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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00098
 Material Information
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title: Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title: Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Creation Date: November 10, 2006
Publication Date: 1933-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID: UF00028405:00098
 Related Items
Preceded by: Enterprise-recorder

Full Text




Four Different
People Offer Their
Views On Teen
Drinking


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Cowboys Look To

Rope Bulldogs

In Playoffs


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Our 142nd Year, Number 10


Friday, November 10, 2006


Madison, Florida 32340


,NAACP Complains

About School System


Gianni Jackson
Local 14AACP President
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The state president of the
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored Peo-
ple (NAACP) met with mem-
bers of the black community
in Madison County on Sunday
peering. October 30, at Mt.
Nebo AME Church in Madi-
son..
Gianni Jackson, local
NAACP president. sent out
notices for the meeting. He
said that a student placed them
in teacher's boxes at random.
He noted that the teachers
,%ere not chosen to receive the
notices based on whether they
were black or white. This
newspaper spoke with several
white teachers at the school,
who indicated that they had
not received the announce-
ment.
The main topic on the.
agenda \\ as concerns over the


Madison County Central
School. Some parents have ex-
pressed disgruntlement over
how the school is being run
and over a decision by the
Madison County School
Board to allow the assistant
principals to run the school, in
the wake of Sam Stalnaker's
absence. Stalnaker, who is a
colonel in the U.S. Army Re-
serves, has been deployed to
Afghanistan.
Reservists and National
Guardsmen are guaranteed
their jobs and positions when
they return from active duty.
Another issue, of the
NAACP, is the number of
black administrations in the
School District. Currently,
there are only two black head
principals serving in the coun-
ty. Mel Roberts, the former
principal at MCCS, is the prin-
cipal at Greenville Elementary
School. Maceo Howell, a for-,
mer assistant principal at
Madison County High School,
"is the principal at Madison
County Excel Alternative
School.
The announcement invit-
ing the public to the meeting at
Mt. Nebo read 'ii one part:
"Let us concerned citizens
work together to get our
schools and community back
on the right track."
School Superintendent
Please See NAACP, Page 3A


Veterans' Day Service Set For:
,Saturday In Four Freedoms Park
The Madison County Veter-
ans' Service Office and local ser-
vice organizations will be having
a Veterans' Day Program, honor-
ing America's and Madison
County Veterans, on Saturday,
November 11th at 11am in the
Four Freedoms City Park, in
downtown Madison.
The program will feature pa-
triotic music; reading of the Vet-
S erans Day Proclamation, signed
by Governor Jeb Bush, and his
Cabinet Members; local greet-
ings; and a special tribute to all
veterans and their families.
The community is invited to come out show their support
and honor the .men and women who have served this country in
the Armed Forces during the time of war and peace.
Veterans Day, as we know it today, began as a concurrent
resolution (44 Stat. 1982) by Congress on June 4, 1926. It was
America's official recognition of the end of World War I, the
world's first modem global conflict.
In May of 1938, the celebration of November 11, Armistice
Day, as a legal American Holiday was formally approved (52
Stat. 351.5 U. S. Code, Sec. 87a) Armistice Day was a day set
aside to honor veterans of World War I.
:But in 1954, with the sacrifices of World War II and Korea
still fresh in the nation's mind, the 83rd Congress, at the urging
of the veterans' service organizations, amended 1938 to expand
'te foc us of Armistice Day to celebrate the American warriors of
all generations. With the approval of the legislation (Public Law
380 on June 1, 1954), November llth became a day to honor
American veterans of all wars. Later that same year on October
Please See Veterans, Page 3A


Mdx

3 Sections, 42 Pages.
Around Madison County 5-12A
Church 14A
Glissifieds/Legals 8-9B
r'..miniirli, Calendar 5A
Health 13A
Obituaries 5A
School 3-5B
Sports 1-2B
United Way 12A


Fri .....&'
11/10 83/56
Except for a few afternoon clouds,
mainly sunny. Warm. High 83F,

Sat 83/53 o
11/11
Mix of sun and clouds. Highs In the
low 80s and Iowa in the low 50s,.


11Sun 73/50
FI'1n1, of sun. Highs In the low 70s
and Iowa In the low 50s,


- I~ I ___ I I


* ~


Jada Woods Williams Bart Alford Wayne Vickers Susie Williamson
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The hospital surtax passed and Jada Woods Williams was elected the new Supervisor of Elections in the election held Tuesday,
November 7.
Williams' race with Margie Foust \\as thrown into a recount, since the votes separating them were less than one-half of a per-
centage point and Williams came out ahead in the race with 23 votes separating her from Foust.
The hospital surtax was passed with 3,211 votes for the tax and 2,594 votes against the tax.
The race for School Board District 1 was extremely close, as incumbent Susie Bishop Willianmson won by 17 votes over for-
mer school board member Ronnie Ragans.
Incumbent Bart Alford held onto his School Board seat by beating challenger Sean Alderman 843 votes to 628 votes.
Wayne Vickers won the race for County Commission District 2 with 806 votes. His nearest challenger Jerry Page received 260
votes. Bob Pugh got 172 votes and Mack Primm received 115 votes.
A revision to the Lee Town Charter passed with 72 people voting for it and 27 voting against it.
Bor full local election results by precinct, please see pages 8-9A.


Hames Resigns As

MCMH-CFQ


Deena Hames
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Madison County Memori-
al Hospital Chief Financial
Officer (CFO) Deena Hames


resigned two weeks ago from
that position.
When David Abercrom-
bie, the hospital's Chief Exec-
utive Officer (CEO), was
reached for comment, he told
this reporter that it was better
to get the story from. the
"horse's mouth" and declined
comment.
Hames could not be
reached for comment. One
number for her had been dis-
connected. When this reporter
tried another number, he was
told by people at the number
that Hames was not there at
Please See Hames, Page 3A


Madison County's

Economic Future

Looks Bright


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The towering blue struc-
ture blends in almost com-
pletely with a skyline in the
background that is almost ex-
actly the same shade of pale
blue. It's a crisp, clear autumn
morning and the newly con-
structed water tower stands as
a promise.
Madison County has
needed promises lately and
they have needed promises
kept. This water tower, ac-
cording to County Manager
Allen Cherry, is a step in the
right direction.
Madison County has
struggled to get off its knees
and regain its strength. Two
years ago, the county seemed
revitalized when Smithfield
Foods, a Virginia-based meat
packing conglomerate, came
to Madison to replace Dixie
Packers, a Winn-Dixie owned
meat processing plant. It had
opened in Sept. 1971, thanks
to a concerted effort by Madi-
son businessmen Tommy
Greene and James Hardee. In
July of this year, Madison felt
thrown to the mat again, as
Smithfield announced it would


plant, due to a glut in the,'.
,


close the doors on its Madison

world's protein market. The
City of Madison, which bor-
rowed money to build a new
wastewater treatment facility,
is struggling just to catch its
breath, due to Smithfield's
closure.
The water tower and sys-
tem which have been con-
structed along Madison's in-
terstate corridor, along with a
sewage system which has been
constructed for the area, may
Please See Future, Page 3A


Policemen Awarded For
Seatbelt Safety Enforcement


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry
Cpl. Chris Cooks (center) and Sgt. Jimbo Roebuck
(right) were recently awarded for issuing the most cita-
tions during two recent Seat Belt Waves, sponsored by
the Madison Police Department. Both Seat Belt Waves
were to remind people to "buckle up" and drive safely.
Cooks and Roebuck are pictured with Inv. Nathan Curtis.

Teenager Attempts To


Burglarize Car
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A juvenile was arrested on felony charges for a burglary at-
tempt with tools on Saturday, November 4.
According to a Madison Police Department report, Patrol-
man Brandon Abbott was dispatched to Hilltop Apartments in
reference to a burglary to a vehicle. When Abbott arrived at the
scene, he made contact with the victim, who informed him that
,he witnessed someone attempting to break into his car.
The victim said that he chased the defendant to a house on
SW Bunker Street.
Abbott went to the house and made contact with Akeem
Watson, 15. The victim identified Watson as the person who
tried to break into his vehicle.
Watson was arrested and transported to the Madison Coun-
ty Jail.

School Board Implements

Improvement Plans
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County School Board approved school im-
provement plans for every school in the district at its Tuesday,
November 7, meeting.
The board also heard a presentation from Vicki Peterson,
who represented Citizens for a Progressive Madison County,
Inc., a not-for-profit organization, which sets up scholarships for
low- to moderate-income students who might not qualify acade-
mically for Bright Futures scholarships.
The school board also heard the audits from last year. All of
the audits went very well.
The School Board members will vote on their salary cap at
their next meeting on Tuesday, November 21.


Williams, Alford, Vickers, Williamson Win;


Hospital Surtax Passes
. .-.i r [ I


Moore Follows In

Her Father's

Footsteps


L


1I












2A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



VIEWPOINTS OPINIONS


Friday, November 10, 2006


'Letes o heEdto


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word,
comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


MyPreacher Doesn 't Preach Reruns

But WatcOut For The C es
Most of the time, I have to leave the Sunday morning wor-
ship service at my church to carry my brother to work. I am able
to enjoy the hymns and the worship music and read the offerto-
ry message for the tithes and offerings. As soon as it's all over,
though, my brother and I walk out the door arid he goes to work.:
I do return, right about the time that the preacher is winding up'
his ser ice.
When I walked back in Sunday. I thought my preacher was'
preaching a rerun from the last Sunday. After I listened a little
more closely, I realize that he was simply using a cliche that he
had used last Sunday, the Sunday before that. the Sunday before
that. Oh, well, I jest, but he does use it a lot. This cliche goes
something like this: "You can have so many degrees that they
have to call you Doctor Fahrenheit." For a while I wondered
why he never used names like Einstein. Isaac Newton. Nobel, or
whomever. until I realize that the boiling point of water is 212
degrees Fahrenheit. So, I thought, oh. I get it. Fahrenheit.
My preacher does 'not preach reruns. He does preach
cliches. It gets'interesting sometimes when he gets his cliches'
mixed up or his illustrations all wrong. One thing. however, I've
noticed is thathe never gets the Word of God wrong (although
he does mispronounce some words). I do, remember one word'
that another preacher used to get mixed up. He talked about
God's unfeigned love. He called it God's "unfinged" love. I was
looking at the Bible verse and knew what it said and knew that
it should have been pronounced "unfained" love. Feign means to
fake. like in a boxing match %when a boxer feigns a punch and
then throws a real one.
I love both of the preachers and wish that I could buy them
the Bible on CD so they could listen to the way the words are
supposed to be pronounced.
Like I said, my preacher doesn't preach reruns and he nev-
er'gets the Word of God wrong, despite mispronunciations or
anything of the sort. He doesn't mine stepping on toes and I still
have the. bumps and bruises on mind to prove it. I do wish, how-
ever. that he would find a new cliche besides the one about Dr.
Fahrenheit.


rKIS


National Survivors Of Suicide Day .
Dear Editor:
Among the various days, weeks, and months designated to
focus attention on professions, issues and causes, National Sur-
vivors of Suicide Day is among the most profound. On No-
vember 18th, the nation reaches out to survivors of suicide loss.
Sponsored by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.
this day will be marked by healing conferences in more than 100
cities across the nation. As part of Big Bend Hospice's mission
to provide emotional support to anyone who has lost a loved
one, oui professional grief and loss counselors offer a support
group for those who have experienced a loss due- to a suicide.
The Suicide Loss Support Group meets on the third Tuesday of
each month, from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 pm. at the Big Bend Hospice
Elaine Bartelt Center, 1723 Mahan Center in Tallahassee. I urge
anyone who has experienced a loss due to suicide to contact Big
Bend Hospice at 878-5310 or toll-free at 1-800-772-5862 and
speak with one of our grief and loss counselors. Big Bend Hos-
pice extends this service to anyone in our eight-county area in-
cluding Madison County.
Carla Braveman. R.N. M.Ed., CHCE
President & CEO
Big Bend Hospice


CORRECTION
In the November 1. 2006 Madison Comnr'i Carrier. Deputy
Kevin Anderson was wrongly) identified in the report as the
deputy in the rape case involving James Eddie Cruce. Deputy
John Deming was the arresting officer. We regret the inconve-
mience.


1^ Why get just a part
=".when you can get it all?
hen oui get I ',Lir nc' r Irom i otherr ,urce,. II's
i.nh piv- I Li- f h Ale picLiure \% lUnOt t Ni i %%
1LJ' I i. l ;one o.' ii, entnj plIe and .e',e o'mmrrilicld
S.,*oar,'elk e i t,1-,erning ; sour eomrplele ,ulde 10
^ local rie,,. eatckr. spons. nmernanment and
,. No tone else can give you what you want-
| all of the new'! "
The Madison County Carrier
& Enterprise Recorder
1695 Hw') 53 South PO. Drajwer 772 MIadion, FL 3234 I
-'""* '****1 .97 .-141 '""


-Want to. WORK?


We are HIRING NOW!


4 I


Due to new 'growth and expansion of local operations We have NEW EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES. Employees are now being hired for new jobs.

: Conmpan repreientalives will be conducting interviews at the following location!
r i i '.

WHEN: MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20
TIME: 9:00 TO 3:00 PM
WHERE: EMPLOYMENT CONNECTIONS
LOCATION: 200 WEST BASE STREET, MADISON, FL
Upstairs in the Wachovia Bank Building
ACTUAL JOB OFFERS MAY BE MADE TO SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES WHILE ON SITE !


Examples of available jobs
Processing Plant


Breast Deboner
Floater
Parts Packers
Box Stackers
Night Sanitation
Live Hangers


Start

$8.06
$7.61
$7.51
$7.86
$7.86
$9.75


after 60 days
* Includes Perfect Attendance Bonus
$9.46
$9.01
$8.91
$9.26
$9.26
$11.40


Management and Staff Positions We are also seeking candidates for our expanding
management and management support team......
BRING RESUMES!


Production Supervisors
Accountant
Accounting Clerk
Yield Coordinator


HACCP Coordinator
Purchasing Coordinator
Maintenance Supervisor


Successful candidates must be able to perform the essential functions of the job with or
without accommodations, and be legally authorized to work. Will train. Overtime work
available daily and weekend.
Medical and life insurance, dental, vision and prescription drug programs, paid vacations,
paid holidays, credit union and more.
For more information call or visit
Employment Connections
850-973-9675
200 WEST BASE STREET, MADISON, Fl
Gold Kist is AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
EOE-AA-M-F-V-D


Getting Education

At The Hospital
When you read this, I will be recovering from surgery."One
of my kidneys decided to do something besides its job. so i 6had
to go.
Since this experience is so recent. I thought I would Ihare
with you some educational points I gained during my six k eks
of hospitalization. Remember them if you oryours have to spend
time within the blue walls.
I say blue walls because I have been starting at the same fpr-
a week at Tallahassee Memorial. Someone did a study and'avis-
covered that blue is restful and calming. Ha! Believe me, 'whent
major surgery appears on your schedule, nothing is peaceful and
calming.
Point two: Nurses will go to any lengths to get informatiqnl
from you. One day I was eating lunch when the nurse came int
with the little blood pressure and temperature machine. I 'aid,
"Oh, dear. I just drank mv iced tea. My temperature will n'dt be)
right."
She gave me such a look and replied, "Oh, have other ays
of getting your temperature."
Boy was I relieved when she took it under my arm.
A p utoaostaemp


Another point: You know that all hospital employees haye
to don these latex gloves before touching you. Beware when you
are lying in bed half-asleep and you hear one snapping the wrists
of these gloves. Be afraid; be %ery afraid!
When an alarm bell goes off in the hall outside your room
and lights start flashing, it's time to panic. Not from fear of dan-
ger, but from the thought that you've got to traipse down a stair-
well in a hospital gown, thus exposing other patients a;viewsof
you that is er- unflattering. To say nothing of seeing sights
yourself that were never intended for the human eye. Thank
goodness we did not have to evacuate. ,
No matter where your hospital room is located, the ilew
from your window will be a rooftop dotted with air conditioning.
units. I promise. And the walls between rooms are not s6And
proof.
I could share several terms which you should learn to de-
fine, but this is a family newspaper. Sorry.
Anyway. etch these points clearly in your brain. They'llH pay
off. believe me.


By Jessalyn Covell
"Who do you think

will win,

FSU or Florida?"


Travis Johnson.
"FSU'


Brandon James

"Florida's got it
all the way."


