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The Madison enterprise-recorder
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00135
 Material Information
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title: Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title: Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Creation Date: August 17, 2007
Publication Date: 1933-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID: UF00028405:00135
 Related Items
Preceded by: Enterprise-recorder

Full Text




www.greenepublishing.com


Our 142nd Ye

Madison I


Cbc maoison


nte ttise


ar, Number 51 Friday. Augus

County A


,- ..-.. ORIGIN MIXED ADC 323
UniversIW of Florida I-braFy 24
Dept of special ,.oil. Fla 1IIO IN
210 Smathers Library
Gainesville FL 32611
!"A"" L t. 1865



cotrct


SALARY EA


Editorial Comment

High Gas Prices?

Don't Blame County Taxes.
At Least Not Yet.


By Ted C. Ensminger
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Gasoline prices fell in Madison Coun-
ty this past week by as much as $.20 cents
per gallon. But don't start the street par-
ty yet. Other areas of the region are still
considerably less. What is the cause of
the price differences you say?
Of the 67 counties in Florida, Madison
County charges less gas tax than 47 of
the others, sometimes a lot less.
Counties are permitted by the Florida
Legislature to levy three different taxes
against a gallon of gasoline.
The first tax, known as the "One to
SLx-cent Tax", finds all of the counties in
Florida except for Franklin County,
charging the full $.06 on each gallon of
gasoline sold. Franklin County, where...
Apalachicola is located, is the lone stand-,
Please see High Gas, Page 4A

County Commission

Adopts Hiring Freeze
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County Commission im-
plemented an across-the-board hiring
freeze at its Wednesday, August 15, meet-
ing.
The hiring freeze will affect all depart-
ments, currently working under the aus-
pices of the County
Commission. Depart-
ments, such as EMS,
Solid Waste and the
Road Department will
Snot be able to hire any
new employees with-
out the board's ap-
proval.
Allen Cherry The board will also
County Coordinator send out letters to the
Please see Hiring, Page 4A

Rack-To-School Information
And Career Awareness Fair
To Be Held August 18
By Ashley Bell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Saturday August 18 from 10 a.m. to
12 p.m., the Madison County School
Board and North Florida Community
College will be hosting a Back-To-School
Information Fair and Career Awareness
Fair at the Four Freetoms Park.
Information for parents and students
such as bus routes and numbers, nurse
guidance for immunization require-
ments, and other back-to-school needs
will be available.
Teachers and Principals from the
schools will be in attendance to answer
any questions that parents or students
may have.
Please see Back-To-School, Page 4A


Index
Aran ~dhn Cut
('liii nh


Ltgjls


1 4A


Jail Repol 4k


Could Mean 300 New Jobs For Madison County


Keystone Foods Considering


Former Smithfield Plant


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A company, based out of Camilla, Ga.,
called Keystone Foods is looking at locat-
ing at the old Smithfield processing plant
in Madison.
Keystone Foods is a processor and dis-
tributor of beef and poultry and non-food
items to the fast food restaurant industry
in the U.S. Its clients include McDonald's,
other restaurants and supermarkets. Out-
side the U.S., the company operates distri-
bution centers and processing facilities in
Europe, Asia, Australia and the Middle
East.


According to County Coordinator Allen
Cherry, a representative from the compa-
ny toured Smithfield recently. Cherry said
that Keystone is looking at the old Smith-
field plant as one of four sites under con-
sideration for a new location.
If Keystone locates in Madison, it could
add up to 300 new jobs to the workforce.
One source, commenting on recent ru-
mors .of Campbell's Soup coming to Madi-
son, said that he had heard that the com-
pany would be building a plant in'Lown-
des County, Ga.
Keystone Foods is number 92 on the list
of the largest privately-owned companies
in the world.


O Neal's Discover 22 Bud Lily




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'.~lf I ". : -.- S S B i. ^*:.^ .- cS"--- .. *.: ;*s. a*.' ,- :-, .:'# -
, s ...


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Ashley Bell, August 14, 2007
The white lily stands approximately 4 feet tall with 22 buds.


By Ashley Bell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
While mowing their field, Joe Mack
and Dorothy O'Neal, of Madison, came
across a white lily with 22 flower buds.
The flowers appear to have grown to-
gether into one stem. The stem being
flat and wide, with the individual stems
somewhat still visible.
The white lily dates as far back as 700
BC, in Ninevah and there are 110 species
in the lily family, Liliaceae.
Joe Mack is a native of Madison, pre-
viously living on the land that he now
farms. When he was 18 years old, he de-
cided to go out into the world and "do
[his] thing."
Luckily Joe Mack and his wife,


2 Sietons, 30 Page
14- 15A


I Yor 6oalWate


8/17

95r74I


8 96/75 96/75

96/75 96/75


Dorothy, were able to retire at the same
time from their jobs in Missouri. After
retiring, they both moved back to Madi-
son to take care of Joe Mack's mother,
who lived on the O'Neal's plantation.
When they first moved here, Joe
Mack and Dorothy lived across the
street from the plantation, in a 100 year
old home. Over the years, they have
filled their old home with many interest-
ing antiques and also paintings by Joe
Mack himself.
When his mother worsened, Joe and
Dorothy moved into an apartment on the
plantation to be closer and have done so
much work.on the plantation, that now
that Joe's mother is in a nursing home,
they still live on and upkeep the O'Neal
plantation.


Supervisor Of
Elections Hold
Meet, Greet, And Eat
Page 6A


Lee Town Council

Refuses To Grant

Reporter Minutes

Of Meeting


Council's President,
Doug McNicol, pro-
posed the idea.to not
release minutes to
this reporter and he
was followed in the
decision by the other
board members.


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing,. Inc.
Although they may have done it un-
knowingly, the Lee Town Council violat-
ed the Sunshine Law when they instruct-
ed Lee Town Manager Cheryl Archam-
bault, not to release minutes from its
monthly meetings to the newspaper.
When this reporter contacted Ar-
chambault on Wednesday, August 15, re-
questing information or minutes on the
August 7 Lee Town Council meeting, he
was informed that she had been instruct-
ed by the Lee Town Council not to re-
lease any information on the meeting,
other than what had been on the agenda.
Archambault was very apologetic and
said that she had questioned the Coun-
cil's v.isdom, behind the decision, think-
ing that all of the minutes of the meet-
ings were public record. According to in-
formation gathered during the conversa-
tion with Archambault, the Council's
President, Doug McNicol, proposed the
idea to not release minutes to this re-
porter and he was followed in the deci-
sion by the other board members. The
decision came at a workshop meeting,
where Bailey Browning, the Lee Town
Council attorney, was not present.
This reporter contacted the Florida
Press Association to speak with Sam
Morley, who serves as the Association's
Please see Lee Town Council, Page 4A


Lee Council Adopts New

Water Rate For Businesses
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Lee Town Council approved new
water rates for businesses on the second
reading at the August 7 meeting of the
Council.
Mayor Ernestine Kinsey read Ordi-
nance No. 2007-05 by title. A previous or-
dinance, No. 2007-01
had provided water
rates for water meters
up to 2" and because
the new Love's Travel
Center required a 3"
meter, the development
of rates for larger me-
ters required that the
Town Council address Mayor,
the issue. Ernestine Kinsey
Council President
Doug McNicol made the motion to adopt
the new ordinance. His motion was sec-
onded by Councilwoman Shirley Yeager
and passed unanimously.
In other business, a motion to allow
Town Manager Cheryl Archambault and
Attorney Bailey Browning to negotiate
the lease contract presented by Tower-
com was made by McNicol. Council-
woman Thelma Thompson seconded the
motion, which was passed unanimously
Yeager made a motion to keep Morrow
Insurance as the Town's provider for
property and liability insurance. Thomp-
son seconded the motion, which passed
unanimously
The council approved the following
people as members of the newly-formed
Code Enforcement Board: Patricia Glee,
Kathy Register, Edwin McMullen, Ron
Bass and Leslie Putnal.


Ob~iunries 5A
cluldof.,12A;
Rrrnicie Guide B S~iI'ln
Vie %11)011 i -2.I A


-I


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2A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Friday, August 17, 2007


Time Flies As

You're Getting Older
t seems that the older I get, the shorter the days be-
come. I will turn another year older on September 1.
(I need to remember to write that down with a per-
manent marker in big block letters on Lisa Greene's
calendar like she always writes her birthday down on
mine.),
There are so many things that I want to squeeze into a
day. I want to get more work done and then I want to have
time to play, to pray, to read, to study the Bible, to watch
TV, to clean the house, to enjoy life...Alas, it gets harder
and harder because the clock seems to have sped up or
else I have slowed down.
This past weekend, I began pondering why weekends
seem so short and weekdays still seem so long. Now, I'm at
.work, wondering how I'm going to finish everything be-
fore the end of the day.,
There are a lot of things that I would like to do for
church. There are a lot of things that I would like to do for
myself. Ginger Gray called me today and told me some in-
formation for a story about a program that Madison
Church of God is doing, called "Weigh Down." I need to
join that program, which will begin at 5 p.m. on Septem-
ber 10 at the church on the Valdosta Highway, because I
need to take a lot of weight off. Will I
have time? I certainly hope so.
I need time to work on some book
ideas that I have. It has been well over a
year since I wrote a giant flop ,of a book
entitled Dreamt Big.
Of all the things I need to find time
for, I need to find time for a quiet time
with God.
Time seems to scurry past on tiny
feet like little mice, headed for a hole to
burrow in. Somehow, I need to find time.
I need to grab it as it's fleeing by me.


ida Press .4socito ,
,, o 4 M 1. 10 %!5W


Award Winning Newspaper






1695 S SR 53 Madison, FL 32340 -
(850) 973-4141 Fax: (850) 973-4121
greenepub@greenepublishing.com
http://www.greenepublishing.com

PUBLISHER
Emerald Greene Kinslev
AssOCIATrE PUBLISHER
Ted Ensmmger
EDITOR
Jacob Bembrv
STAFF WRITERS
Ashle. Bell and Jessica Higeinbothanm
GRAPHIu(C DESIGNERS
Carla Barret and Heather Bowen
TYPESETTIER/SUBSCRIPnION
BrNant Thigpen
ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES
Marn Ellen Greene. Dorothy McKinney.
Samantha Hall, and Jeanette Dunn
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS
Susan Grimes
Deadline for classifieds is- Monday at 3:00 p.m.
Deadline for Legal Advertisement is
NMonday at 5pm.
There will be a 3'" charge for Affidavits.
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Subscnption Rates:
In County $2 Our-of-Countr $35
(State & local taxes included)

-Since 1865-
"Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity"

Madison Recorder established 1865,
New Enterprise established 1901,'
Consolidated June 25, 1908
Published weekly by Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695 S. SR
53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison
Post Office 32340. Publication No. 177.400.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison
Enteiprise-Recorder, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-
0772.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertise-
ment, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the
management, will not be for the best interest of the county
and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any ad-
vertisement submitted.
All photos given to Greene Publishing, Inc. for publication in this
newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they
are dropped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for


photos beyond said deadline.


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word,
comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.

Drawing the Line Against K
Illegal Immigration
By Congressman Ander Crenshaw
America is a country of immigrants. Generations of pio-
neers flocked to our continent and helped build our nation
into what it is today Millions of foreign born citizens left
their homes to carve out their piece of the American dream
and they did it legally And yet today almost 12 million indi-
viduals have set up residence in the U.S. by circumventing
our laws. 1
There have been many proposals on how to deal with
these "uninvited guests," and to prevent more from coming.
Recently, a failed Senate plan would have allowed illegal im-
migrants to pay a $5,000 fine to begin the road to citizenship. ac
First and foremost, this is 'Amnesty" and 'Amnesty" will ab
not work. These individuals broke the law and need to be wi
held accountable, not rewarded. Furthermore, many of the
laws we need to remedy this situation are already on the wa
books. These laws need to be enforced, while taking addi- tee
tional steps to secure our borders and deter future illegal im- wi
migration. sic
The days of catch and release are over. About a year and yet
a half ago, the south Texas town of Del Rio began appre- sw
ending, prosecuting, and briefly jailing illegal immigrants tee
instead of returning them to Mexico. No new laws needed to
be passed, the town just started enforcing the laws already in no
place-and it worked. The first part of this year yielded a 57 ra,
percent drop in arrests. hi,
Controlling the 2,000 miles on our southern border alone bu
is a monumental task-one that must be completed by inter-
twining physical and virtual fences. About a year ago 800 wh
miles of border fence was authorized to be constructed, how- is1
ever as of today only 14 miles have been completed. It is trou- to
bling to think that a county that landed a man on the moon ca
more than forty years ago is unable to create a fence at a tee
faster pace than a mile a month. This year, House Democrats an
withheld much of the needed funding for "further review," the
but we must move at a faster pace before we can consider ca:
looking at the 12 million illegal immigrants already here. wa
Additionally; we need to utilize motion detectors. Un- to
manned Aerial Vehicles (UAV); cameras and sensors to help tha
our border agents patrol the entire border. th:
Illegal immigrants come to the U.S. in search of illegal ya
employment. One of the most powerful tools in deterring ca
them in the first place, is simply to prevent employers from wa
illegally hiring them. We need to establish an Employer Ver- qu
ification System (EVS) that will end this practice. President lea
Clintpn eniplpyed a system to allow the federaggovernment at
rto block federal contractors From receiving government con-
%'tracts who knowingly employ illegal aliens. Unfortunately lea
this turned out to be nothing more than politics and only re- Ch
quired government agencies to "consider" debarring such Sc
firms. We need a system that has teeth, and will successfully th(
deter the illegal immigrant workforce. the
America can no longer turn the other cheek and allow il- Ev
legal immigrants to run ruff-shod over our borders, our laws on
and our nation. This is not just an issue of socio-economics,
but of national security as well. As the smuggling of illegal exc
immigrants continues, so does the prospect of dangerous qu
terrorists crossing our borders. We have stepped up border tio
patrols and technology, but this is still not enough. Only by -
showing that we have the will to enforce our laws, deter the a s
illegal immigrants and truly secure our borders will we the
have the security our nation deserves. the


Qingr jar~
CO~nse ris


Can You Canoe?


The Time Has Come


R regular readers will
know that I always
try to suggest some
kind of summer
tivity each year. Right
out now, this suggestion
ll be supremely welcome.
This is for people who
Lnt to entertain a group of
onagers. Younger children
ll require closer supervi-
on, especially if they can't
t swim. Recommended fo
dimmers of all ages, but
ins will love it.
Rent, buy, or borrow a ca-
e; be sure to rent a. canoe
ck for the top of your ve-
cle, too. Then you're in
siness.
First, teach the teens
hat "portage" means. This
the art of toting the canoe
the water. You turn the
noe upside down with one
en standing under one end
d another youngster at
e other end. They hold the
noe by the seats and
itch their step as they trek
the water's edge. I found
at the fastest way to teach
is -skill is in the front
rd, where the whole world
n observe the process. I
is always amazed at how
.ickly the teens would
irn when an audience was
hand. ,
All the teens in the group'
arnm' how to portage.,-
urch youth group,
outs, family and friends -
ey all take the lessons and
ey all share the labors.
erybodygets along better
the trip after that.
'For the first two or three
cursions, choose fairly
iet water as your destina-
n.
Farmer Shepherd's pond,
hallow river, a calm lake -
ese all, serve well. Later, as
e teens become experi-


YOU HAVE IT.




SOMEBODY ELSE WANTS IT!
Got something you no longer use or need?
Sell it in the classified.
850-973-4141 -.


ANTsy


to sell those


old items you


have just


lying around


the house?



