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 Section A: Main: Around Madison...
 Section A: Main: Madison County...
 Section A: Main: Regional...
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Second Section
 Section A: Main: School
 Section A: Main: Sports
 Section A: Main: Florida Forest...
 Section A: Main: Outdoors
 Section B: Second Section:...
 Section B: Second Section:...














The Madison enterprise-recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00095
 Material Information
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title: Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title: Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Creation Date: October 20, 2006
Publication Date: 1933-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID: UF00028405:00095
 Related Items
Preceded by: Enterprise-recorder

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main: Viewpoints & Opinions
        A1
        page A 2
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Local & Regional Crime Blotter
        page A 4
    Section A: Main: Around Madison County
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
    Section A: Main: Madison County United Way
        page A 11
    Section A: Main: Regional Happenings
        page A 12
    Section A: Main: Church
        page A 13
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 14
    Section B: Second Section
        page B 1
    Section A: Main: School
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
    Section A: Main: Sports
        page B 5
    Section A: Main: Florida Forest Festival
        page B 6
    Section A: Main: Outdoors
        page B 7
    Section B: Second Section: Greensheet
        page B 8
        page B 9
    Section B: Second Section: Farm
        page B 10
Full Text


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SSTRIDE

Students Hold

White Coat Ceremony


www.greenepublishing.com


Tfl rer rbiso -nt

J~ntcrpb~c4-P


Jayne Scott Named

AKA Woman Of

The Year


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............... ALL FOR ADC 320
. i''E-T' OF FLORIDA LIBRARY
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Tax=500


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Our 142nd YearNumber 7


. .


Minimum Wage
To Rise
January 1
By Jacob Bembry'
Greene Publishing,- Inc.
Florida's minimum wage
will be raised from $6.40 an
hour to $6.67
per hour effec-
tive January 1,
2007, for all
hours worked
in Florida.
The raise rep-
resents an
_ hourly in-
crease of 27 cents over the cur-
rent state minimum wage of
Please See Minimum Wage,
3A

School Board
Approves

Senior Trip
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.'
Madison County High
School Principal Ben
Killingsworth asked the Madi-
son County
--School
Board to
approve a
plan for the
seniors 'to
take their
Ben Killingworth n lay 7
,i*.HS Principal 11.
PSlase See Senior Trip, Page

.:.Gas Prices
Going Down
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc..
Gas prices are still higher
in Madison County, .but they
have dropped dramatically
here, as well as in surrounding
counties.


, Falling from a high of
$3.40 a gallon in the summer
Please See Gas Prices, Page
3A


Fri 83/56 -
Frl
10/20
Partly cloudy with a slight chance
of thunderstorms. High 83F.

Sat 82/58 ,
10/21 - --
,A few clouds. Highs in the low 80s
and lows In the upper 50s.

Sun 84/57 -
10/22 2
Partly cloudy with a stray thunder-
storm.





3 Sections, 40 Pages
Around Madison County 5-10B
Classifieds 8B
Community Calendar 5A
Legals 9B
Obituaries 5A
Outdoors 7B
School 1-4B
Sports 5B
Way Back When 5A


Friday, October 20, 2006


Madison, Florida 32340


How Safe Are Madison County Schools?


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Madison County schools
have an Emergency Operation
Plan (EOP) in place in case of an
incident at the school, such as a
stranger walking onto the cam-
pus intending to do harm to the
school children. The Emergency
Operation Plan contains a flip
chart, featuring different scenar-


ios, and how. to respond to each
of them.
Lou Miller, Superintendent
of Schools, said that the high
school also has a, scanner to
check people for weapons.
"Everyone on all the
school's campuses has been no-
tified to have their eyes opened
for strangers, Miller said. "At the
high school, everyone is identi-


fied with a badge of some sort."
Visitors on the campus have
to go through offices to get back-
ground checks done. They are'
then given a badge, which will
identify them to students and
staff members. Each time the
visitor returns to campus,, he or
she has to go through the back-
ground check.
Miller also. said the schools


Two Killed In Crash


Greene Publishing. Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell
Rain caused a crash: that killed two people on Wednesday morning, October 18,
when a 2004 Ford SUV went off the road and struck two trees.


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Two people were killed
when an SUV hit two trees on
Wednesday morning, October
18.
According, to a Florida
Highway Patrol report, Bp-
ford Clayton Flowers, 72,
was traveling east on Inter-
state 10 during adverse rain
conditions. Flowers lost con-
trol of his 2004 Ford SUV
and entered the south side of


1-10.
Flowers began to rotate
in a clockwise motion while
traveling in a southeast direc-
tion on the shoulder. The left
front of the SUV struck a tree.
The SUV continued to
travel south and its left side
struck a tree.
The vehicle came' to a
rest in a northwest direction
facing south on the south
shoulder of I-10.
Buford Clayton Flowers,


72, of Enterprise, Ala., the'
driver of the SUV died as a
result of the crash. '
A second unidentified
passenger died from injuries
in the accident.
A third passenger, Bar-
bara H. Maulden,. 65, of
Black, Ala., suffered serious
injuries in the crash.
FHP Trooper Brandon
Overstreet was the crash in-
vestigator and the homicide
investigator.


Put Emergency Contact Numbers

On Your Driver's License


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On October 2, the Department of Highway
Safety and Motor Vehicles began offering cus-
tomers who hold a current Florida drivers li-
cense or identification card the ability to pro-
vide emergency contact information at its web-
site, located at www. hsmv. state. fl. us.
The effort to add the features to the website
came about after it took five hours to contact a
woman, whose teenage daughter was killed in a


car crash.
The emergency contact data on the web
page is immediately made available to law of-
ficers through DAVID (Driver and Vehicle In-
formation Database). DAVID is available only
to on-duty law officers and not to the general
public.
The registration process is available only
through the Internet at this time, but will be
made available at driver's license offices in
January 2007. -


Call 2-1-1 For Free 24-Hour Help


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Helpline 2-1-1 is a com-
munity hotline providing free,
24-hour access to information,
referrals and anonymous tele-
phone services. The hotline
serves Madison County, as
well as seven other counties in
the Big Bend area, including
Jefferson, Taylor, Wakulla,
Leon, Franklin, Gadsden' and
Liberty
When a caller calls 2-1-1,
they are able to talk to caring,
trained counselors who pro-
vide supportive counseling
and/or referrals to agencies in
the caller's community. The
organization's comprehensive
referral database contains de-
tailed information on more tan
1,200 human health service
and mental health providers in


the Big Bend. Referral infor-
mation is updated frequently
to prevent the chances of
counselors making inappropri-
ate referrals.
People call the hotline for
many reasons. Some callers
simply need a phone number
for another organization,
while others call because they
need to talk over a problem.
Each call is different. A person
doesn't need to be in a crisis
before he or she calls Helpline
2-1-1.
Helpline 2-1-1 also offers
suicide prevention and tele-
phone crisis counselors. Ac-
cording to their website, hun-
dreds of suicidal people call
each year and Helpline 2-1-1
helps to prevent many need-
less deaths.
Helpline 2-1-1 does not


give advice. They believe the
caller is the person who knows
their situation the best and the
caller is a much better position
to figure out what is best for
his or her. life. They do offer
suggestions and alternatives
for people who are feeling
stuck, but they will not advo-
cate any particular opinion as
to what is best for them.
Confidentiality is one of
Helpline 2-1-1's most impor-
tant policies. Every volunteer
and staff member has to sign a
strict confidentiality agree-
ment before they enter the fa-
cility or speak with a caller.
There are two circumstances
where the counselor might
need.to break confidentiality.
. The first is that they have to
report the abuse or neglect of
Please See 2-1-1, Page 3A


have a particular code for
strangers, who aren't supposed
to be on campus. The code is
called into the office and the of-
fice notifies all teachers and staff
members. Students are then iso-
lated and locked into the clas's-
rooms, lunchrooms or library, or
wherever they may be at that
Please See Safe Schools,'Page
'3A '


Lou Miller
Superintendent
Of Schools


Williamson Recognized As

First-Ever Certified School Board

Member In Madison County
By Jacob Bembry
'Greene Publish-
ing, Inc.

Williamson was
recognized as the
first-ever school
board member in
Madison County
to received Certi-
fied Board Mem-
ber distinction
from the' Florida
School Boards
A s s o cli a t i o n Greene publishing , Inc. Photo
(FSBA) on Tues- by Jacob Bembry
day evening, Oc- Susie Williamson, left, chairman of
tober 17 . the Madison County School Board, was
Karen Den- recognized as. the county's first-ever
son, who was on School Board Member to become state
hand from the certified.
FSBA, to make the presentation, told everyone in attendance
that Williamson had completed 96 hours of training in eleven ar2
eas, focusing on the governance rules and responsibilities of
school board members. Williamson is only one of 97 school
board members in the state to achieve the prestigious honor.
The Certified Board Member Program is a voluntary train-
ing program for individual members and is offered by the FSBA.
The Certified Board Member Program provides leadership
training for school board members. The training topics include
student learning, school 'finance, legislative processes, policy-
making, strategic planning, school law, community involve
ment, advocacy for public education; diversity, employee rela
tions and current trends and issues.

Fund Set Up For Woman In

Need Of Liver Transplant
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
.A fund has been set
up at Bank of America
for Debbie McHargue,
who is in desperate need
of a liver transplant.
Funds from the ac
count will be used to
help the family with -<_
travel expenses, as well a
as medical expenses, and
whatever other types of
expenses her illness may
occur. She has already Ed and Debbie McHargue
had to make five trips to
the hospital and she can no longer walk.
McHargue and her husband of 35 years, Ed, have two
daughters,. Shannon Curtis and Lindsey McHargue, and two
grandchildren.
People may simply walk into the Bank of America during
normal business hours and make a deposit into the account set
up for McHargue.


United

Way


Campaign:

Kicks Off

Page 11A


Dave Gailbraith
League Kicks Off
Football Season


's?










2A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Friday, October 20, 2006


CO S Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


My Life On Rollercoasters
Many moons ago, I went to Disney World for Grid Night'
and'I rode on a rollercoaster for the first time. I \\ as sort of anx-
ious and nervous, not because of the fact I w as scared of riding
on the rollercoaster. I was actually looking forward to the ride. I
was anxious and nervous because the girl I was riding with'had
never ridden a rollercoaster before and she expressed her fear
that she might throw up. I had a pair of brand niew dress shoes
on (I don't know how the dress code is now, but, for Grad Night,
guys had to wear a vx white shirt, a tie and dress' shoes). I was wor-
ried that my shoes would get messed up. I took my first ride on
a rollercoaster on Space Mountain. It was a piece of cake. It did-
n't scare me at all or bother me. At least it didn't bother me un-
til we took the bus ride home. All'day, on the bus ride from Lake
Buena Vista back to Monticello, my stomach churned and I felt
like I would throw up. I didn't care if I did it on the school bus
(no charter buses for us) or on my brand new dress shoes, either!
Fast-forward a few moons to 1999. I was at Wild Adven-
tures that day with my nephew, Ryan, and my youngest niece,
Shannan. I had not ridden a rollercoaster since I had been a
teenager. Space Mountain and Thunder Mountain'Railroad were
the only ones I had ridden in my life. R\ an suggested that we try
out the Boomerang. I looked up at the huge monster, towering in
the sky. I said, "Okay." Boy, I was about-to find out the differ-
ence between Space Mountain and the Boomerang. First of all,
you ride Space Mountain in the dark. Second of all, it was' the
light of day and I could perfectly see all those people on the
ground below like ants. Third of all, I was more worried about
my shoes getting messed up at Disney World. Fourth of all, my
then 10-year-old nephew had negotiated so we could get seats at
the front of the Boomerang and had said, ".\ell, I.guess I've
lived long enough. I guess.I'm ready to die."
I rode the whole thing at the front, and I managed not to
scream - e% en when the Boomerang stopped. %\ ith me, riding in
the front at the top land not sure if the thing was broken) and
then % hipped everyone on board backwards. I knew then why it
was called the Boomerang.
I disembarked from the Boomerang with my chest pounding'
louder than it e% er had before. Ryan looked at me. and said,
"That was fun! Let's do it again!"
"No ay)!" I screamed at him.
My life is'like a rollercoaster. I ha% e good day s and bad days
- sometimes on the same day. Life is full of tw% isis and turns and
bumps and burns. There are days that I worry about something
as minute a- get-ing. vomit on'my brand ne'\ 'dress shoes and
there areda,) s hiai I ye 1p9 j..gk up in the, s ky 4ta, monster of a
rollercoaster and say. "What the heck? I'll take a ride."
Through it all, I know that the Holy Spirit goes with me,
giving me comfort, even if I'm going through a dark tunnel on
Space Mountain or getting whipped backwards on the
Boomerang.
Jesus told His disciples of a Comforter who would come
and be with them, when he had gone: "Peace I leave with you,
my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto
you. Let not your heart be ntoubled. neither let it be afraid."
(John 14:27)
I have that Comforter with them on the rollercoaster called
my life.


94I KtL


PUBLISHER/EDITOR
Emerald Greene Kinsley
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Lisa Greene
STAFF WRITERS
Jacob Bembrn. Jesse Covell
and Janet Schrader
GRAPHIC DESIGNERS
Carla Barrett. Carl Painter
and Lisa Greene
TYPESETTERS
Heather Bow en
ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES
Mary Ellen Greene. Dorothy McKinneN
and J'll Sheffield
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS
Susan Grimes
D tadlintt .fr I.s ;\s it MonJan ,r 3 >00 p.ni
Deadlin hr Le.vi Jl AJi ernimm ti i; i fonwdauy lt 5pnm.
Thcre will be '3"t' iar e, toi 4ttidamis
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Subscripuion Rates-
In Count', $28 * Or-of-Counri $35
(Sti .i ( h & lot Il uta. it-luItd',li


Lee Couple Writes Of Problems With Town Council
We moved into town about' 4 years ago. The one with the that it be replaced "ith a brand new one to rent. We went to
motto WHERE HEAVEN SMILES DOWN ON EARTH and towk'n meetings after meetings to no amail. Hea\ en just quit smil-'
AWAY FROM THE STRESS OF THE BIG CITY,. and all % as .. ing dow n on us and all hell broke loose. First of all we were told
well and good. we have great neighbors and e% er one in town 'we were issued a temporarN permit %which don't seem quite right.
' ere nice and friendly\ and we loved it here. Then �'e asked if for a 3 bedroom double"k ide home. They rtirned the w ater off
w e could put a mobile home on our 5 acres for our son to rent and falsely accused us of tampering with the water meter by the,
and %w as told es so we happily invested all our nest egg andbor- town manager. I had, to go home aind get the receipt to PROVE
rowed on our home the total of over $30,000 to put a very nice ,her w wrong. WE HAVE ENDURED MORE STRESS IN THE
one owner, 96 doublewide, 980'.feet to the back of our property LAST YEAR THAN WE HAVE HAD IN OUR WHOLE LIFE-
with all permits and it passed all inspections with flying colors. ". TIME. The'President of the town council has told them oer and
Then during the length of time it took us to do all that our over that this is, NOT RIGHT also to no avail. The Mayor told',
Ssons situation drastically changed and he couldn't move.into it us if our son had moved into the home for'2 weeks we wouldn't
so we thought we were. doing the proper thing and went-over and have all these problems. w ell w hat's the big deal here, our niece
ASKED,the city manager of Lee if we could rent it 'to a good lived there for.almost 5 months so we thought it w\ would be ok to
family and were told NO but we could get it surveyed pff from rent it out to a nice! Family. after she moved out, going on what
our property and rezoned to residential andit would probably be the Ma\ or had told us.'
ok, so we had thjt done!
Another $1,000 expense only to be told that now we have to Sincerely,
mo e this 3 bedroom 2 bath home off our land and stipulated Sherman and Cleo Vas arN


Letter Asks Questions About Rail Traffic


Jacob Bemnbr 's front page account in the October 11 Madi-
son County Carrier of the Colintr Coninission's October 4 de-
cision on writing the Taylor Count3 Conmission about the e.\-
tra railroad traffic that would result here in Madison from the
proposed large coal plant in Perry had some errors. I w%%as there
and I later listened closely to the tape of'that meeting public
record, County Courthouse i.
County attorney Reeves specificallN said that sending the
proposed letter w would pose no risk to Madison County. The let-
ter 'would merely ask a series of reasonable questions about the
increase in rail traffic from the transport of coal through Madi-
son Counts to Perry. It included the question about w hy there is
a railroad bypass being requested for Perr\ and not for our coun-
ty. through which the same trains would pass. It asks that the
Taylor County Commission analyze these concerns and com-
municate their analysis back to our Comnussioners.
Other inaccuracies in Bembry's story: Betty Johnson was


speakirig for herself not Keep TMadison Clean, Mihich wt.as a tem-
porarn coalition during last year's coal plant issue in Madison
and is no"\ defunct.-
B\ the w a\. on Tuesdaiy, October 10, The Madison County'
Conunission agreed to send a similar letter. Like the county let-i
ter. it %\ill include a cops to the state Department of Coinmuni-'
ty Affairs IDCA i.
I ha\e spoken \w ith jurisdictions all along the Highw a\ 9.0'
railroad corridor from here to lMcclenny ALL of them are fed':
up x\ ith the multiple fee tdie CSX railroad company is placing':.
on them,.their sometimes dictatorial attitude, and the heavy rail,
traffic in their communities. Madison is not alone

Barry G. Parsons,
Coordinator, .
Madison Environmental Committee






S,


By Jessalyn Covell

What are your plans for Halloween?


-Since 1865-
"Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity"
Eli tre ibm-t0
- uterpriset- erco r'eti'
Madison Recorder established 1865,
New Enterprise established 1901,
Consolidated June 25, 1908
Published weekly by Greene Publishing, Inc.,
1695 S. SR 53, Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals
postage PAID at Madison Post Office 32340. Pub-
lication No. 177.400.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
The Madison Enterprise-Recorder, P.O. Drawer
772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject
any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions
that, in the opinion of the management, will not be
for the best interest of the county and/or the own-
ers of this newspaper, and to investigate any ad-
vertisement submitted.
All' photos given to Greene Publishing, Inc. for
publication in this newspaper must be picked up no
later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off.
Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for pho-
tos beyond said deadline.


Excavating & Tractor Services
Mowing * Stump Removal * Land Clearing * Ponds
Construction Cleanup * Roads * Culvert Pipes
Disking * Boxblading
No Job Too Small Paul Kinsley
._ .,:" . .850-973-6326

,lorida Press .4sio, WJff 41I1.iion"


2006 ynterpri - nrhcr
Award Winnig Newspaper 1695 S SR 53 * Madison, FL 32340
01 (850) 973-4141 * Fax: (850) 973-4121
greenepub@greenepublishing.com
os http://www.greenepublishing.com


I I










Friday, October 20, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A


Gas Prices


cont from Page 1A


nston ServiceJ




Change Of Season -
Try Changing A Spending Habit,
Fall brings a change of season, so why not change a few
habits. It may be time to take a good look at the way you han-
-dle money and try a new strategy or two to redirect money where
,you want it to go. Extension Family Finance Specialists at Rut-
gers University offer a few ideas:
$ Pay yourself first - This means treating savings with the
same priority as a mortgage, rent or car loan payment. The eas-
~iest way to "pay yourself first" is to have savings deducted au-
tomatically through an employer savings plan.
$ Keep good financial records - Prepare a file folder for
,each stock or. mutual fund that you own. Save the annual sum-
mary statement to help calculate your capital gain or loss when
shares are sold. Reconcile your bank checking account I tate-
ment monthly .
$ Insure against large financial risks - Review your in-
surance coverage periodically. !Family needs change over time,
such as the reduced need for life insurance due to grown chil-
dren who are no longer dependents. Be sure to cover risk such
as liability, disabilit- and loss of bread% inner's income.
$ Invest for long term growth - History tells u: that you'll
earn a higher return in stocks or grow% th mutual funds that invest
in stock, over 10 years or more than an) other asset:class.
$ Live below your means - This one is so hard for most
Americans; it means spend less than you earn and use the dif-
ference to reduce debt and/or sax e for future financial goals. Try
-to keep track of your spending by recording everN purchase for
a month. The easiest way to-do this is to carry around a small
spiral bound notebook. It may seem like a chore at first, but if
.you are honest with ourself. you may be shocked to see where
� your money goes. Once you ha% e done this. you can begin to re-
arrange your spending habits. .
$ Borrow smart - "Shop" at least three lenders before ap-
plying for a loan or credit. Compare the annual percentage rate
(ARP), various fees and other loan features. Transfer existing
credit balances to a lower-rate creditor or ask an existing credi-
tor'to reduce your rate. Always repay the amount owed quickly
to reduce interest charges.
$ Set specific financial goals - Determine what you want,
.when you want it, and how much it costs. For example. you de-
*cide you want to save a down payment of $5,000 for the pur-
.chase of a new car in 2003. Once your goal is specific, you can
then di, ide theimonths in to the dollar amount to,seewhat you
need to sai e each month.
$ Get educated - Take some time to learn about personahlfi-
-nance. You can take a class, read books, magazine articles or
consult a certified financial planner. The extension service has
a. wealth of information on money management and we are just
a phone call away.
$ Think Positive - When facing financial challenges, hav-
'ing a positive attitude in important. You can give up and say "I'll
ieyer save enough money" or you can resolve to take action to
improve your life. People who think positive generally experi-
ence greater success because they believe that there is a connec-
-tion between -,hat the% do today and what will happen in the fu-
'tuire. '
* For more information on managing money, contact the
Madison County Extension Service.

,Senio r Tri up cont from Page' A

Killingsworth said that the plan called for two additional
days to allow the students to be administratively excused. The,
firSt three days of the trip allow the students to use their three un-
excused absences they are allowed during a school year.
, "I told them if they squander those three, it's just too bad,"
Killingsworth said.
The school board approved School Advisory Council mem-
bers for the 2006-2007 school year.
; The board voted to advertise revisions to the district parent
involvement policy.
: Board members voted 3-2 to adopt a supplement for assis-
'tant principals .who are providing coverage for Madison County
Central School Principal Sam Stalnaker in his absence. Stal-
naker, a colonel in the U.S. Army Reserves, has been deployed
to Afghanistan.
S The school board approved revisions to the organizational
chart and approved personnel changes.


County Commission

Approves Site Plan

And Amendment For

New Dentist's Office
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
:. The Madison County Commission unanimously approved
the Planning and Zoning Board' recommendation to accept a
sniall-scale amendment presented by local dentist Clint Rogers.
The amendment will change the land, located off Captain
Brown Road, from agricultural to commercial.
: In other action, the board approved a Tourist Development
.Council grant application for Greenville Country Christmas.
The grant was for $950. TDC tax dollars are generated from
people who stay at local motels, inns or campgrounds.
The board also approved fixing Hickory Grove Road at a
,cost of $31,000. There are currently cracks in the asphalt. Nor-
man Herndon brought the problem with Hickory Grove Road to
.their attention at the meeting.


to $2.28 this week, the prices hae lowered.
In Tallahassee, last Friday, gas had dropped to $2.07 a gallon.
In Valdosta, Ga., gas prices had dropped to $1.99 per gallon for
regular unleaded at Sam's Club and at Moody Air Force.Base.
Madison County's gas prices hover near the national a% erage
for gasoline prices. The national average is $2.25 per gallon.
A primer on the components of the retail. price of gasoline is
featured at the Energy Information Association website:
The cost to produce and deliver gasoline to consumers in-
cludes the cost of crude oil to refiners, refinerN processing costs,
marketing and distribution costs, and finally the retail station
costs and taxes. The prices paid by consumers at the pump reflect
these costs, as well as the profit' (and sometimes losses) of refig-
ers, marketers, distributors, and retail station 'owners.
In 2005 the price of crude oil averaged $50.23 per barrel. and
crude oil accounted'for about 53 percent of the cost of a gallon of.
regular grade gasoline. In comparison, the average price for crude
oil in 2004 was $36.98 per barrel. and it composed 47 percent of
the cost of a gallon of regular gasoline. The share of the retail
price of regular grade gasoline that crude oil, costs represent
varies somewhat over time and among regions.
.Federal; State, and local 'taxes are a large component of the
retail price of gasoline. Taxes (not including conint. and local tax-
es) account for approximately 19 percent of the cost of a gallon
of gasoline. Within this national average. Federal excise taxes are
18.4'cents per gallon and State excise taxes average about 21
cents per gallon.? Also. eleven State- levy additional State sales
and othei taxes, some of which h are applied to the Federal and
State excise taxes Addiuonal local county and cit\ taxes can have
a significant impact on the price of gasoline. Refining costs and
profits comprise about 19 percent of the retail price of gasoline.
This component \aries from region to region due to the different
formulations required in different parts of the country
Distribution. marketing and retail dealer costs and profits
combined make up 9 percent of the cost of a gallon of gasoline.
From the refinerN. most gasoline is shipped first b\ pipeline to ter-
minals near cohsutmiing areas, then loaded into trucks for delivery
to indi, dual stations. Some retail outlets are ox' ned and operated
by refiners, while others are independent businesses that purchase
gasoline for resale to the public. The price on the pump reflects'
both the retailer's purchase cost for the product and the other
costs of operating the service station. It also reflects local market
conditions and factors, such as the desirability of the location and
the marketing strategy of the owner.

