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The Madison enterprise-recorder
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00133
 Material Information
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title: Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title: Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Creation Date: August 3, 2007
Publication Date: 1933-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID: UF00028405:00133
 Related Items
Preceded by: Enterprise-recorder

Full Text




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Our 142nd Year, Number 49 Friday, August 3, 2007 Madison, Florida 32340


Greene Pubiibi shi. Inc. Photo by Jessica Higginbotham, August 1, 2007
On August 1, at the Solid Waste and Recycling barn, Jerome Wyche, along with county employees, County
Commissioners, representatives from Madison Correctional Institution, the Mayor of Lee, and as other local digni-
taries, a ribbon cutting was held to welcome the new addition. Big Blue, as the machine was called, is a wonder-
ful addition to the community.


Madison County Solid Waste And Recycling


Department Holds Ribbon Cutting
"Help Keep Madison County Cl/an."


By Jerome Wyche
Edited By Jessica Higginbotham,
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County Solid Waste and Recycling De-
partment is managing to keep stride with the waves of
technology in our increasing service oriented society
For the past seven or more years, the: department had
dreamed of purchasing a baling machine that would
enhance the capability of processing recyclable mate-
rials claimed from around Madison County.
The dream continued as just that, a dream, until in-
terest was rekindled during the latter portion of 2006,
as it became evident that citizens were beginning to re-
cycle more materials. Madison County is experiencing
a growth spurt in population as well as businesses,
which accounts for a percentage of the increase in ma-
terial collection. The greater increases are attributed
to a positive response in citizen's interest and educa-


tion, thus, more people are aware of the need to recycle
and are pitching in.
The department had been operating with two up-
right balers to bale" corrugate (cardboard), and assort-
ed plastics. Although the upright machines have per-
formed remarkably, the process of baling the materials
was best described as "at a snail's pace." Collection of
corrugate, newspapers, office papers, assorted glass
bottles, aluminum and steel cans continued to accumu-
late at the collection centers as well as the recycling
barn.
The inability to process and package the recyclable
materials in a timely manner required the positioning
of large containers on the center floor to store materi-
als until enough was collected to market. The need for
floor space became critical and there were moments
when only a single aisle for employee and visitor move
PleaseseeSolid Waste, Page 3A


F83 89/73



8/4 '
Scattered thunderstorms. High
89F. Winds SSE at 10to 20 mph.

Sat 91/73

A few thunderstorms possible.
Highs in the low 90s and lows in
the low 70s.

Sun
8/5un 93/73
Isolated thunderstorms. Highs in
the low 90s and lows in the low
70s.





2 Sections, 32 Pages
Around Madison County 5-s-
Church 9A
Classifieds 4A
Community Calendar 5A
Jail Report 4A
Legals 15A
Obituaries 5A
Outdoors 12A
Remote Guide C Section
Real Estate B Section
Viewpoints 2-3A


ov. Crist Making Big Changes For Florida Power


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Due to growing concerns about climate
change and pollution, Governor Charlie Crist
has pulled the plug on now two coal-fired pow-
er plants in Florida.
Just last month, the Public Service Com-
mission vetoed a proposed 960-megawatt plant
near the Everglades National Park. Environ-
mental organizations protested not only the
proposed site of the plant, but also the plant it-
self.
Now, planning for the Taylor Energy Cen-
ter has been suspended, and according to
spokesperson. Mark McCain, "climate change
is becoming a major issue in Florida."
The Taylor Energy Center, located in near-
by Perry, would not have used the coal gasifi-
cation process, and likely pumped copious
amounts of pollutants into the atmosphere.


Governor Charlie
Crist has pulled
the plug on now
two coal-fired
power plants in
Florida.


Throughout the planning for the plant,
McCain was vehement that the technology
proposed was state of the art and would pre-
vent pollution.
Crist'sDepartment of Environmental Pro-
tection also vetoed the proposed addition to a


Seminole Electric plant in Putnam County
Tri-County Electric Cooperative, primary
power giver to the Madison area, purchases
their power from Seminole. The question has
been raised "What does this do to electricity
bills in Madison?"
There is the chance that with anti-coal
leaders sticking to their guns, the price for en-
ergy could increase dramatically.
According to a statement issued by Tri-
County Electric Co-op, [they] work closely
with [their] power supplier, Seminole Electric
Cooperative, Inc, to protect the environment.
"We support, the idea of producing power from
local renewable sources, such as wing, solar,
geothermal, animal waste and landfill gas.
SECI already has one of the largest in-state
portfolios of renewable energy Renewables
meet about four percent of SECI's energy
Please see FLORIDA POWER, Page 3A


Catfish Death Toll Rises


Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
.' "What we're seeing is a continual slow die off of channel catfish in the up-
per Suwannee River," said Gary Byerley at the Fish and Wildlife Commission.
The dead catfish are turning up at the Suwannee in Ellaville and
Dixie County for several weeks now, but it hasn't been a large kill. The
FWC can't pin any clear reason down, but attributes the deaths to low
| water conditions and warmer temperatures, causing stress on the fish
and opening them up to illnesses.
When the waters start to rise again, there will be a drop in catfish
Please see CATFISH, Page 3A


Romeo Law

Benefits Romance
By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Four states Florida,
Connecticut, Indiana, and
Texas are revamping
their sexual offender laws
to take into account Romeo
and Juliet romances. In
most states a 19-year-old
who has consensual sex
with a 17-year-old can be
Please see ROMEO LAW,
Page 3A


4, I


Madison Man


Man Found Guilty Of


Sexual Battery, Home


Invasion, Kidnapping


And Robbery.
By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Termaine IRaynard
Aikens, of Madison, was
found guilty on Wednes-
day, August 1, on all
counts.
Charges against the de-
fenWdant included: sexual
battery while possessing a
firearm; home invasion
robbery with a firearm;
robbery with a deadly
weapon; and kidnapping
while carrying a firearm. Trmaine Raynard Aikens
Aikens has been in jail aie Raynard kens
since February 2006 on un-
related charges. In June of 2006,' the Madison Police De-
partment received a report from the Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement Crime Laboratory, linking ev-
Please see AIKENS, Page 3A

So WantedFugitive
Suspicious Vehicle .eads To

Drugs And Wanted Fugitive
A wanted fugitive was
captured after a Madison
County Sheriff's deputy
noticed a suspicious vehi-
cle.
According to a Sher-
iff's Office report, on
Tuesday, July 31, at 10:30 -.- -
p.m. Cpl. Michael Maurice
was patrolling Hwy 53,
south in Madison. As Cpl.
Maurice approached the -
intersection of Harvey
Greene Drive, he observed
a vehicle take an abrupt
Please see GOIST,
Page3AM Robert Goist












2A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Friday, August 3, 2007


CALL Y



S JacOb's Ladde Letters to the Editor are typed word for word,
Jacob Bembry comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.
olumnii Arizona Letter,


Playing Pretend
I don't know how mapy of my readers, aside from
my immediate family, know this, but I was a theater mi-
nor in college. I had taken a couple of electives in Reli-
gion but growing disgusted at the humanistic point of
view of the course's professors, I decided to change my
minor, although I had an "A" average.
I figured that since my major was Media Perfor-
mance (which was a fancy way to, say "Broadcasting"
and another way to say, "Hey, we'll teach you to read out
loud") and since I had to take theater courses anyway
for the major, I might as well take a few other classes and
make it my minor.
While at Florida State, I never participated in any
plays (th6se people were too weird to hang around with
for very long), but I did have extensive experience as a,
thespian. Elementary school plays are long forgotten
but I will never forget my first "big break" in the movie
industry.
A made-for-television movie called With All Deliber-
ate Speed was being-filmed in Monticello and I was one
of a couple. dozen sixth graders at Howard Middle
School picked out of a crowd to be an extra for the
movie, which starred Paul Winfield (from the movie
Sounder and, later on; the A&E television show City
Confidential). I had to stand at a bus stop with a girl and
get on a bus, while another girl,,from Leon High School,
yelled racial slurs out of a bus window at a couple of
other children. The movie came on that summer. Imag-
ine my thrill when I.was shown in the opening scene of
the movie. Now, imagine my disappointment. The scene
only lasted about a second or two. That was it. My
dreams of stardom vanished. My friends, Curtis Crumi-
ty and Voncile Conner, had some awesome roles in the
movie. Voncile even got to drown in one of the scenes.
Around the same time I had a good role in a Christ-
mas play at church. The pastor's wife glued a beard on
me and I looked a lot like Abraham Lincoln. It was cool
until I had to try to get the glue and whiskers off my face
later. '
Other roles I've had include two plays at North Florir
da Junior College, playing a bully named Plotsky in
Ducktails and Bobbysox and the prime role of rock, tree
and cloud in South Pacific. The only roles I played at
FSU were in classes. In one, I got to play a drunk and in
the other, I got to play the extramarital love interest of
"The Good Wife."
While playing pretend was fun, I do see a lot of it
these days that isn't funny I see people pretending to be
role models for our youth. I see people claiming to know
more about things than they actually do. I see people
who claim to be Christians when their lives don't bear
any fruit. It's dangerous to play pretend. It can harm
yourself and others who may fall into your trap.
God wants honesty in our personal and in our pro-
fessional lives and, as a Christian, I have to live by His
desires not the desires of the world.


To The Editor
Luke AFB is west of Phoenix anid is rapidly being siu-
rouided by civilization that complains about the noise
from the base and its planes, forgetting that it was there
long before they were.
A certain lieutenant colonel at Luke AFB deserves a
big pat on the back. Apparently, ah individual who lives
somniwh're near Luke AFB wrote the local paper! com-
plaining about a group of F-16s that disturbed his her
day at the mall. When that individual read the response
from a Luke AFB officer, I hope it stung quite a bit.
The complaint:
"Question of the day for Luke Air Force Base: Whom
do we thank for the morning air show? Last Wednesday,
at precisely 9:11 a.m., a tight formation of four F-16 jets
made a low pass over Arrowhead Mall, continuing west
over Bell Road at approximately 500 feet. Imagine our
good fortune! Do the Tom Cruise-wannabes feel we need
this wake-up call, or were they trying to impress the
cashiers at Mervyns early bird special? Any response
would be appreciated."
Thd response:
Regarding "A wake-up call from Luke's jets"'(Letters,
Thursday): On June 15, at precisely 9:12 a.m., a perfectly
timed four-ship flyby of F-16s from the 63rd Fighter
Squadron at Luke Air Force Base flew over the grave of
Capt. Jeremy Fresques.
Capt. Fresques was an Air Force officer who was
previously stationed at Luke Air Force Base and was
killed in Iraq on May 30, Memorial Day. At 9 a.m. on
June 15, his family and friends gathered at. Sunland
Memorial Park in Sun City to mourn the loss of a hus-
band, son and friend.
Based on the letter writer's recount of the flyby, and
because of the jet noise, I'm sure you didn't hear the 21-
gun salute, the playing of taps, or my words to the wid-
ow and parents of Capt. Fresques as I gave them their
son's flag on behalf of the President of the United States
and all those veterans and servicemen and women who
understand the sacrifices they have endured.
, Afour-ship flyby is a display of respect the Air Force
pays to those-who give their lives in defense of freedom
We are professional aviators and take our jobs seri-
ously, and on June 15 what the letter writer witnessed
was four officers lining up to pay their ultimate re-
spects.
The letter writer asks, "Whom do we thank for the
morning air-show?" The 56th Fighter Wing will call for
you, and forward your thanks to the widow and parents
of Capt. Fresques, and thank them for you, for it was in
their honor that my pilots flew the most honorable for-
mation of their lives.
Lt. Col. Scott Pleus
CO 63rd Fighter Squadron
Luke AFB


'jar
The cAris~r~~


De-Stress As A Back To
School Exercise
This may come as a surprise to some of you, but here goes
anyway. The biggest concern of school children is not grades.
What?? Our children are not focused on grades? No, not re-
alh. For the majorityiof our little darlings,.the main concern is
societal. The heaviest question does not center on Shakespeare
or exoskeletons; it is"'do they like me?"
Parents can't change that. Children are egocentric creatures,
and society feeds into that. What parents can do is prepare the
child to get along in society, this increasing the "like" factor:
' One excellent teaching tool is the fariily dinner'"Four or five
times a week, everyone should gather around the table to share
a meal. During the meal, each member contributes to polite con-
versationii. No shouting, insults, name-calling, tattling, or belit-
tling. Those practice sessions help the child later when he's
away from home and put in a conversation situation. He'll be
able to participate instead of being a wall-flower.
Another step parents can take is to get help. No, I don't
mean a therapist. Instead, we can take our children to Sunday
school, church, youth group, and Bible school. These offer prac-
tice in urn-iaking. appropriate behavior, give-and-take, and oth-
er skills important to societal success.
SThese lessons and more may also be learned through scouts,
Little League. volunteering, and such activities. Opportunities
abound in everN community.
Parents can also spend some time teaching table manners
and other courteous behavior. The group will "'like" a child more
readily if he seems somewhat domesticated instead of barbarian.
In the flurry of back-to-school shopping, haircuts, new
shoes, and other preparations, the student seems to have a firm
opinion about the whole process. Yet inside, he harbors that ner-
vous question: "will they like me?"
If the parent has helped guide him in steps that lead to a pos-
itive answer to that consuming question, then maybe, just
maybe, the student can turn his attention to a different topic.
Grades, anyone?


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Friday, August 3, 2007


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A


U _________________


r^7qdii6on bounty Tm

Extension Service
Dianin Douglas


Whatever You Need,
Greene Publishing, Inc.