Sell Them In


The Classifieds



85-9734141


enced, you can take the ^
more intrepid ones to Yel- 1
low Jacket on the Flint Riv-
er or even the Chatuge J
(made famous in the move
Deliverance).
Those early outings are
where the grown-ups get
their jollies. Why? Because
teens so seldom follow di- y
reactions. You can tell them "
fifteen times to stay. seated
in the canoe, do not stand
up, do not sway from side to
side all the rules to prevent
tipping.
Ha! When you have done
a couple of trial runs with
them, then you sit down on .
the bank in the shade of a
tree and watch. About ten -
fifteen minutes into their
voyage you hear ker-splash!
and loud yelping and
screaming. Once they all.
grab onto the upside-down
canoe to keep from drown-
ing (in five feet of water),
they realize that it will not
sink.
Then they get inventive.
A few of them will swim up
under the canoe and begin
to talk.
When the others hear the
echoing conversation, they 5
have to join in. Then some- a
one starts to sing, "On top of
,spagh-oeettttii,i ll_ covered. .A
With cheeeeese.I lost myfigrst af
meeeeatball: ,wheo somebody,',
sneezed." They take -turns
because not all of them can
get under there at one time,
.and they occasionally right
the canoe and paddle
around a bit until oops! -
it's tipping time again.
Meanwhile, you're
rolling laughing on the
bank with the other chaper-
.ones, gobbling up the pi-
mento cheese sandwiches.
Then toward the end of the '
day, you get chill bumps and
somewhat teary-eyed when
the unseen singers break i
into "Kum Ba Ya."
How beautiful it is. b
You can't hardly beat a
canoe outing for fun. And
for cementing good .will
among a group of
teenagers. I heartily en-
dorse this as a summer ac-
tivity Have a real good time.


By Ashley Bell
How do you feel about uniforms being
in the school systems?


Sheila Sparks
"I think it's great. I don't
like the idea of the shoe
situation, but with the
uniforms you don't have
kids being teased be-
cause of what they
wear."


Linda Bell
"I think it's
a great idea."


Scott Whisnant
"It doesn't
affect me."


Carolyn Macklin
"Nice, because I'm a
nurse myself."


Latoya Turner
"It's alright with me."


Billy Haynie
"It's approvable."





sat).










Friday, August 17, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A


Did You Know...


High Gas


Cont. from Page 1A


Shaking hands transfer more germs than kissing.


out charging just $.05 per gallon. It is the only county charging this low rateThe next tax category is known as the
"Ninth-cent Fuel Tax". The county can charge this tax for such services as county transportation machinery and struc-
tures, roadway drainage, street lighting, traffic signs and more. The catch to the "Ninth-cent Fuel Tax" is that the
county that imposes this tax is not obligated to share these funds with municipalities. Believe it or not, only 19 Florida
counties charge this tax. Madison County does not charge this extra one-cent tax.. It is estimated that if this tax were
levied, over $121,000 would have been raised this year alone.
And behind door number three is the popular "One to Five Cent Tax". Popular because counties can levy any
amount from one to five cents, depending-on their needs. All but 16 counties charge all or part of this tax. Madison
County does not charge this tax, but if it did, it is estimated that $570, 285 would now be heading for the county bank
account.
That's almost $700,000 in annual revenues that the Madison County Commission could be charging the taxpayers of
Madison County, but they're not. At least not yet. With revenue cuts flying like dove in a spring field, all options for
additional revenues are on the table.
By comparison, Madison County charges less gas tax per gallon than neighboring Suwannee and Jefferson Coun-
ties, and exactly the same as Taylor County. However, our retail gasoline prices almost always run higher.

Interesting:


Think Before You Spend
M ost of us at some time or another will.buy something
on the spur of the moment, without a plan or
thought. Credit cards make this easy to do. Money
experts estimate that only three out of ten purchases are
decided upon in advance, while about half of all purchas-
es are made completely on impulse.
Think of the times you go to the store for one or two
items in mind and check out with a full cart. Or, you run
to a mall on the weekend just to look and leave with a
trunk full of sale items it's a bargain if you never wear
it. Right?
It takes new shopping strategies to gain control of buy-
ing on impulse. A shopping list is essential whether it is
a mental one or a well thought out written plan., Your gro-
cery list, as well as your household supplies, gifts, cloth-
ing, appliance or home furnishings list should allow some
flexibility so you can switch and save, but it is a guide to
keep you on track with your purchases.
Dr. Jo Turner, Extension Family and Consumer Eco-
nomics, suggests you ask yourself three basic questions to
help you separate impulse buying from planned buying.
Do I need it? The answer to this question can immedi-
ately weed out impulse buying.
Will I use it? The answer to this question can be mis-
leading. It is easy to convince yourself that you will use
most anything, but further prodding will help clarify the
answer. Add the questions: "How will I use it?" and "How
soon will I use it?"
Can I afford it? This probably is the true test. You can
answer this question by asking another. "What will I have
to give up if I buy this item now?"i TThe answer to these
questions separates impulse items fromn'necessities. They
tell if ;you can have those things you could live without
but that would be more fun to have.
To avoid the stumbling blocks that cause impulse buy-
ing:

Shop alone. It is usually easier to say no to yourself
than to a spouse, child or friend.
Shop when you are refreshed. If you are tired., you
won't be as willing to take time to compare prices, to con-
sider uses and to answer the three questions that week out
impulse buying
Shop for food when you are not hungry. Hungry shop-
pers tend to buy more.
Shop less often. Consumers who have difficulty con-
trolling impulse buying can avoid the temptation by mak-
ing fewer shopping trips.
Shop sales, but be alert! Just because it is on sale
does not mean it is a good buy for you or your family. An-
swer the three questions about sale items. Modify your
shopping behavior to eliminate impulse buying from yotu"
spending patterns.

For more consumer information on money manage-
ment, contact the'Madison County Extension. Service.
The University of Florida Extension IFAS/ Madison
County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative
Action Employer authorized to provide research, educa-
tional information and other, services only to individuals
and institutions that function without regard to race, col-
or, sex, age, handicap or national origin.


O Da IH
The United States capital moved from New York
City to Philadelphia, Penn.. where it remained until
1800, when it moved to Washington. D.C. (1790)

Construction was started on the Berlin Wall (1961)

Hurricane Camille battered Louisiana and Missis-
sippi, killing 250 people (1969)



YOU HAVE IT.


SOMEBODY ELSE WANTS IT!
Got something you no longer use or need?
Sell it in the classified.

on 850-973-4141 .-." ..


County
Madison
Jefferson
Suwannee


Ninth Cent Tax (Income)
$0.00 (None).
$.01 ($162,487)
$.01 ($331,833)


1-6 Cent Tax (Income)
$.06 ($1,831,280)
$.06 ($924,024)
$.06 ($1,882,446)


1-5 Cent Tax (Income)
$0.00 (None)
$0.00 (None)
$0.05 ($1,111,368)


Total County Gas Taxes Per Gallon:

Madison $.06
Jefferson $.07
Suwannee $.12

Source: Florida Legislative Committee on "Intergovernmental Relations Report-in-Brief Revised January 2007


Back-To-School


While in attendance at the fair, parents should be sure
that their 911 address is correct and updated. Also, a par-
ent or guardian must accompany all elementary and mid-
dle school students during the fair.
North Florida Community College will be sharing
brochures and literature about all the programs offered at



StaighbtTalk&
Ted C. Ensminger
Columnist
if-: -14


Straight Talk
T ry this one on for size, straight talk with no hidden
agenda. No politics, no buddy-buddy, no leaning left
or right. Just what I know or at least, what I think I
know.
I returned to Madison six months ago after graduating
college here in the early 1970's. My initial time in Madi-
son is a cherished memory, but I was a teenager and I sus-
pect most folks cherish that time in their lives.
I spent all of the next thirty-six years living in Florida,
with a couple of years each in Ft. Lauderdale and Jack-
sonville and over thirty years in the Orlando area. I
would think that there have been quite a few people who
have returned to Madison, or who have migrated here to
escape the urban lifestyle. I call it "urban detox".
My return to Madison County was brought about by a
couple of prompting coincidences. Long time friends,
Barry and Suzie Beale, originally from Ft. Pierce, had sent
me an email with photos of the forty acres that they had
just purchased "in north Florida". When I saw the photos
of the huge oak trees I responded to Barry by asking,
"Where is this land? I think I might have rabbit hunted
on it when I was a young man." He responded by asking
me if I had ever heard of Pinetta, I responded back asking
how in the heck he had ever heard of Pinetta? And he
told be about their friends who live in the area and that
they had invited them to come up and "visit". They now
live here.
For me personally, the significance of the Barry's email
was that it planted the seed for me to start thinking again
about a life in Madison.
Within a week the second coincidence occurred. Leav-
ing where I worked one afternoon, it took me an hour and
a half to get home. It was sixteen miles. And with that
punishing ordeal punctuated by heavy traffic with loud
boom-box car stereos, I started for the first time in my
adult life questioning my quality of life.
In less than ninety days from the time of the traffic
jam, the moving truck was packed and I was saying diffi-
cult goodbyes to my beloved family, and dear friends,
many of which I had known for over twenty years.
But with the highest of confidence, my head and my
heart were both convinced that the move to Madison was
the right thing for me. And while at the time of the move
I was not financially or emotionally "fat", I did it anyway
I love this place, always have.
People say, "You can't go back". I say that sometimes
you. have to.
And with that, I'm here.
And it's just that simple. This is an example of how 3
new resident can come to live here. New people will move
to Madison County by the hundreds, probably by the thou-
sands, in the next few years. And they will come. It is not
a matter of if, it's a matter of when. Is Madison County
ready? Probably more than you might think.
But is any county really "ready". I've seen first hand
the madness of urban sprawl. Imagine a twenty-five mile
trip in heavy traffic, with tolls, just to get from one side of
town to the other. Was Orange County (Orlando) ready?
Is what they have in Orlando an example of what happens
when a county is "ready"? If it is, then perhaps we should
pray that Madison County is NOT ready.
The challenges that are coming are enormous and they
are complicated by unprecedented budget cuts at the
county level. One should either pray for our leaders or ap-
ply for their job.


Cont. from Page 1A


the college. NFCC will be focusing on career awareness
and encouraging students to go to college for a higher ed-
ucation. There will also be information on scholarships,
financial aid, organizations and clubs, the athletic pro-
gram, testing, academic programs, and career tech pro-
grams.


Lee Town Council

Cont. from Page 1A
He looked up an Attorney General's opinion and cited
it to the reporter.
The Attorney General's opinion (AG 2005-51), in part,
reads: Section 286.011, Florida Statutes, the Government
in the Sunshine Law, requires all meetings of a public
board or commission to be open to the public. Subsection
(2) of that statute provides that "[t]he minutes of a meet-
ing of any such board or commission of any such state
agency or authority shall be promptly recorded, and such
records shall be open to public inspection."...
One of the footnotes to the opinion, cites an Attorney
General's opinion from 1991 (91-26): "the minutes of city
council meetings are public records when the clerk has
performed his or her duty to prepare the minutes even
though they have not yet been sent to the city council
members, and have not been officially approved by the city
council."
-This reporter took a copy of the Attorney General's
opinion to Archambault, who read it and immediately
handed him a copy of the minutes.
The Government-in-the-Sunshine Law, commonly
known as'"The Sunshine Law," guarantees the people's
right to inspect public records in Florida. Violations of
the Sunshine Law are subject to criminal penalties as stat-
ed below:
"(a) Any public officer who violates any provision of
this section is guilty of a noncriminal infraction, punish-
able by a fine not exceeding $500. (b) Any person who is a
member of a board or commission or of any state agency
or authority of any county, municipal corporation or po-
litical subdivision who knowingly violates the provisions
of this section by attending a meeting not held in accor-
dance with the provisions hereof is guilty of a misde-
meanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in s.
775.082 or s. 775.083.(c) Conduct which occurs outside the
state which would constitute a knowing violation of this
section is a misdemeanor of the second degree, punish-
able as provided in s. 775.082 or 775.083."
Availability to public records in Florida has roots in
the Public Records Law of 1909 and was reinforced in 1967
by the Sunshine Law.


Hiring
Cont. from Page 1A
advising them to consider hiring freezes.
The decision for the freezes was based on anticipated
tax cuts ordered by the Florida Legislature.
In other business, the site plan for the new Wal-Mart
Supercenter, located on Highway 53 South, north of Inter-
state 10, was passed unanimously
The Commission agreed to construct a new library for
the Town of Lee. The money for the library will come
from a grant from the state. The County will have to kick
in an extra $150,000 for the match for the $500,000 grant.
The Commission gave instructions for County Coordi-
nator Allen Cherry and County Attorney Tom Reeves to
draw up a tax abatement for a new business location on
Highway 255 South for Jason Archambault, owner of Fast-
Pack Packaging. Archambault pointed out that his busi-
ness had grown from 500 square feet to its current 3,000
square feet in the old Lee School location. The new loca-
tion, which Archambault, is anticipating building, would
allow him to store 100 percent of the packaging materials
that he sells. Currently, he only has the capacity to store
60 percent of it.
973-
CALL


~c. 1_/








4A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder ww.greenepublishing.


LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER


Friday, August 17, 2007


Two Arrested For
Possession Of Marijuana
Two Madison men were arrested for possession of
marijuana, less than 20 grams on Thursday, August 9.
According to a Madison Police Department report,
Patrolman Joseph Agner was on duty, traveling south
on Duval Street, when he observed a green Chrysler
four-door with inoperable tag lights.
Agner conducted a traffic stop on the vehicle at the'
intersection of Duval and Leon Streets. He made con-
tact with the driver, Reginald Davis and his passenger,
Don Pittman.
While searching the vehicle, Agner found a baggie
of marijuana and a marijuana blunt.
Davis and Pittman were arrested and taken to the
Madison County Jail.

Man Resists Arrest
A Madison man was ar-
rested for domestic violence
and resisting an officer with-
out violence on Monday, Au-
gust 13.
According to a Madison
Police Department report,
Patrolman Joseph Agner
was dispatched to a resi-
dence on Dade Street in ref-
erence to a battery
When Aguer arrived, he
made contact with the vic-
tim, who said that she had ..|..l,
been slapped and kicked Arthur Lee McDaniel
hard to the ground by her
live-in boyfriend, Arthur Lee McDaniel. Agner viewed
the visible mark on the victim's face. .
Agner made contact with McDaniel and attempted
to place him under arrest. McDaniel resisted. Agner at-
tempted to put handcuffs on McDaniel, who still resist-
ed. When Agner got McDaniel cuffed, he had to physi-
cally put McDaniel in the back of the patrol car.


Question:
What Is The "Move Over Law"?
The "Move Over Act", passed during the 2002 ses-
sion of the Florida Legislature now requires motorist to
"move over" or "slow down" when approaching an au-
thorized emergency vehicle that is stopped on a highway
in Florida.
The "Move Over Act", is designed to protect law en-
forcement and other emergency workers on our high-
ways. Motorists are urged to help protect the people who
protect you please move over .and let emergency work-
ers do their jobs without the risk of being injured or
killed. When approaching a police car, ambulance, tow
truck, or other emergency vehicle stopped on the side of
the road, motorists are required to follow this common
sense law.
Unless otherwise directed by a law enforcement offi-
cer, motorists are required to: .
On interstate highways or other highways with two
or more lanes traveling in the direction of the emer-
gency vehicle, drivers approaching law enforcement or
other authorized emergency vehicle parked on a road-
way with their emergency lights activated are required
to vacate the lane closest to the emergency vehicle, as
soon as it is safe to do so.
When approaching a law enforcement or other au-
thorized emergency vehicle parked on a two-lane road-
way with their emergency lights activated, drivers are
required to slow to a speed that is 20 miles per hour less
than the posted speed limit when the posted speed limit
is 25 miles per hour or greater; or travel at five miles per
hour when the posted speed limit is 20 miles per hour or
less.
A violation of this section is a non-criminal traffic
infraction, punishable pursuant to chapter 318 as a mov-
ing violation.
(Note: The above information was copied and edited
from the Florida Highway Patrol website at
www.fhp.state.fl.us.)

YOU HAVE'EM.




SOMEBODY ELSE VWANTS 'EM!
Got some things you need to get rid of?
Sell them in the classified.
ith^- 850-973-4141 i"-- ..