Minimum Wage cont from Page 1A
$6.40 per hour. Florida's minimum w% age was created in a con-
stitutional amendment approved by voters on Noxember 2, 2004,
and covers all emplo\ ees in the state covered by the federal min-
imum wage.
The increase in the minimum wv age for this year represents a
4.2 percent change in the federal consumer price index for urban
wage earners and clerical workers in this region for the 12-month
period prior to, September 1, 2006. Florida's new minimum wage
\ III be $1.52 more than the current $5.15 federal minimum wage.
Employers must pay their employees a wage not less than the
amount of the hourly state minimum wage for all hours worked
in Florida.
For "tipped employees" meeting eligibility requirements for
the tip credit, employers may count tips actually received as.
wages earned, but the employer must pa\ "tipped employees" a
direct wage in an amount equal to the minimum wage of $6.67
minus $3.02 or a direct hourly wage of $3.65 on January 1, 2007.


Safe Schoo S cont from Page 1 A
particular time.
Miller said that the EOP had been given out to all principals,
who reviewed it n ith their staff and teachers and each teacher
will have a cop) in his-or her classroom.
Incidents covered in the EOP include drug incidents, sui-
cides, fire, and serious injury, along with other disruptions. such
as intruders and criminal acts. .
The Madison County School Board was supposed to vote on
a Connect-ED system on Tuesday e ening. .October 17. The
Connect-ED System will allow thousands of numbers to be di-
aled at any time for an emergency situation, .
Miller pointed out that the system could also be used'to send
out messages about school functions and other things.
According to www.schoolsecurity.org, there were 27 identi-
fied school-related violent deaths last year.
* Total Deaths: 27
* Breakdown by Type:
,* Shooting: 15
* Suicides: 1
* Murder-Suicide: 4
* Fight-Related: 0
* Stabbing: 3
* Other: 4
The site also states that there were 85 shootings that did not
result in death and 238 other high-profile crime or crisis inci-
dents last year.
While some of the violence was in larger cities, the site also
identifies violence in small rural areas.
The school shootings last month in the Pennsylvania Amish
school were committed in a rural area.
[-E .1


Sailing Down The River

Of Memories
Did you ever go sailing down the river of memories' - of
course you did. Our memories began at a very young age. We re-
member our 12-year old uncle playing ball with us when we
were only two where we lived in a big old w white house in South
Georgia which had a large slanting red clay front yard, a couple
of huge pecan trees and lots of azaleas. We were staying with my
grandmother %while mother Xas employed as a nanny by a rich
lady %%ho traveled a lot and took her babs evenerwhere. Of course
%we became completely spoiled. since both Mama" and Uncle
Jack kept us on a pedestal. That ended quickly) when Mother re-
turned permanently. The first time she saxw us fall to the floor
and hold our breath ul we turned blue. she calmly walked to the
kitchen for a glass of %water and threat it in our face. Later when
%\e tried our screaming and dancing act. she brought in a small,
keen peach tree sw itch and said. "Well. little lady. I see you like
to dance, so let me see you dance!" And. did we dance! Butnev-
a er agan did %%e tr. either of those tricks - we always were fast
learner! We also occasionally catch fragmentary glimpses of
things e\en earlier.
Then of course the older we 'grow, the more our truiik of
memories fills and the more vii'id they seem. We have so many
%. i id memories; %%e would w% rite a book (we could write sever-
al) if we thought anyone would d read it!
W\e ha e been absent recently from the ER (thought we'd
better tell you in case you had not noticed!). We spent a couple
of weeks in Middleburg at daughter Mona's..sawi a couple of
doctors and visited the family. Also brought 'our dog Big Ben
home- Mona had been keeping him, along xwith her little Shih-
tzu, a friend's 130 pound Rottweiler and a young but full grown
American Bull dog. which she found lost in the middle of busy
CR 218 - she hasn't found his ow ner yet. She calls him Pete and
he.is very sman. loving and gentle. Someone has been training
him well. Ben, however. let them all know that he " as the boss
and he weighs just under 50 pounds.
We haven't heard much since coming home, but had two
\ eeks of Carriers and ERs to catch up on. We send heartfelt
condolences to Herb Spaulding's family - he didn't seem to
have the will to live long w without Mary. They wx'ere a wonderful
couple and we lo\ed them both.
Then the news of the Thomas tragedy - we received a call
right after it happened and haven't had an\ thing affect us so
badly in a long time. Our heart is heav3 for that family. We know
from experience that Only goodi memories \will sustain them.
, We are glad to be home - even if it may be temporary - and
glad to be in touch again.


2-1-1


cont from Page 1A


vulnerable persons (if identifying information is given; howev-
er, the caller can talk about an abuse situation without giving
specific information to the counselor.).They may also, in very
extreme circumstances, break. confidentiality if they believe
someone's life is in immediate danger..
'"This ig very rare." the hotline's website states. "No caller
should assume that Helpline 2-1-1 will attempt to send help
against their will. In the great majority of calls, even when a
caller is seriously suicidal, we protect the caller's expressed
wishes and confidentiality, even when we are worried. First,
there is often no way to find someone in trouble unless the caller
has told us the location. Second, \'e believe that, unless the risk
is very substantial, immediate, and certain, our most valuable
role is to provide a trusted source of support to people in crisis.".
According to the hotline's website the following are warn-
ing signs to look for in a suicide attempt:-
Warning Signs
While there is no single predictor of suicide, there are some
common warning signs to watch for. A suicidal person may:
* Talk about suicide, death, and/or no-reason to live.
* Be preoccupied with death and dying.
* Withdraw from friends and/or social activities.
* Have a recent, severe loss (especially a relationship), or
threat of a significant loss.
* Experiefice drastic changes in behavior.
* Lose interest in hobbies, work, school, etc.
* Prepare for death by making out a will (unexpectedly)
and final arrangements.
* Give away prized possessions.
* Have attempted suicide before.
* Take unnecessary risks; be reckless and/or impulsive.
* Lose interest in their personal appearance.
* Increase their use of alcohol or drugs.
* Express a sense of hopelessness.
* Be faced with a situation of humiliation or failure.
* Have a history of violence or hostility.
* Have been unwilling to "connect" with potential
helpers.
,Nearly everyone at some time in hlis or her life thinks about
suicide. Most people decide to live because they come to realize
that the crisis is temporary, but death is not. On the other hand,
people in the midst of a crisis often perceive their dilemma as in-
escapable and feel an utter loss of control. Frequently, they:
* Can't stop the pain
* Can't think clearly
* Can't make decisions
* Can't see any way out
* Can't sleep, eat, or work
* Can't get out of the depression
* Can't make the sadness go away
* Can't see the possibility of change
* Can't see themselves as worthwhile
* Can't get someone's attention
* Can't seem to get control


Excavating & Tractor Service
(850) 973-6326 * Paul Kinsley









4A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


Friday, October 20, 2006


LOCAL& REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER


Man Arrested For


Disorderly Conduct
A Madison man was ar-
rested Tuesday.evening, Octo-
ber 17, and charged with dis-
Sorderly conduct.
According to a Madison
Police Department report, Pa-
trolman Reggie Alexander re-
sponded to backup the Madi-
son County Sheriff's Office at 5 .. .
the sight of a large brawl in the . +
Drive-In Trailer Park. When
he was there, people came up
to him and began telling him Isaac Cooks, Jr.
what had happened.
Alexander attempted to get several people to return to their,
homes. Isaac Cooks, Jr. stated that it was a public drive, mean-
ing he didn't have to leave.
As Alexander pulled Cooks aside, Cooks cursed at him and
told him that he (Cooks) had a law degree.
Alexander arrested Cooks and transported him to the Madi-
son County Jail.

Bronson Announces Arrest Of

Auto Shop Operator In Theft
Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson today announced the arrest of a St. Peters-
burg auto. shop operator in the theft of auto parts and cash he re-
fused to refund for work not completed.
An investigation by Bronson's Office of Agriculture Law
Enforcement (OALE) into the June theft identified thd suspect
as.Willie James Franklin Jr., of Franklin's Professional Car Care,
who was arrested on a warrant on Monday. Franklin was
charged with grand theft, a third-degree felony, in connection
with a motor vehicle repair in Saint Petersburg. Franklin was
booked into the Pinellas County Jail and placed under a $10,000
bond. ' .- .u '; oj -!, .
According to.OALE investigators, Franklin requested and
received $1,000 and new suspension parts from a consumer who
wanted his vehicle painted and the suspension parts replaced.
Authorities say that Franklin never completed the repair and did
not return the money or auto parts he obtained from the victim.-
The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Ser-
vices, which Bronson heads, regulates motor vehicle repair
shops in Florida. Consumers who want to check on the regis-
tration status of such shops, check their complaint histories or
file a complaint against a shop can call the department's toll-free
helpline at 1-800-HELPFLA (1-800-435-7352).



Certificates of Deposit

Provided by Keith Hargrove, State Farm
FIXED RATE
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT
Effective from Annual Percentage
10/18/2006- 101/24/206 Interest Rates Yield APY
90-day** 4.64% 4.75%
1807day** 4.78% 4.90%
1-year 5.02% . 5.15%
2-year 5.21% 5.35%
3-year 5.21% 5.35%
4-year 4.88% 5.00%
5-year 4.97% 5.10%
*Jumbo CDs are available. **IRA Certificates of
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JUMBO FIXED RATE
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT
Effective from Interest Rates A P.
10/182006 - 1)/24.20006 ild |APY I
90-day** 4.64% 4.75%
180-day** 4.78% 4.90%
1-year 5.02% 5.15%
2-year 5.21% 5.35%
3-year 5.21% 5.35%
4-year 4.97% 5.10%
5-year 5.07% 5.20%
* Minimum opening deposit required for a Jumbo CD is $100,000.
** IRA Certificates of Deposit qre not available in 90-day and 180-day terms.


Scientists Discover
Madison County...
Simple Solution To Make -


Meth Ingredient Useless
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Iowa has found a way to combat the theft of anhydrous am-
monia, an agricultural fertilizer. The fertilizer is used in the mak-
ing of methamphetamine. Anhydrous ammonia tanks are com-
monly stolen by people involved in the illicit manufacture of
methamphetamine, also known as crystal meth, crank, speed and
ice. Some drug officers in the North Florida area have dubbed
the illegal synthetic drug "Suwannee River Slimfast."
' The fertilizer, which is rarely used now in Madison County,
is sold in Georgia to farmers who have permits for its use.
According to the Center for Disease Control, anhydrous am-
monia is a hydroscopic compound, which means that it seeks.
water from the nearest source, including the human body. This
-attraction places the eyes, lungs, and skin at greatest risk be-
cause of their high moisture content, Caustic burns result when.
the anhydrous ammonia dissolves into body tissue.
Most deaths from anhydrous ammonia are caused by severe
,damage to the throat and lungs from a direct blast to the face.
When large amounts are inhaled, the throat,swells shut and vic-
tims suffocate. Exposure to vapors or liquid also can. cause
blindness..
An additional concern is the low boiling point of anhydrous
ammonia. The chemical freeZes-on contact at room, temperature.
It will cause bums similar to, but more severe than, those caused
by dr ice. .
Under normal temperature and air pressure, anhydrous am-
monia is a colorless gas. However, anhydrous ammonia is used
and transported under pressure as a liquid. All equipment used
for applying or transferring liquid anhydrous ammonia must be
designed for use under high pressure to avoidruptures or breaks.
Anhydrous ammonia has a distinct odor, which humans can
detect in concentrations as small as 5 parts per million (ppm).
When used as a fertilizer, anhydrous ammonia has a concentra-
tion of about 1,000,000 ppm. Brief exposure to concentrations
of 2,500 to 6,500 ppm can result in death.
How is Iowa solving.the theft problem? Retailers there are
adding calcium nitrate to the anhydrous ammonia. An acciden-
tal discovery by two Iowa State University "professors revealed
that adding the calcium nitrate to the fertilizer would render the
drug virtually useless in the production of crystal meth.
According to the Iowa State University website:
"The Iowa State chemists and their team of graduate stu-
dents discovered a way. to make anhydrous ammonia fertilizer
useless as an ingredient for methamphetamine. All it takes is
some calcium nitrate - a common fertilizer compound - added to
the anhydrous ammonia and the yield of meth drops, from .42
percent of total ingredient weight down to 2 percent or less.
i,.,,"The disco\erN was made about four. years, agpo and has
since been subject to rounds of testing .by the state's Division of'
Criminal Investigation, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administra-
tion and the U.S. Department of Transportation.
"Calcium nitrate can now be added to anhydrous ammonia
tanks in Iowa on a voluntary basis. The state estimates that treat-
ing all of the state's 26,000 anhydrous ammonia tanks twice a
year would cost ag retailers about $1.2 million annually."

Fort White Man Arrested For

Possession Of Drug Paraphernalia
On Friday, October 13th,
Suwannee County Sheriff's
Deputy Will Johnson arrested
Zachary Tyson Hennessy, 21,
180 SW Wells Street, Fort ' .
White, FL. Hennessy was
charged with possession of '
drug paraphernalia.'
According to the Suwan-
nee County Sheriff's Office, I
while on routine patrol on CR , . .
49 in the vicinity of 204th / I
Street, Deputy Johnson Zachary Tyson Hennessy
stopped Hennessy's vehicle. A
search of the vehicle revealed a small pipe in his front pocket
and two clear plastic sacks with residue in them that appeared to
be cannabis.
Hennessy was arrested and transported to the Suwannee
County Jail. His bond was set at $250.00. He was able to obtain
a surety bond through a local bonding agency and was released.


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10/12/06
Arthur Lee McDaniel -
V.O.P. (county)
Emanuel Brezon Gill-
yard - V.O.P. (circuit)
Ann Decearvae Riffins -
V.O.P. (county)
Ira Lee Denson - V.O.P.


(circuit)
Barry
Contempt
Support).

10/13/06
Willie


Alonzo Terry -
of Court. (Non



James Brantley -


Out of County Warrant
Marvin Rashawn House
- ,Aggravated Battery on a
Pregnant Person, Battery
(Felony), V.O.P. (circuit)
Denny Fredenck Arnold
- Petit Theft, Failure to Ap-
pear-Arraignment, Burglary
of a Structure
Meahason Yoganda
Baldwin - V.O.P. (circuit)
W\illiam Grady Harrel-
son - V.O.P. countt \
Alphonso Cherry
V.O.P. (county)

10/14/06
Joseph Kenneth Crea-
mons - D.W.L.S. Revoked or
Canceled, D.U.I.-Felony,
Refusing to. Take a Citation
Dave Newton Barfield -
V.O.P. (county)
Elid Hernandez Alfaro -
No Valid or Expired Drivers
License, D.U.I.
Bernice Mattiar Davis -
No Valid or Expired Drivers


License, Grand Theft


10/15/06
Gordan Demond Lewis -
Possession of Cocaine with
Intent to Sell
Lillian Laveme Ramirez
- Attaching Tag not As-
signed, No Motor Vehicle
Registration
Miguel Mendez Perez -
No Valid or Expired Drivers
License, Attaching Tag not
Assigned
Mauricio Hernand Her-
nandez - No Valid or Expired
Drivers Litense

10/16/06
Janyta Miranda Johnson
- Failure to Appear-Pretrial
Patricia Lee Shanahan -
V.O.P. (county), V.O.P.
(county), V.O.P. (county)
Tony Anthony Holley -
D.W.L.S. Revoked or Can-
celed
Alphenia Lengre Red-
dick - V.O.P. (circuit)

10/17/06
George Johnson - V.O.P.
(circuit)
Terrance Lashawn
Phillips - V.O.P. (county)
Michael Dnarion Rowe -
V.O.P. (circuit)
Renard Antoine Dou21as
- V.O.P. (circuit)
Isaac Cooks, Jr. - Disor-
derly Conduct
Antiono Shavez Johnson
- Writ of Bodily Attachment


Branford Man Arrestedf:or

Burglary While Armed

On Sunday, October 15th,
Suwannee County Sheriff's
Deputy Bobby Akey arrested,
Paul Calvin Gunter, 23, 4373
288th Street, Branford, FL.
Gunter was charged with bur-
glary while armed, grand theft
firearm and dealing in stolen \ (
property.
According to the Suwan- .
nee County Sheriff's Office,
on Saturday, October 14th,
Gunter and an accomplice en-,
tered an unoccupied residence Paul Calvin Gunter
in Branford and burglarized it. They allegedly took a golf cart,
two television sets and a firearm. When Deputy Akey went to
Gunter's residence he denied having entered the residence but
the golf cart was found on his property. He told the deputy that
he and his friend had gone to Alachua County and sold one of
the television sets. The owner of the residence, 'who is out of.
town, called to mention that her neighbor had checked the resi-
dence and a .357 Magnum pistol was also missing. Gunter de-
nies having taken it but mentioned that his companion could
have taken it. The pistol has not been recovered at this time.
Gunter was arrested and transported to the Suwannee Coun-
ty Jail. His bond was set at $7,500.00.

Live Oak Man Arrested


For Domestic Violence

On Friday, October 13th,
Suwannee County Sheriff's
Deputy Chuck Tompkins ar-
rested James Edward McKen-
non, 28, 10323 198th Place,
Live Oak, FL. McKennon was
charged with battery (domestic
violence).
According to the Suwan-
nee County's Sheriff's Office,
at approximately 9:38 a.m.
Deputy Tompkins was dis-
patched to talk to a woman re-
garding a battery. She told him James Edward
that McKennon had become. McKennon
angry with her earlier and she had asked him to leave the resi-
dence. He allegedly got into her vehicle and refused to get out
and spit in her face several times as she was driving him to a rel-
ative's home. She had left him at the relative's residence but
when the deputy called they told him he was not there anymore.
He was located walking on Ada Street and Jenkins Avenue.
McKennon was arrested and transported to the Suwannee
County Jail. His bond has been set at $1,000.00.


STATE FARM SELECT AGENT
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(- (850) 973-6641
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Friday, October 20, 2006


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AROUND MADISON COUNTY


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5A


Went Gives Birth To Road Warrior
By Jes'salyn Covell .
Greene Publishing. Inc. r h. i
Lisa tWenur and Jon Ste-
nier had full intentions of their
babN boy being born at South
Georgia NMedical Center. but ,
on Sunday, -September 24 at .
11:27.p.m. Lisa Wentz had a
pleasant surprise.
SShe felt strange and told
her husband to stop the car and
call an ambulance. On a dirt
road, named Grassy Pond, just
butsi e of Lake Park, Georgia.
Lisa Wentz ga\e birth to her
son all by herself ..
Stenier was talking to the '-
Sdispatcher on the phone %% hen His mom Lisa Wentz, delivered Kynan Christopher
he heard tdie babN crN ing and Steiner on September 24, 2006. (Photo submitted)
Sent to help \Ventz take care of their ne% born.
The ambulance arrived approxiniatelh fie minutes later and took new\ morm W\Ventz and new
baby Kvnan Christopher Steiner to Valdosta. Morn. dad and ne\\ baby are all doing fine after their
:"roadside" experience. K\ nan is kno% n as the "'road % arrior".
K\nan',s grandparents are Keith and Janet Wentz and John and Debra Steiner.


W i\h special thanks. this
extra special thank :, ou note is
sent to e% ern one. Today holds
more appreciation than an\
Swords can sa. You'll neer be
forgotten. We thank %ou for
your gifts, prayers and the
thoughtfulness you've show\n.
"But He wt'as pierced fir
our transgressions, He was
crushedil four oineqiiti. s; the
punisiunent that brought us
peace was upon Him, and by
his wounds, we are. healed" .
-Isaiah 53:5

Mr: and Mrs. Sitinmie Charles
Thomas and finily









maseoienys


OmTUARIES

Mary Chi0gouns


Mary Chiagouris Bevan
passed away on Sunday, Octo-
ber 15, 2006 at the age of 80 in
:N Madison. She 'grewl up in-
SChlucago, Illinois. one of three
children, born -to. parents
Wilham and Bessie, who emi-
grated there from Greece.
Even though she was a
resident of Madison County
for a few short months, her
love of the area began in the
1960s. \%hen she married
Madison native Ste% e Bevan in
New York City.. Prior to com-
ing to Madison, Mary lived in
Delray Beach for four years.
She is survived by a
daughter, Kell\ Evan Spirer,
her husband Peter and grand-
children named Samuel Peter
Spirer and Rachel Bevan Spir-
er, of Los Angeles, California;.
a brother, Ernest Chiagouris .of
Valparaiso, Indiana, and friend
and caregiver, Linda Postell,
of Madison. . ,
Mary had a deep love for
her family, jazz, animals, and
was a voracious reader. She
was a member of Park Avenue
United Methodist Church in
New York City. The family re-
spectfully requests that in lieu
of flowers, donations be given
to: The Oaks School Vision
Fund, 6817 Franklin Avenue,
Hollywood, California, 90028


Beftha Mae

Wright

'Bertha Mae Wright, age
40, died Saturday, October 14,
2006 in Tallahassee. Services
will be held at 1:00 p-m Satur-
day, October 21 af New Hope
Primitive Baptist- Church in
Greenville. with burial to fol-
low in Wigginsville Cemetery.
The family will receive friends
from 2:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Friday, October 20 at Tillman
Funeral Home..
Ms. \\ right \\as a lifelong
resident of Greenxille's Sir-
: ans community and was a
longtime employee -of the As-
sociation.of Retarded Citizens.
Survivors include a
daughter, Tamika Wright;
mother, Millie Miller; sisters,
Pearlie Mae Wright, Judy
Wright, Fannie Williams, He-
len Miller, Earlean Bozeman
and Vivan Miller; brothers,
Billy Joe Wright,' Tomrmy
Miller, Howard Miller and Jer-
ry Miller, along with several
nieces, nephews, other rela-
tives and friends.
Bertha was predeceased
by her'father, Ezell Miller, Sr.,
brother Ezell Miller, Jr. and
sister, Lucretia Miller Ford.

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October 20
Aucilla Christian Acadenmyi
11ill be holding their Fall Festi\ al
from 3-6 p.m. Their Fall Festiial
will be featuring tLerime baskets.
games, food, a haunted house and
more! . .
October 20
The Senior Citizens of Nladi-
son County will be having a tal-
ent show at the Senior Citizens
Center .from 10 to Noon. For
more niforiiation. or to enter, call
Joan Beck. 973-2-121 or Deloris
Jones, 973-2823
October 21
North Florida Commu nirt
College is offering a 32-hour
Parnamedic refresher course tfor li-
censed professionals. Includes a
two'hour HIV/AIDS update re-
quired by the state'for recertifica-
" ti. e 'Tfiecoiire- cn5istts of four
classsessiofs'eIes do appl,. 'For'
more information, call 973-1629'
or HackleG@nfcc.edu
October 21
The Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society's 21st Annual PET
SHOW, will. be held at the Live
Oak Fairgrounds Coliseum to
raise funds for the Animal Shelter
near Lee. There are 31 fun con-
tests to enter your dog or cat. Win
ribbons and be eligible for best in
show trophies. 'Registration be-
gins at 10. a.m. and contests start
at 11. Lunch, -raffles, baked.
goods, adoptable animals and
more. For more information, call
the shelter at 971-9904.or toll free
866-236-7812.
October22
New Testament Christian
Center (NTCC) will be hosting
Hallelujah Night on October 22
and 29 from 4-7 p.m. NTCC will
also be hosting Hallelujah Night
on October 29 from 5-9 p.m. and
October 31 from 5 p.m. until. It
will be held at 231 SW Rutledge
St., the big white house next to
the dry cleaners. For more infor-
mation, please contact NFCC at
973-8547 or Theresa'Williams at
929-2830.
October 22
New Home Baptist Fall Re-
vival Sunday-Thursday, October
22-26. -Sunday revival begins at 6
p.m. Monday - Thursday revival


begins at 7 p.m. Special singing
every night. Special speaker
Ste\e NMcHaigue. Pastor of Fel-
lot\ ship Baptist Church. \\e are
located at 1100 S\V Mosel\ Hall
Rd., Hwy. 360. The, pastor and
congiegdtion in\ite everyone to'
attend!
October 22
Pine Grove Baptist Church
will celebrate their 150 year an-
niversary. The program will be-
gin with Sunday School at 9:45
a.m. tollov ed by the Homecom-
ing/Anniversary celebration at 11
p.m. Follow ing the service will
be a covered dish' diner on the
grounds.. ' .
'October 23
Bible Deliverance Church's.
Harvest Convention will start
with service at 7 p.m. The speak-
'er mill chrrn'ge rughrl$, starting
Viith Geoff Hill, and'followed by.
Chris Peperson, Cliarles Lasseter
and the McMackes, Dale Thig-
pen, David Addis, 'and Franklin
Barkley. Everyone is welcome!.
For more information, call 973-
6596.
October 23
TABE (Test of Adult Basic
Education) at NFCC Testing Cen-
ter (Bldg. #16), Madison, Florida.
TABE is required for acceptance
into vocational/technical pro-
grams. Photo ID required. Pre-
registration is required. Test be-
.gins at 5 p.m. To register please,
call 973-9451.
October 24
You are invited to Big Bend.
Hospice's BIRTHDAY PARTY
'at the Four Freedoms Park Gaze-
bo from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.,
Join us for birthday cake and
punch and help us celebrate our
23rd.birthday in Madison. Come
meet our new President and help
us continue our mission of pro-
viding compassionate care to
families in our community. For
more information, call Catherine
Arnold 566-7491.
October 24
The Suwannee Valley Bar-
bershop Chorus is sponsoring 4
open house/ guest nights on Tues-
day evenings Oct. 24 and 31, as
well as Nov. 7 and 14, at the
Suwannee River Regional Li-


bran at 7 p m. All men interest-
ed in learning more about this ac-
fti irt are in%\ ied to experience die
fun and camnaradene of this men's
organization. Door prizes and re-
freshments provided. For more
information, call Jack Wilson
963-5023 or Fred Phillips at 362-
1886.