s ci


-XI

~~~1

0


Michael Kinard

"Florida."


Sapphire Glee

"Florida."


U




Li,
-l


J.D. Coody

"Florida!"


David Blackmon

"Florida."


i N F-u


[Question Of The Week


j -Z











Friday, November 10, 2006
> ^"


www.greenepublishing.com




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A


NAACP


cont from Page 1A


Holiday Bird


In a couple of weeks, households will be putting a turkey on
the table. Since most folks only prepare a turkey once a year,
r:rthat holiday bird can be a challenge. It's big, it's awkward, and
.qu. forget from year to year how to prepare it.
Over the years, I've gotten some very interesting questions
'about turkeys. From time to time, you read about different ways
.pt thawing and roasting a turkey. Often these new methods are
,'signed to be short cut, but aren't in the best interest of food
'safety.
S Once again, I would like to share with you the safe recom-
nendations established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
hopefully, it will make your Thanksgiving feast an easy meal to
,,prepare.
HOW TO BUY
.;' Turkeys come in all sizes to fit everyone's holiday meal
plan. They can be purchased whole or in parts,.suitable for small
families s or those who have a preference for white or dark meat.
d iey come fresh, frozen, self-basting or prestuffed. When de-
-iding the size, figure 1 pound of turkey per person, this will
give you enough for a meal and leftovers for the next day.
THAWING "
Thawing a turkey in the refrigerator is the safest method.
,Ilan to purchase your turkey far enough in advance to thaw in
,hl. refrigerator. .
WHOLE TURKEY
8 to 12 pounds 1 to 2 days
12 to 16 pounds 2 to 3 days
16 to,20 pounds 3 to 4 days
20 to 24 pounds 4 to 5 days
PIECES OF LARGE TURKEY
,, half, quarter, half breast 1 to 2 days
If it's the day before and you forgot to thaw the bird, don't
panic. Turkey can be safely thawed in cold water, providing you
,y change the water frequently. Keep the bird in it's original wrap
d, .^d make sure there are no tears, and place in the sink or a large
p,,an and cover with water. Change the water every 30 minutes.
THAWING TIME IN COLD WATER
8 to 12 pounds 4 to 6 hours
12 to 16 pounds 6 to 9 hours
,i 16 to 20 pounds 9 to 11 hours
20 to 24 pounds 11 to 12 hours
ROASTING
*.- rSi fr 1.ne o 1ow\ er than 325F. R Pre-beiting'V'nR t iec-.

Be sure the turkey is coinpletelyThawed. Times are based
oh fresh or completely thawed birds at a refrigerator temperature
: of 40' For below.
Most turkeys come with roasting instruction that can be
; easily followed. USDA recommend placing the turkey breast-
side up on a flat wire rack in a shallow roasting pan 2 to 2 ? inch-
P'es deep. Add ? cup of water to the bottom of the pan. Loosely
tent the bird with aluminum foil for 1 to ? hours, then remove
i from browning. Or, a tent of foil may be placed over the turkey
after the turkey has reached the desired golden brown.
If a meat thermometer is not available, cook stuffing in a
*casserole. Mix ingredients just before oven cooking and if you.
Stuff your bird, stuff loosely. Additional time is required for the
} turkey and stuffing to reach a safe internal temperature.,
COOKING TIMES_
" Unstuffed
4 to 6 lbs. Breast 1 1/2 to 2 1/4 hours
8 to 12 lbs. 2 3/4 to 3 hours
12 to 14 lbs. 3 to 3 3/4 hours
; 14 to 18 lbs. 3 3/4 to 4 1/4 hours
S18 to 20 lbs. 41/4 to 4 1/2 hours
':1 20 to,24 Ibs. 4 1/2 to 5 hours
: Stuffed
48 to 12 lbs. 3 to 3 1/2 hours
"*: 12 to 14 lbs. 3 1/2 to 4 hours
--" 14 to 18 lbs. 4 to 4 1/4 hours
18 to 20 lbs. 4 1/4 to 4 3/4 hours
20 to 24 lbs. 4 3/4 to 5 1/4 hours
For safety and doneness, the internal temperature should
be checked with a meat thermometer. The temperature must
reach 180F in the thigh of a whole turkey (center of the stuff-
Sing should reach 1650 F) before removing it from the oven.
'Cook a turkey breast to 1700 F.
Juices should be clear. In the absence of a meat ther-
- metere, pierce an unstuffed turkey with a fork in several
'laces; juices should be clear with no trace of pink.
A prestuffed turkey should not be thawed, follow the roast-
g instructions that come with the bird.
Let the bird stand 20 minutes before removing stuffing
ad carving.
SFor more information on food preparation and food safety,
ntact the Madison County Extension office.
-Since 1865-
=- "Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity"
W ieiai1na ut e rp rise- crorber
'- Madison Recorder established 1865,
New Enterprise established 1901,
Consolidated June 25, 1908
Published weekly by Greene Publishing, Inc., 1695 S. SR 53,
Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post Of-
fice 32340. Publication No. 177.400.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison Enter-
rise-Recorder, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement,
ews matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the manage-
ent, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the own-
;r of this newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submit-
ed.
All photos given to Greene Publishing, Inc. for publication in this
Shewspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are
d pped off. Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos
beyond said deadline.


Lou Miller met with the state NAACP president Adora Obi
Nweze, who is setting up a meeting between Charles Evans, of
Tallahassee, the district NAACP director, Jackson and her.
One issue that Jackson said concerned him was the fact that
Paula Ginn had been hired as the assistant principal of the Cen-
tral School. He claimed that no one had applied when the job
was advertised and it was given to Ginn.
Not so, Miller said. She said that the job had been advertised
and that two people had responded to the advertisement. Both
applicants were white females.
Jackson said that he didn't think that Miller should have
transferred Mel Roberts to Greenville Elementary School, even
if he had asked for the transfer since Miller knew that Stalnaker
would have to go to Afghanistan.
Miller said that Roberts had asked for the transfer and that
six people, including four white males, one black male and one
white female had applied for the job. The job had originally been
offered to the black male, who was from Gainesville. He refused
the job because his wife did not want to relocate.
Miller said that the committee that hired the principal was
made up of two black males and one white female. Jim Norton
from Jefferson County, Paula Williams from Hamilton County
and Stephen Bass from Suwannee County were the people sat on
the committee.
Jackson said that the school district has 405 employees. Of
these, he said, only 176 are black, with the remainder Caucasian.
Miller noted that there are 436 employees in the school dis-
trict. 185 of the employees are African-American (42.43 per-
cent), 249 are Caucasian (57.11 percent), and two are Hispanic.
The student makeup of the schools include 56.3 percent
black students, 39.6 white students, 2.9 percent Hispanic stu-
dents, .6 percent Indian students, .4 percent multi-racial students
and .1 percent Asian students.
Other issues Jackson said he had were teachers being hired
from out-bf-state and people not being promoted to principal.


Veterans


cont from Page 1A


8th, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, issued the first Veterans
Day Proclamation.
The Uniforms Holiday. Bill (Public Law 90-363 ( 82 Stat.
250) was signed on June 28,1968, and was intended to ensure
three-day wVeekends for Federal employees by celebrating four
(4) national holidays on Mondays Washington's Birthday,
Memorial Day, Veterans Day and Columbus Day. It was though
that these extended weekends would encourage travel, recre-
ational and cultural- activities and stimulate greater industrial and
commercial production.. The first Veterans Day under the new
law was observed with much confusion on October 25, 1971.
It quickly became apparent that the commemoration of this
day was a matter of historic and patriotic significancerto a great
-number of our citizens. On September 20th, 1975, President
GQoald.R.,1EorL signed Public Law 94-97 (89 Stat. 479) which
returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original
date of November 11. The celebration of Veterans Day, returned
to November 11, beginning in 1978,. and has remained there
since.
The observance of Veterans Day helps preserve in the hearts
and lives of all American citizens the spirit of patriotism the love
of country, and the willingness to serve and, sacrifice for the
common good. It's observance on November 11 adds to the
recipe a valuable sense of tradition to the citizens of our great
nation.
Families who have other family members currently serving
in the military Armed Forces, will be recognized during this Vet-
erans Day Celebration Program. For more information please
contact Oliver Bradley, Madison County Veterans Service Offi-
cer at 973-3208 or 464-1322.


Hames


cont from Page 1A


the time.
Cary Hardee, MCMH attorney, was reached but said that he
could not comment on the resignation. He said that he did not
know the name of Hames' attorney.


Future


cont from Page 1A


present Madison and Madison County with a Midas touch to
turn the heavy interstate traffic into gold. The system will be
turned over to Madison County by the first of December, a
whole month ahead of its scheduled Jan. 2007 completion.
According to Florida Department of Transportation statis-
tics, approximately 20,000 vehicles travel along 1-10 on any giv-
en day.
"We need to get some of the travelers, off the interstate, so
they can spend money in Madison County," Cherry said. "This
infrastructure system is a great start."
Lee Town Manager Cheryl Archambault agrees. While the
water tower, which can hold 150,000 gallons of water can be ser-
viced by either Lee or Madison, Lee will be the primary suppli-
er and will get the payments from each business, which will
hook to the system.
"It should be a financial boon to the Town of Lee," she said.
During the last year, Lee, one of Madison County's three in-
corporated areas (along with Madison and Greenville) has ex-
tended its city limits, as it has amassed extra acreage and added
new people to its population, through its annexation efforts. The
town may soon have to drop its motto "Little But Proud."
Funding for the infrastructure is being paid from a local op-
tion sales tax, which was already in place. The tax had been used
to pay for construction of a new jail in Madison County. Con-
struction was completed in 1994 and the loan was repaid through
the sales tax several years ago. A USDA grant has also been ob-
tained to pay for the system. One of the requirements for the
grant is that a former truckstop, owned by Gainesville-based
Fast Track, will be reconstructed to its former glory and hiring
the employees it had before.
People passing through Madison County might look up at
the shining blue structure without giving it much thought. Madi-
son Countians looking to develop the county's economic future
look up at the steel structure and see a promise. A promise that
looks good.


Words About Your
"A Few Words About Your


Nadi.. os capital
Fu~nd


Rife thru life are adversity's pangs
,With thorns of misery and pain
So clad body and mind against itsfangs
With the impervious armor of peace.
As we dance gleefully toward the holiday season, urged on
by all the lovely Christmas ads and catalogs, keep in mind one
of the more famous of those ads, "What's in your wallet?" Oth-
erwise, January will find you way down in the financial dump
and you will not be having a happy New Year!
This election year will reach its conclusion tomorrow night
(Tuesday) leaving many voters elated and many others very un-
happ\ we do hope our new leaders' are highly qualified to lead
us far, from turmoil and strife which is quite unlikely. We really
miss those halcyon years when the most we worried about might
be the health of a neighbor. We worried little about money for no
one had any!
Saturday's political rally and peanut boil, sponsored by the
LVFD, turned out quite well in spite, of a rather small crowd.
There were quite a few candidates braving the raw northeastern
wind also keeping their speeches\short as it whipped through
the pavilion. Joe Odom, with help from Leroy Rutherford, Sr.,
turned out plenty of peanuts boiled to perfection and there was
hot coffee and chocolate. And all was-free until auction time.
VWith Leroy Rutherford, Jr. doing a great job as auctioneer, sev-
eral candidates and some others present spent a really pretty
penny for several delicious cakes baked by some of the Lee
Community's best cooks.- all for the benefit of some of Lee's
best men and women, members of the LVFD. We thank the can-
didates as well as the hospital's administrator, David'Abercrom-
bie, and Lee To% n Nlanager Cheryl Archambault, who spoke on
behalf of the hospital and the Lee Charter amendment.
The Lee Day Committee's first meeting of the year last
Thursday e% ening proved quite productive with Cheryl Archam-
bault and Janice Miller accepting the positions of Chair and Co-
chair. There were 12 members present of 24 members listed and
several responsibilities allocated that evening. We welcome any
prospective members and/or suggestions please call Cheryl or
Janice at 971-5867. Be sure to mark your calendar for the next
meeting which will be on Thursday, November 16. Also be sure
to mark a new date for the festival. Due to Easter weekend be-
ing on our usual date, 2007's Lee Day will be on Saturday,
March 31.
Kathleen (Teenie) Welch has reached a milestone in her life
(a well-lived one, we should add) which most of us find it use-
less to dream of doing. In celebration, the Lee Seniors feted Tee-
nie with a shopping and lunch trip to Valdosta. The occasion was
for Teenie's 98th birthday and she seemed really to enjoy the
day. As people congratulated her, a beautiful smilelit up an al-
ready lovely face. We all had a wonderful day.
Several festivities brightened up the Lee Community during
Halloween or is it 'hollerscream'? Mayor Kinsey reported being
quite surprised by the size of the crowd enjoying the Lee School
Fall Festival;. Dawn's Kinder Academy students and parents had
a screaming good time during their fall festivals as did the Lee
Library's patrons and guests during its Halloween program.
Some area churches joined in the effort to keep children enter-.
tained and out of trouble and danger. Midway Church of God is
always among the leaders of the pack in this endeavor.
We leave you now with this quote "Living past 80 is flying
in the face of jurisprudence"- we are 87!
Correction: We stand corrected and must apologize for our
'ignorance.' We failed to consult the dictionary oni our old and
well established meaning of the word pig. According to the
American Heritage Dictionary a pig is 'a domesticated hog'. We
still maintain that hundreds of years of colloquial usage make it
a baby hog.


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11/1/06
Joseph Christian
Homan-DUI, resisting arrest
without violence, leaving the
scene of an accident
Michael Jermain Dun-
can-DWLSR or cancelled,
grand theft
George Albert Yeatman-
Possession of cocaine
Cubia Hall, Jr,-Failure to
appear
11/2/06
Jackson Prescott-VOP
(circuit)
William Huggins-VOP
(circuit), criminal registra-
tion sexual offender
Kyle Lawrence Stewart-
Criminal registration sexual
offender
Carlos Longoria-Ex-
pired drivers license (more
than four months)
Kenneth Eugene New-
some-VOP (county),
11/3/06
Miriam Edith Munoz-
DWLSR or cancelled, ex-
pired tag
James Claude Strick-
land-Criminal registration
Jason Eugene English-
SVOP circuit0 .
S"Joseph Michael Pate-
Possession of marijuana
more than 20 grams
James Edgar Brown-
Disorderly conduct


11/4/06
Antwoine Buzart Da'is-
Disorderly intoxication
Larry Michael Vickers.
Forgery
11/5/06
Walter McCloud-Pos,
session of cocaine
: Michael Shane Snmithie;
Refusal to submit to a breath
test/second .offense, tfleein
or attempting to elude, reck 7
less driving, VOP (circuit i
Jimmy Lee Bryant-Loi',
tering/prowling
Gregory Leon Fiffia-Ag-
gravated battery "
11/6/06
David Douglas Russell-
DWLSR or cancelled
Deana Marion, McKin-
non-Failure to appear (preii
trial) .^
Sandra Denise Gee-Petit"
theft
Gabriel Lamar Verdell-
Failure to appear for non-"
jury trial .
Ozell Jerome Joneg-)
Criminal registration
William McKnight-VOP"
(circuit)
11/7/06
Kodie Umphenour-Do-
metic \ iolence/battery
Sandra Denise Gee-Dis-
orderly conduct
Jovan 1I. Thompsonr
Battery (touch or strike)


Madiso Count


NIt.
.4 -


A Madison man was ar-
rested for begging on Sunday,
November 5.
According to a Madison
Police Department report, Pa-
trolman Brandon Abbott was
dispatched to CVS Pharmacy
at approximately 9 p.m. in ref-
erence to a black male begging ,
for money.
On the way to the loca-
tion, Abbott was advised by Jimmy Lee Bryant
dispatch that the defendant
was wearing a tan shirt and white shorts.
About one block west of the location, Abbott observed Ji-riL
my Lee Bryant.
Abbott told Bryant of the complaint against him, Br\ .nt
said that he did ask a man for 50 cents.
Bryant was arrested and transported to the Madison Coun-
ty Jail.
Man Arrested For

Aggravated Battery
A man was arrested for aggravated battery on Sunday, N-
vember 5, at approximately 5 p.m.
According to a Madison Police Department report by Pa-
trolman Reggie Alexander, Gregory Leon Fiffia, 36, had
punched another man in the face. After being punched, the vic-
tim fell on the roadway, causing bodily injuries. ,,-;
Fiffia was arrested for aggravated battery and transported to
the Madison County Jail.


Friday, November 10, 2006


LOCAL &


REGIONAL I


CRIME BLOTTER j!i


DID SOMEBODY 5RY


1moil
STl.,, G.


I


Man Arrested
For Begging


I


:P











Friday, November 10, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com




AROUND MADISON COUNTY


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5A


Madison County Juvenile Justice Council Holds Meeting.


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Monday, Octpber 9 at the Inter-
faith Community Action Network
(ICAN) 2 Kids Caf6 Center the Madison
County Juvenile Justice Council held
their monthly meeting.
The meeting had a good.outcome in
,attendance. Brenda Landrum, Brett
Brakes. Theresa Williams, Gregory
"Riska. Phylias Law, Rebecca Miller. An-
gela So% ards, Maceo Howell, Deborah
Cucinella. Linda Gaston, Van Freeman,
'Jan Hendricks, Edwin Ford, Ben Ebber-
,son and Julia Waldrep were all present
,or the meeting.
, In the absence of Rick Davis, Phyl-
lis Law called the meeting to order and
,discussed council business, new and,
old.
During the meeting, Frakes gave a
brief description of an anti-theft video
and will bring the video to next month's
meeting for the council to view.
Also, hie noted that Anger Manage-
ment classes have started and are avail-
-able at Madison County High, School
,(MCHS), Madison County Central
School iMCCSi and Madison County
Alternative Excel School tiNCAESi. He


reported that the classes, are going well.
Jan Hendricks of Disc Village will
be taking Amiee Holland's place and
was warmly welcomed by the council.
Riska and Frakes reminded mem-.
bers of the council that truancy has be-
come a serious problem and there is a
strong need to have a school resource
officer attend. the council meetings.
The council came to the conclusion
that the meeting times ma) be conflict-
ing. with school resource officers'
schedules. Next month's meeting will'
address a possible change in the coun-
cil's meeting time.
Maceo Howell reported that Excel
School's G.E.D. tutoring program is
going v ell and that he has high expec-
tations to exceed this school year's
academics standards.
Madison County High School teen
pregnancy program is going good with
16 students taking advantage of the
program. The high school offers par-
enting classes, childcare and trans-
portation bN Robin Smith.
Phyllis La%\ reminded members to
keep in mind what they would like
their focus to be on as a council She
reported that the Prevention Plan was


approved in Orlando and shared with
the council that Ed lacobucci is no
longer With the Departmept of Juve-
nile Justice (DJJ).
With truancy becoming a signifi-
cant problem throughout counties and
states, the council will be looking into
possibly forming a truancy committee
which will help focus on problems re-
garding student absences at school.
Additionally. Brenda Landrum in-
quired about a Madison County re-
source book and passed -out several
Healthy Start resource guides that the
council is currently using. Rebecca
Miller. shared the 4-H program with
the -council and noted that 4-H is
closely working with MCCS. Pinetta
Elementary School (PES) and
Greenville Elementary School (GESt.
Deborah Cucinella noted that she
has scholarships a\ ailable for students
with 504 IP learning disabilities.
These particular scholarships provide
audio CS, equipment and assistance to
students.
The next Madison County Juve-
nile Justice Council's meeting is
scheduled for November 13 at 10 a.m.
at the ICAN 2 Kids Cafe.


CHARLES ROUSE IS COMING TO MADISON!
S-W7iere: Foui Freedoms Bed and 'Breakfasi Fellowship Hall Georgia and North Florida area. He also hoists syndicated radio
When: Tuesday November 14, 2006 at 6:30 p.m. and tele% vision show s covering health-related issues. He is impact-
-i Everyone is invited to attend this very special meeting. Please ing people internationally helping both children and adults to get
invite your friends and family and join us. Rouse is a Doctor of healthy and to stay healthy. ,
Natural Health and he is also a Registered Pharmacist. First and Please join us to hear this wellness expert who lectures in ma-
-toremost Rouse is w wonderful man of God and Pastor of LibertN jor Uni\'ersities across the country. He is the author of a book on
Baptist Church in Albany, Georgia. natural medicine. vitamins. and important supplements.'He helps
S' Rouse %was recently featured on the cover of the UGA of phar- people to lose \\eight: more importantly, he will tell us how to get
Smacy magazine where he received his degree in pharmacology, healthy and to stay healthy in a ver) busy world! Please mark your
The University of Georgia honored him for his outstanding and calendar and join us for this special event. You will have a chance
continuing contribution toward improving health in the lives num- to ask him questions concerning you and your family..
"ers of peoples across the United States-and beyond. Rouse is also For more information, please call 973-6030.
a Doctor of Natural Medicine. He resides in Albany. Georgia. He Please join us.
.6as an expanding number of health and wellness stores in South Thanks, and %te.hope that you will join us Tuesday night,


- ..
.......I 0NrUI ,i


Th November 12
The Telestials, Live! at New
.Home Baptist Church at 6 p.m.
November 13
The Suwannee Chapter of
< Florida Trail Association \ill
hoid its monthly meeting at the
SiO.annee River Water Nlanage-
ment District from 7-9 p.m. on
'US 90 and CR 49. 2 miles east of
Live Oak The Public is \Vel-
ijnpe! The program will feature
FTA member Tom McLain of
Adele. GA. He will narrate his
poto presentation of his 225-
le trip down the Suwannee
r'er from Fargo, GA. to the
fof Mexico using a River-
i k canoe and a 6 horse, 4-
bke Johnson outboard motor.
i November 13
Individuals w ith concerns
ut their memory are invited
..discuss issues with profes-
sionals from the Nursing depart-
ment at NFCC and the
Alzheimer Resource Center.
Thefree screenings are offered at
NECC Career and Technical
Center, Building 13, Room 140,
{Monday, November 13,,from 9-
011:30 a.m. For an appointment,
$lease call 561-6869.
November 14
The Suwannee Valley Bar-
bershop .Chorus is sponsoring
two open house/guest nightson
(Tuesday evenings Nov. 7 and 14
t the Suwannee River Regional
4,ibrary 1848 US 129 So. Live
'Oaik at 7 p.m. All men (and their
wives) are invited to attend to
hear barbershop chorus and
quartet singing. Refreshments
served. For more information
cll Jack Wilson 963-5023 or
Fred Phillips 36271886
November 14
The Madison Central
School PTO will host it's month-
ly meeting. We will meet at 6
p.m. in the Media center at Cen-
tral School. We are pleased to
have Pam Lake from FDLERS
as: our speaker on Disability
Awareness. Join us, to improve
