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 Section A: Main: Viewpoints...
 Section A: Main: Local & Regional...
 Section A: Main: Around Madison...
 Section A: Main: Health
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Second Section
 Section B: Second Section:...
 Section B: Second Section:...
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The Madison enterprise-recorder
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00092
 Material Information
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title: Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title: Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Creation Date: September 29, 2006
Publication Date: 1933-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID: UF00028405:00092
 Related Items
Preceded by: Enterprise-recorder

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main: Viewpoints & Opinions
        A1
        page A 2
        page A 3
    Section A: Main: Local & Regional Crime Blotter
        page A 4
    Section A: Main: Around Madison County
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        Section 5
    Section A: Main: Health
        page A 10
    Section A: Main continued
        page A 11
        page A 12
        page A 13
        page A 14
    Section B: Second Section
        page B 1
    Section B: Second Section: Sports
        page B 2
        page B 3
    Section B: Second Section: School
        page B 4
        page B 5
    Section B: Second Section: Farm
        page B 6
        page B 7
    Section B: Second Section: : Outdoors
        page B 8
        page B 9
    Section B: Second Section: : Greensheet
        page B 10
        page B 11
        page B 12
Full Text



1Marshall's Gallery Has Greene

Unsual Pieces Of Art

For Anyone's Tastes Advei


7.greenepublishing.com



_ZJT. Je 411R


PublishingInc.

Wins 12

rising Awards


Cowboy Golf

Beats Branford

By 54 Shots


--,--*** *ORIGIN MIXED ADC 323
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARY'
DEPT OF SPECIt LCOLL FLA HISTORY 23
210N SMTHERS LIBRARY
G.IE. S'./ILLE F L ?.T1 11
.... =order'VIf t


;Our 142nd Year, Number 4 Friday, September 29, 2006 Madison, Florida 32340


SRWMD Says Lake Francis Is


Brown Because Of Sediment


By Janet Schrader
Greene Publishing, Inc.
, Last week, the Madison
'Enterprise-Recorder reported
Lake Francis is turning brown.
Suwannee River Water
Management hydrologist
Megan Wetherington and
Madison Farm Agent Kevin
Campbell both extended theo-
ries. SRWM Water Resource
Engineer Jerry Bowden made
ftie trip to Madison to check
out the lake. Bowden thinks
Ihe recent warm temperatures
combined with the relati'.el3
lihallo", water of the lake are
pausing the brown-out.
"From what I understand,
the lake is relatively shallow\,'"
Bowden said. "One thin, that
Please see Lake Francis,


I


G ene Publishin In 6


Man Arrested For


Possession Of Crack

With Intent To Sell
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Craig Solomon was arrested ''
on a warrant for possession of co- .
caine with intent to sell 'on Thurs-
day, September 21.
According to a Madison Po-
lice Department report, on August
11, Patrolman Jimmy Fletcher at-
tempted a traffic stop on a car on ;- ,.
Moore Street. The driver attempt- -____'_ __' _"
ed to flee in the car and headed Craig Solomon
down Farm Road.
The driver of the car, identified as Craig Solomon, jumped out and
fled on foot. Cpl. Chris Cooks monitored the passenger, Danyell Davis,
while Fletcher attempted to locate the suspect, but his attempts were to
no avail. Solomon was arrested on the warrant over a month iter.
After Da\ is had been detained, a coffee cup was located in the cup
holder beside Davis. The cup contained a white substance believed to
be crack cocaine.


Man Arrested On 15

Counts Of Forgery
At approximately 4:10
p.m. on Sunday, September 17,
James C. Williamson was ar-
rested by the Madison County -
Sheriff's Office' for Violation '5 .
Of Probation, 15 counts of
Forgery and 15 counts of Ut- ..
tering A Forger).
According to a Madison
County Sheriff's Office report,
Cpl. David E. Harper conduct-
ed the preliminary investiga-
tion of the forgeries and identi- _
fled Williamson as a potential James C. Williamson
suspect.
Cpl. Harper's investigation revealed that Williamson had a
Violation of Probation warrant for Attempted Possession of a
Firearm by a Convicted Felon and that he was apparently living
in the Eri.du area of Madison County.
Please see Forgery, Page 3A

Governor Appoints

Sale; Reappoints Foust

To Hospital Board


"


James J. "Jim" Sale, II Margie Foust
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Governor Jeb Bush has appointed James J. "Jim" Sale, II,
59, of Madison, to the Madison County: Health and Hospital
Board.
Sale's term began on September 21 and will end on June 30,
2010.
I Sale retired as the owner of Sale Ace Hardware. He replaces
Tom Stone, a local attorney, who is no longer on the board.
Sale is married to Kathy Sale, the librarian at North Florida
Community College.
Margie Foust, 49, was reappointed to the board. She is a
rancher, a tax practitioner and a manufactured home dealer. Her
new term also began on September 21 and will end on June 30,
2010..
Foust, who is also a candidate for Supervisor of Elections,
is married to Allen Foust, owner of Foust Farms.


9Ft2
9129


p/3t
9/30


__ __,__ __ _ ,.I


82/55
Stunny sloes. High 82F.
Wids NNW at to t10
mph.


85/60
Abundant Msnihihi.
ltig w t nthl mid 8s sand
lows in the lPw IOs,


10/1


89/63
Atwbldanta ushiis,
hah1 -l1 i. the ppiw i 0s
miud lows in th� low 0, ,.


Myra Valentine
By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The City of Madison held

Monday evening. September
25.
The city commission in-
2creased the rate on potable
water to eight percent each
year. The ordinance also al-
lows for a five percent in-
Crease for each year thereafter.
Sewage rates also in-
creased 15 percent for the up-
coming fiscal budget year. The
ordinance also allows for a 15
percent increase next year and-
five percent each year there-


Refuses Commissioners'Pay Increase


after.
City: Conirrisioner Jimn
Catron said that he hopes the
r ie, aiti monitored- c.i-h ', , ir
b\ the commission and that
there doesn't ha\e to, be an in-
crease in either se age oi %%a-
ter fees.
The cita coniinision .et
the village rate for the \ear at
7.0 mills.
City employees received a
four percent across-the-board
pay hike.
City Commissioner Myra
Valentine voiced her opinion'
that she will not take a pay. in-
crease voted on earlier for the


board toi themselves
Catron said that he would d
take the pa\ increase. but that
ii ,. ill addri.c1 the issue in up
coming months.
"What bothers me is, it is
tied in l\ith the Count\ Conm-
inission's salary . If \oun be-
lie\e in local go', eminent. ou
need to ha\e decisions made
b\ the commission. instead of
in Tallahassee," Catron said.
:The County Commission-
ers' salaries are decided each
year by the state. The Cit�y
Commission will receive one-
third of the county commis-
sioners' increase if the state


i ilif.


Myra Valentine
raises the salary each year.
An agreement was also
approved ,for Police Chief
Rick Davis to act as the City
Manager.