A night full of Irish stories, music
and dance. Ep erience Ireland as
d A�hfn th th


* October26 1-. a wasLU'" UO.e
' The Area AgencY Aging television, and the telephone as
SThe Area Agencnative Irish stortellerTomaseen
for North Florida, Inc. will hold Foley makes us n Ireland's rich
its Advisory Council and Board. cuural heritage
of Directors meetings at 9:30 a.m.
and.10:30 a.m. For more infor- Thursda
nation, call Linda Bums at 488-
0055 or btui,,l@ddef~afi,, ,oi. | Oct. 26, 2006
October 26
Fort Mack's Old. Western 7:00 p.m.
Towin isHaunted! The last six Van H Priest Auditorium
nights in October there will be Madison, Florida
carnival games, train rides, and a i
Jump-a-Roo from 6 p.m. till.dark. Tickets on Sale NOw!
-,Food is available . Prices are . $11 adultS/$6 Child
per person and children 3 and un- 1 i
der are free,. A portion of the pro- WWW.NFCC.EDU
ceeds will benefit, the Scouts of
America' . For more information i
call 973-8377 or 973-8369 or
email ginackslade@yahoo.com I I
or micheleemack66@vahoo.com


N. november 5.

R bble Hill Plantation















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$70 45
f-I Z Reserved " general Admission

229-226-2344 www.pebblehill.com


"Locally Owned & Operated Since 1991"'


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Lic# CAC1814317 & Insured
827 NE Hickory Grove Rd. - Pinetta, FL 32350.
Jayson Williams - Owner
Sales * Service * Installation * Gas
Heat Pumps * Fuel Oil
FRFF ESTIMATES * 24 Hour Emergency Service 7 Days \ Week .cA.
Commercial & Residential * All Makes & Models







6A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing. com


Friday, October 20, 2006


It's A Cv~uraf..


By Ronda Addv * Inviting the groom to the
You have a strong Irish,,; bride's home bzefor .bthe. N\.ed-
family history. When you -get ding and cooking argooseinh his
married, you would. like your ,honor. The expression. 'his
wedding to reflect that history. goose is cooked," originated
Lucky for you, the Irish have a from this tradition.
rich cultural heritage on which * Having the bride carry a
to draw upon. . hanky that could be, turned into
The Irish have practiced a christening bonnet for the'
many W wedding traditions firstborn with a few stitches and
throughout history. Some 'of transformed back into a hanky
them include: for the firstborn to carry at their,
L..-Ltl III II \\ . 11\\1 IIllIIII Ill II I.A JII!


wedding with the cut of the.
stitchies. .
* Having the bride wear a
ireath of. wvildflowkers in her
hair from.which she would give
each bridesmaid a sprig. The
bridesmaids would plant the
sprigs, .and whoever's grew
would be married inside a year.
* Making the top tier:of the
%wedding i cake from Irish
whiskey and saving it for the
christening of the firstborn.
-' * Serving. the couple salt
and oarmeal at the beginning of
the reception..The couple would
partake of the two three times to.
ward off the evil eye.
* Serving bun rartv meade,
a-honey wine which Was be-
lieved to promote virility, at the
reception.
* Giving a bell as a gift. The
bell's chimes were believed to
keep evil spirits away, restore
harmony when the couple was
fighting and termind them of
their -edding \%os.
* Having 'the mother-in-law
of the bride break a piece of,


wedding, cake over the head of
the bride as she entered' the
house.so they would be friends
for life...
* Having the newlyweds
drink from special goblets for a
month after the wedding to pro-
tect the bride from fairies look-
ing to kidnap her. The bride also
had to keep both of her feet off
the floor while dancing at the
reception to prevent the fairies
from getting her.

Many Irish wedding tradi-
tions revolved around luck. It
%\ a'. considered bad luck if:
* The bride wore green
* The groom sang
* The couple got married on
a Saturday .
* The couple washed their
hands at the same time in the
.same sink ,
* The couple or a guest met
a funeral on the road
* The couple or a guest
heard a cuckoo or saw three
magpies
* The couple or a guest
broke a glass on the wedding,
day
* The first person to wish
the couple joy was a woman
It was considered good
luck if:
* The bride carried a horse-
shoe
'* The couple got married
during a growing moon and a
flowing tide
* A guest threw an old shoe
over the bride's head as she left
the church
Depending. upon how far
you want to go, you can incor-
porate one or .many of these
Irish traditions in your wed-
ding. You can also add other
Irish touches to your wedding.
You can work green into your
color scheme .and use sham-
rocks on your invitations and in
your centerpieces and decora-
tions. You can use Belles of Ire-
land in your flowers and play
Irish or Celtic music during
your ceremony or reception.
You can have the groom and
groomsmen wear kilts and
choose a Claddagh ring as your
engagement or Wedding ring.
You can serve traditional Irish
food at your reception, like
corned beef and cabbage, Irish
soda bread, and mead or dark
beer.
By incorporating Irish tra-
ditions and touches into your
wedding, you can honor your
cultural heritage. Plus, you can
give your wedding a special
twist that will make it all the
more memorable.


Jie J'2erson .2j rw0 n


6nyayemen/

Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Henderson, Jr. of Tar

ment of their daughter, Melissa Dawn Hen-
derson, to Daniel James Brown, of Camp
Lejeune, North Carolina. Dan is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. James W. Brown of Lee, Flori-
da.
Dawn is the granddaughter of Mr. and
S Mrs. Cade. Sherwood of Rowland, North Car-[
olina and Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy Henderson, SJr.ofTar
of Lumberton, North Carolina. announce the engage-
Lejeune, North Carolina. Dan is the grandson of Mrs. Elvira W.
Brown and the late Walter M. Brown of Lee, Flori-
Florida .and the late Mr. and Mrs. Leon M.
dMason,Sr. of Tallahassee, Florida.
.Dawn is a 2001 graduate, of Tar Heel. and
MrHigh School, Tar Heel, NorthCarolina. She Car-
olreceived her BA in 2005 from Campbell Uni-, Sr.
of Lversity, Buies Creek, North Carolina, and is

ture at the University of North Carolina at
BroWilmington. She has been employed as a pri-Lee,
S.vate tutor and a teacher of English and Histo-. Leon M.
ry at Life Academy in Wilmington, North
SMaso Sr. of Tallahassee, Flria.





Dawn is a 2002 graduate of Madison Countyar Heel
High School, Madison, Florida, Dan is a Cor-She
poral, United States Marine Corps, Field Mil- s
itary Policeman with the 26th Marine Expedi-a at
tionary Unit. Dan is a veteran employof Operation
,Iraqi Freedom and Operation Iraqi Enduring
Freedom.
vaThe wedding is planned for Novemberf English and Histo-
18, 2006 at 3:00 p.m. at the Tar Heel Baptist
Church, Tar Heel, North Carolina.da, Dan is a Cor-
Church, Tar Heel, North Carolina.


Life Insurance.

SMarriage changes a lot of things in your life -
- Like your insurance needs. Let Farm Bureau
Insuraiice take care of all the details for you.

For prompt personal attention, Give us a call! .
Helping You Is \\hat We Do Best.







Serving Madison. Jefferson. & Taylor Counties
Freddy Pit s - Agency Manager
Jimmy King - Agent
233 W. Base St.. Madison (850) 973-4071
105 \. Anderson St., Monticello (8501 997-2213
Lauren Lilliot - Agent
813 S. Washington St.. Perry (850) 584-2371


I-I .,l. I. 17.,..,,. ,,,.II I







www.greenepublishing. corn


Friday, October 20, 2006


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7A


Aifteryow say,

"I Do"...

"We Do"
3 Locations To Serve You
3115N. Oak St. Ext
229-244.2471
1301 Baytree Road
229-2425.8640
2181N. Ashley St
229.242-8758


By Ronda Add) :
Best friends since kindergarten, the two of you always.said
you were going to be brides at the same time and get married in
a double ceremony. As you got older, it looked like your dream
wasn't going to happen. But through some strange cosmic event;
each of you was proposed to at the same time. You can have the
double wedding you talked about after, all. .
SWhile double �weddines are not ven common, there are
some benefits to ha% ing one. With someone to share the work-
load and the expenses. couples can hia\e a bigger wedding than
they ever thought possible. Plus, they have someone to share
equally in their excitement. Hoow e\ er. double weddings do take
some work. .
A double wedding involves tw ice as man\ people. In addi-
tion to two brides and two grooms. there are two best men, two
maids of honor, two sets of friends and family, and four sets of
parents. Communication bet% ween the groups is of the utmost im-
portance.
In order for things to ko, smoothly. both couples need to
have similar ideas regard ns the wedding. All concerned parties
'should meet early on to'discuss important issues, like dress
styles, number of guests/ style of the wedding, and ultimately,
money\ Once those issues are .\' worked out, the couples 1 ill need
to find an officiate who is willing to perform a double ceremo-
ny.
Given that most churches have space limitations, both cou-
ples will need to set a lirnit on the number of guests to invite. As
for invitations, each couple may choose their own and send them
out separately, as long as they do so at the same time.
Unless the locat ion where the wedding is being held has two
aisles, the couples w ill have to decide which bride goes first. Ac-
cording to custom, the oldest usually goes first. The order the
brides, come down the aisle generally determines the order the
vows are taken and the register is signed. However, none of this.
is carved in stone.
At the reception, the couples will need separate receiving
lines and gift tables. Everything else is up in the air. If they want,
each couple may have their own head table, wedding cake and
performances of wedding traditions. On the other hand, they can
opt for one large head table, wedding cake and simultaneous
performances of wedding traditions.
A double wedding in- ..
volves twice as many people
and often twice as much work. ."
However, withsome effort, the .
day can be twice as much fun
and be twice as memorable. .-------. legghan
" .�."? A. '4 - Si h MS egghan
�WiMiB""1 _q ". .. ., Scheetz and


-A


. b






XCezlie


.1 , 9








S


BRIDAL,

PAGEANTS.
& PROMS
Gowns by...
Maggie Sottero,
Mary's, Jasmine
and more!
351 Northside Drive
Valdosta, GA
229-244-1619
Mon.-Fri. 10-6 * Sat. 10-5


A


P 1


In Honor of the 50th Wedding Annii ersary
of Al (Buddi) & Virginia Murphy,
. Their sons Al, Jr.. Jerr. 'and granddaughter.
Caitlin, would like to invite all of their friends
and family to a reception in their honor.

Faith Baptist Church
Fellowship Hall
1135 East U.S. 90
Madison, Florida
Saturday, the twenty-first day of October
Two thousand six
From 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.


No local invitations
will be sent out.


.-
.9 . ,-.
'U-.
~
24 ..~.'.. ,,..',..
/ .4,.. -�.


Elizabeth
Christopher A


Lee Brooks were joined in
I marriage in a double ring
ceremony on Friday, July
2Sth at 4:30 in the after-
noon at Holy Family
Catholic Church in Jack-
sondille. Florida. Father
John O'Hara officiated at
the wedding mass. The
bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Richard Scheetz
of Madison, Florida. The
groom is the son of Mr. and .
NIMrs Terry Brooks of
Grand Junction, Colorado.
NMlay Susan Schwartz
ofl Amhert. Massachusetts, a
close friend of the bride, was the
Nlaid of Honor. Bridesmaids in- ,
eluded Rebecca Miller, another
close Iriend of the bride from .
Green' ille. Florida, and the
bride's sisters: Melissa Scheetz
of Tampa. Florida, Marie
Scheetz ot Charlotte, North Car-
olina. and Monique Scheetz of
tladi,son. The flower girl was Ms. Morgan Renfro,
daughter ot Art and Paul Renfro of Jacksonville.
Nlichael Brooks, brother of the Groom, from
Saint .Auiustine, Florida, served as the Best Man.
Close friend, of the Groom served as the groomsmen.
The\ included Casey Dodson, of Grand Junction, Col-
orado. and Ross Pickles of.Pinetta, Florida. The ring
bearer .'. s Reid Manabat, son of Mike and Stephanie
.Miunabat of Neptune Beach, Florida.
! Honored guests included Susan and Tiffany Wet-


Ringbearers 1/2 Price
with 7 ina Rentals






Making The Best


6


Responsible Choices
SBy RondoaAddy
Planning a wedding is difficult, even for those who are or-
ganized. That's why the bride has a maid of honor and brides-.
maids to help her andthe groom has a best man and groomsmen
to help him. When. choosing your best man and groomsmen,
make sure you select indi% iduals \\ho are responsible enough to
,o handle the assigned duties.
" While there are no hard and fast rules as to whom you
Should choose to be your best man and groomsmen, etiquette
suggests you include your brother, the bride's brother and your
.closest friends. If ou or the bride has more than one brother or
you have several close friends, the matter is more complicated.
DO In that case, choose the indi iduals who are closest to you and
keep in mind that they do not have to be male. It is not unheard.
of to have a female friend be your best man or a groomsman. Re-
gardless whom you, choose, each will have duties to perform.
S . The best man has many duties. They include:
* Planning'and paying for the bachelor party
* Renting a tuxedo and attending a-by fittings
S *Ateniding the rehearsal and rehearsal dinner
* Transporting gifts to the ceremony and. reception
* Helping the groom get ready for the ceremony and making
sure the) get to the church on time., - ; -,: '
� "Padying the ofticiate before the %\eddJn ... ..
. * holding the bride's \% wedding ring if there is no ringbearer
* Signing the marriage license
* Walking down the aisle with, the maid of honor and danc-
ing with her at the reception
* Giving the first toast to dthe bride and groom
* Taking the gifts to the bride and groom's home
* Returning all of.the tuxedos on time.


Groomsmen have many duties in preparation fo.r the wed-
ding. They include:
* Renting a tuxedo and attending an) findings
* Assisting the best man with whatever he needs, including
planning and paying for the bachelor party and transporting gifts
to the bride and groom's home
* Attending the rehearsal and rehearsal dinner
* Helping load and unload decorations, food and other items
at the, ceremony and reception
* Decorating the wedding
,/ /car
c * Helping seat the guests at
S. the wedding if-there are no
, ushers, especially the mothers
- ---- . . of the bride and the groom


.^B^. ~zel from Sacramento, r- ,'i,
California, Michelle
Cummingham from
Blackhawk, Col- .
orado; Gerard and
Deya Scheetz from A
Grand Junction, Col-
orado; Joan O'Connor
from Seattle, . Wash-
ington; Dan and
Miryan . O'Connor
from Glade Park, Col-
. - orado; and Dave O'-
., Connor; Brian C'-
14 Connor; and Lin
Sours from Houston.
Texas. .
DnGerard Scheetz.
Dan O'Connor, and Alen

during the service.
The parents of the Bride
hosted the reception fo,:llo,,- ..
ing the wedding at the Jack-
. sonville Garden Club.
. Beautiful. harp music ,.as'
h played throughout the . re-
ception by Stephanie Turner.
Prior to the wedding, a bridesmaids' luncheon
was held at the Casa Marina in Jacksonville and the .
Groom's parents hosted the rehearsal dinner at Nlag-
gianios, also in Jacksonville.
The couple went to the East.Coast for their hon-
eymoon. They are presently residing in Grandl Jtune-
tion, Colorado, where the bride is employed at Lirncoln
Park Elementary School as a first grade teacher and
the groom is employed as a Deputy by the Me'S. Cun-..C - _
ty Sheriff's Department.


* Rolling out the white or
red carpet for the bride to walk
on as she comes down the aisle.
* Dancing with the brides-
maids and any single female
guests at the reception

As you make your decision,
try to select individuals who
can perform these duties and
afford the costs involved.
Make certain that they under-
stand that there is a great deal
of responsibility involved, and
once they accept it, they can-
not back out- later without
causing you problems.
Both the best man and the
groomsmen play valuable
roles in the wedding. Don't se-
lect individuals who can't live
up to those roles. Make re-
sponsible choices.


0% lis h o p

CLEANERS
ow N j


Wedding Gown
Cleaning, Pressing &
Heirlooming.

Valdosta, Georgia


Seeing Double








8A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com.



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Friday, October 20, 2006


M&M Motors Relocates In Madison


Bx Jessaln Covell
Greene Publishing. Inc.
On Monda\. October 9.
M&MN Motors. ow ned by
Richard Maurice relocated
from their location off of
High\ta\ 145 to 178 N.E.
Du\al A enue in Madison.
M&NI Motors decided
to make the move for a bet-
ter location closer to Nladi-
son residents and a ne\ker
building to help better as-
sist Madison customers.
NI&NI Motors says it
provides a minimum of 30
qualitN pre-o\~ned vehicles


BEDRooMs




....ap


Dana Kotowski, left; Richard Maurice, center, own-
er of M&M Motors; and Eva Clark, right, enjoy serving
Madison residents and look forward to seeing you at
their grand opening! (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Jessalyn Covell, October 16, 2006)


at an outstanding price, in
house financing and pro-
\ide great customer ser\ ice
Also. Dana Koto\\ski pro-
vides the rebuilding of the
complete drile train on ,e-
hicles that ma\ need it. Ko-
to[ ski has a lot of experi-
ence and has been doing
this for 23 Nears.
The business is open on
MondaN -FridaN from 9 a.m.
- 5:30 p.m. and open on


,Saturdays from 9. a.m


Vot Experience
* Leadership
Vote *Commitment
* Dedicated to
and Improving Our
Ee. ct School System
+ Elect


' utSEAN

"AIIPERMAN
Madison Cou'nty School Board, District 5
k 'JIrF par f 111 . l,~hhid I,. [l I d , ,,r l'..:L, .It


p.m.
The\ have been estab-
lished in Madison since
1992 and "ill be hosting
their Grand Opening on
Saturday. October 21 from
9 ;f.m. - 5:31) p.m. Visit
them and enjoN free re-
freshments and celebrate 14
Nears of dedication and ser-
vice to Madison Count\
iSt their ad ii 1tday 's
Remote Guide.)


Nu Omega Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., honored
Soror Jayne Scott, center, as their Soror of the Year. Soror Scott was recog-
nized for her outstanding service to the Sorority, the Church, the Community,
and to all Mankind. President (Basilus) Shirley Barfield, along with the other
members of the Sorority, presented Soror Scott with a plaque to commemorate
the occasion. Also present was her son, the Rev. Dr. E.R. Scott, left, and his
lovely wife. Soror Pamela Scott, right.


Students Informed Of MRSA Infection Precautions


Nladison County High
School and lMadison County
Central School football.play-
ers were informed of methi-
cillin resistant staph aureus in-
fections (pronounced "mersa"
by the healthcare community)
by Sherry Wisham, RN, Talla-
'hassee Memorial Hospitals
Coinmuniti Outreach and Ed-
ucation ' Coordinator on
Wednesday, September 6. This
infection can look like a spider
bite or a pimple and if not
treated, will progress into' ah'
infection that requires aggres-'


sive antibiotic treatment.
Sherry informed the s.,tu-
dents that staph Aureus lies
on our skin naturally and
when there is a scratch or tear.
if not kept clean and co\ ered.
may lead to this dangerous: in-
fection. There have been re-
cent serious problems %\ith
MRSA in many football pro-
grams throughout the nation
.and recently in Tallaha see.
Coaches must take .seri-
ousl\ the task of making sure
the equipment is as clean as
possible and the players ha\ e
their wounds covered 'itth
bandages when practicing or
playing a game to protect
.them. Handwashing, a\oid
sharing personal items such as
,towels, washcloths, deodor-
ant, razors, or uniforms are
ways to help prevent infec-
tion.
If .you have a skin sore
that 'keeps getting worse,.
make sure you consult your
doctor. Parents need to make
sure their child who plays
sports takes a warm shower
immediately after every prac-
tice and game to remove any
harmful bacteria that may be&
on their body.
Sherry also t6ok her pre-,
sentation to North Florida
Community College basket-
ball team the same day. She is
dedicated to bringing educa-
tion to the surrounding com-
munities of potential problems
that could be prevented.


DfRECTIK"WogIT I58 OFF 1-10 SOUTH ON 53SOUTH, FIRST
RIGHT ONTO OLD ST. AUGUSTINE RD, 3 MILES ON LEFT1f
Just 2 miles past the Yogi Bear Park at Fort Mack, Madison, Fl.
gmackslade@yahoo.com OR michellemack66@yahoo.com


Soror Jayne Scott


- Named Woman Of The


Yeai


Madison High School Alumni
YOU ARE INVITED!!
Please join the Madison High School
Class of 1966 (Red Devils) for their 40-year
Reunion/Sock Hop on Friday, October 20,
2006, at Jellystone Park.
Festivities begin at 6:00 p.m. The cost
is $5/per person. We will have music, line
dance instructions and lots of fun renewing
friendships with other alumni.

Please contact Howard Phillips
(H: 973-6332 or B: 973-2400) or
Martha Beggs (H: 973-6525) to
reserve your space.

Come join the festivities at
Jellystone Park on Friday, Oct. 20th!


,'W , ,,









Friday, October 20, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A


5opfle'5 VV/ T A Swcces55


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Sophie's Walk was held in Madison on September 30, be7
ginning at 7:30 a.m.
The event was to help raise money and awareness for re-
search associated with Vasa Previa, which has caused many un-
necessary deaths prior to the onset of labor.
Businesses who helped publicize or support Sophie's Walk
in Madison included Greene Publishing, Inc., Alston Kelley,
sales associate/realtor for Witmer Realty; and the Mail Poom.
Vasa previa is a rare condition in which fetal iiuraniembra-
nous blood vessels traverse the fetal membranes across the low-
er segment of the uterus between the fetus and the cervical open-
ing. These vessels may be torn at the time of libor, delivery or
when the membranes rupture. It has a high fetal mortality be-
cause of the bleeding that follows. Transvaginal' color flow
Doppler ultrasound is often used for diagnosis...
Physicians discovered that Kristen Lewis, ,the daughter of
Jim and Sylvia Catron, of Madison, had Vasa Previa prior to the
birth of her son, Chase Michael Lewis. Clihase \\as delivered
safely and is n6o\ eight months old
Over 50 cities took part in Sophie's Walk.


Participants line up for Sophie's Walk.The event was held to make people aware of Vasa Previa. (Photo sub-
mitted)


55 Alive Helps Renew Driving Skills


Chase Michael Lewis is a Vasa Previa survivor.
(Photo submitted) '


Kay Kelley, Sylvia Catron and Alston Kelley helped
with registration at Sophie's Walk. Alston Kelley pro-
vided t-shirts for the event. (Photo submitted)


Re*Elect

BART

ALFORD
Madison County School Board
District 5
.l i .l . I 1 l 'l l ', l, .I III..11. I . .. " ,..I I I l ' I .


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Puiblishiin , Inc.,
Many, older people may
be thinking, I've been driving
for a long time. Why should I
take a driving course now?"
To help save your life whether
it is their fault or not.
The 55 Alive program is
offered to residents who are 55
years of age or older and want.
to update their driving skills.
Even if an elderly person has
not been involved in a crash in
40 years, it may be tirime to re-
view driving skills. With ag-
ing, changes occur in hearing,
vision, flexibility and reaction
time. Seniors can learn to ad-


just their skills to compensate
for those changes.
. Who should rene%. their
driving skills with a 55 Alive.
Driver Refresher Course?
Does entering or exiting a
highway, changing lanes on
the highway, passing, parking
left turns, yielding the right of
way, night driving, winter dri-
ving or the frustrations of to-
day's complicated traffic both-
er you? If you have answered
"yes" to any of these ques-
tions, you may want to seri-
.ously consider taking this sig-
nificant course.
The 55 Alive Driver Re-
fresher. Course is designed to


By Kate Worth
EASY CLEAN - Everyone knows that stainless steel appli-
ances are all the rage right now. When I renovated my kitchen, I
installed stainless steel appliances. However,. I soon found they
were quite difficult to keep clean and shiny. A friend gave me this
tip: Clean.them with a little club soda on a sponge and then dry
with a soft, clean cloth. This wards off water spots and rust. "
Jamie L.

LINT REMOVER - Rubber gloves are great for getting lint
off clothes., Just put on the glove and rub your hand along the
clothing. Off comes the lint! Jane D.

DISINFECTANT - Your toilet bowl brush can harbor germs.
Thus, every time you wash out your toilet bowl, you may actual-
ly be redistributing dirt and bacteria. To avoid this, after each Use,
rinse the brush out with chlorine bleach. Also be sure to do the
same with the caddy you place the brush in. Kelly S.