education and participation in
school activizes.
November 14
'): Madison County High
School's Hi Tech will celebrate
their annual kick off and success
stories. The celebration will be


held from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at
the MCHS Cafeteria. RSVP by,
phone to Mary. CoodN at 973-
5061 ext. 147 or Mike Radel at
973-5061 ext. 211. There will be
food, drinks and door prizes so
please join the fun!
November 18
Pre-Holiday Gospel Con-
cert at Jellystone Park, South of
Madison SR 53 to Old St. Au-
gustine Road. Follow ihe signs
Join us for a night of gospel mu-
sic provided by The Diamonds
from Quitman and Madison,'
Bro. Benny Daniels and Donnie
Bailey, Jr. of the Sunday Morn-
ing Coming Down Radio Show,
Brenda kirkland from Perry, and
Bro. Doyle Glass, Madison.
Donations of non-perishable
food items will be accepted at
the door to provide food for the
needy in our area. Last year we
helped eight families during the
holiday season. Come and be
blessed! Doors open at 6 p.m.
Sing at 7 p.m. Call 973-8269 for
more info.
November 20
At 5 p.m. the TABE (Test of
Adult Basic Education) will be
given at NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison, Florida.
TABE is required for acceptance
into vocational/technical pro-
grams. Photo ID required. Pre-
registration is required. To reg-
ister please call 973-9451.
November 21
North Florida Community
College will conduct GED tests
November 21 and 22, 2006, at
6:00 P.M. in the NFCC Techni-
cal Center on the Madison cam-
pus. Persons taking the tests
will be required to furnish a Pho-
to ID. NFCC holds GED prepa-
ration courses free of charge;
there is a fee for the test. Pre-
registration is required. To regis-
ter please call 973-1629.
November 24
There will be great concert
featuring Southern Gospel, and
Bluegrass Gospel at the Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park in
Live Oak! Lots of great LIVE
MUSIC! No tickets required!
This concert is FREE! The
Gospel Sing will be held inside
the Music Hall,, rain or shine.
Everyone will receive FREE


POPCORN! Drinks and other
snacks will be available for pur-
chase. There will be a FREE
CANDY RAIN' for the children
along with a visit from some
puppets during the ,break!
Many wonderful prizes will be
given away in our FREE Door


Prize Draw ings, we ill even
have separate draw ings for the
kids! EBen Wild Adventures
Tickets! For concert information
call Pam at (386) 362-5214.
For camping information, call
(386) 364-1683, or visit
www.musicliveshere.com.


U


Gertie Mae Smith, 86,
died Wednesday. No% ember 1,
2006.
Her funeral will be held
Saturday, November 11. at 1
p.m. at Shiloh Missionary
Baptist Church in Madison.
She was born in Lake
,.Park, Ga. and reared in Madi-
son.
She is survived by a
cousin, Eunice Burgess
(Miller) of St. Petersburg and
four godchildren: Lorraine J.
Brown, Mary T. Houston and
Rev. Phillip Combs of Madi-
son, and Rev. Joseph Simmons
of Live Oak.


To our friends and neighbors. we would like to say thank
you with deepest gratitude for the food. comfort and prayers you
blessed us with during our bereaement of our beloved brother
and dad, Dan McCormick. Special thanks to Mrs. Pat Fourakres
and her Sunday school class atPineta Baptist Church.

May God Bless You,
The Family of Dan McCormick


PERSONAL INJURY &


WRONGFUL DEATH-


S"Jon D. Caminez
Board Certified Civil Trial Attorney


Ian Brown
Cary A. "Bo" Hardee, III










CAMINEZ, BROWN & HARDEE, P.A.



(850) 997-8181


1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET

MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344




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advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information
about their qualifications and experience.


33rd Annual Campbell

Family Reunion
WHEN: Sunday, November 12, 2006
WHERE: Garden Club Building. Forest Capital State Park
Highway 79/27, Perry, Florida (south side of town)
BRING: Lots of covered dishes, family pictures, cameras
and lots of memories and stories to share
We v. ill gather Sunday morning at the Garden Club Build-
ing. beginning at 10:30 a.m., with some hugs and updating each
other on our year's adventures. At 11 a.m., we will begin our
formal meeting We will aim for 12:15 p.m. to be finished up
with the meeting, saying grace and start eating. (Don't forget to
bring those home-made desserts!) -
This is the descendants of John Campbell. Jr (1800-1838)
and Nancy Taylor (1805-1884); Second Generation Neill Camp-
bell t1802-1875) and Elizabeth Taylor 01809-1883): Third Gen-
eration, Alexander Nicholson Campbell (1826-1905) and Mar-
garet Ann Lee (1832-1905); fourth generation come and learn
about the rest of the generation.



OBITUARIES


SGertie Mae Smith










6A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Friday, November 10, 2006


Jones Loves Authoring And Illustrating

Her Own Children's Books


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Sam Jones seems like your
average girl; a senior at, the
Madison County High School
(MCHS), a Family Career and


Community Leaders of Ameri-
ca (FCCLA) and Key Club
member at school and a part
time Worker for CJ's cleaning
services for six years. Sounds
nrettv average; right? There's a


Sam Jones is pictured with her first-ever published
children's story, "The Polka-Dotted Pig" and enjoys living
in the country where it's nice and quiet. She has been a
Madison resident for 10 years. (Greene Publishing, Inc.
Photo by Jessalyn Covell, October 26, 2006)

PUBLIC NOTICE TO

TAXPAYERS

Please review your Special Assessment for fire
protection services within Madison County. If
you have contiguous properties, they may be
combined and could potentially provide you
with a lesser rate. For questions regarding the
process or your Special Assessment, please
contact the Board of County Commissioners
.office at 8.50-973-3179. .. ... .1
r -" 'g( "i T 'l r*. -


catch; she became an .author
and illustrator of her own chil-
dren's book at the young age of
14.
It all started while Jones at-
tended New Testament Christ-
ian Center (NTCC) and her
teacher Nancy Taylor assigned
her students to write a chil-
dren's book. Jones won first
place at school for her book en-
titled, "The Polka-Dotted Pig."
The Madison County Library
saw her book and prompted her
to read The Polka-Dotted Pig
at their summer reading pro-
grams so she did. Soon after.
her book was published. In this
year's Down Home Days, she
rode in the parade for her book,'
which received much recogni-
lion.
In addition to The Polka-.
Dotted Pig she has five chil-
dren's books on the way that
she has authored and illustrated
herself.
After completing high
school, Jones has plans to re-
ceive her Associate in Arts de-
gree at North Florida Conununi-
ty College (NFCC) and would
like to major in business, adver-
tisement or even journalism. She
has a strong passion for writing
and will be pursuing her career
as an author and illustrator of
her very own children's books.
In her spare time, she en-
joys spending time with her
familJ ~l which includes her mom
Cindi Jones and her brother
Corey. Also. she likes hanging
out with her friends and spend-
ing time with her boyfriend
Thomas Williams She attends
Fellowship Baptist Church.
For further information
about her children's books,
please contact Sam Jones at
973-8519, .


2006 Ticket Locations

The Children's Shop
Onl) Options
Chamber of Commerce
Mockingbird
Valdosta School of Ballet
Steele's Jewelry
Ist America Drugs
Salon 106
Perfect Settings
Alvarado & Thomas
Fads N' Fashions
Country Cobbler


The James H. Rainwater Conference Center Located off 1-75 & H'w 84
VJSL is a non-profit, volunteer organization established in 1936
For additional ticket information: Contact Deidre Parramore at 229-245-8813
For show information: Contact Stacy Evans at 229-333-0837 ,,,,,


Madison County Public Library

Offers More Than Just Books


April Brooks


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing. Inc.
The Madison County Public Library offers
a 'wide selection of fiction and non-fiction
books, large print books, paperback books.
maps/atlases. DVDs, movies, books on
CD/cassette, magazines and music CD's for no
cost at all. Additionally; the library provides
reading programs, internet and e-mail access.
The library) is open Monday 'FridaN from 9
a.m. 5.30 p.m. and on Saturdays from 8:30
a.m. 4 p.m.
Library Aide. April Brooks. stated. "The li-
brary helps instill the love of reading to stu-
dents in Madison County."
The library offers plenty of programs such
as preschool story time and after school pro-
grams. Also. in November. the library will be
featuring an after school program just for


Melanie Salyer Melissa Holben


teenagers
Library Aide. Melanie Salver. said, "We
provide internet services for those who need
info on subjects that are important to their
everyday lives and our reading program starts
young ones out early in life encouraging read-
ing."
The Madison County Librar) offers their
conference room to non-profit organizations
throughout the community. Organizations may
reser' e their space in the conference room for
three months in advance. All you have to do is
call the library for availability.
Library Aide. Melissa Holben. noted. "I
love to interact with people. I came from a
large library system %where community and per-
sonal involvement was not an option. I love the
closeness of the community and my favorite
job in the library is reference."


Yaldosta Junior Service League Will Host Their


33rd Annual Arts


The Valdosta Junior Ser-
vice League will be hosting its"
33rd annual "Arts & Crafts
Christmas Spectacular" Satur-
day, November 18th from
10a.m. to 5p.m. and Sunday,
November 19th from 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m. at the James H. Rain-
water Conference, Center off
1-75 and Highway 84 in Val-
dosta,, Georgia. This year's,
show chairmen are Stacy
Evans and Kathi Clifton.
The show features over
100 booths filled with a vari-
ety of original artwork includ-
ing watercolors, photography,
pottery and handmade jewel-
ry; also available will be holi-
day decorations, Christmas or-
naments, children's clothing,
handmade and painted wood-
crafts, as well as children's
toys. New. features include:
handmade and painted chil-
dren's puzzles, landscaped
photography, painted and dis-
tressed windowpane art, and
much more. Favorite artists in-
cluding Terry Arthur and Gar-
di Wood will be returning, and
over 40 new artists will be pre-.
sent. There will also be live
entertainment.
Homemade cakes will be
available at the League's pop-
ular Cake Booth, also avail-
able the Valdosta Junior Ser-
vice League's latest cookbook
"Southern Treasures: Our Fa-
mous Yellow Cookbook." The
show will also feature a booth
offering Gift Wrap Services
for a small donation. The
League will sponsor a raffle of
holiday gifts, and will have
door prizes donated by fea-
tured artists and craftsmen.
Concessions will also be
available. Please bring the en-
tire family and join the Val-


& Crafts Christmas Spectacular


dosta Junior Service Lea2ue
for a fun filled weekend that
promises to put you in the hol-
iday spirit as you stroll down
Reindeer Row and Peppermint
Place on your way to the
North Pole.
The Valdosta Junior Ser-
vice League is a non-profit or-
ganization. Proceeds from the
Arts & Crafts Show directly
benefit America's Second
Harvest Food Bank, Koats for
Kids', Lowndes Valdosta Arts
Commission, School Hearing
and Vision Screenings, local
Learning Enhancement
Grants, Habitat for Humanity
Women's Build, and many


other worthy causes.
Tickets are $7 for adults
and $1 for children. Children
under three are free. Early
Bird tickets must be purchased
in advance for $12 and are
valid on, Saturday only from 8
to 10 a.m. To find out more
about the 33rd annual "Arts &
Crafts Christmas Spectacu-
lar," and the Valdosta Junior
Service: League, please visit
our website at www.visl.org ,or
email valdostaisl@yahoo.com
You may also contact Sta-
cy Evans (229) 333-0837 or
Anita Sinnott (229) 251-1105.
Tickets are available at select
locations.


COUPON FIVE DOLLARS* COUPON
51st Annual


Columbia County Fair
Lake City, Florida
November 3rd 11th
Sponsored By
The Madison County Carrier and
The Madison Enterprise Recorder

Saturday Matinee


SPiscount Coupon
SGood Both Saturdays
Nov. 4th & 11th Noon to 6 p.m. Only
SUnlimited Ride Armband for $10
* With this coupon ($5 Savings)
STo Redeem: Present this
* Coupon at Midway i
.,\ ~Ticket Booth


ADMISSION
oO AdultS .......... ............................................$7.00
Children 4-12 .......................................$ 1.00
Children 3 and under.............................FREE
AND Tickets Available at the Door


Valdosta Junior Service


Spectacular

Saturday, Nov. 18th
10:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 19th
11:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.

Aflfndoors!*Door Pries
,I *OverOO IeARTIST&

S. CRAFSME .
V VJSL Homemade Cakes
Southern Treasures Cookbook


m




www.greenepublishing.com


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7A


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ALREADY WEAR HEARING AIDS?
'Ae you tired of constantly adjusting your hearing
aiid in order to hear comfortably? Meet the Beltone
rDigital! Its SMART LISTENING feature means that
it automatically adapts to varying sound levels as you
move from one listening environment to another.


by Beltone Why Not For The Holidays?
Trade up to the neiW Beltone Digital One with this Special Offer.
During this Special event, we'll give you up to 50% of the price
you paid fler your current hearing instrument, regardless of
brand or age, working or not, or 40% off MSRP, whichever is
better, on ny Beltone* One Hearing System.
*Up to $0.0O fr any two trade-ins. 10U *EE "
*po$100000f-- -A --100% D-igita l InVisa
-- - --- - -- -- 0'1 l I
Hmiia Special i Type Aid for only
$020nLimited Tim offer
N $2)OO off anir ifANA OO,
N$ 188vNo Other Discounts
Belton Digital System--.--- -. ---.-' ----
SLimited tine offer. No other discounts. .
-ef-l II-- -------
_em Call for your appointment today! 95%
or better -1] fWW (t
.MADISON
eltone 235 SW Dade Street
Helpin the world hear better 850-973-4812
i nd any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay. cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or
The patient ait is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee. or reduced fee service, examination, or treatment.
-r-a-m- h- ---


I


FREE Hearing Tests Set

For Senior Citizens
Free hearing tests are being offered in Madison, FL on
Thursday, November 16th, 2006
Factory trained Beltone Hearing Aid Specialists (licensed by the
State of Florida) will perform the free tests. The tests will be given at
the Beltone Hearing Care Center listed below. Appointments are
preferred and can be made by calling the office listed below.


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Friday, November 10, 2006
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Be'Itone T11 a global leader in hearing healthcare. ,,,.,has ,,,,A-,.,,,!A'-t'cessfully
OneTM. addeesses speech-
completed laboratory trials of Beltone whJ
in-noise problems. This new techr-,,-A utomatically targets what you
are listening to within differeqf---'-.round environments. It enhances desirable
anted ones, and makes speech especially in
sounds, while reducing un
no isy situations a priorit"iy.


Everyone who has trouble hearing is welcome to have a test using the
latest electronic equipment to determine if they have a correctable
hearing loss.
Everyone should have a hearing test at least once a year if there is any
trouble at all hearing clearly. Most hearing problems gradually get worse.
An annual test will help keep track of a progressive loss. No hearing
problem of any consequence should ever be ignored.
We will also be giving service on all makes and models of hearing aids. Call
for an appointment today.


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www.,dreenepublishin,2. corn


8A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Friday, November 10, 2006


2006 GENERAL ELECTION RESULTS


(UNOFFICIAL)

Registered Et A OZ ,
Voters 1 ,1516 Number Voted 5,994 % 52O5%U/
US Senator 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total %o
Katherine Harris REP 376 16 370 83 117 64 236 177 37 138 150 1764 30%
Bill Nelson DEM 750 179 518 128 483 109 409 332 74 601 445 4028 68%
Floyd Ray Frazier NPA 2 2 3 2 3 0 1 1 0 3 3 20 0%
Belinda Noah NPA 1 0 5 2 1 0 2 2 1 3 1 18 0%
Brian Moore NPA 3 2 4 0 2 3 6 4 3 6 4 37 1%
Roy Tanner NPA 1 0 7 1 1 0 6 1 1 5 2 25 0%
Write In Votes 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 4 0%

Cong. Rep Dist 4
Rep 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total %oo
Ander Crenshaw REP 624 32 599 115 202 102 375 276 53 242 222 2842 50%
Robert J Harms DEM 481 166 279 94 369 73 275 227 58 491 362 2875 50%
Write In Votes 2 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 7 0%

Gov and Lt Gov 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total o/o
Charlie Crist
/ Jeff
Kottkamp REP 580 30 587 126 213 111 389 294 55 242 222 2849 48%
Jim Davis
ary". .Jones DEM 524 169 297 86 381 64 250 216 57 495 367 2906 49%
Max Lin-i
Tom Macklinh -'"l-- 12 1 13 3 5 0 10 5 2 3 6 60 1%
Richard Paul -- __ - ------
Dembinsky / Dr.
Joe Smith NPA 7 1 6 31' 5 0 1 4 1 29 0%
John Wayne Smith / 0
James J. Kearney NPA 11 1 5 0 7 4 1_ 2 2 7 3 52 1%
Karl C Behm 2--- ---- 3
/ Carol
Castagnero NPA 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 10 0%
Write in Votes 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 5 0%

Attorney General "
Dem 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 Total o
Bill McCollum REP 529 23 517 108 166 85 327 244- 4. 194 185. 2426 43%
Walter "Skip" I---
Campbell DEM 567 172 357 100 418 84 315 260 64 517 397 3251 57%

Chief Financial '" 3-
Officer 112 3 4 S 6 7 8 9 110 Total o %
Tom Lee _REP 442 22 427 94 139 66 280 191 40 1 159 2039 35%
Alex Sink DEM 665 177 462 115 460 109 371 320 71 55 4333733 65%
,~U A a mI.... .... 1 I I. I I i 4331 3733 6
-o m f lt
d* ^ w* ,-vf A ^ -; I. I . I I. I I I I ----.---I--.....----I------ ~, 8 ---.-----------


I n


.4%J I I -JI -J I I
Charles H. Bronson REP 687 27682-138278113 42932062 288 261,
Eric Copeland DEM 417 172120576 312 57 220 185 481 437 320'

Supervisor of ~ -
Elections 1 2' 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
R A- -. -.. '"a i' I.. .... ' --


Margie Foust REP 6291 19 605 120 196 120 432 297 52 I238220
_I _,-l : #l ,* .. ....... " ................---"-------.... .......-- I --- I --- I


IJaUd VvooUS
Williams


SDEM


502


1831


300


90


408R


9o2


9121


TotalI o


3289


Al 249 43


, Total
2928


-?'T"~


I 2j~


County Commissioner
Dist 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 T1
Bob Pugh REP 19 98 55 -- -
Wayne Vickers DEM 74 358 374 81
Jerry Page NPA 69 146 45 26
Mack Primm NPA 15 52 48 11t
Mack rimm- .~ --~


95'

. Dte
le-
72
,.)E


Justice of the
Supreme Court R.
Fred Lewis 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Tote
YES, 687 125 487 120 390' 97 355 311 67 473 362 3472
NO 331 57 331 75 151 64 225 148 31 200 175 178-'

Justice of the
Supreme Court
Barbara Joan
Pariente 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Totat
YES 675 132 484 122 377 91 349 307 59 481 365 3442k
[_NO 340 55 327 69 160 68 221 150 38 187 162 1777
III i I a a -


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57%


49.80%

50.20%



13%
60%
19%
8%


66%
34%


66%
34%


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Dem :


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Friday, November 10, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A


2006 GENERAL ELECTION RESULTS

(UNOFFICIAL)

Justice of the
Supreme Court
Peggy A. Quince 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total /o
YES 693 135 492 120 396 95 361 303 59 489 379 3522 67%
NO 324 48 325 72 146 65 222 159 40 187 155 1743 33%

District Court of
Appeal Edwin B.
Browning Jr. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total o
YES 887 163 644 144 466 120 456 359 61 569 466 4335 77%
NO 215 27 232 58 103 49 163 127 37 147 112 1270 23%

District Court of
Appeal Brad
Thomas 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total _o
YES 701 138 514 119 407 96 365 315 66 497 372 3590 69%
NO 308 46 295 75 137 61 210 133 32 182 160 1639 31%

District Court of
Appeal Peter
D.:Webster 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total %
YES 701 134 497 120 389 97 365 319 61 478 369 3530 68%
NO 300 49 310 74 147 60 210 135 36 192 161 1674 32%

School Board Member
Dist 1' 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total %oo
Ronnie Ragans 543 -,543 49%
Susie Bishop
Williamson 1560 -- 560 51%

School Board Member
Dist 5 1 ,,,2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total _o_
Sean Alderman 394 234 628 43%
Bart Alford 493 1.....,350 843 57%

Amendment 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11' Total _o%
YES 546 117 435 100 308 79 312 252 47 425 303 2924 56%
NO 458 68 398 94 217 72 277 207 51 252 214 2308 44%

Amendment 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total o%
YES 706 119 565 125 367 119 426 341 46 457 348 3619 66%
NO -1......364 66 299 80 186 50 ,194 1.41 54 230 195 1859 34%

Amendment 4 1. 2 3 4 5 6 7' 8 9 10 11 Total o
YES 764 160 565 120 410 106 388 303 49 527 372 3764 68%
NO 323 31 308 85 150 64 245 187 50 167 173 1783 32%

Amendment 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total o%0
YES ,723 146 642 143 384 110 455 344 57 495 366 3865 68%
NO 378 50 251. 66 192 58 188 157 42 223 195 1800 32%

Amendment 7 .1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total %oo
YES 875 165 730 164 474 137 520 401 62 582 446 4556 82%
NO 209 25 153 42 94 30 113 88 38 116 109 1017 18%
Amendment 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total %o
YES 709 111 580 122 343 120 416 344 46 426 348 3565 66%
NO 334 74 273 76 195 47 196 128 50 247 185 1805 34%

New Hospital
Construction Surtax
Referendum 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total %


For, 726 139 430 82 339 83 313 243 39 465 352 3211 55%
Against 1405 58 481 130 242 90 334 277 67 273 237 2594 45%

Town of Lee Revision to
the Town Charter 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total %
(es 72 72 73%
ilo 0I. -.2....-.-27 27 27%








10A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder





|In The Spotlight...


www.greenepublishing.comrn


Friday, November 10, 2006


JH I *


,BETH MOORE


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
If you've been around and know Madison County then, you know the late
Randall Buchanan who was the principal of Pinetta Elementary School (PES)
for 15 years arid the Madison County School Superintendent for 12 years. Al-
together, he served 39 years in the Madison County school system.
After Buchanan became ill and before he retired, his daughter Beth Moore
interned as principal and as ffth-grade teacher at PES. No\,. she is mai "king her
fourth year a Pinetta's principal:
Moore was born in Valdosta, Ga. on June 26, 1970 and grew up within a
half mile of where she presently lives, in the Hickory Grove community. She
attended Pinetta Junior High School from kindergarten to eighth grade.
She was never the typical girl who played with dolls and dressed in pink.
If anyone wanted to find her then they would look outside and there she would
be with her older brother, Randy, fishing, playing baseball, basketball or hav-
ing dirt-bomb fights.
She grew up in a family that was very close. and her parents always ex-
pected her to have good grades. Beth and her brother were used to living on a
small farm where they grew hard squash for the market. They would spend
their spring break hoeing squash and getting a good farmer's tan. Then, they
would spend the early summer picking, washing and hauling squash. Squash is
how they made money for vacations, mostly camping trips in the North Geor-
gia Mountains.
She and Randy also would work for their neighbor during the summer,
picking squash and peppers. They raised hogs and cows, too. That means they
were always fixing fences! To this day she can build a mean fence!
When Moore was in the eighth grade, her father had cancer and was in