Classifieds ;


Plan Your Spending


For Tax Free Week
Tax-free week starts this weekend. Designed to help
ease Florida consumer's wallets with back- to- school ex-
penses, you won't save money in the long run if you
don't have a plan. Many families spend far more than
they intend and if you don't plan your purchases and
watch for bargains, you can overspend and not have
enough money for regular monthly bills have to pay. Be-
fore you hit the stores, consider putting pencil to paper
and develop a spending plan.
Clothing is considered a flexible expense; meaning it
can vary from month to month and it is probably the
biggest back-to-school expenditure. First, find out what
clothing is needed for each child. Start by taking an in-
ventory of the child's closet to determine what can be
used. You may only need to buy a few basic items to co-
ordinate with clothes the child is currently wearing.
Since school age children experience sporadic growth
spurts, you may want to start the new school year with
a few clothes and add larger sizes in as they get taller.
The weather is so warm for the first few months of the
school year that their current summer clothing may do
fine until the weather cools off.
Older children and teenagers can do inventory of
their clothing by themselves. Make a shopping list for
new purchases that are needed to fill the wardrobe gaps
and plan shopping trips to take advantage of sales. Be
sure to take advantage of the sales many retailers offer;
check newspaper and TV advertisements to find the best
buys.
If your school requires uniforms, consider the ba-
sics. A couple pairs of pants or shorts, with several dif-
ferent shirts to interchange during the week, might be
enough for the first month or so. It may mean you have
to wash clothes several times a week to keep the rotation
going.
School supplies are another big expenditure for
back-to-school preparation. If you can obtain a list of
supplies needed and can take advantage of sales, you
will be able to save as much as 20 40%. If you can af-
ford the extra expense, anticipating the child's needs for
supplies throughout the year, and buying them now, can
pave money.only if you have the storage space.
If your monthly budget is tight. just pace yourself
and buy what you can afford to get the school year start-
ed. Build clothing and school supplies into the next few
months and live within your income. Each family needs
to prepare for back-to-school according to your income
and other monthly expenses.
For more information on family finances and man-
aging money, contact the Madison County Extension of-
fice.


SOLID WASTE contfrompagelA

ment was available.
In February 2007, and opportunity to acquire a bal-
ing machine suitable for our needs surfaced. The possi-
bility of the dream coming into reality caused a rippling
of excitement among the employees. The result of net-
working, comparing prices and the desire to want to
know more, the department was given information and
was provided an in-depth presentation'on the availabili-
ty of a baling machine. Permission to pursue further in-
quiry was granted by the Madison County Board of
County Commissioners.
After all of the information was collected and
processed, the Commissioners gave their approval to
purchase the machine. Purchase of the equipment.
transportation, installation, training and turnkey oper-
ation all fit within the budget allocation from the 2006-
2007 fiscal year budget. .
In June 2007, the dream came true. The equipment
was delivered and installed in the recycling center in
Madison County. The purchase and use of this machine
enables the department to process collected materials at
a much faster pace and with greater efficiency The fa-
cility has been re-organized, making floor space avail-
able for processing and storage. Safety for the depart-
ment employees and use of the equipment are enhances,
thus promoting an enjoyable and clean work environ-
ment. The supplemental use of the upright balers and
the use of the horizontal baler has enhanced produc-
tion.
To date, the department has collected and processed
1,024.36 tons of recyclable materials, with two .months
remaining in the fiscal year. The employees of the Solid
Waste and Recycling Department, inclusive of the col-
lection site attendees, are the epitome of teamwork.
The assistance that this department receives, as well
as other agencies in Madison County, from the Madison
Correctional Institution is unparalleled. The supervi-
sion provided by the Correctional officers and the work
production of the state and 'county inmates positively
impacts the cleanliness of Madison County and a large
percentage of processing recyclable materials.
The support extended by the County Manager, the
Board of County Commissioners and the Clerk of Court
enabled this department to succeed in accomplishing
our goals.
The citizens of Madison County are to be commend-
ed for their efforts in their participation in recycling, ex-
tending the lifespan of the county landfill and their ma-
jor contributions in protecting our environment. A fair
assessment of the cleanliness of Madison County, com-
pared to surrounding jurisdictions, is ranked right at
the top. The Madison County Solid Waste and Recycling
Department continues to issue the challenge to all citi-
zens to "Help Keep Madison County Clean."


GREENE s
Publishing, Inc.
1695 S. SR 53 Madison 973-4141

A-TKFNS cont from page lA

idence in the sexual battery to Aikens.
The report indicated that evidence found during the
examination was matched to Aikens' known finger-
prints.
Investigator Ben Ebberson filed a probable cause af-
fidavit with the Third. Judicial Circuit State Attorney's
Office, charging Aikens with home invasion and sexual
battery in 2006.

GOIST cont from page lA
right hand turn into the driveway of Greene Publishing,
Inc.
Knowing that the vehicle did not belong to an em-
ployee and that the business is closed during this time,
Cpl. Maurice turned around to investigate. As Cpl. Mau-
rice pulled into Greene Publishing Inc., he observed the
vehicle slowly circling around the front of the building
and begin to exit.
Cpl. Maurice stopped the vehicle in the driveway
and made contact with the driver, Robert Goist, 47, of
Wauchulal When Cpl. Maurice questioned Gbist about
trespassing, Goist stated' that he just wanted to see what
was back there. Due to his evasive answers, .Cpl. Mau-
rice suspected that Goist was involved in some criminal
activity.
Cpl. Maurice obtained Goist's information and ran a
drivers license and warrants check. The drivers license
came back suspended and Goist was also a wanted fugi-
tive from Butts County, Ga.
Goist was arrested, and during a search, Cpl. Mau-
rice located a small plastic bag containing several grams
of marijuana in his front pant's pocket.
Goist was transported to the county jail and booked
on charges of driving while license suspended and pos-
session of marijuana. He was also held on the warrant
for extradition to Butts County, Ga.

FLORIDA POWER
cont from page 1A

needs at this time."
Tri-County and SECI are both adamant that "the use
of cdal to produce electricity, and the protect of the en-
vironment, are not incompatible goals." According to
SECI, they recycle nearly 75 percent of the by-products
of coal combustion and have adequate emission con-
trols. This still begs the questions: where does the other
25 percent, the unusable part, go?. Why are coal-fired
power plants still a leading cause of global pollution?
SECI maintains that "numerous studies have deter-
mined that reducing or eliminating coal fueled [power
plants] will destroy the lives or quality of life of mil-
lions of working families and citizens on fixed incomes,
including many Floridians. ...A 15 percent reduction in
our supply of affordable energy will impact poorest fam-
ilies the hardest... and any option to domestic coal is
more expensive pre kilowatt hour."
Tri-County states that they are committed to renew-
able energy and environmental stewardship. Tri-Coun-
ty believes that, "clean coal is, important to ensuring a
reliable, affordable energy supply."
Environmentalists agree that coal has never been
and certainly never will be "clean."
Barry Parsons, local environmental activist, has
said, "The future will see decommissioning of coal
plants." If that happens, citizens are looking at cleaner,
renewable sources of energy that are more cost effi-
cient, and not threatened by "big storms in the Gulf or
terrorist attacks."

CATFISH
cont from page 1A

deaths. As for now, people are reporting seeing a dead
catfish every 200 or 300 yards.
According to Byerley, there are still plenty of
healthy catfish, and they are expected to spawn again in
large numbers.
The upper Suwannee is most affected, said Byerley,
and any dead fish near Santa Fe or below are probably
just the carcasses floating downriver.
People are urged not to eat any visibly sick fish, such
as ones with ulcers or sores.


Red Devils Brought A Flood Of Memories

A photo of the old Madison High School (and the Red
Devils) in last week's paper brought a flood of memories
(mostly good) to mind. Our two years ('35 and '36) there
were quite pleasant although we didn't care much for
math and sometimes had trouble keeping awake in
geometry class. Not your fault though Ms. Sims! You
were a great teacher! But we loved Latin and enjoyed
Ms. Wadsworth's class very much. We liked all our
teachers, especially the principal, Mr. Jones most of
the girls had a teenagers' crush on him! Remember the
"bowl" in back of the school we had no cafeterias in
schools then, so we took our lunches from home and the
bowl (which was just a huge natural basin) was our
lunchroom, where we experienced sampling each others
sandwiches. Most of them had "light bread" bases for
theirs but we country girls had biscuits. Our lunch usu-
ally consisted of an egg biscuit, fried potato biscuit and
one with butter and, sugar. The other girls loved my
fried potato biscuits so much that their sampling didn't
leave much so Mother started putting in two. After that
we could swap our extra one for our choices of several
offered. We especially liked Ruby McCullough's (Ulm)
home made peanut butter one. Ah, those were the days!
Good old golden rule days!
We have many congratulations to offer this week be-
ginning'with Emerald and her business acumen we
wish you and the girls much success, with your new
company and its acquisition of the Monticello papers.
Also congratulations to Jacob on his promotion and new
help.
Congratulations to Myrtice Hutcherson a wonder-
fully nice person on her retirement. We worked as a
student assistant in the registrar's office at NFCC in '72-
'73 which was practically next door to Myrtice and
found her to be extremely helpful and a real friend.
We congratulate Lee residents Joanie Brown, Natal-
ie Holcomb and Margie Phillips for their outstanding ac-
complishments at,. St. Leo University all made the
dean's list. And to an outstanding citizen and long time
friend we really enjoyed the full page write-up on you,
Eloise. Dice worked for your family for many years.
And you are still a credit to your community
We were pleasantly surprised to receive a visit last
Wednesday from our Postmistress, Mary Sanderfeit and
her husband, T.J., who is the new pastor at Beulah Bap-
tist Church. He seems to be a "people person" like Mary,
so we foresee good things in Beulah's future.
ni; Adwe can't praise Mary and our postal employees
too highly -they go far beyond the call of duty in servidd
both to their patrons, to the community in general and
our personal carrier, Eddie Hale, and his substitute,
David Rutherford, have gone far out of their way to be
helpful to us since we've been in need of help.
On your prayer list this week, we ask that you in-
clude Carlton Langford who unfortunately was rather
badly broken up in a one-car accident about two weeks
ago. After spending a few days in South Georgia Med-
ical Center, he was sent to Madison Nursing Center for
rehabilitation. This will probably be a very long and
painful process he has two broken legs, a broken collar
bone and one foot was practically mangled. Since Carl-
ton was once a part of our family, we feel the same sym-
pathy as if he still were.
We leave you now with this thought if you aren't
traveling on life's slow boat, you should be for there is so
much more time to enjoy the scenery that way.

Correction: Last week we wrote that a check was pre-
sented to Madison City- that should have read Madison
County.


ROMEO LAW
cont from page 1A


prosecuted for committing a sex crime.
These new laws are aimed to keep low risk offenders
- such as the previously mentioned 19-year-old from
being treated like a sexual predator. Most often, rela-
tionships between an older and younger partner are re-
ported to authorities by the younger partners unhappy
parents.
In Florida, the current law states that a person no
more than 24 years of age may enter into sexual activity
with someone at least 16 years of age.
The laws are intended to keep people who don't de-
serve it out of prison time and a lifetime inclusion on a
sexual offender registry...
Sharon Shadrick, Investigator for Madison County
Sheriff's Department, stated that the Romeo Law
"might be to the advantage of romances." State law
should consider the circumstances when prosecuting
cases of that nature. "I was a School Resource Officer
for 15 years, and I know when girls [specifically] get past
a certain age, they're interested in older males."
The Romeo Law could prove to be very ,beneficial to
Madison residents because of the rural area and low
population. There aren't as many fish to choose from in
a small pond is an adequate representation of the not
quite ideal number of partner choices in a smaller coun-
ty
Another law taking effect in Florida includes sex of-
fenders being required to have registry numbers printed
on their I.D. Shadrick says, "This is a wonderful idea!
When people present identification when entering an
amusement park or school, they'd be recognized. The
school system especially must enforce safety"
The Florida legislature is also trying to pass a law
that would require that a juvenile's sexual offense
crimes'not be sealed when the juvenile turns 18. A sex-
ual offense would carry onto their permanent adult
record.









4A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder www.greenepublishing.com


LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER


Friday, August 3, 2007


Community Service Provides A Valuable
Ask The Resource To The Community


Question:
If I am involved in a traffic crash, should I
lea ve the vehicle in place or move it?
Over the years, many of us have been taught not to
move a vehicle until police arrive. That may have been
the conventional advice of the time, however, that is no
longer good advice. With the character and congestion of
traffic today, it is much more dangerous to leave a vehi-
cle in the roadway often creating a hazard. In fact, Flori-
da Statute 316.061 (2) states in part: "if a damaged vehi-
cle is obstructing traffic, the driver of such vehicle must
make every reasonable effort to move the vehicle or have
it moved so as not to block the regular flow of traffic.
Any person failing to comply with this subsection could
receive a traffic citation."


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Court-ordered community service is unpaid work
by an offender for a civic or nonprofit organization. In
Madison County, an offender may work for the Cities
of Greenville, Madison or Lee, Consolidated Christian
Ministries, the Suwannee River Regional Library, the
Madison County Recycling Center, the Madison Coun-
ty Senior Citizen's Center, the Madison Fire Depart-
ment, or even the Suwannee Valley Humane Society
Community service addresses the sentencing
goals of punishment, without incarceration. Accord-
ing to the U.S. Probation and Pretrial Services, com-
munity service adds a punitive measure to probation.
While performing community service, an offender's
personal time is restricted and they must forfeit
leisure time.
Community service also allows offenders to atone
for their actions with reparation. Constructive tasks
give an offender the ability to make their victim whole
again.


Restitution, the financial compensation for indi-
viduals, is regarded as a symbolic compensation dur-
ing community service.
Community service, the U.S. Probation and Pretri-
al Services says, fosters a sense of social responsibili-
ty ip offenders and allows them to repair their self-im-
age though serving the community. Community ser-
vice is rehabilitation.
Community service can be geared towards the in-
dividual or a group of individuals at the corporate lev-
el, first time offenders or repeat offenders, teenagers
or senior citizens, the poor or the wealthy. An offend-
er completing community service must not have a vio-
lent background, a history of sexual offenses or as-
sault, or even a current drug or alcohol addiction. The
offender must be stable, as well as motivated.
During community service, offenders repay their
community for the wrongs they have committed. The
practice is cost-effective, and, oftentimes saves commu-
nities thousands of tax dollars that would otherwise
go to prison costs.


Protecting Your Pocketbook From Healthcare Fraud


From the FBI website at www.fbi.gov:
"A billion here, a billion there, and pretty soon
you're talking real money," the late Senator Everett
Dirksen is supposed to have said.
And so it is today with health care fraud, a bur-
geoning crime plague that's adding up in a big way, big-
ticket scheme after big-ticket scheme, essentially cost-
ing you money every time you walk into a hospital or
doctor's office or fill a prescription, whether you know
it or not. The National Health Care Anti-Fraud Associ-
ation estimates that this fraud collectively costs Amer-
icans between $60 billion and $100 billion a year. Ouch.
Our role in combating the problem? We're the pri-
mary investigative agency, with jurisdiction over feder-
al programs like Medicare and Medicaid (both big tar-
gets) and private insurance programs, all the while
working hand-in-hand with plenty of public and pri-
vate sector partners. Locally, our agents team up with
their investigative counterparts on health care fraud
working groups, task forces, and strike teams to tackle
the biggest scams. Nationally, we have a Health Care
Fraud unit at FBI Headquarters that helps, support and
coordinate field investigations and leads field-wide ini-
tiatives.