BE PREPARED - It seems my kids 'always need poster
board for school projects. So as not to be caught short, I keep a
stockpile of .it. To keep the boards clean, I keep them in a plastic
garbage bag and store it away out of sight (behind a china closet
or under a bed). Rhonda P.
* * *
A-PEELING TIP - To make it easier to peel a baked sweet
potato, I rub the skin with vegetable oil before baking. When it's
done, the skin comes right off. Barbara C.


help people 55 years and over
to maintain their indepen-
dence and their driving pri% i-
leges. The 55 Alive course is
designed to help older drivers
gain more confidence behind
the wheel, improve the aware-
ness of traffic hazards, update
yourself on traffic laws and
new technology, anticipate the
actions of other drivers, identi-
fy and correct bad driving
.habits and drivers can voice
their concerns in a friendly, re-
laxed environment
To find a class closest to


Madison, ,please contact 1-
888-227-7669 or please visit
htp: .'''\\'. a rDp.or
Driving helps seniors
keep their independence - 55
Alive helps them protect it.

Hav you been turneddow
forSoiaSeurftor1S


' NVomen 's



SJfHealCtfi

ATr inrvestment for- todacfy aind-
the future


Call CCodacy for MViore Information or
a Freee VWomen's Jl-ealCth Screening

Madison County Health Department
Mary Mosley
850-973-5000
group Presentations Available on, Request

,,a i,�ia . START
Jefferson, Mvadisorn, acnd 'Tay lor County 3-1e1/Ct 'Depa:rtents


Georgia ENT & Facial
Plastics, P.C.
and

SMITH
Northyview
H o s p i ta 1
Proudly Announce
The Association of
Dr. Arthur & Sheila Allen
Now Taking Appointments
2418 N. Oak St. * Valdosta
PH: 229-244-9944 * Fax: 229-244-9942 g


Will Your Vote Count? Only If You Vote!
Early Voting ends on Saturday, November 4.
Absentee ballots must be requested no later than Friday, November 3.
2006 General Election is Tuesday, November 7.
Democrats support fiscal responsibility. Government should be lean, not mean.
We insist on an efficient and accountable government which provides a dollars' worth of
services for each dollar of taxes. Government of the people, by the people, and for the
people should mean exactly what it says. Your vote may make the difference!
The Madison County Democratic Executive Committee
Supports These Candidates. Vote For And Elect:

United States Senate Bill Nelson
House of Representatives Robert J. Harms
4th Congressional District
Governor Jim Davis
Lt. Governor Daryl Jones
Attorney General Walter "Skip" Campbell
Chief Financial Officer Alex Sink
State Agriculture Commissioner Eric Copeland

Supervisor of Elections Jada Woods Williams
County Commissioner Wayne Vickers
District #2
Paid political advertisement paid for by the Madison County Democratic Executive Committee.
Jim Catron, Chairman. Royce Allmond, Treasurer:









1 OA The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Friday, October'20, 2006


aUwed SJtpyf of JiMadio (9on&ewet



National t9)ical Leat Wliu& (9pem &i9e


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Tuesday, October 3, from 8 a.m. - 4 p.m., Allied Thera-
py of Madison, LLC. held an open house for all of Madison in
honor of National Physical Therapy Month..
Allied Therapy offered free sensory screenings and balance
testing and had an abundance of food and refreshments for
everyone present. There were approximately 40 people in atten-
dance.
Additionally, in honor of National Physical Therapy Month.
Allied Therapy of Madison will continue ,to offer free sensor)
screenings and balance testing through the month of October.
Physical therapy has always been able to help with muscle
strength, balance and improved stability w'hen w walking. but not
Allied Therapy' is pleased to be able to offer an exciting new


Aaron's Grading, Inc.
Land Clearing * Forestry Work' Underbiushing
Mulching " House pads* Driveway Grading
Finish Grading * Ponds & A\ccess Roads.


Aaron Mick
License & Insured
Cell: 321-231-5540


. . .. ' . ?



SJoe RRam;. Jr







3' wide galvalume' 3' wide painted Cut to your desired lengths!
Steel Buildings Available Delivery Service Available
Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg. Inc.
Call Toll Free 1-888-593-060555


HUGH'S LAWN CARE
and TREE SERVICE, LLC
Hugh Sherrod
238 NE Brickyard Pond Ave. * Madison, Florida
Business; 850-445-3321 * Home: 850-973-6601 * email: hughsl@earthlink.net
Lawn Mowing WE PLANT
Edging Call Ff & MAINTAIN
Weed Eating isll &MAI- GM TA FIrN
Tree Trimming "" GAME FEED
Bush Hogging Roads PLOTS
We acceptATM& Debit Cards

"Good Water Means Good Health"
Shea's Well & Pump

Everett's
Well Drilling & Irrigation Wells
Residential & Irrigation Wells * Deep Wells 4" to 8"
Sales * Service
Serving The Georgia & Florida Area For Over 30 Years.
Old Quitman-Madison Road * Quitman, GA
FL-Lic#2153 (229) 263-4192 GALic#253


fu Your Ad HeKrt!

Call

8ssw.q73-w4


treatment for peripheral neuropathy which is a disabling condi-
tion oftefi associated \\ ith diabetes. Near-Infrared' Enerig
(n RE) has Food and Drug Administration ITDA) approval for
treatment of pain and decreased circulation. Studies are showing
iimproved sensation, better balance and fewer falls in the people
receiving the "red light therapy."
Allied Therapy of Madison is o%% ned and operated by N ladi-
son resident, Kim Sanders. Sanders has been a phy sical therapist
for 27 years and has attended oer 140 hours of continuing ed-
ucation on evaluation and treatment of spinal disorders. She is
highly experienced to treat a wide range of neurological and
musculoskeletal disorders.
Cind\ Geick joined Allied in 2005. In addition to physical
therapy. she holds a Mlaster's Degree in Exercise Physiology
and has oler 10 years experience developing and implementing


.. . or PUMP&IRRIGATION
Sales & Service
"Four Generations ol Experience"


"AFFORDABLE QUALITY"
LEWIS WALKER
ROOFING
Repairs * Shingle Roofing * Flat Roofing
Residential & Commercial * Metal Roofing
RC0067442 Senior Citizens Discount
FEEEEstimates Office: 386-497-1419
fense & Insured Toll I r. 866-SL\% -ROOF
BoNDrD'"ORKER5 CONIP. Nlo ;MI ,l :'NTRA.C . RS' ,[



Peacock's
Landscaping & Sprinkler Systems
Residential & Commercial
Landscape Design & Installation'*Site-prep, * Sodding
Sending * Irrigation * Lawn* Shrub* Gravel Driveways * Drip
Owners: Glenn & Margie Peacock
850.973.2848 since 1975

Bumette Plumbing &
Well Service A
l FamityyOWned Since 1902 -
.Plpmbing Repairs Wells Drilled
Fixtures-Faucets Pumps Replaced
Sewer & Water, Connections . Tanks Replaced
Water Heater Repairs . All Repairs
125 SW Shelby Ave. Drilling Carlton Burnette
Madison, L 32340 Master Plumber
adison.# RF 008445 Repairs 850-973-1404


Bell Mobile Home'
Transport & Setup
- - * Relevel * Tie-downs *
,- ' Permits
1.I j Call For FREE Estimates
Kevin Bell
850-948-3372'


Farm Bureau
Freddy Pitts or Jimmy King j
Serving Madison, Jefferson
and Taylor Counties
233 W. Base St., Madison
(850) 973-4071.
SFreddy Pitts 105 W. Anderson St., Monticello jimmyyKing
(850) 997-2213
813 S. Washington St., Perry
A Lauren Lilliott, Agent


Hall's
Tire 5 muffler Center
1064 E. US 90 * Madison, Florida
-Beside Clover Farm-
Owners:
509733026Lee Anne Hall


cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programs.
Mary Johnson has been with Allied Therapy for eight years.
She is a lifelong resident of Madison and a good friend to many.
She ser es Sanders and Geick as an office assistant and also
helps with the illnessss and infrared patients
Miriam Chimnienti %w welcomes you with a smile and is the of-
fice manager. Her duties include processing insurance claims
and keeping the office running smoothly. She joined the staff in
2003.
. Allied is well supplied with equipment to meet all of Madi-
son's citizen's rehabilitation needs. Patients can regain their
ability to %\alk and improve their balance inside the safety of
their parallel bars, Citizens can rebuild stamina and endurance
%w ith their assortment of cardiovascular equipment and'increase
strength w\ ith their resistive machines.
Also, Allied prot ides a 'wellness program to maintain bene-
fits gained from client's physical therapy regimen. Standard
phy sical therapy includes specialized therapeutic exercise, elec-
tricail stimulation, biofeedback. traction. iontophoresis, thera-
peutic ultrasound, manual therapy techniques and near infrared
light energy inIRE). Individualized physical therapy last any-
\\here from 45 minutes to one hour and participants should
come dressed w% ith athletic style shoes if possible.
Allied Therapy 's goal is to be the leader in deliver\ ofphys-
ical therapy ser ices in Madison County, helping to improve the
health. wellness and quality of life of ladison's citizens.


TO GET ALL THE FACTS
Subscribe Today Aind Get All The Facts.
. Get The Madison Co-unity Carrier
& The Madison Ernterprise-Recorder
For $26 In-Couty, $31 O41t-of-County
973-4141


Mike's Pump Repair
And Well Drilling, Inc.
Serving You With 2 Locations
610 Industrial Ave. 179 E. Base St. Suite A
Line Oak, FL Madison. FL
386-364-5360 850-973-8877
Above-Ground Swimming Pools * Pool Supplies * Pool Chemicals
Mike Harris (Owner) - Cell (386) 590-0888
24 Hour Service- . Lic 26.10


m


D~ir ct r



l ....


904 NW Suwannee Ave.
Br~anford. FL
LicP 'fi3l


r-~ WE

L DiRI2ING






The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11A


MADISON COUNTY UNITED WAY




Community Gears Up For Madison County United Way

"We Do Dreams.... In Madison County."


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing Inc.
The Madison County United Way committee and volun-
teers will be at a variety of different places throughout the com-
munity to reach their fundraising goal for this year of $75,000.
Last year, Madison County had a goal of raising $75,000,
and raised $78,788. This year, Madison County has high hopes
of exceeding their goal of $75,000 again.' .
This year's theme is "We Do Dreams.... In Madison Coun-
ty."-
The neat thing about raising money for the United Way' is
that all of the funds raised in the county stays in the county. Ad-
ditionally, residents and volunteers can make donations to Unit-
ed Way and specify which agency they n would like their funds to


Ability First, America's Second Harvest of the Big Bend, Amer-
ican Red Cross,' Capital Area,Chapter,. Big Bend Cares,. Big
Bend Hospice, Boy Scouts of America, Suwannee River Area
Council, Brehon Institute for Family Services. Citizens for a
Progressive Madison County, Consolidated Christian Min-.
istries, Early Learning Coalition of the Big Bend, Elder Care
Services. Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Girl Scdut Council
of Apalachee Bend, Kids Incorporated, Refuge House, Senior
Citizens Council of Madison County and Volunteer Income Tax
Assistance. , ' ' : ' ' ' ' '
The 206 Madison Count) Campaign Team includes Chair-
men Mary Frances Nlauldin. Ann Sapp, 'Jackie Johnson, Ed
Meggs, Betty Williams, Morris Steen. Emerald Kinsley. Ernes-
tine Kinsey, M)yra Valentine. Roy Ellis. Tony Hughey. Stephen


Look for the Madison County United Way Lifesaver on the
courthouse la\ nh to help keep residents informed on how much
funds are being raised for Madison County.

Getd Together.
Gt Focused.
iGet Results..

Thre United ,wayj
*= ' ' '. ' *' * . ^ ' _ _ . ,


be given to. and Ra IPike. Hazel Mitchell, Jim Sale. Cheryl James. ,Judie
The Madison County Agencies include 2-1-1 Big Bend, Price, Allen Cherry and JudNiMcGhee.


MauldinINamed New Chairmen


For Ma'dison CountyUnited Way


By Jessalyn Covell.
Greene Publishing. Inc.
The 2006 United Way in
Madison County marks the
third year that Mary Frances
Mauldin has been involved.
with volunteering and serving
the community of Madison.'
She has been named the newI
chairman for this N ear.'s Unit-
ed Way in Madison County.
"People need: to realize
how' the United Way assists
with funds. There are few
people throughout the com-
munity who are not touched
by one of these agencies that
are a part of ihe United Way.
It is a very comprehensive


Mary Frances Mauldin


way of giving and dollars,
raised in Madison County,
stay in Madison County and
really do help Madison Counm-
ty people." stated Mauldin.
She %till be out in the
community, visiting busi-
nesses and individuals toitalk
with them about what .the,
United .Way is and how it,
helps serve the people of
Madison.
She 'noted, "I got in-
volved with the United Way
of Madison because many of
their agencies helped me per-
sonally. and' my friends
through, .the loss of my, hus-
band four years ago. All of


" the funds collected in NMadi-,
son County stay in Madison
County to help Madison
families." : . . ;.
* Chairman Mary Frances
Mauldin and the Madison
County campaign team %\ill
be collecting donations for
the next two months. Last
year; 17 agencies were
helped with assistance from
the funds collected from the
United Way of Madison.
There are. various levels
of giving that include having
donations taken out of your
personal paycheck, making a
one time donation and more.
Additionally, people can


volunteer by serving ori the.
Allocation Committee. help-,,
ing with the Leadership Din-
ner that is put on for people
who .have donated $500 or
more within Madison Coun-
ty, helping on the Madison
County campaign team with


fundraising or getting in-
volved with a specific
agency through the United
VWay.
If you are interested in
becoming a volunteer, please
contact Mary - . Frances
Mauldin at 973-6255.


Why Contributing To The

United Way Makes Sense


There are over 1,400 sep-
arate United Way organiza-
'tions across "the United
States. United Way of the Big
Bend 'is one of over 35 Unit-
ed Ways in Florida.
Why not give directly to
agencies? There are several
reasons that United
Way is among the
best ways to
give to charity.
Contributing
through Unit-
dd 'Way gn-
rantees agen-
cies . funds
they can- rely
on and plan rather
than depending on spo-
radic contributions.
Also, the United Way's
community-based. oversight
ensures that the chairties you
support through United Way
adhere to sound fiscal poli-
cies and provide needed ser-
vices. Giving through the
United Way reduces costly
and time-consuming fund
raising efforts so time can be
spent helping people. United


\Way gifts are often matched
by state, federal and private
funds.
Can you trust the United
Way with your donation?
Every United Way agency
meets high standards of qual-
ity and efficiency that include
being recognized by
the IRS as a non-
c profit organiza-
tion, governed
by a local
volunteer
board of di-
rectors, pro-
vides for hu-
man care need,
- audited annually to
a panel of community
volunteers and operates at a
reasonable cost. Additionally,
the United Way has experi-
enced community volunteers
who oversee the dollar allo-
cations to agencies, conduct-
ing agency site visits and
monitoring agency problems.
Distributions and an audited
financial statement are public
information and published in
the annual report.


Madison County


2005 Outcomes
The Money You Donate In Madison County -,
STAYS in Madison Counry

* 6,382 citizens of Madison County were served by the
American Red Cross.
* 4,334 falmlies were served by Second Harvest of the
Big Bend and 171.336 pounds .of food were distributed
throughout Madison Count).
* 84 Madison youth boys were served while in the Boy
Scouts of America.
* 69 Madison patients and families were served by the
Big Bend Hospice.
* 53 citizens were served b\ the Brehon Institute for
Family. Services.
* 196 citizens were served by the Refuge House.
* 159 citizens of Madison County called 2-1-1 Big Bend.
* 15 Girl Scouts were, served in Madison County.
* 64 seniors in Madison were served by Elder Care Ser-
vices.
* 3 were served by Kids Incorporated of the Big Bend.
* 160 citizens were served by the Fellowship of Christian
Athletes.
* 310 seniors were served b\ the Senior Citizens Council
of Madison.
* 465 citizens were served by Area Management Coali-
tion for School Readiness: Inc.
* 878 citizens were served by Big Bend Cares.
* 10 citizens were served by Ability First.

Total Madison County Citizens Served: 13.182


4,,. .






'*j7 .' g.e i ^ .. - '










Do you knowwhat happened in your

community last week? The Madison County Carrier

& The Enterprise-Recorder help keep you informed

about the happenings in your world,













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-----



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Friday, October 20, 2006


I










12A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



REGIONAL HAPPENINGS.


Friday, October 20, 2006


SLive! At Dowling Park" Celebrates



Food, Dance & Culture Of India


By Sally Q. Smith,
Office for Retirement Services, Advent Christian Village
The 19th annual Live! At Dowling Park Artist Series at Ad-
vent Christian Village (ACV) and the Indian Cultural & Educa-.
tional Center (ICEC) Youth Group from Gainesville, Fla., are
pleased to present "Celebrate India! A Celebration of Indian
Food, Dance & Culture" on Saturday'afternoon, October 28,
with a performance by the ICEC Youth Group from 3:00-5:00
p.m., at The Village Church. The performance will be followed
by a light, simple, and tasty Indian Cuisine Sampler in Phillips
Dining Room from 5:00-6:30 p.m. The sampler - w which . ill, in-
clude such delectable dishes as mixed vegetable .Pok6ras, Aam
Ka Mitha Achar, Gajar ka Halwa, Machhli Tari, Kashmiri Mu-
tanjan, and Traditional Chicken Curry - is compliments of,
Phillips Dining Services in cooperation with ICEC.
The ICEC Youth Group, which was formed in 1995 to aid
the children ('aged 12-18) of first generation Indian immigrants.
celebrated its eleveiith Near in April 2006. According to the ICEC
web site, www.icec-florida.ors. "The initial purpose [of this
youth group]. was to provide a setting for these teens in which
theNy could socialize with other children of their o\% n age and her-
itage and develop a sense of belonging and community.." At first.'
the group only met on, a social basis. O\er the ears. howe% er.
the group incorporated activities, such as volunteeringg at the
ICEC and throughout Gainesville and Alachua CountN. organiz-
ing ICEC fundraisers, tutoring minority children, sponsoring


needy families in Gaines\ ille and also world\ ide, and hosting
and organizing cultural programs at the ICEC to celebrate India's
Republic and Independence Day s. and also the annual India Fes[.
a fes\val that promotes the culture and heritage of India.
The w\eb site further states that this louth group "'has show n
dedication and selflessness through their v oluntary acts for the
ICEC, Gaines' ille, and surrounding communities. In addition to
their sometimes grueling school work. they take time outi of
their schedules to help those. around them and trul\ demonstrate
that they are today and \\ill be in the future, caring, dedicated,"


and community-oriented citizens." .6
Ticket prices for both the show and cuisine sampler are as
follows: ACV Members: $10, Adults.(i.e., non-ACV Members):
$15, Students (ages 13-18): $4, and Children (ages 5-12). $3.
Admission for children ages 4 and under is free. Tickets are
available at the ACV Cashier's- Office, as well as in- Live Oak at
The Music Center and the Suwannee County Chamber of Com-
merce. Tickets may also be purchased at the door on the evening
of the concert.
STicket prices for show only are as follows: ACV Mem-
bers: $5,.Adults i i.e.. non-ACV Members): $8, Students and
'Children: free. Tickets are available at the ACV Cashier's Of-
fice.
Li'e! At Dowling Park is pleased to welcome guests partici-
pating in the Reciprocity Program: North Florida Communityr
College (NFCC) and Communit3 Concerts of Lake City, Inc.
All e' ents. v% ith the exceptions of events with cuisine samplers
and the Dinner Theatre/Show,. are covered by ACV tickets.
NFCC requests that all reciprocating parties please call in ad-
vance to reserve their seats.
For additional information about this performance, please
call the Retirement Ser% ices Office at 1386) 658-5400. ore-mail
tdgrdlol(<',iac\'illa~n ct. �
Live! At Dowling Park is sponsored in part by the State of
Florida. Department of State. Division of Cultural Affairs, the
Florida Arts Council. and the National Endow ment for the Arts.


Halloween Scare estAt W l Adventures


It's out there w waiting; bid- falling, darkness, monsters, line, "Phobia Express" is your "Curse of the Mummy," "Ho- Haunted Attractions
ing its time to strike. A.nd you ghosts, snakes. clowns:.:..what quick-ticket: to fear. For just tel Doom," "Terror Train," ' NEW THIS YEAR) Pi-
thought only vou knew w hat it makes ou tremble and q4ui er $15 (in addition to park ad- "Black Forest: Revenaint's Re- rates of the Dead 3-D- Walk
was. Get ready to face your in nervous anticipation? What mission yoti can be one of the venge," "Fright Flight"' and thiis gauntlet of terror from the
fear because Wild Adventures are you afraid of? Come face-; first to .experience the scares "Buzzby"s Boo House." Tick- high seas as pirates threaten
'knows what you are afraid of to-face with the known and 'in-all the haunted attractions. ets can be purchased in the with promises of the hempenn
and it's waiting for you. Pho- unknown in Phobia., . Each "Phobia Express" is a Dockside area. "Phobia' Ex-. halter." But e en if \ou escape
bia is the Halloween scare fest New this Year!! .PPhobia one-time quick-ticket for each press" quick-tickets will be the hangman's noose; beware
full of the stuff nightmares are Express"When you're just of the following: "Pirates of available on a limited basis, so of Black Jack Ketch, the Grim
made of. Spiders, heights,, dyin' to get to the front of the the Dead 3-D," "Dominion," get ours early! Reaper of Pirates! Will- .ou


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spend eternity as one of the
Brethren of the Blood?
Opens at 7 pm
(NEW' THIS YEAR)
Black Forest: Revenant's Re-
venge- Welcome to stop #13 on
the historic tour, site of this
area's most horrific massacre. It
was the roaring 20's and toast
of the town, Jonathon, had just
married his sweetheart, .Lily.
The reception was in full swing
right here on this spot and the
, future' looked bright. But not
for long. Wretdhed' Roger;,
brother of the groom, was on
the run.from Eddie and Ray-
mond,. the Fabulous Falcon
Brothers,, leaders of the most
notorious bootleggers in the
South. Roger burst into the re-
ception and the henchmten were
not far behind. Laughter turned
to screams as gunfire rang out.
When the smoke cleared, 28
lay dead, Jonathon and Lily
among them. In despair, his fa-
ther voved to erase the site and
destroyed the nearby dam,
flooding the area and turning it
to swamp. And the land wasn't
the only thing that turned ugly -
Jonathon returned from the
dead as the Revenant, bent on
his revenge. He and his-band of
fellow undead haunt the
sw amp, searching for descen-
dents of the Falcon Brothers
and their gang, intent on wiping
out the last of their bloodline.
Think you know your family
tree'? Better be very sure before
entering. Many go in; few re-
turn.
Opens at dusk
Dominion - Enter the
realm of the undead, where the
rulers of the night lay claim to
their victims. Forgot your cross
or garlic? Should'be an interest-
ing journey, as vampires lurk in
every comer.
Opens at 7 p.m.
Curse of the Mummy-
There's a curse on these ruins
and all who dare to enter.
Dodge hissing snakes and
creeping spiders as you trek
thorough this archaeological
expedition. But be leery of any-
one asking you to dig-it could
be . our own grave! Opens at 7
p.m.
Hotel Doom- Don't bother
hanging the "Do Not Disturb"
sign: it's anything but a peace-
ful night's rest in this hotel. You
won't have any time to unpack
)our bags, you'll be too busy
running from the other guests.
Some of them have been here
forever and they want you to
check in permanently! *








www.greenepublishing. com




CHURCH
� : �-P


Friday, October 20, 2006


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A


appeinmgs Atfaiort tst Iapi


In a sermon on Tuesday
morning, Preacher's message
was about a certain king who.
was moved with compassion-
and forgave his servant a huge
debt. He also said he'd heard
the great Preacher R.G.;:Lee
preach his famous,' many)
times preached sermon. "Pay
Day Soriiedia". It is certain
there will be a payday some
day. One side of our sign
says, "Sin has no minimum
wage".- ,
God uses busy people-to
do more. A special thanks to a
veryIbusy Judy Phillips who
wrote the past two article for-
me and didn't signher name.
She did, and does a super, su-
per job.. We're all so glad
she's one of us. She said when
she first came here sik years
ago, she knew Mrs. Nlarintha

Pine GrOve


Bap tst Church

To Celebrate Their

150th Anniversary
The Pine Grove Baptist
Church, which was founded
October 25. 1856. \\ill cele-
brate its 150th anniversary
w ith homecoming day on Oc-
tober 22. 2006. The celebra-
tion began in January of this
year with the first. of ten
Sesquicentennial'. Sunday s.
each highlighting 'a 15 - year
period in the history of the
church. These,,hae continued
on the fourth Sunday of each
month, with. special speakers
recalling historical events of
that period, along with special
music, and a covered-dish din-
ner f -4lo ibig the sern ice. The.,
Sundayvs a-solincluded a histor-
ical summary of each 15 -year
period in the form of a bulletin
insert written' by former pastor
Phil Heard. These vignettes
w ill be compiled into a com-
plete history of the church.
which is planned for comple-
tion bN the end of this year.
The climax of the 10 -
month celebration will be on
October 22, when members.
former members, families and
friends gather for the big
homecoming day events Mem -
bers will dress in costumes of
the periods 'from 1856 to the
1960's. Contests will be held.
old times will be remembered.
and former pastor Phil Heard
(1989-2005) will: be the guest
speaker. Special music \\ill be
provided by. musician Ja)
Hicks, and by music director
Carol Herring and her'sisters.
the Hart to Heart Singers. Fol-
lowing the morning service at
11:00 a.m., those present will
be treated to a traditional cov-
ered dish dinner in the fellow-
ship hall and under the outdoor
picnic shelter.


