGET SUMMARY


CITY OF MADISON FISCAL YEAR 2007- 2008


CASH BALANCE BROUGHT FORWARD
ESTIMATED REVENUES:
Taxes:
Ad Valorem Taxes
Sales and Use Taxes
Charge for Services
Intergovernmental Revenue
Licenses and Permits
Fines and Forfeitures
Franchise Fees
Federal and State Grants
Interest Eamed/Other
TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER
FINANCING SOURCES
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND
BALANCES
EXPENDITURESIEXPENSES
General Government
Fire Department
Police Department
Street Department
Parks/Cemetery Department
Community Development Department
Superfund.
Water Department
Sewer Department
Debt Services
Natural Gas Department
Sanitation Department
Warehouse Department
Transfers to General Fund
TOTAL EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES
Reserves
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES
AND RESERVES


GENERAL WATER &SEWER NATURAL GAS SANITATION
FUND FUND FUND FUND
$ 100,000.00 $ 400,000.00 $ 150,000.00 $ 80,000.00


Millage Per $1000
6.6746


$ 551,000.00
$ 1,047,701.00
$ 44,831.00 $
$ 695,000.00
$ 49,524.00
$ 71,651.00
$ 209,020.00
$ $
$ 74,757.00 $


1,917,000.00 $1,072,000,00 $




100,000.00 $ 5,000.00 $


WAREHOUSE
FUND
$ 20,000.00 $


302,000.00 $ 212,000.00


TOTAL
BUDGET
750,000.00


551,000,00
1,047,701,00
3,547,831.00
695,000.00
49,524.00
71,651.00
209,020.00


The Town of Lee and the Lee Community "v
Volunteer Fire Department are hosting a
garage sale on Saturday October 6. The
event will be held at and around the ; .,H
softball field adjacent to City
Hall, located at 286 NE CR : -0-.
255. Additional vendor --
information and appli-, US R
nations may be picked -
up at City Hall. Please -
call 971-5867 for morm e -. ;-.. 2, _..
details. al I mt^ n- ,
Part of the pro-
ceeds will go towards Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, September 14, 2007
the fire department Michael Curtis is volunteering with the Town of Lee to help
and another portion develop a youth program for the town.
will go towards a
youth program that the town is starting.


Recognizing the critical need to build permanent so-
lutions for the needs of youth throughout the Town of
Lee and Madison County, the council is harvesting
every available resource for this noteworthy cause.
Town Manager Cheryl Archambault has enlisted the
aid of Michael Curtis, a volunteer, to assist with the
program.
All proceeds for the town from the garage sale will
be used by the town for the following:
*The Express Yourself Program: This project is cen-
tered on arts, crafts and recreation. It is an easy-to-
launch and free-to-user program, providing both social
and functional benefits to elementary-aged children, as
well as the high school student coachess" who are tar-
geted to assist them. The goal is to bolster confidence
through constructive expression, while simultaneously
replacing "hanging out" time, especially in summer
and after school, with supervised developmental activi-
ties...what a win-win!
*Workforce Training Program. At first glance, it may
seem premature to begin professional and skilled labor
orientation to youngsters. But just the opposite is true.
Researchers and practitioners agree that a well-orga-
nized, ongoing introduction to "real-world" choices,
from vocation to balancing a checkbook, creates a level
of confidence and achievement well above their non-
participating peers. This will be offered in a curricu-
lum format just like school.
*Recreation/Youth Services Department. The devel-
opment of a full recreation department for youth and
adult programs will require a more formal approach
and substantial acquisition of funds from relevant
state and federal agencies, as well as the business com-
munity Our current volunteer status must grow rapid-
ly to a professional one. In doing so, it will also provide
jobs, another essential community issue, but, more im-
portantly, it will provide permanence and a staging
area from which to address the urgent needs of our
children.





Get lead stories,
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3,500.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 184,257.00


$ 2,743,484,00 $ 2,017,000.00 $ 1,077,000.00 $ 305,500.00 $ 213,000.00 $ 6,355,984.00

$ 2,843,484.00 $ 2,417,000.00 $ 1,227,000.00 $ 385,500.00 $ 233,000.00 $ 7,105,984.00

$ 576,524.00 $ 576,524.00
$ 532,432.00 $ 532,432.00
$ 877,347.00 $ 877,347.00
$ 447,115.00 $ 447,115.00
$ 139,477,00 $ 139,477.00
$ 175,589.00 $ 175,589.00
$ 95,000,00 $ 95,000.00
$ 688,592.00 $ 688,592.00
$ 882,713.00 $ 882,713.00
$ 470,695,00 $ 470,695.00
$ 1,007,000.00 $ 1,007,000.00
$ 285,500.00 $ 285,500.00
$ 233,000.00 $ 233,000.00
$ 375,000.00 $ 220,000.00 $ 100,000.00 $ 320,000.00


0 0 0 0 0 0

$ 2,843,484.00 $ 2.417,000,00 $ 1,227,000.00 $ 385,500.00 $ 233,000.00 $ 7,105,984.00


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, ANDIOR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY
AS A PUBLIC RECORD,


NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING


The City of Madison hastentatively adopted a
budget for fiscal year 2007-2008. A public '
hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the
budget AND TAXES will be held on Tuesday.
September 25, 2007 at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall,
'321 SW Rutledge St., Madison, Florida







www. greenepublishing. cor



Chu rch


Friday, September 21, 2007


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A


Cairk The S


By Vickie Howerton
For this reason, I kneel before the Father,
from whom His whole family in heaven and on
earth derives its name. I pray that out of his
glorious riches He may strengthen you with
power through his Spirit in your inner being,
so that Christ may dwell in your hearts
through faith. And I pray that you, being root-
ed and established in love, mayhave power, to-
gether with all the saints, to grasp how wide
and long and high and deep is the love of
Christ, and to know this love that surpasses
knowledge-that you maybefilled to the mea-
sure of all the fullness of God.
Now to Him who is able to do immeasur-
ablymore than all we ask or imagine, accord-
ing to his power that is at work within us, to
Him be glory in the church and in Christ Je-
sus throughout all generations for ever and
ever Amen.
(Ephesians 3:14-20)
All men are invited to participate in the
Florida Men of Integrity Conference. This
will be held at Grace United Methodist
Church in Gainesville, Florida. The date will
be October 13, 2007. The keynote speakers for
this event will be Larry Malone, who is Na-
tional Director of Men's Ministries of Unit-
ed Methodist Men. Having been a fighter pi-
lot in the Vietnam war, he keeps a sword on
his wall. This symbolizes his present engage-
ment as a warrior in the intense battle for
the souls of men and families.
The second keynote speaker for this in-
credible upcoming men's event will be Chuck
Brewster. He is the founder of Champions of
Honor. His ministry focuses on men and their
relationship with God, their family, their
church, and their community. He served pre-
viously as the National Director of Honor-
Bound. Chuck Brewster formerly served as a
Special Agent with the United States Secret
Service where he guarded numerous public
officials including the President of the Unit-
ed States. This will be an event that the men
of Madison County and the surrounding ar-
eas will not want to miss.
Please mark your calendars for October
21, 2007. Our own Rev. Rick Bonfim will be
coming back to his home church here in the
U.S. for special revival services. Rick will be
preaching from Sunday evening through
Thursday evening, October 25th. Our Pastor
and our congregation invite everyone in our


community to come and join us at First Unit-
ed Methodist Church as we worship the One
who in His word says: God demonstrated His
own love for us in this: while we were yet
sinners, Christ died for us. Rick will join us
as we set apart this time to worship Christ
and ask God's blessings on a country-indeed
a world which needs God's grace and pow-
er. Rick, along with our own Pastor, will
challenge and pray with us in Madison as we
choose to journey with Christ beyond just
nominal cultural Christianity- choosing
rather to become Warriors in the
Faith...born into the kingdom for such a
time as this!
We especially invite everyone in our com-
munity to come and experience this time of
Rekindling the Spirit of Christ in our lives
as together we choose to stand in the gap for
our families, our children, our grandchil-
dren, our community, and far beyond even
that. This will be a special time of encoun-
tering the Love, the Presence, and the Power
of the One who loves us with an everlasting
love!
For anyone in the county who is interest-
ed, we gather at First United Methodist
Church in the Sanctuary on Wednesday
evenings at 5:30 p.m. to pray for this revival.
Please come and join us each Wednesday
as Holy Spirit blazes in the midst of this spe-
cial prayer gathering. Holy Spirit continues
to overflow in praise, worship, and in the
stirring sermons that our own Pastor, Rev.
Bob Laidlaw, delivers each Sunday morning
at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Communion is also a
part of the 8:30 worship service. The revival
in our hearts has already begun. You will not
want to miss these encounters with Christ:
His love, His church. You are invited.,
Our Pastor recently reminded us of this
verse: "If my people, which are ,called by my
name, will humble themselves, and pray, and
seek my face. and turn from their wicked
ways; I will hear them from heaven, and will
forgive their sin, and will heal their land."
You are invited to join us in worshiping
the One who is speaking His word to us. We
also remind everyone that radio station
WMAF in Madison carries our 11 a.m. ser-
vice each Sunday morning for those who
are unable to be in our sanctuary We are
grateful that our radio family joins us in
worship.


RZ Jm ,'i t


By Nell Dobbs
The days of fall are fast ap-
proaching. Fall will fall on Septem-
ber 23 this year and there's a cool-
ness in the air and soon leaves will
be changing into beautiful colors.
Sign at First Baptist: Two things
are certain-Jesus loves you and
we're all kin to Noah.
Our sign on the west side: Joy-
The State of One Who Belongs to
the Lord Who Is Not Affected By
Circumstances
Beautiful flowers were placed in.
church Sunday by Geoff and Robin
Hill in honor of Joshua's second
birthday on September 18. Bless
this family and we give thanks for
their gifts of love and service.
Amen!
Other birthdays: Matt
Buchanan, September 16; Sherry
Finney, September 17; Debbie
Rutherford, Holly Stalvey and
Marty Stern, September 19;
Hunter Robinson and Stephanie
Roebuck, September 20; Princess
Roebuck, September 21; Jerry Mc-
Clune and Ruby Moyer, September
22; Marshall Pike and Thelma De-
Hart, September 23.
We give thanks for 143 in Sun-
day School.
From the Pastor's Heart: Re-
joice! Pray! Petition! Be at Peace!
Make requests!
The Trio-Dan Campbell, Liane
Wakefield and Phillip Holbrook-
blessed us singing "Who? Who?
Who?"
We sang "O Worship the King,"
using verse 3:
"Frail children of dust
And feeble afraid,
In thee do I trust,
Nor find Thee to fail;
Thy mercies how tender,
How firm to the end,.