Gainesville for a couple of months for treatments. She was put in charge of the
hogs. She did a great job until one pen of feeder hogs started dying. She had
every farmer from Madison to Tallahassee trying to save those pigs. They did-
n't all die; she did save a few. From all of these early jobs, she learned respon-
sibility and a strong work ethic.
Her dad was the Superintendent of Madison County Schools the year she
started kindergarten and the year she graduated from Madison County High
School (MCHS) in 1988. She learned a lot from those years of watching and
listening; mostly she realized that she hated politics! During the summers,
Moore would go with her dad to work. The ladies at the county office would
always find things for her to do. She was the copy-machine queen for the sum-
mer!
Moore was involved in many things growing up such as Little League
baseball, 4-H, North Florida Livestock Show and her church. She said she had
a great childhood.
At the high school, she played basketball and softball and was very in-
volved in clubs at MCHS. She received a basketball and softball scholarship to
Santa Fe Community College in Gainesville. After she finished her two years
there, she received a basketball scholarship to Valdosta State University (VSU).
She spent two years there playing ball and finishing her Bachelor's degree. She
went back to VSU a few years later and received her Master's degree in Edu-
cational Leadership.
Beth Moore stated, "I try to be an influential principal who cares for peo-
ple not just an image. My father was probably the most influential principal
and person I ever knew. I have tried to follow his lead in my philosophy of ed-
ucational leadership. The number-one reason I am in this position is for our stu-
dents. I get to know the children at my school, hear about their problems and
try to help them find solutions. I try to be involved in the classrooms as much
as I can one-on-one with students and teachers. In this day' of education, the
teacher's job is anything but easy. I believe in our teachers and do everything
in my power to help make their job as worry free as possible."
When Moore started working at Pinetta Elementary all the new faces were
new, but it was the same old place. There was one familiar face, a paraprofes-
sional who she has known for many years, Linda Sapp. "I often tease her and
say that she has been here since dirt was new, but I don't know what I would
do without her."


RANDALL BUCHANAN


When Moore was a teacher, she became really close to her students. Now
she has an entire school of students that she falls in love with-every day. "Noth-
ing compares to a child looking up at you and saying, 'Mrs. Beth, I love you,'
and then they give you a big hug," she said.
Most principals are extremely busy people and Moore is no different. The
majority of the time, she's not even in her own office. Students and staff can
find her, outside teaching P.E. classes and she tries to have organized activities
daily for her students. "
During the school year, PES doesn't fall' short of providing students with
fun and exciting events. Pinetta has a peanut boil in the fall, a basketball league
in the winter, trips to Pizza Hut for rewards, trips to the Pinetta Market for ice
cream treats and during lunch duty Moore makes up stories to tell the classes.
Plus, for all the field trips that the students take, she makes sure to drive the
bus. What other principal does that.
Beth Moore resides in the Hickory Grove community approximately five
mile from the school on her family's farm. She has been married to Theron
Moore for 12 years and has two sons, Jacob, who is nine, and Joshua, who is
seven. Her parents are Betty Sue Buchanai and the late Randall Buchanan.
When she's not at PES, she enjoys camping, photography, canoeing, and
spending time with her family. Also, she enjoys attending church as a member
of Iickory Grove United Methodist Church and is a 4-H volunteer with the
Hickory Grove 4-H Club.
"Pinetta Elementary is a wonderful place to work. We are a family and just
like families we are not perfect and we make mistakes. However, we work as
a team and help each other not only at work but also in our every day lives.
There are not'many places you could work with that kind of support. Our fac-
ulty and staff are some of the best you will find anywhere!" Moore stated.


Beth Moore is pictured with her tight-knitted family husband
Theron and her two sons, Joshua (left) and Jacob. (Photo submit-
ted)


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Friday, November 10, 2006


www.greenepmblishigg.com


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11A


Of View


TEENAGE DRUNK DRIVING...

a paradoxical phrase
By Sylvia Tomberlin
At age 13, one automatically becomes a teen. Exiting the environment of a child who may
have been carefree with line responsibility, a young teen finds themselves faced with quite dif-
ferent expectations from adults and peers. Comparisons with others socially, financiall, physi-
cally, and scholastically no longer refers to who has the newest Barbie or Mario game. It's all
about cell phones, Ipods, My Space...and a car. Generally, teens feel they have earned the rights
to those possessions and making their own decisions about life just because they recently hit
teenage status.
At this vulnerable age, a teen would probably choose to be a clone if being a unique individ-
ual meant being different from the crowd. They want to blend in and find acceptance. Evern one's
self-confidence is affected by whether or not they feel affirmation and approval. Popularity. is still
the "'jewel of desire" and many will fall prey to unhealthy decisions that will occur during the teen
years. Impacted by such things as hormones, mood swings, changes in physical appearance and-
sexual interests, peer pressure and challenges to their value system, the trials and errors they face
now have more serious consequences than those they faced as a child.
Teens may also be impacted by situations where parents so pressed %with time and job re-
straints, or financial and social aspirations, unintentionally push relationships in the home to the
bottom of the list. Parents have stated that having their children involved in extracurricular events
"is" their fanfily time. Greater value is frequently placed on these achievements than meaningful
family interaction, sometimes resulting in communicating to unachievers their worthlessness.
Also, research indicates marketing is targeting youngerfand younger consumers. TV and mag-
azine ads project the consumption of alcohol as a near prerequisite to being a person with any
prestige or notoriety at all. Many teens having been presented a role model for drinking right in
their own families, now face a barrage of "acceptable temptation" from the marketing media. Al-
though told to "do as I say, and not as I do" the opposite usually occurs...kids generally behave
what the) see, not what they are told.
Getting drunk has become the "in thing" among teens. By the time one hits high school, the
ne, w "family of friends" have scheduled social drinking parties in the woods, at the beach, mud
bog-ins, or even. at unsupervised homes. Teen peer pressure insinuates you.have to participate or
be an outcast...that means isolation, loneliness, boredom, pain. Many teens initial, and mistak-
enly, believe they can just hang out and not get involved, or be a positive influence on those who
do drink. Not many survive the pressure.
Alcohol has become the "drug of choice" to alleviate pain, or alter our senses for recreation-
al purposes. Being intoxicated with alcohol inhibits a person's ability to function normally due to
the physical/chemical affects on the organs of the body. Alcohol is known to diminish our ability
to make rational and accurate decisions; it erases our cautions regarding safetN.: and clouds our
moral conscience. We become either hyper- or hypo-, tuned in to what is going on around us, or
w within us.
Parents and teens often rush towards the driving privilege as a convenience to both, even
when some know or suspect alcohol has already become a potential threat in their child's life.
Blindly leaning on the "trust factor," the results are often devastating. A "teenage drunk driver" is
a young, possibly irrational, physically, mentally. and emotionally disabled operator of a destruc-
tive weapon.
If DUI's and other legal proceedings have been issued, transportation rights have been with-
drawn, and employment has been limited, a teen's entire future opportunities for success may be
at stake. In the counseling process, we see those who are troubled by guilt and shame, bitterness
and anger. This teen may now be plagued.by a negative self-image that manifests itself in such
ways as anxiety, depression,,panic attacks, eating disorders, more drug and alcohol involvement,
suicide, loss of self worth, moral impurit\ and more. .
Those responsible for these teens must draw more secure boundaries and be willing to enforce
them, which requires determination, perseverance, and a loving, but firm stance. Restricting
amenities such as phones, computers, and Ipods is not enough to deter drunk driving. Neither is
withdrawing their driving privileges for two weeks. Accepting only the verbal promise "not to re-
peat the offense" from one who has made this irrational choice should not be an option.
Early supportive intervention may become a necessity. Counseling can be effective in exam-
ining, evaluating, and stimulating' positive changes .in destructive attitudes and behaviors. As
James Dobson would say, "now's the time for tough love."
Dr. Sylvia Tomberlin is an author, women's speaker, and biblical counselor with offices in
Madison, Perry, and the Tallahassee area. i


A Trooper's Point Of View


Tinney Remembers Wrecks
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The hardest thing, B.J. Tinney said, in his 43 years in law enforcement was informing fami-
lies that a member of their family had died.
"It was always hard," he said, "but the hardest part was having to tell the parent of a teenag-
er that their child had been killed in a wreck.
Tinney worked 37 years and three months with the Florida Highway Patrol, beginning his
state trooper career in West Palm Beach.
During his time with FHP, Tinney said, "I saw a lot of dead people. I worked the turnpike for
14 years. I worked wrecks with little babies in them."
Tinney said that, for the most part, accidents involving drunk-driving fatalities, mostly in-
volved the drunk drivers themselves. Other times, he said, the driver had collided with someone
else and killed them.
Once, while working in West Palm Beach, he had to inform an 83-year-old woman that her
son-in-law and grandchildren had been killed in a wreck. Her daughter was in the hospital at the
time and couldn't be contacted.
"That was the most stress in our work, when we had to tell family members that a loved one
had died," Tinney said.
Tinney said that the FHP did offer counseling at times when troopers asked for it to deal with
the tragedy. When former Trooper Jimmy Fulford was
killed by a bomb, hidden inside a microwave oven by drug
dealers, the troopers had four days of intense counseling,
Tinney said.
Tinney went to work for the FHP after being a military
policeman in the United States Air Force and after working
for the Homestead Police Department. He began his FHP
career on November 1, 1961 and retired from the FHP in
January 1999.
Tinney said that he still thought about many of the peo-
ple killed in the accidents years later.
Tinney resides in Pinetta with his, wife, Inda. They have
two daughters, Tamara and Kayla, and six grandchildren.


A Counselor's Point


A Witness's Point Of View

A Horrifying Drunk Driving


Accident On Christmas Eve
By Mickey Starling
SWe were just returning from our traditional last-minute
shopping trip last Christmas Eve. As we were unloading the car,
my brother-in-law said he thought he heard a crash on the high-
way. So, he and my wife went to check it out. Within minutes,
they called me, telling meto hurry down 360 South. Because it
was really bad.,
I had no idea %what bad meant, until I saw it for myself. E- ,
cept. I didn't really "'see" it at first. I went to try to comfort and
pray with a very fortunate but shaken family that my wife was
w ith on the side of the road. Josh, m\ brother-in-law, was in the
ditch checking for a pulse. and trying to find a way to help a
family that had jusi been hit head-on by a drunk driver. There
was no helping them. What I sasw next will be emblazoned into
my memory for the rest of my life. A young man's burnt torso
was extending out of the passenger's side window, w here he had Mickey Starling
been trying to exit. Only the young man's passenger surv ied the
collision. I have never seen that much beer come out of one vehicle. Nor have I ever seen that
much waste of precious human life.
I came away from that experience w ith a lesson and a wish. I will ever again do last minute
shopping late in the evening. I have witnessed why that is not such a good idea. My wish is sim-
ple. For the sake of the guilty and the innocent, wouldn't it be nice if all first-time DUI offend-
ers were forced to spend some time in jail or a rehabilitation program in the hopes that they 'w would
receive the wake-up call they so desperately need? Young folks especially\ seem to consider them-
selves immortal. Add some. alcohol to that equation, and you have someone who is. both fearless
and reckless with their "immortality." Letting them off easy is a death-threat to all of us.
I am sure that the drunk driver's family-would have loved for someone to help prevent the loss of
their son. The are victimss as well. and they need our prayers.
; There's a young man in Perry who knows this reality all too well. He will-wake up this Christ-
mas morning as he did last Christm/as, minus his family. I have never met him, but I have prayed
for him often, and I memorized his family's names because they deserve at least that, and I want-
ed to call then by name when I meet them in heaven. After all, that's what Christmas is all about.
Mickey Starling is the associate pastor of New Testament Christian Center in Madison. where
he also works with vouth and teaches school at the chinch s private academnv.

A Tee.fat er W o, As-+3is Frw Ak .1.
Your ,Ac+ t Hav C e45s


By Jillian Sheffield
Every day in the news, you hear about someone being 1
killed in a car accident. Drunk drivers cause the majority of
those accidents. Most of them do not see a problem with drink-,
ing and driving, at least not until they are the one behind. the.
wheel of a car who has killed an innocent person. Most people
do not choose to drink responsibly and those choices will e% en-'
tually reflect in their consequences. It only takes one or two
drinks for you to be over the consumption level tolerated for "
you to drive. When you drink, even if you only have one beer,
your body is impaired and you are considered an unsafe driver.
This Scripture outlines the actions of a drunkard and how some-
one feels when he or she is impaired: 'AVio has anguish? Who
has sorrow? Who is always fighting? Who is always complain-
ing? Who has unnecessary bruises? Who has bloodshot eyes? It
is the one who spends long hours in the taverns, trying out new Jillian Sheffield
drinks. Don't let the sparkle and smooth taste of wine deceive you. For in the end it.bites like a
poisonous serpent; it stings like a viper. You will see hallucinations, and you will say crazy
things. You will stagger like a sailor tossed at sea, clinging to a swaying mast. And you will say,
'They hit me, but I didn't feel it. I didn't even know it when they beat me up. When will I wake
up so I can have another drink?'" (Proverbs 23:29-35, New Living Translation)
God says not to let the wine you drink deceive you. The problem is people are deceived and
they make wrong choices because of it. When you.drink, your vision becomes blurred and you
cannot judge distance. Therefore, when you drive you are not able to tell how close or far away
another car or person is. People are not able to control their tongue when they drink either. They
say things they will regret the next day, but have no control over at that point in time. In our so-
ciety, everyone has their own opinions of what is or isn't too much to drink. The question I would
like to ask them is "What is the point? What are you going to receive from drinking?" The an-
swer is nothing. Some think it. solves all their problems and choose to "drink away their sor-
rows." The fact is that drinking is only a temporary filler and will not solve anything. Drinking
to me is pointless.
As a college student, I could allow myself to be pressured by the influence of my classmates.
Instead, I choose not to drink'.and to stand up for what I believe. Honestly, I can tell you that I
have had one drink in my entire life. If I could take it back, would I? Absolutely! I feel that, even
though only a handful of people know about it, that I have ruined my witness as a Christian with
the few people who do.
Throughout my life, my dad has always told me my actions have consequences. In this case,
I can never take back drinking that night, but I can say that I will never drink again. I have made
that decision, because as a Christian, I do not want my witness to be ruined because God tells us,
not to be a drunkard. I also feel it impairs your judgment and you make foolish choices. Most
will say they will never drink and drive, but the fact is you make foolish choices when you are
drunk that you don't even remember the next day. How do
you know that when you are in that situation you will
choose not to drive? The only way to know that you will
Ii I !^^ H not make these decisions is to not drink to an extent that
Syou will regret. In saying this, I encourage you to drink re-
sponsibly and understand that your actions do have conse-
quences.
The daughter of Wayne and Deborah Sheffield 'of
Madison, Jillian Sheffield is a student at North Florida
Community College, where she is the president of Baptist
Campus Ministries. *She attends Fellowship Baptist
Church. She works as an advertising representative for
Greene Publishing, Inc. ,


I

I


I


nfl- rp) -I vi







www.greenepublishing.com


12ATheMadisonEnterprise-Reorder MADISON COUNTY UNITED WAY


Friday, November 10, 2006


United Way Helps Consolidated Christian



Ministries Give Back .To The Madison Community


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Vice President of Consol-
idated Christian Ministries
(CCM) Joe McClung stated,
"The rise and cost of gasoline
and food has been a burden to
people who may be poverty
stricken. The United Way
helps us get through. Without
them, we would be hard put:"
Everyone who works at
Consolidated Christian Min-
istries are volunteers .and help
provide food to the needy
from the goodness of their
hearts.
Consolidated Christian
Ministries is located at 900-A
S. Pickney Street in Madison.
was organized in 1997 and
started distributing food to


Madison citizens in 1998,.
The ministry all began, by
two ladies Jan Zinn and Jan
Grant who joined together
with the St. Vincent DePaul
Catholic Church bread min-
istry' and other individual
Madison churches who de-
sired a better way of meeting
the needs of the Madison citi-
zens.
Consolidated Christian
Ministries is a 501C3 organi-
zation that means that they are
a nion-profit and faith-based
organization.
CCM's financial and `ol-
unteer sponsors include Cher-
ry Lake United Nlethodist.
Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter Day Saints, Concord Bap-
tist Church, Faith Baptist


Church, First Assembly of
God of Madison, First Baptist
Church of Pinetta, First Unit-
ed Methodist of Madison, Fel-
lowship Baptist Church, Faith
Baptist Church. Grave Presby-
terian Church, Hanson United,
Methodist, Harmony Baptist
Church, Lee First Baptist
Church, Lee United
Methodist, Macedonia Church
of God, Madison Church of
God, Midway Church of God,
Mount Nebo AME Church,
Mount Zion AME Church of
Cherry Lake, New Life Chris-
tian Center, Original Apostolic
Church. Pineland Missionary
Baptist. St. Mary's Episcopal
Church, St. Margaret's
Catholic Church. St. Vincent
DePaul Catholic Church,


Volunteers at Consolidated Christian Ministries look like they're having fun
preparing chicken to be distributed to Madison citizens in need. (Photo submitted)
- .. .,_. ... ..


Shiloli Missionary Baptist,
United Methodist. Cooperative
Ministries, Unity Baptist
Church, St. Johns Baptist
Church, Farm Share and Mis-
sign Harvest of America.
With the help of these or-
ganizations and churches,
Consolidated Christian Min-
istries distributes 250 or more
bags of free food each month
to the hungry in the communi-
ty. ,
CCM distributes free
bread and \pastries, every
Wednesday, offers a Share
Food Discolunt Program and
provides Agency Referral Ser-
vice to Nladison citizens.
The Share Food Program
is a non-profit organization
that builds and strengthens the
coninunir) through volunteer
service. Share offers savings
on food. Everyone who volun-
teers just two hours a month is
welcome to participate.
There are. no income re-
quirements, just a desire to
make a positive difference in'
the Madison community.
The. ministry distributes
free bread every WednesdaN
from 12 p.m. 2:30 p.m. to the
general public and Thursday
from 10 a.m. 12:30 pm.
Also, the ministry offers
free food,eyery third Monday
of each month from 10 a.m. -
12:30 p.m. All recipients must
apply and meet income guide-
lines and must be Madison


Hobo Hutchinson; (left) Vice President of Consoli-
dated Christian Ministries Joe McClung and Arlene
Hutchinson enjoys volunteering their time to distrib-
ute food to the needy in Madison. (Greene Publishing,
Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell)


County residents. Also, emer-
gency food is a\ ailable by re-.
ferrals once a year.
bI addition, there are a
limited number of hospital
beds, wheel chairs,, crutches,
and ,potty-chairs for loan to
Madison residents. CCM has
mattresses that are provided
for Madison citizens too.
During the months of No-,
vember and December the
need for an increased amount
of food and volunteers are ex-
pected due to the holidays.
Consolidated Christian
Ministries operates with the
support of the Madison Coun-
ty United Way and America's
Second Harvest of the- Big
Bend.
In 2005, CCM served


1.556 people. 779 households.
409 children 18 years of age
or younger, 611 adults 19-59
years of age and 546 seniors.
In 2005 bread was distrib-
uted to 4,797 homes, 10,008
people and 239 churches and
organizations.
In 2005, food was offered
to 3,063 homes and 6,753 peo-
ple in Madison County. There
.were 277 Shared Food Dis-
count Program orders. 167 set
of mattresses and three wheel
chairs to people in the com-
munity.
If you would like to make
a difference, please donate
food, money or time to CCM.
Any donation is very much
appreciated and helps give
back to people in Madison.


Servers To Help Raise Funds For Madison County United Way
By Jessalyn Covell \"ill be designated towards reaching this
Greene Publishing. Inc. year's goal that is S75.000.
' 'On Tuesday. Nbvem'bel '1-4 kicking off Regular .eripoyees will be. on site to
at'4 p.m. and&ending at 9 p.m: be a group of carefully watch and make sure that the guest
guest servers will take over Ken's Bar B Q serers take orders and bring food to tables
on Highway 90 in Madison. The United Way properly.
will reap the benefits. Please come out and support communi-
Owner Bill Brown welcomes guest ty leaders and Madison citizens and help
serves from the United Way as his own crew raise money for the United Way and NMadi-
each year to help raise funds specifically for son businesses. It is one more way to in-
the United Way. evolve the community in the United Way dri-
All tips and donations for the evening ve.



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HEALTH


Friday, November 10, 2006


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A


M Many Women May Be




'Pregnant And Not Know It


By Jessalyn Co,
Greene Publish
Mostly every
./ nal bloating,a
have been preg
It is Common i
g Out.of, six Ma
anand not knowing
Not all wome:
Ifin doubt, alw
Prim
she was preg
i husband had

Covenant Hospice Honors

National Hospice Month