Lorena Kelley

The Sesquicentennial
Committee is made up of
members of the present Home-
coming and History and Her-
itage committees, with Lorena
Kelley being the coordinator.
Other members include Ver-
non Adams, Mary Bush, Belle
Davis, Richie Gaston, Jerry
Herring, M. C. and Louise
Herring, Brandy Kinsey,
Catherine Smith, and Mouzon
Sockel.
The church is located on
Rocky Ford Road, four miles
north of Madison.


L


Howard as very .active' in
women's missionary work,
with a heart full of love and a
great burden for missions. We
prhy comfort for her family.
I say over and o\er again
ho\\ much a part of this coun-
ty is in our lives. .Mother's
oldest sister, Aunt Lola Con-
ner. w\as .married to Uncle'
James 'Conner, who. was
preaching at Midway and
teaching at Enterprise School
when he died in December of.
1924. Another's youngest sis-
ter,' Aunt Maude Miner, of'
Martinez, Georgia, and Mrs.
NMarimntha ere the same age
and great friends .They had,
seen each other some tume ago
at "Lee Day". Aunt Maude is
the only one of Mother's sib-
lings living except Aunt Alice
of California. the %ildow oft
their only brother. Uncle Lee
Stew art.
S Tragic death with great
sorrow in the death of Scott
Thomas, who was 'dearly
loved by hundreds and hun-'
dreds, and greatly mourned.
Comfort for all. His mother
was one of our school nurses
and was appreciated. His Un-
cle. Eddie (Bell). is in our


St. John Damascene
Orthodox Catholic Church
141 SW Broad Ave. * Green% ille. FL 32331 * 8'850-48-2S22
Reverend Falicr T J. Pan ne
Bishop .41e.mandtr BaiiiholoiiewI
Sunday - Eucharist Mass IDivine Liturgy)
10:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.


Barbara Memorial Church
Of The Nazarene
Highr. \ "'i � 4':'-1.673.4l
,r R , ., I A l .
Sunday School.......................................... 10:00 a.m.
M morning W orship.........................................11:011 a.m .
Evening W orship.............................................5: p.m.
Wednesday. Bible Stud.............. . ................7:301 p.m.



Reapers Of The Harvest Church
3 rrmile. Ae.l o Gre:nr.ill.:. FL * -i. ., '9)(
.Sini, I R, ' " � ' PF tr.,r
Sunday School........................... ......... 10:1)0 n.m
M morning W\ orhip.............. . .... .......................11:1)0 n.m
Evening 1\ orship............................................( ll p.m.
Wednesday Nighl Serice..............................7:30 p.m.
r' . Ana , h- h I s in i ..' '.. w .. I " .- hii b . .in.
ill,:) rC ' all n r hI ..r n ,/.., , . 1, 1 . n, p1 . i.. I, 1.. 1 I
E% ERYONE I 5\L. \\ S % WELCOME!


St. Vincent DePaul Roman
Catholic Church
M er.clrg & Siril,: S i , '.. "' .''.:
"," .. .h, I ,- ..', .,/ r lli
Sunda................................................ . .. . .....................:00 a.m.
M on.., T es., \%ed. Mlas .................:........ 7:3 a m.
Thursda) Mn sn............. .......................... 7.30 a.m.
5aturd Mass........................ ............. .. :30j p im.



St. Mary's Episcopal Church
I-1.1 N E I..r , I n : . " , i .: j .., . . , y . , 1
TIll ,R . ',. 0 .. ,! . i i .,,, i. I , . .' .. 1 . 1 , ,( ,


Sunday Church Schrol...... ...... ......... 10 a.m.
Sunday Hul. Eucharist...... .. .............. :00i n m.
NMi ion Board - 2nd Sunda.................... ...11:01) p m.
Epicnpal Church omnill . Ird Sund:......II II10 p m.
I, ri i.n'' rr r. /..,


church and in the choir. We
are saddened our Billy Luttrell
will be lea\ ing us soon.
As Lil Jess and I visited.
the home of Mr. B.F. Kelley.
'the kindness and love felt
there touched me and we'll all
pray for comfort for their large
family. He was a special
friend. '
We think :of '"empty
places"' in church. Dr. J.A.
Da\ is i flow ers placed on the
altar Sunday by Edith in lov-
'ing memory ,of "Doc" ,. still
plenty missed, as is Carl Be-
vis. Both great men and great
lovers of the Lord and church.'
as iell as so man\ others.
Sad o\er the death of
Lynn Wre\ and we pray for
Charles and family, and it's
great to see them in church.
Willie Clare Copeland-re-
sponsible for 4me writing
�"Happenings" since October
2, 1998. ,
As Death comes, so does;.
ne\\ life. We are grateful for
new babies. Sarah and Ray
Pike's little John Marshall.
born September 22. joins
brother HenrN Fisher: Janie
and And. Barnes IlI Lydia
Jane born September 14 joins


I


'Mi


Gabriel and Ann (she had her
3rd birthday .party Saturday).
Stacey wvas showing lil'
Kaitlyn to David and 'Idiuma
Smith and said 'it was time for
her tLo'o back to work. but all
she wanted to do was look at:
precious Kaitli n. She is like a
pretty little doll.
Mo ed with compassion
and great love. Many thanks.
for prayers and thoughts and.
love and care and visits 'and
food for our family as I've re-
cently had. surgery., So ver
thankful I've done unbelie'-
ably well. What has been
'done for us has surely been
done for man\ others. We are,
a church fanill of lo\e.
Touched by Justin Da is'"
song and appreciated many of
his family being there. Dr.
Henry Langford, who grew\ up.
in our church, prayed the most'
beautiful morning prayer: just
w ish e' eryone had a copy of it
to read o\er and over and
think about
Touched bN the testimony
of Brett Frakes as he gale
thanks for living in the "Bible
Belt" because spirituality is
certainly greater from \\here
he grew up. and the fact that


someone from Quincy recom-n
mended our church. He also
gave credit to his daughter
Cammie for leading him to the
Lord. His mother and step-
dad from North Carolina were
present.
Touched b') Billy Wash-.
ington's tesumonN of being
reared in a Christian home.
'not at all like Brett's. and ho\\
in Iraq they had two books to
.read, an infantry manual and
the Gideons' Newx Testament.
:which he read o-er and over.
Preacher gale credit to
Kara for her earnest prayers
for him and her being in
Church and having us all pray
for him. I'll al\a\s remember
the time preacher \%as preach-
ing about Moses only \\inning
* the victorN if his arms were
- raised so different ones under
girded his arms He called our
Youth Minister to come and
hold up his arms and "hen he
got tired and dropped them.
Preacher would tell him to put
them back up. Time went on
and \e all felt sorry for him.
but Kara'-s mother. Kath\.
went to help him, and then Ed
Nlegg's went up. They were
mo\ed %with compassion and


Fellowship Baptist Church
One rmile rionof 'ladjJ,,on on -145
Si H �C Ih . ,i ',,: .. Pa' tor
Gaii' G :'/li i1.u . Drrnitr- . li A c i`iai , SiiIt ni P-asior
.r.h .A.. Chil i'en', M-.u U-: . r.' e ) u-.u L -dull ,hrriitry
OIlt-. , S~ rii '73.2in6
Morning \\orhip....................8:30 a.m. & 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School............................................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday : Famnil) Nighl................Call for schedule
AI Fain iof 'raindrh Cnltriernipora' Warship"
it ' ieet... i a io i,,. ...,l., coil 65 .-"'3-3266


First United Methodist Church
Since 1831 i' Horn M Rirledc Si * 850-9i?3.-6295
R .' Rrt-,-i E L .I illau
* Bl ran svaid r,,. "it. .i.; * I .it Callr,. i. L. L dder
., . , ,, � Service iol Word & Table..............................8:30 a.m.
Sundni School....... ..................................... 9:45 a.m .
,",, Sunday Morning \lorshlnp............................ :00 a.m.
.... ednda All Youth igrades 6-8S.......6:30-8:00 p.m.
S.You grad s 9-121................................ 7:00 p.m.
.. , . Men's f'elloshjp BriakfaslO 3rd Sun.)........8:00 a.m.
..**.. Women' MNleling , Lunch I.l Mon.I.....12:00 noon


Greenville Baptist Church
I Ins SV. M...r-. SI Cr'.,'n- ,l FL * ?5l'l.r4,.1 51
Sunday Sch, l -All \ ............................. :u:O a.m.
Sunday Mirning tWorship ........................... 11:010 am.
Sunday E%1n11ng ourship.... ................ 7:00 p.m.
Sunday) PrL-chorI. Sludinl, iind
Adults Choir R chrara ...... ......................... :30 p.m.
\cidncsda) Prtschool childan,.
noulh & Adull Bible Sdudi .'......................7:00 p.m.
Isl Sundaiu teri monih-.Min' Biiakfaus...........8:01ja.m.
-All . i.i,,,.M-


Hanson United Methodist h


?96. NE D..is, Sirei * Hai.on. FL
, i.' r.'s m om Ma.id.on on H.' . 115. murn nght on Daj'i
l .+' '. *Sunday School...............................................1. 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship......................................11:15 .m.
Sunday Eening Bible Stud .........................6:00 p.m.
Choir Practice Sunday Exening......................5:00 p.m.
W ednesda) Evening Pra etr Sen ice...............7:00 p.m.

All Are welcomee . Please Come!


Faith Baptist Church
II i LIS oii E st * M a.l.lN .,or. FL * 8- i.1'73.28 ,7
P.iir,'rRi:lji, Ir n.h * ,'li-,,'. i r,r'r.:l iriMlnlir L.', Acl . n l..l
. i , i Sinndai Schonl...........................................9..:45 a.m .
Morning Worship.................................. 11:00 a.m.
-, ,.., Church Training..........................................6... :00 p.m.
" E ening W orship......................................... 7:00 p.m.
li lit, ' Pra er Meeting. 'Wcdnesda.........................8:110 p.m.
L.., Hoi I-amili Night Supper., Isl \cdnesday........6-7:00 p.m.
... Lr.ririr Pupp ltI Mlinislri Sunda)............................ 6:00 p.m.
SGRO%\ %i|siLation. Mondai............................:30 p.m.


Grace Presbyterian Church
i (1..',ngr-LE'r. lL'.. ' Fr P , n,ir.f-n 'Ch lJa-L ir Arrm i'riu
F, . i...,,h , ..| ...',J
ri i N rilh r h i,lii;i... r e * r 1.r..i,',n FL **",73 .r 'rul
Sunday School For A11 A s......................:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning W\'orship.......................11:001 a.m
%Ied. Fellowship Supper/Bihle Stud)...... .6:01 p.m.
Inuth Groups Isl - 121h Grades................6:311 p.m.
Choir Practice......... . ............................. 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Men's Pra cr Brakfasta.................7:00 a.m.
Cor'c e II , .h, ' -4'J ., lIi',/, I'. '

Lee United Methodist Church
H,,., '. . * I.r FL - * . .. ' .'5 .
R ch 'nd t,lIu . l .c rtu-I F .: i.
Morning \,orhip ..... .......... ................9:.. li a.m.
Sunday Schl.. ..... . . . ...... . .... . . ....10:1111 a m.
Ihrning W ornship...... ........ ..................11:111 a.m.
Sunday E tning: orship... ...........................6:30 p.m.
Mmnfll'jtwII,,hip Brc.ikfjst
S tLL. ndd in l .. ... ............ ........ :i atin
i. lnp| .. & J. h , L3 l.r.i.. . ,...I. .. . . . hi. .,
"L rrrUIrIC I Lw Luhrlrrrii Illii C/ri in.



Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
1 [-,...,,.h' 'l; ,,r, h
Cherry Lake, FL - 850-929-4355
Rev. Nathaniel Robinson, Jr
Sound School ............................................. 9:4,5 a.m.
Pastoral Sundai , rI .I & 'ri w ..,.., ..............11:110 a.m.n
1.ulih Chuimch ,'ri .r di.I. .......... ... 1:0110 a.m
P.slural M ud) i Ji .n.l.,i ............................II 1)l a.m .


Madison Church of God
- NE r C.. n kell II , ., M .. .il L
1.;1.9 7 1- .r3,.I ' * 1., . ' *. .L iC'/, t',. t r
Sunday Schon.l . . ........................:m............. 1:00 . .
M morning i% rship. .................................1....11:110 a.m .
Etmng %%r.,hip. ....................... 6:01) p.m.
W'ednosdas Biblc St uid%........................... 7:01)0 p.m.


Mono="


did something about it. We
pray for Brett and Billy as new
Deacons. .
Monday at 4 p.m., the As-
sociatiin Annual Meeting was
held at Faith Baptist. Tuesday
the Senior Adult Choir sang at
Madison Nursing Home at 10
a.m. Wednesday, all-the usual
acti\ ities from 3 p.m. on.
Next Wednesday, the Fall
Festival will be held. Sunday
Billk is to show slides of the
Music and Worship Mission
, :tour to Sydney, Australia, and
Kuala Lampur, Malaysia.
Also Sunday is Pine Grove's
Homecoming. celebrating 150
years.
Many are still ill and in
need of prayer. Juanita Ra-
gans now home. Toinette Gra-
ham in Shands hospital: both
Estelle and George Osborne
and their Laura and Joe's lil'
Joey still in TMH. Leone Gay
had knee surgery, Mr. George
Burnette in South Georgia.
Marge Heatter with chest
pains.
May the Lord bless us one
and all and help us gile thanks
that we have decided to follow
Jesus and pra\ for all others to
do likewise. Amen!






14A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.comrn


Friday, October 20, 2006


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School
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Un


Keeping School Bus Safety In

Mind For A Safer School Year


Lou Miller, Superinten-
dent of Madison County's
School's.

By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing. Inc.
The majority ofstudents
who start and end the school
day with a trip on a school
bus. Unfortunately, each year
many children are injured and
several are killed in school
bus incidents.
School bus related crash-
es killed 164 persons and in-`
jured an estimated 18,000
persons nationwide in 1999,
according to data. from the
National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration's Fa-
tality Analysis Reporting
System (FARS) and General
Estimates System (GES).
The majority of people
feel that school bus trans-.
portation is safe. In fact, bus-
es are safer than cars! In
2005. approximately 26 stu-


dents were killed and another
9,000 were injured in inci-
dents involving school buses.
'.Suprisingly, these deaths and
injuries did not occur .in a
crash,. but as the students
were entering and exiting the
bus.
Superintendent of Madi-
son County School's Lou
Miller stated, �'Students and
parents need to practice safe-
ty tips to keep the dangers
aloof from having accidents.
Students should always have
a safe place
to wait . .. - "
for their
school

a w a W
f rom
traffic and '
Sthe street.
S tu d e n t s
need to make' sure that they
stay away from the bus until
it comes to a complete stop
Sahid the driver signals them to
,enter. Also, when students are
being dropped off, they need
.to exit the bus and walk ten
giant steps away from the
bus. Keeping a safe distance
between the students and the
bus is always safe and re-
member that the bus driver'
can see students best when
they are back away from the
bus." .
Over the past sixypars.-
about 70 percent of the deaths


in' fatal school bus related
crashes were occupants of ve-
hicles other than the school
bus and 20 percent were
pedestrians. About four per-
cent were school bus passen-
gers and two percent were
school bus drivers.
Of the pedestrians killed
in school bus related crashes
over this period, approxi-
mately .77 percent were struck
by a school bus. Of the peo-
ple injured in school bus re-
lated crashes from 1994
through.
1999, about

cupants ofe r e
school bus
passengers,
9 percent
be aware f the e r e
school bus
drivers, and
another 43 percent were oc-
cupants of othervehain rules.
Additionally, students
should practicerusing the
handrail to enter and exit the
bus. Students always need to
be aware of the street traffic
around. them. Drivers are re-
quired'to follow certain rules
of the road concerning school
buses, unfortunately,. not all
do.
These simple steps will
help protect students from
dangers getting on and off the
schooll bus-.keeping students,..
safe, and out of harm's \was.


MCHS Implements New School Schedule


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
For the 2006-2007 school year, the Madi-
son County High School (MCHS) has imple-
mented a new schedule to better suit students
and their educational needs.
MCHS principal. Ben Killingsworth. stat-
ed, "A seventh class period as been added to
the schedule as part of a continued effort to
provide the best education possible for the
school's students."
MCHS has revised the instructional focus
time. Second time is now the instructional fo-
cus time. During second period, ninth and
tenth grade students will work on reading and
writing skills. Eleventh graders will work on
science skills.
Those students who have passed the


Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test
(FCAT) and the science pretest are allowed to
take an elective during the instructional focus
time.
MCHS principal's secretary. Evdlyn
Chancy said. "The new schedule is a great
way to help better provide our students with
extra help that the) may need throughout the
school year."
Any student still needing additional help
in reading or math will take an appropriate
course second period. The second period class
will last for thirty minutes. Students must re-
main in the class all year to earn half a credit.
Grades will be assigned for these classes. Bi-
weekly assessments will be given and will be
followed by enrichment or remediation if nec-
essary.


Coody, Lancaster Keep The


Beat, Despite Their Handicaps

.'" -
i .,. , .


J.D. Coody and Richard Lancaster, seniors at MCHS, have both played in the
Cowboy band for four years! (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, Oc-
tober 16, 2006)


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By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County
High. School (MCHS) band
has two members who may,
not be as tall and strong as
other members, but who sure
can play their instruments.
well.
J.D.. Coody is a seven-
teen-year-old resident of
Madison County. He is a se-
nior at the high school. He
plays the quints for the Cow-
boys' band and also plays the
guitar in his spare time.
He has always been
physically handicapped due
to the diagnosis of Osteogen-
esis Imperfecta, which means
that his bones are very brittle
due to the lack of protection
from tissue surrounding his


bones.
Coody has been a mem-
ber of the band for four years
and is also a member of the
Future Farmers of America.
In his spare time, he en-
joys what any teenager en-
joys doing; hunting, fishing
and hanging out with his
friends.
"There is an advantage of
being physically handicapped
because I get to be at the front
of all the lines. If you try hard
enough, you can do anything
if you want it bad enough."
Richard Lancaster, of
Madison, is an eighteen-year-
old student and band member
at MCHS. He is a senior at
the high school and has been
in band all four years of high
school.


When he was born, he
was diagnosed with Cerebral
Palsy. This disease refers to a
number of neurological dis-
orders that appear in infancy
or early childhood, and per-
manently affect body move-
ment and muscle coordina-
tion, but does not worse
over time. He has learned to
cope with being physically
handicapped so well that he
has played the bass drum for
four years in the Cowboy
band.
In his spare time, he lis-
tens to music and plays
games. "My advantage of be-
ing physically handicapped is
that I don't have to march on
the field. You can do whatev-
er you put your mind to. I
did."


ON NOVEMBER 7, ELECT









....... .. � F O R

County Commissioner

District Two


Gv"e yourself a voice in the decisions affecting
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"I WILL NEVER VOTE TO RAISE YOUR TAXES!"
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JINSIJD


1-4B
5B
6-7B
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T.










2B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Kenny Hall, School Board

Member for District 2,.-



Supports

The

SSTRIDE
gC'^ O ^'o'^^^A
Su.1 I l - .i ;',


www.greenepublishing.com



SCHOOL


Madison County.

FW Ch 0SchooI



We supot theS9 9D


^^ffB/fia RiT IN 0 FA ffBt^^


Friday, October 20, 2006


(


\6 AR P ..Rl..D

)F OIlR




Madisn ClCiUn

Central School


Program 1|a INC ' Madison, FIo Ida e la

Madison County SSTRIDE Students Hold


Fourth Annual White Coat Ceremony


MCCS seventh grade students received white lab codts during the fourth annual SSTRIDE ceremony. Front
row, pictured left to right: Donna Odom, Kristi Ferrell, Will Hagan, Dylan Hammock, Felicia Hudson, Ryan Korne-
gay, Kayla Pippin and Jalisa Reddick. Back row, pictured left to right: Tiffany Alexander, Ashley Duran, Alana Elli-
son, Deondra Lee and Dillon Rykard. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, October 10, 2006)
..:. . , . .]I


MCCS eighth grade students received handy stethescopes for their commitment to the program. Front row.
pictured left to right: Snowy Hagan, Jamie Herndon, Ramey Panero, Aaron Pitts, Giselle Dennis, Shakera Santi-
ague, Courtney Williams and Zet Primm. Back row, pictured left to right: Amanda Bennett, Erika Reaves, Erica
Brown, Orlando Gallegos, Addie Krause, Abbey Mercer and Donna Odom. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jes-
salyn Covell, October 10, 2006)


MCHS ninth grade students received book bags with the FSU College of Medicine monogram on them.
Front row, pictured left to right: Nikita Bernard, Katie Dedge, Kierystan Johnson, David Sanders and Kayla Sapp.
Back row, pictured left to right: Cody Belinski, Anderlyn Ellison, Desiree Jonas, Tanega Rodgers, Robby Williams,
and Donna Odom. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, October 10, 2006)
SI K . Ah NT --- * f 6 owp - -' - I I


1 1I


By Jessalyn Covell,.
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Tuesday, October 10, at
6:30 p.m. Madison County Sci-
ence Students Together Reach-
ing Instructional Di\ersity and
Excellence (SSTRIDE) stu-
dents held their fourth annual
Shlie coat ceremony.
The program began with
the Executi\e Director of Ad-,
kising and Outreach from Flori-
da State Uni'ersi. (FTStU Col-
lege of Medicine Thesla Ander-
son w'ho established the pro-
gram in 1994, 14 years ago.
She \\elconmed students,
parents, the very first SSTRIDE
teacher of Madison and Middle
Grades Curriculum Coordina-
tor Lynne Sapp; master
SSTRIDE teacher for grades
seventh-tenth Donna Odom;
SSTRIDE .mentors who are. all
students at North Florida Comrn
unity College (NFCC)
Tiffany Floyd, Kristin Sinnon
and Charnettee Jackson and
others %.ho were instrumental


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene. Publishing Inc.
The Madison County
High School (MCHS) and
Madison County Central
School (MCCS) are relishing
the benefits of a fairly new
program, Science Students To-
gether Reaching Instructional
Diversity and Excellence
(SSTRIDE).
The Madison County
School District and Florida
State University College of
Medicine have partnered' to
provide students who have a
genuine interest in pursuing a
career in science, engineering,
mathematics, health or medi-
cine with knowledge of the
skills they need to be success-
ful in their field of study.
SSTRIDE gives students
the support services that are
important for them to develop
a sense of responsibility, focus
and motivation.
. Not all students can be in-
volved in this program. Stu-
dents must obtain academic
achievement and an interview
to be eligible and honored for
acceptance into this competi-
tive program.
The popular program is
offered at MCCS for seventh
and eighth graders and also at
MCHS for ninth graders and
tenth graders.


in helping the Madison County'
SSTRIDE program become the,
model 'program for other
schools and universities.
"Ne\ er gie up and stay fo-
cused, visualize yourself in the
end. Success is achieved by tak-
ing a dream and making it come
true," stated Andersoni.
The Coordinator of Rural
',Outreach Programs from FSU
College of Medicine Roose\elh
Rogers III noted to all present
that the average .SSTRIDE stu-
dent in Madison maintains a
minimum of a 3.0 grade point
average (GPA). He had the hon-
or of introducing Lynne Sapp.
the first-ever SSTRIDE teacher
in Madison.
She delivered a heartfelt
speech, touching on the signifi-
cance of the SSTRIDE program
and its students. She serves as
the liason of SSTRIDE within
the community. She made her
own words that. made up:
the acronym; "Successful,
cont. on page 3B


Donna Odom has tak-
en on the position as the
SSTRIDE teacher for sev-
enth, eighth, ninth and
tenth grades in Madison
County schools.
Donna. Odom is in charge
of seventh, eighth, ninth and
tenth grades.
* The majority of SSTRIDE
students are focused on a med-
ical career as a doctor or in
nursing, psychology, pharma-
cy or physical therapy.
Odom stated, "It gives
students the opportunity they
probably wouldn't have com-
ing from a rural setting and en-
vironment. Now, they can re-
ceive. vital information that
will better help them pursue
their careers."


North!