Our Maker, Defender,
Redeemer and Friend!"
Brett Frakes as Deacon of the
Week gave the offertory prayer.
Lex Webb on the organ played "I
Need Thee Every Hour" so well.
Chancel Choir sang "The Mind of
Christ."
Preacher continues about Peter
from Acts 4. He makes me think of
Billy Graham and is indeed a great
preacher and we are so blessed he
is with us.
God uses common people who
show they've been with Jesus,
whose lives have been changed by
the power of the Holy Spirit and
even uses enemies and oppressors
to accomplish His will.
On Monday, September 17, at 7
p.m., there was a Middle Florida
Baptist Association Sunday School
training at Greenville Baptist for
all Sunday School Workers.
On Tuesday, September 18, the
Senior Adult Choir sang at Madi-
son Nursing Home.
Pray hard for our Pastor Search
Committee at least three times a
day, Judy Phillips urged.
There are so many, many needs
and requests, so many ill, so many
troubled, so many sad ones for.
many reasons, so many sad that
death has come to those they love,
family and friends.
Pray for the family of our neigh-
bor and special friend Lillian
McLeod, whose sweet service was
at Faith Baptist. Her desire was to
live for the Lord and her family
and then to be with her Donald,
who died four years ago. Bless
them.
May the Lord make us bold in
sharing our personal witness and
let His Spirit lead us in the every-
day events of our lives. Amen!


,' Blessed [is] the man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful. But his
delight [is] in the law of the Lord; and in his law doth he meditate day and night. And he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water, that
" bringeth forth his fruit in his season; his leaf also shall not wither: and whatsoever he doeth shall prosper. -Psalms 1:1-3







'N





Madison Church of God JHanson United Methodist Church Shiloq Missionary Baptist Church
N7 290 NE Dais. Strcet Hanson, FL 221 Martin Luther King Drive Madi.sor, FL
.P -I NE Colin Kelly H.-, Madison, FL (7.5 miles from Madison on Hw:, 1-15. turn right on DaJ I P.O. Box 242 Nfadison. FL
5 -3-.. ..'. Rt Dovic Glass. Parr Rev' 1tavne Albertson. Pastor 850-973-3127
k chSunday School 10:00 a.m. .. mal: shiohotimnadison@valhoo corn
MoSunda School ip10:00 a.. Morning Worship 11:15 a.m. Marcus h as, Sr. Pastor Josie Graham Assistant Pastor
onng 100 p.m Sunday Evening Bible Study 6:00 p.m. Sunday School............9:30 a.m.
Sning W p Choir Practice Sunday Evening q:00 pn.m.11
Sednesda% Bible Stud) 7:00 p.m. Wednesday Evening Prayer Sece.............7:00 p.m. Worship Service.......11:00 a.m.
All Are Welcome. Please Come! Wednesday Night Bible Study.....6:00 p.m.
Barbara Memorial Church "We Walk B faith, No B Sih.
0 T Na rn II Corinthians 5:7
SOf The Nazarene ace
Hihu:. 2 S450-473-4160 Greenville Baptist Church Grace Presbyterian Church
Ro R.-/..'r ..loner 1365 SW Mlain St.. Greer,. lie. FL 8-5i0-48-2353 ..A Congregation of the Presbyterian Chu ch Ir. Ame crKa
Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Suday School -All Ages 10:00 a.m. Rev John Hopwoxd
i Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 anm. 688 North Washington Ave Madman. FL 973.2692
S E ening Worship t:30p.m. Sunday Evning Worship 7:00 p.m. Sunday School For All Ages. ................9:45 anm.
07 Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 aim.
Wednesda, Bible Study 7:30 p.m. S y Pre-ool, Studenis, and Sunday Morning Worship ll:00 aa.
SAdults Choir Rehearsals t:30 pan. Wed. Fellowship Supper/Bible Study........6:00 p.m.
SOfTh Har t rch Wednesd Pre-school children Youth Groups 1st 12th Grades............6....:30 pm.
Readers Of The Harvest Church CoirPractice...., 730 pm.
RKeapers Of The Harvest Churc vYouth & Adult Bible Studies 7:00 p.m. "1m't 7:0 pam.
-: 01e. i, .e.i,tf (rircen.Llle, FL H%5y. 90 -All Invited- . Fr ayt om's Prayer Breakfast ................ 7:00 am.
N s.,,il t Sr -Paso, .. :. Worship And Se e W1th L '
Sunday School 10:00 an. -
Morning W\orship 11:00an.m. Lee Un:
E being orship Leem. Lee United 'Methodis*tChurch
Wednesday Night Service 7:30 pmn. Hy. 255 S. Lee, FL, 850.97.1558 MIt. Zion A.M .E. Church
I' lni/ 1 h.t ii,. Jui. t o f -,.rl-sti u's .hfilly ci me. Richaxd Quackenbush, Pas r.'tr ..'"
.,ilf acor l ij p '**CI~j ACIS 2.1 i i"A Friendly Church
I,, n .d b .'t' rJ m oil place -cr 2.1 Morning Worship 9: 00 am. erry:LakenFLy 850-9:94
EVERYONE IS ALWAS WELCOME! School FL 50-92
oEVrERIpONE IS ALWAYS WpELCOME! .orning.. Worship.'ai .- hanie Robinson, Jr. Pa.t, r
Sunday Evening Worship....... ..-. ., 30p pan. Church -hoo, 9:45 a-m.
St. Vincent DePaul Roman Men's Fellowship rshipService .:00
Second Sunday 11..:.00a .m.
Catholic Church Nlulple Weekly Bible Studis/Actk. :,B-bleeStud r 7:00 p.m.
,,.aLI,'. L. "- 'Coincang The CoamrnwidtO. 'f .
SMeetinm L & Sumter St 850-973-2428S *' c: ,.. .. ; ',
S Rev John J. Gordon, OMI 9A 0'1VI-krc -
Sunday 9:00 am. First Unted turch h: Baptist Church
Mon.. Tues.. Wed. Mast 7:30 a.m. First United Methi shp Baptist Church
Thursday Mass 7:30 a.m. Since I ,* Hornr at Ru'edg 2 . I' mile north of Madison on 1-15
SaIurday Mass 5:30 p.m. Rev RoberL.' Laidlaw r'. ,. Szeve MAclargue. Pasior
Brian Sander ,on. Youth Parr..r P Jim Catr,,n. Li Lader -' cecor -Ake t s' rtr'r
Service of Word & Table 8:30 sn. : Minise s, Aciie Younc: A8u0-7in, 3-,b6
St. Mary's Episcopal Church ,SundaySchooL,..., :45a. an. ........ 30.& 11:00a..
41 NE H. n.FL-850-973-8338 'Sundayi ln orship 11:00 a. 10:00 a.m.
T .-i. ,i a.i, P il..- tl,c-. Bovles Seuor Warden e ayA uth (grades 6-8)......5:00-6:00 pn. t-............Call for schedule
Sunday% Church School 10:00 a.m. t.91-:i..t.. 9,2).. .6:30-7:30 pnm. -'.. M .s" "Contempora. -l, h.,,hip"
Sunda; Hol Eucharist 10:00 a.m. Mfton. .l.ip.., : :00 am.a home grup, call S'.: 266
NMiusiun Board 2nd Snndu3 11:00 a.m. -Wtu1'sMt0ig noon &.&IF'.-.>(a 20 can,w&F.. -. ........
Sunday 11a.m. Senice Now On I5H'F 1230 4W "Where Lwe Ha, A Lt)rima
Episcopal Church \\omen 3rd Sunda3......11:00 a.m. Eru'n e mrc n 'ralle ent "enr L L
t IME0ernnelcomf to all_ eent


I


40 4D
OWN









10A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.cor



RcqionaL Aappcnioa


Friday, September 21, 2007


Live! At Dowling Park" Artist


Series Opens Its 20th Season


With A Puppet Theatre


By Sally Q. Smith,
Office for Residential Services,
Advent Christian Village
The 20th annual "Live! At Dowling Park" Artist
Series at Advent Christian Village (ACV) is
pleased to announce its premiere concert of the
2007-2008 season "Cinderella and the Chinese
Slipper," presented by Bits 'N Pieces Giant Puppet
Theatre that will be held on Saturday, Septem-
ber 22, at 7:00 p.m. in the Rumph Pavilion at Camp
Suwannee. An abridged version of this perfor-
mance will take place at 10:30 a.m. on that same
day in the Magnolia Dining Room at Good Samar-
itan Center
Bits 'N Pieces Giant Puppet Theatre has been
dedicated to enchanting audiences via the art of
puppetry since 1975. The shows originally includ-
ed puppets of ten sizes. Over the years, the exclu-
sive use of fanciful, nine-foot-tall puppets has be-
come the theatre's "hallmark." The theatre travels
to schools and communities around the nation
and makes international appearances under the
sponsorships of cultural exchange programs with
Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, and Taiwan.


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The earliest known root story of "Cinderella"
is from ninth century Chinese folklore. Twelve
centuries later, Bit 'N Pieces' retells the Chinese
version of this beloved fairy tale using a variety
of Asian animals, featuring Cinderella as "Pan-
darella" and her family of pandas, a Shree Mon-
key, a baby dragon, and even a goldfish as the
Fairy Godmother. According to one review of this
show, "The beautiful stage set of fans, bamboo,
macram6, and traditional trimmings unfolds like
a clever puzzle filling the stage with color.and
splendor."
Ticket prices for this performance are as fol-
lows: ACV Members: $10, Adults (i.e., non-ACV
Members): $12, Students (ages 13-18): $5, and Chil-
dren (ages 5-12): $4. Admission for children ages 4
and under,is free. Tickets are available at the ACV
Cashier's Office, as well as in Live Oak at The Mu-
sic Center and the Suwannee County Chamber of
Commerce. Tickets may also be purchased at the
door on the evening of the concert.
'Live! At Dowling Park' is pleased to welcome
guests participating in the Reciprocity Program:
North Florida Community College (NFCC) and
Community Concerts of Lake City, Inc. NFCC re-
quests that all reciprocating parties please call in
advance to reserve their seats.
For additional information about this perfor-
mance, please call Dick Grillo at (386) 658-5557, or
e-mail dgrillo6(acvillage.net.
'Live! At Dowling Park' is sponsored in part by
the State of Florida, Department of State, Divi-
sion of Cultural Affairs, the Florida Arts Council,
and the National Endowment for the Arts.