An anniversary, of sorts. It was 15 years ago, actu-
ally, that we ran our first major health care fraud in-
vestigation-"Operation Gold Pill." It involved about a
thousand "professional patients" getting prescriptions
for medicine they didn't need and having them filled at
pharmacies that
Joe Ford, Associate Deputy Director (left), and Sal Her-
nandez, Deputy Assistant Director in our Criminal In-
vestigative Division, at the briefing. Billed Medicare
for much more than the cost. The patients then sold the
medication at a discount to dealers, who turned around
and hawked it on the street or repackaged it and sold it,
back to the pharmacies a full circle of crime.
Fifteen years ago this month, as the investigation'
came to a head, hundreds of FBI agents and other law
enforcement professionals fanned .out across the na-
tion, making more than a 100 arrests and seizing more
than $30 million in cash and assets. By today's stan-
dards, that's pocket change. But soon, more resources
came our way, and we were in the business of busting
healthcare fraud full-time.
A million ways.... Today, the schemes, are more com-
plex, more time-consuming, and more costly than ever.
"There's literally millions of ways to defraud health


care," our Associate Deputy Director Joseph L. Ford
told reporters this week. "They come up with new ways
every day." Just a very few examples of what we see:
Hospitals, doctors, pharmacists, and other care
providers submitting fake bills for services never ren-
dered-or overcharge;
Service providers -charging insurance for unnec-
essary' and costly procedures;
Doctors selling prescriptions to patients for cash;
Companies billing insurance for expensive equip-
ment but providing poor substitutes;
Crooked docs enticing patients to visit their of-
fices for "free services" or gifts, then stealing their per-
sonal information and using it to file fake claims.
Your role. As with any white-collar fraud, we de-
pend on alert and conscientious citizens for help. We
encourage you to contact the FBI if you come across
any suspected abuse either on the job or in your own
personal lives. Please do yourself a favor and keep an
eye on your explanation of benefits to make sure you're
not getting billed for services or items you never re-
ceived. And please safeguard your insurance card and
your patient information-just like you would a credit
card. It's fodder for identity thieves, as well.


Hedge Funds Admit To $194 Million Scam:


R. Alexander Acosta,
United States Attorney for
the Southern District of
Florida, Jonathan I.
Solomon, Special Agent in
Charge, ,Federal Bureau of
Investigation (FBI), Miami


'ci


Division, and Don Saxon,
Commissioner, State of
Florida's Office of Finan-
cial Regulation announced
that KL Group LLC, Shore-
land Trading, LLC, and KL
Triangulum Management,


LLC, each admitted their
role in running a large
hedge fund scam based out
of south Florida and Cali-
fornia. The corporations
admitted their complicity,
through the attorney for


%xRETHOUND RACIN~tIi

Moatce Lo71350-997-2561
ww .ikwvunds~com


their court-appointed re-
ceiver, in overseeing ap-
proximately $195,000,000 in
fraudulently obtained pro-
ceeds. Specifically, the
companies pled guilty to
conspiracy to commit mail
and wire fraud. Sentenc-
ing for the corporations
was set for 1:30 p.m. on Fri-
day, November 2, 2007 in
West Palm Beach before
Senior United States Dis-
trict Judge Kenneth L.
Ryskamp.
In addition to the cor-'
porate guilty pleas, John
Kim, his brother Yung
Kim, and Won Lee were
previously indicted in De-
cember 2006 concerning
the hedge fund scam. Yung
Kim pled guilty earlier
this month to two charges
in the Indictment; John
Kim is pending trial set for
October 29, 2007 before
Judge Ryskamp and Won
Lee remains a fugitive.
Between 2000 and 2005,
nearly $195 million was
fraudulently obtained
from investors. In early
2005, the Securities and
Exchange Commission be-
gan legal action to shut
down KL's operations.
Judge Ryskamp appointed
a receiver to oversee the
assets of KL shortly there-
after. Since then, the court-
appointed receiver assist-








Get lead stones,
classified,
the Communty
Calendar

so muchmore!


ed federal investigators
and prosecutors to unravel
KL's complicated web of
financial transactions in
an effort to recoup money
for defrauded investors.
Acosta commended
the investigative efforts of
the. Federal Bureau of In-
vestigation, Florida's Of-


fice of Financial Regula-
tion, and the West Palm
Beach office of the United
States Attorney, Korinne
haper, forensic auditor.
These cases are being
prosecuted by Assistant
United States Attorneys
Stephen Carlton and An-
drew Louri.


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Friday, August 3, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5A


OBITUARIES
-Tbffw'w ,


Barney Lee Sadler
Barney Lee Sadler,
76, of Pinetta, died Sunday,
July 29, 2007 in Pinetta.
He was born in De-
catur County, Ga. and was
a retired landscape gar-
dener who owned his own
business. He was a mem-
ber of the First Church of
the Nazarene in Sarasota.
He is survived by his
wife of 53 years, Mary
Lamb Sadler; daughters
and sons-in-law, Mary
Gayle and William J.
Miller of Palmetto and
Melody and Denver
McLaughlin of Madison;
sons and daughter-in-law,
Barney Michael (Boe) and
Deborah Sadler of Palmet-
to and Christopher Scott
Sadler of Bradenton;
daughter-in-law, Shelly
Sadler of Bradenton; sons
of the heart, Sammie Dean
Holton and wife, Melissa,
of Camilla, Ga., Marlin
Kelly White and wife, Mar-
garet of Pelham, Ga.; sis-
ters: Reba Blackston,
Thomaston, Ga.; Gertrude
Belle White, Oneco; Erlene
Blackstone, Perry, Ga.;
Nora Frances Blackburn,
Cairo, Ga., Katherine
Prince, Thomasville, Ga.
and Carolyn Joiner of
Thomasville, Ga.; broth-
ers: Frank Edward Sadler
and Wendell William
Sadler, both of Cairo, Ga.;
grandchildren: Britney
Perry, Spring Thompson,
Justin Sadler, Spencer
Miller, Garrett Loughlin,
Emily. Sadler, Morgan
Sadler, Marlie Holton,
Chloe Holton, and Conner
Holton: and 'six great-
grandchildren. .
He was preceded in
death by his parents, one
sister and five brothers.


Emmogene Lamb
Skaggs
.. ;


Emmogene Lamb Sk-
aggs, 67, of Valdosta, GA,
died on Tuesday, July 31,
2007, at her residence. She
was born on April 20, 1940
in Madison, to William
and Louella Lamb. She
was employed by Park-
wood Developmental Cen-
ter and was a member of
Rosedale Church of God.
She is survived by her
husband, Lester Skaggs of
Valdosta; daughters, Mar-
chetta Touchton of Perry,
and Lisa Humphrey of
Madison; son, Chris Giani-
no of Perry; mother,
Louella Walker Lamb; sis-
ter, Ermagene Chaney,
both of Madison; sister,
Gladys Ferrell of
Thomasville, Ga.; eight
grandchildren and one
great grandchild. She was
preceded in death by her
father, William Lamb;
daughter, Linda Jean
Strickland; son-in-law, Kei-
th Touchton; grandson,
Michael Humphrey, Sr.
Services will be held
on Friday, August 3, 2007 at
11 a.m. in the chapel of
Carson Mclane Funeral
Home with Pastor Maxie
Williams, officiating. The
graveside service will be
at 3 p.m. with Pastor
Gainey officiating at
Hopewell Baptist Church
in Madison. The family
will receive, friends. ,on
Thursday evening from ,3
-.until 8p.mn: at the' funeral
home. Condolences may be
made online at www.mclan-
funeralservices. com.


Fred Bell


Fred Bell, age 80 died
Tuesday, July 31, in Madi-
son.
Funeral services will
be Friday August 3, 2007, at
11 a.m. at Midway Baptist
Church Lee, with burial to
follow in Midway Ceme-
tery, Lee. The family will
receive friends Thursday,
August 2, from 6-8 p.m. at
Beggs Funeral Home.
He was born in Day,
and spent most of his life
in Madison, where he
worked with the Forestry
Department for 33 years.,
He was a World War II
Veteran with the US Army
He was a member of the
Foxhunters Association
and loved to hunt, work in
his garden, and his job
with the Forestry Depart-
ment.
He is survived by his
wife, Ann Bell of Perry;
two sons, Roger Bell and
(Diane) of Columbus, GA.,
Rick Bell and (Richard) of.
Quincy; one daughter, June
Knowles and (Gary) of Per-
ry; one brother, Lester Bell
of White Springs; four sis-
ters, Carlie Bell of Cross
City, Margie Starling of Sa-
vannah, Bobbie Jean Lit-
tleton of Texas, and Lottie
Mae Stokeley, of Georgia;
seven grandchildren, Eric,
Kevin, Amanda, Gary Jr.
Jeff, Kristi, and Jeremiah;
12 great grandchildren,
Erin, Kurtis, Kelsey Han-
n"iahi, Gacie; Kassi, Jessica,
TiristaI Alex. Austin, Syd-
ney, and Wyatt; and one
great-great-grandchild,
Shane.


August 2, 1957
Misses Francine Milli-
nor, Nancy Smith, Billie
Jean Coody, Joan Sale,
Mary Jo Gross, and Joy
Gossman will leave tomor-
row, (Friday) for Leesburg,
to spend a week at the
Methodist Youth Camp.
Rev. Lee Davidson was
guest at the Rotary Club
Wednesday. Service to the
Community, State, and Na-
tion was the central
thought of the talk, which
was both inspirational and
devotional. The story of
the miraculous draught of
fishes, as told in Luke, was
the scriptural background
for the message. Visitors
were Pete Gibson of Perry
and Billy Beggs.
Mrs. Turner Davis en-
tertained her bridge club
Tuesday afternoon with
two tables of players. High
score club prize was won
by Mrs. J.G. Ashley and
Mrs. J.R. McClure was pre-
sented with the visitor's
prize.
August 4, 1967
Lon Shadrick scat-
tered 6 hits and held Lee
Community scoreless in
pitching Beggs-Stockyard
to an 11-0 victory This is
the only shutout of this
softball season.
Beggs scored 6 in the
first inning and were nev-
er bothered by Lee.
-Beggs was led by
Howard Drew's 3 hits for 4
trips in the plate.
Mrs. Frank Davis was
hostess Wednesday after-
noon at a surprise birth-
day party given for her
aunt, Mrs. W.T.
Hollingsworth. Ten
friends of ,the honoree


were entertained in the pa-
tio at Mrs. Carroll
Blalock's home. After
"Happy Birthday" was
sung, birthday cake and
punch were served. The
honoree received gifts
from the guests.
August 5, 1977
Twelve-year-old Alan
Welch has been fishing
ever since he' could handle
a reel and line. Alan had
his big catch on Monday
this week when he came
very close to breaking
state record for a blue gill.
One of the fish weighed in
at one pound, eight
ounces, only one and four-
tenths from the state
record..
Mr. Henry Ragaris is
on a camping trip for sey-
eral days, sponsored by the
Good SAM Trailor Co.
near Atlanta.
We're sure his many
friends join us in congrat-
ulating him on the.fine job
he has done in Madison
County, and wishing him,
Mr. and Mrs. Rudy Ham-
rick, and the two boys the
best of everything as he
pauses briefly before
plunging headlong into an-
other rewarding career of
helping others help them-
selves.
August 6, 1987
The children of Mr.
and Mrs. George Young
will honor their parents
on their golden anniver-
sary with a reception at
New ,Hopeful Baptist
Church Fellowship Hall.
The reception will be from
2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Au-
gust 16. All friends and rel-
atives are invited to at-
tend.


, The home of Mrs.
John Gordon Ashley, Jr.
was the setting Saturday
morning for a coffee hon-
oring Miss Comer, given
by members of her moth-
er's bridge club. Hostesses
included Mrs. Bobby Sher-
rod, Emy Howerton, Mrs.
Robert Burns, Mrs. B.G.
Wyche, Mrs. Glen Baker,
Mrs. Everette Browning,
Mrs. Jargo Clark, and Mrs.
C.E. Russell.
Although the. weather
is sweltering, there's a
hint of fall in the air with
the arrival of newly ap-
pointed NFJC President
William H. McCoy on cam-
pus.
McCoy put in his first
day of work Monday as of-
ficial greeter of a new
class of hearing impaired
students at an orientation
session.
He will be in. transi-
tion for the next few weeks
while he gets his bearings
and becomes acquainted
with his staff.
CHEST
tf~w?,-r


&U"



- -I ~~T~i~ik INC ru i


- .Robrts


Gary and Marie Clark of Wewahitch- with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Crimi-
ka, are pleased to announce the. engage- nology. He is employed as a Field Train-
ment of their daughter ShantiaTherese ing Officer
Clark to Phillip Nicholas with the Talla-
Roberts, hassee Police
son of Department.
Phillip The wed-
a n d ding will
K a r e n take place at
Roberts 6 p.m. on
of Green- SatLurday,
ville. October 13
The at Willow
bride-to-be Pond Plan-
is the station in
g ran d Monticel-
daughter of lo, Flori-
Freeman da. Recep-
B-aIi m action to
and the late follow. In-
Joyce Bali-, citations
man of We- will be
wahitchka. -sent.
Florida and The
Carol Clark couple
and the late wll re-
Gordon Clark side in
of Hudson Talla-
Palls, N.Y has -
The groom- see.
to-be is the '
grandson of the
late Judge T.
Guy Connell. j ,
and the late
Alma ConnelU of
Valdosta, Ga.. and
the late Leon Roberts and
Mozelle Roberts of Valdos-f
ta, Ga.
Tia is a 2001 graduate
of Wewahitchka High
School, and a 2007 gradu- (
ate of Florida State Uni- 4
versity with a Bachelor of
Science degree in Environ-
mental Studies.
Nick is a 1993 graduate '
of Madison County High .
School and attended North "'
Florida Community Col- ,..
lege. He is a graduate of -
Santa Fe Community Col-
lege, and a 2000 graduate of '
the University of Florida Want A Good Feelig? Call


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6A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Friday, August 3, 2007


-! Darius and Devon request
the presence in the upcoming
marriage of their mother. Gloria Aikens,
to Kenneth Davis.
The wedding will be held in Madison at
Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church Satur-
day, August 11. 2007, at 3 p.m. Everyone is
invited.