8/8/07
Carla Grimsley-Writ of bodily attachment
Teddy Lashay Phillips-Domestic violence/battery
Douglas Ken Tuten-Out of county warrant
Genieve Olivia Davis-VOP (circuit)
Howard Leland Trefethen-Driving while license
suspended, revoked or cancelled
8/9/07
Rufus G. Thompkins, Jr.-Shoplifting
Reginald Mario Davis-Possession of marijuana
less than 20 grams
Don Pittman-Possession of marijuana less than
20 grams
8/10/07
Carla Grimsley-VOP (circuit)
Michael James Rosano-VOP (circuit)
Crystal Dawn Jones-Failure to appear
Ramon Lamar Cobb-VOP (circuit)
Willie James Anderson-DUI
8/11/07
Dennis Michael Pope-No valid or expired drivers
license
Maynor Perez-No valid or expired drivers license
Laquinton Jarrod Dobson-Obstruction by dis-
guise
Stacy Denise James-Uttering a forgery
Jarvis Lamar McQuay-No valid or expired dri-
vers license
8/12/07
Jarvis Lamar McQuay-Resisting an officer with-
out violence
Tavares Roshell Sanders-Battery (touch or strike)
8/13/07
Gregory Jerrod Tillman-VOP (circuit)
Antonio Cortez Henderson-Grand theft, cheating,
theft by taking
Willie James McNair-Sell of a controlled sub-
stance (crack cocaine) (two counts)
8/14/07
Arthur Lee McDaniel-Resisting an officer with-
out violence, VOP (circuit), domestic vio-
lence/battery
Mike Gluszcz-VOP (county)
Michael Moody-Driving while license suspended
(habitual offender)
James Williams-VOP (ciITcuit)
Sonny Joe Potter-Possession of drug parapherna-
lia, possession of controlled substance (methamphet-
amine)
Cedric Eugene Williams-Grand theft, burglary


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The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based
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free written information about their qualifications and experience.


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Turf Club Open Turf Club Closed
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Friday, August 17, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com




AROUND MADISON COUNTY


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5A


...........__._._......._._..
01.2' ~~-'l-A g MAA. -


Virginia Iduma

Perkins
Virginia Iduma Perkins,
age 81 died Monday August
13, in Tallahassee.
Funeral services will
be Friday, August 17, at
11:00 a.m. at Beggs Funeral
Home Madison Chapel.
with burial to follow in
Midway Cemetery, Lee.
The Family will receive
friends Thursday from 5-7
p.m., at Beggs Funeral
Home.
She was born in Madi-
son County, Florida, where
she lived most of her life.
She moved to Craw-
fordville in 1989. She re-
tired from Gold Kist, and
was a former member of
Midway Baptist Church
and was a member of
Crawfordville First Baptist
Church, Crawfordville.
She is survived by one
son: James "Buddy"
Perkins of Live Oak; three
daughters, Alice Battles of
Buford, Ga., Jean Piplack
of Crawfordville, and
Joette McHenry of Talla-
hassee; one sister: Belle
Davis of Madison; seven
grandchildren and 13
great-grandchildren.


Every Tuesday
Saturday
The Diamonds ii the,
Ruff Adoption Program
at the Suwannee Valley
Humane Society is open
every Tuesday through
Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m., It is located on 1156
S.E Bisbee Loop Madison
FL, 32340. For a healthy
lifestyle adopt an animal
and they will make your
life more fulfilled. For.
more information or di-
rections call 1-866-236-7812
or (850) 971-9904.
Third Tuesday
of each Month
The Greater Greenville
Area Diabetes Support
Group is a free educational
service and support for di-
abetes and thoes wanting
to prevent diabetes. The
group meets the third
Tuesday of each month at
the Greenville Public Li-
brary Conference Room at
312 SW Church Street,
Greenville, 11 11:30 a.m.
Everyone is welcome!
Third Wednesday of
each Month
The Madison County
Health Education Club is
holding a free educational
service and support for


Rosa Mae Caplinger
Rosa Mae Caplinger,
81, died on Wednesday, Au-
gust 8, 2007 at her home in
Greenville.
Funeral services were
held Saturday, August 11,
at 2 p.m. at Beggs Funeral
Home, Madison Chapel in
Madison. Burial followed
at Hensey Cemetery in
Greenville. The family re-
ceived friends at Beggs
Chapel on Friday, August
10, from 6-8 p.m.
Mrs. Caplinger was
born in Nahunta, Ga. on
August 9, 1925, the daugh-
ter of the late Fountain
Hendrix and Nora Strick-
land Hendrix. She moved
to Greenville about 15
years ago from Homestead
to be near her children.
She was a homemaker and
of the Primitive Baptist
Faith.
She is survived by one
son, Thomas H. Brown and
wife Elsie of Orlando; one
daughter, Melba Hauss of
Greenville; three sisters,
Murial Sands of Inter-
lachen, Martha Fitch of
Key West and Mary Ann
Hier of Perry. She was
blessed with eight grand-
children, 19 great-grand-
children and one great-
great grandson.


people interested in pre-
venting or controlling: di-
-abets, high blood prels-
sure, elevated cholesterol:
levels, obesity, and other
chronic health condi-
tions. The club meets the
third Wednesday of each
month at, the Madison
Public Library Confer-
ence Room at 378 NW Col-,
lege Loop, Madison, 12:15
- 12:45 p.m.. Everyone is
welcome to bring their
own lunch!
Third Wednesday of
each Month
The Madison County
Diabetes Support Group
is a free educational ser-
vice and support for dia-
betes and those wanting
to prevent diabetes. The
group meets the third
Wednesday of each
month at the Madison
Public Library Confer-
ence Room at 378 NW Col-
lege Loop, Madison, 11:45
a.m. 12:10 p.m. Everyone
is welcome is bring their
own lunch!
details: contact Marcia
Kazmierski at 386-752-
2461 or Lorriane Miller at
386-752-6439.
August 19
The members of Jes-


Daniel Benjamin
"Bennie"
Knight, Sr.,
Daniel Benjamin "Ben-
nie" Knight, Sr., age 80,
died Monday, August 13,
in Madison.
Funeral services were
11:00 a.m. Thursday, Au-
gust 16, at Beggs Funeral
Home Madison Chapel,
with burial following in
Ebenezer Cemetery, Madi-
son. The family received
friends Wednesday, Au-
gust 15, from 6-8 p.m. at
Beggs Funeral Home.
Donations may be
made to Big Bend Hospice,
i723 Mahan Center Blvd.,
Tallahassee,, Fl., 32308-
5428 or First United
Methodist Church, Build-
ing, Fund, P.O. Box 294,,
Madison, Fl. 32341.
He was born in
Knightsville, S.C. and
moved to Florida in 1948
working in the North
Florida area for Bouligney
Electrical Construction
Co. He also worked for
Gulf Power for several
years. He came to Madison
in 1966 working as a ser-
viceman for Florida Pow-
er where he retired after
16 years. He was a member
of the Madison Masonic
Lodge #11 F&AM and
First United Methodist
Church in Madison.
He is survived by his
wife of 58 years, Billy
Knight of Madison; three
sons, Danny Knight of Mi-
ami, Joe Knight of Madi-
son, and Mark Knight of
Lake Park; two sisters,
June Albers pf. Columbia
S.C.;,and Inimgene Purvis
of Florence S.C.; five
grandchildren, and seven
great-grandchildren; and
a host of nieces &
nephews.
lamb A.M.E. Church of
Madison will be observ-
ing its first "I Love Jes-
lamb Day" on August 19,
at 7 p.m. The guest speak-
er will be Rev. Louis Kirk-
land of New Fountain
Chapel A.M.E. Church, in
Jacksonville.
August 19
Midway Baptist
Church will be celebrating
their 150th Homecoming
Service on Sunday, August
19, 2007. Sunday School
10:30 a.m. and Worship
Service at 11:30 AM. Guest
speaker will be Dr. Jerry
M. Windsor Secre-
tary/Treasury for the
Florida Baptist Historicial
Society, Baptist College of
Florida, Graceville. "Last
Call" will be providing the
music prior to the morn-
ing worship hour. Every-
one is cordially invited to
come join and worship
with us.


_ -? '-4 _


August 16, 1957
A family birthday was held at the home of
SMr. and Mrs. S.P Odom Sunday Present were
Mrs. J.B. Phillips, Mr. and Mrs. Cleo Phillips
and daughter of Madison, Mr. and Mrs. V.L.
Perkins and four children of Lee, Mr. and Mrs.
Bobby Littleton and baby Mike.
Mr. and Mrs. J.B. Davis left last week on a
vacation trip to the mountains of North Car-
olina. They expected to spend several days at
Junaluska and will be accompanied home by
their son, Albert, who was attending
Methodist Youth Camp there.
August 18, 1967
Miss Marie Floyd was married July 21 in
Collinwood Christian Church in Cleveland,
Ohio, to Robert Paul Baker, son of Mr. Ken-
neth Baker of Cleveland. The bride's parents
are Mr and Mrs. L.T. Floyd of Greenville.
Dr. and Mrs. Burns and daughters re-
turned Monday from their three weeks' trip to
Expo 67 and visits with relatives in North Car-
olina and several New England states. They re-
turned by way of the North Carolina moun-
tains. They reported a wonderful trip and en-
joyable visits with their relatives.
August 19, 1977
From 3-5 p.m., the children, grandchil-


dren, families, and friends gathered at the
Madison Womens Club here in Madison just
recently to share in the joyous occasion of Mr.
and Mrs. Kater Burns, Sr., who were celebrat-
ing their "Golden Wedding Anniversary."
Mr. and Mrs. Odis H. Allbritton announce
the engagement and approaching marriage of
their daughter, Charlotte Virginia, to, Mr. Ben-
jamin Sale Waring, H, son of Mrs. Howell War-
ing of Madison. Miss Albritton is a graduate
of Suwannee High School.
August 20, 1987
Richard and Danatta lott announce the ar-
rival of a baby boy born Saturday August 1,
weighing 7 pounds, 14 % ounces in South
Georgia Medical Center, Valdosta, Ga. The lit-
tle fellow has been named Zachary Andrews
lott.
Eight children from Madison County were
among those who attended the Salvation Army
summer camp at Camp Keystone during the
week of Aug. 3-8. The campers were Michael
Monlyn, Lennie Hatcher, George Johnson, Sta-
cy Johnson, Tracy Johnson, Jamie Johnson,
Deon Turner, and Calvin Jenkins. Several of
the children brought home awards. Each child
received a T-shirt, which was provided by
Gary Williams of Williams Electronics.


T:al 4


~-~r((rL~r~X1t I~


%M.- qmo- AV bl 1F oq- A 10












6A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Friday, August 17, 2007


Supervisor

Holds Meet, (
On Saturday. Jtul\ 28. 2007 the Supervi-
sor of Elections and Office Staff held a
"Meet, Greet. and Eat" in the Four Free-
doms Park. Individuals came by the park for
various reasons individuals took advan-
tage of this tune to register to vote or update
voter information while others gave sugges-
tions. asked questions and ate lunch in the
park.
During lunch, Supervisor Jada Woods-
Williams, used the opportunity to educate
voters on legislative changes and inform
v r


Of Elections

3reet, And Eat
voters of their rights and responsibilities.
It was also suggested that voters visit
the office to update their addresses to pre-
vent unnecessary tax dollars to be spent and
continue effective conunmnication between
the office and Madison Cotity citizens.
The Supervisor would like to cordially
thank each and every one for stopping by.
She also understands those that were not
able to stop b\: However. she reminds citi-
zens that her doors are always open with lis-
tening ears and smiling faces.


Pholt Sahmtied
Isaac Williams, Rod Williams and Ericka Williams, pictured left to right, help prepare
the food and drinks at the Meet and Greet.


Plhoto Sublmitted
Frances Ginn, left, Lisa Ginn and Pat Cantey visit during the Meet and Greet.


CHEST


N -


Photo S ta'lnimdi
Letha Gervin is caught on camera'at the Meet and


Greet.

"It's Time To Put On Your Dancing Shoes!"
















Registration &
Dancewear Fittings
Wednesday, August 15th Friday, August 17th
3:00 PM 6:00 PM
Ballet Pointe Tap Jazz Kinderdance
~Ages 3 thru Adult-

New Classes!
Boys' Zone Jazz, Tap & Hip Hop Adult Classes-
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Hip Hop for Kids Dance Intensive Classes w/ Guest Teachers
NEW! Dance Competition Team

Classes Begin
Tuesday, September 4th
Call Today!! 973-4828 973-4444
438 E. Base Street, next to McDonald's in Madison, Florida
Becky Robinson Director, Member Dance Masters of America


PIhoto h., .l1 itit
Jerry and Carolyn Harrington, pictured at left, visit with Madison County Supervi-
sor of Elections Jada Woods-Williams at the Meet and Greet.



Certificates of Deposit

Provided by Keith Hargrove, State Farm
I: \ FIXED RATE
S! CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT


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Saturday, August 25th
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Jackie's Then and Now
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08/15/200'17 08/21/2007 Interest Rates Yield iAPYV
90-day' 4.55"c 4.65'%
180-day** 4.88% 5.00%
1-year 4.88% 5.00%
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3-year 5.02% 5.15%
4-year 4.88% 5.00%
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1-year 4.97% 5.10%
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5-year 4.93% 5.05%5o
Minimum opening deposit required for a Jumbo CD is $100,000.
** IRA Certificates of Deposit are not available in 90-day and 180-day terms.




STATE FARM SELECT AGENT
KEITH G.

HARGROVE
145 E. Base St.
(850) 973-6641
MEMBER FD
rim FDIC


150 Caitafl CrleK. NWr
TalhaseF


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mu:ri rr.ci c=












Friday, August 17, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7A


P.C. Wu, Rotarian District Governor,


Presented With Key To The City Of Madison


By Ashley Bell
Greene Pub-
lishing, Inc.
It was an
eventful day at
the August 8
Rotary meeting
with many sur-
prises for mem-
bers.
D e i d r a
Newman, the
new Business
Development
Officer of the
Madison Coun-
ty Community
Bank, was in-
ducted as a
new member ..
into the Rotary '; IZ
Club. Newman Gr,' ,
was previously
a member of Deidra
the Perry son Count
Chapter and ducted int(
was sponsored meeting he
by Ed Meggs,
President of the Madison
County Community Bank
to join the Madison chap-
ter.
Diane Ching, Assis-
tant District Governor and
Rotarian from the Perry
Chapter, welcomed PC.
Wu, District Governor, as
the guest speaker. PC. Wu
was raised in Savannah,
Georgia, but is originally
from New York City, N.Y.
Wu received his Bache-
lor's of Arts, Masters, and
a Ph.D. from Florida State
University. After gradua-
tion in 1977, Wu moved to
Pensacola to teach at the
University of West Flori-
da. After 28. years of em-
ployment at UWF, Wu rie-
ceived the title Professor
Emeritus.
Wu and his Wife, Judi,
are the parents of Christo-
pher and Ashley. Christo-
pher is a computer engi-
neer and Ashley is a
speech language patholo-
gist.
In 2004, Wu continued
his humanitarian work
and was elected to the City
Council.
Throughout his life,
Wu was taught to be a car-
ing and giving person. His
parents, who owned a Chi-
nese restaurant, would
feed the less fortunate
from the back door of the
restaurant. Wu recalled
that sometimes it seemed
like the line to the back
door was longer than the
line at the front door. But
his parents continued to
help those in need.
Wu's mother, who
passed away in October of
2006, received three keys.
to the city for her charita-
ble works. Although she
herself was not a Rotari-
an, Wu commented that
she would have made a
fantastic member because
of her generosity.
'"As Rotarians, we
share what we have with
people in need," said Wu.
"And we work to make it a
better world." Wu has
been a member of the Ro-
tary club since 1995 and is
part of the Five Flags
chapter in Pensacola.
During his speech, Wu
thanked Jargo Clark and
Assistant District Gover-
nor Diane Ching for their
phenomenal work. He also
recognized former club
presidents, former and
current board members,
former Assistant District


PuMNItsn g. In, PI,.,. 1, .1 .-I,I BE II
August 8, 2007
Newman, employee of Madi-
ty Community Bank, was in-
o the Rotary Club during the
eld August 8.
Governor Carl Dean, and
also Jim Catron.
After Wu completed
his speech, Jim Catron
called him back to the
podium to present him
with a key to the City of
Madison. Wu was thrilled
that he received his first
key to a city. He comment-
ed that he has always giv-
en out keys to the city, but
never actually received
one.
Pete Bucher, Sheriff
of Madison County, pre-
sented Jargo Clark with
an American flag in hon-
or of his father, Sheriff
Charles D. Clark, who
died in the line of duty. A
" ; -4.1 r !