Our Lives In Fabric

The 26th Annual Capital City

Quilt Show'
Secretary of State Kurt S. Browning announced the
26th Annual Capital City Quilt Show titled Our Lives in
Fabric will open at the Museum of Florida History on
September 6 and run through October 28, 2007. Ap-
proximately 67 handcrafted and colorful creations will
be featured in the exhibit cosponsored by Quilters Un-
limited of Tallahassee.
"This popular exhibit appeals to the whole family,"
said Secretary Browning. ."Quilts are items that evoke
happy memories and remembrances because they often
tell stories and brighten a room with their colorful and
intricate patterns."
Our Lives.in Fabric includes quilts that reflect fami-
ly history and relationships. Many of them are created
with a specific family member or friend in mind. Often
times they are given as gifts to those who have close re-
lationships with the quilter. The exhibit continues with ,.
the tradition of displaying an "Opportunity Quilt"
made by the quilt guild. Visitors can make a donation
to the guild and are then entered into a drawing for the
Opportunity Quilt when the exhibit closes in October.
Visitors may also bid on a number of items included in
the silent auction throughout the run of the exhibit.
The show includes "Quilts for the Community," a group
highlighting the Quilters Unlimited philanthropic ven-
tures.
In addition to this year's quilt exhibit, the Museum
of Florida History will display three wooden sculp-
tures from a larger body of work created by Tampa
wood sculpture artist Fraser Smith. He will speak at
the opening on September 6 about his work and the in-
spiration he receives from quilts. These realistic pieces
look like actual hanging quilts and have been shown in
galleries from coast to coast, and many are in private
homes.
The Museum is located in the R. A. Gray Building at
500 South Bronough Street, downtown Tallahassee.
The History Shop will have items for sale that reflect
the quilt theme. Hours are Monday through Friday, 9
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Sunday
and holidays, 12 noon to 4:30 p.m. The Museum and the
History Shop are open 3rd Thursdays until 8 p.m. For
more information, contact (850) 245-6400 or go online to
www.museumoffloridahistorv.com.


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Real Estate


Friday, September 21, 2007


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11A


Selling Your Home In A Buyer's Market


Selling a home can be a daunting task
for any homeowner and in a "buyer's
market" the process can feel overwhelm-
ing. While many sellers think that home-
buyers have the upper hand, with a little
patience and a few helpful tips from
GMAC Real Estate, you can successfully
sell your home.
The Price Is Right
The No. 1 factor in the sale of your
home and one of the most critical ele-
ments of the sales process is setting the
asking price. While you want to get the
most appreciation from the sale of your
home, you also want to be realistic when
setting your price.
"Sellers need to work with an experi-
enced real estate professional who can
help them establish a realistic value and
price for their home," said Lane Barnett,
president and CEO of GMAC Real Estate
Franchise Operations. "Setting a price
that is unrealistic and too high can re-
duce agent and buyer interest, and can
make other competing homes look like a
better value."
On the flip side, it's critical to not un-
derprice your home when looking to sell.
Your real estate agent will research and


provide you with data on current market
conditions in your area.
Remodel
Remodeling is a great way to increase
your home's value in a more challenging
market. Remodeling a kitchen or bath-
room generally offers the highest per-
centage return on your initial invest-
ment according to numerous industry
surveys. Another rule of thumb is to dec-
orate your home so it appeals to the
broadest number of potential buyers.
Buyers generally prefer neutral, main-
stream designs, so avoid bold colors or
patterns or out-of-date designs that can
make it harder to sell. New paint, a nice-
ly mowed lawn and attractive landscap-
ing can go a long way in enhancing your
home's curb appeal.
Identify Potential Problems
Hire a home inspector to help you
identify any potential problems before
you put your house on the market. Also,
make sure your home complies with all
local housing codes,
Presentation Is Key
The presentation of your home when
you are listing it plays an important role
in attracting a buyer. As with choosing


an asking price, look at the condition of
your home through a buyer's perspec-
tive.
"Sellers need to understand the im-
portance of how their home looks to
prospective buyers and really need to
put themselves into the shoes of the buy-
ing public," said Barnett. "Potential buy-
ers will examine every nook and cranny
of your house as they begin to think
about making a purchase."
Overall Marketing
Your real estate agent will prepare
your listing for the multiple listing ser-
vice as well as create an advertisement
for the Internet and any materials that
will be made available to those who visit
your house. More and more, the first im-
pression of your home that many poten-
tial buyers. have comes from it being
seen on the Internet. It is important to


offer a wide variety of photos of both
the inside and outside of your home. 360-
degree virtual tours of your home are
another popular choice to consider.
Also, the description of your house
needs to be accurate and complete to
grab the attention of the potential home-
buyer.
When selling your home, remember
that an experienced real estate profes-
sional can help you sell your home not
only for the highest price but also in the
shortest time. Your agent should serve
as your trusted advisor, your skilled ne-
gotiator and your marketing coordina-
tor every step of the way From pricing
to closing day, these professionals can
make you seem like a pro at selling in a
buyer's market. For more information or
to find a realtor nearby, go to
h ntt//www.ma rea lesta tf comm.


Whether you're buying
a new home or you're in
the market for an older
home, the door should al-
ways be open to a home
inspection--before you
buy.
That's the advice from
experts who say home in-
spections can help home
buyers spot potential
problems with a house--
ranging from dry rot to
termites, and from faulty
wiring to bad plumbing.
That information not
only saves you future
headaches, but it can also
be used as leverage when
negotiating the price of a
hom e.,,,, ,... .
"Simply put, you want
to know what you're get-
ting into when you buy a
house," explains Dan
Steward, president of Pil-
lar To Post, North Ameri-
ca's leading provider of,
home-inspection services..
"A home inspector will
check the roof,. crawl
spaces and other hard-to-
reach places. He'll check
for damage on old homes
and defects on newly built
ones."
In addition, Steward
says a home inspection
covers heating and cool-
ing systems, the attic,
walls and windows, the
basement and foundation,
as well as plumbing and
wiring.
Here's a look at the top
three ways a home inspec-
tion can help homeown-
ers:
#1: Cut Costs
Home inspections gen-
erally cost between $300
and $400--a cost that can
often be recouped in
maintenance savings or
even split between home
buyer and seller.
And consider this fact:
A new roof for a 2,000-
square-foot, single-story
home (tar and gravel)
costs between $14,000 and
$20,000, depending on re-
gions, upgrades, complex-
ity and disposal fees.


If you unknowingly
buy a home needing a new
roof, that cost is passed
entirely to you.
However, if a home in-
spector determines a new
roof is needed, at least
part of that cost might be
subtracted from the sell-
ing price of a home or
split between you and the
seller.
You may learn about
other repair cost esti-
mates at
www.pillartopost.com. ,
' #2: Boost Your
Homeowner IQ
"A home inspection
can be a great learning
opportunity." says Stew-
ard. "You'll find out quite
a bit about the house you
buy and have a better
idea of what mainte-
nance areas need your at-
tention."
Pillar To Post provides
a home inspection report
to clients, complete with
digital photos, a detailed
list and executive sum-
mary of findings, and
maintenance recommen-
dations and tips, among
other things. The reports
are done at the time of
home inspection and cov-
er more than 1,600 items
in the home.
Also, if you're the
"hands-on" type, you
might be able to follow
the home inspector as he
does his work.*
Often, the home inspec-
tors will describe what
they're doing and talk
about routine mainte-
nance as they perform the
inspection.
#3: Build A Better
Budget
Because a home inspec-
tion report points out po-
tential problems with a
house, it can help you
budget for upcoming re-
pair expenses and priori-
tize work that needs to be
done.
"If you have a good un-
derstanding of what it's
going to cost you to keep


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your house in shape, you
can get a much better idea
of what perks--such as a
new kitchen--you can af-
ford," says Steward. "You
can also use home inspec-
tion reports to help deter-
mine what you can afford
in the way of mortgage
payments and closing
costs."
For more information
about home inspections,
visit www. pillartopostcomL
The best way to avoid
unpleasant surprises is to
have the home inspected
before you buy.


To be held:
SEPTEMBER 22,2007
at 9:00 a.m.
Open House:
SEPTEMBER 19, 2 07
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p
12534 Roberts Stree
White Springs, FL -


VIVIAN W.



SEARCH


General Appraiser Z3.M



148 East Base Street
Madsomn, FL 32340


Offic= 50973


eunaiI sem %..yaWpeaL IblijualQt Mobffc 854U58



Moonuftens Lafayette and Thykir Cvanths


DESCRIPTION: It is the right moment
to invest in this-one of a lind property.
6 units on 2.19 acres in charming White
Springs, Hamilton County. Many
businesses can be made with this
Commercial neighborhood zoning.
*Commercial Outlets *Bed & Breakfast
* Barber Shop Beauty Shop
& or Dry Cleaner 'Art Gallery
Gift Shops
tbre 'Craft Shop


DIRECTIONS: 1-75 North to Exit 439, head East to White Springs
on 136, turn on US 41, turn just before end of City Limits.


To be held: SEPTEMBER 22, 2007 at 9:00 a.m.
Open House: SEPTEMBER 19, 2007 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

DESCRIPTION: 1 acre of land mol in
White Springs, Hamilton County, FL.
Zoned for Commercial neighborhood.


To be held: SEPTEMBER 22,2007 at 10:00 a.m.
Open House: SEPTEMBER 20, 2007 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
11888 3rd Street,


DIRECTIONS: From Live Oak,
take CR 136, cross bridge, go
straight to Suwannee Avenue
and turn right onto CR 135,
cross railroad tracks and it's
on right.


DESCRIPTION: Historic 1893 two story
home. 4 bedroom, 2 bath with 6 fire-
places on 1.4 acres. On the National
Historic Register. Original pine and
pecan flooring, one mile from
Suwannee River, great for a Bed
and Breakfast.


To be held: SEPTEMBER 22, 2007 at 10:00 a.m. @ 11888 3" Street White Springs, FL
Open House: SEPTEMBER 21, 2007 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.


DESCRIPTION: 4 Bedroom, 2.5 Bath
on .48 acres (not an acre), hard pine
and yellow pine wood floors, carpet
in kids bedroom, vinyl in kitchen,
carport, garden in back yard. GREAT
STARTER HOME.


LOCATION OF HOUSE:
598 S.W. Horry Avenue
Madison, FL
DIRECTIONS TO HOUSE:
From Live Oak, go US 90 West
towards Madison, turn left on
Horry Avenue, go 5 blocks.


Three Smart Reasons

To Get A Home Inspection

Before You Buy


SERVICES, INC.

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12A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www. greenepublishing. com


Friday, September 21, 2007
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The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A


www. greenepublishing. cor


Florida's Sheriff's Youth Ranch



Charity Celebrates 50 Years!