Andrea Allen Says Horse Slaughter Must Stop
For full story and pictures, see page 6B


By Janet Schrader
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Horses are slaughtered
in three kill plants in the
United States. This year
over 90,000 horses will be
killed for their meat. The
meat is sent overseas for Eu-
ropean and Asian diners
who consider it a delicacy.
Local rancher, Andrea
Allen, is working hard to
promote a proposed law to
ban horse slaughter current-
ly resting in committee in
the U.S. Senate. The bill was
passed by the House of Rep-
resentatives September 7. It
is likely it will not make it to
the senate floor for voting
this year. Holds (objections)
have been placed on it by
several senators and con-
gress is getting ready to -ad-
journ for the upcoming elec-


(Photo submitted)
Salvation is a weanling colt that was rescued from
slaughter by a group of school kids. He has a nice.
home now, and is getting the best of care for injuries
he received while waiting for slaughter. Unfortunately,
Salvation's mother was killed.


tions. Allen and all of the bill's supporters are concerned that
it will never make it to a vote and it will be lost in the shuf-
'fle when congress reconvenes January 1.


3 Sections, 34 Pages
Around Madison County 5-10A Legals 11B
Church 9A Obituaries 5A
Classifieds 10A Outdoors . 8-9B
Community Calendar 5A School 4-5B
Farm 6-7B Sports 1-3B
Health 10A Way Back When 5A


Allen says those who ap-
pro' e of the slaughter of
American horses claim that
only old, unwanted animals
are killed. She says this is
not true. The USDA has
stated that 90 percent of the
horses sent to slaughter are
healthy, fit horses. The kill
buyers don't want old or
sick horses. They obviously
would want nice, fat
healthy horses because the
animals are sold to the
slaughterhouses by the
pound. And the price per
pound for live slaughter
horses is going up. Per-
pound prices have recently
risen. to as high as 77 cents
and an average of 60 cents
per pound.
"I never dreamed things
were run like this," Allen
said about how the bill is


passing through congress. "America has been asleep. We
need to stand up for the things we care about and for our way
of life."


Martinez Office To Assist

Local Residents This Friday
Caseworkers from the Office of Senator Martinez will be
available to assist residents on veterans services, healthcare, so-
cial security, Medicare/Medicaid, and other services provided by
the federal government on Friday, September 29th from 9:00
a.m. to 10:30 a.m. in the County Commissioners Board room lo-
cated at 229 SW Pinckney Street.
If you have concerns or questions, please attend the com-
munity office hours or contact Senator Martinez's office at (202)
228-5957 or the Florida office,.(904) 398-8586.


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Page 3A W t r. ............ - .....~ .....-. -w ... .i

City Raises Water And Sewer Rates; Sets Millage At 7.0 Mills


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2A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com




VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Friday, September 29, 2006


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.

Governmental Accountability? What Was I Thinking?
At the September 12th; 2006 City Commission meeting, the 'While this decision by the commission is disappointing to
commission upheld their decision allowing an approximate 34% those of us %\ ho are uncomfortable with almost certain increas-
pay increase to themselves. es in the price of local government, there are options available
While this increase is perhaps understandable, the long term, to the citizens of the cirs. -
effect is.to guarantee that the cost of local government will in- One of the options is a charter amendment.
crease. The ordinance provides the commissioners with an au- Since the city charter does not address the 'city commis-
tomatic increase based on the county commission salaries --- sioners' salaries, the citizens of Madison can pursue a city char-
when the county commissioners receive a salary increase from ter amendment addressing the salaries to be paid to the com-
the state legislature, the city commission will automatically re- missioners. Florida Statute (FS 166.031) provides a vehicle for
ceive 1/3 of the increase the county commission receives. There the electors of the city to petition the city for a proposed city
will be no public input on any future increases as the city ordi- charter amendment. If 10% of the registered electors sign a pe-
nance in June approves this method. No questions asked, no re- tition to amend the charter, the city would have to place the pro-
gard to the financial health of the city,' and no accountability . -posed city charter amendment to a vote in a general election (or
This is a classic case of Entitlement Mentality -the'heck \\ith a Special Election i. A charter amendment is different than an
performance measures and accountability. . ordinary ordinance as charter amendments must be \%oted on by
The city commission was pro\ ided \' ith a petition signed by the registered voters. It's a true form of democracy giving all
approximately 200 city residents urging the commission to re- registered voters an opportunity to vote.
consider this issue. The' commission elected to disregard the Since o\ er 200 city residents recent\ signed a petition urg-
wishes of their constituents: The commission listened, consid- ing the commission to rescind the recent ordinance, I would
ered, and voted not to rescind their 34% pay increase. venture to guess that % e could get the required number of regis-
What is the justification for giving the city commissioners a tered voters to ign a petition to amend the charter and take care
raise based on the county commissioners salariess' Somnething is of this issue once and for all.
wrong with this picture. Where's the fiscal responsibility andac- Finally, in, addition to a charter amendment. what needs to
countability to the citizens of Madison ? The population of the take place is an evaluation of the city's % orkforce needs for the
City of Madison is about 17% of the county population, not 33 next five years with an action plan to ensure the citizens of
1/2%. Since 1973, the City of Madison has enjoyed municipal Madison recei e the best value for their tax dollars.
home rule' Salary decisions for the city have not been made in
Tallahassee. Toim Tucke .


Praise Given For Tom Moffses


Dear Mr. Moffses;
My work world started out in Miami Beach as a young'
woman (That was a hundred years ago), and took me, over the
decades, to Madison County.
Considering mi line of work, I have had dealings with
man) Citr Managers. Like you, they had two features. First, a
genuine goal to do the best for the cit 'they served. Jokingly, I
used to point out, that the second feature had to be a need to
travel. Sad.


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Run the field with Greene Publishing, Inc. News and get
i complete, accurate, up-to-date sports coverage,

., Greene Publishing, Inc....your footprint to great news

/ GREENE
Publishing, Inc.


State: __ Zip: _


You, Sir, were several cuts above the routine. The one Pro-
ject kith which %we had dealings, you left me shocked. You had
an exquisite understanding of hea\. _construction, piping, me-
chanical %work and this \\as handled with business-like class- -
-all for the good of the Project AND the Citr .ou served.
So sorry to see y ou go - - not having yotiur dignified Busi-
ness acumen will be a true loss. In leiu of 'Good Bye'...just
'travel on!'
S, . ame withheld, on file


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Press ALvroc-I, cT1ektMu n


200 06iterpn0 - Rexrser
Award Winning Newspaper 1695 S SR 53 * Madison, FL 32340

S(850) 973-4141 * Fax: (850) 973-4121
I'm greenepub@greenepublishing.com
J ) http://www.greenepublishing.com


PUBLISHER/IEDITOR
Emerald Greene KinsleN
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Lisa Greene
STAFF WRITERS
Jacob Bembr\. Jes,,e Covell
and Janet Schrader
GRAPHIC DESIGNERS
Carla Barret. Cail Painter
and Lisa Greene
TYPFSEI TTERS
Heather Bow en
ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATI\ ES
MANtr. Ellen Greene, Doroth\ McKinne,.
Jill Shetfield and Dan Mathis
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAI ADS
Suslan Grimes
D c, ,li'ic i,..r ,'. / ai ,r.,./' , .l/ .,.../,,' ,.i. i ,., .' . ; ....
DO di.. ttor Lcrti \Ji r'iSi'ri'. ', s ,t/d.i-, i,i '7, "
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CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Sub-rnipii:'n Rate.i
In C.-iunii, b * Urn-.;,f-C'o rii 'bt5
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p.u-,iage PAID at MNladi,,n Po.t Office 3234i Pub-
!|l|I |>.lI N ,n 1-- -4111.1
POST)TNI ASTER Send JJdreo- chances to
Th/ lli.i .,..n i[le ,",'ir :t-Re ,_.J;,. PC) D1j.0.e0
'2 N ldi,..nr, FL 32341-i 1- 2
Ti n - i -i' paper ie-e ,e. [he iI ht tn L eie'.
In', jd eriiseemeni. Ine'.., maril "er. or Luhsic ip ,i.ins
tila. in the opinii. ii..t II1 n1.in gemen[. '. ill not be
lor th,-' be-1i ii[er-il I h 1 e count', and . r -11 o . n-i -
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God's Grace And