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Kiwanis Club Hears



About A Drought


Driest Years since 1932


Ft
a
a
I'

a
0


By Jessica HIigginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc,
At last week's Kiwanis
Club meeting, George
Willis had the program. His
guest was Megan Wether-
ington, an engineer for the
Suwannee River Water
Management District. Fol-
lowing a delicious lunch,
Wetherington spoke at
length about the current
drought. Her program was
punctuated by an in-depth
slideshow presentation.
Currently, Madison
County falls into a range of
eight to 20 inches below the
average for rainfall. This
drought has caused the
number eight driest year
since 1932 in Florida.
The flow of the Withla-
coochee in Pinetta is quite
a bit lower than normal,
but not at an all time low
yet. The Suwannee River
in Ellaville is at an histori-
cal all time low lower than
1933. In fact, water depth
has to be measured manu-
ally because the level falls
below the existing gauge.


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Monticello 997-2591
Tallahassee
Apalachee Parkway 878-2626
Mahan Office 942-2626
Metropolitan 893-5100
North Monroe 514-2626
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Greenville 948-2626
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Gictn Publiidlang, inc Plioto b\t'Icssiai
George Willis (left) brought gue
ton, to the Kiwanis Club meeting to


conditions in the area.
Groundwater in Madi-
son County is at an extreme
low, with several recorded
monthly lows.
Wetherington contin-
ued by explaining what a
drought is, The formal def-
inition of a drought is a
"persistent and abnormal
.moisture deficiency having
adverse impacts on vegeta-
bles,. animals, and people."
A drought can be meteoro-
logical, agricultural, hydro-
logical, or socioeconomic.
Right now, people in
south and central Florida
are experiencing a socioe-
conomic drought; they
have certain water restric-
tions imposed.
According to scientists,
droughts are caused by
plenty of things, including
areas of high pressure that
won't go away, El Nino/La
Nina cycle, Atlantic Multi-
decadal Oscillation,
Sunspots, and Global
Warming. Most obvious,
however, is simply a lack of
rainfall.
There's really no for-
mula to determine how bad
a drought is compared to
others in the past century.
From 1932 to 1942, Florida


expel
Bowl
Flori
anoth
1989
Suwa
lows,
water
the lo
the Sa
M
vere
the U
Moni
factor
perpe
The c
been
down
F
state
effect
rising
amor
a low
again
trend
F
ered f
T
enced
as d
droug
quite
P
Sever
droug


1990,based on the thickness
of the tree rings.
In 1885, the southeast
region experienced an all
time low on rainfall.
The long term forecast:
for Florida is a greater than
50 percent probability that
the state will be wetter than
normal in the next three
S months, but the spring will
be another dry time. These
are merely predictions, and
may or may not happen.
Wetherington illustrat-
ed the "Hydro-Illogical Cy-
cle" or the way people react
est, Megan Wethering- to situations of drought.
speak about drought People first notice a
--- drought and continue
rienced the "Dust about their business.
." From 1954 to 1957 Then, people really notice
da was plunged into how bad the problem is.
her drought. From This is followed by pan-
to 1990, the upper ic. Once rain begins, peo-
nnee River has record ple are thankful, but short-
and from 1998 to 2002, ly resume their daily activ-
r flow was lowered on cities, apathy Then, because
)wer Suwannee and on of people's actions, thereiis
anta Fe. anothei- dr6ight'in which
ladison is still in a se- the cycle starts over.
drought according to Wetherington, and other
United States Drought people like her are trying to
tor. Rainfall and other help people replace apathy
rs are to blame for the with preparedness, to pre-
atual state of dryness. vent or at least be ready for
curve for rainfall has another drought.
continuously sloping After Wetherington's
ward since 1968. presentation, Jim Holben
rom 1932 to 2002, the announced that "The
has experienced a hill Winners" are still in the
t, with a low period, lead for the membership
g steadily to a high :drive. "Willis already has
mnt of rainfall, then to one [new member] in the
v amount of rainfall mill," Holben said.
t. There is no real Pat Cantey, captain of
t. "The Conquerors," stat-
lorida has not recov- ed, "I'm confident that
from the 1998 drought. we'll pull ahead and win.
he drought expert- My team's going to do
i in the 1930s was not fine.'
iry as the current The race is on... next
ght, but it lasted for week, see if Cantey can
some time. get more members to join
almers Drought and beat out "The Win-
rity Index measures ners" for the steak dinner
ghts from 1800 to and bragging rights.


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Friday, August 3, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com



AROUND MADISON COUNTY,


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7A


SENIOR CITIZEN'S FUN DAY IS PHENOMENAL


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.


The Senior Citizen's was jam packed with
Center Carnival Fun Day games, music, and deli-


cious food some of the
best hot dogs ever! Se-
niors and guests were able
to participate in a ntunber
of entertaining games and
win some spectacular
prizes that included carni-
val-esque stuffed animals.
Lots of seniors came
to what was the Old Jail.
now used by the Senior
Citizen's Council of Nladi-
son, to take part in the fes-
tivities. Some seniors
even brought along
friends!
The music was hop-
pin,' to say the least. Gui-
tarist Ken Methvin wowed


the crowd with a selection
of golden oldies and
gospel music, all very up-
beat. The seniors sang
along and. danced; Older
American Act Coordina-
tor Joan Beck swayed to
the music, refilling drinks
and redeeming tickets for
prizes.
Popcorn, hot dogs,
chips. and sodas were of-
fered as sustenance, and
all of the seniors had a
blast.
Beck made sure to
thank all of the sponsors
for the event, who provid-
ed balloons, prizes, and


food.
Sponsors for the event
included: Big Mike's Pro-
duce, Madison County
. Community Bank,
Farmer's Supply, Winn
Dixie, CVS Pharmacy, and
Southern Eye Specialists.






Hav yo Iu bee turndIdow


Griene Publi/ung, Inc Photos by
Jessua Higiiinblio i. July 27, 2007




Bivens Named ARC's


Professional Of The Year


this category this year
than any of the other
award categories.
In addition to working
with ARC. Bivens is the


pastor at New Bethel
AME Church in Bellville.
He also has a wife, Gwen,
and two sons, Al and Dar-


ius.


We love you very much,
Mommy, Daddy, Corey, Riley,
Nannie & PawPaw


-~


By Asmey Belu
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Albert Bivens, the Pro-
gram Director of ARC (As-
sociation of Retarded Citi-
zens) Madison/Jefferson,
was awarded the Profes-
sional of the Year award at a
Statewide Conference held
on July 10 at the Vinoy Ho-
tel in St. Petersburg.
Bivens began working
for ARC 20 years ago at an
entry-level position in
Adult Day Training. Cur-
rently, he manages pro-
grams in the center, con-
ducts the date training pro-
gram, aids in the trans-
portation provided by ARC,
and provides companion
services (NRSS).
"He has helped literally
over a hundred individuals
evolve through the years
and reach their desired
goals," said Tim Ressler,
Administrator at ARC. "He
maintains a low profile nev-
er seeking credit or recog-
nition from his peers. Ask
any parent in the two large
rural counties served by
ARC Madison/Jefferson
what they think of Mr. Al-
bert Bivens Jr. and you will
hear nothing but praise and
a smile on their face."
Bivens was chosen to
serve on the ARC of Florida
strategic planning commit-
tee to represent services in
rural counties. He has as-
sisted not only at the local
level but has been an active
participant in statewide ini-
tiatives to improve the lives
of persons with develop-
mental disabilities.
The Professional of the
Year honors a professional
working in a state or local
program that has demon-
strated excellence in serv-
ing people with develop-
mental disabilities. There
were more nominations in


- ~


Reg. Admission $44.95, Juniors' (3-9) and Seniors' 55+ '$39.95 per person, plus tax, parking additional. Obtain 2nd day ticket by exchanging
1st day ticket at the upgrade center on the first day's visit. "2nd day ticket must be used within 6 days and is non-transferable. Good thru 08/31/07
229.219.7080 1-75 Exit 13, Valdosta, GA wildadventures.net







8A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Friday, August 3, 2007


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enin 9*mac


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* Always consult your owner's manual, but a good rule of
thumb is to have the oil filter changed regularly, every 3,000'
Ito 4,000 miles. |


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intomotie (229) 242-2170
e 57 ai Located In Downtown Valdosta
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145 E Base St.'Madison, FL
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Jody's


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IDFL. Mama. Papa. Nana, Sissy. Granny.
N Mema\\. Papa Jerry. Ninnie.
Big Papa. Nanny and Momo!!!

Happenings At
Madison first Baptist Church
By Neal Dobbs
School will begin soon! We pray special blessings
upon all involved children, parents, teachers lunch-
room workers aides those who keep everything clean
and in order all staff county personnel bus drivers
(coming from Valdosta, Ga. one day, we saw in the back
of a dump truck, "Jesus Won't Dump U" applicable for
bus drivers as their bus is behind them), and everybody
At our church, on the west side, "God Needs Our
Availability, Not Our Ability" Appreciation for the sign
at Ken's Barbecue, "Give Thanks Each Day!"
I love and appreciate all in our church and every-
where and ask God's continued love and mercy upon us
all. Amen!


BEN'Iouglas,
DiB Ese I I Auto Repair
iTowing & Diesel Repair Foreign & Domestic I
I 528E, Base St. Madison, FL 405 South Ohio St. |
1 1| Live Oak, FL
(850) 973 48 (386) 362-1225
| \ .J / IJ uI A/C, Alternator, Brakes, I
Ben Bwenll Owner Exhaust, Dual Exhaust,
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* Have all fluids checked, including brake, power steering, Tu 0 l MA 'l
Itransmission/transaxle, windshield washer solvent andl illlIIIIIIl I
antifreeze. These fluids play a large role in the safety and per- America'S Body Shop
S formance of the vehicle.
| 1 ' 813 SSt Augupstine' Vallosta, GA I 4317 WPensacola St. TaUahassee, FL
* Check tire inflation. Under-inflated tires can result in a loss .. A A ct Tl
of fuel efficiency. This is the least expensive form of preven- (229) 24 880 1 850 -575"7124
Stive and safety maintenance. Seamless Panel Repair
S"FREE ESTIMATES
'* Keep your engine tuned. A bad spark plug or -m -
plugged/restricted fuel injector can reduce fuel efficiency as| M a is I
much as 30 percent. B i
* Have the lighting system checked frequently, including| B[
headlights, turn signals, and brake and tail lights. C rtS oiG
.. . 100% Customer Satisfaction Is Our Goal Hwy 14 South Madison, FL
Inspect engine belts regularly. Worn belts will affect the B FORIEGN& DOMESTIC a (Q50 174 a
engine performance. Body- Paint Work- Frame Straightening .(8,50) 973-4 172 I
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Have the air filtration system checked frequently. The air fil- 1630 E. Jackson St. Thomasville, GA We buy Copper, Brass, Aluminum,
ter should be checked approximately every other oil change (Located behind LangdaleAuto MOa) "Stainless Steel, Radiators, Junk Cars,
Ifor clogging or damage. Q 77 I ronAluminum Cans,
1 1 229-226- 2077 1 rc


1 ism I i i i iiSuwannee
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L m m m m mm- m* m m m m m m


The Regional Employment Connections office in Madison
hosted a Job Fair at the North Florida Community College Gym-
nasium. Twelve area businesses and just over 150 job seekers
participated in the event.
Participating employers included:
Twin Oaks Juvenile Development
Hamilton Correctional Institute
North Florida Community College
Florida Department of Transportation
Doctors Memorial Hospital
Ambassador Personnel Inc.
Madison Correctional Institute
Kid's Incorporated
Lake Park of Madison
Avon
Suwannee Healthcare
Nature Coast Eye Care Institute
An informal survey of employers and job seekers indicated
that the event was a success and the employers were able to iden-
tify potential candidates for their existing job openings.
Employment Connections would like to thank the donors of
the door prizes given to job seekers. Donors include: Farmer's
Supply Company, Beall's Outlet, Bank of America, Wachovia
Bank, Madison County Community Bank, Capital City Bank,
and Lake Park of Madison.
If you would like your business to be a part of a recruiting
event hosted by Employment Connections, please contact them
at 850-973-9675.


uatat yu ,IB I DfrIes

Sorensen'
Tire Center, Inc.
you need lawn Mower, ATV, Passenger,
lt Truck, Semi and/or Tracor Tires.....
we've gotyour tires!
We have an ASE Crlified Mechanic
on dvuty for all your repair needs. I
forget, we are also fill service andlube station,
1300 N.Jefferson St. Monticello
850 997.4689
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Job Fair


lsle ,

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Change lhe oil and
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Replace any worn cooling system as
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Correct any prob-
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www.greenepublishing.com



CHURCH


Friday, August 3, 2007


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A


Happenings At Oad's Woodside


Church In Flint, Michigan
By Nell Dobbs could. I looked for a phone, didn't see
Indeed, it was such a blessing to be one, and spoke to a young fellow at the
with Oad in his church where he is Min- counter. He said, "Use mine." Then later,
ister of Music/Organist and to see how he called Oad saying we still hadn't left -
loved and cared for he is. His preacher is almost a six-hour wait. The other person
Deborah Kohler and her meditation and sitting with me going to Atlanta helped
message were great. One person can in- me when we got off to go on the elevators,
deed make a difference in the world of- on the train, up to the right place where
ten in one's small world and often around Nita and Nat met me. Was I happy to see
the world. The special was "He." Some of them! I spent the night with them and
their songs I knew all with such a mes- ,. that was great. Getting on the
sage though. Valdosta flight was something
Preacher announced I was there and I'-' else. The wheelchair assis-
then I had a chance to thank the church -- tant was a Godsend.,
for love shown him. Several friends f It was great to be
said they wanted to ask us for a meal home Monday! It was
and Marge did on Sunda. \ \, hard on Marjell,
and their friend h though Jesse did
Norm came, a good job car-
brought food, and sing for him,
shared. The week plus making
of September 11 t m y trip possi-.
will be six years t. ble. cost wise,
he's been there n and caring for
An exciting hap- Jis dad. AndI
pening...We shopped .,, thank him so
at "Save-A-Lot" in iimuch! Now he's
Flint and Oad ex- looking for-
claimed, "Look ward to Little
Mom! This melon is Jess and him
from Bea Sweet in Madi- going up to see
son, Florida!" I asked to see Oad and Hosh.
the manager, and she said they sell a Thanks. to Debbie
lot and she'd eaten one the night before, Cunningham for bringing food to them
-and it was very good. and for Hilda checking.
Also, we went 6ver into Canada over Very sad about Charles' Walker's
the Ambassador Bridge to Windsor. We death. Our brother Jimmie (Agner) and
ate Chindse; drove forty miles to see he were best friends and Bonnie and he
huge tropical plants, flowers, vegetables were blessed to be here 'cause their son
callefonti just could not bring one thing Martin was in the hospital over a colosto-
from there across the border. Came my reversal. We pray comfort for Ruth
through Detroit and saw some of its his- and all their family
tory automobiles, music, GE, and ate There are many that are ill among us,
some custard ice cream after leaving and we pray for them. Hettie Selman in
there. Madison Hospital, Joe Crafton at Shands,
Many kindnesses shown at the air- and Tommy Pepper. May the Lord bless
port on Sunday we had to wait a long us one and all and direct our paths that
time Oad and Hosh waited where they we may serve Him, Amen!