The Florida Sheriff's Youth Ranches
are on the verge of making history This
year, Florida's charity is celebrating 50
years of dedicated service to children
and families throughout the state. While
recognizing 50 years of achievement, the
Youth Ranches will reach another amaz-
ing milestone. By the end of the year, the
organization will have served over 100,000
children since it began in 1957, when two
sheriffs founded the first "Boys Ranch" lo-
cated along the Suwannee River in Live
Oak. Today, the Youth Ranches consists of
four residential facilities and two camps,
serving all 67 counties in Florida.
The main purpose of the Florida Sher-
iff's Youth Ranches is to provide a positive
and healthy living environment for at-risk
boys and girls. Children come to the Youth
Ranches from a variety of backgrounds.
Some have been neglected or abused, other
might struggle socially and academically. Re-
gardless of their past, the Youth Ranches provides
hope for their future. Unlike correctional institutions
(such as boot camps), this
a r,,u


Josh came from an abusive home. At the age of
12, he ran away only to find himself- homeless and
(Le., e -"...t alonen.
fAfter turning himself in to a local church, Josh
was invited to live at the Boys Ranch in Live Oak.
At the first sight of the Ranch, Josh had found a
'a, home. Not only did the Ranch offer him three
meals a day and a warm bed to sleep in, neither of
A. Ar (r Awhich he had in quite a while, but Josh was given
the chance to attend school, develop hobbies and
talents, while pursuing his goals. Josh maintained
a 3.0 grade point average throughout high school,
and had the honor of' being elected Homecoming
">1 1 King. This fall Josh began his first semester of
l college with solid goals and a plan for success.
,i For 50 years the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch-
1 es has helped thousands of kids just like Josh.
Since 1957, generous sheriffs, donors, and citi-
zens have come together to offer hope and a
chance for success. This year, the Youth Ranches will
celebrate its 50 Year Anniversary through a broad
range of events all across the state, including the sig-
organization serves a different type of kid in a differ- nature Annual Boys Ranch Open House in Live Oak,
ent way. The Youth Ranches reaches out to "good" kids Saturday, October 6, 2007. For more information call
who come from "bad" situations, like Josh. (800) 765-3797 or visit www.vouthranches.org.

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Answers to Frequently Asked Questions
About The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches


Q: JUST WHAT IS THE FLORIDA
SHERIFFS YOUTH RANCHES?
-A: The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch-
es, Inc. is the parent organization which
.operates four residential programs:
S Boys Ranch, Youth Villa, Youth
Ranch/Safety Harbor, and Youth
Ranch/Bradenton-Sarasota; two camp-
it police ing programs: Youth Camp and Caruth
,.Servi' Camp; and other family services around
To )ou. the state. The Youth Ranches is a chari-
table, non-profit corporation, chartered
in the State of Florida. The Office of the
President is located at the Boys Ranch
S|C | and uses the mailing address P.O. Box
5 2000, Boys Rapch, Florida 32064. The Of-
fice of the President provides an um-
brella of management services includ-
00 ing program development, fiscal affairs,
accounting, human resources, financial
m development and public relations for all
Youth Ranches programs. This adminis-
trative entity unifies the separate pro-
grams, combines like functions and
eliminates wasteful duplication.
In 1977, the decision was made to
merge the Boys Ranch and Girls Villa
4 into the Youth Fund and form a single


organization. This meant that Boys
Ranch and the Girls Villa had to surren-
der their status as individual legal enti-
ties; however, they continue to operate
much as before and their identities were
preserved through a filing procedure
with the Florida Department of State.
Prior to February 20, 1986, when the
name was changed to Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches, Inc., this same organiza-
tion was known as the Florida Sheriffs
Youth Fund, Inc. In 1987, the Girls Villa
was renamed as the Youth Villa. All oth-
er sites programs were established as
additional programs of the Florida
Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc.
Q: ARE CHILDREN OF ALL
RACES, CREEDS, AND COLORS
WELCOME AT YOUTH RANCHES
FACILITIES?
A: Yes...All applications for admis-
sion are given the same attention and
consideration, regardless of the appli-
cant's race, creed, or color. Our priority
for admission is based upon need and
ability to meet those needs much more
than any other factor.


< New Life_ Bible
BO0kS!Oe
... ooksore






Books Bibles Gifts Cards Music
Mon.-Fri127 W Howard St., Live Oak
9 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
386n362 .41851
2-48-.1


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Credit Union Offers
* SA TN(,S ACCOUNTS ... ir...1....,,,, ,-.1,1,. f ....
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Dixie, Hamilton, Lafayette and Suwannee Counties
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Live Oak, Florida 32064 (386) 362-2225 I"'
152 Main St., Suite 2, Mayo, Florida (386) 294-2778
102 Central Avenue, Jasper, Florida (386) 792-2301 5


/ I


lor*d Sh 11 s


Friday, September 21, 2007


am











14A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www. greenepublishing.corn



sports Sc ool & Eoucation


Friday, September 21, 2007


MCHS Cowgirls


Beat Lady Bulldogs


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County High
School Cowgirls beat the Suwan-
nee High Lady Bull-
dogs 3-1 in a volley-
ball match played
Thursday, Septem-
ber 13, in Live Oak.
The Cowgirls
dropped the first
game by a score of
25-19, before coming back and
winning the next three games
by scores of 25-10, 25-17 and 25-
18.
Megan Jackson had 13 kills


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
New Testament Christian
School is selling chicken dinners
to raise funds for the
school.
Dinners are available
for $6 each. The school
will deliver to businesses "f
and residents if they or-
der 10 meals or more.
The dinner will be
available between 11 a.m.
and 1 p.m. on Friday. Sep-
tember 28. Orders need to
be in to the school or
someone selling the din-
ners for the school by Mon-
day. September 24.


Warriors' JV Beat Munroe's JV


and 3 aces in the match.
Ashley Haynes had 20 kills, 1
assist, 2 aces and 1 block in the
match.
Alexis Stalnaker
had 13 kills and 1
ace.
Caitlin Griffin
had 1 kill, 48 as-
sists and 1 ace in
the match.
Brittany Davis
had 5 kills, 4 aces and 1 block.
Emily Hentges had 10 assists
and 4 aces.
Brittany Bezick had 1 kill.
Kayla Sapp had 2 kills.


p> y


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Cheltsie Kinsley, September 13, 2007
ACA Junior Varsity Warrior Bradley Holm, #47, runs the ball down
the field for the Warriors. Holm had a total of 56 yards in last Thursday
night's game.


New Testament Christian
School is located on US 90, east of
Madison. near the US 90 and the
State Road 6 intersection.


Greene Publishing. Inc. Photo by Cheltsie Kinsley,. September 13. 2007
Phillip Watts, #35, carried the ball downfield for the ACA Junior Var-
sity Warriors, before being brought down by the Bobcats. Watts led the
Warriors with nine tackles and one assist during last Thursday night's
game against Robert F. Munroe.


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Aucilla Christian
Academy Warriors' junior
varsity beat the Robert E
Munroe Bobcats' junior
varsity 8-0 in action played
Thursday, September 13.
Quarterback Joey Dow-
ell went one for four on
pass attempts, picking up
25 yards.
Quarterback Tyler
Jackson completed three
of nine passes for 31 yards.
Bradley Holm had four
pass receptions for 56
yards.
Phillip Watts led the
Warriors with nine tackles
and one assist.
Dowell had three tackles
and one assist. '
Matt Tuten had one
tackle and four assists.
Jared Jackson had four
tackles and one assist: I
Tres Copeland had one
tackle and one assist in tlhe
game.
Levi Cobb had thrde
tackles, one assists and a
fumble recovery.
Holm had two tackles
and two assists.
Hans Sorenson had four
tackles, two sacks and one
assist.
Ben Sadler had thrde
tackles and two assists.
Tyler Jackson had one
tackle, two assists and ode
pass interception.
The JV Warriors play
Brookwood at 6 p.m. on
Thursday, September 20, at
the Swamp in Aucilla.

First-Aid Tips
For Outdoor Furl


229.219.7080 1-75 Exit 13, Valdosta, GA

phobiaevent.com
Reg. Admission $44.95 per person, plus tax, parking additional. Obtain 2nd day ticket by exchanging 1st day ticket
at the upgrade center on the first day's visit- 2nd day ticket must be used within 6 days and is non-transferable.


(NAPSI) Outdoor activ-
ities are fun but can als6
raise your risk for cuts.
scrapes, bug bites, poiso#i
ivy and skin irritation
that, if left untreated, can
turn into something seri-
ous. To stay safe. while en-
joying the great outdoors,
try some of these tips: '
1. Come prepared. 4
well-stocked first-aid kit is
essential.
2. Protect your skin
with a sunscreen of at
least SPF 15. Reapply fre-
quently.
3. Use insect repel-
lent on exposed skin antl
clothing to reduce insect
bites. 1
4. Avoid using scent-
ed soaps, perfumes or hair
sprays before heading out
to help prevent bee and in-
sect stings. Should they oc-
cur, apply CVS/pharmacy
Maximum Strength Corti-
sone, which relieves itch-
ing and soothes skin.
5. Treat cuts, scrape$
and other irritation
promptly. Try store-brand
first-aid products, which
will not only do the first-
aid job, but could save you
20 to 30 percent in the
process.
If stings or bites occuL,
apply cortisone, which re-
lieves itching while alsp
soothing the skin.


All Concerts and Events are FREE with park admission


New Testament Christian,


School Selling Chicken


Dinners For Fundraiser


I


~1Jlr








www.greenepublishing.com



sports


-Friday, September 21, 2007


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 15A


Warriors Run Roughshod Over Maranatha


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Aucilla Christian Academy Warriors ran
roughshod over Maranatha in a football game played
rFriday, September 14. The final score was ACA 72,
'Maranatha 0.
"- The Warriors scored quickly and often, leading 28-0 at
the end of the first quarter. The Warriors
extended their lead to 58-0 at the half.
The Warriors lead at the end of three
was 65-0. They drove the final nail in the
coffin in the fourth quarter as they scored
one more touchdown.
S Quarterback Matt Dobson went five for
seven for 75 yards and one touchdown.
-' Casey Casey Anderson went two for two for 39
Anderson yards and one touchdown.
Matt Bishop was the leading rusher on
the evening, gaining 86 yards and three
touchdowns.
SShane Westberry had 13 carries for 71
Kyards and one touchdown.
Jerel Drew had six carries for 69 yards
and two touchdowns.
Dobson rushed one time for 10 yards.
S A.J. Reggie Walker had three carries for 54
Connel yards.
A.J. Connell converted all ten extra
t 'point attempts.
Anderson caught three passes for 49
yards and one touchdown.
S Luke Witmer had two receptions for 26
yards.
a Brandon Dunbar caught one pass for 19
Luke yards and a touchdown.
' Witmer Elliot Lewis had a 65-yard punt return
for a touchdown.
Lewis had five tackles.
Bishop had four tackles.
A Will Hartsfield had four tackles.
i Woody Vollertson had four tackles and
one tackle for loss.
Walker had two tackles.
Rob Searcy, Zack Waters and Hunter
Will' Greene each had a tackle for loss.
Hartsfield Westberry had one pass interception.
Cole Swann had one fumble recovery
b The Warriors improved their season record to 3-0.


Whatever You Need,
Greene Publishing, Inc.

Classifieds
Have


'J *
It! ... o .< ,..

,., .. .. ,..: ".: : ;'2 ...