My Choice
I've, almost finished reading a fantastic book called The Lost
Choice, which was w written b\ Andy Andrew s.
I first became acquainted with Andrews when he was co-
-median and made regular appearances on television. His come-
dy was always clean, and never vulgar, like that of Eddie NMur-
phy, Chris Rock or any of a list of other so-called comedians.
Andrews. however. moved into the. field of motivational speak-
ing
The Lost Choice is a book that revolves around three medal-
lions, made of bronze, with three separate, messages on them.
The book revolves around history, weaving together separate
stories featuring people from..history, such as John Adams,
Thomas Jefferson. George Washington Carver, former vice-
president Henry .Wallace,' Alfred Vanderbilt\ and Oskar
Schindler. of Schindter's List fame.
Throughout the book, God's grace is interwo en with peo-
ple \ ho made a choice to do something special w ith their lives.
Each person's calling is different. John Adams and Thomas Jef-
ferson helped make America free; Oskar Schindler was respon-
sible for sa% ing the li\ es of thousands of Jews during .the Holo-
caust: Geore Washington Carver presented starvation around
the world, by showing people all the uses of peanuts, (including
the fact that the) are edible to more than pigs); Henry Wallace
also helped prevent star ation: and Alfred Vanderbilt lost l)is life
while ,a- ing the li\ es of others on the Lusitania. which %%as sunk
off the coast of Ireland, with American passengers aboard. The
sinking of the Lusitania bN the Germans was one of main rea-
sons Amenca. which had taken a hands-off approach to the war
in Europe. entered the First World War.
As man\ of the people in the book, sometimes Ifeel useless
and feel that I'm not doing enough. Sometimes, I get, tired and.
want to throw up my hands and give up and beg people to stop
demanding more of me. It's only through God's grace and my
choice that I keep going on.


Daisies to Commissioners; Darts to Waste Managers
Lotsa daisies to the coun- 4" . A Saturdays. I believe that oth-
comminssioners for appro - 'er sites are probably just as
g the, wording of the cent e. C nge T xerpaked Health and en-
les ta\ referendum for No- vironmental concerns dictate
mber. We',e repeated .. G.. inger Jarvis it a better system. '
en the need for a new hospi-. .Columnist Darts to parents who
building; this tax is an al-' . have not taught their children
ost-painless xa\ to get one. the fine art of saying
ooray! ' "please" and "thank you."'
Daisies to the Lake Park of Madison Nursing Facility for Not only is the child's life easier when he employs these terms,
king such -tender care of my parents. .The nurses, certified but the people who have to deal with him have a more pleasant
rsgin asistants, and other staff were unfailingly efficient and time of it. If you catch your kid leaving off the magic words,
ring. I can't thank them enough. make him sit in the comer until he learns the value of them.
Daisies to the Nladison Linited Methodist Church for allow- Daisies to parents who pull the plug on inappropriate tele-
e m\ farm l to hold in\ father's funeral there. We are mem- vision programs, popular songs with dirty Islrics, and raunchy
rs else\ here. but needed n-tore space. Those folks set up a movies. Not now, but in the future, your children will rise up
worship center and decorated the social hall beautifully for us. and call you blessed.
:tw lo ing and gi\ ing it \, as. I do appreciate your gift to us. Daisies to former Madison City Manager Tom Moffses for
Armfuls of daisies to my dear friends at Rocky Springs all his years of dedicated service to the people of the town.
ethodist Church. \ho pro ided such wonderful food for the Darts to smokers for the junk you leave behind. Did you
ge crow d of relatit es and out-of-towners here for the funeral, know that the average smoker produces about 27 pounds of lit-
d for the ice and drinks, too. and other thoughtful kindnesses. ter each year? Please, people. Take care of your trash your-
oi do people manage such a time without a church family? selves.
Darts to our w aste-management system, and whoever is in Sharp darts to you if you believe we do not need a new hos-
arge The dumpster boxes on Little Cat Road near Pickle Lane pital building.
erflow et ei\ i, weekend, lea ing no space for anyone else to get Many lovely daisies to you if you have smiled at a stranger,
I of their trash. Someone needs to rearrange pick-up sched- crooned to a child, or hugged an elderly person today. You are
es or e\ en xI hat??.' \ pa o\ ertime for someone to pick up on the stuff of human dreams.


By Jessalyn Covell
Why did you choose a

career in education?

Caulette King
Gary Merone
"To help children learn GaryMerone
and to hopefully spark ", love working wi
an interest in them with children."
the passion of literature children."
that I have."



Karla Molnar Takesha Thomas

"I wanted to have a pos- "I like helping kids lea
itive impact on the life skills."
world."



Mike Radel
James Johnson ,
James Johnson "I worked with compu

"To make a difference in ers in the military a
kids' lives." now I'm teaching ki


computer skills which I
love to do."


'th


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It-
nd
ds
. I


Name:
Address:
City:
Phone:


'Mail To:
Greene Publishing, inc,
PO. Drawer 772 - Madison, FL 32341


QueSSstoOfTe Week











Friday, September 29, 2006


www.greenepublishing.com



VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A


Don't Compromise - Clean and Sanitize
September is National Food Safety Education Month and
the recent E. coil outbreak with fresh spinach reminds us that
food safety is a critical issue for families. The US has the safest
food supply in the world; educating consumer to use safe food
handling practices is a big piece of the puzzle.
This year, the focus is on cleaning and sanitation. Hand
washing is the first step in this process. Wash you hands often
when handling food. Be sure to wash your hands with soap and
warm water for 20 seconds before and after handling food. Any
time you are interrupted during food preparation, whether it's a
phone call or petting the dog; be sure to wash again. By the way,
next time you wash your hands, time yourself - you will be
amazed how brief you are at handwashing!
Use paper towels or clean cloths to wipe up kitchen surfaces
or spills. If you prefer using dish cloths, wash them often in the
hot cycle of your washing machine. .
Sponges can be sanitized by soaking in a chlorine bleach solu-
tion of one teaspoon to one quart of water. This same bleach so-
lution can be pored down the kitchen sink to keep your drain and
disposal to minimize bacterial growth.
Kitchen counter tops should be washed with warm soapy
water. A bleach solution will also go a long way to rid your
kitchen surfaces of bacteria. Wipe surfaces or spray with a
bleach solution and let them air dry. If you are impatience wait-
ing for the counter tops to dry and worried about getting bleach
on your clothes, use clean paper towels to dry your surfaces.
Cutting boards are another kitchen surface that can grow
bacteria; they can be notorious for causing food illness from
cross contamination. This- occurs when you cut raw meat or-
poultry and then turn around and cut up raw vegetables without.
washing the cutting board between uses. The best practice is to
use one cutting board for fresh produces and' a separate one for
raw meat poultry and seafood. 'Wash, your cutting boards fre-
quently and once they become excessively Worn, simple\ replace
them.