Florida





NFCC Supports STRIDE
m
m
NFCC Supports SSTRIDE


I Odom Ser'ves As SSTRIDE
Teacher For MCHS And MCCSI


I









Friday, October 20, 2006


www.greenepublishing. corn



SCHOOL


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3B


SSTRIDE Program Going Strong


SSTRIDE Ceremony
cont. from page 2B ,


Serious, Thinkers, Responsi-
ble, Informed, Determined
and Excited." Sapp noted that
each and every one of. the
SSTRIDE students display all
of these actions.
Sapp said, "Through the
SSTRIDE program, we are
growing our own doctors in
Madison County. These are
kids we grew ourselves."
Madison County fosters
57 SSTRIDE students and the
majority of these students are
certified in CardioPulminarN
Rescuitation (CPR)..
Superintendent of Madi-
son County Schools. ,Lou
Miller noted, "You all do not,
know the pride we feel as par-
ents and connmmunit\ member,
to, have such, dedicated stu-
dents to ihis SSTRIE)E pro-
gram."
Additionall, Director of
,Instructional Learnine Julia
Waldrep. Madison County
High School (MCHS) Prinici-
pal Ben Killing.s\orth., men-


tor of , Gadsen. County
SSTRIDE program Toya
Chambers and office manager
Vancheria Perkins were pre-
sent for the program. Also,
the Coordinator of Rural Out-
reach Programs Roosevelt
Roger', immediate director
Gwendolyn Randolph was
not present, but was recog-
nized.
Seventh grade studenLts
received white lab coats,
eighth grade students re-
ceived siethescopes. ninth
grade students recer.ed book
bags \,xiih the FSU College of
Medicine, monogram and
tenth grade students received
flash drives.
Ander sn stated. "I am so
impressed with the SSTRIDE
program of Madison County.'
S After ards, tudenis.
Parents, teachers, mentors
aInd other personnel- joined to-
gether at the Lake Side Stu-
dent Center at NFCC for are-
cep-ion with lefreshmients


MCHS tenth grade students received flash drives to help them continue their dedication and efforts for the
SSTRIDE program. Fiont row, pictured left to right: Randee Bilyou, Bobby Crafton, Jacob Hentges, Travis Shepard
and Laurie Smith. Back row, pictured left to right: Amanda Brown, Chris McHargue, Jimmy Smith Jr., Kristen
Campbell, Brittany Collins and Donna Odom. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, October 10, 2006]


SSTRIDE teachers and representatives of the FSU College of Medicine were
present at the program to help make it a huge success. Front row, pictured left
to right: first ever SSTRIDE teacher of Madison and Middle Grades, Curriculum
Coordinator Lynne Sapp; Executive Director of Advising and Outreach from
Florida State University (FSU) College of Medicine Thesla Anderson; office man-
ager Vancheria Perkins and master SSTRIDE teacher for seventh-tenth grades
Donna Odom. Back row; Coordinator of Rural Outreach Programs, Roosevelt
Roger III. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, October 10, 2006)


Support

For Our

Local

SSTRIDE

Students . ....






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SSTRIDE mentors and students at NFCC dedicate their spare time in offering
one-on-one time with SSTRIDE students. Pictured left to right: Tiffany Floyd, Kristin
Sirmon and Charnettee Jackson. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell,
October 10, 2006)











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4B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



SCHOOL


Friday, October 20, 2006


New Kindergarten Teacher For MCCS Makes Things Happen


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Nelly Thompson of
Madison is the newest addi-
tion to the kindergarten de-
partment at Madison Coun-
ty Central School (MCCS).
The 2006-2007 school year
totals three years of teach-
ing with. a total of 18 stu-
dents for this school year.
"I love working with
children. I felt called to be-'
come a teacher so here I
am" stated Thompson.
She was encouraged by
the Florida Agricultural &
Mechanical University.
(FAMU) to become a
teacher, where she received
her Bachelor of Science in
Elementary Education.
Pre% iously. she worked
as a daycare %worker for
Kids Incorporated arid
taught at Jefferson Elemen-
tary School (JES) for two
years'..
Thompson said; "Be the


Classes Stai
Free


At Mac

Cont
Ti


best you can be is what I
emphasize to all of my little
ones. Teaching just comes
naturally for me, I was giv-.
en a gift and I'm using it to
my fullest potential."
How does she deal with
18 energized students each
day? She said. " It takes a
lot of willingness, enthusi-
asm, love, dependability,
patience and being very
flexible." .
"When I introduce m
students to a new concept
and they get it, I love it,"
noted Thompson.
Her family includes her
parents James and Mamie
Thompson, a sister Annie
Ree Thompson and 'a broth-
er Jerome Thompson.
In her 'spare time, she
loves, to attend church at.
One Accord Prayer, Min-
istry' in-Tallahassee. Her
pastor is Effie Slaughter
and she has been attending
for 13 years. Also, she


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loves shopping and reading.
"There.is great team
work here, the principals
stop in your class room to


see if you are having a good
day. What other school
does that? Plus, there are
plenty of warm welcomes

'4... .


_ ,".i ; .


B\ Jessal n Co\ell
Greene Pubhlising, Inc.
Kendra Woods is thie
daughter of Terrn and Pa-
tricia Johnson.
She is a junior at the
NMadison Count\ High
I School tNICHS i.
At the high school.
she has been a member of


Nelly Thompson is enjoying marking her third year
of teaching as the, new kindergarten teacher at MCCS.
(Greene Publishing. Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, Oc-
tober 17, 2006)


Madison Academy Selling

Christmas Wreaths

By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing. Inc.
The Madison Academ'n will be selling live Christmas
wreaths. There are brochures and additional information at the
Academy. There are different sizes and different prices avail-
able. There is a guaranteed delivery the first week of Decem-
ber to recipients. Slkip out on the hyqstle and bustle of the
hwonderstasful preseason a mily andoos fiendse
wonderful present for family and friends.


1,
:1


the track team tor two
Years..
After completing high ..
school, she plans on enter- ..,' i" ., ,|
in-g the Na\y for two \ears ' " "e ' r " W'"
and then completing fle Kendra Woods
Sears in college as a ps\- plans on going into the
chology major. Navy and then plans
Her favorite music is on. majoring in Psy-
R&B and hip-hop. chology.
S Wood's favorite sub- When asked to de-
jecit is English and her be herself
least favorite subject is ins threes
math. ords or
Her favonte color is I e s s o
blue and her favorite sea- \ I d
son of the ear is inter ed
In her spare time. sheet - r e
writes poetry and makes r a -
! up songs ith her sister. e n
Jerica ire t
She attends Mao ei . t.
E ergreen Baptist Church.

8 ... .... U L.


Shaw Takes Over


MCCS Fifth Grade


24 hours a day, seven days a week.


Elizabeth Shaw has 22
students in her fifth grade
class at MCCS. (Greene
Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Jessalyn Covell, October
17,2006)

Speakers. of Other Languages
(ESOL) degree as well.
She taught in Broward
County as a second-grade
teacher for three years and a
sixth-grade reading teacher for
three years too.
Although her favorite sub-
ject to teach is reading, she in-
structs her students each day
with all of the basic, core class-.
es. Also, she tries to instill tol-
erance in-her students.
She said, "You have to be
flexible to be a good teacher.
Sometimes it's hard for me to
do things without my students
because I'm used to having
them around and that's encour-
aging. My favorite thing about
teaching is when kids have
those "Oh I get it" moments.
It's all worthwhile."
Shaw resides in Lee and
has a nine-year-old son, Antho-
ny. In her spare time, she en-
joys watching football, base-
ball and hanging out with Cub
Scouts. with her son, she loves
to read and spend time with her
Blue Heeler, Steel.
"People in Madison really
do offer to help so much and
when they offer, they really
mean it. I love the old houses
and the great atmosphere, it's a
wonderful place."


WfIL LMa ri~~air~fa~ci


�saa-^ima3ia..afiiiJif-sn-f, mw.-t.iK^i.









Friday, October 20, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com


SPORTS


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5B


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(850) 973-3026 Future
Cowboys
Owners: Daryl & Lee Anne Hall


Dave Galbraith Football Season Kicks Off


It's the Saints against the Lions. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet Schrad-
er, October 14, 2006)

ME - ( 2x,7/


OF



f7T 4,
t .?."AI

9
,, :.> ', .


Baby Falcon Willie Hamifton faces off with a Colt. #9
Dreshawn Ingram comes behind carrying the ball.
(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet Schrader, Oc-
tober 14, 2006)
By Janet Schrader Monlyn scored both first half
Greene Publishing, Inc. touchdowns for the Saints.
Saturday, "October 14, in Things looked bad for the
the bright sunshine, Dave Gal- Lions in the second half when
braith football kicked off its NMn InI n scored another touch-
2006' season. Five games were down. The point-after attempt
scheduled for the opening day. was no good' and the score
In the morning the 10 and un- went to 19- ). But the Lions
der kids hit the field with a con-' didn't quit and came back
test between the Lions and the when #6, Clay Peoples, scored
Saints at 9 a.m. followed by an- for the Lions off a quarterback
other game between the Colts option. The point-after at-
and the Baby Falcons at 11 a.m. tempt was no good and the.
The last game for the 10 and score went to 19-6.
under was the Jaguars and the The Lions tried an onside
Saints at. 1 p.m. In the afternoon kick to start the fourth quarter.
the 13 and under boys made They recovered the ball and
their opening appearance with #18 Alex Brown scored with a
a contest between the Falcons 50-yard scamper for the Li-
and the Packers at 3 p.m. The . ons. A short pitch from quar-
last game of the beautiful day terback' Deshawn Hiatten to
was the Steelers and the Ben- Brown again fell short of the
gals at 5 p.m. extra point effort.' The final
The Saints and the Lions score was 19-12 with the
opened up with a spirited Saints holding on to take the
match between two fairly equal win.
teams. The Saints were in the The Colts and the Baby
lead at the half .13-0. James . Falcons faced off in the next


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Proud/it Supporting

ZDae 5albraith football/ /


#18 Alex Brown scores
for the Lions. (Greene
Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Janet Schrader, October
14, 2006)
game of the day. The Colts got
off to a bad start with a fumble
'10- yards from the goal. The
Baby Falcons recovered and
#2 "Jamond Bruton galloped.
90 yards on the first play for a
Baby Falcon touchdown. Bru-
ton scored again and the score
was 12-0 Baby Falcons at the
half. The final score had the
Baby Falcons with the win 28-
7.
The third game of the day
featured more 10 and under
kids. The Jaguars faced off
against the Saints. This was
the Saints second game of the
day and they won 21-19 over
the Jags.
The fourth game of this
football-packed Saturday was
the 13 and under Packers and
Falcons. According to Billy
Tolar, an organizer for Dave
Galbraith football and a
coach, it was a really close
game. The final score was 6-0
with the Packers- taking the


#6 quarterback for the Lions Deshawn Hatten and #18 Alex Brown carrying the
ball for the Colts. #9 Devante Monismith for the Colts. #1 Garrett Sadler for the
Saints. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet Schrader, October 14. 2006)
*,kw. u5


Saints' quarterback
Drew Richardson hands
off. (Greene Publishing.
Inc. Photo by Janet
Schrader, October 14,
2006)
win. Tolar said the only points
were scored in the last min-
utes of the game.
The last game of the day
featured more 13 and under


Saints #17 Ladarius Robinson gets tackled by Li-f
ons. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet Schrader,'
October 14, 2006) ;


players. The Benglas beat the
Steelers in this game 17-0.
Monday night there was
more 10 and under, action at
Boot Hill Stadium. The Baby


Falcons played the Lions and '
won the game 19-12. In the*
second game of the evening ;1
Monday night, the Jaguars
beat the Colts 19-7.


2006 Dave Galbraith Football Schedule


Date
10/21
10/21
10/21
10/23
10/23
10/24
10/24
10/28
10/28
10/28
10/28
10/30
10/30
11/6
11/6
11,/7
11/7


Day
Saturday
Saturday
Satuird.aY
Monday
Monday
TuCesdav
Tuesday
Saturday
Saturday
Saturday
Saturday
Monday
Monday
Nlonday
NMondaiy
Tuesday
TuesdaN


Time
10 a.m.
12 p.m.
2 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
10 a.m.
12 p.m.
2 p in
4 p.m.
5-30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
5-30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.


Di ision
10/under
10/under
13/iunder
10/under
10/under
13/under
13/under
10/under
10/under
13/under
13/under
10/under
10/under
10/under
10/under
13/under
13/under


Home Team
Saints
Colts
Steelers
Bah\ Falcons
Colts
Bengal..
Packers
Cowboys
Bab. Falcons
Falcons
Steelers
Saints
Jaguars
Colts
Co'\ bo\ s
Falcons
Bengals


Away Team
Bab\ Filcons
Cowboys
Falcons
Jaguars
Saints
Steelers
Falcons
Jaguars
Colts
Bengals
Packers
Cowboys
Baby Fldcons
Saints
Jaguars
Steelers
Packers


,All games are at Madison County High School in Boot Hill Stadium


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The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



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features tie \World's Largest
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Some of the popular an-
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month of October are the An-
nual Canoe Trip Dowmn the
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rade. the King Tree Parade
and the Annual Bed Race
around the Court House
square.
On Festival da\. the an-
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tors %\ ill find an abundance of
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Country Kitchen Competi-
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. The festival is, the best
"media" .available, to tell the
"Green and Growing story of .


Florida's Forest Industr."
The festival is celebrating
more than 50 \ ears of ser\ ice
to the indutstir. We are proud
of our festival here in our
"Tree Capital." Hundreds of
volunteers \woik sear round.
making it a success in --pam ing
tribute to the tree" and to just
"having fun."


-or further Information
on the Forest Festival, please
contact: Florida Forest Festi-
\al. P.O. Box 1062, Perrt.
Florida 32348. Phone: 850-
58.4-TREE 18733). Fax 850-
584-8732. Email at: Forest-
Fcstia,'nl pirr' .cgutfi,.coin.
or \isit ii'i'. TavylorCounr'-
Chaimbet:col/


Thanksgiving is again coming two days early this year

') Thanksgiving is again coming two days early this year


" -'**f�v " 4f ",- f, - "
,*, ", .o ,'. . " .* .-..
: "" c" ' . - ' " '
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. 14, : 4-4' ':', . "* '1.
,'l" l;.': "*'.':-:
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�~'- .4'.,' "
S'.' ' ,"- "'


-. * '-

,.4-; **
, , .i':% .,




q e.


. , " 2. - ',"


for those people needing eye surgery.

Dr. Joel K. Shugar, MD, MSEE will be providing

FREE Cataract Surgery for individuals meeting

the program guidelines.


Special Surgery Day is:

NOVEMBER 21, 2006

at the Nature Coast EyeCare Institute in Perry, FL


To determine if you qualify for the free cataract surgery

please contact Darlene as soon as possible at:


�*' ? * ; .. i. . *.*/*
�- " '" ? * . * .,.
"7 : .."':: ;. .
;':: *.Z : . .�"-.
I. ..
,.I,,


r
'4
A


(800) 870-6001 ext. 641






NATURE COAST
T\feCare Instituite




. .,


A
4'~1
4..


The Forida Forest Festival

Board of Directors invites
you to attend the

2006 Florida Forest Festival ___,
in Perry, Florida. PERRY,
" .,- ERRY, FLORIDA


Saturday, Oct. 21
Kids' Parade and Picnic in the Park

Tuesday, Oct. 24
Fireworks (at Perry-Foley Airport)
Carnival begins (at Perry-Foley Airport)


10:00 a.m.


Dusk
12:00 noon


Thursday, Oct. 26
Festival Fine Arts Show Reception
(Forest Capital Hall State Museum)


Friday, Oct. 27
Field Trips at Forest Capital Park
Mr. and Mrs. Tourist Reception (Chamber)
Bed Race (Downtown)
Gaslight Antique Car Pafade (Downtown)
"Scary Stories" at Cracker Homestead


Cub Scout
Breakfast
7:00 a.m.


Arts and Crafts
Show
9:00 a.m.


9:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
6:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.


King Tree Parade
(Downtown)
10:00 a.m.


OPENING CEREMONIES
12:00 p.m.
National Anthem & Color Guard
Entertainment--Albany Marine Band, Sandspur, The Return, Karaoke Competition
Storytelling in the Pines - Loader Competition - Carnival
Festival/Elks Club Dance 9:00 p.m.



For more information, call (850) 584-TREE


6B


Friday, October 20, 2006


STIVAL DAY S'turday, 0 t 28


I


� .;,v.- �


Adblm-

�qw"










Friday, October 20, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com



OUTDOORS


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7B


Spring T
Hunters looking to do
some turkey hunting on
most of Florida's wildlife,
management areas during
the 2007 spring turkey sea-
son need to apply for quota
hunt permits beginning 10
a.m. (EDT), Tuesda'. Oct.
31, 2006.
Quota hunt permit
worksheets are available on
the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conser action Com-
mission's (FWC W\\eb site at
MyFWC.coin/huming under
"Quota Hunts." Worksheets
also are available at count\
tax collectors' offices and at
all FWC.regional offices.
Applicants must appl\
through.the FWC's Total Li-
censing System iTLSi. Ap-
plications are no longer ac-
cepted by . mail. Hunters


urkey Quota Hunt Applications Now


may apply through the In-
ternet at wildlifelicense.comr
or turn in their completed
worksheets to any tax col-
lector or license agent..
All applicants, regard-
less of when theN apply.
ha'e the same chance of be-
ing selected as long as the\
submit their applications
within the application peri-
od. Applicants must applk
bN 11:59 p.m. (EDT),
Thursday. No%. 9. 2006 to
be included in one of two
random draw ings.
Hunters,. \ho were in-
cluded in the random draw-
ing last ear but were not is-
sued a quota hunt permit.
%\ill be included in this
\ear's first draw in,. know n
as the "preference draw ing."
"When vou submit your


application, there is no
need to attach any rejection
notice you may have re-
ceived 'last year. The TLS
knows who was rejected
and who is eligible," said
FWC quota hunt coordina-
tor Eddie White. "When
you submit your applica-
tion, you will receive a re-
ceipt showing the hunts you
have applied for and your
preference status. If you are
eligible for the preference
drawing, your receipt will
indicate 'Preference: Yes.'
Those not eligible for the
preference drawing will be
included in the second
drawing."
Hunters also may apply
as a "group." A group
leader first must apply to
create the group. The


Available
group's number will :be
printed on the group
leader's receipt. Each per-
son wishing to join the
group must .submit an ap-
plication using that unique
group number.
Applicants will receive,
. by mail, either a spring
turkey quota hunt permit or
a rejection notice prior:; to
the beginning of Phase 2: o'f
the selection process occur-
ring Dec. 5. Rejected appli-
cants may re-apply during
Phase 2 on a first-come,
first-served basis for any
hunts not filled and will, be
eligible for the preference
drawing next year.
For more information
on how to apply for spring
turkey quota hunt permits,
visit MyFWC.com/hunting.


2006-2007 HUNTING SEASON DATES
Seasons and dates are not applicable on WMAs. For specific WMA regulations, obtain
individual WMA brochures published annually for each area.


Northwest
Hunting Zone

Oct. 14-Nov. 12


SDeer- Dog Training Oct. 28 - Nov. 16


General Gun

Antlerless Deer

Fall Turkey *

Quail and Gray
Squirrel

Bobcat and Otter

Spring Turkey

Wild hogs, rabbits,
taken year-round.


Nov. 27 - Dec. 3


Nov. 23-26
'Dec. 9- Feb. 14

Dec. 16-22

Nov. 23-26
Dec. 9 -Jan. 14

Nov. 11 - March 4

Dec. 1 - March 1

**March 17 - April 22


Central
Hunting Zone

Sept. 23 - Oct. 22

Oct. 7-26

Oct. 23-27

Oct. 28 - Nov. 5

Nov. 11 - Jan. 21

Nov. 18-24

Nov. 11 - Jan. 7'

Nov. 11 - March 4

Dec. 1 - March 1


South
Hunting Zone

Sept. 9 - Oct. 8

Oct. 7-26

Oct. 9-13

Oct. 14-22

Opt. 28 -Jan. 7

Nov. 4-10

Nov. 11i- Jan. 7

Nov. 11 - March 4 �

Dec. 1 - March 1


March 17 - April 22 March 3 - April 8


raccoons, opossums, skunks, nutrias, beavers and 'coyotes may be


* Except for Holmes County where there is no fall harvest of turkeys allowed.
** Spring turkey season is limited to March 17-19 in Holmes County.


CWD Not Found In


Florid a's Deer Herd


The Fish and Wildlife- ease, if such an outbreak she
Conservation Commission occur in Florida," said I
(FWC) has concluded Florida's Management Section leader
deer herd shows no signs of Robert Vanderhoof of
chronic wasting disease (CWD). FWC's Division of Hun
after four years of testing for and, Game Management.
the deadly disease.
CWD is ,a contagious , - ..
neurological disease that has - ) "
been found in captive and
wild herds of mule deer, white- ..
tailed deer and Rocky Moun- ,
tain elk within several mid-
western and western states. ' "
The disease causes degenera-: "" '.


tion of the brains of infected an-
imals resulting in emaciation,
abnormal behavior, loss of
bodily functions and death.
No southeastern states, in-
cludijng Flidi4a. ho , been lut
by the. deer disease thus far.
The FWC tested 512 free-rang-
ing deer during the past year
and more than 2,300 deer dur-
ing the past four years, with no
CWD-positive results.
"Early detection is the key
to limiting the spread of the dis-


)uld
)eer
Dr.
the
ting


To reduce the chances of
CWD gaining entry into Florida,
it is illegal to bring into the state,
carcasses of any species of deer,
elk or moose from 14 states and


www. aphis., usda. gov/vs/nahps/c
wd/ for the most up-to-date
CWD coverage.
Once again, this hunting
season the FWC is turning :to
sportsmen for assistance ;in
helping monitor the state's deer
herd for CWD.
"\\e' re asking hunters report an, sightings of sickly.or
scrak n) -hlooking deer," Vander-
hoof 'aid. "If you see sucl a
deer. call toll-free 1-866-CWD-
\\ATCH 1293-9282). Wildlife
biologists' will respond, and: if
neces.sarn, collect deer tissue for
testing. It's important -to
contact ii.s as soon as possible,
because uc.h testing must take
place ~'nhin 48 hours of a
deei'. death o field d reliable.rc-
sulls. ".
-1C C\VD WATCH is part of
an aggressive monitoring pro-
gram to ensure CWD is not al-
ready in Florida and the disease
does not spread into this state.
Currently, there is no evi-
dence that CWD poses a risk for
111 - -... 1- - l 1-1- _. 1 "i


two alnguia provinces were humans, however, public health
S: " ' ' ' CWD has been detected, officials recommend avoiding
Sh .. A The disease has been de- direct contact with any siek-
So tested in New Mexico, Utah, looking deer or one that has
'-.' . - E Colorado, Wyoming, Kansas, died from unknown causes.
Minnesota, Oklahoma, Mon- More information about
tana, South Dakota, Nebraska, CWD is available at
tSFIiiu gu e3 pK 0^ rt ; Wisconsin, Illinois, New York, MyFWC.com/CWD. The Web
West Virginia, and Alberta and site also offers links to wildlife
B. Pat McGniff trout to 25 inches. and oto reds (they landed I I and Saskatchewan, Canada. Visit and health agencies with more
One hu.re Cast Guide Sert ice tw o Spanish. The Morellos fished plugs. cut bait and, the United States Department of in-depth information about the
S Strange udes this past %weekend yielded less than li\e pinfish undei Ciuns to land their fish. *' Agriculture's Web site at disease.
. ideal conditions for the trout leight-hour incoming udes \William \Vaner. also of Kissimmee, and his part-
SSaturda\ and Sunda\ l but seemed to rall\ the reds back ner, i ho didn't w\ ant to be identified...w\ witness protec-
out of the creeks? Most folks ha\e been doing good on tion program nmi be'i had 10 trout, a flounder and t\wo
reds and fair on trout Trout are hitting topj\ater Nlir- Spanish fishing plugs and liie pinfish under Cajun1.s
rOlures in SheDogs and Top Dog Jrs. A few trout were from 3 - 6 feet of \\atei.
c\en landed on Catch 2000's The water temperature a.s aroutid 73 - 75 depend- ' '1 10 versideDr.te haee L
Mickey Wheeler of Thomas\ ille. Ga. and a budd mine on w hen and \ here oti took it'
had 10 trout and two reds. on Cordell Redfins and Biie- Note: I \\ill be gi ing a free seminar on "Trout Fish- . MotelnAccommodations
A .-Bait fighters Saturday from 2.5 teet of water. ing with Plugs and Grubs"' at Boater's World 150R5 entalBoatsGas alb ndHDiesel
Bill\ Pillow and I went out for four hours Sunda\ Go\ernor'\ Square Bl\d Suite H3 in Tallahassee on . Live"Bait-e SlipRemn3s
and had three trout, a red. three flounder, and three black \Vednesda.y. October 25 at 5 30 p.m There \\ ill be plen- $nacks, Beer, Drinks
'sea bass. The flounder and blacks hit Assassins Shrimp t1 of door prizes. Call iS50 671-3400 for more informa- OffshoreTackleAcce 32
Cocktails it 5 - 6 feet of w water. The trout and reds came tion. & more! 877-90709
3 . on ierkbaJis in four feet of w after. No Offshore Report as the High \\ --N-D and lousy' a 77
s;k ';"- Fra.nks. and Kath\ lorello of Ki,'inimee hiad ti\e I fore .,cL. h i lni ,'n , \ le.r , ,in..n..-i..........In.-. , "r


. - ' '"


The Enterprise-Recorder


How to use 'The major and minor feeding time for each day are listed helon The najor feeding Umes are the besi for the
sportsman and Idsl about 2 hturs. the minor feeding times Lan ikls, l.ive ,-.od siicces, but aInst nly about I hour.
Good luck and be careful out0111 there.
IL 11 111 11, 11 111 F IT


Season

Archery


Crossbow


Muzzleloading Gun Nov..17-19
Feb. 15-25


Ix


IWAWA�A 'aloa-,�-Iw -1, . A-9-- A-1-1- - -f At. W I


J~l~ i ......... . ..... .. . . .............. .. ...