GREENER
Publishing, Inc.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Chelt-
sie Kinsley, September 14, 2007
-. ACA Warrior Elliott
..ewis, #11, brings ,down a
Alaranatha player during last
Friday night's awesome win.
-The Warriors finished the
o)ight out with a 72-0 score,
bringing them to a 3-0 record
-for this year, Lewis also had
-five tackles and a 65-yard
punt return for a touchdown.


h ~ INC'

151CaialCrceN

Talahasee F


1695 S. SR 53 Madison


973-4141


LIVE OAK GAS

TANK SET SPECIAL



starting at



$94.95

call our office for details

FALL FILL SPECIAL
Get ready for fall weather with our special pricing
on propane for the month of September

Come see our selection of gas logs, fireplaces, space heaters,
tankless water heaters, ranges, washers, dryers, cookers and outdoor
living products. Our service department has over 100 years experience
and is eager to serve your LP gas needs. Call us today!!

973-2256 1-877-517-3604


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Emerald Kinsley, September 14, 2007
The Aucilla Warriors are
ready for battle as they tear
through the banner and take
the field against Maranatha.


ACA Warrior Jerel Drew,
#32, runs the ball down for a
touchdown. Drew had six
carries for 69 yards and two
touchdowns during last Fri-
day night's win against
Maranatha.


STILLMAN MOTORS
S.Peas ia tf7 Y vs moon
SERVING CUSTOMERS SINCE 1939
I.11 I i. m.. 1 .i


NOW IN STOCK
OVER 25 VANS, :' & 1 TON TRUCKS, FLATBEDS, BOX VANS,
STEP VANS, SERVICE BODIES, PICKUPS, GAS & DIESEL!




Certificates of Deposit


Provided by Keith Hargrove, State Farm


FIXED RATE
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT


Effective from Interest Rates annual Percenlage
09/19/2007 09/25/2007 interestt Rates Yield I \PY)
90-day** 4.74% 4.85%
180-day** 4.88% 5.00%
1-year 4.88% 5.00%
2-year 4.88% 5.00%
3-year 4.88% 5.00%
4-year 4.88% 5.00%
5-year 4.88% 5.00%
*Jumbo CDs are available. **IRA Certificates of
Deposit are not available in 90 and 180-day terms.
JUMBO FIXED RATE
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT
Effective from Interest Rates annual Percentage
09/1912007 119/25,2007 interest Rates field AP
90-day** 4.74% 4.85%
180-day** 4.88% 5.00%
1-year 4.97% 5.00%
2-year 4.88% 5.00%
3-year 4.88% 5.00%
4-year 4.88% 5.00%
5-year 4.88% 5.00%
Minimum opening,deposit required for a Jumbo CD is $100,000.
** IRA Certificates of Deposit are not available in 90 and 180-day terms.




STATE FARM SELECT AGENT
KEITH G.
HARGROVE
200 W. Base St. H
(850) 973-6641
n MEMBER
IN ,...FDIC


j










16A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



Farm &, Outootrs


Friday, September 21, 2007


Grants Available


For Farm To Fuel


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On September 12, Flori-
da Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services Commis-
sioner Charles Bronson an-
nounced that applications
are available
for Florida's
"Farm to Fuel"
Grants Pro-
Florida Legis-
lature has ap-
propriated $25
million dollars
in funds to sup-
port the grant
program,
which centers
on the produc-
tion and distri-
bution of re-
newable energy.
Bioenergy, or renew-
able energy, is made from
crops, agriculture wastes
and residues, as well as
other biomass.
"Florida is poised to be-
come a national leader in
the production of renew-
able energy," Bronson said.


Researchers and grow-
ers need assistance, howev-
er, and that's where the
grant program comes in.
Eligible applicants include
municipalities and county
governments, for profit
companies
with a license
to do business
in the state,
universities
and colleges,
utilities locat-
ed and operat-
ed within the
state, and not
for profit orga-
nizations.
tAppl i c a-
i tions for the
program are
due by five
p.m. on October 26. Pro-
jects are will be evaluated
and several different crite-
ria, including cost-share
percentage, economic de-
velopment potential, and
extent to which the project
produces bioenergy from
Florida grown crops or bio-
mass.


SFarmer's

Cooperative, Inc.




748 SW Horry Street Madison, FL
850-973-2269





A DVi6i POF AESEEDCOMW

229-482-3131 1-800-634-1672
www.super-sod.com
__ s ,-._...1.- J . .


www.pattenseea.com

rno,6-&'mf


pe- em ......t.iA',eke. ~....~& ~ rrflMflS~fl"ii~


Madison County Crop.
A. -t


Volume Jan-Mar Apr-Jun Jul-Sep Oct-Dec
(Acres, Head) A
Apiculture
Bee Colonies 170 Dormant Active Active Active
Field Crops
Field Corn 3,900 Plant Grow Harvest
Dry southern peas 2,914 Plant Grow Harvest
Forage 7,630 Plant Mow/Grow Mow/Grow
Peanuts 8.000 Plant Grow Harvest
Rye 3,104 Plant Grow Harvest
Soybeans 1,100 Plant Grow Harvest
Tobacco 490 Plant Grow Harvest
Fruits, Nuts and Melons
Blueberries 15 Set Fruit Harvest Grow Go Dormant
Watermelon 205 Plant Harvest
Horticulture
Acres in open 181 In Production In Production In Production In Production
Greenhouses/sq ft 185,524 In Production In Production In Production In Production
Livestock
Beef Cattle/Calves 18,000 Over-Winter Calving Growing Growing
Goats 551 Over-Winter Kidding Growing Growing
Horses/Ponies 613 Over-Winter Foaling Growing Growing
Poultry/Broilers 1,123,000 In Production In Production In Production In Production
| Sheep 26 Over-Winter Lambing Growing Growing
Vegetables
Cow Peas 35 Harvest Harvest Plant
Cucumbers 4 Harvest Harvest Plant
Sweet Corn 33 Harvest Harvest Plant
Sources:
S2002 Census of Agriculture
2005 USDA NASS Quick Stats
2004 USDA NASS Quick Stats


TietoPan h Pomo k~u ui ime De TharresFo iwu'


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
With fall right
around the corner, it's
time to get ready for
plants that thrive in
cooler weather. Leafy
greens and root vegeta-
bles grow as happy as
can be before first frost,
which is typically some-
time in early to mid-No-
vember.,
Potatoes grow espe-
cially well in the cold
because the plants get a


chance to develop before
the potato bugs get to
them. Covering the
.newly planted eyes with
a layer of soil and then
garden mulch (like
grass clippings) pre-
vents freezing.
For a 20-foot row,
potato planters should
purchase about two and
a half pounds of seed
potatoes. A firm fresh
apple put in the bag'
with the seed potatoes
aids in sprouting.
When digging potato
rows, dig a trench on ei-
ther side to keep the
potatoes from standing
in water, add compost,
some 5-10-10, and about
a half cup of Epsom


salts. Each separate
seeding should have at
least two eyes and little
bit of ;the core. Place
the seed cuts four inches,
deep and 12 inches
apart, then cover with a
layer of soil and fol-
lowed by garden mulch.
The potatoes should
be ready to harvest just
when those early peas
are coming in, and a
dish of fresh-from-the-
garden peas and pota-
toes is delicious!
Other great fall
grows include leafy
greens like turnips, col-
lards and mustard
greens, as well as mem-
bers of the cabbage fam-"
ily and lettuces. Broc-


coli, cauliflower an4
Brussels sprouts also 4nt
well, as do radishes
beets and carrots. .o
,"ah @' '^i


fo


SOUTHEASTERN SURVEYING & MAPPING CORP.
SURVEYING FLORIDA SINCE 1972


JOIN US FOR OUR


GRAND OPENING!


Friday,


September 28th,


2007


Located at the comer of Range
Avenue and Marion Street
Downtown Madison, Florida

The ribbon cutting will be held at 11 am, with '
office staff available for tours, information and ..
questions from 8am until 5pm.

Refreshments will be served.
All of SSMC's owners and staff hope to see you there!

For More Information Please Visit or Call Us: 4
141 NE Range Avenue, Suite A
Madison, Florida 32340
850-253-0202
infob(isoutheastemsurx eying.comrn


k







www.greenepublishing.com


Outdoors


Friday, September 21, 2007


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 17A


We alteOu


'wa Around biode Deer Harvest *Wldewl'f fM-ft~e qL &M ar
- Licens~d lunting Preserve
I.38- 294-21Broad StoA
Day, Flrida- 86294121D BP 289 A~aflable
www.huclhananfarms.com A'il Year


iwwww.cap inpat cm
.386-96-14094 386

Veniso
'Clean. cool and quick
,e the watchwords of
good venison care. A clean
sliot, a clean cleaning job
ahd quick cooling of the
carcass are the key steps
to good-tasting venison.
Immediate field dressing
is best.
Postpone field dressing


2


NHF Day:

A Great Tradition
From Wonders of Wildlife Museum Hunters and an-
glers have always been the most vocal supporters of
Conservation and scientific wildlife management.
'They were the
first to recognize that rapid development and un-
regulated uses were threatening many species. They
called for the first game laws and habitat protections,
and then paid for these services by creating hunting
and fishing licenses, and lobbying for taxes on sport-
ing equipment-
In 1972, the National Shooting Sports Foundation
:urged Congress to adopt an official day of thanks to
!sportsmen In May that year, Congress passed a resolu-
tion authorizing the President to proclaim the fourth
;Saturday of September as NHF Day.
'Nixon was the first to do so, and every president
since has joined the celebration.


FISH! FISH! FISH!
S .Nights for $79.99
,Full Ups
TAISHi RIV R ARkc50amp.8 89f
Salt earft Seinhachee lch
NOW
Cot your Punch Card
for FREE Nights
i352-498-1188
V. ^ ^ ^^ ^ i


n Care
only if the carcass must be
dragged through dirt,
leaves or swamp water.
The carcass should be
thoroughly chilled at 35 to
40 degrees and go through
rigors mortis before
butchering.
Boneless, lean meat has
a milder flavor.