Forgery


count from page IA


Harper requested assistance from Lt. Mark W. Joost and they
eventually located Williamson at a residence located southwest
of Sirmans.
Williamson was placed under arrest for the .Violation osf
Probation warrant and transported to the Madison County Jail.
Jo.host rter iev. ed Williamson before charging \illiamson
wit& the forgenes. , ..... i
Williamson remains in the Madison Count\ Jail at this time.
Additional charges are pending.


Lake Francis


cont from page IA


happens to shallow lakes is the air temperature effects it a lot."
Bowden said the hot temperatures we've been.having heats
up the lake water because it's so shallow. Then at night, the top
layer of the water begins cooling faster than the bottom layer.
Hot air and hot water rises. When the warmer water at the bot-
toin rises through the top cooler layer, it carries silt from the bot-
tom with it. Bowden said these fine particles of silt are what's
turning the lake brown.
Wetherington said Bowden checked with Chuck Hitchcock.
Hitchcock said there has been' no construction around the lake
recently. Water management was concerned the lake was brown
due to construction run off. Bowden. was able to ascertain that
this was not the case.
Bowden said the lake should begin to clear up in two days
to two weeks, depending on how hot the weather continues to
be. He also said when Madison finally gets some cooler weath-
er, the lake will also clear up.
Bowden comes to Madison County on a regular basis as part
of his job, checking and issuing permits. He.said he will contin-
ue to keep an eye on the lake. "If it doesn't clear up, we will
have to look for something else," Bowden said:


I


Friday . September 28, 1956
Miss Barbara Naughton returned to Miami last "veek to
continue her studies at Barry College, after spending her vaca-
tion at home. Miss Agnes Clare Morrow is also a student at
Barry again this year.

Twenty-seven boy scouts and prospective scouts of Madi-
son Troop 606 attended the football game Saturday night in
Tallahassee. The game was played in Campbell Stadium be-
tween Florida State and Ohio University. Florida Stalewon by
the score of 47 to 7. The boys had a grand time and consumed
several pounds of peanuts and hotdogs.

Mrs. R. L. Prine and daughter. Miss Mary Ned Prine, have
returned form a two weeks' motor trip to,Gadsden, Alabama;
Ft. Wayne, Indiana, and Knoxville, Tennessee. They visited
Mrs. Prine's father, Mr. L. L. Tilly, at Knoxville. En route
home they visited historic places ini North- Carolina, and.
friends in Cherokee and the Smokey Mountains.

Friday, September 30, 1966
A number of fine exhibits were entered at the 4-H Club
Corn, Can and Poultry Show Saturday, at the Ag Center.
County Agents Pat Sullivan and O.R. Hamrick and the Florida
Agricultural Extension Service directed the show, and Sears-
Roebuck \\ as a sponsor Cit\ business houses presented the
prizes. The ..oung people are, e\cted to be commended for the
excellent products on display, and for the care and diligence re-
quired to bring their exhibits to perfection.

Mrs. W.E: Winderweedle and three grandchildren of Win-
ter Park were Saturday visitors of Mr. and Mrs. J.L. Brinson.
Accompanying them was Mrs. Bishop Clark, Sr.

There were approximately 50 people attending the FTA.
dance. Operating 'the record player were Milber Jean Adams
and Vickie Starling. Collecting money at the door was Barbara.
Townsend, Peggy Newsome and Priscilla Agner. Refresh-
ments of cookies, potato chips, mints and punch were served.

Friday, October 1, 1976
Theo Ashley, a freshman at Auburn Unilersii\, was


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FO REST &.HUNTERt'


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pledged to the Delta Zeta
sororit *o.n September 9,.
She is concenrtrtin, her
studies', in the field of Early
Childhood Education. She, is
the daughter of Mr. and Mis
J.G. Ashley, Jr., of Madison \' .

\William 0. Brazil. Headmaster of the Madison Acade-
min. has announced the names of the students who were
named to, the Honor Roll for the first six-week grading pe-
riod. In order to qualify for this honor a student must have
an A or B in each subject and not less than satisfactory in
conduct. The students are:; Kelly, McCard, Chris O'Brian,
Suzi Beggs, Todd Gordon, John Grant, John Paul Maults-
by, Carol Strickland, Michael Browning, William Greene,
Kim Harmsen, Kimberly Harris, Mitzi Beggs, Bill Brazil,
Suzanne Comer,, Mandy Maultsby, Eddie Valentine, Kayla
Moore, Kathryn Rowe, and Connie Strickland.

Thursday, October 5, 1986
Madison Acadeim held a special Ceremony Wednes-
day, the first of October, to honor and-recognize a, very spe-
cial person. Head mistress Linda Gibson presented Willie
Clare Copeland with a very special edition of the 1986
Madison Academyn Yearbook The e\emabook %v.as dedicated
to. NMrs. Copeland for all het lo,e, support. and service to
the academrr for manN \ears. Needless to sa\. Mrs.
Copelnd was thrilled and very surprised to receive this
great honor.

Friday afternoon Madison County High School revved
itself up for another awesome pep rally. Students and fac-
ulty began' filling up the gym around 2:30 while the band,
played and the cheerleaders danced. The Cowboys had lots
of support from the community as well.

Margaret Agner, North Florida Field' Director of the
American Cancer Society, spoke to those attending a wrap-
up cancer meeting at the Agricultural Center on the many
services provided by the -society to the patients, and their
families.


'HIN T 6 ": '..:...' :

Tabliec loth for

next football

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a~rt
you r.. ,... :, . -
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Once you have finished reading
the newspaper, don't throw it
away. Find another use for it.
Newspaper makes wonderful
tablecloths for outdoor
occasions. After everyone is
done eating, take the used
newspaper to a recycling center
near you.
IZ~aJ.
IRd^us Z2-

850-973-41
-----------------------------I
NEW RENEW
nie I
dress
I) /State/Zip

Mail To: Greene Publishing, Inc., P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341
or bring by the Enterprise-Recorder office. I
-- - - - - - - - - - -ntpi- Recorde--


41

In County Subscriptionwi*ijt
S28
Out of County Subscription:

A one year subsrjiqIon
th of our .Aek16y papers,
so~~u~fiCnty Carrier &
Enterprise Recorder.