By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
During the month of November, Covenant Hospice joins
with other home care and hospice providers in Madison to cele-
brate National Home Care Month and National Hospice Month.
Covenant Hospice is a health care provider that has made count-
less contributions to the Madison community
During November, home-care and Hospice pro\ iders will
celebrate the great contributions the health care delivery system.
and reaffirm their commitment to serving others.
During National Hospice Month. Covenant Hospice work-
ers recognize hospice caregivers that are building a more corn-
passionate society, where life is valued and those in .need can
count on the love and support of others. Also, Covenant
Hospice workers recognize the courage and strength of termi-
nally ill patients and their families.
Hospice programs provide an option for individuals with
terminal illnesses to be cared for as they choose in their final
days, often in their own homes and surrounded by the love of
their families. The doctors, nurses, counselors, Volunteers, and
others who provide hospice care throughout the community
bring comfort to those most in need every day, treating termi-
nally ill patients with the dignity and respect, they deserve. By
dedicating themselves to the care of those approaching the end
of life, they demonstrate great love.
ATlidc'h passion reflected min Covenant Hospice care ik'one
.of1the reasoinsthat hMadison has an outstanding health care sys-
tem. The community is grateful for the good work of the com-
munity's dedicated medical professionals and Covenant hospice
caregivers.


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woman knows the signs of being pregnant. Fatigue, nausea or vomiting, increased sensitivity to odors, frequent urination, abdomi-
a missed period and more. So, why have there been several cases not only in the conmunirt, but in the country with women who
nant for. months and don't even know it?
for women to not have a clue that they may be pregnant until they miss a period a week or two later after the fact.
dison County Health Department employees, five of the employees stated that they have either heard of women becoming pregnant
git or they have experienced a client first hand who was seven-nine months pregnant and had no clue.
n experience any of those symptoms and may have irregular periods that make it hard to decipher whether they're pregnant or not.
ways take a home pregnancy test to make sure.
ary doctor at Madison Osteopathic Medicine (M.O.Mi.) Julie Schindler stated,-" I have had one in the community who didn't know
nant until the ninth month. This was eight years ago. The mother had no pain, had regular periods and didn't gain any weight. Her
d a vasectomy performed and they didn't think anything of it until she w.as almost due."

Neifeld Learns About Health Care From

Madison Covenant Hospice Nurse


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing. Ic.
On Tuesday. October 31, a
Florida State University (FSU),
nursing student Erica Neifeld
tagged along with Covenant
Hospice Nurse Melissa Taylor
to receive a better knowledge
of various aspects of health
care.
Taylor has been a local
hospice nurse for 14 years. She
is a registered nurse (RN) and
Certified Hospice Pallative
Nurse I.CHPN). She resides in
Monticello with her husband.
Paul and has three children:
Katie, Josh and Jesse Covell.
She has been bringing quality
health care to local Madison
citizens for 14 years.
Neifeld 'will; receive a
Bachelor of Science degree in
Nursing in April 2007. She has
plans to move to Tennessee to
practice health care. She comes
Sfom. a background ,\ ith a lot of
medical experience. Her moth-
er has been a nurse for 23 years
and her father has been a doctor
for over 25 years. She has one
sister still in high school in


Bradenton and another sister
and one brother who reside in
Tallahassee and attend Talla-
hassee Community College
(TCC'. Also. she has a fiancee.
Tom w four and a half years.
Neifeld's lab grouD is solit


into two halves and one half
shadow s Co\ enant Hospice and
the other half shadows Big
Bend Hospice.
Neifeld stated, "I learned
so much w while observing Tay-
lor. Hospice work is a totally
different %world outside of the


FSU nursing student Erica Neifeld and Covenant
Hospice Nurse Melissa Taylor make their rounds in
Madison to hospice patients. (Greene Publishing, Inc.
Photo by Jessalyn Covell, October 31, 2006)


More Cost-Saving Generic Drugs Available
Generic drugs are safe, ef- generic options for medications for allergy'
fective, less expensive and an you take. In the past two and Amaryl (glimepiride) for
option for an increasing number one-half years, many important diabetes
,of patients with many medical brand name drugs have gone off Cefzil (cefprozil), an an-
conditions. patent. Some examples include: tibiotic
' According to the Septem- Accupril (generic name Flonase (fluticasone), an
ber issue of Mayo Clinic Health quinapril) for high blood pres- allergy nasal steroid
Letter, generics make up more sure and heart failure Spray
than 50 percent of drugs pre- Allegra (fexofenadine) Neurontin (gabapentini
scribed today. Compared with
brand name drugs, generics can
cost 30 percent to 80 percent
less.
The popularity and avail-
ability of generic drugs resulted
from the federal Hatch-Wax-
man Act of 1984. Then, only
about 12 percent of prescription
drugs Were generics. The act al-
lowed companies that manufac-
tured generic drugs to forgo
costly duplication of expensive
clinical trials already conducted-
by the developer of the brand
name medication.
If you haven't asked lately,
check with your doctor about


hospital. There is to much more
to do."
Taylor noted. "My job of-
fers one-on-one care for the pa-
tient and the family. It is a
whole different aspect of nurs-
ing., It is fast paced and we
spend a lot of time with the pa-
tient. It is unlike a hospital set-
ting and our number one priori-
ty is catering to the needs of the
patient and their family."


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1 4A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com




CHURCH


Friday, November 10, 2006


CATCH THE SPIRIT


For I know the plans that I have for you, declares the Lord;
plans for welfare and not for calamity to give you a future and
a hope.
(Jeremiah 20:11) NAS
As we step into November, we are reminded of God's good-
ness in each of our lives and we are thankful. In a recent Charge
Conference report, our Pastor, Reverend Bob Laidlaw, listed
some of the ways, that we see God's promises being fulfilled in
our individual lives and in those of our church family. Our com-
munity is also impacted as lives are being steadily influenced by
the love of God and the Kingdom of God growing in our midst.
His report included many areas which reflect the love for God
and for our world being lived out in daily lives. He stated that
100% of our apportionment conunitments are met. but more im-
portantly, God's giving nature does not stop %\\ith requirements.
God's love causes expectations to be surpassed in support of the
Florida Children's Home. our Cuban sister Church. in local min-
istries as well as in youth mission trips, community missions.
social justice ministries, and so much more. Our church active-
ly supports and participates in many community events and in
ecumenical ministries. More importantly, our Pastor went on to
say that our church has great zeal for spiritual grow th- for per-
sonal relationships with Christ. There is much interest in the
ne%% Disciple Bible Study,. which begins in Januar'. Ne%. groups
are emerging \\ ith Bible studies and prayer groups that are in the
process of expanding. NMany are discovering God's call on their
lives and regularly seeking prayer and guidance from our.Pas-
tor. Vital and exciting ministry continues to accelerate in our
Youth as Pastor Brian gives wonderful leadership to an ever-
growing group. Many youth are discovering the jo\ of knowing
and serving Christ-the TOP mission or our church. The organi-
zations of the United Methodist Men and Women minister to,
needs both near and far. The Christmas in October project is
now underway. Everyone is asked to bring toys and donations


Lee Worship Center
3 l MNln.:.I.. D, Lee. FL 32059
P,. ib.r C a- rt, La,,. .
Sunda).........................................................10: 0n) a.m .
Sunday) Esening lWorship.............................6:00 p.m.
Thurs. Praser lteling & Bible Study ............6:1H) p.m.
A ihurnh \\Tcrae Er ',r.nre I Someone
C ill Pa.-;t.-. Ch, arles ,. M r,I:.u L. ..lc: *.r A.' si.iaril ellcn & Brenda
NMcC.,ruosL lor a pr,~,.:r .-r a iv.. horhch 971-2S1I1


Barbara Memorial Church
Of The Nazarene
i-iL-," i., ."54 r.",'l.l.,l:.
f .-I rA I llL r
Sund.j School..... . ......... .................... 111:11) a.m .
Morning i\orhip..............................1ll:0 u.m.
Evening % or hip........................................... 5:30 p.m .
1 .\ dnt.da, Bihkt SLtud%................................. :30 p.m.



Reapers Of The Harvest Church
? -il. - .I (. I JIi ..r I .I f, L H .- 411
,a, .n,' ,i r ,,.r
Sunday School.. ..........................................10-00 a.m .
M morning, \\ rship............................... .......I 1:lll '.m .
E'enin \\orship............................................... 6: ) p.m .
%%edn.--dai Night 'ersice.............................. :3 p.m.
i, ,, hl'. li . il ,..ii .'I f .t 1, t l.h l ,',n. 'I.
I -.r I. ." l l ,' ., r h. .. 1
E EVERYONE IS 1 L\% S O'wELCOME!


St. Vincent DePaul Roman
Catholic Church

L '. . l' l
SUinda .. .............................. ......:.......... ......... :ill a.m .
Mon.. tut.... trd. la. ......... .........7:311) .m.
Thursday M a ,....... ............................"':311 n.m .
Saiurda.i M ai .. ......... ......... ................... 5:3 p m .



St. Mary's Episcopal Church
I an, NI I-i...-, .. a I .. .,.. FL 850-973-8338
DL R',., .* r ,' i, ., '.. hfyles Senior Warden
SSunday Church School..............................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Holy Eucharist...............................10:00 a.m.
Mission Board 2nd Sunday......................11:00 p.m.
Episcopal Church Women 3rd Suinda%......Il1:llli p.m.
Visitors always welcome!


for food for those in our community who need to experience
God's love being extended from a caring community. Important
ministry happens daily. Our Pastor says it best: The excitement
is truly contagious!
We are incredibly humbled and very grateful to be a part of
advancing the Kingdom of Christ in our world today. These are
a few of the ministries 'which reflect the heartbeat of Christ in
our midst. In this Thanksgiving season, we are truly thankful.
Please come and join us if you do not already have a church
home. Visitors are warmly welcomed.
Fifty-Five Plus Club will meet on Novemberl1, 2006 at the
Cooperative Ministries Center. The Chamber of Commerce will
be in charge the program and Greenville United Methodist
Church will be hosting this event.
Pastor Brian reminds all teenage girls \ho are planning to
attend the '"Re'olve Tour" in Atlanta, Georgia. on Dec. 1st 10
please contact lum. Early registration is $49.00 for groups of ten
or more and $69 for individuals. Invite Nour friend and register
for this special e\ent.
Please pray for our troops. Don't forget to express appreci-:.
ation a veteran this Veteran's Day while remembering all the
ones who have given so much to secure our freedom. Many sol-
diers continue to ,stand in the gap in harm's way for us today.
Also please pray fo all churche. and pastors! We continue to
pray for hurting people everywhere....
Come and celebrate God's love with the people of First
United Methodist Church in beautiful Madison. Florida. Pastor
Bob, Pastor Brian, andthe entire church invites you to join us as
we give thanks to the One w\ho says: I have loved ) ou Aith an
everlasting love'" We are blessed We are grateful!
Happy Thanksgiving!
Vicki Howerton
First United Methodist Church
Madison, Florida


Pi


J~ac~on ~st Z~a/tr-7


By Nell Dobbs
-"One day at a time, sweet
,Jesus, that's all I'm asking
from you." That is really all
the time we have and we are to
be thankful in all things for all


- '2 '




,
v.-

... .. : '- ,', *^ '


Faith Baptist Church
I LIS '- .... r f , ..'i Fi .- 3-
P I *.I'lit, 6,',,,1 ll, a. . .... ..I llt , IL., a' a'.' ,
Sunday Si h.ul.........................................9... :45 a.m .
M orniniu \\ia .ir.l p.... .. ............................... 1:00 .nl.
S (hur, h f ralnin .li ........................................6:01) p.m .
L ning I isup .... ...................................':11 p.m .
il ,,a I',Praer Nltinc. \\riut l:.......................7.8:UO p.m.
L-. '- f .. Faniill Nighi siipptn. i.I l\ dn .~tldat .........6-'7:ulI p.m.
. Puppt ini-r. und................................ :..... :111) p.m.
jRO\ i-tillu a ntld s............. ............ 6:311 p.m.


Grace Presbyterian Church

-,. i, ,, l-l,,| ',, -I
Sunday, Sthailn I- r \l \i .... ................. :45 a m.
Sund:IN Morningu or,.hlip...................11:1111 a.m.
lied. Felroslhip S.tpper Bihl- Sluds.......(6:1111 p.m.
'oulih Group, Isi 121h Grad. ... .. .......6:311 p.m.
Choir Pr.i.:lic ....... . .........................7.. 311 p.m .
Friday Men'\ Pra.er Brunklial................. 7:111I a.m.
Come Worship And Ser.. il I,,, i

Lee United Methodist Church
Hwy. 255 S. Lee, FL 850-971-5585
Murnain_ ir..rsin[ ...... .......... i:34i a..im.
Sunri. i,,,,,l .... .. .... ................. .. ... .': ini.
Mlarn pi I i ... ..i.. ........ .. ............ ... 11:l J.in.
',un l.n Esii c iIIn 11, -hip............. ...............6:?11 p.r..
M mn's l' -l,,, iip BrI.lklil-l
St ,,nd u u hiL . .. .. ... .. ...... . ...... :1111 .i.m .
.... .... _..... ,, I n .



Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
"A Friendly Church"
Cherry Lake, FL 850-929-4355
Rev Nathaniel Robinson, J:A
Sunday School............................................ 9:45 a.m.
Pastoral Sunday (Ist & 3rd Sunday) ..................11:00 a.m.
Youth Church (2nd Sundav)............................11:00 a.m.
P.ia loral.lq ud 1.41. u in ..i.... ... ................ 1 :11 .i.a.


S) uk I i'" I H .-.r, ..I u ,liedg. S l 1S .73 .: 'S I
F,. F:i., E a L -.m ..,
bi a,,,, 5.,,ti l ,', .,, 1 ,1, f i,,-, it' a j.',l i. L. a Lt,,r.'
, , Sern ice- of rd & Tabl............................... 8:30 a.m.
, ..*, Sundal School...... ... ...............................9:45 a m .
,' t Sundas Morning ionrship .......................11:110 a.m.
ili n'idn-.da. l ll liulh igradts b681.......6:30-8:1.10 p.m.
oudl 'i rad.d 9-12rd ..................................... 7:.1U p.m .
Men', Felhliship lBreakfa[l 3rd Sun..........8:1n0 a.m.
,nmen's Me(eling & Lunch I Isl MNln.i....12:01l noon

Greenville Baptist Church
1365 SW Main St., Greenville, FL 850-948-2353
Sunday School -All Ages.........................1....10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship..............................11:00 a.m.
Sunday E'tning W i sli[). ...... ..... ....'":1f p.m.
Sunday Pr-..iii.,,,l, Slidemli, .ind
Adults Choir Rehearsals.................................. 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Pre-school children,
Youth & Adult Bible Studies ..........................7:00 p.m.
1st Sunday every month-Men's Breakfast...........8:00 a.m.
-All Invited-



Madison Church of God
771 NE'Colin Kelly Hwy., Madison, FL
850-973-6307 Ret. Doyle Glass, Pastor
Sunday School.........................................1.....0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship........................11:00 a.m.
Evening W orship.............................................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study.........................7:00 p.m.


things and whatever good 'xeA
find to-do we are to do it Wvith1
all our might, for we shall not
pass this "\ a again. Might, for
all we shall not pass this wayAi
again. We keep always in1.>
mind there's a payday some-,vi
day."
Beautiful flowers werewin,
placed in church Sunday byag
Bryan and Mikey Wilson irGl.)
loving memory of Mr. and?
Mrs. E.B. Wilson, Sr. Theyfrq
were such special people and,.b
loved the Lord and church. We",
pray for Bryan and Nlikey and the lives they liveand for their'hb
family and the things they area l
,doing best, for the Lord., ass
God is good,in. supplying.;.d
talented people to carry on His,br:
work. We miss Billy and prayjnn
for him and pray for us. *'At
Last Sunday, Preacher had-
asked us to sit in differentrli
places and some of us did butti
one person said he didn't be-loj
cause if he had the person whoton
sat where he sits would. claim Qr
that place,for his and he'd besis
out of his place. bu>
Chancel Choir sang "Heliw
Reigns." .d
Preacher's messages have3qi)
been. about the seven churches
in Revelation and he said hegiiy
was preaching on the Eighthl oh
Church First Baptist Churchiki
of Madison. God is pleased*1q
with the growth of our churchfyv
Last year, we added 49 peoplenyq
and 19 ofthose were baptizedbl
and yet there is much more toqj
be done. The fields are white,
unto harvest. ,iu
We welcome Mrs. Lestevrg;-
Plain into church and are
thankful she has joined us(ioi
Special prayers for her and her
family.
Empty places, not by -
death but by situations: Mr, ,
A.J. Hudson (102), Sue Raines,i?
(100), Louise Browning,a,?
Yvonne Smith now overcom-iI
ing serious surgery, Jearngt,
Wilder, Buford Selman, A.J.o-
and Leona Gay, Mabelle Gib-,:,.,-
son, Bernard Wilson, Betty .,
Jane Wilson, Sheltonorm
Williams, Walteria Schnitker,
Sarah Rowe, Hettie Selmandija
Marjorie Woodard, Hazel,-j
Woodard, Marion Arnold ancd *i
more. ,j
Remember all the ill ones,
Franklin and Louise Carroll;rl
Herman Cherry, Norman and-iq
Kathy Haynes. w
Remember the 50th an-CUi-
niversary celebration Satur-.i:@
day, November 11, from 2-4it,,
p.m. for Buck and Betty Drig-,ioi
gers! We give thanks for themrni,,
and their family and their loven)
for the Lord. Tow
May we turn our eyes-q.
upon Jesus, look full in His, Qd
wonderful face and the things0ii)
of this world will grow, t
strangely dim. Amen! bi)


Fellowship Baptist Church
O r..: Iuk r.c ,,ti rll ..n un 145
s U t- t, -. 'l',l j .r
(,,,' C -,'-/l ..'. ai t.'.. 'i, t, 1 S I At,.1 P.i- l.r
1l,.i 1". >:l'..IJdi.u l Mh...rh.-. -..h.. 1 :.ur.i dul Ar..-u Ltr
OlUii^e o -'*i 3" J 2.,
Morning \\or..lip ................... 8:30 a.m. & 11:01 u.m.
Sunday) Schliiiol....................................... ....10:011 a.m.
\\ednit-sdas: Famil Nighti................Call For schedule
It ri m ila I I 1t .ll I. .1/ ** ..,al 1 i'- l ..'7 .
II lllll lr ll in,1 I ,1,:r-'lll l .,a

t sriF United Methodist Church


November 12
The Telestials, Live! at New Home Baptist Church at 6 p.m.
November 18
Pre-Holiday Gospel Concert at Jellystone Park, South of'
Madison SR 53 to Old St. Augustine Road. Follow the signs.'
Join us for a night of gospel music provided by The Diamonds :
from Quitman and Madison, Bro. Benny Daniels and Donnie
Bailey, Jr.of the Sunday Morning Coming Down Radio, Show,.d.
Brenda Kirkland from Perry,. and Bro. Doyle Glass, Madison.'b
Donations of non perishable food items will be accepted at the a
door to provide food for the 'needy in our area. Last year we it
helped 8 families during the holdiay season. Come -and be
blessed! Doors open at 6:00 PM Sing at 7:00 PM Call 850-"s'
973-8269 for more info. .

Phone Home
It's Ale God!
Mankind rias made aSioandng adt.ancee in i Cl
erce. lechn.ologI .and medicine The question I:
Because .,:.u c.rn do .melling., should :'Ou
The _an:lit',' ,It life i something thai, should
alhaj be firsl '.h-ere ethics are concerned It is not your place to "play
God \ou need to senousl .LAeigh rghi from wrong.
E'.eri, human being is precious to Me I alorfe should be the one who
decides the issues of life and death Th's ,; riot for man to take on himself.
A? tempting as it is. this is a po,.-er that does riot belong to man.
Technological ad'. inces shouldd be u.ed to help the lot of mankind, at the
?ame time being used in a compassi.'n.ie. respeciful ',.a No harm should
come to the innocent e'.er
S2006 DBR Media, Inc.











Friday, November 10, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com



REGIONAL HAPPENINGS


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 15A


TOP BUSINESSES ARE RECOGNIZED


Florida business executives were in Talla-
hassee recently to receive awards for their
companies' commitment to a diverse work-
force in celebration of October's National Dis-
ability Employment Awareness Month. Flori-
da's Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program
recognized the top businesses in the state arid
in the Big Bend that hire people with disabili-
ties, The Employment Connection Celebration
was held at Tallahassee City Hall on October 4.
The top businesses in the state of Florida in
2006 that hire people with disabilities are:
f Publix.:
SWal-Mart


. Winn-Dixie
* Goodwill Industries
* McDonalds
Target
* Wendy's
* Albertsons
* Gulf Coast Enterprises
* Burger King :
* Walt Disney World
* Home Depot


*Publix
Florida State University
City of Tallahassee
Florida A & M University
Wal-Mart
Denny's of Madison
Florida State Hospital
Hampton Inn and Suites
Florida Department of Revenue
Tallahassee Community College
VR also debuted its new Employer-fo-
cused Web site-FLJobConnections.com.
The web site %will allow businesses to search for
employees who are ready to go to work, and


also post available jobs.
Business people attended to learn more
about disability issues. Tallahassee Mayor John
Marks welcomed attendees and discussed the
city's commitment to workplace diversity.
State Representative Loranne Ausley encour-
aged businesses to keep up the good work of
hiring people with disabilities. There was also
a session on Disability Etiquette and Aware-
ness. Various businesses and disability service
providers participated in an information fair at
City Hall too. The Able Trust sponsored the
refreshments for this event.
This event was held in recognition of Oc-


tober's National Disability Employment
Awareness Month. The theme this year is
Americans with Disabilities: Ready for the
Global Workforce. Vocational Rehabilitation is
a statewide program that assists people with
disabilities so they may become employed. VR
assists people with disabilities with training,
medical treatment, accommodations, or other'
services so they may become or remain em-
ployed. VR helped more than 10,796 Floridi-
ans find or keep their jobs last year. VRhas 116
offices across Florida. For more information
about VR and its services, call 1-866-515-3692
or visit Rehab 'orks.org.


on
in
ng
a
S.5,
a
dd
)n;
ast
tal


The top businesses in the
Big Bend that hire people with
disabilities are: -
Governor Jeb Bush
Announces $757,000
For Statewide Health
Tracking System
.Funding will, bei used 'to
build on efforts to better un-
derstand ihe link between envi-
ronment and health.
Governor Jeb Bush today
announced the Centers for Dis-
ease Control and Prevention
(CDC) recently awarded
$,757,402 to the Florida De-
partment'of Health to continue
development of a state-level,
web-based, health tracking
system. When complete, Flori-'
da's Environmental Public
Health Tracking (EPHT) Pro-
gram will 4oack environmental
hazards,. Adhronic-diseases aiid
adverse .health risks to better
understand the linkbetween
the environment and health.
i "P'ublic health surveil-
lance or tracking systems are
critical in preventing and con-,
trollnig disease." said Gover-
nor Bush. :"This funding will
be used to further develop a
statewide network of health
and environmental data that
wili drive actions to improve
the health of our communi-
ties."
Florida's EPHT program
will coordinate with the' CDC
to ensure the system's compat-.
ibility with a national EPHT
netWork, currently being de-
veloped. Ultimately, these ef-
forts will expand the ability of
federal, state and local agen-
cies to develop effective inter-
veritions that can be used to
guide public health policy and
practices.
I'"This award represents a
monumental step in our efforts
to leverage technological ad-
vances and data-gathering
methods to address public
health issues," said Deputy
State Health Officer Bonita
Sorenson, M.D., M.B.A. "The
State"of Florida is an enthusi-
astic partner in the national
movement to prevent and con-