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Ashley Bell, August 8, 2007
Jim Catron, right, presents P.C. Wu with the key to the
city of Madison.


Grteir PuuhliOtlung, Inc. Photo. by .s1silt\ ell.. Augus . ?5. 1_u
Sheriff Pete Bucher, left, presents Jargo Clark with
the American flag in memory of his father, Sheriff Charles
D. Clark.
paid assassin shot Sheriff
Clark six times in the '
back. At the time of his
death, the family of those
who died in the line of
duty was not presented w aA n. f a
with an American flag.
Clark was in awe of the
honor that his father re-
ceived.

S ,


x.]l coIeIt8 nn-7d Elvent x re FRLE vithl park ddmission

229.21 .7080. C,,E ".": :r, ,- : 5, it Al.,,-d .i, ,-I : .' E. 6 ,3, ,n l: ,r-tr i er ,t .,-
229.219.7080 9 1-75 Exit 13, Valdosta, GA e wildadventures.net


v~a i I unslat r. Ep









8A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Friday, August 17, 2007


!71 Kiwanians

STell Their Stories


Chne.2 i n


T cr o any

in o


*


Relcewr
wpr Sldesad


r PN W -IN ------m M mm Nmm =ON 11

BEN'S09oUvata:I
B E" S ,I Auto Repair I

STowing & Diesel Repair Foreign & Domestic
1 528 E. Base St.' Madison, Fl 405 South Ohio St,
SI Live Oak, FL
(850) 978 (386) 362-1225
I 0JV / 7 1 I A/C, Alternator, Brakes, I
Ben Bowven, Own Exhaust, Dual Exhaust,
) CVAxles & Tune-Ups
m- 1m-m- -mm m

'Hall's:
STire & Muffler'


787 E. Base St. Madison, FL 1064 East Base St. Madison, FL
85097 -2 76'-(Beside Clover Farm)
085e973-2676 (850) 973-3026 ei








SNewa U02 i s 30 E ve, 1Vosta (G

rS Located in Dowitomidosta
1512 E Base St Mdlison, FL A no et I



M Muffler Center'
State Far 800 N. Ashley Street
Insurance Valdosta, GA 31602
Keith HargroveAgen 229-253-9797


145 E Base St.'Madison, FL
(850) 973-6641
" 11I A


Mon-Fri:
8:00 am-4:30pm
m -s- -m s


I
-4


Always consult your owner's manual, but a good rule of, Uy, f
thumb is to have the oil filter changed regularly, every 3,000
Ito 4,000 miles. I |
* Have all fluids checked, including brake, power steering, All
Itransmission/transaxle, windshield washer solvent and| l|Tl W I
,antifreeze. These fluids play a large role in the safety and per- America's Body Shop I
formance of the vehicle.
1 1 | 813 S. St Augustine 'Valdosta, GA 4317W Pensacola St.* Tallahassee, FL
* Check tire inflation. Under-inflated tires can result in a loss g
of fuel efficiency. This is the least expensive form of preven- (2 2 2458880 850575-7124"
1tive and safety maintenance. Seamless Panel Repair
FREE ESTIMATES
I* Keep your engine tuned. A bad spark plug or _M N*M_ _MR__,= 4
|plugged/restricted fuel injector can reduce fuel efficiency as| a M adis n ,
much as 30 percent. PUHA0 AA
I* Have the lighting system checked frequently, including _ t I| S
headlights, turn signals, and brake and tail lights. M t li
S100% Customer Satisfaction Is Our Goal wy. 14 South Madison, FL
Inspect engine belts regularly. Worn belts will affect the| FORIEGN & DOMESTIC w4 South Madison, L
,engine performance. Body*Paint Work* Frame Straightening (850) 9734172
i| p r | Free Esftimates Insurance Work Welcome
Have the air filtration system checked frequently. The air fil-| 1630 E. Jackson St. Thomasville, GA | e buy Copper, Brass, Aluminum
ter should be checked approximately every other oil change (Located behind Langdale Auto Ma) Stainless Steel, adiators, unk Cars,
for clogging or damage. 2292262077 I Catalytic Converters, Batteries

SMaisoln Auto mPt1 Suwannee Sorensen '
M& Tractor Parts! 'Insurance Tire Center, Inc.
e Ave. If youneed Lawn Mower, AD, Passenger,
(BumpertoBumper)Ma ionL ofMadison a
i(Bumper t umper) ms o FL f J .ght Truc Semi and/or Tractor Tires.....
253 S. Duval St 850) 9736016 348 I Base St, Madison, FL we've gotyour tires
3 S. Duval St. g i We have an ASE Cerlified Mecanic
Madison, FL Am am T ,[ ', 1 (850) 973-8312 *(850) 973-8341 oan duy for allyor repair needs I
M adi so FL[II'.'" i ,iv'i, | f ,/n' tf we f are also afillservie and lube slatn
W[F [M'[,l'e' ""rUax':'. 0 97 3 a 1 [13U) 0'11 13 N Jefferson St. -Monticello
850-973-2275 1 .- 850-,.997.4689
I.... .... .......-. ..- ..8.=r-,-,, rn.........l


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Before the monthly Kiwahis Club board meet-
ing, Jim Holben, president, asked various members
to share their own personal "How I Got Here" story.
Linda Hesketh was the first to share her story.
She moved to Florida from New England and
worked a few places. She worked as a secretary and
in insurance in St. Petersburg, before working with
the Department of Corrections.
After working 14 years for DOC, Linda and her
husband, then a teacher in Pinellas County, decided
to retire. They had previously purchased land in
Madison, and in 1998 moved to North Florida.
For six or seven years, Linda and her husband
traveled. Linda became restless and got another job,
this time for the Suwannee River Regional Library.
She worked in Lee and Greenville, coordinating
children's programs..
It wasn't long until Linda applied for the posi-
tion of Madison County Youth Services Coordina-
tor. She was given the job, and now Linda works
with children. She reads stories, makes crafts and
plays with puppets, among other things.
"This is the best job I've ever had," Linda said.
A longtime Kiwanian, George Willis, was next to
share his story. He "discovered America" in Tifton,
Ga., in a farmhouse about where the Holiday Inn
sits today. He lived in the area during the Depres-
sion, but because of money moved to Orlando. He
went to school in Orlando before moving to Sanford
in 1935.
In Sanford, in the sixth grade, Willis lied about
his age and worked for Western Union, delivering
telegrams. He would work until m id n igh t or later,
soht'etimes delivering telegrams tintil 1 a.mi"Willis'
also worked as a meat cutter in a market, a stock
manager, and in a clothing store.
In eleventh grade, Willis went to one of the De-
fense Schools set up during the war. There he went
to radio training and electrical training. He went
into civil service, in the eleventh grade, and quit
school. He moved to Biloxi, Ms., then to Lincoln,
Ne. In Lincoln, Willis worked on aircraft engines
and aircraft construction.
He then traveled to California, where he worked
on P39 aircraft. Willis said that because people
were advanced so quickly from boot camp, the mili-
tary lost several P39 planes.
Willis then moved to Arizona, stayed there for a
short time, then went to Washington, D.C. In D.C.,
he worked on the planes that generals would take
home on the weekends. "It was the easiest job I
had," said Willis.
In 1946, after three years and 28 days, Willis was
discharged. He worked in marketing after that, and
construction, and also taught at a few technical
schools. Somewhere along the way, Willis "tricked"
his wife Jo into marrying him.
Willis was a realtor for a long time, and retired
as such. He and his wife, Jo, reside in the country-
side of Madison.
Edie Day was the last to tell her story of how she
arrived in Madison. She was born in upstate New
York and attended a one-room schoolhouse. She
moved to Central Florida, and there she graduated
from high school.
Day went to Florida State University where she.
achieved her bachelor's and master's degrees, and
then was director of drama and an English instruc-
tor at North Florida Junior College (now NFCC) for
34 years.
She went back to school, received her Doctorate,
and then became an assistant to the president of
NFJC. Following her time in Madison, Day moved
to Thomaston, Ga., where she was the Vice Presi-
dent of Instruction at a technical institution. She
then taught high school.
Day retired back to Madison, where she now
lives with her husband Lloyd. Day and her husband
own a farm in Greenville that was established in
1832. Day enjoys traveling and gardening in her
spare time.
In other news, Lucille's Winners are doing quite
well. The Winners have racked up 70 points in their
membership drive, while Cantey's Conquerors have
a mere 30 points.


YoUC)-,I


Got something you no longer use or need?
Sell it in the classified.
^miw^ ,850-973-4141 *._ -.."


'I l
man Ean foC
h em ,


Rosh and refill the
Replace any worn cooling system as
tires and burned needed,
out bulbs,

TaO A
Correct any prol
lems Atith the air Oved b
conditioning system. and maint,
being slia


_ _ n









Friday, August 17, 2007


www. reenepublishino.com


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A


Madison County Board of County Commissioners


Current Salaries As Of 7/31/2007


Position


SOLID WASTE DEPARTMENT


Wyche, Jerome
Albritton, Joe Dean **
Alexander, James E.**
Blair, Clay A.
Davis, Dozier **
Fudge, James
Holcomb, Steve **
Green, Robert K.
Jobes Jr., William H.**
Johnson, Sylvia E.**
Kelley, Richard A.
Lee Sr., Nathaniel**
May Jr., Lewis Stan**
McCrary, Marcus
McNealey, Alvin L.
Miller, Clyde **
Miller, Dan **
Newman, Nathan **
Norris, Eurlene **
Peterson, Carleton**
Phillips, Chadwick A.
Placzkowski, Donald F
Rickelmann, Jefery A.
Robinson, Linda**
Sever, Elbert**
Smith, Sharon
Southall, Randall**
Phillips, Turner **
Williams, Andrew**
Williamson, Willie**
ROAD DEPARTMENT
McClune, Jerry W.
(DROP Prog. Retirement)
Akins, Michael A.
Bass, James D.
Bell, Charles L.
Bryant Jr., O.E.
Bryant, Betty
Carter, Hubert**(31)
Chaney, Steven Joe
Cressley, Larry
Crocket III, David E.
Day Jr., Gene A.
Green Jr., Charles E.
Hagan, Jack W., Jr,
Henderson, Deborah
Henderson, Robert
(DROP Prog.Retirement)
Jenkins, Louise S.
Kesler, Lonnie D..
McKnight, Daniel J.
Medley, Ronald K.
Merritt, Frank N.
Neloms, Alvin L.
Nelson Jr., Rosevelt
Pinkard, JoQhnny.,,
Quick;, ,heryl,,
Rye, Roy
Scarboro Jr.,
James R.
Sever, Kenneth E.
Sherrod, Hubert L.
Thigpen,
James Lonnie
Williams
Helen Joanne


SW/RE Coordinator
Collection Center Attendent
Collection Center Attendent
Crew Leader / Truck Driver
Collection Center Attendent
Truck Driver / Operator
Collection Center Attendent
Mechanic / Truck Driver
Collection Center Attendent
Collection Center Attendent
Truck Driver
Collection Center Attendent
Collection Center Attendent
Truck Driver I
Truck Driver I
Collection Center Attendent
Collection Center Attendent
Collection Center Attendent
Collection Center Attendent
Collection Center Attendent
Truck Driver I
Collection Center Attendent
Driver/Operator
Collection Center Attendent
Collection Center Attendent
Admin. Office Mgr.
Collection Center Attendent
Collection Center Attendent
Collection Center Attendent
Collection Center Attendent

public works director
crew tech.
machine operator
machine operator
machine operator
traffic control specialist
building grounds tech.
truck driver
machine operator
mechanic shop supervisor
machine operator
machine operator
machine operator
admin. office assist.


field specialist
admin. office assist.
machine operator
truck driver
truck driver
machine operator
machine operator
truck driver
machine operator
traffic control specialist -
machine operator

truck driver
machine operator
machine operator

machine operator

admin. office manager


BOCC/Commissioners
Ellis, Roy (Chairman) commissioner-chairman
Vickers, Wayne commissioner
Henderson, Ricky commissioner
Martin, Alfred commissioner
Moore, Ronnie commissioner
BOCC/Other
Cherry, Allen -
(Senior Mgmt. Retirement) county coord.
Pickels, Sherilyn K. admin. office manager
Bass, Jeanne county planner
Capan, Beatrice receptionist
COURTHOUSE
Barfield, Albert Lee facilities maintenance mgr.
VETERANS SERVICE
Bradley, Oliver veterans services officer
BUILDING DEPARTMENT,
Sessions, Anthony building inspector
Demps, Sisseritta
(Renee) admin. assist.
CODE ENFORCEMENT DEPT
Randall, Gloria code enforcement officer
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
Stanley, James E. director
Brown, Victoria program coord.
ANIMAL CONTROL
Willoughby, James A animal control coord.
MOSQUITO CONTROL
Mandziara, Ronald mosquito control coord.
AG CENTER
Douglas, Diann co. extension director
Campbell, Kevin extension agent / agriculture
Hemanes, Heidi admin. office mgr.
Miller, Rebekah extension agent / 4H
Williams, Theresa program assistant
SOIL & WATER
Newman, Doris admin. office assist.
PARKS AND RECREATION


Garner, Thomas W.
Bussey, Alan R.
EMS
Botino, Juan
Covell, Robert
Gniewek, Thomas
Hooker, Mattie
Jordan, Lisa
Kent, Cecil J.
Leggett, Albert
Lewis, Rebecca
Phillips, Bryan
Raines, Michael
Segrest, Lori
Shipp, Tonia
Thomas, Christopher
Thomas, Maurice
Williams, Lucas
Williams, Nathan

Botino, Juan
Taylor, Carol


recreation director
recreation assistant

ems director
paramedic/supervisor
paramedic
emt
emt / supervisor
paramedic
paramedic
paramedic
emt
paramedic
admin. office manager
emt
emt
emt
paramedic
emt / assistant director

911-coord.
911-assistant


Rate of Pay

S2,875.50
S6.93
S8.37
S14.19
S7.66
S11.04
S6.93
S12.98
S6.93
S6.93
S12.36
S6.93
S7.95
S11.37
S11.37
S6.93
S6.93
S7.66
S6.93
S6.93
S11.59
S6.93
S11.04
S6.93
S9.03
S14.09
S7.95
S7.95
S6.93
S6.93

S5,145.98
S11.36
S11.94
S11.04
S13.68
S11.92
S9.84
S11.37
S13.68
S15.80
S12.52
S11.04
S11.94
S10.02


$16.43
S11.84
S11.94
S11.59
S11.04
S12.59
S11.92
S11.04
S13.68
S11.92
S11.59


$12.81
$12.17
$11.04

$13.80

$16.94

S2,492.17.
S2,292.17
S2,292.17
S2,292.17
S2,292.17

$5,775.00 $
$12.52
$15.00
$7.87

$ $2,914.60

$ $2,815.33


Hours or
Months

$12.00
S1,716.00
S1,716.00
S2,080.00
S1,716.00
S2,080.00
S1,716.00
S2,080.00
S1,716.00
S1,716.00
S2,080.00
S1,716.00
S1,716.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
S1,716.00
S1,716.00
S1,716.00
S1,716.00
S1,716.00
S2,080.00
S1,716.00
S2,080.00
S1,716.00
S1,716.00
S2,080.00
S1,716.00
S1,71,6.00
S1,716.00
S1,716.00

S12.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
$1,612.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00


$2,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
82,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00
S2,080.00

$2,080.00
$2,080.00
$2,080.00


Annual Salary FICA/Medicare


S34,506.00
S11,891.88
814,362.92
S29,515.20
S13,144.56
S22,963.20
S11,891.88
S26,998.40
S11,891.88
S11,891.88
825,708.80
S11,891.88
S13,642.20
S23,649.60
S23,649.60
S11,891.88
S11,891.88
S13,144.56
$11,891.88
S11,891.88
S24;107.20
S11,891.88
S22,963.20
S11,891.88
S1 5,495.48
S29,307.20
S13,642.20
S13,642.20
S11,891.88
S11,891.88

S61,751.76
S23,628.80
S24,835.20
S22,963.20
S28,454.40
S24,793.60
S15,862.08
S23,649.60
S28,454.40
S32,864.00
S26,041.60'
S22,963.20
S24,835.20
$20,841.60

S34,174.40
S24,627.20
S24,835.20
S24,107.20.
S22,963.20
S26,187.20
S24,793.60
$22,963:20
S28,454.40
S24,793.60
S24,107.20

$26,644.80
$25,313.60
$22,963.20


$2,080.00 $28,704.00


$2,080.00

S12.00
S12.00.
S12.00
S12.00
S12.00

$12.00
$2,080.00
$2,080.00
$1,248.00

$12.00

$12.00


$3,166.66 $12.00


$10.00

$11.94


$2,080.00

$2,080.00


$3,584.53 $12.00
$3,193.65 $12.00


$2,208.33

$ $3,042.00

$1,561.05
S1,172.69
S12.85
S1,166.67
S10.00

$8.48


$12.00

$12.00

S12.00
S12.00
S2,080.00
S12.00
S2,080.00

$1,040.00


$2,897.82 $12.00
$9.84 $2,080.00


$8.50

$12.40

$8.50


$2,080.00

$2,080.00

$2,080.00


$1,000.00 $12.00
$125.00 $12.00


$35,235.20

S29,906.04
S27,506.04
S27,506.04
S27,506.04
S27,506.04

$69,300:00
$26,041.60
$31,200.00
$9,821.76

$34,975.20

$33,783.96

$37,999.92

$20,800.00

$24,835.20

$43,014.36
$38,323.80.