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4A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


Friday, September 29, 2006


LOCAL & REGIONAL CRIME BLOTTER


9/20/2006
Lucille McCray Hall - Grand Theft III
Willie Lee McCray - Criminal Registra-
tion

9/21/2006
Eric Robert Kubisty - Possession of Mar-
ijuana Less that 20 Grams; Possession of
Drug Paraphernalia
Ezell Alexander Stephens - Criminal
Registration
Byron Lapadre Mobley - Failure to Ap-
pear
Craig Lamar Solomon - Possession of
Cocaine with Intent to Sell, Possession of
Marijuana with intent to sell, Resisting Offi-
cer without Violence
Jose Victor Sanchez - Improper Tag

9/22/2006
Kevin Allen Davis - D.W.L.S. Revoked
or Canceled
Guy Duane Etter - Sexual Activity with a
Minor
William Hashem - V.O.P (circuit)
Brian Steven Benifield - Failure to Ap-
pear for Non-Jury Trial
Charles Alonzo Simmons - Criminal
Registration
David Dewayne Skinner - Criminal Reg-
istration

9/23/2006
Van Powell - Domestic Violence/ Battery
Patricia Lynn Perkins - Domestic Vio-
lence/ Battery
Moises Gabriel - No Valid or Expired


Drivers License


9/24/2006
Mauro Roblero/Miguel Perez/Angel -
D.U.I., Failure to Appear, Resisting Officer
without Violence
Maynor Perez - D.W.L.S. Revoked or
Canceled, No Motor Vehicle Registration
Jose Manuel Perales - No Valid or Ex-
pired Drivers License
Audrey Pearl Beasley - Battery on a
Pregnant Person

9/25/2006
David Lawrence Delcambre - Posses-
sion of Marijuana Less that 20.Grams, Pos-
session of Drug Paraphernalia
Delilah Langford Farnell - Grand Theft
III
Robert Paul Marciano - Failure to Ap-
pear
Brian Lawrence Williams - Failure to
Appear-Arraignment
Cod� Eugene Hilbrand - V.O.P. (circuit)
Cedric Lamont Ruffin - Failure to Ap-
pear-Arraignment
Gerald Lee Davis - Unknown
Thomas Howard Perkins - Failure to Ap-
pear

9/26/2006
Charles Douglas Milstead - V.O.P. (cir-
cuit)
Vivian Ann Turner - Criminal Registra-
tion
Chad Allen Hanners - D.W.L.S. Re-
voked or Canceled


Branford Woman Arrested For

Grand Theft Auto And Burglary
On Sunday, September 24th, Suwannee hicle and stopping it the driver, Pound, told
County Sheriff's Deputy Stephen Greaves ar- the deputy a fictitious story of needing the ve-
rested April May Pound, 45, Bryson's Trailer hicle to escape from men who were attacking
Park, Branford, FL. Pound was charged with her. This was later proven not to be true.. A
grand theft auto, burglary, grand theft, driving check of the residence where the vehicle had
while her license was suspended and giving been stolen from revealed that it had been
false information to a law enforcement offi- burglarized. The vehicle was checked and
cer. found to have a ,large trash bag in it full of
According to the Suwannee County Sher- frozen food and cleaning supplies that had
iff's Office, at approximately 2:58 a.m., been taken from the residence.
Deputy Greaves was dispatched to meet with Pound was arrested and transported to the
John Ward regarding someone stealing his ve- Suwannee County Jail. She was also found to
hicle. Mr. Ward called dispatch and told them have an open Suwannee County Warrant for
that he was in pursuit of the vehicle and it was grand theft. The bond for the new charges has
west bound on CR 248. After locating the ve- been set at $17,000.00.

Branford Woman Arrested For Battery


On Saturday, September 23rd, Suwannee
County Sheriff's Deputy Stephen Greaves, ar-
rested Deborah Ann Keehbaugh, 41, 27090
37th Road, Branford, FL. Keehbaugh was
charged with battery (domestic violence).
According to a Suwannee County Sher-
iff's Office report, at approximately 11:37 p.m.
Deputy Greaves was dispatched to a residence
in Branford in reference to a disturbance. After
talking to both parties involved he determined
that Keehbaugh had been drinking and had
gotten into an argument with her boyfriend


when he refused to let her back into the house.
She allegedly swung at him and pushed him
twice before he called for the deputy. When
Deputy Greaves attempted to talk to her she
became belligerent and threatened her
boyfriend.
Keehbaugh was arrested and transported
to the Suwannee County Jail. Her bond was set
at $1,000.00.
She was able to obtain a surety bond
through a local bonding agency and was re-
leased on Monday, morning.


Live Oak Man Arrested For Grand Theft Auto


On Saturday, September 23rd, Suwannee
County Sheriff's Deputy Jake Greene arrest-
ed Montrequez Jemard Ross, 20, 930
Roberts Street, Live Oak, FL. Ross was
charged v. iih grand theft auto. Florida High-
way Patrol also charged him with leaving the
scene of an accident, driving without a li-
cense, and giving false information.
According to a Suwannee County Sher-
iff's Office report, at approximately 12:31
a.m. Deputy Greene responded to the report
of a vehicle crash on 161st Road.
He observed a blue 2006 Honda Civic
overturned on the roadway without a driver
present. While Florida Highway Patrol was
conducting their investigation the owner of


the crashed vehicle arrived. She told the
deputI that her vehicle had been stolen from
the parking lot at Gold Kist Poultry, where
she worked. While conducting the inter-
views regarding the theft, it was discovered
that Ross had obtained the keys to the vehi-
cle and driven it from the parking lot at Gold
Kist without the owner's permission. While
on .the way to visit his girlfriend he had
crashed it, and left before law enforcement
arrived.
Ross was arrested and transported to the
Suwannee County Jail. A bond of $2,500.00
was set for the charge of grand theft auto. A
bond of $2,250.00 was set for the Florida
Highway Patrol charges.

O'Brien Man
Arrested For

Aggravated
Battery
On Saturday, September
23rd, Suwannee County Sher-
iff's Deputy Stephen Greaves
arrested Michael James Greg,
34, 22059 135th Lane,
O'Brien, FL. Greg was
charged with aggravated bat-
tery.
According to. a Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office report,
at approximately 10:07 p.m.
Deputy Greaves was dis-
patched to investigate a distur-
bance. After talking to the par-
ties involved he determined
*that Greg had drunk a case of
beer belonging to someone
else who resided at his resi-
dence. An hour later he barged
into the kitchen with a running
chainsaw in his hand and
threatened the man he had
stolen the beer from. The man
managed to keep him away by
using a plastic chair to hit
Greg. Greg ran out of the
house, dropping the chainsaw
in the yard, and disappeared.
Hamilton County K-9 was
called in and approximately an
hour later Greg was located
sleeping in a construction trail-
er on 135th Lane.
Greg was arrested and
transported to, the Suwannee
County Jail. His bond has been
set at $5,000.00.