3








Wilson Eye 'Center






-' .- ----I"r-------- .- --.-
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N

~1~1
l~,~ I
,~.t. I
(I


)










w


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) Single Vision Glasses
@ Scratch Coating


Must present coupon at
appointment


time


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0I~ I
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I


Limited to CR-39 lenses. Not %alid
\ ith other coupons,. discounts.I
sale items. other package offers. I
previous purchases, promotional I
offers, most insurance programs, I
non-prescription sunglasses or I
readers
9/30/07'
-------------
Steven M. Wilson, O.D.
Jodie E. Summers, O.D.


Contact Lenses


Must present coupon at time of
appointment
(2 Boxes)
Limited to clear, spherical, I
Acuvue2, and Clinasost 55 ,
Not valid with other coupons,
discounts, sale items, package
offers, previous purchases,
promotional offers, most
insurance programs, non-
prescription sunglasses or readers.
I 9/30/07
L ------------......-1

Cynthia J. McMurray. O.D.
David K. Price, O.D.


Alex M. Culbreth. O.D.

2108 N. Patterson Street

229.244.3000

www.wilsoneyecenter.com


.-'.., .' ^:^'^ s- s*">' w er!'s'e**t*'*'y 't x'*


'


N Blessed [is] the man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful. But his
delight [is] in the law of the Lord; and in his law doth he meditate day and night. And he shall be like a tree planted by the..riverof ter; that
bringeth forth his fruit in his season; his leaf also shall not wither: and whatsoever he doeth shall prosper. -Psahns 1:1-3













Madison Church of God Hanson United Methodist Church Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church |
S. 90) NE D.u-', Sucir Hjns.:rn. FL 221 Mrtinm Luther King Drr.e Madi,.vn. FL
5 I NE Colin Kelly H .,. M dison, FL mle trom Mi ad n-i, 1i-i .. 14. 1un r. 1 i-..i ,., ). P.0 Bo 2-12 Madison. FL
5 ?0-.973-6307 Re DovieGlass., Pawr PR., /.. ,i ,... ... Pa.:.., 850-973-31.?
Sho1:0n.Sunday School 10:00 n.m. Email Ilshilolh, tadiwn@"niloo n
Sunday School 10:00 a a. sh "
SSMorning Worship 11:15 anm. Marcus Hawkins, Sr. Pastor Josie Graham assistantt Pastor
Sning worship 600 p.m. Sunday Evening Bible Study 6:00 pn. Sunday School............9:30 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 i. Choir Practice Sunday Evening ;:00 p.m.
%ednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. 00 Worship Service.......11:00 a.m.
rWednesday Evening Prater Serice............... 7:00 pn.m.
AlI Are WVelcome. Please Come! Wednesday Night Bible Stud).....6:00 p.m.
Barbara M memorial Church I1. walk BeXftaith No, B Slr.
II Corinthian s 5. 7
Of The Nazarene
SHigh-ay254 -973-4161 Greenville Baptist Church Grace Presbyterian Church
R,.. R'' l,'t .4_c oif 1365 S\ in Si Gr er, lie. FL -.'-* :5. A Coungr:eg.mon of e P,esbyienar Churh In n-,er :
:r Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Sunday School -All Ages 10:00 a.m. Re\ k,, Hopo,,
orningorshp 1100 a.. Sunday Morning Worship 11:0 a.m. t", N,,h W.jhinr, Ave aNlj,-.ii. FL *- -- 4.
4 Esening Worship :30 p.m. Sunday Evening Worship 7:0 p.m. Sunday School For All Ages..................9:45 a 'm.
Wednesdayy Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Sunday Pre.school.Students.,nd Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
SAdults Choir Rehearsals 4:30 p.m. Wed. Fellowship Supper/Bible Stud&........6:00 p.m.
SOfTh Harvtt Ch rh ednesdai Pre-school children. Youth Groups 1st 12th Grades...............6:30 p.m.
Reapers Of The Harvest Church ,,Choir-Practice. 7:30 pin.
LY eouth & Adult Bible Studies 7:00 p.m.
3 miles ,..est of Greenville, FL Ht .00 -All Inm ned Friday Men's Prayer Breakfast.................7:00 an.m.
. 5,nu.Cl Ba 7i.i. Sr -rPato, C,,in'e irship .nd Serve ,a /, 1 '1
Sunday) School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 61:00 ap.ni
von ing Worship 6:00p.,m. Lee United M ethodist Church Z
Wednesday Night Service 7:30 p.m. 25M t* L. FL Zion A.M .E. Church
S\,J wh/n tiie J y J rt. Pneii.lc.sti wa full\ -C..l> Richard Quacjkernbi., Pj.':'r 4" Frietndly Chinch"
tth t.i tl n i a ut I : i accord in o pacee" 4.i, '. / Morning Worship 9:00 a.m. Cherr Lake. FL 8509-929--5 4
Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Re. Nitlhactt Re,,hoant, .Ir Po,,
; EVERYONE IS ALWAYS WELCOME! Su Scu I P'.
E ROMorning Worship 11:00 a.mn. *a,, ,iary B. Hargcn, ,'litiunl 'It I,. .
Sunday Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
S St. Vin ent DePaul Roman lMen'sFellowship Breakfast Church School 9:45 ann.
Second Sunday 8:00 a.m. Worship Service 11:00 a.m.
SfCatholic Church Mul,,iple Weekly Bible Simde..'.\uitie, Wed. Night Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
L.*',' .ttt lht Tle Cu t,w, ''nir S ilt/ Cl ir t r
Meeting & Sumter St 350-.73--24 '
V1 Rci Jol nIJ Gort'1n. lMI
I sons, 9:0.m. First United Methodist Church Fellowship Baptist Church
Nlon.. Tues., Wed. Mass 7:30 anm. m.p
Thursday Mass 7:30 anm. Sine I i il..rr, at Rutlieuc SI 510-973-6295 One mile north of Madison or, 14';
Q Saturday Mass ;:30) pn.m. ,. R.lerit l'.,. ,i S .1,Hargu. Pat,..-
Ga ,,.,, S, dh, ...I,, ,t 1. ,. iI, .G,, I. .... .. G a ia Ga r:ila .Ah s,i Dioct' r Ja/ .e I,'. St,,.a, Pa,,I .,'
"N \'louth & Chldrer', Minrt-i-_1 .ctM 1l.....r.- luiollr 1,...t i
.' SerA ice of Word & Table 8:30 a.m. ie S. :,,.
Epi .far scopal urchSe.5(o:7 32'-"
St. M army's Episcopal Church Sunday School 9:45 a.m.. Morning Worship............... :30a.. & 1:00 an. .
1-11.1 NE H...rr, A .: * MA..lon ii-L 5'-3-$35, Sunday Morning Worship 11:110 a.m. Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
i 7 ti B/,, P.,I/ i.., I., ..,u .i S, .i.ii i, m.Di'i Wednesday .Ml Youth grades 6-81......3:10-6:001 p.m. Wednesday: FamillN Night................Call for schedule
N. Sunday Church School 10:00 a.m. Youth (grades 9-12) 6:301-7:30 pn.m. ".1 Ful. ,v Familis C,w nc ,, \.-, ;ar
Sunday Holy Eucharist 10:00 a.m. Men's Fellowship Breakfast 13rd Sun.I........8:00 a.m. Ii .'lerc,h'd1 i, al hom tvroup,, li ,'.'- -,'
Mission Board 2nd Sundai 11:00 anm. Women's Meeting & Lunch (1st Mon.i.....12:00 noon 1.., ., ,.. a ,v n' .... .. ..-. ..... ,.., r.. ... ... .,
a Episcopal Church W o% len 3rd Sundan .......11:lli a.m. ,,,,,.., ., t ,,, .. ... .r,, ,, ,, a/t ,,, ,. HH ,- \,' l [ n,.
':* .';* ' ' . . .' ".. " ; Z : : " .. -' ? "' - -. -t " : " ." ? :. . " : t ' ,' ' ", ', ? " ?


I











10A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



HEALTH


Friday, August 3, 2007


How To Treat "A PATIENT"


Choosing A Physical Therapy Clinic


Having an excellent
staff is essential to the suc-
cess of treatment for any
patient. Everyone has been
"a patient" at one time in
their lives. So ask yourself,
as a patient, what did you
want or need most of all?,
Someone to listen...to un-
derstand... show compas-
sion for... treatment for
you as an individual.
These are some of the
things I look for. as a pa-
tient. The front desk staff
is the first impression of
any practice and being
greeted with a smiling
friendly gesture is a sure
win; especially when
you're not feeling your
best! Continued care of be-
ing helpful and apprecia-


tive of a patient's choice in
choosing your practice
shows loyalty to yourself
and the owrier(s). I have al-
ways known that believing
in what you do makes the
difference.
Quality of Care is to-
day's catch phrase, but
what does it mean? Quality
of Care is defined as a ca-
pacity to achieve goals.
Your next question should
be who chooses these goals
and how are goals chosen?
Because patient values are
what shapes goals and
these gpals are not always
assessed, are you receiving
"Quality of Care?" Imple-
menting your own goals of
treatment as a patient is a
critical step to a successful


recovery, especially when
dealing with complica-
tions of a chronic dis-
ease/pain (such as Diabet-
ic or Non-Diabetic Per-
pheral Neuropathy).
Knowledge is powerful
and being educated is em-
powering. Research shows
17% of licensed therapists
read less than 2 articles a
month that provide re-
search on new technolo-
gies within their own pro-
fessions and only 25% of
those who read articles ac-
tually implement the tech-
niques, There is more in-
formation available to the
general public than ever
before with one require-
ment having the willing-
ness to learn.


responsibility to learn as
much as you can about
your symptoms and/or
condition. Know the com-
plications associated with
it and what treatments are
available for successful
management. You may be
interested in knowing that
the most effective treat-
ment of Neuropathy and
Chronic pain conditions is
the multi-superficial in-
crease in circulation and
Nitric Oxide levels in your,
red blood cells for ease of
neural transmission.
The HEART of any
practice is the patient.
Walk away with a sense of
accomplishment and confi-
dence that you have made
a difference, not only in


come into contact with. It
takes teamwork to achieve
the desired goals. The
team is made up of the pa-
tients, physical therapists,
physicians, and staff, and
the patient who chooses a
therapy group, sets person-
al goals, carries out the
home exercises and puts
forth the effort to partici-
pate in the therapeutic in-
terventions.
The physicians assist
in choosing a therapy
group, prescribes a P.T.
Evaluation, and continues
to be an active participant
as the primary care
provider. The therapists
perform a thorough evalu-
ation, sets goal and imple-
ment a treatment plan,


with progress reports 10
visits or 30 days. The staff
maintains communication
between the two providers,
which leads us back to my
first sentence, having an
EXCELLENT STAFF is vi-
tal to the success of treat-
ment for any patient.
Knowing how to treat a
patient is providing quali-
ty care in meeting the
goals of the, patient. Put
both your mind and soul
into what you do, and most
importantly BE ON THE
SAME TEAM!
Sign up with a winning
team... .Jerry Mercer Phys-
ical Therapy! 229-242-9600
30 years+ experi-
ence... Evidence- Based
Protocols... Hands-On Di-


As a patient it is your yourself, but in those you providing the physician rect Patient Care
JERRY MERCER VALDOSTA'S LEADING
1 "s a EU PoesalsEObesity In Youth Linked To Location
S HANDS-ON Professionals


HIGHLY SKILLED
in the Latest Techniques
NEWEST most effective and
pain-free treatment of foot/leg
pain. Endorsed by The American
Diabetes Association -
90% SUCCESS RATE


Jerry Mercer PT/Owner Ginger Elmin PTA
n. o A UNIQUE FLARE TO calorenr
TRADITIONAL SERVICE:
We take GREAT PRIDE in helping people... PERSONALIZED CARE
MANUAL THERAPY LARGE GYM IN-DOOR TRACK
CHRONIC PAIN MANAGEMENT and EDUCATION
We not onl% treat the symptoms, hut we hnd the cause of the dysfunction
1-tiNCTIONAL CAPACITY EVALIJATIONS
Make sure you are READY and ABLE to RETURN to WORK...
BALANCE RETRAINING/MOVEMENT ANALYSIS
Correcting structural changes and restoring normal function
LOOKING for just the RIGHT FIT....WHAT ARE YOUR GOALS...
to ensure QUALITY OF LIFE


By Jessica Higginbotham
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Recent studies have
linked childhood obesity
to the area that they live
in. 'About 30.6 percent of
American children ages 10
to 17 are overweight," stat-
ed the study conducted by
the South Carolina Rural
Health Research Center.
As for rural areas,, the
forecast is gloomy. Ac-
cording to the study, 16.5
percent of the 30.6 percent
of American children who
are overweight live in rur-
al areas.
There are a number of
causes for the rates from
lack of good nutrition
choices to poverty. There
is a'link, between finances
and weight. Families with
more money seem to have
lower weights, while peo-
ple with less money or
4 W, a a -


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who are on fixed incomes
have higher weights.
This could be due to
the fact that cheaper foods
aren't healthy foods.
Every fast food chain has
a "Value Menu," where
unhealthy foods are super
cheap. In addition to that,
cheap good food found in
grocery stores, is typically
full of fat, cholesterol, and
sodium, all which hinder
weight loss.
Children in the south
are most likely to be over-
weight or obese, cited the
study 33.1 percent of
children in the south meet
the criteria. However,
children in the rural
south are even more likely
to be overweight or obese
- 34.5 percent and 19.5 per-
cent, respectively
Nearly one in four
black, rural children are
obese, while only 19 and 12
percent of Hispanic and
white children, respec-
tively, were obese.
Poverty may be an
overriding cause for obe-.


sity, because poor, urban
projects have the same
obesity rates as the rural
south.
At the supermarket.
level, healthy, low fat foods
are expensive. The pover-
ty rate in rural areas is
linked to that weight gain.
A pack of hotdogs and
canned Spaghetti-O's are a
whole lot cheaper than
fresh fruits and vegeta-
bles. The Industrial Revo-
lution brought canneries,
packaging foods with
preservatives, which
brought on the pounds.
Rural supermarkets,
normally noticeably
smaller than a city mar-
ket, don't have the same
choices available to con-
sumers. The markets are
small and geared toward
the number of people in
the area and the type of
consumer. A person who
has grown up in a rural
area is less likely to eat
the same food as someone
who grew up in an urban
area, so why carry the


same products?
Habits are passed
down through the genera-
tions, but the diet of yes-
teryear will not fit the peo-
ple of today. While Grand-
ma's cooking is delicious,
it isn't healthy for today's
stagnant generation to eat
a lot of.
To combat the grow-
ing trend of obesity in
youth, schools are altering
their wellness programs
to include mandatory
physical education and
personal fitness. classes.
Federally subsidized
lunch programs, such as
the ones provided in pub-
lic schools, ,have certain
nutrition guidelines that
they must meet. The
lunches must provide a
balanced, low-fat meal
that is equally tasty, but
making meals healthy and
tasty has become harder
than expected.
Students should al-
ways balance food with ex-
ercise to maintain a
healthy lifestyle.