$26,499.96'

$36,504.00

S18,732.60
S14,072.28
S26,728.00
S14,000.04
S20,800.00

$8,819.20

$34,773.84
$20,467.20

S 59,353.00
S 40,582.08
S 33,086.40
S 24,888.00
S 36,775.68
S $38,181.12
S $29,280.00
S $33,906.24
S 17,680.00
S 31,388.16
S 25,792.00
S 24,888.00
S 17,680.00
S 24,888.00
S $30,626.88
S 37,712.64

$12,000.00
$1,500.00


Retirement


S2,639.71
S909.73
S1,098.76
S2,257.91
S1,005.56
S1,756.68
S909.73
S2,065.38
S909.73
S909.73
S1,966.72
S909.73
S1,043.63
S1,809.19
S1,809.19
S909.73
S909.73
S1,005.56
S909.73
S909.73
S1,844.20
S909.73
S1,756.68
S909.73
81,185.40
S2,242.00
S1,043.63
S1,043.63
8909.73
5909.73

S4,724.01
S1,807.60
S 1,899.89
S 1,756.68
S 2,176.76
S 1,896.71
S 1,213.45
S 1,809.19
S 2,176.76
S 2,514.10
S 1,992.18,
S 1,756.68
S 1,899.89
S 1,594.38

S2,614.34
S1,883.98
S1,899.89
81,844.20
S1,756.68
. S2,003.32
81,896.71
S1,756.68
S 2,176.76,
SS 1,896.71
S 1,844.20

$ 2,038.33
$1,936.49
$1,756.68

$ 2,195.86

$2,695.49
S2,287.81
S 2,104.21
S 2,104.21
S 2,104.21
S 2,104.21

$5,301.45
$1,992.18
$2,386.80
$751.36

$ 2,675.60 $

$ 2,584.47 $

$ 2,906.99 $

$1,591.20 $

$1,899.89 $

$ 3,290.60 $
$2,931.77 $

$ 2,027.25 $
$ 2,792.56 $

S 1,433.04 S
S 1,076.53 S
S 2,044.69 S
S 1,071.00 S
,S 1,591.20 S

$674.67

$ 2,660.20
$1,565.74

S 4,540.50
S 3,104.53
S 2,531.11
S 1,903.93
S 2,813.34
S 2,920.86
S 2,239.92
S 2,593.83
S 1,352.52
S 2,401.19
S 1,973.09
S 1,903.93


S 1,352.52
S 1,903.93
S 2,342.96
S 2,885.02

$918.00
$114.75


Health


S3,398.84
S1,171.35
S1,414.75
S2,907.25
S1,294.74
S2,261.88
S1,171.35
S2,659.34
S1,171.35
S1,171.35
S2,532.32
S1,171.35
S1,343.76
S2,329.49
S2,329.49
S1,171.35,
S1,171.35
S1,294.74
S1,171.35
S1,171.35
S2,374.56
S1,171.35
S2,261.88
S1,171.35
S1,526.30
S2,886.76
S1,343.76
S1,343.76
S1,171.35
S1,171.35

S 6,737.12
S 2,327.44
S 2,446.27
S 2,261.88
S 2,802.76
S 2,442.17
- 1,562.41
S 2,329.49
S 2,802.76
S 3,237.10
S 2,565.10
S 2,261.88
S 2,446.27
S 2,052.90

$ 3,728.43
S 2,425.78
S 2,446.27
S 2,374.56
S 2,261.88
S 2,579.44
S 2,442.17
S 2,261:88
S 2,802.76
S 2,442.17
S 2,374.56

$ 2,624.51
$ 2,493.39
$ 2,261.88

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1 OA The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



CHURCH


Friday, August 17, 2007


Happenings At
By Nell Dobbs
"It's no bother for my Father" some of the words.
from "I'll Talk to My Father for You" sung by Thel-
ma DeHart in morning service. How touching! How
comforting! As I've thought about it, I've been con-
victed of the times I've said to the children and oth-
ers, "Don't bother me. I'm busy" Then, we also say,
"It's no bother. I don't mind being bothered." I could-
n't find the word in the concordance, but I had hoped
to.
What a huge beautiful bouquet of delicate pink
roses provided by Edwin and Faye Browning in lov-
ing memory of Marilyn Browning Chutz, daughter
of Louise Browning and sister of Edwin Browning,
Jr., James Browning and Dorothy B. Brown. We pray
earnestly for all their families and give thanks for
their love of the Lord and their work in His king-
dom and community in the past and down to this
present day 1
The Pastor Search Committee continues to meet
weekly Sunday at 9 aim. Judy Phillips reported to us
what has been done, what is being done and what yet
must be done. In keeping with all that Dr. Bob
Mounts, Director Pastor/Church Staff Relations
Dept., Florida Baptist Convention, will be'our guest
speaker this Sunday, August 19, since his primary
responsibility is to assist churches in seeking new
staff members.
Preacher asked Jack McLeod to introduce their
great-grandson, Sean Culver McLeod, growing so
fast.
Preacher is concerned about many things all the
while, being confident that "surely goodness and
mercy shall follow us all the days of our lives." He


Madison First Baptist Church


read from Galatians about the Fruits of the Spirit -
all the wonderful good fruit.
A bit of humor: Billy Washington gave a fitting
offertory prayer after saying Sheriff Joe Peavy had
called him looking for a fellow "tall and good-look-
ing like him, and of course, I fit the bill." We all
laughed. Then, after church someone said that what
Billy lacked in height, he made up for in charm.
Chancel Choir sang, "In Christ Alone." Preach-
er's message continued about Peter and his failing
Jesus three times by denying Him. Jesus' look con-
victed him of his wrongs. There's something about
eyes. Marjell said of his grandmother, who was old,
.that she would grab him by his overalls and say,
"Look me in the eye, Mister." He had no buttons left.
Very good shower for Ashley Smith Sunday af-
ternoon.
School starts Monday, August 20, and we pray for
everybody involved, that all students will grow in
wisdom and in stature and in favor with God and
men and be safe.,
Talking about blessings? Talk about being late!
Appreciated Jessica Higginbotham's write-up about
Mrs. Eloise Stewart. Frances had brought us the
book, Women of the Harvest: Inspiring Stories of
Contemporary Farmers by Holly Ballinger and
Cathy Phillips one day in June and I had a write-up
for my article, which I failed to turn in. Mrs. Stew-
art is one of the women arid three of us who know
her know she is one great loving outstanding
women! How Frances and Bennie Rose are likewise
great! In the book, it says it takes 25 years for yellow
pine to be ready for lumber. It takes a certain pa-
tience to appreciate the beauty The regeneration.


The regeneration of Mrs. Stewart's family reveals
itself in the cycle of trees. Seeds fall on the soft for-
est floor, get nurtured by the surrounding trees, put
-down roots, grow straight, grow tall, reach for the
sun. We can change that to her family reaching for
the Son. Preacher used that as the Circle of Encour-
agement or Cycle of Encouragement, reaching for
the Son.
Special prayers for WC. Copeland.
In The Florida Retirement System Newsletter in
July, reports there were 72 benefit payment recipi-
ents over 100. Fifty-eight live in Florida. The oldest
one is 108. To be 100 is something else! Happy
blessed 101st to Sue Raines on the 23rd. What a real-
ly great person she has always been and is still. She
is so blessed in having loving tenderhearted care-
takers her Bill and Pat.
Hettie and Gordon Selman have been so blessed
to have Don at home and Martha, who came two
weeks to be with them and now they continue being
blessed by caretaker Sue Downing and Hospice.
They expressed thanks for every expression of care.
Prayers for all our many, many ill ones and for
our brother-in-law Wayne Rehberg's uncle and aunt
who both fell Friday, while moving and are bad hurt.
They live in Thomasville, Ga.
Prayers of comfort for all of Joe!Crafton's fami-
ly His mother, Alice Pearl. is the one I know best and
is a special school friend. Prayers for all the other
sad ones.
We pray comfort for Catherine Hodges in the
loss of/ her Colonel. He was taken back to Alabama.
May the Lord continue working on us working
with us until He calls us Home. Amen and Amen!


Blessed [is] the man that walkelh.4)iWT i.Wfft counsel of the angodly, nor standeth in the, way of ,iDrFers. nor sitteth in the s~eabf the scowifid. Bfthis
delight [is] in the law of the Lord: and in his law doth he meditate day and night. And he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water, that
bringeth forth his fruit in his season; his leaf also shall not wither: and whatsoever hlie doeth shall prosper. -Psahns 1:1-3














Madison Church of God Hanson United Methodist Church Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church
S. 290NE D.. Su,.r-*H:.,,rin. FL .1 M.arnm Luther Kirn Dre.c Madis,.n. FL
1 NE Colhin KeUl Hw Madoin. FL 77 5 nule from Mldi....,-, H, 14-1. iur, ,i.li .., D..n.. i P.O. Bo MIdison. FL
,H.;,145. [utL.,,, .0.,,'I P.O. BoK '42 Nbdior. FL
u 73.6107 Rev. Doyle Glais. PaRre,, i. m P, 850-973-3 127
Sunda School 10:00 .m. Sunday School 111:00 a.m. Ernuld. shilirfnmadimnaIahool colir
Morning Worshi 1100 am Miorning %Horship 11:15 a.m. Marcui Hawkins. Sr. Pastor Josie Graham .Aviistant Pastor
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Sunday Evening Bible Study 6:00 p.m. Sunday School...........9:30 a.m.
Evening Worshi 6:1 p.m. -Choir Pracrice Sunda\ Eiening `:00 p.m. ._. V-sh a.m.
11ednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Wednesday Evening Praer Service...............7:00 p.m. Worship Service....... 1:00 am.
All Are Welcome. Please Comel Wednesday Night Bible Stud......6:00 p.m.
Barbara M memorial Church Ih \ alk Byfaith.Not By Sight.
SIICoriuhiias .5:7
Of The Nazarene
dHighs y Cu254fo50 734o Greemille Baptist Church Grace Presbyterian Church
N Ro C Ke A d FL 1365 Sn \ MNUj Sti r.-r, 1. -I [ ur.- h .., l. \Conc.reg.nni o. [he Preb,ierjan Church n. F L-n .
Sunday, School 10:00 a.m. R e\ J.t adlaHa'
Sunda School 10:00 a.m. Sunday School -All Ages 10:01) a.m. Re\ J- P n Horpw o i
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. Sunday Morning W\orvhip 11:0.1 a.m. tS\ NeiUi \Nashingion Ave Nladison. FL 73. 21hQ
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m. Sunday Evening Inrship 7:00 p.m. Sunday) School For All Ages.....................9:45 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Sday Pre-school.Studnand Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Adults Choir Rehearsals .:30 p.m. WVed. Fellowship Supper/Bible Study........6:00 p.m.
Reapers Of The Harvest Church WdndarP u-hoo chdun Y h. o us Ist 12th Grades................-30 pm.
Youth & Adult Bible Siudici 7:.111 p.m. Choir Practice 7:30 pim.
Snule. w of Grenville. FL Hwy. 0 -ll i- Friday Men's Prayer Breakfast.................7:00 a.m.
Ss'iijui Bass, St. -Paso, CCome it) \bli iipAnd Serte Itil L '
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship U1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Lee United M methodist Church r urch
Wednesday Night Service 7:30 p.m. Hy' 2S S I Le. FL .150--.5 M t. Zion A.M .E. Church
O h/ i the' iitd f Peni'coit 'I' /a nii"y coice Richard QuaL.kenbu-i. P.iltr 4 "A Friendi Churi
i.'' Id S ll O .LAa.'di in i'nt plc e." A..- 2 1i Morning RVorship 9:01 a.m. Cherry Lake, FL -50.0-2.-355
SEVERYON IS ALWAYS WELCOME! Sunday School 10:00a.mi Rcl Robi ../,.. M ,
.."W L Morning Worship............. 11:00 a.m. ..er anv B. Harncrt. 1iuiimii *i i,
Sunday Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
St. Vincent DePaul Roman Men's Fellowship Breakfast Church School 9:45 a in.
Second Sunday 8:00 a.m. Worship Service 11:00 a.m.
.. Catholic Church iMul iple ier/J, Bib :leSdn/ALc ies Wed. Night Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
SL.i ni Tle Ci..umnrnr Wilith Ci f ,
MLecting & Sumter Si 8S50-973-242 1S
R,. Ji-.: n .1 ,mlGa lo 0.11/
Moundaues..ed Mass :3.m. First United M methodist Church Fellowship Baptist Church
Thursday lMass 7:30 an.m. Si.ce I. H -orn ai Rutledge SL. r50-973-6295 One nie norfh o fM.adison ..r. I-4 a
SSaturday Mass 10:30 p.m. .:i. 0bp. L L.ii, r.eL 'I, Hu'ge. PAi7 I
I hi, S.J., '. .,'il, Pr I ,.. ,f. ., i.,' ,.,,;. L ,0)r Gj-1,,. Altic. D c.-rot Jacl.ic u r a i, ...,, P,,i
a'ini'h & Childrcn Ninitirisu 5cr \ic 1i41 .li1
St. M army's Episcopal Church Sunda) School 9-45a .m. Morn hi ....... .m. 1
Morning. MorshipO....................8.30 a & 11:00 a.m.
Elii NiE Ar, Nh.i 1.--. II I 0-)7 ,833S Sunday Morning Morship 11:01. a.m. Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
iA, i i ,, P *a, \ ,itP, i i 7.,. 11,./ Sn lSo p.w otr/t Wednesday All Youth Igrades 6-8....... 5:00-6:00 p.m. Weduesda.t Family Night................Call for schedule
Sunday% Church School 10:00 a.m. Youth (grades 9-12) 6:30-7:30 p.mn. .1 Rlmnl.% of lionl, o Cn'ci oI,. I.. 1 r
Sunday l-lol' Eucharist 10:00a.m. Men's Fellowship Breakfast (3rd Sun.)........8:(1 a.m. I iii .1. l 5 a-. /i ,. ill .' ''' :
Mission Board 2nd Sunda u 11:00 a.m. Women's Meeting & Lunch (1st Mon.i....12:00 noon r,.,..,i. n. iu,,.,. .. ... a... ,:
Episcopal. .hi d .. .. : 0 ,i i i 11
t';'~~ ~~~~~ I',.'ii.. hi,/n inlt C,_ll^l~~ 11'tt Ch /i.t 'n '


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12A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