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AROUND MADISON COUNTY


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5A


Marshall's Gallery Has Unusal Pieces Of Art For Anyone's Lil


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Where is a neat place to
stop by and look around, pass
time, or spend a weekend day
looking at the most unique,
handmade art crafted to perfec-
tion? Artistic Things by Mar-
shall's Gallery is a good place to
bring friends, family, and art
lovers alike to enjoy a fun filled
day.
The artist that creates all of
these inventions is Marshall
Norris. His wife, Barbara Nor-
ris, is largely in charge of the
business.
Marshall Norris.was a para-
medic for 30 years and got in-
jured in the line-of duty. Now,
you can find him tooling around
his shop, making paintings,
Si id "Lculptures of people and
a'io dr' i . . .,rrU n. d oI l-d
l..ectibles,:,old ,.farm stuff and
more. He has been a full-time
artist for the past 20 years and is
still .going strong.
Norris uses flat sheet met-
als, spoons and car parts, and
whatever else comes to mind to
create his art.
His art work has been fea-
tured in Farm & Ranch maga-


I y nIn


Norris stands with one of his creations "Bubba" made of flat sheet metal that
took only two weeks to complete. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Cov-
ell, September 26, 2006)


zine; the Valdosta Magazine; the
Valdosta Times numerous times,
including being named the Artist
of the Month for June; GRIT
magazine; the Quitman, Georgia
Museum anid other places.
He has even competed na-
tionally at the Springing To Arts,
a Valdosta, GA., competition
where he submitted a sculpture
and a painting and battled out
placing among 500 other artists.
He has received first place twice,
fourth place one year and honor-
able mention three times.
Also, Norris has competed
and brought his art to an assort-
ment of shows and festivals.
He has had students visit his
and Barbara's Art Gallery from
Madison County Central School
(MCHS), and other civic organi-
zations, and clubs from all over
Madison County have come by.
Norris's 'work has been
compared to Grandma Moses
and primitive art work - unique.
Marshall and Barbara Nor-
ris are not granted much spare
time, but when they do, they en-
joy being volunteers at the Ham-
burg-Lovett Fire Department,
and enjoy their five children,
four grandchildren, three cats
and one very spoiled dog, Ham-
bone.
If you ever want something
extraordinary to do or just love
art, please stop by and nose
around at Marshall's Gallery.
The gallery is open from Mon-


day-Saturday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
and Sunday, 1 p.m. - 5 p.m. Ap-
pointments are also welcome
during non-operational hours.


Marshall Norris made this dinosaur out of old oil
pan and car parts. It is currently exhibited at his art
gallery and has been exhibited at the museum in Quit-
man, Georgia. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jes-
salyn Covell, September 26, 2006)


- ", 5930 MN FLowe4i- T ' .*, G ree tiLUe, FL 32331
3 ] 8 5 850-9488-2 720

Marshall Norris I
SArtist. Sculptor

artist Bymarshall@hotmail.com

2002 TOWN & COUNTRY LXi 2000 FORD EXCURSION 2004 DODGE I


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* ^lt^:-' * ^^S~i'' I^^AV
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SK11950 'i11900


11050 np'ridlyItIo


Legal Defense Fund Set Up

At Wachovia For Schindler
- Local doctors of the Madison Community, Johnson Bibb
and Filemon Patacxil, have set, up a legal defense fund at Wa-
chovia Bank for Julie Schindler. The account was set up on
Monday,. September 18 to help with the legal obligations
Schindler is facing to help clear her name. For further informa-
tion on how to help, please see a Wachovia Bank employee.

Come Early For The

Best Choices!

The Suwannee County Friends of the Library will host The
Great Book Sale commencing on October 5, 6, 7th, 2006 and on
the following week, October 12-13-14th, 2006. The sale will be
during the regular library hours. The Live Oak Library is locat-
ed on US 129, south of Live Oak. Library hours are from 8:30
a.m. to 8:00 p.m. on Thursday, Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.,
and Saturday '8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
At present, volunteers are needed for pre-sale set-up on
Wednesday, September 27th and Thursday, September 28, 2006.
Sign up sheets are available at the library. Volunteers are
also needed to staff the sale, on the dates listed above.
Please call or come by the library to volunteer, 386-362-
2317.


Kr ' The Suwannee County Friends of the Library is a volunteer
booster organization for libraries of Suwannee County. Through
membership and fundraisers, such as The Great Book Sale, thou-.
sands of dollars have been donated to enhance and provide for
'- " library services. Furniture, staff training, books, videos, special
.I) children's programs and even major contributions to the con-
r'.. structioh of the Live Oak and Branford Libraries have been sup-,
. ported by the Suwannee County Friends of the Library.
A.v Contact person: Danny Hales, Director of the Libraries,
386/362-2317, Betsey. Bergman, President of the Suwannee
County Friends of the Library, 386-842-2953.

Madison County Health

Department Offers

Free Childbirth Classes
By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County Health 'Department is offering free
childbirth classes to expectant mothers and their families for the
Madison community.


Classes will be offered on Oc-
tober 12, 19, 26 and November
second and ninth.
Each class is scheduled from
3:30 p.m. - 5 p.m.
For further information, or to
register for the class, please con-
tact Bridget Gamble, Certified
Professional Childbirth Educa-
tion (CPCE) or Brenda Wyche,
CPCE at 973-5000 extension 117
or 119.
Participants are encouraged
to come alone, or bring a friend,
family member; or partner.


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6A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing. com



AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Friday, September 29, 2006


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc. .
Have you wanted to lose weight, but just can't find the spare time or the right program for
you? Well, Madison residents are in luck with the "Biggest Loser" coming to Madison, funded
by the Madison County Memorial Hospital (MCMH). They are heading a program to cut the
obesity levels down to size, that will also slim your waist size down too. Plus, the biggest los-
er wins a cruise to the Caribbean. Put on your walking shoes, get ready to hear about the latest
education in health and get ready to lose weight.
The purpose of The Biggest Loser-Madison is to redevelop a strong relationship with the
community members of Madison County, through activities which promote wellness and health
prevention, through the utilization of grant funding for obesity and chronic health disease edu-
cation.
The obesity and chronic health disease grant requires discussion and education on the caus-
es of obesity, information and education on chronic health conditions, mainly heart disease and
diabetes and preventative self care methods of treatment, providing information on local ser-
vices, and screenings such as blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol, and blood glucose
levels.
The goal of The Biggest Loser-Madison is to not only meet those requirements of the grant,
but to do so in an ongoing fashion, supporting the continued side for health in the communi-
ty. , .


973-
PALLifi



LIVE ON STAGE!


'Coming To Madison
The Biggest Loser-Madison will consist of a six month long program, with bimonthlN
meetings. The meetings will be held on the second and fourth Thursday of each month. One
meeting will incorporate physical activity and the second meeting will provide education on
nutrition, chronic health diseases, and teaching on how to make healthy lifestyle choices.
Madison County Memorial Hospital (MCMH) will use The Biggest Loser program as an
opportunity to strengthen community relationships with local businesses, such as fitness
providers, the Madison County Health Department, North Florida Community College
(NFCC), and local physicians to provide opportunity for a supportive climate for positive and
healthy lifestyle choices.
The kick-off da\ for The Biggest Loser-Madison is October 12. The registration period \- ill
be September 28 through October 12. Registration packets will be available at ICNIH. Free
medical screenings will be offered to those , without primary physicians or health insurance, but
are committed to making healthy choices.
The first 100 participants will receive free health packets that include daily diet and exer-
cise logs, and other educational information to equip the participant with the knowledge to
make, health choices. Those who participate in the meetings, not only gain the support of the
group, but will also haxe the opportunity to win prizes. The winner of The Biggest Loser-Madi-
son will be rewarded for their hard work with a cruise to the Caribbean.
If you are interested in sponsoring activities, prizes, or educational opportunities, please
contact Nikki Willis at 973-2271.