Deer Hunters:

Don't Go To Camp

At Lunchtime
The first hour of dawn and the last hour of dusk are
magical, highly productive deer hunting times. White-
tails prefer the low-light periods surrounding sunrise
and sunset.
However, under some conditions, hunting in the mid-
dle of the day or all day long can be very effective.
Deer move or feed several times over a 24-hour peri-
od. Under a full moon, deer are active during the mid-
dle of the night. This may stimulate a corresponding
period of movement during the following day.
Essentially the same thing occurs when heavy hunt-
ing pressure forces nocturnal activity
Also, many experienced hunters suspect that wary
bucks pattern hunter movements and are well aware
that most hunters are loafing around camp by 9 or 10
a.m.
Severely cold weather also seems to get bucks off to
a late start with more midday activity Likewise, cloudy
and rainy days, which keep the light turned down all
day, promote daytime feeding and movement activity.
- Courtesy of Realtree


"i
, Ii
* *i


..
Great Getaway Close To Home
www.naturescoastrvresort.com
Located in the heart of nature's recreation ground
Offshore/River Fishing
Scalloping
Crabbing
: Kayaking/Canoeing
Water Sports
Wildlife/Hiking
Horseback Riding
Boat Charters
Close to Public Boat Ramp
Full Hookupl 30/50 amp service
Email rv@naturescoastrvresnort.com
Steinhatchee, Florida

(3 15 0 ,r^^^t--wr.A~''nfT^1 .""It**"fV i' ^f" NOA-Irt- W -"'.*


For all his 'extraordinary accomplishments-best-
selling comedy recording artist of all time, Grammy
nominee, popular radio showhost. best-selling author.
star of hit comedy tours, television series and movies,
plus host of a new hit game show called "Are You
Smarter Than a 5th Grader?"-Jeff Foxworthy is equal-
ly enthused about a recreational passion he shares with
64 million other Americans.
Hunting and fishing.
"It just drives my wife crazy," laughs Foxworthy "She
goes, 'We get invited to the Oscars. You turn that down.
We get invited to the Grammys. You turn that down. But
you never turn down a hunting or fishing trip.' I always
explain, 'Well, if I have my choice of putting on a tuxedo
and going out to L.A. and sitting around with people I
have nothing in common with, or going out to Kansas to
hunt a monster whitetail...uh...it's not much of a chin-
scratcher."'
It's Foxworthy's rare combination of box-office star-
power and bait-shop modesty that make him a perfect
honorary chairman for this year's National Hunting and
Fishing Day, set for Sept. 22.
"Without question, sharing hunting and fishing trips
with my family had a profound impact on my life, and
undoubtedly shaped and molded the person I am today,"
he said.

Country
SStyle

.IA Meat

S'" Market


Mdison, FL
Chicken Wings
Chicken Breasts
Leg QuartersHAVE
10 lb. Bag of Leg Quarters LIVE
Hand Cut Ribeyes LIVE
Pork Chops CRABSI
Homemade Rind Bacon
Ribs
RibsAlso aviallable
Ox Tails 11Mullet- Shrlmp
Fresh Ground Chuck Mulle-t* Shrim
Cube Steak Speckled Trtil
Bottom Round Roast Catlsh and other
Stew Meat fresh fish


at Markt Fsh Mrke
HoursHour
Fri. 97 Wed.& Thur. 9-6


.i-b~









18A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Friday, September 21, 2007


Check out the classified when you want!
All our classifieds-homes, autos, jobs, pets and more-are now online!
._ i.


* PERRY FLEA MARKET
7 ,1 Antiques Glassware Collectibles Gifts & More *o

SYard Sale Visit the Tool Shop FRI SUN 10 A.M. 4 P.M. Buy
SSet-UpL$5 & up Hwy. 19 S, (Old Motel)(850) 838.1422 (850) 584-7124 Call Us


Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Irrigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
(850) 973-2848

Serious about losing FAT?
Call Dr. Bartholomew
(850) 673-8338
Chiropractic-Clinical Nutrition

Veteran Handyman
25 years exp. and new to area. Elec-
trical, plumbing, carpentry etc.,
hauling, clean outs, painting.
No Job To Small and Always Fair
Call anytime 850-973-6489
m~


AUCTION
September 22, 6:30 p.m. 1693 SW
Moseley Hall Rd.(CR360) Madison
973 2959 New Truckload has jusi
arrived. Don't miss it! Take CR 14
W, ON CR14/360. Bear right onto
CR360 at fork on left, past fire-
house. AU 69 1 Col.RonCox
AB2490





Madison County 4-H Clubs
Relay for Life Yard SalI.
October 6. 2007.
9 a.m. until? "?
In front of the Livestock Show
Building Look for Signs
Household items Clothes Toys -
Games Really Good Deals!!!
Please Support Madison 4-H Clubs


Yard Sale Saturday Sept. 22,
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m Household
items exercise equipment, pocket
knives 2 bulldog puppies variety
of stuff. 1404 NE Cactus Ave Lee,
Fl. 850-971-2887. Call Friday after
4 pm for directions






Free to Good Home
Black Bull Terrier
Female, very sweet disposition.
Adult phone calls only 850-948-
6993







Dunn's
Lawn Mower Repair
Welding
New & Used Parts
850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340


1978 Trans Am Bandit
Limited Edition
Runs good, needs some work on re-
conditioning. 850-929-2502
We Buy Caravan, Voyager and
Town N Country Vans. 1996 and
UP. Running or Not Running.
Bud Chute 850-843-0127






25 lbs. of
Clean Newspapers
just $2 a bundle
973-4141

A variety of SMC products; old
inventory in new condition. Also
kittens/cats and a 1990 old silhou-
ette. Call for prices and more infor-
mation. 850-973-2898
Moving Must Sell!!
Kenmore Portable Dishwasher,
Butcher block top, $50. Priced to
sell quickly. 973-3981


AIRLINE TICKETS
Local man has three round-trip
tickets to ANYWHERE SouthWest
Airlines flies. No restrictions, just
make reservations. HURRY! One
expires in Dec, the other two in
March, 2008! Just $300 each, all
three for $750. Will consider trade
for large screen TV..Call Ted 800-
741-0045


d :


Yearbook Wanted
I would like to purchase a 1963-
64 Madison High School year-
book. Call Bonnie at 973-4592







FREE
Very sweet and loving cat
needs a loving home. She has
been a wonderful kitty to us, but
we are moving and need to find
her a good home. Please call us
if you are interested. Adult
phone calls only please. 850-
948-6993

Hurricane Season lasts 2 more
months. Keep your aquarium ani-
mals alive during power outages.
Buy a battery powered back-up-
pump from ...
Creatures Featured
850-973-3488

FREE PUPPY
Bassett mix puppy, tri-color re-
ally cute! Will be medium size
dogs. Would be really great
with kids! 850-948-5482


Chocolate Lab puppies
Dad is AKC registered. Both mom
and dad on site. Shots, wormed &
ready to go home. Sept 25th, $100
each. 4 males and 3 females. Pick
yours now. 850-843-0259





Luxury Apartments- overlooking
the Courthouse Circle in downtown
Monticello, 3BR/2BA, $1050.
Monthly, Contact Katrina Walton at
510-9512

Southern Villas of

'\. adison apartments

Rental assistance may be available.
HUD vouchers accepted. 1, 2, & 3
BR HC & non-HC accessible apts.
Call 850-973-8582, TDD/TTY,
711. 315 SW Lawson Circle, Madi-
son, FL 32340. Equal Housing Op-
portunity

2 bedroom 1 bath mobile
homes in park, 135/week, own-
er pays electric, $300 deposit,
call Erin at 850-570-0459


Large Mobile Home near Cherry'
Lake $550.00 per/Mo, deposit,
no pets References. 850-973-
2353 AM only.


Greenville Pointe

Apartments

1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible apts. Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers accepted.
Call 850-948-3036. TDD/TTY
711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal'
Housing Opportunity
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Seniors
and Disabled 1 & 2 bedrooms.
HUD. '.tichers accepted Call 850-
973-3786 TTY Acs 711.
Equal Housing Opportunity







Pioneer
Excavating & Tractor
Services
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump
Removal, Demolition, Roads,
Mowing, Discing, Box-Blading,
and Tilling.
No Job Too Small
Free Estimates
Call Paul Kinsley
850-973-6326.

$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385






3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995
Factory Direct
Prestige Home Center
352-752-7751

LOG HOMES
With as little as
$500 Down
Prestige Home Center
Lake City, Florida
1-800-355-9385


40 private acres in Glenwood
Forest subdivision. Beautiful
homes already built. Fantastic op-
portunity to own property with re-
strictions for all owners & family
members. Call 954-495-3841 or
gauchal @ bellsouth.net





Single Wide Mobile Home
1994 Destiny 14 x 70 SWMH
2 bd/2 bth, brand new LG, front
loading washer & dryer, gas stove,
dish washer, refridgerater and cen-
tral heat and air. Some remodeling
done. Asking $11,000. 850-869-
9022 or 850-869-9021
3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995
Factory Direct
Prestige Home Center
352-752-7751


$500UU DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385





LPN or RN Needed
7A 7P
With Benefits
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Contact Angela Akins or Amelia
Tompkins at 386-362-7860
FMB Greenville is seeking
CSR/Asst. Mgr. Banking experi-
ence required. Qualified appli-
cants go to: www.fmbbank.com for
application.
Fax to: HR at (850) 997-2315 by
Tues. Sept. 25 EEO/AA/D/V

Great Opportunity
RN House Supervisor
7P 7A
Great Schedule and Benefits
Suwannee Health Care Center.
1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Please Contact
Amelia Tompkins/DON at,
386-362-7860





- .ooo .......
OD STORE
Asst. Managers
Customer Sales Associates
Convenience store-seeking highly
motivated, energetic employees
with retail exp. for the Madison &
Greenville areas. Full time posi-
tions available. Offering a competi-
tive salary, weekly pay, paid vaca-
tions and holiday. s. Bonus and 401
K plan. Call Berue Di-trict Su-
pervisor at 352-49-1-750 ( to
arrange for interview

Live Oak Gas is seeking candi-
dates for the position of service
technician. Sucessful candidates
must; have a clean driving record,
be customer and service oriented,
dedicated to a safe work environ-
ment, loyal,. dependable, have a
class B CDL license with a hazmat
endorsement, experience in the L.P.
gas industry is preferred but not re-
quired. Apply in person at Live Oak
Gas 1675 SR 14 South, Madison.
Caregiver Needed.
Around the clock personal assis-
tance needed for older female.
Must be able to help with daily ac-
tivities such as cooking, cleaning,
shopping and doctor's appoint-
ments. Several shifts available. Ref-
erences and background checks a
must. Contact Kim Gordon anytime
at (850)673-7761 or (850)973-4408
after 5:00 p.m.


GREENE
Publishing, Inc. "
General News/School Reporter
needed. Must be a team player,
able to handle multiple tasks, and
be able to cover a variety of stories.
Experience in writing/reporting
preferred, computer experience re-
quired. Must have an excellent
knowledge of English grammar and
its proper usage. Apply in person
only at the Madison County Carri-
er newspaper office, located at
1695 South SR 53.
Experienced Mechanic
Wanted
Good Pay Health Benefits
401K Uniforms
Call Wayne or Keith 973-2245


The Jefferson County Road De-
partment is accepting applications
for a full time Tire re-
pair/Equipment PM Specialist.
Candidate must have a high school
education or equivalent, possess a
CDL-B or better, 2 5 years expe-
rience in the fields of mechanics,
heavy equipment tire repair, or
equipment preventative mainte-
nance. Duties will include greasing
equipment, fueling, field tire repair,
assisting mechanics when needed.
Candidates must submit a county
application, resume, references,
and a copy of their current driving
record from DMV. Salary range is
$9.79 to $14.68. Deadline for ap-
plications is Sept. 28, 2007. Call
850-997-2036 for further informa-
tion.