OUTDOORS


Friday, August 17, 2007


FWC Passes New Captive Wildlife Rules And Others


The Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission (FWC) passed a
new rule concerning FWC-managed
lands and approved a draft rule outlining
bonding requirements for exhibiting po-
tentially dangerous animals and ven-
omous reptiles. Final public hearings for
the draft rule will be at the September
Commission meeting. The FWC took the
action during its two-day meeting at Mel-
bourne.
Commissioners also approved mem-
bers of a panel to evaluate a petition to
change the listing status of the peregrine
falcon during 2007-08.
Following an overview of the imper-
iled species management plan process,
Commissioners reviewed drafts of man-
agement plans for manatees, gopher tor-
toises and Panama City crayfish.
Final consideration of the manage-
ment plans for the manatee and gopher
tortoise will take place at the FWC's Sep-
tember meeting in St. Petersburg. Final
consideration for the Panama City cray-
fish will take place at the Commission's
February meeting: in Panama City.
Commissioners also approved an in-
terim policy to end entombment of go-


pher tortoises requiring developers to
relocate them, rather than allow the ani-
mals to be buried in their burrows amid
development. The interim policy will re-
main in effect until the FWC can launch.
the new permitting framework,
proposed in the draft gophert
tortoise management plan.
FWC staff presented .
an array of proposed
changes to the Alligator
Management diProg ram.
Commissioners directed
the staff to proceed with
developing rules to
change some of the allow-
able methods of taking alli-
gators and to step up efforts
to make Floridians more
aware of ways to coexist with alli-
gators peacefully.
In addition, Commissioners ap-
proved land-acquisition proposals in-
cluding the Nature Conservancy's David-
son Ranch parcel as a mitigation park,
the Nature Conservancy's donation of
the Janet Butterfield Brooks Preserve as
a mitigation park and two donated Na-
ture Conservancy parcels as additions to


Chinsegut Wildlife and Environmental .
Area.
Concerning marine issues, the FWC
approved rule amendments for snook
that lower the daily recreational bag lim-
it from two fish to one on Florida's
a Atlantic Coast and narrow the
AC current 27-34 inches total
length snook slot limit to 28-
32 inches in Atlantic waters
and 28-33 inches in Gulf,
Everglades- National Park
and Monroe County wa-
Sters.

add the first half of Decem-
ber and all of February to
the closed harvest season.in
Gulf. Everglades and Monroe
County waters and allow snook an-
glers statewide to carry more than one
cast net aboard a vessel. The new snook
rules will be in place in time for the re-
opening of snook season in September.
Commissioners also discussed pro-
posed new rules that would allow li-
censed trap fishers to designate people to
recover and possess their traps when the
governor and FWC declare an emergency'


The proposed rules also would ex-
empt local, state and federal officials
from having to get FWC approval before
removing traps, derelict traps and trap
debris from areas where trapping is pro-
hibited.
In addition, the Commission pro-
posed a rule amendment that would al-
low recreational fishers to use fold-up
blue crab traps with square sides. A final
public hearing on all of these proposed
rules will be scheduled for the September
Commission meeting.
In other marine fisheries action,
Commissioners directed staff to contin-
ue to work with stakeholders and develop
a full range of management options for
the Atlantic and Gulf coasts that work to-
ward achieving a 40-percent escapement
goal for red drum.
The FWC also heard an update on is-
sues and proposed rules for spiny lobster
and discussed federal fisheries manage-
ment issues.
The meeting agenda is available on-
line at MvFWC.com/commission-
/2007/JunO7/index.html.
The next FWC meeting is set for Sept.
12-14 in St. Petersburg.


FWC Publishes Boating Accident Stats


Reports of dead fish,
ranging from a few indi-
viduals to thousands, have
prompted dozens of calls
per week to the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission (FWC)
this summer.
Apprehensive callers
to the FWC's Fish Kill Hot-
line worry something
must be. terribly wrong;
others just want to know
the causes.
Fortunately, the mech-
anism at the: root of most
summertime fish kills in
freshwater lakes, man-
made retention ponds and


brackish estuaries is well
understood by scientists.'
Ironically, a lack of
sunshine in the Sunshine
State is where problems
begin. The process starts
with overcast skies, hot
summer days and rainy
weather. Low water lev-
els, brought on by
drought, add to the mix.
Most of the oxygen
fish breathe is created
when waterborne micro-
scopic plants use sunlight
to produce and add dis-
solved oxygen to the wa-
ter a process known as
photosynthesis. But


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when overcast skies per-
sist for several days. there
is. often not enough sun-
light to power the oxygen-
making process that sup-
ports fish life.
Heavy rain and wind
from thunderstorms adds
. to the problem by stirring
up bottom sediments that
mix with good quality wa-
ter near the surface, com-
pounding the problem.
Rainwater runoff can
also wash large amounts
of decaying plant and an-:
imal material into the
water body In the decay
process, bacteria use dis-
solved oxygen in the wa-
ter to break down plant
and animal matter, fur-
ther lowering oxygen lev-
els.
"If these conditions
persist, and dissolved
oxygen levels drop for ex-
tended periods; fish suffo-
cate," said Gary Byerley,
FWC freshwater fisheries
biologist.
In short, during ex-
tended summer periods of
overcast, rainy or cloudy
weather, the biological
system uses dissolved
oxygen faster than it can
produce it. : Stormy
weather aggravates the
situation by creating and'
intensifying all the condi-
tions that lower dissolved
oxygen levels in the wa-
ter.
The good news is that
most water bodies don't
suffer repeat perfor-
mances every year. In'
fact, most water bodies go
years without suffering a
major/fish kill. Fish popu-
lations usually replenish
themselves naturally
from surviving fish.
There are times however,
when the severity of the


-











i .





kill requires restocking.
. "In spite of summer
fish kills, most Florida
lakes are in relatively
healthy shape and fish
populations remain. sta-
ble. Angling success gen-
erally is not affected over
the long haul, even after
events that might appear
serious to the untrained
eye," said Byerley
Still, it's important for
biologists like Byerley to
keep track of the location
and extent of fish kills in
natural lakes and estuar-
ies to see if there are seri-
ous problems developing
in an ecosystem that
might require investiga-.
tion or restorative mea-
sures.
Floridians can report
fish kills in natural water
bodies to the FWC's Fish
Kill Hotline at 1-800-636-
0511, the FWC's Lake City
office at (386) 758-0525 or on-
line at http://MvFWC.com
by, clicking on "Contact
FWC." It is not necessary
to report fish kills in man-
made retention or private
pond.


Florida's boating acci-
dent rate (671) for 2006 was
second only to California's,
757. Florida led the nation
with 69 fatalities, com-
pared to 47 for Texas and.
44 for California.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) 'said
the high numbers reflect
the reality that Floridians
own more than 1. million,
registered recreational
vessels, and they use them
throughout the year.
All but eight of the fa-
talities were the result of
drowning, and- none of the
'drowning victimsR, were.
wearing life jackets:
The most likely county
for boaters to be in an acci-
dent was Monroe, followed
. in order by Palm Beach,
Miami-Dade, Pinellas, Lee,
Broward, Collier, Brevard,
Escambia and Duval.
The most likely month
for the accident to happen
was July The most likely
time of day to be in an ac-
cident was 4-6 p.m., and


the most common type of
accident was a collision
with another vessel or a
fixed object.
Accidents occur most
frequently on rivers or
creeks, but .the number of
accidents on the ocean or
gulf or in a bay or sound
are almost as high. Nearly
600 of the state's accidents
occurred while the vessel
was cruising, and more
than 400 of them occurred
when the operator was not
trying to change direction
whild cruising. Small ves-
sels, especially those un-
der 18 feet long, were the
most likely.
to be involved in acci-
dents.
A typical accident in-
volved a privately owned
vessel, operated carelessly
or without a. lookout, with
the operator being a male
at least 22 years old most
likely 36-50 years old.
The 85-page report on
2006 boating accidents in
Florida is available online at
MvFWC.com/la w/boa tin.


& Sons Painting, Inc.
W Family Owned & Operated
COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL
LICENSED & INSURED
Interior/Exterior Caulking
Waterproofing Pressure Cleaning
Spray Painting Faux Finishes \
Wood Repair Fence Painting* J
Deck Rest. Roof Painting
Jerry Borgert
P.O. Box 329 Madison, FL
jb-painting@eartlink.net
850-929-9925
^.-/ ..,-- .


U


The Enterprise-Recorder


NORTH AMERICA
Madison Bottling Plant







'I


.r.Lorida Fish Kills Common During Summer,

But Need To Be Reported


__.


a








Friday, August 17, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A


'PUmP &eIRRIGATION'
6 a 1 1 Sales & Service
"Four Generations of Experience"


904 NW Suwannee Ave.
Branford, FL
LIe# 2630,


Law(

Monica




125 NE Range Ave
Madison, FL 32340
TaiblLaw@aol.com


Offices of

Taibli


P.L.


Phone: 850.973.1477
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that
should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before
you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written
information about their qualifications and experience.


Hall S
Tire & Muffler Center
1064 E. US 90 Madison, Florida
-Beside Clover Farm-
Owners:
~ Daryl &
u850-973-3026 Lee Anne Hall

Buniette Plumbing &
Wel l Service
Family Owned Since 1902


Plumbing Repairs
Fixtures-Faucets
Sewer & Water Connections
Water Heater Repairs


125 SW Shelby Ave.
Madison, FL 32340
Lic.# RF 0058445


Drilling
&
Repairs


Wells Drilled
* Pumps Replaced
Tanks Replaced
All Repairs

Carlton Burnette
Master Plumber
850-973-1404


Peacock's
Landscaping & Sprinkler Systems
Residential & Commercial
iL Landscape Drsign & Installation* Site-prep. *Sodding
,t'ding Irrigation Lawn Shrub Gravel Driveways *Drip
r. ... Glenn & Margie Peacock
850.973.2848


jT ~Metal Roofing
$ $ $$,$ SAVE $ $ $ $ $
Buy Direct From Manufacturer
Several Profiles to Choose From Over 20 Colors In Stock
with 40 Year Warranties
Call for Brochures & Installation Guides
Toll Free
1-888-393-0335
www.gulfcoastsupply.com


"Good Water Means Good Health"
Shea's Well & Pump
Everett's
Well Drilling & Irrigation Wells
Residential & Irrigation Wells Deep Wells 4" to 8"
Sales Service
Serving The Georgia & Florida Area For Over 30 Years.
Old Quitman-Madison Road Quitman, GA
(229) 263-4192
FLLic#2153 GA Lic#253


PROFESSIONAL ROOFING
Roof Inspections, New Roofs,
Re-Roofs & Repair Specialist.
CCC#1325926
Folsom Constructing, LLC

850-566-6504
We Accept All Credit Cards


N--



24/7 Claim Service:
1-866-275.7322
"Helping You
Is What We Do Best.".


Serving Madison, Jefferson,
Taylor & Lafayette Counties


Auto, Life, Health, Home
Freddy Pitts; Agency.Manager
Jimmy King, Agent ,
233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071.
Doug Helms, Agent
105 W. Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-2213
Freddy Pitts
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371
Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL (386) 294-1399


HUGH'S LAWN CARE
and TREE SERVICE, LLC
Hugh Sherrod
238 NE Brickyard Pond Ave. Madison, Florida
Business: 850.445-3321 Home: 850-973-6601 email: hughsl@earthlink.net
Lawn Mowing Hurricane
Edging cifOT Hurricane
Weed Eating l l Bad Weather
Tree Trimming IS(l.i "S Clean Up
Bush Hogging Roads Before & After
Game Feed Plots The Storms
Watered & Maintained h s t
We accept ATM & Debit Cards


LAfordable Quality"



Family Owned & Operated
Commercial Residential


We WOrK From
Start to Finishi
"No Bull"


Free 386-497-1419 Lwwenedonded
Estimates io.n aco067442 Insured *WorkrsComp


Get Your Business Namne &

Services Out ThIere!
Place Your Business Card In Our Weekly
Business Card Directory.

850-973-4141


Mike's Pump ingRepair
And Well Drilling, Inc.
610 Industrial Ave. 179 E. Base St. Suite A
Live Oak, FL Madison, FL
386-364-5360 850-973-8877
24 HR. SERVICE
EMERGENCY #
(386) 590-0888


Owner:
Mike Harris
34 Yrs.
Experience
Lic# 2610
Est. 1983


I


n


(850) 973-6326
PAUL KINSLEY
OWNER I









Friday, August 17, 2007


14A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


GA 4F ~r~~f~i # tUU ir-Vli '[-4fi~i


* U B -I


1DADLN FRCASS IFdIED 80 7-1133 EVEY MIDAY


Free kittens, many colors to
choose from. 850-948-5482

PUPPIES
Mix breed pupies, really cute!
Will be medium size dogs. $25
adoption fee. 850-948-5482


I 973 -1 29 I Doberman Mix Puppies
_850-929-2487 or
850-464-9230


Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Irrigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
(850) 973-2848

Kids World Day Care and Pre -
School is taking enrollment appli-
cations for VPK and Infant/Toddler
care. Please call or come by the
center for more information. (850)
973-2977.

Excavating Work
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Re-
moval, Demolition, and Roads. No
Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call
Paul Kinsley at 850-973-6326
Home Care for Seniors
Will assist with activities of daily
living, NFCC Patient Care Techni-
cian Certificate. CPR & CNA Cer-
tified Available now. Call Beverly
at 850-973-2264

Hair and Nail Services provid-
ed for all who are homebound.
For more information call 850-
673-9209. LIC#CLl1180971


Chiropractic
& Clinical Nutrition
Carl D. Bartholomew, DC, MD
235 SW Dade St, Madison
By Appointment
850-673-8338





AUCTION
NO AUCTION
AUGUST 18th
OUR NEXT AUCTION WILL BE
AUGUST 25th. -
1693 SW MOSELEY HALL RD
850 973 2959
Mastercard Visa and debit cards
NEW TRUCKLOADS ARRIV-
ING WEEKLY AU691-Col.Ron
'Cox AB2490





25 lbs. of
Clean
Newspapers
just $2
a bundle
973-4141


Gentle Bull For Sale
8 months old and of good stock. He
is well fed and has gentle temper-
ment. Must see to appreciate.$500
firm. Call 850-948-5097


Oh Boy! Another shipment of
Beautiful Koi! Shubunkins
and Sarassas too!
Free samples Blackwater Creek
Koi and Goldfish Color Food
Creatures Featured Pet Shop
850-973-3488





Country home for rent.
5bed/2bath, privacy fenced back-
yard, carport. NO CATS NO
DOGS. $550 per month plus utili-
ties, $550 deposit. Call 973-8377
Garage Apartment $750
Country lovers preferred, No
Smoking, No Pets, 2/1, in-
cludes utilities.
All Realty Services
850-973-9990

Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Senior's
and Disabled. 1 & 2 bedrooms,
HUD vouchers accepted Call 850-.
973-3786 TTY Acs 711.
Equal Housing Opportunity,

For Rent- 2 bed/1 bath with
utilities in Greenville. Big Yard.
$400/month. Call 850-584-6699


/ Couthe m Villasof

C adison Capartments

Rental assistance may be available.
HUD vouchers accepted. 1, 2, & 3
BR HC & non-HC accessible apts.
Call '850-973-8582, TDD/TTY
711. 315 SW Lawson Circle, Madi-
son, FL 32340. Equal Housing Op-
portunity
Weekly Rental Available in
SLee. $135/wk. all utilities in-
cluded. (850) 673-9564 or (850)
973-4606

Restaurant $750 per month,
fully functional, ready to go, for
rent, sale or lease, on US 90
"The Main Drag" downtown
Greenville.
All Realty Services
850-973-9990


reenville Pointe

Apartments

1, 2,& 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible apts. Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers accepted.
Call 850-948-3036. TDD/TTY
711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal
Housing Opportunity

2 bedroom 1 bath mobile
homes in park, 135/week, own-
er pays electric, $300 deposit,
call Erin at 850-570-0459


For Rent 3 bedroom/2 bath in
Lee. 1 bedroom/lbath in Madi-
son. HUD recipient welcome.
(850) 673-9564 or (850) 973-
4606

For Rent- Room in double
wide mobile home in country.
Mature adult, professional, over
30. Non-smoker, $300 monthly.
386-658-2434


Deadline For Classified Advertising
Is At 3:30 p.m. On
The Monday Of The Week
You Want Your Ad To Run.