Elmer Spear Speaks At Rotary


By Janet Schrader
Greene- Pbli:hiin. Inc.
Elmer Spear brought his extensive file of pictures from a re-
cent journeN to Alaska to share with the Madison RotarN Club
September 20. Spear and his \ ife June took their 2-1. R\ to Alas-
kasthis summer and only recently returned. June Spear prepared
a Po\%er Point presentation for the club. u \hch Elmer delivered.
This was Elmer's fourth trip to Alaska. "I'd move there if
there .as no winter." Elmer said. "Unfortunately, there is a lot
of \ inter."
June Spear drove because Elmer had suffered a stroke in
January. The Spears \% ent to Los Angeles first, hung a right and
headed up the coast. They took a ferrn from Bellingham, Wash.
to Alaska.
The photos June Spear took. showed a variety of mountain
and seascapes and lots of animals., Elmer accompanied the pic-
tures with an animated dialogue describing the sights and things
he and his wife enjoyed on their trip. Rotary members enjoyed
the presentation.


a�?'*' * - ...
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Elmer
Spear
shows
pictures
of his trip
to Alaska
to Madison
Rotary at
their
regular
meeting
September
20.
(Greene
Publishing,
Inc. Photo
by Janet
Schrader)


THAHVM eOU


2 SHOWS! OCTOBER 1 1
' Show Times: 11:00am & 6:30pm
O' Tdllalhasiset'-l.con Counlrv
7jCIVIC CENTER
Tickets On Sale NOW oat the Civic Center Box Offiie, all fickelmrnsler Outlets
and at www tickelmaster com or www.tlccc.org.
Group Discounts available at the Box Office.
CHARGE BY PHONE: 222-0400 or 1-800-322-3602


Dear Friends,
How greatly you helped us
during our time of grief. You
can never know how much we
appreciate all the cards, letters,
phone calls, flowers, gifts,
food, and visits in the days af-
ter' the death of our husband
and father. Your kindness was
above all requirements of duty.-
Our special thanks to the
congregation of First United
Methodist Church of Madison
for allowing us to use their fa-
cility for a meal and for the


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AROUND MADISON COUNTY


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7A


VINEGAR FRY MAN MAKES A HIT AT FAIRS


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0 _ *..
^ . -. *" ,* ; **1*


Doris and Ray Cullers have been enjoying attending fairs, festivals and com-
petitions all over the United States for over 25 years! (Greene Publishing, Inc. Pho-
to by Jessalyn Covell, September 22, 2006)


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Ray Cullers has been in the
French fry business for 61
years. During that time, he has
been a vendor for a number of
fairs.
Cullers' wife, Dora, said,
"He makes fresh cut Idaho pota-
toes with vinegar. He's known
as the Vinegar.Fry Man."
At this time, the only fair
that Ray works in Florida is in
Orlando. He had previously
worked fairs in Pensacola .and
Kissimmee
Ray worked at. Down
Home Days one year, but Dora
said that the people there didn't
know him and he had not at-


tempted to work at that venue
again.
The closest fair that Ray,
who lives west of Greenville,
currently works is in Columbus,
Ga.
Ray is currently preparing
to go on the fair circuit in Geor-
gia and South Carolina. He has
three fairs that he pulls to. Each
fair that he has contracts to ap--
pear at.
Cullers has been selling his
brand of French fries out of his
trailers near the grandstand for
the last 61 years. Originally
from Greenville, he was a
rancher before retiring.
Cullers says he likes the
state fair circuit, because "I'm a


farm boy. I can relate to farm
people."
He got into the French fry
business right after World War
II, after tasting his first French
fry in Pennsylvania.
"I've sold many truckloads
of potatoes since," he said. "The
secret is fresh potatoes and good
* grease. Some restaurants have
gone to frozen fries, but we only
use fresh potatoes."
The only changes are that
the potatoes are now peeled by,
an electric slicer rather than by
hand and the price has risen
from 20 cents for a cup to one
dollar per cup.
It took some time for
Cullers to convince some folks


Ray Cullers was presented with a sign from the Champaign County Fair nam-
ing him the "French Fry an" for all of his hard work at the fairs for over 50 years.
(Greene Publishing, Ini Photo by Jessalyn Covell, September 22, 2006)

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to put vinegar on their fries. He
said that he educated them the
"English way."
"I'd have to put a few in a
,cup and let people try it," he
said.
A veteran of World War II
and the Korean War, Ray has,
been on television numerous
times. He has been featured on
HBO, as well as on t.v. stations
in Champaign, Illinois and in
the Carolinas.
"As long as I can go like
this, I will," Cullers said.
"When I'm too old, I'll sit out
here in my chair and let my
nephew run the business. I
want to be here to see my
friends."


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRAFFIC ADVISORY

STATE ROAD AND LANE CLOSURES
FOR SEPTEMBER 23 - 29, 2006


LIKE CIT": 7Ti~ fi.'l.,wtni,
is Ia Ist *~',foJ,',,rl l,' , Ia\ /IV
the FDOT thia may unpact iajfic.
HAMILTON COUNTY:
U.S. 41 Daytime lane clo-
sures north and south of Jennings
to work on the box culverts. Also,
working on the shoulders on the
west side of the roadway between
U.S. 41 and the Georgialine. The


final pa ing should begin in early,
October
County Road 143 Daytime
lane closures between Interstate
75 and County Road 146. to re-
place or extend culverts and
drainage structures. May start re-
working the shoulders next week
and finish paving the first layer of
asphalt.


NLADISON COUNTY: a Jaw, enforcement officer pre-
County Road 53 Traffic is sent.
reduced to one lane over the Sand
Pond Creek Bridge and traffic is
controlled by a temporary traffic
signal. Also, temporary lane clo-
sures at the Norton Creek Bridge
as work is underway to replace
the bridge. One-way traffic at the
Norton Creek Bridge should be-
gin in the next two to three
weeks. O A 3
SUWANNEE COUNTY:
Interstate 10 Daytime lane
closures to install sensors in the
pavement used for traffic count- expnse. W
ing between U.S. 129 north of ca t l.F
Live Oak and the Columbia c a p
County line, about 10 miles.
Also, lane closures on the outside BONELESS WHOI
lanes to place the rumble strips on BOTTOM ROUND F
the paved shoulders. The speed BEEF ROAST Cl.
limit is reduced to 60 mph during .
lane closures when workers are
present and FHP will be strictly LB.
enforcing.
TAYLOR COUNTY:
U.S. 19 The inside north- B O
bound lane just north of Salem, or 7
about 17 miles south of Perry,
will remain closed while a sink- j * *
hole is repaired. The sinkhole was
discovered Thursday and excava-
tion has COTTAGE BRAND A
revealed a cavity about 4-feet 12 OZ.
deep. Plans are to begin filling SLICED BACON QUI
with grout ( a mixture of cement,

Until then, the inside lane will re-
main closed 24-hours a day with EA.


. . .. . . . .. ' ... . .......... .



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' T lUVER 1I ER
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'Jj HS D�L 'VI: O.Mjrl WIWBE .. ,'


Attention

Madison County Residents


Are you 55+ and having

difficulty finding a job?


If you qualify, Experience Works has paid Certified
Nurse Assistant (CNA) training and job opportuni-
ties funded by grants from SBA at no cost to you.