$ AVON $
Start Today. Earn 50%
on your very first order.
Start-Up Kit Only $10.
Call ISR Dorothy
850-973-3153

Registered Nurse (RN Manage-
ment position, desk job, excellent
salary and training program. Call
850-948-4601 ask for Doug Cruce
or Dottie Lestein for appointment.


APALACHEE CENTER
Recovery Specialist I /
(#2037) ADULT
A Bachelor's degree from an ac-
credited university or college with a
major in counseling, social work,
psychology, 'criminal justice, nurs-
ing, rehabilitation, specrl educa-
tion, health education, or a related
human services field (a related hu-
man services field is one in which
major course work includes the
study of human behavior and devel-
opment) and have a minimum of
one year of full time or equivalent
experience working with adults ex-
periencing serious mental' illness or
a bachelor's degree from an accred-
ited university or college and three
\ears full time or equi% ilerit experi-
ence working with adulih experi-
encing serious mental illness.
Recovery Specialist I
(#2015)CHILD
A Bachelor's degree from an ac-
credited university or college with a
major in counseling, social work,
psychology, criminal justice, nurs-
ing, rehabilitation, special educa-
tion, health education, or a related
human services field (a related hu-
man services field is one in which
major course work includes the
study of human behavior and devel-
opment) and have a minimum of
one year of full time or equivalent
experience working with' children
experiencing serious mental illness
or a bachelor's degree from an ac-
,credited university or college and
three years full time or equivalent
experience working with adults ex-
periencing serious mental illness.
Recovery Specialist I
(#2200)CHILD
A Bachelor's degree from an ac-
credited university or college with a
major in counseling, social work,
psychology, criminal justice, nurs-
ing, rehabilitation, special educa-
tion, health education, or a related
human services field (a related hu-
man services field is one in which
major course work includes the
study of human behavior and devel-
opment) and have a minimum of
one year of full time or equivalent
experience working with children
experiencing serious mental illness
or a bachelor's degree from an ac-
credited university or college and
three years full time or equivalent
experience working with adults ex-
periencing serious mental illness.
Recovery Specialist I .
(#2192)CHILD
A Bachelor's degree from an ac-
credited university or college with a
major in counseling, social work,
psychology, criminal justice, nurs-
ing, rehabilitation, special educa-
tion, health education, or a related
human services field (a related hu-
man services field is one in which
major course work includes the
study of human behavior and devel-
opment) and have a minimum of
one year of full time or equivalent
experience working with children
experiencing serious mental illness
or a bachelor's degree from an ac-
credited university or college and
three years full time or equivalent
experience working with adults ex-
periencing serious mental illness.
For more information of avail-
able positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org.
Human Resources
2634-J Capital Circle N.E.,
Tallahassee, FL.
Pre-Hire Drug Screen & FDLE
background check
An Equal Opportuni-
ty/Affirmative Action Employer
Drug Free Workplace


GREENE
Publishing, Inc,
Greene Publishing, Inc. is now ac-
cepting applications for current: as
well as future position openings.
Experience is preferred but we will
train the right individuals. Working
at the newspaper is fun rewarding,
fast paced and requires a person that
is outgoing and capable of working
easily under stress and deadlines.
No two days are ever the same. Key
full time or part-time positions in-
clude:

Reporters q
Advertising Sales Associates
Layout & Design (Experience re-
quired)

If you're a responsible adult, punc-
tual, and, have, a great attendance
record, please fax your resumeito
Ted at 850-973-4121, email to: ;
2ted@greenepublishing.com or ap-
ply in person at our office on Hwy
53, just south of Madison. We wel-
come those who want to grow
with us. -


Eye Tech Training Program'
Immediate opening FT w/benefits;
Career opportunity; Direct-patient-
care duties; Books provided; Entfy-
level salary; Substantial increas'.at
1-year w/attainment of Ophthalmic
Certification and good performance
evaluation. PCAs, CNAs, and honRor
students are encouraged to apply.
Requirements: HS diploma.' or
equiv; articulate; initiative; highl.y-
motivated; good home study habits;
ability to quickly grasp and apply
new principles & techniques; abifty
.to lift/carry 50 lbs. or more.
Nature Coast EyeCare Institdte
Perry, FL. EOE (850) 584-2778
Fax Resume: (850) 838-3937 4


Bookkeeper/Lay Out Position
Are you a Multi-tasker? Are yqu
experienced in Quickbooks? Then
we may have a position for. you.
We are looking for a candidate
who has experience in Quickbooks
and knowledge of computers. This
person must be able to multi task
and work well under the pressure
of deadlines. Training is available-
for the right candidate bit experi-
ence is a plus. This is a unique pp-
sition with room for growth. Please
apply at Greene Publishing, Inc.
Highway 53 South, Monday
through Friday 8 a.m. til 5 p.m.'



Classifieds

Continued on;

Page 19A
r ''I


Get In The Swing Of Thin !
Stay Current On
Your Local News, Church,
Business and Area Growth.
Subscription Rates:
In County $28
Out Of County $35
Includes;
The Madison County Carrier
&

The Enterprise Recorder.
-Major Credit Cards Accepted-
Order Your Paper Today!
(850J 973-4141


- -- ----


tI









The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 19A


-Friday, September 21, 2007


------------------------


Enjoy Sports? DN

Mw-r I 1 1 1


Z R IN'I i


Classifieds

Continued

From

Page 18A


APALACHEE CENTER
r Recovery Specialist I
(#1830) CHILD
A Bachelor's degree from an ac-
$credited university or college with a
majorr in counseling, social work,
psychology, criminal justice, nurs-
-ving, rehabilitation, special educa-
?;ition, health education, or a related
.zauman services field (a related hu-
fliman services field is one in which
Mamajor course work includes the
studyy of human behavior and devel-
tr.dpment) and have a minimum of
rone year of full time or equivalent
..experience working with children
,txperiencing serious mental illness
-mr a bachelor's degree from an ac-
credited university or college and
three years full time or equivalent
experience working with adults ex-
periencing serious mental illness.
Recovery Specialist I
(#1981) CHILD
A Bachelor's degree from an ac-
credited university or college with a
-major in counseling, social work,
-:psychology, criminal justice, nurs-
oling, rehabilitation, special educa-
tion, health education, or a related
--qhuman services field (a related hu-
-liaajor course work includes the
wettidy of human behavior and devel-
opment) and have a minimum of
ope year of full time or equivalent
:Aexperience working with children
Experiencing serious mental illness
pr a bachelor's degree from an ac-
,, credited university or college and
,three years full time or equivalent
experience working ,ith adults ex-
.operiencing serious menial ilIness
Recovery Specialist II (#1182)
.,,Masters degree from an accredited
_.university or college with a major
Ip the field of counseling, social
.rWork; psychology, or a related hu-
,, an services field and two years of
professional experience in provid-
,jng services to persons with behav-
8doral illness. Substance abuse
knowledge preferred. Some local
-travel required. 'LICENSE PRE-
FERRED.
Recovery Specialist H
If (#2270)CHILD
'Majiers decree from an accredited
1i.ni\ersto\ >r college '.xiih a major
'ri the field of counseling. .,'cial
work, psychology, or a related hu-
man services field and two years of
professional experience in provid-
ning services to persons with behav-
Jpral illness. Substance abuse
)knowledge preferred. Some local
travel required. LICENSE PRE-
"pERRED.,
"Masters degree from an' accredited
titniversity or college with a major in
'the field of counseling, social work,
'psychology, nursing, rehabilitation,'
-'special education, health education,
Jr a related human services field
smith h three (3) years of full time or
equivalent related professional ex-
perience one of which was in a su-,
pervisory/administrative capacity;
l'r a Bichelor's degree from an ac-
P credited university or college with a
major in the field of counseling, so-
cial ork. psychology, .nursing, re-
habilitation, special, education,
health education, orarelated human
serx ice' field and five (5) years of,
full time or equivalent related pro-
t fessional experience, one of which
B.inas in a supervisory/administrative
r'capacity. Must possess current,
Svalid driver's license,.
Recovery Team Leader (#1363)
SMasters degree from an accredited
University 01 college w ith a major in
Sthe field of counselling, social work.
Psychology, nursing, rehabilitation,
special education, health education,
fr a related human services field
!['^ith three (3). years of full time 'or
iluivalent related professional ex-
|erience one of which was in a su--
pervisory/administrative capacity;
or a Bachelor's degree from an ac-
Scredited university or college n ith a
major in the field of counseling, so-
cial work, psychology, nursing, re-
Shabilitation, special education,
health education, or a related human
Services field and five (5) years of
j full time or equivalent related pro-
fessional experience, one of which
w was in a supervisory/administrative
capacity. Must possess current,
valid driver's license.


positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org.
Human Resources
2634-J Capital Circle N.E., Talla-
hassee, FL.
Pre-Hire Drug Screen & FDLE
background check
An Equal, Opportuni-.
ty/Affirmative Action Employer
Drug Free Workplace
LPN or RN needed
7P 7A
WITH BENEFITS!!!
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Please Contact Angela Akins or
Amelia Tompkins at
386-362-7860


We have the Dest

local sports coverage!

Sd-virho bnu ib oTd


I


nuu xr eu o a -IPhone#
850-973-4141 I

In County $28 Out of County $35 M' T:(Grnem ing, 0.i,PODraelr772, Man, FL l

Major Credit/Debit Cards Accepted r br t


-J


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 3RD JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO:06-369-CA

THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE
PLAINTIFF
VS.
LAURA WILLIAMS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
LAURA WILLIAMS, IF ANY; ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN
INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN
DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)

RE- NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Granting the Motion
to Reset Foreclosure Sale dated Sept. 4, 2007 entered in Civil Case No. 06-369-CA of
the Circuit Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit m and for MADISON County, MADI-
SON, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at THE FRONT DOOR
of the MADISON County Courthouse, 125.SW RANGE AVE, MADISON, Florida, at
*11:00 a.m.
on the 4 day of October, 2007 the following described property) as set forth in said Sum-
mary Final Judgment, lo-wil:
LOTS 10,11.12 AND 13.AND THE EAST HALF OF LOT 14 ANDTHE WEST HALF
l OF LOT 15, BLOCK B TO PLANT'S ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF MADISON.
'FLORIDA, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK I, PAGE 31, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA


Any rD-.rL',)ri '.- flai ri a ian i riterp'o t in the :iIJrroiin f romti-


. any othrr than the Drncocrtv
NilP a rlaim within 60 days a
Dated this 4 day of Seplemb


'wnPr .as .:-' th. t j t :E l.- t i ce1 n.'
f tpr th.e sale.
Ter 2007.