$ AVON $
Start Today. Earn 50%
on your very first order.
Start-Up Kit Only $10.
Call ISR Dorothy
850-973-3153


Great Opportunity
RN House Supervisor,
7P 7A
Great Schedule and Benefits
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Please Contact
Amelia Tompkins/DON at
386-362-7860

LPN or RN needed
7P 7A
WITH BENEFITS!!!
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Please Contact Angela Akins or
Amelia Tompkins at
386-362-7860


FREE prep classes
M-TH: 9am-12:30pm @ NFCC
*Tues: 5-9pm@ NFCC
T/TH: 6-9pm @ Madison Rec. Cnfr.
I [as,' mmsaat' jj ltt Wl


A Whole Lot Of Band For Your Buck!!!
Classified Ads Are $12 For 196 characters
(including spaces). Your Ad Will Be Published
In Both The Madison County Carrier And The
Enterprise Recorder As Well As Being Placed
On The World Wide Web!


mpr Ia


The Jefferson County Road De-
partment is accepting applications
for a full timeTire repair/Equipment
PM Specialist. Candidate must
have a high school education or
equivalent, possess a CDL-B or bet-
ter, 2 5 years experience in the
fields of mechanics, heavy equip-
ment tire repair, or equipment pre-
ventative maintenance. Duties will
include greasing equipment, fuel-
ing, field tire repair, assisting me-
chanics when needed. Candidates
must submit a county application,
resume, references, and a copy of
their current driving record from
DMV. Salary range is $9.79 to
$14.68. Deadline for applications
is Sept. 28, 2007. Call 850-997-
2036 for further information.


LPN or RN Needed
7A 7P
With Benefits
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Contact Angela Akins or Amelia
Tompkins at 386-362-7860 -


Case Manager is needed to work
with at risk youths and their fami-
lies implanting evidence based
model program Functional Family-
Therapy. BA required. 386-755-
1172.fax 386-755-1486


i^-sT^S^^


Commercial/Industrial
with state highway frontage-23
acres, Comer lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Drive and High-
way 53 South. Natural gas line,
8 inch water main, access to city
utilities, fire hydrant, and ser-
vice from two power companies.
Property has easy access to I-10,
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will build to
suit tenant.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141


Pioneer
Excavating & Tractor
Services
We now have
Fill Dirt and Top Soil
No Job Too Small
Free Estimates
.Call Paul Kinsley
850-973-6326

$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385





LAND FOR SALE
1 acre wooded on county
road less than 1/4 *, 0o

FtrT"omnp, year
'round fun. $15,500. cash
discount.
5.76 acres short drive ,to
Cherry Lake, nice wooded
homesite with old well.
$37,500
32 acre mini plantation
high on hill, great views,
mature timber, located 5
minutes NE of downtown
Madison, call for details)
Also many' Monticello,
Florida area properties!

Omega Management
(S. Rissmnan, Realtor)
Monticello (850) 997-5619
or 997-5618 after hours
FOR SALE BY OWNER 1800 sq.
ft. 3 BR, 2 BA, Brick Veneer home
located on one block in Greenville,
Florida. Remodeled Kitchen with
full appliances. Cultured Marble
Whirlpool Tub and shower; Large
den w/Fire place. Tiled Patio;
20x28' detatched garage. Just two
miles to I-10. Reason for selling
built new home. Best value in
North FL at $139,000. Phone 800-
284-1725 Day, 850-997-4456 Nite,
850-545-9292 Cell. Brokers Pro-
tected.
LOG HOMES
With as little as
$500.00 Down
Prestige Home Center
Lake City, Florida
1-800-355-9385





2004 Fleetwood mobile home 4
hbr 2' bath around 1500 sq ft.
must be relocated asking
$51,500. 850.973.6276

3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$40,495.00
Factory Direct
Prestige Home Center
352-752-7751

$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City .Florida
1-800-355-9385


A place

to call

your ov

Airplane Lovers! 5 acres with
two homes, borders taxi-way
along 6.000 ft. grass airstrip.
Ask for Bruce Mitchell.
Majestic Oaks- Twisted &
gnarled, designed fantastically
by nature, paved road, old
cracker home farmnnstead. bring
your tool belt for the tobacco
barn and corn crib or maybe a
match depending on whether??
Ask for Teresa Stalvey.
Hidey Hoe-Getaway- Little
cabin plus large home with ad-
ditions, three bay barn, work-
shop, screened cook shed,
gardens. fenced, corner lot,
paved road $149.000. Ask for
Willard Keen.
Cottage near Lake Ella-
ARTSY side of town near Tal-
lahassee Governors Mansion in
3BD/IBA, fenced back yard,
pristine oak floors, must inquire
about the handwritten poetry on
kitchen cabinetry, $179,900
Ask for Bruce DuPuis.
Executive Suite- Brick, 3/2. all
amenities. fireplace, rec. room.
porches, workshop., spa.
stocked pond. E-Z access to 1-
10, plenty of room to roam,
$325,000. Ask for Lynette Sir-
mon
Just how many acres do yon
need? 5, 10. 15. 20? Ask about
the parcels on paved roads, be-
tween Madisun and Valdosia
and between Madison and
Monticello, wildlife, hilltop
home sites, water features.
hills, pasture, trees. just ask
from $6,995 per acre. Ask for
Lvnette C. Sirmon.
Cottage Like New- 4/2. OLDIE
BUT GOODIE, absolutely all
new everything, fresh and
clean, food prep island in
kitchen, 3 ft. wide door ways
throughout, five city lots, all
fenced in rear. $142,000 Ask
for Willard Keen.
Hunting Land- Timber, creeks.
streams, oak hammocks,


I


!u~.


-' .'
s.h I d
turkeys hog, deer, quaidove.
You name it, this parcel has it.
Paved road joins plantation.
$5,995 per acre. Ask for Jack
Richards.
Workshop/OfficelWarehouse-
5 acre Pecan Orchard on paved
road. well, septic, power,
homesite. $115.000. Ask for
Bruce Mitchell.
Fully Functional Restaurant-
Ready to go, please inquire
about easy start up for rent,
lease or sale. Ask for Jack
Richards.
Small Yard- Easy maintenance,
3BD/2BA DW. great room,
garden tub, shower, not real
fancy. but all the basics,
$69,900. Ask for Bruce
DuPuis.
Withlacoochee River- One full
acre, breath-taking riverscape
and perfect fishing banks, not
far from bridge, just off the
beaten path. all wooded, turkey
and deer haven, $44,900. Ask
for Teresa Stalvey.
Rolling Hills Pasture- Just
south of Pinetta, 21.33 acres
borders paved road, 95% per-
manent pasture with umbrella
oaks doting the landscape,
would you let us show you this
parcel from the hilltop at sun-
set ? Can you imagine star gaz-
ing? Seller motivated. Ask for
Teresa Stalvey.
Gated Community- Private
40 acre, just off SR 221
South, site built homes only,
mixture of pines & oaks with
a diversity of cypress & gum,
partially cleared $5,995 per
acre Ask for Teresa Stalvey.
Waterfront Fun- Very steep
banks, fossil divers will have
no competition, wide section
of river just South of "S"
curve, white sandy shoals and
gentle rapids. South of Blue
Springs and public boat ramp,
$55.000. Ask for Willard
Keen.


ALL REALTY SERVICES
A Lynette Sirmon, Realtor
Big BOe-Moric 850-973-9990


-


www~greenepublishing.com


EI#AIPLOY

.NIDu ,


M


. -- T--A-A


mmmmmmmiw


INSURANCE
SS -ERVICES, INC.

Personal Lines Insurance Account Manager
D O ye l I. I -"- r I._' -.il I U.c' 1 I-u llj. ...':- ,:r> |. c r,:ln'.-". i L. L .k r'l t.
expar..,'-.'i [r.inn1 . In1P iiur.ncir knr.k lc.L..e 1.\ I- er n .111 in'|fnIn
for \'si0 s~,'m r, ri-n.e ,r RM I lc r pr'terrdi. .r ire n i. c se
will 1. r- ur':-dJ Musr l'tc ..,imputcr liter.irre au n t .vir .. .nrli Office
produ.r I' ll L,crtitit pI lckli : n-..ludir a, i inccit ,r ir,-nnis'ioC'n
progr- n'i r nii. ,rir a i 401i k. (.'"if'.' on *" m m n ..lrnu 'A hll
ce nn. r't -.e94.
E-n ...,'. i. r*hudy fmbirnutrance._.O] .r F., 1 *8. y ,9 2



I PERRY FLEA MARKET"
'A nAntiques Glassware Collectibles* Gifts & More
Yard Sale Visit the Tool Shop FRI. SUN 10 A.M. 4 P.M. We Buy
Se-ups$ 5 & up Hwy. 19 S. (Od Motel)(8) 838-1422* (50s847124Call Us












Friday, August 17, 2007


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 15A


AV


CALL FOR BIDS

Made by Peter R. Brown Construction, Inc. (CG-C036285), The Construction Manag-
er for North Florida Community College Building 5 and 6 Remodeling, Madison, FL

Bid Packages:

02A Selective Demolition
03A Concrete
05A Metal Fabrications
06A General Trades
06B Architectural Woodwork
07A Retrofit Roof System
08A Glass & Glazing
09A Framing & Drywall
09B Floor Covering & Tile
09C Acoustical
09D Painting
15A Plumbing
15B HVAC
16A Electrical

PREQUALIFICATION: All Bidders must be pre-qualified at the time of bid opening
in accordance with the bid package. Sealed bids will be received on: September 13,
2007 at 2:00 p.m.

PLANS & DEPOSIT: Bid documents will be available after August 15, 2007 from Pe-
ter R. Brown Construction, Inc. The bid documents maybe reviewed at the office of
Peter R. Brown Construction Inc., 1424 Piedmont Drive East, Tallahassee, FL 32308.
For information about obtaining bid documents call the Construction Manager at 850-
668-4498 or fax request to 850-668-6790.

DATE AND TIME: September 13, 2007 at 2:00 p.m. at Peter R. Brown Construction,
1424 Piedmont Drive East, Tallahassee, FL 32308, at which time and place they will be
publicly opened and read aloud.

PROPOSAL: Bids must be submitted in full and in accordance with the requirements
of the drawings and Project Manual which may be obtained or examined at the office
of Peter R. Brown Construction, 1424 Piedmont Drive East, Tallahassee, FL 32309.
(850) 668-4498.

PRE-SOLICITATION/PRE-BID MEETING: The Bidder is encouraged to attend the
pre-solicitation/pre-bid meeting. Minority Business Enterprise firms are invited to at-
tend to become familiar with the project specifications and to become acquainted with
contractors interested in bidding the project. The meeting has been scheduled for: Sep-
tember 6, 2007 at 2:00 p.m. located on site at the North Florida Community College,
Building 5 and 6, Madison, FL.

8/17.8/24








IN ITHE C IR(C IT COURT. I1HIRD
JUDICIAl. (.IRCUIT. IN \NI FOR
N1%DISONCOI COUNTY. FLORID \.

C SE NO(). 612007C AIIIIp248l01 ll\

(OLD BLUE SPRINGS. LLC.

Plaintiff.


JN NET %kE\V.l as Personal Reprs.senialis of the
Estt~e of JOHN \NTHONX LaPORTE. a'k/a
John \. LaPorit. ak'a John LaPorte: and other
unknown parlie, in po e._ssion. including ihy un-
kqaoun .pous. of .an person in possession of thr
proper and il a n.nmid D fenndal is du~s, .ea,
the surmihin, 'ptu,-. heirs. dkite-i. _Lr.nlmet.
cre-dirr.,r. and all othcr partic claiming In.
through. under or against ihait Dtefndanl. and all
claim.janl. ptr.on or parnir. natural or cnrpo-
rait. or hoe \uac Iceal sialtu ik unknown.
claiming under an ol Ithe named or describd D.-
I'ndanL.

Dftndanis.

NOTICE OF FOREC LOSURE SIE L


NOTICE IS HEREHI} GIl EN that pursuani to a Summnar Final Judgment of Fore.

closure dalkd lu'ut '.21I"'. in ihi abhot rferernced ca.e in whichh OLD BLUE

W;PRINGS. LL is Plaintiff. and J INLT A.-K a- Per.onal Repr,.entalise ol the Es-

aeic of IO-IHN LNTHON LaiPORI E. a/k/a John \. LaPort-. a/kda John LaPorte: un-

knorun tenant-: and other unknown parties in possession. including the unknounn

spou-e ol an. person in possession of the property and if a named Dtlendan is de.

teasedl. tihe ur iin *.pouE. heir.. des isE.l. granltet. creditor., and all other parliev4

claiming hi. through. undtr or against thai Ddfsndant. and all clamiantL. person, or

parti. natural or corporate, or shose exactly Itgal status is unkn.omn. claiming under

an) of the named or described Drefndans. art Delendant.. I. TIM SANDERS. Clkrk

of the Courl. will .ll n the lhighe.i and best bidder for a-h in the Madi.on LountL

Courihouse in Nladison. Florida. a ilt-e Clerk of the (ouri mar designai a! iht- time

ol -ale. at II:til o'clock 1. Ml. or a. .oon therealler as Plainlifts counsel mu) direct

pr.o ided that 'aid -all mu-t bi commenced prior to 2:111 o'clock P.M.i. on ihe 17th doa

of Spitmhber. 2011". ihe following de-cribed properly -st1 forth in Ihe Defaull Final

ludgmniti nl -orcclonure:

I ot It of Bionck \ of hli6 r Irate subdis i-ion a- re.ordtd in Plai ItI.,k 2.
Paue. 28-30 ol alMdi-on Counts. Florida.
'IBIR IECT 10 amn oum ending mineral right.L of r-ord.

Ini and all bidder. partik. or other inlere.-ld person, shall contact thte

informaiio.n derk oIl the 1 Irk of tile Lourn prior to the scheduled foreclo-ure ale uho

till ad6~1i- of ihe saci location in the iladi-on (Counl Courthou.e loi Iht, foreclosure
;ak.

4NT PERSON CL IIliNGC N INTEREST INTIffiE SlIRPI S FROM
THE S\ 1 E. IF N OTHER TH lN THE PROPERTY O\\N NTR S,
OF THE D\TE OF TilE I Is PENDENS MUL'ST Fil.E A CL \lM
It WITHIN 6li D\1 S OFFERR l -HE % 1 F.


[NOI E: If iou are a per-on "ollh a di-ablint uho need- ani acc.mmoda

rion in order to participate in this procctding. 'ou ar- entitled, at nn cotl Io iou. in the

provision of ci:rlin a--itaie,. Pla'te conlaci iLour) dminislraior. PojI Of(ice Bo\

15M9. Lake itns. I lhrndn 32ul56 15h4. Telephone: i386. 7.8 2163. within tlo i2i nork- .

ini, dai ,f ,nur receipt ol thi Notice or pkading. If ou are hearing or oi et mipaired.

plea- call: I SimIII.'-5 -" l.i

\\ TNEISS mn hand and the official cseal ol said C(urn, this. 13 day of \u-

gu-t. 2ni' ai Mladison. ,ladi-on Corunti. Florida.


HONIORABLl IIM I ANDERS
CLERK OF THE (IRU'll COURT
Ml\DISON CO-LiNT\. FLORID

Bl: Ramona Dikkinson
\s Deputy C-Irk


I I1. DLCKER I. \1 I IRMP. \.
3211 \I l.h: Irnuc
Post Ollie B.r\ 12sh
List Oak. FIhrida .32ilt.4
Fi k phone: i 3t3 i 36,4 44-I4U
I kc.pilir: -3861i 364--45u
Lnui.l: rlecklla l .alil.nit
\ulirne for Plaintiff


'I., 24


Public eStric \Innouncemmni

I he Suwannce Riser Econrmic Council. Inc. %ill hold an section for a Iladison Coun.
i\ Representative of the poor. The representative need not lie poor, but must be chosen
in a manner to insure that they represent the poor. To be elected, an individual must be
ai least 18 years of age and a resident of Madison County. Individuals interested in hav-
ing their names placed on the ballot should contact Myrtle Webb at 850-973-6709 no
lattr than August 31, 2007.

I he election will be held on September 10-14, in the Suwannee River Economic Coun-
;il. Inc.'s (SREC) office located at: 645 SE Lake Shore Drive, Madison, Florida 32341.
L i-ted below are the general duties of SREC, Inc. Board Members:

1. Sets major organizational, personnel, fiscal and program policies
2. Determines overall program plans and priorities and evaluation of performance. .
3. Final approval of all program proposals.
4. Enforcement of compliance with all conditions of State, Federal, and Local grants.