WAIT Certification Training Available


. By Ashley Bell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Why Am I Tempted? (WAIT) Training
will be held August 17 and 18, 8:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. The cost for the training will be
$350 and will take place at the TCC Capi-
tal Center at the Mary Brogan Museum of
Arts and Science, 300 West Pensacola
Street in Tallahassee.
The training is for educators to teach
the youth how to truly have the best sex...
By waiting until and in preparation of
marriage. The training is open to middle
and high school teachers, medical profes-
sionals, parents, youth pastors, and
adults who work with the youth in non-
profit organizations. However, all indi-
viduals who are trained in WAIT .will be
authorized to facilitate WAIT Training
and versions thereof only under and at
the direction of Live the Life and pur-
suant to the terms of its agreements with
WAIT Training.
WAIT Training is a development
course that aims to teach youth how to


achieve personal success, say yes to
healthy choices, to develop healthy rela-
tionships, and say no to choices that
would hinder them from success.
The training is a 16-hour, two-day
training that includes:
Life and Conflict Resolution Skills
Positive Youth Developments and
Assets
Age and Developmentally-Appropri-
ate content
Fun and Interactive Programming
Character and Relationship Educa-
tion
Culturally Sensitive, Research-
based and Medically Accurate Informa-
tion
Marriage Preparation Education

To register for the training, visit the
website at www.livethelife.org and click
on WAIT Training Certification registra-
tion or contact Stacee Satcher, Student
Programming Coordinator, at Live the
Life, 850-668-3700.


DR. JOEL SHUGAR, MD. MSEE is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist who has performed
OVER 30,000 LASER PROCEDURES. Dr. Shugar will personally share information on
the new Premium Implant, Calaract and LASIK procedures.
Receive a FREE personal consultation at the seminar from Dr. Shugai.


NATURE COAST
EyeCare I titute


555 North Byron Butler Parkway Perry, Florida
www.naturecoasteye.com


(800) 870-6001 EXT. 641

ITE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS THE RIGHT TO REFUSE 10 PAY. CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR ANY OTHER
SERVICE. EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT WHICH IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE,
DISCOUNTED FEE. OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE. EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 455.225(1) FLORIDA STATUS.


mmr.pecior First Month ,

Cooler Rent Cooler Rent A
$795 FREE
FREE Delivery

Cuillian Water
850-878L0245
Toll Free: 888-1 ,-9461


7:00PM

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SEATING IS LIMITED
SO CALL TODAY
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YOUR PLACE!


1"~


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"ald J I D..V








Friday, August 3, 2007


www.greenepublishing.com


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11A


200 Sales T


0lid


ist Of Taxable And Tax-Exempt Items




August 4, through August 13,2007


The 2007 Florida Legislature
passed and the Governor approved
a tax-free period that states:
No sales tax shall be collected
on the sale of books, clothing, wal-
lets, or bags, including handbags,
backpacks, fanny packs, and diaper
bags. but excluding briefcases, suit-
cases, and other garment bags, hav-
ing a selling price of $50 or less, or
on sales of certain school supplies
having a selling price of $10 or less
for the period beginning 12:01 a.m.
August 4, 2007. and ending at mid-
night August 13, 2007.
Clothing means any article of
wearing apparel, including all
footwear, except skis, swim fins,
roller blades, and skates, intended
to be worn on or about the htunan
body. Clothing does not include
watches, watchbands. jewelry um-
brellas. handkerchiefs, or sporting
equipment.
Book means a set of printed
sheets bound together and pub-
lished in a volume. The term book
does not include newspapers. mag-
azines, other periodicals, or audio
books.
School supplies means pens,
pencils, erasers. crayons, note-
books, notebook filler paper, legal
pads. composition books, poster pa-
per, scissors, cellophane tape, glue
or paste, rulers, computer disks.
protractors, compasses, and calcu-
lators.
The following is a list of cloth-
ing and accessory items and their
. taable '(T) or exlmpt (E)' status"
di'i-itg the tax free period if they
are sold for $50 or less


The following is a list of clothing and accessory items and their taxable (T) or exempt (E) status during the tax tree
period if they are sold tor S50 or less


Ite RM ThwiaEn-pxro Ir


" I.iii" tt,,i nfd I.lvpins
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Rnieiii-na l--ihing,


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E Fi~hing %,-.6-in-.n-11--t,,lwin
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F. bvm u-iL. anid unhl*rr.nl
H
E [lair n~lz. h.,,-: div. .and hand;
F iinH m .and prw



E i: .ini.. i-i.hi'iii .pp'.rI h'--itrv
E Huntingi ii.!,


C IN. *i inicludin3 r'*m.,hniu.I and mi-Sd
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F. 'A-rk oh 4 jh- nd uridl-ra.;
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f- r-d" -
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F:I I.pu.i~a-~inihp


Li-kb, i -I r- id ., I-., ii rh. .]. i ,,'r .t q


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, -,i rIh. r F. ium [.a -...hi
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IT'S BAC


SCHOOLTI


~aturaI Hair

)WeI In ss V I Ia or,


Cono s Call to schedule a
'FREE consultation


Tuie l '.M -


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is


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12A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


OUTDOORS


Friday, August 3, 2007


w1.F~~~


Three Locals


Win State
"m Ur


Arcnery


Titles


I. .
4 ..,


After traveling to Tampa, Florida
on July 22. 2007 to compete in the ASA
Florida State Archery tournament
sponsored by the Gasparilla Bowmen
Club, three locals come home with the
State Titles. Jantz Jenkins. Ethan Pick-
les, and Troy Pickles each won an ASA
Florida State Archery Federation title
in their respective class, while George
Jenkins finished 2nd in his class. For
their win, all three received an ASA
State Federation State Champion belt
buckle.
"Winning this year is special for me
as I'll always have the memory that my
son and I both hold the Florida State Ti-
tlefor 2007 in Open B and Young Adult."
said Troy Pickles.
Jantz Jenkins competes in the


Youth Boys' division of the ASA com-
petitions and is currently in 4th Place for Shooter of the
Year. Jantz is the 14-yr old son of Nondis and George
Jenkins of Madison. Jantz will be going into the 9th
grade at Madison County High School.
Ethan Pickles competes in the Young Adult division
of the ASA competitions and is currently in 2nd Place

:) Country


Meat


~ "Market


,arvey Greene Dr.
Madison, FL
Chicken Wings
Chicken Breasts


$1.99 Ib.


Leg Quarters $1.09 lb.
$1Ei Bag of-Leg Quarters ,
Hand Cut Ribeyes $6.99 lb.

Homemade Rind Bacon $3.99 lb.

Ox Talk $4.49 Ih.


Cube Steak


$2.99 lb.


~wa A A~


~-~6'-' 4'J A


A."
Jtt
I'


V
4-. -
4-"
.1.,


;... I '"* '' ,.,^
'4,..4
.'. .I


V ,."-
.I "


for Shooter of the Year. Ethan is the 16-yr old son of
Karen and Troy Pickles of Madison. Ethan will be go-
ing into the llth grade at Madison County High School
and works for Jemia Ranch.
Troy Pickles competes in the Open B division of the
ASA competitions and is currently in llth Place for
"Shooter of the Year."
All will finish up the ASA Tournament Season by
Bowhunting Course

Scheduled For

Annual Jamboree


Learn how to bowhunt, for free.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) and the Florida Bowhunters Council will
offer a free bowhunting course Sept. 1. The 8 a.m. 5
p.m. course will be part of the Florida Bowhunting Jam-
boree at the Citrus Wildlife Management Area.
The jamboree has attracted 600 archers in the past.
Participants competed in shooting skills using broad-
head-tipped hunting arrows.
This year's added attraction is the FWC's Bowhunt-
ing Course, designed to meet the specifications of states
That require National Bowhunter Education Foundation
y (NBEF) certification prior to purchasing a bowhunting
License.
Participants can expect to learn all aspects of
Sbowhunting, including:
History of bowhunting,
Safe and responsible bowhunting
Know your bow and arrow
Preparing for the hunt
Shot placement and game recovery
Use of elevated stands and other techniques
Outdoor preparedness
Participants must bring all equipment, including
bow and arrows. Instructors Lowe Morrison and Bill
Wilson are among the most accomplished and respected
bowhunting instructors in the state.
Students should pre-register for the course by call-
ing the FWC's Lake City Regional Office at (386) 758-0525.
Students of all ages may participate.
For more information on the Jamboree, visit
http://www.floridabowhmunters.ore/.


I *!


~7'IO4r


It


* competing in the final competition shoot in
Columbus. Georgia on August 9 12, 2007.
Jantz Jenkins shoots a Mathews Prestige
bow, uses a Tru-ball release, Carbon Ex-
press arrows. AEP stabilizer. Sure-Lock
SSlide Bar with a Viper scope. Jantz is spon-
- scored by Greene Publishing. Davis Enter-
S prises. Solo-Archery Tru-Ball. Bohning
.: .,.Archery, Rainbow Signs, Catbon Express,
AEP, and family. Jantz also placed second
in the Georgia State Archery tournament
J held at the Oconee Lodge in Eatonton, Geor-
gia on July 14 and 15. 2007.
S... Ethan Pickles shoots a Constitution
&.,f';,. Compound Bow made by BowTech and is a
member of Team BowTech.
Pickles is proudly sponsored by Mr. Jimmy Davis of
Jimmy Davis Enterprises. In the Tallahassee area,
Pickles shoots for and uses Seminole Outdoors as his
bow shop. In addition, Pickles is also sponsored by
BowTech (bow), Extreme Archery Products (sights and
stabilizers), TRU-Ball (releases), Easton (arrows), Dura-
vane (fletching), and TrophyTaker (arrow rest).
: .' " . -- -
Quitman Country Club
**. (V ))}



/ 1 Since 1913
1229-560-4141
i "' ^' c ,* : '
18Holes

II











229-560-4 14 1 f^
FOR A LIMITED TIME OlMLY.^
[:'-y;| ~'Some restrictions may apply. r i*^
i';:;| Saturday & Sunday coupon good for a limited time. ;*;*
2,Tee timesondyFrm 8am-10am. .y s i
i,:-- ---- ----- I ..':i



*, '"'
i ,,r((...



......229-...560-4141 ":::
FOR A LIMIlTED TIME ONLY "
',','': i'Some restrictions may apply, ____'""
77 Saturday & Sunday coupon god o a limited time. '
....Tee times onyfo am-lOam. 37 .....
]'...'. 1,'L171 __P' .- 7 5 K'KK,''-',1


.. The Enterprise-Recorder

Fish & Game Feeding Chart
How to use- The mnij r ad minor t eding tine fotr ea.h day tre lItted het '.~ The mdjor teeding times are the best for the
sporhtman dfnd lat ib ut hours the mm r tee.dmL limes ca iflo hjt. goond succe'. but last only bout 1 hour.
Good ULuc and he Lcaretul out here.



I. I I. m I! Ii'
Iia 'I I, I ,
.5.a II.. I II I I .
-, n I I A '


RIBS CHICKEN BEEF
PORK* BBQ BEANS


0
^-^

(.


S Real Pit B-B-Que of Perry, Inc.

Only The Finest et"--
Quality Meats, --- ,telb .--
Slow Cooked Over r aiable "
An Open Pit O cAsll o ns.
a1. '--lahead or Carry-0ul Drive-ln Window
2429 Byron Buller Pkwy Hwy 19 Soutlh Perry, FL

850. 584- 3751


4. ,


I' '~**~' ,.
A- ~
~


3' -


I:


,w '-..


rJ







www.greenepublishing.com


Friday, August 3, 2007


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A


ADAMS=
Auto Upholstery

Convertible T
Seat Recove.inil
John R. Adams 11716 102"' Terrace
(386) 362-1525 Live Oak, Florida
Monday thru Friday 8:00 AM 5:00 PM


SServing Madison, Jefferson,
Taylor & Lafayette Counties
Auto, Life, Health, Home.
Freddy Pitts, Agency Manager
Jimmy King, Agent
233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071
24/7 Claim Service: Doug Helms, Agent
/1-866275-7322 105 W. Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-2213
Freddy Pitts
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371
"Helping You
Is What We Do Best."' Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL* (386) 294-1399

"Affordable Quality"


Family Owned & Operated We Wor Fm
Start to Finishi ,
Commercial Residential 'tOMIIr

free 386-497-1419 U' Ltr Estimates RC...A.7oo42 4 insured Worers Comp

Mike's Pump Repair
And Well Drilling, Inc...
il0 Induqlrial \%e. 1 ,"9-E.Ba. .
'Lie (ak, FL Madison, IL
386-364-5360 850-973-8877 Owner:
24 HR. SERVICE Mike Harris
34 Yrs.
EMERGENCY # Experience
(386) 590-0888 s.10


S/4.