trol diseases that can be linked
to 'hazards in our environ-
meit."2
Florida is one: of sixteen
states funded by the CDC to
develop plans for the creation
of mhe electronic computerized
tracking network. The CDC is
establishing the network by
drawing on a wide range of ex-
pertise from federal agencies,
state and local health and envi-
ronmental agencies, non-
governmental organizations,.
state public health and envi-
ronmental laboratories, and
schools of public health.
Onte the National EPHT Net-
work is complete, health care
providers and the public will
be able to access vital informa-
tion that can be used to
strengthen both public health
and preventive services for
Floridians.


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Friday, November 10, 2006:.


16A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


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Cowboys Play Marianna Tonight!

First Game Of The 2006 Run For The State Championship At Boot Hill Stadium Tonight




.~C hris Thompson shows Apopka why it is they nev-
S,:"' _'' ', s. er throw, when he picks off this Blue Darter pass in the Drew Do
___"__:_......._"_ '_ ........_ _ ......__ second quarter. (Photo submitted by Daniel Douglas) Sanders PAl
Blake Sapp, Madison's throwing Cowboy. (Photo Reddick played a tremendous back and like to run the ball plays every
submitted by Daniel Douglas) game blocking." Coe said. more than throw, according to add some or
BN Janet Schrader next week." He's a real unselfish kid." Coe Carroll. Dow ling said they like every eek de
Greene Publishing. Inc. Carroll feels good about praised the blocking efforts of. to do a 50/50 run-throw mmix. we think will
The Madison County the upcoming game. He said Andrew\ Edxwards and Jordan Look for #2 Philip Sylvester, a the team we
Cow boys been the fight for a the kids are excited. "It helps Johnson as %well. senior, to carry the ball for Friday night.
state playoff berth tonight to have a bunch of young Madison had 415 total NMarianna. He carried for 1.500 Coe said
against the Marianna Bull- kids." Carroll added. .ards of offense against Apop- yards in 2005 and has totaled boys are acor
dogs. NMarianna is 5-5 going Coach Don Dow ling of ka versus the Blue Darters' 1,342 so far this year. Marian- team from the
into tonight's game. According Nlarianna said he's happy his 183 yards of generated of- na's quarterback is Brandon the beginning
to the Cow\bo. 's head football team is in the playoffs but real- fense. The Cowboys rushed Gardner, a junior. Dowling kids have re
coach, Frankie Carroll. the 1\ concerned about his oppo- for 264 yards and threw for said Gardner has a total of
players are ready. n,enW. "The\ should be called 151 yards. Madison held a 6-A 1,500 passing yards in the
..~ i ,,a, "n- 0j-e D Co, bo'~ not the school - ."e doesn't t
tonight." 2ffoll said. "We've Nladison Cowboys,-"D6wlingT lae app,.\vas 57or ra fle'b "
had a good week of practice., said. with 151 yards. Chris Thomp- his quarterback. "1 e's real
The kids know if you shp up .Coach Nhke Coe, Cowboy son was the CowboNy's leading calm."
bne time from now on. it's all offensive coordinator, said, "I, rusher with 135 yards gained. On defense, the Bulldogs
o\er. There's no getting better think \we're finally hitting oir Redcdick had 82 yards rushing. run a 6-1 front or a 4-4. Carroll
peak. I try to impress on the : Coe reiterated that said they like to stop the run
players. \ hboever gets.. better Thompson couldn't have with that 6-1 formation. Look overlo,000
IOm every week from no\\ on is go- gained those ards or made his for Jamal Holmes, a 1Marianna locations
ing to \min the state champi- pass reception \without Red- Bulldog weak side defensive worldwide
SQ Table & onship." dick's blocking. end to try to rush the Cowboy
6 Chairs Coe said he \ as proud of Carroll said Marianna quarterback. He leads the team
the kids and the job they are runs a one-back, spread type in sacks. (850)973-4700
1 ._ l~a I^Hdoing and the game they offense with two tight ends. Coe said the Cow boy 24OM.
played against Apopkla. "Harr They have a good running coaches tr to add some ne\


By Janet Schrader
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Monday, October 30,
saw the final cast of the up-
coming playoff games decid.


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ed. Suwannee had to play in
a shootout Monday night
with Raines and Bishop Ken-
ny. SuLt annee beat Raines in
the first game, -
but lost to Bish-
op Kenny.
Suwannee is '
out. and. 5-4
Bishop Kenn\
will play 8- 1
St. Augustine in
St. Augustine in
the, first ,
round of
the regional finals.
Coach Frankie Carroll
called to straighten this re-
porter out on a few playoff
matters. Carroll said the
Cowboyswill have to play at
Pensacola Catholic if they


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defeat district runner-tip Dix-
ie Count). But . if Dixie
County beats Pensacola
Catholic, Madison
will host Dixie
County in a
i rematch of.,
b' os b- the. game
N l .d is.son,
\ on October
Th-e '27. 46-0. The
Season 'Madi-
son hosts is
( iU because
1-t h e
Cowboys beat them.
Then . if the Cow-
boys beat Marianna Friday
night, and beats the winner
of the Pensacola
Catholic/Dixie County
game, they will HOST
Bolles. Bolles has the better
season record, but Carroll
said Bolles will have to
come here if they are in our
path to the state champi-
onships because Madison
traveled to Jacksonville to
play Bolles last year. Cur-
rently, Bolles is rated num-
ber-one in Class 2-A while
the Cowboys are still in the
number-five position.
Look for all the news of
the playoffs in future edi-
tions of your Madison
County Carrier and Madi-
son Enterprise-Recorder.


uglas holds for another successful Daniel
. (Photo submitted by Daniel Douglas)


week. "We w"ill
pull some out
pending on what
do better against
have to face on

he feels the Cow-
npletely different
one they were at
of the y ear. "The
responded well."


Coe said. "We continue to get
better up front every week. We
have to block better than we
have been and cut dow n on the
penalties."
Come out and be that 12th
man on the field for the Cow-
boys tonight. The weather
looks great and the football
will be better. Game time is
7:30 p.m. Go, Cowboys!


r esolutiO




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Football- Playoff Update]


Don't get caught in the cold


I

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2B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



SPORTS


Friday, November 10, 2006


Cowgirl Basketball Opener Tuesday Night
Cowgrl Ber Tues igh


2006 Madison County High Cowgirl basketball team: Front row I to r: Khandace Cherry, Sasha Turner, Ayesha
Williams and Quanesha Arnold. Back row I to r: Jennifer Hopkins, Rashauntah Jackson, Fredisa Williams, Shon-
tavia Huggins and Lateska Brown. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet Schrader, November 6,2006)

MCHS Baseball Program Looking For Old And

New Players To Honor In Updating Facilityr


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.


The Madison: County old concrete bleachers will be
High School I MCHS )base- the foundation for new stadi-
ball program is updating its um seating, complete with in-
facility. Head Coach Barney dividual, permanent stadium
Myers is working diligently to seats.
address some major repairs to Madison parents and resi-
the field and the surrounding.. ,dents needi.topalltogheuto.
stadium. elp uaeiese necessary re-
One of the cosmetic pro- pairs. The baseball program
jects underway is the refur- would like to offer parents,
bishment of the stands. The staff, local organizations,
civic clubs and businesses the


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opportunity to honor a Cow-
boy baseball player's time
with the program by purchas-
ing a plaque that will be,
mounted on the backrest of
one of these new seats.
.. The engerae plaue will
ha, e thie players name and
his jersey number, along with
the years he represented
Madison County High
School. This plaque will be
permanently fixed to a seat.
The cost of the plaque is $50.
If anyone would like to
take advantage of this offer or
would' like further informa-
tion, please contact Brigitte
Gudz or Barney Myers at 973-
5061 extensions 160 or 259,
respectively.
The Cowboy Baseball
program is attempting to con-
tact, any player who has
played at MCHS. Please share
this information with anyone
interested in Madison County
baseball.


By Janet Schrader
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison Countiy
Cowgirl basketball season.
opens Tuesday, November 14
with a home game against
Lafayette County. The JV
Cowgirls get things rolling
with a game at 6 p.m. and the
varsity Cowgirls take to the
court for their first regular-sea--
son game at 7:30 p.m.
Cowgirl coach Chris Neal
is hoping for a better season.
He said last >ear's season was
mediocre. The Cowgirls fin-
ished last year just shy of the
500 mark, but did take home
district runner-up honors.'
This '.ear the Co%%girls
have four players returning


from last Near's %arsity team.
But Neal said his team features
a lot of 10th graders. This
-ear s center \\ill be Lateska
Brown, Three form\ ards for the
2006 team nill be Jennifer
Hopkins. Crystal Highto%%er
and Shontaxia Huggins. Neal
said Huggins i's' the team's
strongest ball handler Point
"guards for 2006 will be Ayesha
Williams and Sasha Turner.
Taylor County. Hamilton
County. Florida High and Jef-
ferson County teams make up
this year's district for the::
Cowgirls. Neal said he felt
Taylor %would be. the biggest-
opponent Madison %\ill face.
"Taylor is going to be tough."
Neal.said.


Sign Up Starts For -
Greenville Recreation .r. S
litA alAlr s


By Janet Schrader
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Sign up,November 11 for
Greenville Recreation Board
basketball. Sign-up at the
Greenville Elementary be-
tween 9 a.m. and 12 p.m. There
will be age groups for 9-10
year olds, 11-12 year olds and
13-15 year olds. Both girls and
boys are encouraged to sign up
and play. If your child turns
nine before January 1, they are
eligible to play. If your child
turns 16 before January 1, they
are not eligible. Games will be
held at the Greenville Elemen-
tary School gym.
Coaches and referees are
also needed. For more infor-
mation call Jay Lane at 948-
5123.'


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Friday, November 10, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com




SCHOOL


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3B


MCHS Class of 1986 Holds 20-Year Class Reunion


MCHS Class of 1986 enjoyed their 20-year reunion in Madison. All of the classmates are pictured with their
family. (Photo submitted)


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On October 6-7, the
Madison County High
School Class
1986 had their
20-year class
reunion.
On Fri-
day, many
classmates at-
tended the foo I
.ball game Fxu.ay
night, which was also
MCHS's homecoming.
On Saturday, there was a
picnic for classmates and their
families at the gazebo in the
Four Freedoms Park. At satur-


day night, there was a dance at
Divine Events.
There were approximately
50 classmates in atten-
nce at the re-
union. There
were many
I classmates
that came
from out of
town, from
EO )laces such as
naitaanooga, Ten-
nessee, Atlanta, Georgia, Tal-
lahassee and Orlando. Every- -
one had an outstanding time,
mingling with old classmates
and seeing faces that they have
not seen in quite some time.


State Releases Adequate Yearly Progress


Report For Madison County School District


By Lou S. Miller, Superinten-
dent, Madison District Public
'Schools
As you know, our
schools and district are dedi-
cated to ensuring that our stu-
dents succeed. While we
have always had high expec-
tations for our students, the
federal No Child Left Behind
Act of 2001 (NCLB) has set
new standards for students to
meet. NCLB requires states
to evaluate the performance
of all students in all public
schools.
This summer, our state
released a report on the
progress our schools are
making toward achieving
proficiency for 100 percent
of our students under NCLB.
The report identifies whether
schools have made "Ade-
quate Yearly progress" (AYP)
a simple yes or no grade
based on a complex set of
measurements. To make AYP,
each district school must
achieve 39 targets: students
at each school are tested in
| reading, writing and mathe-
matics; performance scores
are then divided into various
H subgroups having at least 30
Members which identify stu-
dents by race, socioeconomic
status, language proficiency,
and disability status; each
subgroup's performance per-
centage is then rated as pass-
ing or failing according to
state standards and, is used
when determining the overall
performance of the entire
school; in addition, schools
must meet graduation rates
and attendance targets. If just
one subgroup misses just one
target, an entire school does
not make AYP,
All our district schools
tested under the new law.
Pinetta Elementary School
achieved the NCLB goal for
AYP. All the other schools in
the district missed the AYP
designation. In several cases,
just a few subgroups missed
the designation. Lee Elemen-
tary School made AYP for the
2005-06 school year, but is
still identified by the state as
a School In Need of Improve-
ment (SINI) because it has
not yet made AYP for two
years in a row.
Please note that many
good schools across the state
as well as the nation have not
made AYP. For example, in
our state, a significant per-
centage of schools haven't
met the goal. That doesn't
mean they're not successful.
AYP is an all-or-nothing
proposition, but student
achievement is not. Academ-
ic success is measured in
many ways, including class-
room tests, teacher observa-
tion, report cards, homework,
and standardized tests. But
AYP focuses only on state
tests. Low performance in
only one subgroup can cause


a school to miss AYR
We are firmly committed
to achieving our goal of suc-
cess for every child, and we
recognize that we must con-
tinually improve. We current-
ly have the following re-
search-based programs in.
place to help improve scores:
Intervention Reading Pro-
grams such as Read 180,
Achieve 3000, River Deep,
and Brainchild, and Credit
Recovery programs to im-
prove the graduation rates.
Our teachers are continuous-
ly participating in scientifi-
cally research-based profes-
sional development training
such as Six Traits Writing,
Math, Snapshot, Florida's
Continuous Improvement


Model and progress monitor-
ing to recognize how to ef-
fectively use data to drive all
instructional decision-mak-
ing. Extended Day after-
school programs and Supple-
mental Educational Services
(SES) are available at. all
schools to help eligible stu-
dents get the extra academic
help they need in the areas of
reading, writing, and math.
Our schools are filled
with outstanding teachers,
principals, and support staff
that regularly update their
skills and participate in train-
ing to help them meet the'
needs of the students. We in-
vite you to arrange a visit to
any classroom in the district
to see for yourself.


We also urge Nou to ex-
amine the results and look
closely at the progress our
schools are making. Most im-
portantly, we encourage you
to join us in addressing the
challenges and applauding
the great work students and
staff is doing in the class-
rooms throughout the district.
As always, we welcome your
comments, suggestions, and
involvement in our schools
and in the challenges our stu-
dents face.
Detailed information
concerning school grades or
AYP status may be obtained
from the Department of Edu-
cation website which can be
found at http://school-
grades.fldoe.org


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4B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


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SCHOOL


Friday, November 10, 2006


MCHS Hi-Tech Gears Back Up For Another Year


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing Inc.
Madison County High
School's (MCHS) Hi-Tech
program has geared up for an-
other successful year of help-
ing prepare students for the
careers of their choice.
Mary Coody is not only
the program adviser, but is,
also a Paraprofessional Job
Coach at the high school.
The learning experiences
within a very diverse environ-
ment helps students open their
eyes to what is happening in
the workforces. There are 24
students who meet as a club,
by invitation and teacher rec-


.mi4NWUS~2t -'
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ommended. The officers of
this program are Jerrica
Woods, President JJ Johns arid
Vice President. Also, Jerrica
Woods was named Miss Hi-
Tech. The other leaders that
keep this program up and run-
ning are Co-Director Mike
Radel and Co-Assistant Jean
James.
Coody stated, "The club
is going really well, We have
had a lot of speakers who have
'taught students a lot of things
about different employment
issues. We are looking for-
ward to having a great year."
These students have done
different projects far and %wide


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including; re-directing. their
own program brochures, per-
forming mock interviews,
practicing resume writings
and planning their annual trip
to Sea World Which they will
take in December.
In the past. Hi-Tech situ-
dents have given presentations
at the Clerk of the Court, Ki-
wanis International and Fami-
ly LifeLine Center.
Also. Hi-Tech has done a:
series of explorations from the
Kennedy Space Center, Relief
Printing, Job Shadow ing.
Florida State University's
High Magneric Field Labora-
tory. North Florida Conumuni-


ty College and the Tallahassee
Democrat.'None of these trips
would be possible if it was not
for the ABLE Trust and the
The Department's Of Labor's
Office Of Disability Employ-
ment PolicN iODEP).
April Lewis of Employ-
ment Connections and Person-
nel Development Services has
visited the high school to pro-
Side presentations for Hi-Tech
members.
Each week. Darlene.
Strimple from Employment
connections visits students on
a weekly basis and provides
significant instructions for
employability skills.


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Hi-Tech is looking for-
w\ard to welcoming more
guest speakers in the future.
including an upcoming pre-
sentation from Madison Cor-
rectional Institute (MCI).
On Tuesday. November
14. at 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m. in the
cafeteria, the Hi-Tech Club
\\ill celebrate their annual


kick off with outstanding fel-
low ship and the sharing of
success stories.
Please RSVP by phone to
Mary Coody at 973-5061 ext.
147 or Mike Radel at 973-
5061 ext. 211. There will be
food. drinks and door prizes
so please join in on the fun!


Hi-Tech program adviser Mary Coody (left) and
Co-Director Mike Radel enjoy providing students with
information that will help them decipher which career
is best for them. (Photo submitted by Mary Coody)


Michele Barnes


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Greeni-Ptubibliiniq. Inc. r V'
Michele Barnes is
the daugther of Thomas
and Louann Barnes.
She is a junior at '
Madison County High .
School 'NICHS).
S After completing
high school. she plans
on majoring in business
at Valdosta State Uni-
versity (VSUi and be-
Michele Barnes
come a secretary. has plans on majoring
Her favorite colors in business.
are blue and red and her
fa' orite season of the sic. plays on the com-
y ear is winter. puter and watches TV.
When asked if she When asked to de-
could go anywhere in scribe herself in three
the world and \ph, she 0or ds or less.
stated. "Eeile. Penns\l- B a r n e S
vania o here inm friend sta ted .
De\eon Hubbart lives." Cruza .
Her favorite college f u n n y
football team is the a n d
Florida Gatois. s eet."
In hei spare time
she writes poetry,i listens
to hip hop and R&B mu-

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SCHOOL


Friday, November 10, 2006


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5B


Madison County
E--xcel -Mt. School-
MCD6 Literar Club Starts Back UPHReleases Honor Ro'll Fori


The Literary Club members said they have a ball learning more about literature and having their own work be-
ing published in the school's literary magazine. Front row, pictured left to right: Ashly Phy, Alicia Livingston,,
Kamecia Davis, Ryanna McGuire, Bobbi Crafton, Caulette King, Katherine Pedge, and Thomas Johnson. Back row,
pictured left to right: Janie Martin, Randee Bilyou, Illeeyah Barfield, Robbie Williams and Desiree' Jonas. (Photo
submitted by Donn Smith)


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County.
High School (MCHS) Liter-
ary Club has just kicked off
again. In the past, the. club
was offered at the school,
but hasn't been around for a
couple of years. Now, sec-
ond year English teacher,
Cauletie King is heading up
this vear-'s Literar\ Club.
Recently, the Literary
Club elected new officers.
The officers are Alishia Liv-
ingston, President; Ashly
Phy, Vice President; Bobbi
Crafton,Treasurer; Janie
Martin, Secretary; and Ke-
shanna Weatherspoon, Par-
liamentarian.,
There are nine official


members in the club and 17 see their kids in an actual
interested students who are play.
most likely going to become On November 18,, from
members once their dues 9 a.m. 2 p.m. the Literary
are paid. Club will be having
The.club of- ,a garage sale as- one
fers another -, of their fund rais-
outlet for -- ers for this school
creaiv i % i y ear. The location
that student has not yet been
would not be determined and if
*abte -to -get in i"- in the com-
the classroom. t. _. -,- -- munity would like
This club to donate their
in an academic space for a couple of
club geared to- hours for a good cause
wards enhancing students' then please contact Caulette
love for literature. The Lit- King at 973-5061. In De-
erary Club is considering cember, the club will be or-
putting on a play where par- ganizing a Renaissance Fair
ents and Madison citizens at MCHS'.
will have the opportunity to The Literary Club is


Tentative Five Iear Work Program
oz District Two
Fiscal Years Beginning July 1, 2007 June 30, 2012
The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), District Two, announces a public
hearing (Tentative Work Program for Fiscal Years beginning July 1, 2007, through
June 30, 2012) to which all persons are invited to attend and be heard. Assistance for
disabled persons may be arranged by contacting Mr. Bill Henderson, District Planning
& Environmental Manager, Lake City District Office at 1-800-749-2967 at least ten
(10) days in advance of the Public Hearing.
Live Oak Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the County Commissions for
Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee, and Taylor counties serving as MPO for
their respective counties.
DATE AND TIME: Tuesday, November 28, 2006, at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: Suwannee River Water Management District, Board Room #103
9225 County Road 49, Live Oak, Florida
The proposed program has been developed in accordance with the Civil Rights Act of
1964, and the Civil Rights Act of 1968. Under Title VI Program and Related Statutes
of the United States Civil Rights Act any persons) or beneficiary Wvho believes they
have been subjected to discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, age,
national origin, disability or familial status may file a written complaint to the Florida
Department of Transportation's Equal Opportunity Office in Tallahassee or contact the
District's Administrative Compliance Monitor in Lake City, Florida.
Central Office: Florida Department of Transportation, Equal Opportunity Office,
605 Suwannee Street Mail Ststion 65, Tallahassee, FL 32399-0450
District Office: Florida Department of Transportation, District Two
Administrative Compliance Monitor, 1109 South Marion Avenue Mail Station 2016,
Lake City, FL 32025-5874
This Public Hearing is being conducted pursuant to Section 339.135(4)(c), Florida
Statutes, to consider the Department's Tentative Work Program for the Fiscal Years
2007-08 through 2011-12, and to consider the necessity of making any changes to the
Program.
Written comments from the MPOs, Commissions and other interested parties will be
received by the Department at the Public Hearing and within ten days thereafter.