It I t U I-"I" '' c % " 1 -" CI" '2" c %% " I I i .'t o.









810 The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Friday, October 20, 2006


EDWARDS INSULATION
Covering all your insulation needs
Specializing in Fiberglass Blown
Insulation..FREE ESTIMATES
Ricky Edwards 850-253-3732
Cell: 850-673-9897

'Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Iriigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
(850) 973-2848 '


. Excavating Work
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Re-
moval, Demolition, and Roads. No
Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call
Paul. Kinsley at 850-973-6326






2003 ALpha See Ya
lMotorhome
S 23,000 miles
2 slide ts ou
7 foot ceihngs:
washer.'drnei cornbo
Strand up Sho%%ei
4 TV's and DVD Players
* Basement ,ir Condiuoning
Back ULip Camera
Dual Refngator
Leather Couch and J Lounge
AUton,'iaic Fro't Shades
1 ,120i,t,1t001
Still has some "arrant',
386-316-s054


FOR SALE
1982 Motr[home, 25' .Long,
Sleeps Five. $4,000 or Best Of-
fer. Call 850-929-2487 or 850-
673-1178
I


1998 Ford Explorer Sport
2 Door. Tnes in Excellent'(F'or '",
edition; Low Miles $5:x ' * ''
850-929-7541


Bedroom Set. New King Bed, TV
Armoire, chest, 2 nightstands. Re-
tail $3,200, sacrifice $1,0001: 850-
222-2113
DINING ROOM - Brand New
Cherry Table, .6 Chippendale
Chairs, Lighted China Cabinet.
$850. -Can Deliver. Call 850-222-
9879
2' PC LEATHER sofa & loveseat.
Brand new, hardwood frames -
$795. can deliver. 850-425-8374

Living Faith on Tape
Send $6 check /money order to:
Mother Mattie
P. O. Box 1163
Madison, FL 32341

3 Piece Living Room - New Micro
Fiber Sota, Loveseat, Chair. $650,
still wrapped, qtain'resis. 850-222-
9879
QUEEN ORTHOPEDIC PILLOW-
TOP MATTRESS SET. New in
plastic, warranty $275. 850-222-'
2113
Cherry sleigh bed, $250, solid
wood, still boxed, 850-425-8374
6 piece bedroom set, new in boxes,
must sell, $550 Call 850-545-7112.

Packing???
House Breaking???
25 lbs. of
Clean Newspapers
just $2
S973-4141

AJL NEW KING PLUSH TOP
ORTHOPEDIC mattress set. Still
inelastic with warranty,' can deliver
- P.95. 850-222-7783






-Gentle Hand Raised Bull
10 Months Old, 12-1-05
3/4 Black Angus 1/4 Hereford
Chemical Free except for fly
spray. This bull can rayed,
brushed and led. bodied
from good , Comes
fom sto ws fast. Ex-
,ell nation, Asset for
Br Dam and older heifer
s ,li of same parents on prop-
eity. Worth taking a look at $800
'all 948-5097


\Wanted - peafowl[ Need one ma-
ture mate nov. before 'pring, but
v.ill bha pair,, if needed Call S50-
973-6131 or 50-46-1-1165. Aso
Sant guineas





- ," L KI ' ' t 'will-
Greenville ointe

Apartments

1,2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible apts. H LID vouchers accept-
ed. Call 850-948-3036. TDD/TTY
711. 192 NW- Greertille Pointe
Trail, Green\ille, FL 32331
Equal Housing Opportunity


Cambridge Manor
Apartment, designed for Senioi's
, and Disabled. I &: 2' bedrooms.
HITD Noucher. accepted Call 850-
073-37"L_ - TTY Acs " 11 "Thts in-'
sutution is an equal opportunity\
prcoidet and empl:s, er."

Couthem i Illas of.

A(adison C'partments

HUD vouchers accepted. J; 2, &,
3 BR, HC & non-HC accessible
apts. CeI 850-S73-85_2, TDDTTY
711. 200 Southern Villas Circle,
Madison, FL 32-4. i.
Equal Housing Opportunity.

K"l"


Commercial
Industrial
Property.
v. ith state htighrsa frontage-23
acres, Comer lot_ Fronts both
Harvey Greene Dn\e and High-
way 53 South. Natural gas line,
,. !pw ,4 tler mamn. a3Cce'I,,io i,0I
f,iC tire hidrant .'a i so 'C
from t\ Property has easy access to 1-10,
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will build to
suit tenant.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141



Real Estate


SOUTH FLORIDA West Palm
Beach very close 'to beach; 4 bd;
1:5 bath; 2 story; is.ood tloors, de-
tachable garage. $275,000 Seller
will contribute $2.1001 to closing.
954-864-5788
315 Leggette Ave, Greenville Fl, 3
bedroom 1 bath' home in quiet area,
hardwood floors, paneling, separate
dining room, separate living room,
eat-in kitchen, recent insulated win- :
dows and central heat/ AC.. Utility
building in rear with washed/dryer
hookups, .carport. Offered at
$83,500..
Alan A. 'Levin Broker-Associate
McClellan Realty 850:570-0742


Pioneer

Excavating
& Tractor Services
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump
Removal, Demolition, Roads,
Mowing, Discing, Box-Blading,
and Tilling.
No Job Too Small Free Estimates
Call Paul Kinsley
850-973-6326

Cottage style house for sale with-
in walking distance to NFCC. Two
or three bedroom, sunroom, inside
laundry room, completely renovat-
ed, brand new appliances, heat: &
air. $98,000 850-869-0135.
192 ACRES OF PRIME
HUNTING PROPERTY
(Madison County) :
Four Star Hunt Camp, Virgin Tim-
ber, 8 Cabins, Huge Cookhouse,
Fully Equipped Workshop w/3
Bays, Tractor, Four Wheeler, Com-
pletely Furnished, HVAC, I/M;
Washer/Dryer, Satellite TV, No
Expense Spared. For sale by owner
$1.75, 863-634-3340


5 Mobile Homes For Less
Than $30,000 Each. Dei',-
cred And Set Up On Your Land'
Call MikeAI: "
(386) 364-1340.







Kountry Kitchen
No\\ Hiring
Full-Time Servers
(8501 971-00124


POSITION AVAILABLE
CITY MANAGER
OF MLADISON, FLORIDA

The Citu of Madjison. Florida is
seeking a full Lime Cir\t Manag-
er The CjtL of Mladison. has a
population of 3.063. an annual
budget of $8.5 million, and 53
full imrne employees, and oper-
ates a natural gas department, a
water and sewer department, a
police department, a fire depart-
ment, a sanitation department.
and a public works department.
The City Manager oversees. the
day,to day operations of the City,
and reports to a five member.
City Commission, who are elect-
ed on a non-partisan basis for
four ',ier1 teriri, Jbe ideal can-
didaie i ill be killedd and e\pen-
enced in communication, com-
munity relations, administrative
leadership, organizational devel-
opment, personnel management,
municipal accounting, economic
development, and strategic plan-
ning. A degree in public admin-
istration or related field, and/or a
minimum of five years of public
administration e\peiience is de-
sirable if inteieted, please
send letter and resume of no
more than five (5) pages, with
references (but no letters ofrec-
ommeridati.-ni, to the City
Clerk, City of Madison, 321 SW
Rutledge Street Madison, Flori-
da (fax no. 850-973-5084, no
later than December '31, 2006, in
envelope or behind cover sheet
clearly marked as "City Manag-
er Position". Letter and resumes
are subject to disclosure under
Florida' public records laws.
Salary negotiable depending on
quality aton' . "


.Monticello Christian Academy is
now accepting applications for
teachers pre-k thru 12th grade and
teachers aide. No college required.
For more, information call 997-
6048 "

Tractor and
Loader Operators
Are wanted in the Lee area.
Please call (800) 447-3304. ask
for Chad or Mas.


Suwannee Valley
Humane Society
1156 SE Bisbee Loop
Madison. Florida 32340
T1., miles south ol Lee otf C R. 2-55
From I1-1.I E,.n 262. T-ke C R. 255
nonth 1/2 mile follow. the �igns
YouL niut check'. i.h a'i prior to
bringjiim in a animal drop-off do-
nation I. i-rc duird o ir an% animal
brought to the shelter. Our HouIrs-
Tue., th .. 1 ii i . .1 2 11. 'is't our
we'bsiic ir ad _ee the jninialNthat need
a [ dall, good home al , ti ii'_,i,. 'i
', ,' it. 'iu tiir.t'li. oir e-.rrimail u at
'!nl aot'i /ti n ldi. i d.'5 ti . ll ,ll
Lost or Found Pets:
It 'ou ha'e lot a pet or found one.
die Iluimiane society k, Ill help i,ou tind
\oui pei. Call u, ai iS50i i 71-9904
,o-r Loll tiee at I -1,4ti-( 23.-72 ! i2.
Lea'.e a mes..age if' \.'e re cloed, '.e
.*ill letui r ',our :Call.
\Vc ieall% appreiate donatons,
- e coul.In'tl ..per ,: . .h.ot rd - hemn
The;, ajie lc heart -ind oul o- t our
Thritt Shop,' icoinme. Pleas.e conid-
cr hinging u' donanons'. ot clothes..
liousehold goods unmitJire anJd t-,..
\\E ASK fHAT ALL DON[lIONS
BE IN GOOD CONDITION. odither-
'.'. ic ,' cannot sel! then I TIH ANKS.


Apalachee center
A Beha ibral Health Care Center
currentIl seeking-

NIASTER'S LEVEL
THERAPIST #1981
A MINIMUM OF A MASTER'S
DEGREE \\WITH A MAJOR IIN
COUNSELING. SOCIAL \WORK.
PSYCHOLOGY. NURSING RE-
HABILITATION. SPECIAL EDU-
CATION. HEALTH EDUCATION.
OR A RELATED HUMAN SER-
VICES FIELD AND T\WO YEARS
OF PROFESSIONAL EXPERI-
ENCE IN PROVIDING SER-
VICES TO PERSONS WITH BE-
H-\VIORAL ILLNESS. SOME
LOCAL TRAVEL REQUIRED.

CHILDREN'S C SE
A MANAGER #1830)
A BACHELOR'S DEGREE
.FROM AN ACCREDITED UNI-
VERSITY OR COLLEGE \\ITH
7 A MAJOR IN COLINSELING. SO-
CIAL WORK. PSYCHOLOGY.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE. NURSING.
REHABILITATION. SPECIAL
EDUCATION, HEALTH EDUC.-
TION, OR RE LAT E D HUMAN
SERVICES FIELD WITH ONE (1)
YEAR OF FULL-TIME OR
EQUIVALENT EXPERIENCE
WORKING WITH CHILDREN
WITH SEVERE EMOTIONAL
DISTULIRBANCE. OR, OTHER
BACHELOR'S DEGREE FROM
AN ACCREDITED UNIVERSITY
OR COLLEGE WITH THREE (3)
YEARS FULL-TIME OR EQLil V-
ALENT EXPERIENCE WORK-
ING WITH CHILDREN WITH
SEVERE, EMOTIONAL DISTUR-
BANCE, MASTER'S DEGREE
PREFERRED. ,
: "'ADUL,'WAS!iF'' , ,
MANAGERS #2211
A BACHELOR'S DEGREE
FROM AN ACCREDITED UNI-
VERSITY OR COLLEGE WITH
A MAJOR IN COUNSELING, SO-
CIAL WORK, PSYCHOLOGY,'
CRIMINAL JUSTICE, NURSING,
REHABILITATION, SPECIAL
EDUCATION. HEALTH EDUC-
TION. OR A RELATED HULIAN
SERVICES FIELD (A RELATED'
HUMAN SERVICES FIELD IS
ONE IN WHICH MAJOR
COURSE WORK INCLUDES'
THE STUDY OF HUMAN BE-
HAVIOR AND DEVELOPMENT)
AND HAVE A MINIMUM, OF
ONE YEAROF FULL TIME OR
EQUIVALENT EXPERIENCE
WORKING WITHADULTS EX-
PERIENCING SERIOUS MEN-
TAL ILLNESS OR A BACHE-
LOR'S DEGREE FROM AN AC-
CREDITED UNIVERSITY OR
COLLEGE AND THREE YEARS
FULL TIME OR EQUIVALENT
EXPERIENCE WORKING WITH
ADULTS EXPERIENCING SE-
RIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS.
For more information and a,
complete listing of available po-
sitions:
www.apalacheecenter.org
(850)523-3218 or (800)226-2931
x2218
Human Resources.
2634-J.Capital Circle N.E.,
Tallahassee, FL 32308
Pre-Hire Drug Screen & FDLE
background check An Equal Op-
portunity '/Affirmative Action Em-
ployer Drug-Free Workplace.


Newspapers & Aluminum Cans:
\Ve haje a rec.',cle newspaper bin
at 305 Pinev.rood Dr iUt-I west of
Johnson'. Appliance.Radio Shack
We also collect aluminum cans to re-
cIcle. just bnaig iheim to the shelter.
All the mone', goes to help the home-
less anima:d
ANIALALS FOR ADOPTION
DOGS:
3070 - Cocoa - I' a 11 eek old Cat-
ulhua. She i.- ,hite and chocolate.
spa.ed and \ei' loveable
3062 - Gretchen - la a Romrmnix and
S _ month'. old Site is. black and
brown and has been spadvd She
would d like 10 uo home with someonee
3089 - lackal - A large Germann
Shepard! nil'. He is W\hite and
brown . houscbioken, and good u idi
older kids He is a 1 year old and
been neutered
3051 - Chester - A 5_ month old,
blacl. 'nd brown Heeler'mi, Ha.
been netitered and ,s .er\ fuerndly.
31)39 - Freckles - Is uI lk, ha.,
bo.i .'n spois and has a tan e'r e She ii
S _ month'. old and has been ,payed
Thr little houndJ sould lo,.e to to
home \\%th someone
CATS:
3056 - Ra'cal - I.; a male Tabb,, who,
h.ia been neuteied He i' 2 :,ear :old'


What make so e ia
I :MlMlj ^j ^


As a Fortune 100 company and industry leader, we're
an employee-based, team-focused organization where
you can stay - and flourish! CVS has over 6,000 stores
and $38 billion in yearly sales. Currently, we seek the
following individuals in the Madison area: .


w PHARMACY TECHNICIANS

PHARMACY CLERKS
Full and part-time
We offer an excellent structured pharmacy training
program that allows you to become nationally certified.
Must be at least 18 yrs old with an HS diploma (or
equivalent) and solid customer service, computer and/
or data entry skills. Prior experience preferred. State or
National certification a plus.

Salary commensurate with experience and certification.
* For consideration, please apply in person at 407 E. Base
Street, Madison, FL 32340. You may also apply online at
www.careers-cvs.com. An equal opportunity employer
supporting a drug-free work environment.



CVS/pharmacy
Expect something extqa.

i-


$$ AVON REPS $$
NEEDED NOW
50% COMN
Could \Vin $1.000 '
HURRY CALL
Dorothy
973-3153
The Healthy Start Coalition of
Jelerison. Nladis.on, & Taylor
Counties. a non-profit agency. is re-
cruiting doulas from the.tri-county
area. Doulas arej women who pro-
vide supportive services during
childbirth arid eain S'5-350 per
service. A recruitment for interest-
ed women will be held October
24th at 1pm at the Madison Count.\
Public Library (no charge). For
more information. coritait 550-948-
274 t.i; :l t i: * .. ; ": 'ri
100 TALENT SCOUTS NEED-
ED! WORK FOR HOLLYWOOD
FROM YOUR HOME. NO EXPE-
RIENCE REQUIRED. WW .JIM-
BROWNSCOUTS.COM


MADISON COUNTY
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COLiRT
JOB OPPORTUNITY AN-
NOUNCEMENT

The Madison County Clerk's Of-
fice has an opening for a deputy
,clerk in the C.il'Recording Divi--
sion. Qualified applicants need c\-
perience in the ci\ il court area and
recording public records or educa-
tion that \'.ouid gi\e background in
said area' Applicant shouldd be
able to perform a variety of tasks in
a busy office, be responsible for
processing and maintaining court
papers and.public records, provide
assistance to citizens in accessing
the courts and records, be a quick
learner in data entry and retrieval,
be a team member working with
other deputy clerks, and be meticu-
lous with ethe paperwork while
working with the public. Salary
range: $22,445 - $28,057.: Applica-
tions Deadline: October 27, 2006.
Submit completed Application for
Employment, available at same, to:.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Madison County Courthouse
Room 101
P.O. Box 237,
Madison, FL 32341-0237
Madison County is an Equal Op-
portunity employer and a Drug
Free Workplace.


thorthaired domesnc.
3055 - Tom - A 9 -.eekl old ktllen.
M\ho is black and has been fixed FiHe
lo'. e to pliN and bounce .,iound
3035 - Baby Doll - a 5 month old
Lat. '.'.ho been spaj'ed arid is a sIlack
kitty Likes to he made of
2998 - Jenny - This labby ith 4
' lhie Jeei. is a female thai has been
,payed. She i a leal s....'eetheart and
is 5 month, old.
2990 - Punch - is a female calico
She has been spayed and is 15
m,-n-Lh. old
THESE ARE SPECIAL KITTY}
2592 - Millie - is a 3 %\ea old cat.
who i' ',ery sieet She i. a '.'.'hile
TabbN and has been pis,ed. Oldet
cats make V'. ondeiful pet foi an older
pers,,n Doe' not like children and
does not hlie io be held all the rim-e
Thii is a s ei special l cat and ,ou can-
adopt her floi $60 00) because ,hc has
a mcn.T - thip in ca.e she get[ -,I
2240 - Si"\ - This is a real -pe:iil
I ,iir,, Slit i- 3 \eai, ,Id and io. black
and gr:m:, Tabt- She does not like
children but, v.otuld iiiak. a i v.-inder-
ful companion tor and oldei person
She does ha.e to hase speci.il tod If
theie i_ ai oldei peison, isho iiouild
1,o.e to ha'.e this cai. hle can he
ad pied for .a .pecial price ;t $25-'5 '


AUCTION
Saturday, October 21, at 6 30 PM
1693 SW M.:sole - Hall
Rd;(CR360) Mladison. For Infor-
mation Call 850-973-2959
NE\ TRLICKLOAD HAS AR-
RIV'D TROMN A LARGE.-TV
SHOPPING NETWORK and
must be sold Air conditioned with
Comnfy Seats'.
Cookout Starts at 5:30 PM
GET THE BEST
BARGAINS AROUND !!
LOTS OF FUN &
GIVE-A-WAYS
AU691 AB290
Directi:,nns From 1-10: Take SR14
SW 'to. stop _ign Turn right on
SR14 361;i 2cuto forkinroadbear
right onto SW Mosley Hall
(CR360), past fite huL,,,e on left.


Yard sale October 20, 21, 22 and
weekend of October 27, 28, 29,
6537 NW 40th Way, Jennings, FL.
From Madison, SR 6 east to Hamil-
ton County Road 141 N, appx. 3.6
miles, follow the yellow signs. '93
Dodge Spirit, '91 Aerostar Van, '84
Ford Pickup, '88 Cougar, shotgun, 3
rifles, 3 pistols, 3 boats and motors,
100 silver dollars, Peace set, Mor-
gan set, complete American Eagle,
1400 books and book tapes, west-
erni, scifi, and mystery, 5 computers,
bicycles, gun cabinet, table saw, 2
freezers, dryer, generator, air com-
pressor, waterless cleaner, home
and auto by Envirotec, gas cook
stove. Five families, too much to
list.
Come in iand ee her.
- \\e ha.e kilnens rio. So cone in
and look around. I am suic \ou ,'ill
rind v hal .',oLI .ue looking t,.r \Ve are
iov". doing -4 in I cat -'no,[ers-, 'n all
cat. here ai t f thiue IuI .irn %L .oCitI
LOST AND FOUND:
LOST- Harle\ - a niale Chihuahua
I. iokI. like Dau,.hundi \\a., lust
around SE Farii Road in Lee, FL
He is Ch,.oci:late ii 1 2 Jdots on his
bick He ha-i stiimac protIleni. an
needs speciall care Di Le.i'. ha, his.
inl [It found please call Crs-tal
Birhop al S i" o -1.545',
FOUND: Maliee, Pug. around H%,.
41 io .,rd, I '5 It .Oiir duo g all Bar-
bola .i th. Si..a.iince \Ville%. H iii'iaine
Sneser, a't s:.q:-c I. -,1: 4 01 t,., I leI.
. ty- 236-1S 12 ben'.eein i O.ijia ni til
2 1.11.1 p n
DO V"T FORGET TO . JOIN L'S .4A
OUR 21ST A.NN .AL PEI' SHOt
AT SUil 4.V.VEE COLrNT COLI-
SEl'M ONV OCTOBER 21ST REG-
ISIRATIO,\ STARTS IT IO.O0.1 t1
SHOW S1ARIS .AT 11:0O.4,tA. tE
HOPE TO SEE YOU
THERE.BRING l'OUR PE TS A'ND
HAVE SOME FLUN. IE 11ll.
HA.tE DOG\ IAN) CATS THERE
TO A.4DOPT. (,.AIN.


Inside & Treasures & More Glassware
Outside Shops Summer Hours: Sat-Sun 10-4 Antiques

Yard sale We buy...call usl Collectibles
Set-up Tools
$8 up - . - Furniture
Hwy. 19 S. * 850-838-1422 * 850-584-7124 Mon-Th


I


II









Friday, October 20, 2006





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Be your own boss and make thousands of dollars without a license
or experience.
Free training, web tools, marketing material
and complete support.
Be the first in your area. Conditions apply

CALL NOW AT 1-877-300-1595






Read Together, Florida


Statewide Reading Event- October 2006


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9BV


JUVENILE DIVISION
4-02-DP


IN THE INTEREST OF:

T.K. 12-19-1999.
M.E. 05-30-1998

MINOR CHILDREN
________/_


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: Michelle Hamilton
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 1450 Georgetown Road, Madison Florida 32340

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition under oath, has been filed in the above
-styled court for the termination of parental rights and the permanent commitifhent of
T.K., a female child born onlO/10/1999 in Leon Count., Florida ') the State of Florida
and M.E. a female child born 05/30/1998 in Leon Counnt placing agency, for-subse-
quent adoption and you are hereby to be and appear in the above court at the Taylor
County Courthouse, Perr). Florida 32344 on Mlondai. October 23, 2006 at Q9:i0 L.M..
for a Termination of Parenial Righit. Adisor' Hearing and I itsho cause w is .aid pe-
tition should not be granutd. You musl appear on the date and time pecificd.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THE TPR ADVISORY HEARING CON
STITUTES YOUR CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
TO THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECI-
FIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE,
PETITION. .

WITNESS my hand and official seal as the Judge of said court this 27th of epltembrr,
2006.

/s/

10/6. 10/13. 10/20.10/27
�... .. . . .. . .. .


I Plesecal:Mar Ele Geee 80-75411


Business Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do
you earn SOO/da", ' 30 Machines.
Free Cands All for $9.995.
888M629-9968 BO2000033 Call
us: We aill not be undersold'

NO BULL. THIS IS A FAST
TIRACK' I'll show you hocs I make
$3.000 weekly form any location.
No MLM. NO Lies Call i8SSi
657-8461.

GOLF BUSINESS Play Lots of
Golf and Travel. Pla' better. tour-
naments played in US and W\orld
Raise MoneN tor Chanties. Earn
Aw.esome Income. , i'c,.SGSPte-
seitalli.'iis.colit iSO i861-9456
24/-7

VENDING ROUTE Snacks,
Drinks. Eieri) Drinks Tool All
Btand�.-.All Siz:.-. P v.,'sin'ial-
Equipment, Professional Support.
Financing w/ 57.500 Down Tom:
i1277i 841-S726, Local BO#2002-
137

YtOUL \ ON T SLEEP TONIGHT!
The "Ulumate Juice" monev-mak-
ing opportunity i., coming
12,'i)l/16 Pre'. e.'. at ws- Jul-
cePerfect.com Don't mus, this
tremendous nutriiional-technology
breakthrough' FREE Pre-registra-
tion'!

Fia icial
REFINANCE/PURCH ASE -NY
CREDIT YOU are our Prionrty
Bankruptcy. curndoxwns, stop fore-
closures Residential / In\estors
/Commnercial We get the job dose
"The Right Wa\ Call us Direct
Lending Partners (f66W459-2606

PRIVATE MONEY AVAILABLE:
Easy qualifying. Rapid funding.
Flexible teonsl on real estate se-
cured properties 'Bare-land
'Commercial ' Residential.
Thomas: iS:,608L5-45i02.
Help W anted
AMNERICA'S DRI\ ING ACADE-
MY Start our diving cariee to-
da:,' Offerini Courses in CDL A.
Low tuition fee' Man) payment
options! No registration fee'
iS6h1SS9-02 ii i tito@,to raii .:
dr i 't . iL' lte ' ' i *i .