The terms of office as a SREC, Inc. Board member will be five (5) years (2007-2012).
T he SREC, Inc. Board of Directors meet quarterly jn Live Oak, Florida.

8.17


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CICUIT IN
AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FL

JUVENILE DIVISION
4-02-DP


IN THE INTEREST OF:

S.C.
M.C.

MINOR CHILDREN


05/27/1999
01/11/2002


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: Ronald Carniewski and Dawn Carniewski
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 165 SW Boston Terrace, Fort White, Florida 32038

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition under oath, has been filed in the above
-styled court for the termination of parental rights and the permanent commitment of
S.C and M.C., a female/female child born on 05/27/1999 and 01/11/2002 in Clark Neva-
da and Iron, Utah to the State of Florida and S.C .and M.C. a female/female child born
05/27/1999 and 01/11/2002 in Madison County placing agency, for subsequent adop-"
tion and you are hereby to be and appear in the above court at the Madison County
Courthouse, Madison, Florida 32344 on Thursday, October 3, 2007 at 1:00 P.M., for a
Termination of Parental Rights Advisory Hearing and to show cause why said petition
I should not be granted. You must appear on the date and time specified.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THE TPR ADVISORY HEARING CON-
STITUTES YOUR CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION. OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
TO THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECI-
FEED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE
PETITION.

WITNESS my hand and official seal as the Judge of said court this 13th of August,
12007.




Dates to run ad: August 17, August 24, August 31 and September 7. 2007,


...... ,,...


ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS


Project No. 06DB-3K-03-50-02-C07

City of Madison (herein referred to as the "Owner")

Sealed bids marked "Sealed Bid" City of Madison Small Cities Community Deitlop-
ment Block Grant Project for Fiscal Year 2005 to be financed by the State of Florida
Department of Community Affairs under the provisions, and subject to'the require-
ments, of Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amend-
ed, will be received by the Owner for the construction of the Project described as fol.
lows:

Commercial revitalization consisting of sidewalk and pedestrian mall
improvements located along Dade Street and Horry Street.

Bid proposals shall be addressed to the City Commission of Madison, and delivered to
the Office of the City Manager at City Hall, located at 321 Southwest Rutledge S re-t.
Madison, FL, 32340, 850-973-5081, not later than 3:00 p.m., Eastern Daylight Sa' ings
Time, on September 18,2007. Proposals shall be designated as "Sealed Bid"- Madison
Community Development Block Grant Project for Fiscal Year 2005 to be financed hi
the State of Florida Department of Community Affairs. Facsimile or electronic mail
bids will not be accepted. Any bids received after the specified time and date %ill nom
be considered. The sealed bids will be publicly opened and read aloud at 3:liI p.m..
Eastern Daylight Savings Time, on September 18, 2007 at City Hall.


Save time and money by e-mailing

your documents to:

susan@greenepublhshing.eom


,


The information for Bidders, Form of Bid Proposal, Form of Contract, Plans, Specifi-
cations, and Forms of Bid Bond, Performance and Payment Bond, and other contract
documents may be examined at the office of the project engineer, Brian Hepburn. Jones
Edmunds and Associates, 1100 Cesery Blvd., 2nd Floor, Jacksonville, FL 32211 and at
the following Dodge Plan Rooms located at Koger Complex, Ellis Building, Suite 1018.
1311 Executive Center Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; and 1809 Art Museum Dri-
ve, Suite 104, Jacksonville, Florida 32207. Copies may be obtained by mailing a re
quest for plans and specifications citing a return address and a check in the amount of
Sone hundred ninety dollars and no cpnts ($190.00) to the project engineer.
The payment of one hundred ninety dollars and no cents ($190.00) will not be n-fund-
ed.

The Owner reserves the right to waive any informalities or to reject any or all bid..

Each Bidder must deposit with his/her bid, security in the amount, form and subject to
the conditions provided in the Information for Bidders. Sureties used for obtaining
bonds must appear as acceptable on the Department of Treasury Circular 570.
Only bidders with prior experience in completing projects of similar scope and mnag
nitude will be qualified to submit a bid.
A mandatory bidders prequalification meeting will be held onAugust 29, 2007 at 10:00
a.m. in the City Commission Meeting Room, City Hall, 321 SW Rutledge Streel. Matdi-
son, FL. If you plan to submit a bid, a representative of your firm must attend ihe pre-
qualification meeting to become familiar with the work to be completed.

No Bidder may withdraw his/her bid within ninety (90) days after the actual dale of tht
opening thereof.

A person or affiliate who has been placed on the convicted vendor list following a con-
viction for a public entity crime, pursuant to Section 287.133, Florida Statutes, mas not
submit a bid on a contract to provide any goods or services to a public entity, ma) noi
submit a bid on a contract with a public entity for the construction or repair of a pub-
lic building or public work, may not submit bids on leases of real .property to a public
entity, may not be awarded or perform work as a contractor, supplier, subcontractor.
or.consultant under a contract with any public entity, and may not transact business,
with any public entity in excess of the threshold amount provided in Section 28'.ll"'.
Florida Statutes, for Category Two for a period of 36 months from the date of being
placed on the convicted vendor list.

Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of em-
ployment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under the Contract. Sec-
tion 3, Segregated Facilities, Section 109 Executive Order 11246, and all applicable .
laws and regulations of the Federal government and State of Florida, and bonding and
insurance requirements.

In accordance with Executive Order 11246 and Supplemental General Conditions.
paragraph 21.2.1.1, the Contractor will not discriminate against any employee or ap.
plicant for employment because of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. The .'
Contractor will take affirmative action to ensure that applicants are employed, and
that employees are treated during employment, without regard to their race, color. rt-
ligion, sex, or national origin. Such action shall include, but not be limited to the fol.
lowing: employment, upgrading, demotion or transfer; recruitment, or recruitment
advertising; layoff or termination, rates of pay or other forms of compensation: and se-
lection for training, including apprenticeship. *

IN PARTICULAR, BIDDERS SHOULD NO-E THE REQUIRED %TTSCHMNENTS
AND CERTIFICATIONS TO BE EXECUTED \ND SUBMITTED %ITTH THE -
FORMOFBID PROPOSAL, WHICHARE IDENTIFIED ON THE ATTICHAIENTS
CHECKLIST OF THE FORM OF BID PROPO IS L

A FAIR HOUSING/EQUALOPPORTUNIT,1:H \NDIC %P ClCFSS JIRISDI- ACTION

8/17


NOTICE OF BUDGET WORKSHOP
CITY COMMISSION
MADISON, FLORIDA

The City Commission of the City of Madison, Florida will have a fiscal year 2007/2008
budget workshop on Tuesday, August 28, 2007 at 5:30 p.m. in City Hall.

Any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect
to any matter considered of such meeting will need a record of the proceedings, and
that for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the ap-
peal is based.

8/17





DEFENDANT DATE POSTED AMOUNT POSTED

ESTELL F:.iDFdRlG .iEZ 1115 :

M h-iSE0 S Ai, LTARAN PEREZ c.,' .* ', I(i, si


SHiMiKOi E .L_ 3'.' in 4, 63

iORGE kIE NDOZA01HERNNDEZ J.ii. ', "OI,,


ORBELi 1' Z';.liEZ o*,,2 1:1Z. 1 "

G[LBEF, HET N\NDEZ 0 lO.'.i" "5111










SIN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.

CASE NO. 2007CA0002460001XX
OLD BLUE SPRINGS, LLC,

BLU SP' Plaintiff,



DERRICK TAYLOR and MAXINE TAYLOR,
husband and wife; and other unknown parties in
possession, including the unknown spouse of any,
person in possession of the property, and if a
named Defendant is deceased, the surviving
spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,: creditors, and all
other parties clauning b\. through, under or
against that Defendant, and all claimants, persons
or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact le-
gal status is unknown, claiming under any of the
named or described Defendants,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE


SNOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Default Final Judgment of Foreclo-

| sure dated August 9,2007, in the above referenced case in which OLD BLUE SPRINGS,

LLC is Plaintiff, and DERRICK TAYLOR and MAXINE TAYLOR; unknown tenants;

and other unknown parties in possession, including the unknown spouse of any person

in possession of the property, and if a named Defendant is deceased, the surviving

spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming by, through,

under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or cor-

porate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the named or de-

scribed Defendants, are Defendants, I, TIM SANDERS, Clerk of the Court, will sell to

the highest and best bidder for cash in the Madison County Courthouse in Madison,

Florida, at 11:00 o'clock A. M. (or as soon thereafter as Plaintiffs counsel may direct

provided that said sale must be commenced prior to 2:00 o'clock P.M.), on the 17th day

of September, 2007, the following described property set forth in the Default Final

Judgment of Foreclosure:

Lot 26, of Block A, of River Trace subdivision as recorded in Plat Book
2, Pages 28-30 of Madison County, Florida.
SUBJECT TO any outstanding mineral rights of record.


Any and all bidders, parties or other interested persons shall contact the

information desk of the Clerk of the Court prior to the scheduled foreclosure sale who

will advise of the exact location in the Madison County Courthouse for the foreclosure

sale.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE. IF ANY. OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.


[NOTE: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommoda-

tion in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the

provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administrator, Post Office Box

.1569, Lake City, Florida 32056-1569, Telephone: (386) 758-2163, within two (2) work-

ing days of your receipt of this Notice or pleading. If you are hearing or voice impaired,

please call: 1-800-955-8771.]


WITNESS my hand and the official seal of said Court, this 17th day of August, 2007 at

Madison, Madison County, Florida.

HONORABLE TIM SANDERS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk


THE DECKER LAW FIRM, P. A.
320 White Avenue
Post Office Box 1288
/ Lie Oak, Florida 32064
.. telephone: (386) 364-4440
STelecoptr: (386) 364-4508
Email: decklaw@alltel.net
S turned for Plaintiff


-, '55 5. '55555555 "5555 '5555










16A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



NATIONAL NEWS


Friday, August 17, 2007


Crackdown Coming On


Employers Of Illegal Immigrants


SConducting interviews on this
topic is the National Executive DI-
rector of the MinIIentIi Civil De-
fense Corps (MCDC) Al Garza.
Employers across the country
are preparing to fire workers with
qOismnable Social Security num-
bers to avoid getting snagged in a
Bush ahmin irtion crackdown on
.18gal innnigranvta
The Depatiment of Hompland
Security is expected to make public
soon new rules for employers noti-
fied when their woiuer'sname or So-
cial Secuiily number was flagged by
the Social Security AdministrHtion.
The rule, as initially drafted, re-
quires employers to fire people who
can't be verified as a legal worker
and can't resolve within 60 days why
the name or Social Security number
oan their W-2 doesn't match the gov-
ernment's database..
Employers who don't comply
could facefines of $20 to $10,000 per
MDegalo arker and incident
"There's a lot of fear and anxi-
ety about what this rule is going to
mean particularly in the agricultur-
al sectW" said Craig Regelbrugge,
spokesman fwr the American Nurs-
ery and tnm-caqe Association and
cochsuirman of the Agriculture
Coalition for Immigration Reform.
The Social Security Administra-
tion has sent "no match" letters to
wukers and their employers notify-
ing than of the information dis-
crepancies far years. Its goal has
been to make sure money withheld
om a person's paycheck is credited
to the correct woker
The letters are not shared with
other government agencies because
of privacy laws.
Although employers are prohib-
ited by law h m hiring illegal work-
ers, their respnmsibilitIes with the
letters have generally ended with
notifying the workers of the discrep-
acies and leaving it to them to deal


with it.,
Many employers have been
warned by attorneys to be careful
not to fire a worker because they got
a letter, because the no match could
be the result of a typo in a name or
number a computer error, a name
change that wasn't reported after
marriage or other reasons.
But those who don't comply with
the new rule could be deemed as
knowingly hiring an illegal worker.
The Homeland Security Depart-
ment says the new rule provides
guidance to employers on how to
deal with workers who receive no
match letters and give those who
comply "safe harbor" if illegal
workers are found at their business
in an investigation or raid, said
Russ Knocke, Homeland Security
department spokesman.
U.S. Immigration and Customs
Enforcement, a division of the
Homeland Security Department, "is
going to be tough and aggressive in
the enforcement of the law," Knocke
said. "You are going to see more work
site cases. And no more excuses."
The administration trotted out
the stepped-up enforcement plan last
summer but put it on hold while the
Senate debated an immigration re-
form bill.
That bill would have granted a
chance at legal status for the estimat-
ed 11 million to 12 million illegal im-
migrants in the country and created
a temporary worker program. It also
would have re
quired employers Got
to verify the status
of all their work- straigi


ers.
After the bill
collapsed in Con-
gress, employers
started bracing for
the tougher rule.
"Congress did-
i't act. They didn't


do what they needed to do on com-
prehensive immigration reform.
Now there's going to be some pain to
pay, and Congress is not going to feel
the pain right away, it's the commu-
nities (of employees) and that's a real
shame," said Laura Reiff, co-chair-
woman of the Essential Workers Im-
migration Coalition, a national
group of business and trade associa-
tions.
For Mark Chamblee, the stricter
rule could mean losing some of his 28
workers at his East Texas nursery in
Tyler.
Chamblee suspects a few of his
workers could have trouble with
their Social Security numbers and
said he will fire them if the problems
aren't resolved.
"Of course, it would add to the
workload for the other workers," he
said. "It would reduce our produc-
tion and our output. Not all of our de-
mand would be met on our products.
Operating costs would go up."
Ray Atkinson, a spokesman for
Pilgrim's Pride Corp., confirmed the
country's largest chicken processing
company recently let go employees at
two Texas plants, as first reported in
the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.
The company's policy "for some
time now" has been to terminate
employees who can't clear up dis-
crepancies, Atkinson said.
"We're all very cautious and
we're all very nervous," Chamblee
said.


news
ht from


the horse's mouth?

We Do.

The Madison County Carrier
& Madison Enterprise Recorder


Conducting interviews on this topic is the author of
this article Dr. Jerome Corsi.
A Texas congressman is leading discussions with
the White House to develop a military plan to assist
Mexico in the war President Felipe Calder6n is waging
against the drug cartels.
Yolanda Urrabazo, spokeswoman for Rep. Henry
Cuellar, D-Texas, told WND the discussions involve the
possibility of utilizing the U.S. military directly in the
effort in addition to providing military assistance.
The Bush administration is considering a multi-
year multi-million dollar military assistance package
that could include telephone-tapping equipment, Black-
hawk helicopters, radar to track drug shipments and
training, according to the Associated Press.
Until now,.there has been no mention that the assis-
tance might include direct US. military involvement in
Mexico.
Urrabazo also confirmed to WND that the issue of
involving the U.S. military and providing military assis-
tance to Mexico.would be on the agenda of the upcoming
third summit of the Security and Prosperity Partier-
ship of North America, or SPP, scheduled Aug. 20-21 in
Montebello, Quebec.
Cuellar's district includes Laredo, Texas, which has
been considered ground zero for spillover of the Mexi-
can drug war into the U.S..
On Jan 17, Cuellar filed H.R. 502, entitled the "Pros-
perous and Secure Neighbor Alliance Act of 2007,"
which originally proposed providing military assis-
tance to Mexico to fight the war on the Mexican drug
cartels.
H.R. 502 proposed to spend $90 million to provide
Mexican law enforcement with sophisticated military
technology, training and equipment from the U.S. mili-
tary to assist Mexico in fighting the drug war.
The other goal of the bill was to spend another $80
million to provide economic development assistance to
Mexico under the premise that combating Mexican
poverty would also combat Mexican drugs.
H.R. 502 was referred to the House Foreign Affairs
Committee. The committee press office told WND no
hearings on the bill have been scheduled.
The legislation, however, placed Cuellar at the fore-
front of the effort to involve the U.S. military in Mexi-
co's war on the drug cartels.
Rep. Silvestre Reyes, D-Texas, whose district in-
cludes El Paso, has joined Cuellar ii urging the Bush ad-
ministration to allocate up to $850 million over the next
five years to help train Mexican law 'enforcement and
military personnel to utilize the advanced military
equipment the U.S. is planning to send to Mexico in a
drug-related mii tary assistance effort.


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