Comments should be addressed to:
Charles W. Baldwin, RE., District Secretary
Florida Department of Transportation, District Two
1109 South Marion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025-5874
Telephone 1-800-749-2967
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION


looking forward to doing,
several things within their
club such as visiting the Re-
naissance Fair in
Gainesville, attending a
play in Tallahassee and
working on a Literary mag-
azine that is distributed
through the high school that
contains poetry and short
stories written by Literary
Club members'.


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To Redeem: Present this
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Ticket Booth
1121.0


Honda Card- $39 PER MONTH AT 9.9% FOR 24 MONTHS- All Models
S.. I ,. -.. F .,.. ., .. .. 1".. r ... I i ...
dealers for detlals.
All prca n ore plu, tax nod cloc
A ..... p...a f


S. ours Mon. -Fri. 8. 30- 5:30
Sat 8:30 4:00
Phone: 229-558-9016
Toll Free:
Brian Miller, General Manager 1-800-558-9016 o


NFCC Releases Fall Schedule
November 10. Friday VETERANS DAY
N o t November 13 17, Mon. Fri. Registration for
Nt spring term 2007 for currently enrolled students.
Mon.. 11/13 36+ earned semester hours
lU Ui da (priority for students with disabilities, athletes, tutors)
F ITues.. 11/14 24+ earned semester hours
Wed.. 11/15 12+ earned semester hours
Thurs., 11/16 currently enrolled students
Fri.. 11/17 currently enrolled students
November 20, Monday Open registration for spring
SIterm 2007. to include dual enrolled students. Registration
S-continues through the first week of class.
November 23 24. Thurs. Fri. THANKSGIVING
HOLIDAYS
December 7, Thursday Last day classes meet. Classes end following evening
class.
Evening class exams given at last class meeting.
December 8 12, Fri. Tues. Final Exams
December 12, Tuesday PSAv, EMT, and Paramedic grades due by 3 pm.
December 14. Thursday Career and Technical Convocation. 7:00pm. van H.
Priest Auditorium
December 14, Thursday Grades due by 5:00 pm.
December 15, Friday Enrollment Services/Registrar Office closes at 12 noon.
December 18. Monday Christmas Break begins










6B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



OUTDOORS


Friday, November 10, 2006


Underwater Tactics With Ken Cook


'Still Time To Catch Fall Bass


While the temperature
may be dropping and atten-
tions may be turning to fall
pursuits like days in a deer
stand, October and November
isn't the time to put away your
fishing tackle that is if you
like catching fish. Even
though the mornings and
evenings on the water can be
pretty brisk, fall can be a great
time to target bass as they be-
gin feeding heavily on school-
ing bait fish.
During the fall, bass will
spend a good amount of their
time gorging on baitfish like
shad in the backs of creek
channels. Eventually, if there
is deep, rocky habitat in the
lake that you fish, the bass
will wind up in the deeper
portions of the lake near those
rocks. If there is other cover
like standing timber or boat
docks nearby, these deep,
rocky banks will be even


more to a bass's liking. Once
you locate such a deep, rocky
bank (hopefully with some
more structure nearby), the
idea is to fish as much of this
bank as you can, searching for
.the first bite of the day. Once
you locate a fish by getting
your first bite, there's a good
chance that there is a group of
bass in the immediate area
since this is the time of year
when bass will group in small
areas that they find to their
liking. Though this area can
be hard to' find, once you find
them it is possible to catch nu-
merous fish out of these
schools.
The best lure choices
when trying to catch these
fish fall into two categories:
food lures and, reaction lures.
While bass during this time of
year may have slowed down
compared to their warmer wa-
ter activity levels, they still


possess the instinct to attack
an easy meal when the oppor-
tunity arises. Because of this,
I use reaction lures such as
jerkbaits as my search
bait. Jerkbalts seem to
be ideal for draw\ ing a *
reaction strike from
a somewhat lethar-
gic bass.
Once I get my In
initial strike. I
someti mes
continue -
to cast
a -'
jerk-,
b ait .


"more _:
often
I will -
slow down and try
to get the bass to eat. My fa-
vorites for this technique are
Berkley GULP! baits like the


Sinking Minnow and Wacky
Crawler. I fish these soft,
non-plastic baits on a
drop-shot rig or a tung-
sten jig head. These rigs
allow me to fish
these 'baits slowly
on or near the
bottom, allow-
ing the scent
cloud to build up
S around them
11CA like a
[ -, lij\e bait
would.


This
/scent cloud convinces the
' bass that it is food and entices
them to eat.


This is when a sensitive
rod, reel and line combination
is crucial to success. My rig
for this situation consists of a
7-foot, medium fast Fenwick
Techna AV spinning rods be-
cause it is lightweight and its
sensitive action helps .me to
detect .strikes. My spinning
reel is the Abu Garcia 503
ALB, which has an excellent
drag feature that allows the
use of light line without fail.
Small diameter line is impor-
tant to your success when try-
ing to get bass to eat larger
line sometimes scares fish
away. Smaller line, though,
can also cause you to break
off fish, so having a reel with
a smooth drag is vital to keep-
ing a fish on. I also use
Berkley Vanish Transition
fluorocarbon line for this type
of fishing. It is virtually in-
visible to the fish while al-
lowing excellent feel of the.


lure as it drags along the bot-
tom. With bass in this transi-
tion period, getting them to
eat the bait instead of reacting
to its presence can be diffi-
cult. Having the right equip-
ment is a must.
With the days getting
shorter and the temperatures
getting cooler, fewer andfew-
er people will be taking ad-
vantage of all the wonderful
fisheries we have around the
country. Though you may be
waiting for hunting season,
there's plenty of fish still to
be caught. So before you set-
tle in to your treestand for the
remainder of the year, take a
shot at catching some fall
transition bass.
Ken Cook is the 1991
Bassimaster Classic champion
and a 14-time Classic qualifi-
er A former fisheries biolo-
gist. Cook lives on his ranch
in Meers, Okla.


Wildfire Threat Remains Due

To Shortage Of Summer Rain


Florida Agriculture and sioner Charles H. Bronson said
Consumer Services Commis- today that despite intermittent

Jim Hubbard




pre.ie i STUMP 1 r3 n lind
Madison, Florida






Call Jim Hubbard
850-948-2800 *- 850-210-5497


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Offer Ends 11-24-06 FLEE1 4W
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rain this summer, showers
have. not come -with sufficient
frequency to ease the wildfire
threat. As a result, Floridians
need to remain cautious with
all outdoor fires.
The KBDI or Keetch-
Byram Drought Index is a way
that scientists measure the
amount of moisture in the up-
per 36 inches of the soil. Read-
ings are given on a scale of 0
(saturated soil) to, 800 (desert-
like conditions. iHig. values
of the KBDI mean that condi-
tions are favorable for the oc-
currence and spread of wild-
fires.
Typically in the late sum-
mer months, the KBDI regis-


WAYNE


FRIER
SLIVE OAK
S: 1,XA


386.362.6306
'^'FLEEflWDW.HOMES


.Charles H. Bronson,
the Agricultid'e and Cori6-
sumer Services Commis-
sioner for the State of
Florida, warns residents of
the wildfire danger to
Florida.
ters in the 100 to 200 range.
This year's statewide average
for these months is a KBDI
reading of 442, which is more
typical of late spring when
wildfire danger is high, is testi-
mony to lack of adequate sum-
mer, rainfall.
Bronson is concerned that
under these conditions, the
residual debris in forests from
recent hurricanes and tropical
storms will fuel bigger and
more destructive wildfires.
"Until we get more rain-
fall and more widespread rain-
fall, 'the large amount of up-
rooted or dead and dying trees
and shrubs will make condi-
tions very dangerous for our
wildland firefighters," Bron-
son said.
Florida averages about
5,000 wildfires each year.
Since January 1, 2006, 4,195
wildfires have burned
214,646.2 acres and destroyed
43 homes and 164 other struc-
tures. Meanwhile, thousands
of homes and other structures
have been saved as a result of
the efforts of firefighters.


FWC Technology Chief


Joins Executive Council


The Florida Fish &
Wildlife Conservation
Commission's (FWC'si
Margaret A. "Peg" Davis
has accepted an invitation to
join CIO magazine's CIO
Executive Council, a pro-
fessional organization for
chief information officers.
The 300-member executive
council's mission is to har-
ness the collective strengths
of clief information officers
to pursue positive changes,
within their organizations
and key industry, academic.
media and governmental
groups.
Ms. Davis won a 2005
CIO magazine "Ones to
Watch Award," recognizing
her demonstrated leader-
ship, innovations and con-
tributions to Internet tech-
nology and business.
Before she joined the
FWC. Ms. Davis was
deputy chief information of-
ficer in charge of telecom-
munications and network
infrastructure for the city of
Phoenix, Ariz. Before that,
she was operations manager
for CNN's Satellites and


PFWC is proud to an-
nounce that Margaret A.
"Peg" Davis has joined
CIO Magazine's CIO Ex-
ecutive Council.
Circuits Department in Lon-
don.
Ms. Davis is also a for-
mer U.S. Army Signal
Corps officer and was a
1985 fellow at the American
Film Institute.
CIO magazine address-
es issues vital to the success
of chief information officers
worldwide. The magazine
is published in more than 15
countries, including Aus-
tralia, Canada, China,
France. Germany and Japan.
More information is
available at www.cioexecu-
tivecouncil. com.


SMIOLE OUTDOORS


604 Tenn ee St. allahass e, FL
85 -576- 702


The Enterprise-Recorder


Fish & Game Feeding Chart


A- I
;'-'-- I


Row to use The major and minor feeding limes for each day are listed below. The major feeding times are the best for the
sportsman and last about 2 hours, the minor feeding times can also hae good success, but last only about I hour.
Good luck and be careful out there.


1m


OHN DEERE
10055 iS 129 S.
Live Oak, FL
(3861 362-1113
800-893-9255


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sw ^See Us
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Real power, with real easy self-shifting
hydro transmission, convenient con-
trol-and 58-hp muscle.


Accessories


om
.-J


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www.greenepublishing.com



FARM


Friday, November 10, 2006


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7B


Pick Yourself Some Veggies At Tuten's U-Pick


By Janet Schrader
Greene Publishing Inc.
Tuten's U-Pick is out CR


360, seven miles past the SR
14 fork. The business is
owned by Timmy and" Lisa


Priscilla Doner (right) mans the U-Pick stand for
Tuten's U-Pick. Watermelons, cantaloupes, okra, sweet
potatoes and tomatoes were plentiful, either already
picked or waiting in the fields. (Greene Publishing, Inc.
Photo by Janet Schrader, October 21, 2006)


Tuten along with partners
Priscilla and James Doner.
Their five planted acres practi-
cally bursts with veggies this
time of year. Rows of toma-
toes, peppers and eggplants
are ready to be harvested.
The Tutens also offer a
small vegetable stand with
watermelon, cantaloupes and
picked veggies for sale. Last
weekend, Priscilla and James
manned the stand. Timmy and
Lisa were off digging sweet
potatoes on a wooded tract.
The. potatoes are offered for
sale at the stand by the pound
or crate. Tiny little icebox wa-
termelons are also grown on'
another tract, picked and
brought in ,
The Tutens have had the
U-Pick operation for around
14 years. Priscilla said she's
been a part of the operation for
10 or 11 years.*
"We do a pretty good,
business," Priscilla said. The
biggest tomato buyer they


have comes all the way from
Lake City. Trish Johnson
bought 50 boxes of tomatoes
for her stand at the Lake City
Flea Market recently.
Most of the Tuten's busi-
ness comes from Pemn. ac-
cording to Priscilla. But Nladi-
son folks make the trip out as
well. It's a great way to get a
bargain on vegetables. Just
pick what you' want or need.
You supply the labor and reap
the financial benefits. Toma-
toes at Tuten's go for $8 a
five-gallon bucket. At the lo-
cal supermarket they go for as
high as $3 a pound. That's a
significant savings. The egg-
plants are 50 cents each and
the bell peppers are three for a
dollar. The sweet potatoes \\ ill
cost you $15 a bushel or 50
cents a pound.
In the spring, the Tutens
start all over according to
Lisa. She said they'll plant
new potatoes, green beans and,
squash. After 'those finish.


they put in watermelons and
cantaloupes. It's a year-around.
business with a variety of veg-
etables and fruits available.


Drive, out and have some fun
picking your own veggies.
Don't forget to bring some-
thing to carry them home in.


Eggplants hang ripe from staked plants in front of
rows of staked tomatoes all ready for picking at Tuten's
U-Pick. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet Schrad-
er, October 21, 2006)


Fall Marks Seasonal Opening Of Community

Farmers' Markets Throughout Florida
Locally Grwn Fruits And Vegetables Soon Available At The Peak Of Freshness


Fall's cooler \ weather offers a,
welcome break from summer's
s-veltering heat. Baseball fans
eagerly avinit the World Series
to wind up another -season of
America's Pastime, while foot-
ball fans are enjoying a brand
new season of exciting gridiron


action Holiday s are on the hori-
zon, and family get-togethers
are being planned.
In FlIrida, fall brings an-
other welcome event: the sea-
sonal opening of many commu-
nity farmers' markets throughout
the state and the kickoff of Flori-


Oooh...That's






By Janet Schrader, Columnist

Wood Heating Is A Natural

In Madison County
It's highly possible that trally located so many isolated
you heat with wood if you live corners of the house are a lot
in the country around here. I colder than I would like, espe-
kriow I am not the only one in cially when the thermometer
this county who wakes up at dips below freezing. Distant
two in the morning and stuffs comers like the bathroom. Br-
more wood on the fire. rrrr! There is nothing quite as
Wood heaters are like ba- shocking as plopping ones
bies. You have to feed them buns on a toilet seat reduced'to
every two hours no matter 28 degrees in the middle of the
what the time of-day is. But night.
there's nothing like the smell Yes, the comers are freez-
of wood smoke to bring back ing while the living room is so
memories of fall, Christmas hot we have to open windows.
and crisp evenings outdoors That little wood heater will
around a bonfire, unless it's drive you out of the house
the smell of smoke filling up when it's cooking.
your home because the man of In winter we have to re-
the house shut the damper a arrange the furniture to make
little too soon. space around the wood heater.
Wood heaters. have a lot In summer, we just pile stuff
going for them. The fuel is on it like,it was another table.
free to most and plentiful for In winter the nearest chair is a
us. However. there is Some safe six feet away.
labor involved. Cutting, chop- The real kicker to this sto-
ping and hauling wood for the ry is, in our house we have a
fire is a major undertaking. perfectly good central-heating
Another benefit of heat- system. The man of the house
ing with wood besides the cost, prefers we don't use it because
is the teapot filled with water he tends to be a little cheap.
on top of the wood stove. The Little does he know, the
house stays a lot less dry than minute his truck leaves the
when the. electric heat is yard, the daughter and I' shoot
cranking away. This is a major out of bed and run the ther-
consideration for someone mometer up to 80 and climb
who uses as much moisturizer back into bed to wait for the
as I do. blessed warmth.
Our wood heater is cen- But we heat with wood.


day's fall fruit and vegetable har-
vest. Shopping :at farmers' mar-
kets is a growing trend in Flori-
da, and the number of farmers'
markets in the state has doubled
in the last 10 years. Seventy-
three communitN farmers' mar-
kets are listed with the Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services. Half of
Florida's 67 counties have farm-
ers' markets.
People who shop at farmers'
markets enjoy fresh, wholesome
produce throughout the growing
beqo%\\hn. 1..,g '.tou keep,.
small farms viable. There are
also less obvious benefits: buy-
ing locally grown food con-
serves energy and other natural
resources, reduces air and %\ ater
pollution, preserves green space,
and helps build a stronger, more
close-knit community.
Farmers usually harvest in
the early morning, just before
heading to the markets, so its
only a matter of hours between
harvest and purchase. Produce
remains vital, intensely fla-
vored, juicy, and crisp. Nutrient
loss is minimal, so your food not
only tastes better, it's better for
you.
Buying locally at farmers'
markets cuts. down on the dis-
tance that food is transported,
the consumption of fossil fuels,
and pollution. It also cuts down
on the amount of food packag-
ing that ends up in landfills.
Plus, eating locally grown food
makes for stronger, farms and
better communities.
Farmers' markets serve as
community gathering places,
spaces where people can linger
and chat and get to know each
other. Some have evolved into
weekly festivals, with live mu-
sic, arts and crafts, educational
exhibits, and community out-
reach by organizations such as
local health departments and the
Humane Society.
"There tends to be a social
aspect to the markets," Bronson
said. "The historic ties between
farmer and consumer are re-
stored."


Florida Livestock Market

For the week ended November 2, 2006


Feeder Steers:



Feeder -Heifers:





Slaughter Cows:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 125.00-180.00
300-400 Ibs 110.00-151.00
400-500 Ibs. 100.00-131.00
Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 Ibs 117.00-150.00
300-400 Ibs 108.00-130.00
.400-500 Ibs 92.00-118.00


,ean: 750-1200 Ibs 85-90 percent 39.00-44.50
YieghterNo 1000-21 bsBus4.00-61.00
YieM Grade No? *.-,2 1000-2lOQ.lbs'4.00-61.00
: *i.Lwr, .' -' .ir ii ,st;);n V- ,".:''*' .,ril ,, ? R,,.^.T, 21" '"'


N or, vlll--, "m

IGA 11300 Wei! t a

We Ago,
Prices #Oqd'b i
YOU'RE INVITED TO SEE THE MR. B'S FOOD OUTLET DIFFERENCE!
1. COST-PLUS PRICING GIVE YOU LOWER GROCERY PRICES EVERY DAY 365 DAYS A YEAR.
2. OUR STORES ARE CLEAN, NEAT AND WELL7STOCKED.
3. OUR EMPLOYEES ARE FRIENDLY, HELPFUL AND EXPERIENCED.
4. EVERYTHING WE SELL IS ALWAYS, 100% GUARANTEED FOR FRESHNESS &QUALITY.
5. ABOVE ALL, WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS AND WE'LL STRIVE TO MAKE SURE YOU KNOW IT!


TRACTORS TRAILERS MOWERS
BROWN* KUBOTA C Gifts for
WOODS JOHN DEERE Men, Women
BUSH HOG FORD U -& Children
HOWSE MASSEY
Tractor Co. ew Tractor Gift Shop

Call For Prices, T
Financing Avail. w/Approvedi T00 manyo
LANDSCAPING & -John Deere Collectibles
TRACTOR SERVICE & Housewares to mention
Discing, Food Plots,
Bush Hogging & Finish Mowirge Hoid Layaway ilabl
Vl, Hours:
1085 East Highway 90 Madison, Florida M-F85-5:3
850-519-4725 850-869-0183 Office: 850-973-3355 Sat 8-5


0,


I = = = 4


10

t
e
v
t
c


El


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t









8B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Friday, November 10, 2006


Excavating Work
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Re-
moval, Demolition, and Roads. No
Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call
Paul Kinsley at 850-973-6326
I build sheds, decks, handicap
ramps, exterior carpentry work,
window and door replacement.
Call Bob: 850-242-9342


Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Irrigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
(850) 973-2848,






AUCTION
Saturday, November 11, 6:30PM
1693 SW Mosley Hall Rd
(CR360) Madison,Florida
PHONE 850 973-2959
New truckload in nowll
START CHRISTMAS SHOP-
PING WITH THESE GREAT
ITEMS.
LOTS OF FUN &
GIVE-A-WAYS
Heated / AC Comfy seats
S 5 p.m. Preview
Food starts at 5:30PM
Directions From 1-10: Take SR14
SW to stop sign.Turn .right on
SR14-360 1 runiil fork in road.
Bare right onto SW Mosley Hal
Rd.(CR360).Past fire house, on
left. AU691 Col.Ron Cox AB2490






BIG C REPORT SALE
Saturday, November 18th, 8 h m
till 2 p.m., 100's'of used" r.
N.O.S. antique car parts, .me-
chanical tools, woodworking
tools, air compressor, work ta-
bles, display cabinets. N.E. Du-
val Pond Rd, Madison, FL.
850-929-6952 or 850-464-0583


Cold weather is here!!! .
I have a tree that has been cut
into blocks, the rest of the cut-
ting is tip to you. It's good oak
wood and it is FREE!
850-973-8345






1998 Ford Explorer Sport
2 Door; Tires in Excellent Con-
dition; Low Miles $5,800.
850-929-7541
... .. .


1994 GMC Sonoma; red;
regular cab; 145,000 miles;
$1,000 Call 973-4141


2003 ALpha See Ya
Motorhome
23,000 miles
2 slide outs
7 :,: e, I ce ilri
washer /dryer combo
Strand up Shower
4 TV's and DVD Players
Basement Air Conditioning
Back Up Camera
Dual Refrigator
Leather Couch and J Lounge
Automatic Front Shades
$120,000
Still has some warranty
386-316-8054

81' Ford Stepside
Last year of the full size Ranger.
Runs Great! $2,500 Call 929-2897


2 PC. LEATHER sofa & loveseat.
,,Brand new, hardwMood frames, life- .
time warranty- $795 can deliver,
850-425-8374

THE DEALS IN THE

CLASSIFIED

ARE OUTTA SIGHT!


Packing???
25 lbs. of Clean
Newspapers
just $2
973-4141

5 piece bedroom set, new in boxes,
must sell, $475 850-222-2113
Cherry sleigh bed, $250, solid
wood, still boxed 850-222-9879.
For Sale: Craftsman Sweeper that
picks up leaves and pine straw.$75.
Oak cocktail table $75. Call 850-
253-1201
Nationwade Appliance
Washers and dryers $100 and up
Refrigerators and stoves $100 and
up, comes with 1 year warranty
Delivery available
229-247-2710


* New Micio Fiber Sofa + Loveseat
$475, still wrapped,', stain resist.
850-425-8374
DINING ROOM Brand New
Table, 6 Chairs, China Cabinet.
$900. Can Deliver, Call 850-222-
7783
$150'NEW QWEEN PILLQWTOP
M I TTRESS SET, in plastic,, war-
ranty. 850-222-7783
Bedroom Set New King bed, TV
Arnioire, chest + nightstand.'Retail
$3K, sacrifice $900. 850-545-7112
NEW KING PLUSH TOP mattress
set. Still in plastic with warranty,
can deliver $250 850-222-2113





Wanted peafowl. Need one ma-
ture mal6 now before spring, but
will buy pairs if needed. Call 850-
973-6131 or 850-464-1165. Also
want guineas.,


Wnant~l~ed-


Baby Sitter Wanted: Responsible,
reliable, dependable babysitter to
babysit 5 month old. Experience
and references required. Call 850-
228-1144


I t $100 Rewardi

WAYNESiILLE, NC Ret1 W tRd No quen
Sat tions ed. Call 850-~7 3-3363 If
no answer leave a message.


Highland
Forest

I I I : I I 1 : I For Rent
Located in Gated Highland Forest 3 Story Custom Mansion on 4.46 Acres 2bdrm/1 bath MH in park on
7,633 Sq. Ft. *4 Bedrooms* 4.5 Baths Elevator Ballet Room* Library Highway 53 in Madison,
4 Decks/2 Patios Japanese Gardens Koi.Ponds $135/wk includes electric, ten-
Waterfalls* Breathtaking Smoky Mountain Views ant to pay for propane.
Long Range Mountain Views Call Erin Levin
NOVEMBER www.redfieldgroup.com at 850-570-0459

S16th 1-866-673-9270
ANOTHER FINE PROPERTY BEIN SOLD BY: One and two bedroom
apartments I for rent.
1 850-673-1113


SM s" . . . . . . .
E-HRISMAS 15 MING FAST...


THE KIDS ARE
DREAMING BF
M
bBTS BF TBYS
AND NEW
THINGS...


MAKE THBSE
DREAMS EGME
TRUE WITH EXTRA.
EASH EARNED
WIT41THE 4iEbP
OF EbASSIFI.EBS...


SElbb THGSE UN-
WANTED ITEMS
TGBAY-I
TO PbAEE YOUR AD EAhlb

9 73'-4141
ASK FOR MATHER


S Greenville Pointe

^ Apartments

1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible apts. HUD vouchers accept-
ed. Call 850-948-3036. TDD/TTY
711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Senior's
and Disabled. 1 & 2 bedrooms,
HUD vouchers accepted Call 850-
973-3786 TTY Acs 711 "This in-
stitution is an equal opportunity
provider and employer."

'outhem 1illasof

8adison 1 partmients

HUD vouchers accepted. 1, 2, &
3 BR, HC & non-HC accessible
apts. Call 850-973-8582/ TDDTTY
711. 200 Southern Villas Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing Opportunity.





Commercial
Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage-23
acres, Corner lots. Fronts both
Harvey GreeneDrive and High-
way 53 South. Natural gas line,
8 inch water main, access to city
utilities, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
Property has easy access to 1-10,
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will build to
suit tenant.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141






House For Sale
Gingerbread house, 3 bedroom, new
central heat & air, all new appli-
ances, completely renovated.
$98,000, 850-869-0135.

192 ACRES OF PRIME HUNT-
ING PROPERTY
(Madison County)
Four Star Hunt Camp, Virgin Tim-
ber, 8 Cabins, Huge Cookhouse,
Fully Equipped Workshop w/3
Bays, Tractor, Four Wheeler, Com-
pletely Furnished, HVAC, I/M,
Washer/Dryer, Satellite TV, No
Expense Spared. For sale by owner
$1.75 Million, 863-634-3340
315 Leggette Ave, Greenville FIl, 3
bedroom 1 bath home in quiet area,
,hardwood floors, paneling, separate
dining room, separate living room,
eat-in kitchen, recent insulated win-
dows and central heat/ AC. Utility
building in rear with washed/dryer
hookups, carport. Offered at
$83,500.
Alan A. Levin Broker-Associate
McClellan Realty 850:570-0742
Madison Rent Sell or Lease Op-
tion Remodeled 3 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath, doublewide on appx. 1/2 acre.
New carpet, paneling, range, refrig-
erator, front porch, cabinets and
more. CAC lowest price on market.
$55,500, 386-963-1551,

Pioneer
Excavating
& Tractor Services
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump
Removal, Demolition, Roads,
Mowing, Discing, Box-Blading,
and Tilling.
No Job Too Small Free Estimates
Call Paul Kinsley
850-973-6326


Full-Time Legal Secretary for fast
paced personal injury law firm lo-
cated in Monticello. Team player
with extensive litigation experience
preferred. Fax resume to 850-997-
5189


Inside & "Ireasures & More Glassware:
Outside Shops Summer Hours: Sat-Sun 10-4 Antiques
Yard sale We buy...call us! Collectibles
Set-up ju.aTools
$8 & u-p .Furniture
Hwy. 19 S.* 850-838-1422 850-584-7124 Mon-Th


$$ AVON REPS $$
NEEDED NOW
50% COM.
Could Win $1,000
HURRY CALL
Dorothy
973-3153


Bank Teller needed. Prior cash
handling experience required.
Computer skills are essential.
Great work environment with com-
petitive pay and benefits. Applica-
tions are available at www.fmb-
bank.com or any Farmers & Mer-
chants Bank location. Mail applica-
tion to P.O. box 340, Monticello, Fl
32345 or fax to: 850-997-2315.
EEO/AA/D/V


Tractor and
Loader Operators
Are wanted in the Lee area.
Please call (800) 447-3304 ask
for Chad or Mas.

Position: Case Manager So-
cial Worker -Full Time
Duties include: Assessments, ob-
servation; care plans, ri.alairii.ii
confidential records and reports Pas
well as other in home services and
all services pertinent to frail Ih-orn:--
bound elderly.
Experience: Bachelor Degree in
social work/years of work experi-
ence in counseling/Human services
may be substituted for degree.
Applicants need to apply in person
at the Senior Citizens Council Ceh-
ter, 400 SW Rutledge Street, Mati-
son, Florida 32340.
Monticello Christian Academy is
now accepting applications *for
teachers pre-k thru 12th grade and
teachers aide. No college Icquired
For more information call 997-
6048 :

Kountry Kitchen
Now Hiring
Full-Time Servers
(850) 971-0024


Cracker Barrel
Now Hiring
Full and part time'experienced; Re-
tail, Grill Cooks, Cashiers duad
Servers. Flexible scheduled. weekly
pai,c iecl.4. health iri ;iranc .ridn
other great benefits. '


Housekeeper Needed
Salary based on experience, day
shift 7 a.m. 5 p rn Appi,, direct-
'dApphl r per.o. at di e IaeJ c Pail.
1, -- f-. 401) 4 T n-ber DLI e. EOE


LAKE FRONT HOUSE ON LONG POND, LAKE
VIEW BUILDING LOT, COMMERCIAL
BUILDING ON ASHLEY STREET, RENTAL HOUSE
NEAR VSU, MOBILE HOME & LOT NEAR
INDUSTRIAL PARK & 37 ACRES IN BROOKS
COUNTY NEAR VALDOSTA!
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2006- 10:00 AM

Prop. #1 5466 Danieli Dr. Lake Front Home on Long
Pond, 2,400 Sq. Ft., 3 Bedrooms, 2 BA, 2-Tier Wooden
Deck, 85.5 Ft. of Lake frontage, Beautiful Lakeview!
Prop. #2 Danieli Drive & Payton Place Lakeview
Home Building Lot, Zoned RI0, Water & Sewer.
Prop. #3 704 North Ashley Street Two-Story Office
Building, High Traffic Count, 3,200 Sq. Ft., 11 Rooms,
3.5 Baths, Zoned CH, Front & Rear Parking.
Prop. #4 307 West College Street 3 Bedrooms, 1
Bath, Excellent Rental Investment, Only 300 Feet
From VSU Campus, Zoned DR10, Rents for $595/Mo.
Prop. #5 220 Cummings Place Rental Property,
Two Bedroom, Two Bath Mobile Home & Lot Near
Industrial Park, Rented for $450/Mo. w/12 Mo. Lease.
Prop. #6 -37 Acre Farm in Brooks County Near
Troupeville & Studstill Rds. On Coody Rd. Only 11
Miles from Valdosta, Over 1,600 Feet of County Road
Frontage, Divided into 8 Tracts Ranging in Size from
1 Acre to 13 Acres, Buy One Tract, Several Tracts or
Buy All. Beautiful Homesites & Mini-farms!
SALE SITE: Valdosta Elks Lodge, 2309 Hwy 84 W., Valdosta, GA
10% Buyer's Premium
FREE Brochure! 242-5412 or 800-334-9724
Or www.professionalauctioneer.com


Lead Singer Needed
Looking for an experienced,
dedicated, tl1eutle singer for a
local band. Must have experi-
ence. Call Dan at 850-973-2933
after 5 p.m.


Greene Publishing, Inc.

Now Hiring

Advertising Sales Person

Would you like to work with a winning
team? Do you thrive in a fast paced environment?
Enjoy talking with people? Then we w% would encour-
age you to look into a position with us.
We require : A professional appearance and
a pleasant personality You must be able to work
well under the pressure of meeting deadlines and al-
ways maintain a team player relationship with your
co-w workers. Experience in Advertising Sales is not
required but helpful.
Apply in person at
Greene Publishing Inc.
Highway 53 South
NMadison, FL. 32340
EOE/DFWP/M-F


I


I









Friday, November 10, 2006


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9B


SuaneeVale Hmae oiet rset..


Leal


'Suwannee Valley Humane Society
1156 SE Bisbee Loop
Madison, Florida 32340

Two miles south of Lee off C.R.'
255 From 1-10 Exit 262. Take
C.R. 255 north 1/2-mile look for
the sins
II Ot LD YOU LIKE A DOG
OR.CAT THAT HAS ALREADY
BEEN SPAYED/NEUTERED,
CURRENT ON BOOSTERS,
WORMED, HEART WORM TEST-.
ED, FELINE LEUKIMIA TESTED
AND CURRENT ON RABIES
COME SEE OUR, ANIMALS AT
THE SUWANNEE VALLEY HU-
MANE SOCIETY. WE TRY TO
ADOPT THE HEALHIEST ANI-
MAL POSSIBLE. AND WE HELP
TO CONTROL THE POPULA-
TION OF ABANDONED AND
UNWANTED ANIMALS.
You must check with us prior to
bringing in 'an artimal. A drop-off
dornaion is required for any animal
brought to the shelter. Our Hours:
Tues' to Sat. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or
by appointment. Visit our website
and see the animals that need a re-
ally good home at www.geoci-
ties.com/Suwanneehs or e-mail us
afi 01 t 11t Ltt i v c 'l 'ai id ik it
Lost or Found Pets:
If you have lost a pet or found
one, the humane socieLt %ill help
you find your pet. Call us at 1i850s ,
971-9904 or toll free at 1-866-236-
7812. Leave a message if we are.
closed, we will return your call.
-Remember to always call your lo-
cal animal controls or shelters, if
you have a lost or found animal. ,

We ieall appreciate donations..
\e couldn't operate without Lhem.
The., arec lhe Iarte and soul of our
Thrift Shops' income Please con-
sider bringing us donations of
clothes,. household goods,. furni-


ture and toys. WE ASK THAT
ALL DONATIONS BE IN GOOD
CONDITION; otherwise we can-
not sell them. THANKS. Please
feel free to stop in and look around
at the ideas we have in the Thrift
Shop for you to buy.
Newspapers and
Aluminum Cans:
We hate. a recycle new spaper
bin at 305 Pinewood Dr. just west
of JOhnson's -Appliance/Radio
Shack. We also collect aluminum
cans to recycle, just bring them t 10
the shelter. All the money goes,to
help the homeless animals.
FEATURED ANIMALS FOR
ADOPTION
DOGS: .
3106- Hunk A is 1-years old, is
bnrndle color male. He is a Mastiff/
imix. He is a beautiful large dog.
3101- Della Is:6 months old and
is a Collie/mix. She is -black.
browi' and shite. She is a sweel-
heart..
3085 Loretta A Catuhula/ini\.
she is brown \% ith a black muzzle.
She is 9 \eeks old and tould lo-ve
Io go home ith \ou. ..:
3078 Ma\ Is 6 weeks old and
has been spaced. She is a mixed
breed and is brosn with a wiite
streak on her nose. And has a Mi-
cro- chip.
3051 Chester Is 5 nionths old.
:he is aheeler/mix. He is brov. n and
black and has been neutered
CATS: "
3094 iKin Is 2-years old. is
Orange vmilh shite. She is a spaed
female and would d loke a home
3092 Patches Is 7 \eeks old and
is black and white, niore hijte
'than black He has been neutered.
.3057 -Sam Is 8 months old and
he is ,hite arid graj. has been
neutered
3015 Frances [s a light gras
tabby This male is 4 months old


and look around, I am sure youi' the love and companionshiup ot a
'\ill find 0hat you are looking for four legged ball of 1o\e
'We are no%\ doing 4 in I cat boost- These animals are read\ io gite
ers on all cats here at the humane 'ou all the lose ihat is in their
society. hearts iust for the chance to ha.ec a
We always need people to hdld. family to care and lou e them.
pet lo' e, hold and o all, animals so All thie, ask i bfor lihe chance to
if %ou can't adopt lou can alW as .be seer, and to sihov'. 'i ho:lw'.
help in many other 'a: : much the\ can -:ftter i: 0,o
We hate mnan\ more kittens and Please come out and isn us to see
cats that are spa ed or neutered, the '.arilet\ of funr, tace.
formed feline leukemia tested,, Kittenrs that are lcad', to shale
.rabies shots The Suv.annee \ai-'. unconditional I-e that is in their
le\ Humane Societe Depends on hearts Men, Cirtinma roinm all
adoptions for AVAILABLE ihe animals and oliteers at the
.SPACE. ADOPTION FEES ARE Sun. annee \.,ie' Humane Socilt\
$50.00 which INCLUDES.
spay/neutei,' rabies, boosters, __ __ .
is orming, feline leuikemniahejri 1 1 j
,korm testing .WE ALSO OFFER t .
OPTIONAL_ MICRO-CHIPPING y lu, Clh 'tallio Tree
When YOU ADOPT FOR $10.00 Tv/


(.):VCB~~AYiu


$2.9u0( Weekly Guaranteed!
Addr-ssing letters .in your
spare time. Free
postage supplies. No experi-
ence necessary!! Start imme-
diately. write A&G Publica-
tions. 2370-G' Hillcrest Rd.
U147-H, Mobile. AL 36695.

TEAMS NEEDED. Home
weekly. Class A-CDL
w/HAZMAT. TOP PAY &
BENEFITS. (800)428-0678.
www.Armellini.com.

AMERICA'S DRIVING
ACADEMY Start your dri-
ving career today! Offering.
courses in CDL A. Low tu-
ition fee! Many payment op-
tions! No registration feet
(866)889-0210 info(iamericas-
drivinkacademy.com.

DRIVER: YOU WANT IT, WE
HAVE IT! Solo, teams, owner
operators, company drivers,
students, recent grads, re-
gional, dedicated, long haul.
Van, flatbed; Must be 21.
CRST Career Center.
(800)940-2778, www.drivefor-
crst.com.

ASAP + Early Christmas
Bonus $1000+Wkly 36-
43cpm/$1.20pm. $0 Lease
NEW Trucks CDL-A + 3 mos
OTR (800) 635-8669.,

Earn Up. to $550 WEEKLY
Working through the gov-
ernment PT No Experience.
Call Today!! (800)488-2921
Ask for Department W21.

DATA ENTRY! Work From
Anywhere. Flexible Hours.
Personal Computer Re-
quired. Excellent Career Op-
portunity Serious Inquiries
Only (800)344-9636 Ext. 700.

We're raising pay for Florida
regional drivers! Home
every weekend! Home dur-
ing the week! Solid weekly
miles! 95% no touch! Pre-
planned freight! $.43 per
mile, hometime, money &
more! Heartland Express
(800)441-4953 www.heart-
landexpress.com.

Driver- ACT NOW...Hiring
OTR & Local Drivers *Earn
$4,000 in bonuses your 1st


year "New Equipment "Pre-
mium Pay Package *No Haz-
Mat Required -Call (877)882-
6537-Oakley Transport, We
care about our drivers!

Placement Reps, part time to
supervise international
high school exchange stu-
dents and recruit host fami-
lies. Phone WISE at (800)264-
0948 or email: wise(iawise-
foundation.com.

Homes For Sale
$0 DOWN HOMES Gov't .&
Bank Foreclosures! ,Low or,
no down! No credit OK! Call
Now! (800)749-2905.

PALM HARBOR Factory
Liquidation Sale 2006- mod-
els. National Builder 0%
DOWN when you own your
land. Call for FREE
.Brochures (800)622-2832.


Instruction
HEAVY EQUIPMENT OP-
ERATOR TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT: Bulldozers,
Backhoes, Loaders, Dump
Trucks, Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators; National Certifi-
cation, Job Placement Assis-
tance; Associated Training
Services (800)251-3274
www.equipmentoperatorcom


Heavy Equipment Operator.
CERTIFIED. Hands on
Training. Job Placement As-
sistance. Call Toll Free
(866)933-1575. ASSOCIATED
TRAINING SERVICES, 5177
Homosassa Trail, Lecanto,
Florida, 34461.

Miscellaneous
ATTEND COLLEGE ON-
LINE from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Computers *Criminal Jus-
tice. Job placement assis-
tance. Computer provided.
Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (866)858-2121 www.on-
lineTidewaterTech.com.

DIVORCE$275-$350*COV-
ERS children, etc. Only one
signature required! *Ex-
cludes govt. fees! Call week-
days (800)462-2000, ext.600.
(8am-6pm) Alta Divorce,
LLC. Established 1977.


ANew Look


For Only 48

I ahn,, & NL11t1 1 1


EARNHARDT & SONS
U P H -O L-S-T*E R-Y

Highway 14 Madison. FL .850.973.6006




!i'-.., '







F., .,,I -.

& ICK D Pughter, I
- -. : -- , - .- '


AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for high paying Avia-
tion Maintenance Career.
FAA approved program. Job
placement assistance. CALL
Aviation Institute of Mainte-
nance (888)349-5387.

Internet Shopping Mall
WORLD BUYERS MALL In-
ternet SuperMall with over
770 stores. Open 24/7. Thou-
sands of Products to BUY.
WA LM A RT-TARGET-BEST-
BUY-PETCO-TOYSRUS-
BEALLS-STARBUCKS Web-'
Site: http://www.worldbuy-
ersmall.com/

WOLFF TANNING BEDS
Buy. Direct and Save! Full
Body units from $22 a
month! FREE Color Catalog
CALL TODAY! (800)842-1305
www.np.etstan.com.

Real Estate
MURPHY, NORTH CAROLI-
NA Affordable Homes in the
Mountains. Affordable
Homes, Mountain Cabins
anid Land. CALL FOR FREE
BROCHURE (877)837-2288
EXIT REALTY MOUNTAIN
VIEW PROPERTIES
www.exitmurphy.com.

Gulf front lots $595k. Homes


starting mid $3110k. New
niaster planned ocean front
community on beautiful
Mustang Island, near Cor-
pus Christi, TX. www.cinna-
?monshore.com, (866)891-5163.

BEAUTIFUL BLUE RIDGE,
NC Mountain Views. 8+
Acre.Mountain Estate. Heav-
ily Wooded with Stream. EZ
Financing- $49,900. (800)230-
6380, ext.120._

VA MOUNTAIN LOG CAB-
IN unfinished inside, view,
trees, private, large creek
and river nearby, .$1,39.5i)0
owner (866)789-8535.

Steel Buildings
STEEL BUILDINGS. Facto-
ry Deals. Save $$$. 40 x 60' to
100 x 200'. Ex: 50 x 100 x 12' =
$3.60/sq ft. (800)658-2885.
www.rigidbuilding.com.

SPECIAL BUILDING
SALE..."DON'T MISS IT!"
2006 delivery or deposit
holds till spring. 25'x40'x12'
$4800. 40'x60'x16' $12,800:
Front end optional. Other
sizes available. Pioneer.
(800)668-5422.
( Advertising
Network of Florida/


NOTICE OF 'SLE PURSLiANT TO CHAPTER 83. PART RT
Under the Authority of the Self-Serricing Storage Facilitl Act. Section 83.805 the de-
scribed below has been seized for nonpayment of rent and other accrued expenses.
Property consists primarily of household goods in units rented by: Charles Owens. The
proper. will be sold at auction to the highest bidder as provided bi the Self-Storage
Facilin \ci. Section 83.t06. The sale %ill be held Fridas. November 17, 2006 at 9:00
-\.M., at the Madison Mini Storage, 1098 East U.S. 90. in Madison. Florida. For further
information call 971-5744.
11/3. 1Ubf .. "


IN THE (IRCUITCOURT OF THE TRIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN %ND FOR M1ADISON COL'NT, FLORID%
( CIVIL ACTION


and has been neutered.
2831 Lovey Is a calico, female,
she is 1 years old and has been
spayed. Would love a new home.
THESE ARE SPECIAL
KITTYS
2592 Millie is a 3-year-old cat,
who is very sweet. She is a white
Tabby .and has-been spayed. Older
cats make wonderful pet for an
older person Does not like chil-
.dreri and does not like to be held
all the time. This is.a very special
cat and you can adopt her for
$60.00 because she, has a micro -
chip in case she gets lost.
2240 Sissy This is a real spe-
,cial kitty. She is: 3 years old and is.
a black and gra3 Tjbb\. She does
not like children but,.would make
a wonderful companion for and
older person. She does have to
have special food. If there is an
older, person, who would love to'
. haje this cat, she can be adopted
for a special price of $25. Come in
and see her.
We have kittens too. So come in


MORE.
LOST AND FOUND:
LOST: In Lee around S.E. Corinth
church Road. An'all black Lab, his
name is "Max". He weight around
70 pounds. Has a green reflective
collar. Is a very sweet dog and
loves Children. If found please.
call: Suwannee Valley Humane
Society at:, 50-97 1-9904 or toll
free at:, 866-236-7812.
LOST: in Live Oak at Darling.
Park 130th street. "KING" an all
black lab. This male has a tatoo in
his ear and has an orange collar
with owners name. If found please
call: Danielle Herb at 386-364-
5322.
A CHRISTNLAS WISH
Our Christmas '%. ish this Near is
to find loving homes for all of our
Furrn fends \We kri,, that thlis is
not possible but n ill think of our aninialslirfs be-
fore \ou look some here else for
that special friend for \our Chld-
dren. grandparents. husband. ife,
or an- other losed one that needs


By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputs Clerk


II Il. 1 ,17


Let (HomecCarc )hcmivercd

KrtaoowiOaabIraia~d sWio ~holp Fu icho~wtIN badt Eupplas.
Fr.-Au~t thsr pm jfelsm-Rumg
Niric m i iv~Ik-owlsAryvurvrotkz~qweflras
LJA U5 64 zp'U nWMWirccmfimmna izacji
1 (800) 565-5644 vwwiv auMoeCarfunleivenmudoorn





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I


.IJPNORG\N CHSE BAN.. AS TRUSTEE, IN TRUST
FOR FHE HOLDERS OF TRUl.MAN MORTG GE
I O.N TRUST 21102-1. ASSET-B\CKED
CERTIFIC TES. SERIES 2002-1,
Plaintiff,

5."> .


C %SE NO 201)6-175-CA
DIVISION


THE UNKNOWN N HEIRS, DE% ISEES. GRANTEES.
\SSIGNEES, LIENORS. CREDITORS. TRUSTEES. OR
OTHER CL IMANTS CL AIlING BY. THROUGH.
UtiNDER. CONSTNCE L \ONNE THOMPSON,
DECEA.%ED. et al.
Defendanusi.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSiRE SALE

NOTI( E IS HEREB1 GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Morigage Foreclosure
datld October ih). 211116 and entered in Case No. 2006-175-CA of the Circuit Court of
the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and flr MADISON County. Florida "herein JPNIOR-
GA.N CH.ASE BANK. AS TRUSTEE. IN TRUST FOR THE HOLDERS OF TRUMANl.
NIORTGGE LON TRUST 21102-1. ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES. SERIES
2n112-1, is the Plaintiffand THE UNKNOWN HEIRS. DEVISEES. GRANTEES, AS-
SIGNEES. LIENORS. CREDITORS. TRUSTEES. OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
CI.AIMING B1. THROUGH. LENDER. CONSTANCE LAVONNE THOMPSON. DE-
CEASED: BOBBIE DOBSON. %S AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF CONSTANCE
L sS ONNE rHOMPSON, DECE SED: KO\ \CHERICH J. ARNOLD. AS A.N HEIR
OF THE ESTATE OF CONSTANCE LAVONNE THOMPSON. DECEASED: WILLIE
JAMES ARNOLD. AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF CONSTkNCE LAVONNE"
THOMPSON. DECEASED; DEDRICK L\MONE BURTON. ,S AN HEIR OF THE
ESf \IlE OF CONSTSNCE L. \ONNE THOMPSON. DECEASED: TOMORROW' N.
BURTON ,K,.A TOMORROW \ NICOLE BURTON. AS %N HEIR OF THE ESTATE
,:OF CONST.NCE LA.VONNE THOMPSON. DECEASED: JOVAN MONTREUL L
THOMPSON, .\S \N HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF CONSTNCE LA\ONNE
THOMPsON. DECEASED: JAQUESE DEMPS. S \%N HEIR OFTHE ESTATE OF
CONSTANCE L \\ONNE THOMPSON, DECEASED; ANY SND ALL UNKNOi\WN
P-RTIES CLAIMING B). THROUGH. UNDER. %ND AGAINST THE HEREIN .
N,\MED INDI\ (DUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNO\%N TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE. % %HETHE R S \ID ULNKNOW\N PARTIES NM\ CLAIM .ANINTEREST
%S SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES. GRANTEES OR OTHER CLINM.ANTS: TEN-j
ANT lI NiK/i KOVACHERICK ARNOLD: TENANT 4.2 N/K/' VER- JONESarethe :
Ddcendant.. I "ill sell to the highest and best bidder for cash al EAST DOOR OF THE
iM \DISON COUNTN COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 6th day of Dec., 2006, the
, follhing described property) as set forth in said Final Judgment:

LOTS 4.5. 6, 7.10.11.12,13,14 AND 15, OF BLOCK 37. AS SHOi N BY,
MAP OR PL1T OF GREENVILLE INVESTMENT COMPANY'S
L -NDS IN TO'N OF GREEN% ILLE. FLORIDA..SAID [MAP BEING OF
RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT. MADISON COUNTY, FLORID. .
A'Ki\ 141 CHURCH STREET F/K! ROUl E I BOX 6, GREENVILLE,
FL 32331
\it\ person claiming an inteiest in the surplus from the sale. if any. other
than the prupertu iiner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty
ihin da). after ihe sale.
IT I TN ESSS M1 H AND and the seal of this Court on Oct. 19,2006.
Tim Sanders
Clerk of the Circuit Court


MMIWLI
Moro,






1 OB The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


Friday, November 10, 2006


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BEST REBATES UP TO $8000, PLUS GET THE BEST BIG 27" TV WITH EVERY VEHICLE PURCHASED!!!
EXAMPLE #06309 $28,140 DIVIDED B' 60 @ 0%=$469/MTH. ONLY $399 DUE AT INCEPTION + FIRST MONTH PAYMENT ON LEASES. ON WRANGLERS & ASPENS, $1399 DUE AT INCEPTION + FIRST
MONTH PAYMENT. NO SECURITY DEPOSIT REQUIRED. ONLY $399 DOWN ON 72 MONTH PURCHASES, FINANCED w!CHRYSLER AT 7.85o. PAYMENTS ARE PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE, WARRANTY
RIGHTS/ACQUISITION FEES. SEE US FOR DETAILS. MUST TAKE DELIVERY BY 11/30/06. PROMOTION APPLIES TO ALL SALES ON OR AFTER 11/10/06. MUST BE IN DEALER STOCK.


2006 RAM 1500
219mo.
YOU CHOOSE THE BEST
LEASE 39 MOS. OR
PURCHASE 72 MOS.


2006 DAKOTA QUAD
2 5 1 for 39 mos.
Lease it... and walk
$ away....
or 2 7 9 for 72 mos.
buy it... and own it/


D lap- ;K -a,.S5


0% for 60mths.
Available
on All 2006
Dodge Rams
Dakotas &
Durangos
A~rf#5-^r y


2006 RAM QUAD CAB
,u.299 MO.
YOU CHOOSE THE BEST
LEASE 39 MOS. OR
PURCHASE 72 MOS.


0% for 60mths.
Available on
06 PT Cruisers
first time
ever!


2006 PT CRUISER
SA& for 39 mos.
it. 5 and walk
Lease. ai way...lk
for 72
or it mos. and
uy ...own it!

2006 CHRYSLER PACIFICA
2for 39 mos.
77O and walk
Lease it... away..
s or 72
buy mos. and
buyi.own it!


HUGE MINI-VAN
SALE
Over 50 to
Choose From!
2006 TOWN& COUNTRY
Sfor 39 mos.
M4MJ andwalk
Lease it... away...
2I g for 72
or mos. and
buy it...a own itn i


0% for 60mths
Available on
ALL 2006
Mini-Vans
& Pacificas


0% for
60 maths.
Available
on 2006


*nI. 4-.


0% for
60 mths.
A -- ME al a


W Nd W rangers! s Available
2006 JEEP WRANGLER 2006 JEEP LIBERTY on All 2006 GRAND CHEROKEE 2006 COMMANDER
206JEPWRN LERs06JeepsT for 39 mos. for 39 mos.
lii U for 39 mos. f fE for 39 mos. 2 6 and walk I and walk
an0w ale e and 'awayl..
Lease it. away.. Lease it. Jee as!walk Lease it...- %Vaway... Lease i away..
.r249 away...t dbuan359 b 369
for 72 for 72 m or moE. and orJOs.and
buy 2 o it i I o own i buy it 2 wn, it! bit.

5 3or39mos. 9mos.
Lease -i U O a walk.. ,Lease .it.. awy...
0 for 72 for 72
673 ios.and moB.and
PA R buy it... own it! buyit.. own it!
2006 DODGE UCHARGER When financed w/Chrysler Financial. When financed wlChrysler Financial. 2006 CHRYSLER 300


INROUCNGTE ALsEW20d"


-4 AIV., SE


2007 DODGE CALIBER NEW 2007 DODGE NITRO
f1 for327 2f 9 forj39 mos.
rmos. and and walk
Lease it walkaway.. Lease it... away...
for 72 for 72 /
or. mos and mos. and
buy it... own it buy it.. M own it! o
1, 2 5 bu i 'g' own* "^ B W W it k


EXIT 16, HIGHWAY 84
QUITMANo229-263-2277
CHRYSLER
EXIT 22, N. VALDOSTA RD
VALDOSTA 229-242-1540


007 CHRYSLER ASPEN
39 mos.
Lease iand walk
Leaseit.. away...
Guilt Free Indulgence,
SNOW IN STOCK!


2007 CHRYSLER SEBRING
~Leasefor 36 mos.
*an d wand
mos.oan
buy it..own it!


2006 DODGE CARAVAN
2 9 for39mos.
Lease it.. and walk
21 21away...
b $y t,% for 72
or mos. and
buy it... sd own it!


2007 4 DOOR WRANGL
f 9 for 39 mos.
Leases and walk
$ for 72
bu' it .b .mos. and
Sbuy own it!


2007 JEEP COMPASS
eas and walk
Veaseit 2t29' f oraway...
by .2 for 72
y it mos. and
y .own it!


13ACK 1, BY
UP'O:P-,,U L,,A4k-
FPO A, N D:.,-. 0 U A
W
13 A C D' -0
ANN--',N :U A -U-,i-
'ii- U."a E
F I K B y
T"i'l
E
V '-! 7

0 p
r -'
I -VE- A WA-20!
v


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