,."",is ~ s
.1'~ IL: ilt:.M ifc


Burnette Plumbing &
Well Service
Famib Owned Since 1902 '.
mbing Repairs VWells Drilled
xtures-Faucets Pumps Replaced
wer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced
water Heater Repairs All Repairs


125 SW Shelby Ave.
Madison, FL 32340
Lic.# RF 0058445


Drilling
&
Repairs


Carlton Burnette
Master Plumber
850-973-1404


Law Offices of

Monica Taibl

125 NE Range Ave. Madison, FL 850-973-1477
TaiblLaw@embarqmail.com
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before
you decide ask the lawyer to send you free written information about their qualifications and experience.


HUGH'S LAWN CARE
and TREE SERVICE, LLC
Hugh Sherrod
238 NE Brickyard Pond Ave. Madison, Florida
Business: 850-445-3321 Home: 850-973-6601 email: hughsl@earthlink.tiet
Lawn Mowing Hurricane &
Edging Bad Weather
Weed Eating CI C Bad ean ther
Tree Trimming S1|iS Cleanl
Bush Hogging Roads Before & After
Debris Clean Up The Storms
We accept ATM & Debit Cards


Metal Roofing
$ $ $ $ $ S AV E $ $ $ $ $
Buy Direct From Manufacturer
Several Profiles to Choose From Over 20 Colors In Stock
with 40 Year Warrantles
Call for Brochures & Installation Guides
Toll Free
1-888-393-0335
www.gulfcoastsupply.com

"Good Water Means Good Health"
Shea's Well & Pump
Everett's
Well Drilling & Irrigation Wells
Residential & Irrigation Wells Deep Wells 4" to 8"
Sales Service
Serving The Georgia & Florida Area For Over 30 Years.
Old Quitman-Madison Road Quitman, GA
FLic 213 (229) 263-4192 GA


PROFESSIONAL ROOFING
Roof Inspections, New Roofs,
Re-Roofs & Repair Specialist.
CCC#1325926
Folsom Constructing, LLC
850-566-6504
We Accept All Credit Cards


QToPUMP & IRRIGATION,
Sales & Service
"Four Generafions of Experience


904 N"W Suwannee Ave.
Branford, FL
L1 iz26-0


LOTS STUFF
, New & Used Items.
ATVs' Pirt Pikes* Scooters
ChrisM as. Lay-A- WayfPlan
S141 Broad Ave. Greenville (Beside Hayes Park)
(850) 242-9343




'Peacock's
Landscaping & Sprinkler Systems
Residential & Commercial
.' Landc'ap. Design & Installation Site-prep, Sodding
ding Irrigahtin Lawn Shrub Gravel Driveways Drip
Glenn & Margie Peacock
850.973.2848


Get Your Business Nanme &
Services Out There!
Place Your Business Card In Our Weekly
Business Card Directory.

850-973-4141


Fix
SeN
Wa


L WELL
F- ILL
Lt 7DRILLING










14A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Friday, August 3, 2007


I - .--- -- - MLU

DEDLIE O'CASIIED (5) 7-44 33'P'. ODAY


^4 PERRY FLEA MARKET
7 'Antiques Glassware Collectibles Gifts & More
Yard Sale Visit the Tool Shop FRI SUN 10 A.M. 4 P.M. We Buy
Set-Ups $5 & up Hwy. 19 S.-(Old Motel)(850) 838.1422 (850) 584-7124Call Us


Excavating Work
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Re-
moval, Demolition, and Roads. No
Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call
Paul Kinsley at 850-973-6326
Chiropractic
& Clinical Nutrition
Carl D. Bartholomew, DC, MD
235 SW Dade St, Madison
By Appointment
850-673-8338

Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Irrigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
(850) 973-2848







AUCTION
Every Saturday
6:30 p.m.
1693 SW Mosley Hall Rd.
(CR360) Madison, Florida
Phone: 850-993-2959
M/C. VISA & DEBIT CARDS
New Truckloads Arriving Weekly
Heated /AC /Comfy Seats
Directions From 1-10: Take SR14
SW to stop sign. Turn right on
SR14/360. At fork in road, bear
right onto SW Mosley Hall Rd.
(CR360).Past fire house, on left.
AU691-Col.Ron Cox-AB2490


YARDSALE


Multi Family Yard Sale
Aug. 3rd & 4th 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
241 Livingston St, Madison.
Antiques, collectables, old and new
furniture, tools, Hess trucks and
much more!
Yard Sale Sat. August 4th
8372 N. Hwy 53 (just north of
Cherry Lake C.R.) Wood and metal
desk, chairs, computer desk, file
cabinets, folding tables, water cool-
er, metal and wood shelves, shop
benches and much more.






25 lbs. of
Clean Newspapers
just $2 a bundle
973-4141


Please! help me to get my 2 gen-
tle, 8 month old bulls to market. I
have no trailer. I need a couple of
panels, a bucket of feed (I have the
feed) and a trailer to lead them into
(I will lead them) that's all it would
take. Reasonable and fair payment
given. Call 850-948-5097. In
Lovett.


Venus' Fly Traps.
Those Amazing
Carnivorous Plants!
Available Exclusively at
Creatures Featured Pet Shop
Madison, FL 850-973-3488
Last three Mini Schnauzers for
sale. Two females, one male,
salt/pepper and white. They have
shots, health certificates, CKC reg-
istration and arc on heart worm pre-
vention. All are loving and
adorable. $350 each Call Leona at
850-929-4416.


Doberman Mix Puppies
& Free Kittens
Ready to go!
850-929-2487 or
850-464-9230








2 bedroom 1 bath mobile
homes in park, 135/week, own-
er pays electric, $300 deposit,
call Erin at 850-570-0459

Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Senior's
and Disabled. 1 & 2 bedrooms,
HUD vouchers accepted Call 850-
973-3786 TTY Acs 711.
Equal Housing Opportunity

r Greenville Pointe

Apartments

1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible apts. Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers accepted.
Call 850-948-3036. TDD/TTY
711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal
Housing Opportunity

/ Q*_outhem4 Villasi8 of

C,, adison apartments

Rental assistance may be available.
HUD vouchers accepted. 1, 2, & 3
BR HC & non-HC accessible apts.
Call 850-973-8582, TDD/TTY
. 714,315 S\V La son Circle. Madi-
son, FL 32340. Equal Housing Op-
portunity







Pioneer
Excavating & Tractor
Services
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump
Removal, Demolition, Roads,
Mowing, Discing, Box-Blading,
and Tilling.
No Job Too Small
Free Estimates *
Call Paul Kinsley
850-973-6326

$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
NoMiddle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385

Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage-23
acres, Comer lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Drive and High-
way 53 South. Natural gas line,
8 inch water main, access to city
utilities, fire hydrant, and ser-
vice from two power companies.
Property has easy access to 1-10,
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will build to
suit tenant.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141







FOR SALE BY OWNER 1800 sq.
ft. 3 BR, 2 BA, Brick Veneer home
located on one block in Greenville,
Florida. Remodeled Kitchen with
full appliances. Cultured Marble
Whirlpool Tub and shower; Large
den w/Fire place. Tiled Patio;
20x28' detatched garage. Just two
miles to I-10. Reason for selling
built new home. Best value in
North FL at $139,000. Phone 800-
284-1725 Day, 850-997-4456 Nite,
850-545-9292 Cell. Brokers Pro-
tected.
3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995.00
Factory Direct
Home Prestige Center
352-752-7751

LOG HOMES
With as little as
$500.00 Down
Prestige Home Center
Lake City, Florida
1-800-355-9385


WOW! 2 Homes For The Price of
One!!! In Shady Grove, on Hwy
14, wood frame home has 1,200
sqft. Double Wide home has 1,296
sqft on 3.76 acres. Own all for only
$135,000 very nice, neat and clean.
Call Jason at 850-843-0503.





$500 DOWN
With your land
Factory Direct Prices
No Middle Man!
Prestige Home Center
Lake City Florida
1-800-355-9385
3 BR/2 BA Doublewide
$39,995.00
Factory Direct
Home Prestige Center
352-752-7751











Publishing, Inc.

Person Needed For Advertising
Sales at:
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Does a fast-paced career with a
growing newspaper group spark
your interest?
Do you enjoy customer contact,
both in person and over the phone?
Then, it's a safe bet you will enjoy
this job. We're fun, we're busy and
work best under pressure. If that
sounds like you, please. fax your
resume to Emerald at: 850-973-
4121 or apply in person at the office
on Hwy 53 South. '
Please, if you're not sure how an
alarm clock works or you average,
more than two dramatic incidents
per week in ouir 'life,'"o 'simplI,
only work because you're bored, or
feel that you must complain on a
daily basis or fight with co-work-
ers, then please do not apply.





`N-
A /



LPN or RN Needed
7A 7P
With Benefits
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston St..
Live Oak, FL 32064.
Contact Angela Akins or Amelia,
Tompkins at 386-362-7860

Great Opportunity
RN House Supervisor
7P 7A
Great Schedule and Benefits
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Please Contact
Amelia Tompkins/DON at
386-362-7860

Busy PR office needs skilled
copywriter. Contract basis, $10/hr.
Press releases, features. Photogra-
phy desirable. Must have profes-
sional experience. Email 3 writing
samples, resume, references to Tr-
ish Hinton, news@nfcc.edu, Col-
lege Advancement, NFCC. EO/EE.



Publishing,

Page Designer/Layout needed for
two weekly newspapers. Must be
a team player, able to handle multi-
ple tasks, have experience with
Quark Express and/or Photoshop
and/or experience with laying-out
newspapers. Apply in person only
at the Greene Publishing Inc.
newspaper building, located at
1695 Highway 53 South.
LPN or RN needed
7P 7A
WITH BENEFITS!!!
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E..Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064
Please Contact Angela Akins or
Amelia Tompkins at
386-362-7860 -
$AVON $
Start Today. Earn 50%
on your very first order.
Start-Up Kit Only $10.
Call ISR Dorothy


850-973-3153


Advent Christian Village
Current JOBS line
Advertisement
call 658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net
24 hrs/day, 7 days/week


If excellence in quality & compas-
sionate care are important, give us
a call. Our team may be what you
have been looking for!
Become part of a professional and
caring team; and experience grati-
fication like never before.

Cook and Support
Food Service Positions

High school diploma or equivalent
desired. Dependability and coop-
erative working style required. Ex-
perience in institutional food ser-
vice a plus.

Competitive wages & competitive
benefits for FT positions (health,
dental, life, disability, supplemen-
tal insurance; 403b; paid time off)
plus access to onsite daycare and
fitness facilities.

Apply in person at Personnel Of-
fice (Carter Village Hall) Monday
through Friday from 9:00 a.m. un-
til 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/cre-
dentials to
(386) 658-5160.

EOE / Drug-Free Workplace
Criminal background checks
required.


DRIVERS
NO EXPERIENCE?
NEED TRAINING?
Company Sponsored Training
Get Your CDL in just a Few
Short Weeks.
1st Day Insurance
Start Your New Career Today!
866-917-2778
www.joincrst.com
CRST VAN'EXPEDtTE "'


Seeking Part-Time Administra-
tive Assistant. Applicant must be
self-motivated, hard worker with
courteous phone skills, typing and
computer skills (QuickBooks, Mi-
crosoft Excel & Word), and able to
manage multiple tasks. Account-
ing background preferred. Pay
based on experience. Call 850-
253-3854; fax resume with refer-
ences to 904-212-0144.


FREE prep classes
* M-TH: 9am-12:30pm @ NFCC
* Tues: 5-9pm @ NFCC
* T/TH: 6-9pm @ Madison Rec. Cntr.




973-1629


Going On A Business Trip Or Vacation?
Keep Your Pet In Their Home Environment!
-Professional Pet Sitting In Your Home-


For the times when you have to
be away from your furry family
members, you don't need to
worry. Our Staff will treat your
animal just as you do. We give
you peace of mind while you're
separated from your best friend.


Other Services Available
* Check Mail
* Lights
* Water Plants
* Multiple Visits
* Check Gates/Fences
* Custom Services Upon Request


Basic one time feed and water with walk/play $ 10
.25 mileage charge.
References Available

Can Critter Sitter Today 850-948-5097


MOVING SALE
*Patio sliding door/hurricane glass panes $150
*Propane burnisher w/two tanks $1,550 *Craftsman
42" cut riding lawn mower *Dell
computer/tower/toner/Lexmark printer $125 *BBQ gas
grill $50 *Basketball court/water base $40 *Lawn
chairs & table $35 *Big screen TV HD $900. *Pretty
blue couch and matching loveseat $'150. *Rabbit Hutch
Call 850-973-8519 or 850-9730506. !


I ) -"' "


A rewarding job with the nation's leading bottled water company
may be closer than you think. Nestl4 Waters North America is hiring.

Nestle has several immediate openings at its Madison County bottling facility.
Employment opportunities are available for flexible and self-motivated individuals seeking
careers in production, maintenance, logistics and quality assurance.


Production Operator I
51165 per hour
Forklift Operator
$1165 per hour
Janitor
S10s5 per hour
Administrative
Assistant
514-S16 per hour


Nestle Waters offers great starting pay,
ranging from $105W to 517 hour depending upon the posi-
tion. Our outstanding benefits
package includes health and
dental insurance along with a
401K and profit-sharing plans.


Stop by and fill out an application (directions below),
and take the first step toward a challenging and
rewarding future with Nestle Waters.


For more information, call Nestle Waters at (850) 971-2100 or visit our website
at www madisonblue.org.


1 tions.-
From I-10:
-- Take exit 262 North through
the town of Lee to SR 6.
Turn East (RIGHT) for approx.
3 miles to Hawthorn Road.
Look for the Deer Park sign.
Turn RIGHT on Hawthorn Road and
follow the signs to the parking area.
From 1-75: Take exit 460 turn West
approx. 15 miles. Entrance is on LEFT.


Equal opportunity employer
M/F/VID


NORTH AMERICA


" MR


e e
Waters
V,


^


q,"pw;









Friday, August 3, 2007


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 15A


V


*...~ -2~%.-.


NOTICE OF MELE[ING
CIT tLOMMISI(O)N
Ml DISON. FLORID\

The rtnular merling of the Citm Commiimon of the C it of Madison. Florida will hbe
held Tu.,da%. AuEuul 14. 2fini al 5:311 p.m in Cils Hall.