TEAMS NEEDED Home w\eekl\.
Class A-CDL nv,HAZMAT. TOP
PAY & BENEFITS i-00'li42"-
O'l07S 11ww' i nti llo .o it 11

Dnier- ACT NOW Hiring OTR
& Local Drier, 'Earn $l41.000 in
bonuses sour l it ,ear 'Nev,
Equipment "Preiiiiuun Pay Pack-
age 'No HazMat Requied -Call
iS77,S82- :,5 7-Oakles Tran.porin.
%%e care about our dn-.er.s!

DRIVER: YOU WANT If, WE
HAVE IT' Solo. teams. ,o. ner op-
erators, conmpan, drivei s, *tudent;s.
recent grads, regional. dedicated.
long haul. \an. flatbed Mlust be
21 CRST Career Center
. fff -i40-27 S. 1 it ii - tl or_
L i it.' -.I

Dri'.er-HIRING QU ALIFIED
DRIVERS for Central Florida Lo-
cal & National OTR positions,
Food grade tanker. n,' haznat. no
pumps. great benefits. competitive
pa, & nev. equipment Need 2
sear-. eperiente. Call Bynum
fr.insport for ouW 'O'p pp ntlinit', to-
da', S IN00A'41-5i"l

INTERESTED IN A. POSTAl


JOB Earning $57K/\r Avg Mini-
mum Pa,' Our oer ices can help
you prepare fur the Postal Battery
E\am. Find Out Ho,', Call Today
For More Information .. (800U584-
1775 Ret Code #P5799. not affib-
ated wUv.-SPS

Earn Up to $55i0 WEEKLY Work-
ing though the government PT No
Experience. Call Today"
i18iJ148-292-1 Ak for Depart-
ment W21

DATA ENTRY! Work From Any-
where Flexible Houir. Personal
Computer Required. Excellent Ca-
reel Opfportunitf Serious Inquiries
Only ixluj344-9636 Ext. 700.

$2,900 Wectd, Guaranteed! Ad-
dressing letters in youi spare time
Free po:t:ige.-.upplie: No e\petn-
: ca.-se nc.-L.c-..u '" a ...tal iiuiini dite-
ly. write AA&G Publicanons, 2370-
G HillLrest Rd #147-H, Mobile,
AL 36695.

Homes For Sale
Su DOWN HOMES Go t & Bank
Forcclo-ures' Lc,% oi no don n' No
credit OK' Call Ncu i (8001749.
20i'i5.

FOR SALE Bt OWNER -- 2BR
cond'.. St. Pc ersbuig. I mile from
Gull ot Nle'.ico'Don Cesar On Isla
Del S.ul gult cour-e Completels,
fui nished. 5370.000( . Call
i S5t6.ii8s-S-2213

Instruction
HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERA-
TOR TRAINING FOR EMPLOY-
MENT Bulldozers. Backhoes.
Loaders. Dump Trucks. Graders.
Scraper,. E\ca\ators: National
Certification, Job Placement Assis-
tance. A.,s-ciated Training Ser-
vices, 101 34.1251 -32 4 ni'n.cqlulp-
lilt iif rl� ' i it, ' i'il

He.a, Equipment Operator CER-
T IFIED Hand onl Tiaining. Job
Placement .-\s-i.iance. Call Toll
Free 8i6 i933- 1575. ASSOCI.AT-
ED TRAINING SERVICES. 5177
Homous,.t,,.i Tr.,il. Lec.nto. Florida.
34-141.

Land Ior Sale
2ii a.:re, 'ith puind neji State &
Na.rl park:, C.inip. Fish. Hunt
$S9 i.9ii. ,A. niiel fin $4C 5 down
1i001312-52163 IFlonda Woudrand
Giriop, Inc LL. RE Broker

N. Fla S.' ).\ 1 1 i2i.perr aLre Pines,
haM-..-d- & .:ieek HomenLses.
hunt oi iccleiatiin i l00i294-2313
E.t I I05 A Bar S.ile,. Inc. 7 days
"aiii-"pm i

Medical Suprplies
FREE DIABETIC SUPPLIES'
MEDIC \RL PATIENTS! Call Us
Toll Free i.5i0 204-34"0 and re-
cerie .t FREE METER' Am-Med
Quality\ iahbelic Supplies

_Miscellaneous
AI FEND CO(.'LLEGE ONLINE
.fro in, Hlin. M Jl Ial. ' Bu-iness,
' Para.leal. C..mputer- "Cimninal
lu'ti.C. ',li.h olc.'tmlernt ais-iiance
Counputie prm'. ided. Financial Aid
if Liquailited Call ( i iS5 -2121
1 il n... ''iJ t, Ir'h.,'f, e, Te-. Ir io r.

AIRLINF MECHANIC - Rapid
traii inri 1. I, Igh pap in .\',V action
Caieei. - -\ predict, esere eshort-
age -in. i . i.il .id , I i|l|ilhl - Job
plaLc ieni:nit .-i.,lice. CALL AIM


DIVORCE$275-$350*COVE RS
children, etc Oni; one signature
required' *Excludes govt. fees!
Call weekdays (80001462-2000.
ext.600. 8Sani-6pm. Alia Divorce.
LLC Established 1977.

2006 MODEL BLOWOUT!!!
Warehouse Clearance Sale on the
New Kayak Pool. SAVE $ thou-
sands on selected model., limited
supply' FREE ESTIMATES Eas,
Finance Fast Irstallation Call
(866)348-7560 www'.kawk\ools-'
flo iLda.con.

* Real Estate
MURPHY, NORTH CAROLINA
Affordable Home-s in the Moun-
tains Affoidable Homes, Moun-
tain Cabins and Land CALL FOR
FREE BROCHURE (S77)j37-
228h EXIT:lREALTY MOUN-
TAIN VIEW PROPERTIES
wui,.:eirmnurplthy.cotm.

Mounauin Waterfront Sale Lake-
front homesites & condos \.'boat
slips on beautiful Lake Chatuge in
Western NC Call no'. foi Nov. 4
reservation. 877j234-8850 x 102.

Gulf front lots $595k Homes start-
ing mid $300k New master
planned ocean front community on
beautiful Mustang Island. near
Corpus Chris.ti, TX. L'rini(na-
mnonshioe.com, i866)891-5163

North Carolina Cool Mountain Air.
Views & Streams, Homes. Cabins
& Acreage. FREE BROCHURE
1800i642-5333. Realty Of Mturph,
317 Peachtree St. Murphy, N C.
28906 w, . rea/rh'ofmiirphiy.cni.

BEAUTIFUL N CAROLINA.
ESCAPE THE HEAT IN THE
BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL
MOUNTAINS OF WESTERN NC
Homes. Cabins. Acreage & IN-
VESTMENTS. CHEROKEE
MOUNTAIN GMAC REAL ES-
TAT E
clicroAkt'einou 'lotitrealrv.t'omI Call
for free brochwue i.800841-586S.

A LAND BARGAIN -
WYOMING 35 ares - $49.90Uj:
.50 acre-- $559.90)0 Located 90
minute east of Salt Lake in the
foothills ot the ULinta Mountains.
Snow-capped mountain \ ie..
SuiTounded b., go\'t land Recre-
alional paradise EZ Teinim, Call
Utah R.inches LLC i.Sj5-)5 1-
5263

With Tennerssee' Beautiful Lakes
& Mountains, you are sure to find
the perfect spot to call home. Call
Nanc\ Gaines. Gables & Gates
1865 138IM -7 '03., i h517 7 7 -,) I 1


NORTH GEORGIA Lovel, 7-ace
retreat, located on the
Cherokee/Pickeis Counts Line.
Has 600 ft. trout stream frontage in
rear. 5B!4BA house. pool. hot tub.
pasture & oodlands. Listed forI
$575,0iii00i. Ron Zalkind, MetruoBo-
kers/GMAC. i 7(16273-04;59

BEAUTIFUL BLUE RIDGE, NC
Mountain Viev., S+ Acie Moun-
tain Estate Hea'.ils Wooded with
Stream EZ Financing- $4,i000.
i800i230-6380.e.t. 120

EatI Tennessee- Nonii. Lake 5.c.,
acrc w.,ioded L-\KEFR(NT I...-i
$66.5i.ii 5.1 ACRE WOODED
.iev. lot- $28.900(i Call Lakeide


Realty @ 1423.626-5820 Or Visit
iswii.ake sideraititlr-ni.com.

LAKE LOT CLOSE OUT SALE
Saturday, November 11. We'll
make \our payments for the 1st
year! 3 ACRE LAKE ACCESS
ONLY $34,900. FREE BOAT
SLIPS' On spectacular 34,000 acre
recreational lake in Eastern Ten-
ne.ssee. Surrounded by state forest
Limited # available Call today for
early appointment i(b0)01704-3154
X 880, TN Land Pariners, LLC
li1'- dowo. balance financed 1
year C@ 7.25'c fixed. 1 year bal-
loon. OAC, payment
$189.77/month.

LIQUIDATION LAND SALE. 5
- to 138 Acres. A limited number of
spectacular parcel, ate being sold
at 3iJ% below appmiised value. Lo-
cated in Ceniial IL w/-good ac-
cess, itils. survey, recent appraisal
& exc fin. Call today (866)352-
2249 x $47.

VA MOUNTAIN LOG CABIN
unfinished inside, snew, trees, pn-
vate. large creek and river nearby,
$139,500 owner (866.1789-8535
VA94 corn.

View Western North Carolina,
North Georgia. Eastern TN, Real
Estate Excellent retirement area.
Vers affordable homes. cabins.
land Low i\axes. Good paying jobs
av.ailable.n n i'.milakesreguide.co
in

LAKEFRONT PREDEVELOP-
MENT OPPORTUNITY!
'.wv, grandeharbor.info All water-
access homesites direct from the
developer. Beautiful East Ten-
nessee Lake LiJing Most amenm-
ties already in From only $79.900
Possible 18 mo NO PAYMENTS'
Call Now' Sl)SiBY-LAKIES
Grand Vision Inc. Broker.

MOUNTAIN GOLF RESORT
LIVING Beautiful Blue Ridge
Mountain location. Cashiers, NC.
70 degree Jul dIays. Precons-truc-
tion e\ent October 27- 29 during
leaf -eason 'so call now to attend
and lor more infoi niatlon.
i888i743-2975 and u w.rver-
Ot kl.nci-e'_. Vision Rock LLS,
Broker.

MYRTLE BEACH. SC OCEAN-
SIDE- NEAR BEACH GXfED
COMMUNITY 169.900 -
$225.900 Exquisite I and 2 BR
Villas- Pre-tigious Location Gran-
ite couiitertops. Sunrooms. Walk-
in closets Owners, clubhouse/ Fit-
ness room' Tennis Courts 90% Fi-
nancing for Qualified Purchaseis
Limited A\.ailability i8001l382-
3332 Open 7 days-

WATERFRONT RESORT LIV-
ING WILMINGTON. NC Historic
Port Cit,' Coastal De\elopment
"The Bluffs on the Cape Fear.
Fa-test Gro'..sing County in NC
Public Grand Opening Oct 21. Di-
re l Ocean -ccesS Pre-constmruc-
ion incentive, to call now\
' V..thebluffnc com IS66i725-
8337 Cape Fear Blulf-. LLC Bro-
Ler

Steel Buildings
STEEL BUILDINGS. Factorts
Deals. Sacc $'5' 40 \ nf0J' to 100 \
2011. Ex. 5(ii l00J \ 12' = $3 60/sq
It i 'iiiS-.' - 2S885. iu,,.ri, id-
ht lid~ ..' m._L'i.


CONCERNING AN AMENDMENT TO THE -
CITY OF MADISON LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS

BY THE PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD OF CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA,
SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF THE CITY OF MADI-5
SON, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,.pursuant to Sections 1633161
through 163.3215, Florida Statutes, as amended, and the City of Madison Land Devel-
opment Regulations, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Land Development
Regulations, objections, recommendations and comments concerning an amendment,
as described below, will be heard by the Planning and Zoning Board.of the City o
Madison, Florida, serving also as the Local Planning Agency of the City of Madison,
Florida, at a public hearing on November 2, 2006 at 4:45 p.m. or as soon thereafter as
the matter can be heard, in the City Commission Meeting Room, City Hall located at
321 Southwest Rutledge Street, Madison, Florida.

LDR 06-5, an application by the City Commission, to amend the text of the Land De-
velopment Regulations by adding Section 14.15, entitled Proportionate Fair-Share
Transportation Program, to establish a method whereby the impacts of development on'
transportation facilities can be mitigated by the cooperative efforts of the.public and'
prihale sectors. . .

The public hearing ma) be continued to one or more future dale. An) interested part)
shall be advised that the dale, lime and place of an continuation or the public hearing
.hall be announced during the public hearing and that no further notice concerning the-I
matter mill be published, unless said continuation exceeds six calender weeks from the
date oflhe aboie referenced public hearing. . '

At the aforementlioned public hearing, all interested parties may appear to be heard
m.ilh respect to Ihe amendment.

Copies of the amendment are available, for public inspection at the Office of the Direc-
tor of Communits Deielopment. City Hall located at 321 Southwes Rutlledge Street.
? Madison, Florida, during regular business hours.

Ml persons are advised that if the) decide to appeal an% decision made at the abo'e ref-
erenced public hearing. lhe will need a record ol the proceedings. and that, for such-
purpose, the) may need to ensure that a %erbatim record of the proceedings is made.'
whichh record includes ihe lestimon3 and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

10/20



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISO#ICOUNTY, FLORIDA


BELL TREE FARM, INC., a North
Carolina Corpration authorized to do
business in Florida, Plaintiff,


CASE NO.:2006-325 CA


vs
DEBORAH LARGE, Defendant.
. CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN, that under a Final Judgment of Foreclosure of October 6,2006,
in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the.highest and best bidder for cash at the West door of the "
Madison County Courthouse, Madison, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on November 9,2006, the following
described property: (TRACT I)
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 21 AND 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH; RANGE 10
EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDAAND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
- FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 21; THENCE
SOUTH 88 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,327.82 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 1,200.38
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE _
CONTINUE NORTH 18 DEGREES 33 MINUTES20 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 763.48
FEET TO THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY OF SOUTHWEST KELLY ROAD; THENCE ALONG
SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF WAY THE FOLLOWING COURSES: NORTH 30 DEGREES 58
MINUTS47SECONDSEAST, ADISTANCEOF110.91FEET; THENCE NORTH 31DEGREES ;
34 MINUTES .18 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 26.14 FEET; THENCE NORTH 36
DEGREES 55 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 23.20 FEET; THENCE NORTH
46 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 22.48 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 55 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 23.08 FEET;.
THENCE NORTH 64 DEGREES A4 MINITIES 13 SECONDS EAST. A DISTANCE OF 25 75
FEET. THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 'i. MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST. A DISTANCE OF
25.79 FEET; THENCE NORTH 74 DEGREES II MINUTES 1 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE'
OF 27.75 FEET; THENCE NORTH 77 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCEOF25 24 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST,
A DISTANCE OF 77.06 FEET; THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 36'MINUTES 32 SECONDS
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 56.52 FEET; THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 56 MINUTES.16 .
SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 50.17 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 51 MINUTES -
51 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 27.45 FEET; THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 15 '
MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 32.61 FEET; THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES -"
11 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 38.09 FEET; THENCE NORTH 79 ,
DEGREES 31 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 59.47 FEET; THENCE NORTH
80 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 24.23 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 10 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 41.29 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 77 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 83.11
FEET; THENCE NORTH 67 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF
45.78 FEET; THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE
OF 112.09 FEET; THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 88.45 FEET; THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST, '
A DISTANCE OF'50.47 FEET; THENCE NORTH 66 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 29 SECONDS
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 51.84 FEET; THENCE NORTH 68 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 13 >-
SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 46.94 FEET; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 35 MINUTES -
42 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 154.59 FEET; THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 06 -
MINUTES15SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 123.23 FEET;THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES
30 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 41.08 FEET; THENCE NORTH 67 ,
DEGREES 14 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 50.92 FEET; THENCE NORTH .
63 DEGREES 24 MINUTES-23 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 61.99 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 60 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 82.96 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 56 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 54.27
FEET; THENCE NORTH 48 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF
69.62 FEET; THENCE NORTH43 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE
OF 41.33 FEET; THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES -15 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST, A
DISTANCE OF S0.89 FEET; THENCE NORTH 43 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST,
A DISTANCE OF 87.47 FEET; THENCE NORTH 51 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 06 SECONDS
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 38.95 FEET; THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 05
SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 41.49 FEET; THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 55 MINUTES
27 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 29.48 FEET; THENCE NORTH 37 DEGREES 44 -:
MINUTES 42SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE.OF 32.78 FEET; THENCE NORTH 38 DEGREES -
42 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 39.05 FEET; THENCE NORTH 45 '
DEGREES 50 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 50.98 FEET; THENCE NORTH , 7
55 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 45.10 FEET; THENCE.
NORTH 66 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST, .A DISTANCE OF 46.05 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 79 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 49.06
FEET; THENCE NORTH 86-DEGREES 30 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF
'fl t.iET; THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE
Or130.54 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD No. 53, THENCE '
RUN SOUTH 45 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY, . ,
A DISTANCE OF 634.17 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 61
DEGREES 39 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 2,776.48 FEET TO THE POINT '
-OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 40.01 ACRES, MORE OR LESS.


Dated: October 6,2006
ia/ll an/in


TIM SANDERS, Clerk of the Court
BY: Ramona Dickinson, Deputy Clerk


. 0*' * s* *Ia**



H A OE. I A


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1330 Post Oak Blvd., Suite 3030
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for college scholarships
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Register online for qt drawing to
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The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing. corn



FARM


Boyles Tree Farm Is The Original


Joe Boyles in one of his stands of slash pine.
'(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet Schrader, Oc-
,lober 12, 2006)
By Janet Schrader not. "You can never. be ab-
Greene Publishing, Inc. solutely positive." Cobble
Joe and Linda Boyles own said. Cobble added, he
around 1.850 acres of planted' thought there were one or two.
pines. What makes their tree people in Suwannee County
:Carm operation original, is planting pines in the 1930's,
.Boyles' father. Eugene, ap- but there are no exact records.
,ears to be the first farmer to "In 1950 we lived in
actually plant pine trees in this Gainesville." Boyles o said.
area. Brian Cobble, Suwannee ."My dad worked there for the
county Forester, said he does- Department of Agriculture. He
nt know whether it's true or w\as trying to think of some


way to farm his land in
Suwannee County while liv-
ing and working in
Gainesville without renting it
out. He came up with planting
timber and we're now reaping
the benefits."
The tree farm is a family-
owned business. The'. Boyles
.purchased several tracts equal-
ing around 600'acres, one in
Madison and one in Hamilton
County. They have a five-year
plan to get all, of the land
planted and are one-year away
from completion. Their plan
was to plant 120 acres a year.
Most of the profit from
'the Boyles' timber operation
currently comes from the sale
of the trees. "But we're work-
ing Pmore aggressively with
'pine straw," Boyles said.
There are two kinds of
pine trees used in the straw in-
dustry in Madison County,
slash and long-leaf varieties.
The long-leaf produce more
and a better quality of straw
mulch preferred by landscap-
ers. Because of this, Boyles
has started planting the long-,
'leaf varieties. Most of his cur-
rent stands are in slash pines.
-Boyles said you can start har-
vesting straw from the lonig-
*leafs when the stands are
about eight-years old.
Boy les said the long-leaf
pines are more difficult to
plant. ,The rooting systems of
the seedlings are smaller and
need more care in the planting


operation. Boyles gets his
seedlings from local nursery
Superior Trees, Inc. He ex-
pects to lose around 10 per-
cent of his planted seedlings.
. There is a lot of w ork that
goes into preparing the cu-
tover land for planting. When
pine trees are cut off the land
is in rough shape. covered
with stumps, limbs and' pretty
torn uip as well. To prepare for
planting, Boyles hires a man
with a -giant bush-clearing
dozer to come in. The blade on
the dozer alone weighs 33.000
pounds. After, the bulldozer
has been over the land, Boyles
hires a plane sprayer to come
in with pow erful herbicides to
kill off the scrub brush, oak
and cherry trees, and the
ground weeds. Piles of limbs
and stumps from the previous
harvest of pines are burned
and when the weather gets
cold. it's time to plant. Boyles
plants in the' cold weather
months from late November
through January. He said
when planting seedlings from
rootstock and not containers.
cold weather .is best because
the trees are in a dormant cy-
cle. He plants his seedling
long-leaf pines six feet apart,
in 10-foot rows. Around
100,000 seedlings will be
planted soon on a 130-acre
parcel Boyles is preparing
right now.
His new plantings of the
long-leaf pines are doing pret-


Joe Boyles holds the needles of one of his baby
long-leaf pines planted last year. (Greene Publishing,
Inc. Photo by Janet Schrader, October 12, 2006)


ty good according to Boyles.
..Even though the weather has
been dry,. the plants are doing
okay." Boyles said.
Boyles and his family also
lease their pinelands to
hunters. The hunters put tree
stands in and hunt deer and
turkey. According to Bo les.
tree farming is an ecologicallN
sound business that helps pro-
\ ide homes and stable % wildlife


hlabitats.for a variety of local{
animal He, likes the fact
there are deer, turkeys, fox.
raccoons and e\ en gopher tor-
toises on the land. "We plant
on about a 25-year rotation."
Boyles said. "\\'e lea'\e it
alone for about 25 years ex-
cept for the pine strain\ harvest.
It's a combined thing. The an-
imals get a home and we still
make money off the tree.


Guide Book from The National Arbor Day Foundation


Takes the Guestwork Out of Identifyin [Florida Trees
With hundreds of differ- in Florida and throughout the of the United States, the aver-
ent species of trees growing Eastern and Central regions age person might be hard--
pressed to recognize ,and
S .O . " NOD D 'O T- name more than just a hand-
DMVMWlQASt1JN TOQUES_ -' ful.


TREASURES SHOW 2006
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"What Tree Is That", a
unique 72-page pocket guide
available from The National
Arbor Day' Foundation,
makes this detective work fun
and easy by showing how to
identify trees in a simple step-
by-step process.
The guide book begins by
noting the distinguishing
characteristics that separate
one tree species from another.
Dozens of richly detailed
dra w ings accurately illustrate
the specific shapes and tex-
tures of different leaves, nee-
dles, acorns, berries, seed
pods, cones and other identi-'
fying features.
To obtain your tree ID
guide, send your name and
address and $3 for each guide
to "What Tree 'Is That?", The
National Arbor, Day Founda-
tion, Nebraska City, NE
68410. Or go online to arbor-
day.org to. order.


Progress Energy Florida Recognized


As Tree Line USA Utility
Progress Energy Florida When three hurricanes hit with a landscaping beaunfica-
has been recognized for its Central Florida in 2004, Lake dion a% ard.
progressi%'e tree-care practices Helen - a three-time Tree City Progress Energ� educinesk
with the dis- its ,customers
tinctive Tree '' about the comnpa-
Line USA des- ny's trimming
ignation from . ,practices' and the
The National right trees to plant
Arbor. Day ".. around power
Foundation. -! lines through its
Trees are a . Know Where You
leading cause -..-Grow campaign.
of power out- '. - The campaign
ages. Progress gave away 8,000
Energy works, " - low-growing,
to 'balance the. power line-
need for reli- friendly trees and
able electric power with sensi- USA - lost se eral si 2nificant brochures that' outline good
tivity for the environment, trees, including one that was a planting practices. Customriers
Tree ciews use a technique landmark. Last' :April, ban learn more at the Know
known as directional pruning, Progress' Energy planted live Where You Grow home on the
which is endorsed by The Na- oaks at a park in Lake Helen Web: www.progress-
tional Arbor .Day Foundation in Volusia County. and the do- enerev.com/environment/veg-


and the International Society
of Arboriculture.
"'The Tree Line USA des-
ignation acknowledges the ef-
fectiveness of our comprehen-
sive program that respects the
environment while we manage
our electric business,", said
Larry Bonner, Progress Ener-
gy Florida's supervisor of veg-
etation management. "This
sends a positive message back
to the communities we serve,
many of which carry the Tree
City USA designation."
The Tree Line USA pro-
gram is sponsored by The Na-
tiopal Arbor Day Foundation
in cooperation with the Na-
tional Association of State
Foresters. It recognizes public
and private utilities that
demonstrate practices that
protect and enhance commu-1
nity forests. This is the first
year Progress Energy Florida
has received the Tree Line
USA designation.
"Progress Energy is a
good corporate citizen and de-
serves to be known as a Tree
Line USA utility," said Lake
Helen Mayor Mark Shuttle-
worth. "Progress Energy's
dedication to protecting and
promoting healthy trees in its
communities helps us sustain
the character of our small and
beautiful city."


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Friday, October 20, 2006


nation was, later recognized


station/


I