Tim Sanders


SLlerk o1 the Circuit
Court
By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

Publish in: MADISON ENTERPRISE RECORDER
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. persons
with disabilities needing a special accommodation should contact COURT %DMINIS-
TRATION, at the MADISON County Courthouse at NONE. 1-800-955-8771 I TDDi or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
DAVID J. STERN, PA.
801 S. UNIVERSITY DRIVE SUITEE 500
PLANTATION. FL 33324
09541 233-8000 06-60540LITi


K X-CalMllEle Ge ne oda


rAnnouncemen ts
GET COVERED....Run sour ad
STATEWIDE! You can run your
classified ad in over 100 Florida
newspapers for one low rate. Call
this newspaper or (866)742-1373
for more details or visit:
www.florida-classifieds.com.

Apartment for Rent
$199/Mo! 4BR/2BA HUD Home!
(5% down 20 years @ 8% apr)
More Homes Available from
$199/Mo! For listings call
(800)366-9783 Ext 5669.

SAuctions
*Land Auction* 350 Props Must
be Sold! Low Down / E-Z Financ-
ing Free Catalog (866)554-3852
www.LANDAUCTION.com.

Business Opportuni
ties
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do
you earn $800/day? 30 Machines,
Free Candy' All for $9,995.
(888)629-9968 B02000033.
CALL US: We will not be under-
sold!

Earn Up to $550 WEEKLY Help-
ing the government PT No Experi-
ence. Call Today!! (800)488-2921
Ask for Department L5.

.Employment Services
2007 Post Office Job's. $18-
$20.Hour. NO Experience, Paid
training, Benefits, Vacations. Call
Today! (800)910-9941.

Notice: Post Office Positions Now
Available. Avg. Pay $20/hour or
$57K annually including Federal
Benefits and OT. Get your exam
guide materials now. (866)713-
4492 USWA Fee Req..

Help Wanted
DRIVERS...ASAP! $1000+
Weekly 36-43cpai/$1.20pm $0
Lease NEW Trucks Teams Wel-
come CDL-A + 3 rios OTR
(800)635-8669.

TRAVELING INDEPENDENT
SALES REP. Max. Travel 6 hrs.
from home. Gone M-F. Commis-
sion Position. Company avg. pays
$820.00/wk. Call (800)225-6368,
ext 333.


PERMANENT PART-TIME
MERCHANDISERS. Driveline
Retail is seeking merchandisers
with prior retail experience to ser-
vice local stores. No selling. Must
be friendly and a self starter.
Hourly pay plus bonus for perfor-
mance. Please send name, e-mail
address, city and state to: ef-
baum@drivelineretail.com.

Driver-BYNUM TRANSPORT-
needs qualified drivers for Central
Florida- Local & National OTR
positions. Food grade tanker, no
hazmat, no pumps, great benefits,
competitive pay & new equipment.
(866)GO-BYNUM. Need 2 years
experience:

RAILROADS ARE looking for
experienced help. Train in four to
eight weeks to become a Conduc-
tor, Welder, Mechanical Locomo-
tive, or Carmen. Average salaries
$63,000. Tuition loans available,
(913)319-2603 / (913)319-2658,
www.RailroadTraining. corn.

Our top driver made $54,780 in
2006 running our Florida region.
Home weekly and during the
week! 401k! 'Blue Cross/Blue
Shield! 1 Year OTR experience re-
quired. HEARTLAND EXPRESS
(8 0 0 ) 4 4 1 4 9 5 3
www. heartlandexpress. com.

Driver: DON'T JUST START
YOUR CAREER, START IT
RIGHT! Company Sponsored
CDL training in 3 weeks. Must be
21. Have CDL? Tuition reimburse-
ment! CRST. (866)917-2778.

Homes For Rent
3BR/2BA Foreclosure! $22,500!
Only $199/Mo! 5% down 20 years
@ 8% apr. Buy, 5/BR $302/Mo!
For listings (800)366-9783 Ext
5798.

Never Rent Again! Buy, 5BR/2BA
$38,000! Only $302/Mo! 3/BR
$11,000! 5% down 20 years 8%.
HUD Homes Available! For list-
ings (800)366-9783 Ext 5796.

Homes For Sale
0% Down When you own land.
Modular, Mobile, & Stilt Homes.
Come visit our Plant City Model
center with over 20 model homes


It-l I iev. SIll62"-2s32


Instruction'
AMERICA'S DRIVING ACADE-
MY!! Start your driving career to-
day! Offering courses in CDL A!
Low tuition fee! Many payment
options! No registration fee!
( -8 8 8) 8 99 5 9 1 0
info @ americasdrivingacademv. co
m. ,

Miscellaneous
DIVORCE$275-$350*COVERS
children, etc., Only one signature
required! *Excludes govt. fees!
Call weekdays (800)462-2000,
ext.600. (8am-6pm) Alta Divorce,
LLC. Established 1977.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train
for high paying Aviation Mainte-.
nance Career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if qualified -
Job placement assistance. CALL
Aviation Institute of Maintenance
-(888)349-5387.1

.ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from home. Medical, business,
paralegal, computers, criminal jus-.
tice. Job placement assistance. Fi-
nancial aid and computer provided
if qualified. Call (866)858-2121,
www. OnlineTidewaterTech. corn.

Real Estate
BEAUTIFUL N. CAROLINA.
ESCAPE TO BEAUTIFUL
WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA
MTS FREE Color Brochure & In-
formation MOUNTAIN PROPER-
TIES with Spectacular views,
Homes, Cabins, Creeks, & Invest-
ment acreage, CHEROKEE
MOUNTAIN GMAC REAL ES-
TATE... cherokeemountainreal-
tv.com Call for free brochure
(800)841-5868.

GORGEOUS N.C. MOUNTAIN
HOMESITES 3-7 Acres from just
$79,900 MINUTES TO
ASHEVILLE N.C. Enjoy sweep-
ing mountain views, A mile of riv-
er frontage and walking trails.
Amenities include gated entrance,
community lodge & Riverside
BBQ area. Excellent Financing
Available. GRAND OPENING
Saturday, October 13th Call To-
day! (877)890-5253 X 2987.

LIMITED TIME OFFER 100%


FINANCING- Gated Lakefront
Communmi of the NC Blue Ridge
Mtns. 90 miles of Shoreline start
$99,000.. Call,. Now (800)709-
LAKE."

'Move to the Smoky Mountains
3/4-3 acre tracts starting at
$79,900.' 15 min from, Pigeon
Forge Gatlinburg. Low taxes Low
crime. Majestic Mountain Views
(888)215-5611 xl01
www.mountainhightn. com.

AFFORDABLE LAKE PROPER-
TIES On pristine 34,000 acre Nor-
ris Lake Over 800 miles of wood-
ed shoreline Four SeasonS- Call
(888)291-5253 Or visit Lakeside
Realty www.lakesiderealtv-tn.com.

SOUTHERN COLORADO 5 Acre
Homesites $59,900 GRAND
OPENING SALE SEPTEMBER
15TH &16TH. Gated community,
underground utilities 1,100 acres
of open space, spectacular moun-
tain, views. Great primary/ sec-
ondary home. Recreation galore!
Call Today for'. appointment!
(8.66)696-5263 X 2563.

North Carolina Cool Mountain
Air, Views & Streams, Homes,
Cabins & Acreage. FREE
BROCHURE (800)642-5333. Re-
alty Of Murphy 317 Peachtree St.
Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtyofinurphv.com.

ARIZONA LAND LIQUIDA-
TION! Near Tucson, Football
Field Sized Lots. $0 Down/i0 In-
terest, $159/Month ($18,995 to-
tal). FREE INFORMATION.
Money Back Guarantee!
(800)682-6103 Op#10.

1ST TIME OFFERED Colorado
Mountain Ranch. 35 ACRES -
$49,900. Priced for Quick Sale.
Overlooking a majestic lake, beau-
tifully treed, 360 degree mountain
views, adjacent to national forest.
EZ Terms. (866)353-4807.

EXCLUSIVE ESTATES! Very
rare estates being offered for 1st
time: Unique waterfall estate. 120
acre gentleman's farm. View @
www.troutstreamestates.com.

NC MOUNTAINS 2 acres with
great view, very private, big trees,
waterfalls & large public lake


nearby. $69.500.
t8661789-8535.


'LAKE EUFALA, ALABAMA Ac-
cess to lake with community slips.
Homesites starting at $39,990.
Clubhouse, nature trails & other
amenities. Call now for appoint-
ment, and save on closing costs!
(866)339-2555.

Direct Private Access to Jefferson
Nat'l Forest. One of a kind land of-
ferifg mix of hardwood forest &
pristine pasture. Incredible mtn
views. Only $119,000.
www.NationalForestLand.com,

Outstanding Mtn Views Trophy
Trout Stream 6.5 AC $119,000
Secluded VA mtn acreage, private
access to Jefferson Nat'l Forest,
buildable terrain. Asphalt rds w/
electric & phone, EZ terms. Call
owner. (304)262-2770.

Mm Land Bargains. Large trout
stream properties w/ nat'l forest
frontage. Go to:
www.valandsale.com.

A Mountain Retreat! :3 BR,
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A MTN BARGAIN! 11+ AC-
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surrounded by Nat'l Forest. Enjoy
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Estate Homesites in Gated Lake-
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20A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Sevor Cousins

Family Reunion

To Be Held
The Sevor cousins family reunion will be held at the
Pinetta Baptist Church Fellowship hall on October 6,
2007, beginning.at 10 a.m. Tell all your Sevor cousins
and extended family
Please bring a covered dish and items for the auc-
tion table. There is a fenced in playground for the little
one's. There's something for everyone! See you there.


www. reenepublishing.com


Madison County
4-H Clubs To Hold
Relay For Life
Yard Sale
Madison County 4-H Clubs Relay for Life yard sale
will take place October 6, in front of the livestock show
building. The yard sale is set to begin at 9 a.m. All mon-
ey collected will go to benefit the Relay for Life Cancer
Walk that will be held in the Spring of 2008. For more
information, call (850) 971-5869.





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2007 SANTA FE GLS AWD
Editor's Choice Award "Hyundai Santa Fe
2007 SUVof the Year" -Autobytel.com
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2007 ACCENT GLS
"Editor's Most Wanted Sedan under
$15,000"- Edmund&com


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2007 TUCSON GLS
"Best in Class Vehicle Satisfaction,
Compact Sport Utility" Auto Pacific


$17,


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A DIVISION OF PIPKIN'S MOTORS


4001 N. Valdosta Road


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www.hyiiindaiofvaldosta.net


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Drive your wayT
AMERICA'S BEST WARRANTY'


2007 SONATA GLS
"A Consumer's Digest Best Buy"
Consumer's Digest


- -A


Stk. #7175


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Friday, September 21, 2007

Come, Walk To4

Remember!
Join with us as we remember the babies. we hav-
lost due to miscarriage, stillbirth, or infant death. Thigh
walk is for everyone: women, men, and children.
Even if you haven't lost a child, please come supt,
port those who have. We will have baby name reading4
life certificates, and much more.
This is free and everyone is welcome. Registration
begins at 6:30 p.m. at Lake Francis.
For more information, contact Fellowship Church'!
Women's Health Ministry (850) 973-3266.


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