\ns peon "ho decid-s IO appeal ans decision made b Ithe Commi,'ion lnh r.tpecl
I. an matter con.idired ofl uch meeting mill need a record of the proc'eding., and
ihat lor .uch purple., he: or -he ma need to10 inure that a 'erbarim record ol Lthi pro-
e:.ding-, i, made. hiich record include-. ihe l timons and evidence upon which the ap-
pial is based.

8,3


IN THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION

File Number: 2007-50-CP

IN RE: .ESTATE OF

EMMA LAMB MCCALL,

DECEASED.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of EMMA LAMB MCCALL, deceased,
whose date of death was January 27, 2007, File Number 2007-50-CP, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Madison County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is
125 SW Range Avenue, Madison, Florida 32340. The names and addresses of the Per-
sonal Representative and the Personal Representative=s attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent=s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims .
with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. h
All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or de-
mands against the Decedent=s estate must file their claims, including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims, with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE .
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT=S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is July 27, 2007.


Attorney for Personal Representative:


Paul Stanley West, Attorney At Law
Florida Bar Number: 0286620
600 S. Orlando Ave., Suite 301
Maitland, FL 32751
Phone: (407) 678-9111
FAX: (407) 679-9911


Personal Representative:


ELOUISE M. BROWN
9340 Albermarle Road
Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714


7/27.18/3





IN 11f OCLI1I CljiO UR I OR UJION
CO'MTh, FLORIDA


IN RE. ETlTfiOF

ELAM siEal kL. la
I L 0i S. S ~EA


PROBAIE [T11SIION

FILE NO. ll-orWP


Drfa.sd.


NOTICE OF ENACTMENT OF ORDINANCES

BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE

TOWN OF LEE

N(-) I ICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ordinances, which title hereinafter appears, will be
considered for enactment by the Town Council of the Town of Lee, Florida, at a public
hearing on August 7 2007 at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be
heard, at Lee City Hall, 286 NE County Road 255, Lee, Florida. Copies of said ordi-
nance.i may be inspected by any member of the public at the office of the Town Man-
ager. Lee City Hall, 286 NE County Road 255, Lee, Florida during regular business
hour.. On the date, time and place first above mentioned, all interested persons may
appear and.be heard with respect to the ordinance.

Ordinance 2007-05

\n Ordinance amending resolution 2000-03 promulgating rates to be charged for the
use ol the municipal waterworks system

Pro' hiding for severability; providing for repeal of conflicting provisions; and provid-
ing an effective date.

T hI public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any interested par-
in hall be advised that the date, time and place of any continuation of the public hear-
inme hall be announced during the public hearing and that no further notice concern-
ing the matter will be published.

Ill persons are advised that, if they decide to appeal any decision made at the public

hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose, they may
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record in-.
clude the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

"25. 8/3


00a. 5 m0000 00 0500000 05


IN Hi:i CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
[IIRD JUDIICI %L CIRCUIT. IN \ND
FOR MADISON COLUNTT FLORIDA.


CASE NUMBER 201)i'-i,4-CP
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: E.itale of:
CM ROLLL ST\PLER BI 1 LOCK. IR.
lieiLased.

NOT ICF TO1 CRFDITORS

The adminkiraiion ul the estate Oi l RROLL STAPLER BL lockC. JR. dc-
ceaNed. ,hose dalt of dealth as Mat 26. 20117: is pending in the Circuit Court in and
for Madiison (Count%. I lorida. Probate Di kiion: File Numbt-r 2007. 6.4CP: the address
of ldnch is Madison Counit Courthouse. Madi-on. FL 32340. The name and addre-s
of Ihe personal representlalii and of the personal representarise'. anorne, i- sel forth
heloit.
Nill crc-dltorsof the decednli and other per.onn- ho hase claims or demands against
decedenl's slate. including unmatured. contingent or unliquidated claims, and who
hae hben senrsd siuth a tops ol this nouice must file Iheir claimm- ith this court \ 1TH-
IN THE L ER OF FREE 03, MONTHS AFTERR I HE DATE OF HRE FIRST PUB-
LIC \]ION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRIT\ I31iE 1iS AFTERR THE DATE OF SER-
\ ICE OF \ COP\ OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
II other credi r-, of the dc-dent and other persons who hase claims or demands
aains-t tIhe deceduntr'. stte. including unmatured. c.nmingent or unlitquidatcd claims.
must file their claims iitlh tInt court 11THIN THREE 1i3 MONTHS FTER THE
D\TE OF IHI FIRST PLiBIIIC fION OF [HIS NOTIICE.
\LL CL. IlML NOI SO FII ED \%mILL BE FORE'%ER BARRED.
NOI['% I THST.NIDING 'HE TIMNI PERIODS SET FORTH ABO% E. AN) Cl. AIM
FILED I\0 I21' \ERS OR MORE IFTER THE DECEDENT'S DE TH IS
BARRED.
1 RE )\T OF L THE FIRST PUBLIC \TION OF THIS NOTICE IS \ugust 3.211017.


* In.Jrnes'v iojr ne Peronial
Represenitlihse

J.R. Z %NT. \nornme at La%%
Fla Bar 47"4541
632 NE elloi Pine \>e.
Madison. Florida 323411
b85111 '3-61616


SI hritf ilinral desription.ifiti I'rprapn I.S3, r,,illowi:
Perional Repr.sentatiise t h f l
3 5 anm, -. mrt .r lei-i, t gelher ith iimprmrmenta located thereon, at 189 SWV Captain
Bro a Road, Madison, Hlirida 32.-10
CL %RENCE 1I.ONZO BL Al OCk. A mfapef ,ih Proiperiy tis ullos.:
Personal Reprt~enian ie
P.O. Box 3041
Madison. FL 323411


NOICl 10(RFDiTORS


8/3. 8111


rI~ii: iqirjilunod lr ''I li; o Lhti l A w ~E\ i L'sM S lHEA, do'r, -0 o :1 C 0 a'ii i
drkih WxNU-' M'f,'1. U100. L Fiid-mr II & Crul.lTIlouT? li if Mdil.in (iiivr, Flipis&, PmiIal Dm,[tIci.li
aaltrcirol shjci: 1,,123 S W U.t A, r ,Molmin. Rsund&i c41.1i02i7Fin, mB ad ad~>'n-'I di,.




Itrin .. 1011 w 0.hi *1 i 1 NAl ojil~td ii, dhMW>61C 11hal Wlir a l.ls,iti I 111McWT [I FIR~ ~
UL-F.l 1.11Mum ils AlTGh'U. fl[W f FaF El, FWMP1 FIIICA 1-14,1.11116N IS N' 'U 10
D.-i EJ:TI I1ll:t['All'f -f "TOVFC I ifACOY '.1 H"If ibNIA117 IPI F01~
ai! lhr rh illr. ii ~ jIC ~a l hL' T [arid AlaT lor:/a, ii i abiM6 'IT W 'kiiiAri. fil '? d Ta li'

11L IaII 'r P101 lit t I ot ljgsillN l~bintl 8WI MN3 MONl II HS Al EI P f ['.';T f IRF '-W[ f'j


ih iBI FIA l'4 F11115 P)BTUNiWf B 11TU.P-k
NIVTM-i T i.w;NutFHill 2WI1,111 Fi IM i'tIA. D\511-FH&1 FIK II [N AHRi 'NiIF) /1


.'I V 'P M''ItAYTit lFlfR'FCMi'l D[1711'AIlS '' f ULA1III ISB.F'j'
ii.-1rda it fin ui .jt mnoI a/ri il 'Noii i"11111


IIalIL~u I lridiIj
01.1) 1".1%2-
Th.q li I'rorrujj~ o~i2i


Lo vlr U' ~
Pl Au fS.I ld








P;I I fillu I i 21


I t( W i t The donation is tax deductible. ,
BI *- Pick-up is free,
or the Blind.w----,,
So* We take care of all the paperwork.










STOP LEG CRAMPS LS

BEFORE THEY STOP YOU. CIcet



I r I I in 1.1. n i.'j. I |
l r -i iill l~ n J'l,'b i l l l i.lir. ],..


The cumplet le gal dtscriplion of tIb Propetrl) hi metis jad bounds, and a. cop of the
Ordinance, mas br obiainrd or inspeiied by tht pubIllk during aurmal b,-ines hbr.urs at
Iht fflT ufilh CiL C lerk in Cit) Hall. 321 S i Ruilidge Stred, .Madison, Fltnda 32.140.

Tht dalt, tim .and piare ofr th m ting there btheCommis3iin hall consider adapling the
Ordinants i as ifoll.uw,:

DATE: Tiiu-la., \ugust 14. 2i107

TIME- 5:30 pin

PL( F: ThL C11% Crimmiskion (h.ambtrs
Cin Hall
121S\ Rutldige Sirett
Madioin, Flonrida 32341

MiI iniersled parti-rs mah appear al the miteing and he heard witb respeil in the
Ordinanct

If ouu arn a person msih a disabiliir iho ned ari r'saucommodadion in order i, parricipail
in the abowe m uing, yoa artn entilled. al no o01 I to u, in Ihe pruiiaion of terrain
amsisiance Pilase contact Let Annt Hall, Cin Cltrk, at 321 SH Rutledge Sirel,
Madie'n, Frlrida 3234fi, cliphnet: (1850 973.5.JSI. at Icasi 3 working da)s prior to Ib
irtrcing dle;: if uad art haring or 'ict inipnitrid. C,1ill 711

If a pirsn dcidr, tou appeal an deesinn madt h) thei Cummisqion nith respect to any
matter censidterl at such meeting he ur she i,ill nead .a rtord of the proEc.ding; and
that. for such rpos., h, r he ma\ ncd In enIsar- ihal a icrbanm record of the
procedngs i;s made. uhich nucrd includes ihi lesiimony and evidence upon hbsch ibe
appeal is %i ht had.

DAITED thii 3' da) nof August. 2i'.

THE CIT COMMISSION OF THE
CITI OF MADISON, FLORID%
B1: 'l/ Let Anne Hall
Cir) Clerk


HOP HOP HOP



HOP ON THE PHONE AND


ORDER YOUR HOMETOWN


PAPER TODA I


J$28 Within Madison County


$35 Outside Madison County



850-973-4141


.0~~m
-'ii -.
I...
I-
Jo ,C.-.
.5- -


. ,'


AI




GRAND LAKE ESTATE I

GRAND LAKE, COLORADO
SConvenient proximity to Denver,* SEl:r: I
views of Mt, Baldy* Recreate on Cl.r~l: ;
three most beautiful lakes. Snow mb l .
the groomed trail system through Rc:, I..
Mountain National Park [August 23 at 11:o0 AM (MT) ]





I .
Real E~state:,TP King Aution Co, Inc, in cooperation with ficensed Coiorado Broier Patti Bruder #1R40032543


~________1_111______X_~.-.~~~--~


II r


SI.FTE OF FLORID.A
DEPARTMENT OF COMMLINITI AFFAIRS
NOTICE OF INILNT [O FIND THE
CITY OF MADISON
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENTS) IN COMPLIANCE
DOCKET NO. 07-1ER-NOI-4004-(A)-(I)

The Department gives notice of its intent to find the Amendments) to the
Comprehensive Plan for the City of Madison, adopted by Ordinance No. 2006-8 on
March 13, 2007, IN COMPLIANCE, pursuant to Sections 163.3184, 163.3187 and
163.3189, F.S.

The adopted City of Madison Comprehensive Plan Amendment(s) and the
Department's Objections, Recommendations and Comments Report, (if any), are
available for public inspection Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, dur-
ing normal business hours, at the City of Madison, City Hall, 109 West Rutledge Street,
Madison, Florida 32340.

Any affected person, as defined in Section 163.3184, ES,, has a right to pe-
tition for an administrative hearing to challenge the proposed agency determination
that the Amendments) to the City of Madison Comprehensive Plan are In Compliance,
as defined in Subsection 163.3184(1), F.S. The petition must be filed within twenty-one
(21) days after publication of this notice, and must include all of the information and
contents described in Uniform Rule 28-106.201, F.A.C. The petition must be filed with
the Agency Clerk, Department of Community Affairs, 2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2100, and a copy mailed or delivered to the local govern-
ment. Failure to timely file a petition shall constitute a waiver of any right to request
an administrative proceeding as a petitioner under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. If
a petition is filed, the purpose of the administrative hearing will be to present evidence
and testimony and. forward a recommended order to the Department. If no petition is
filed,
this Notice of Intent shall become final agency action.

If a petition is filed, other affected persons may petition for leave to inter-
vene in the proceeding. A petition for intervention must be filed at least twenty (20)
days before the final hearing and must include all of the information and contents de-
scribed in Uniform Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. A petition for leave to intervene shall be
filed at the Division of Administrative Hearings, Department of Management Services,
1230 Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3060. Failure to petition to inter-
vene within the allowed time frame constitutes a waiver of any right such a person has
to request a hearing under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, ES., or to participate in the ad-
ministrative hearing.

After an administrative hearing petition is timely filed, mediation is avail-
able pursuant to Subsection 163.3189(3)(a), F.S., to any affected person who is made a
party to the proceeding by filing that request with the administrative law judge as-
signed by the Division of Administrative Hearings. The choice of mediation shall not af-
fect a party's right to an administrative hearing.

-s- Mike McDaniel, Chief
Office of Comprehensive Planning
Department of Community Affairs
2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2100

8/3



NOTICE OF INTENTION OF THE CIT1 OF MADISON, FLORIDA
TO CONSIDER ADOPTION OF CITY ORDINANCE

NOTICE IS GIVEN uf the intetlion of thl Cin Cnmmitsion lhtreinifkr hit
"Curmissii "l if rhe Ciry c fi Madison, Florida., (hrtmiaritr the "Citn"i. Iv consider ih,
adopriin of a properly ordinance rilhrinafier the "Ordinriee'") to voluntarily aanni
eirtlam rtal propirr) lhrtninafir the "Properr)"l in t ihe Cdi)

The number and tilk to Ihe Ordinmnce iL a follows.

ORDLNANC. NO. 2007-6
AN ORDINANCE OF THF CII OF MADISON FLORIDA, 'OLUNT4RIL
ANNEMNGC CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY INTO THE Cill OF MA.DISON AND
REDEFINING THE BOUNDARY LINEs OF THE CTF OF 11DISON TO INCLUDE
SUCH REIL PROPERTi; PROVIDING FOR APPEAL, PROVIDING FOR
%SEVERABILITF; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDIN.NCES;
\NDiPROIDIING ,AN EFFECil\ E DATE


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16A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


Friday, August 3, 2007


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