For more information call
Lana @ 850-922-0023 ext. 242
Georgia @ 850-973-9922 or
1-888-859-1051

A national nonprofit organization, EEO/AA
"This U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) Grant Award, #SBAIIQ-02-1-
0034 is funded by the SBA. SBA's funding is not an endorsement of any prod-
ucts, opinions, or services. All SBA funded programs are extended to the public
on a nondiscrimnatory basis."











8A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com




AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Friday, September 29, 2006


HliP's Smyrnios Triplets Patrol And Serve Madison County


' By Jessalyn Covell
� Greene Publishing, Inc.
Most people cannot tell the
Smyrnios brothers apart. Why? They
are identical triplets, and are all troop-
ers for the Florida Highway Patrol
(FHP).
Gus, Manuel and George
Smyrnios patrol the Madison Com-
munity with dignity, respect and hon-
or.
a* Gus Smymios has been an FHP
trooper for 14 years and feels that
' pride sets FHP apart from any other
" law enforcement agency. He enjoys
public service and his days are usual-
" ly filled with investigating traffic ac-
cidents and enforcing daily traffic and
illegal drugs. "I decided to become a
trooper because it was a great job op-
portunity and a nice career. It has def-
initely proven to be just that. Madison
'is a great place to work in; the people
- are always charming and very friend-
ly," he stated. Gus Smyrnios resides
in Perry with his wife of 14 years,
Kristie and his four children. In his
spare time, he enjoys watching rac-
ing, playing sports, mainly golf and
football, and spending quality time
with his family.
"I really enjoy law enforcement,
knowing that justice' is being pre-
vailed," noted Manuel Smyrnios. He


no .
< . . . . _ . ' ' .....



-'-.. -. . . . . -% ) * ',, " , . . ,





.; 5.-















:'-, f -+ ,. . ,, a,


Gus, Manuel and George Smyrnios followed in their father's footsteps and now serve the Madison
County area as FHP troopers. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Kinsley, September 25, 2006)


has been an FHP trooper for 15
years. Day-in-and-day-out, he spends his hours at work performing Dri ia,, Under the Influence
(DUI) enforcement and ensuring the o\ erall safety of motor vehicles and the public. "The train-


NOTICE OF LAND USE CHANGE

The City Commission of the Cait of Madison. Florida proposes to regulate the use of land within the area
shovn on the map belo\\. by amending the City of Madison Comprehensive Plan. hereinafter referred
to as the Comprehensive Plan, as follows:

CPA 06-1, an application by the City.Commission, to amend the Future Land Ui'c Plan ra up and [hie
Illustration A-I1, Historic Resources Map of the Future Land'Use Plan Map Series u'f the ( ,.,aprchensi e,
Plan by designating a historic district for the following lands lying within ScL-i on 22, Toi\ n,lhip I No-rtili.
Range 9 East, Madison County. Florida Being mure particularly described, as f6illo>\.

An area bounded on the North by a line being 2(0).t0(i feet North of jnd parallel to LiviI.iuAtl
Street, on the East by a line being 100.00 feet East of and parallel it Dual -\\eniue on the mouth
by a line being 200.00 feet South of and parallel to Bunker Street and on the We b a line being.
100.00 feet West of and parallel to Parramore Avenue.


CITY OF MADISON








4 J-







t Ja- ;'

* e t
N,





The first of two public hearings concerning the amendment and the first reading of an ordinance adopting
the amendment will be conducted by the City Commission on October 10, 2006 at 5:30 p.m., or as soon
thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the City Commission Meetiig Room, City Hall located at
321 Southwest Rutledge Street, IMadi-on, Florida. This application ''.it prei..u'ly noticed for public
hearings to be held on May 9,2006 and August 8, 2006. The title of said ordinance shall read, as follows:

ORDIN NC. NO. 2006-6

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA, RELATING TO AN A . I L N M 1L NT
OF MORE THAN TEN ACRES OF LAND TO THE F LIT L, R E LAND USE PLAN MAP OF
THE CITY OF MADISON CONMPR FHEF.NSIV' PLAN, P1.1RS I \NT TO AN APPLICA1-
BY THE CITY COMMISSION, AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND USE PLAN MAP AND
STHE ILLUSTRATION A-l, HISTORIC RESOURCES MAP OF THE FUTURE 1.. ) I. N L
PLAN MAP SERIES OF THE CITY OF MADISON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, 1. DF P THE
AMENDMENT PROCEDURES ESTABLISHED IN S SECTIONS 163.3161 THROUGH
163.3215, FLORIDA STATUTES, AS .\ F.NDF . .r).SlE'N 1TING A HISTORIC Di tSTk
FOR LANDS LYING WITHIN SFC - ION 22, TOWNSHIP I NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST,
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY; R i:1 AL I .'tALL
ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE

The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates. Any interested party shall be advised
that the date, time and place of any continuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the
public hearing and that no further notices concerning the matter will re published.

The public hearing is being conducted by the City Commission to consider transmittal of the amendment
to the Florida Department of Community Affairs.

At the aforementioned public hearing, all interested persons may appear and heard with respect to the
amendment on the date, time and place as referenced above.

. Copies of the amendment and the ordinance adopting the amendment are available for public inspection
at the Office of the City Clerk, City Hall located at 321 Southwest Rutledge Street, Madison, Florida,
during regular business hours.

All persons are advised that, if they decide to appeal any decisions made at the public hearing, they will
need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal
is to be based,.


spending time with his wife, Angie, of 16 years and his three children.
Between the three of the Smyrnios brothers, they have worked in Charolete County, Polk
County and Osceola County. *
The three troopers have just recently mo\ ed back to the area where they grew. up. All three
graduated from Aucilla Christian Academy in 1987. They resided in the Aucilla.area during their
teen years. Gus has been back in this area for four years; Manuel has been back two years; and
George has been back only two months.
Once again, the triplets are united and they are glad to be able to serve Madison County.


S. . .


� � "... ..i , " - . :


Greene Publishing Inc. won 12 advertising awards
at the recent Florida Press Conference. Pictured left to
right are: Emerald Kinsley, Publisher; Lisa Greene,
Production Manager; and Carla Barrett, Graphic Artist.


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Greene Publishing, Inc.
graphic artist, Carla Barrett,
and , Lisa Greene, production
manager, won 12 awards in the
2005-2006 Florida Press Asso-
ciation Display Advertising
Contest..
Barrett won three first
place awards for ads that she
designed. One award was for
the "ABCs of Safety." The oth-
er award was for "Day's Tree
Services." The third first place
award was for an advertise-
ment School Superintendent
Lou Miller placed in the news-
paper.
Barrett received two sec-
ond place awards for "Teach
Your Family Fire Safety" and
"M.C. Stevens Realty."
Barrett received three third
place awards and three honor-
able mention awards.
Barrett's third place
awards were for "Uphold's
Feed," "Business Card Direc-
tory" and "Tanya's U-Pick."
She won honorable men-
tion for "Gutter Helmet,"
"Multiple Ad Page" and "Holy
Smoke BBQ."
Lisa Greene won a third
place award for her work on
the advertisement, "Who has
the most luscious lips?"
Barrett said, "I've very
proud to receive these honors
from the Florida Press Associa-
tion. It feels good to be recog-
nized for your hard work."
Greene said, "I'm proud to
have Carla on our staff, work-
ing beside me."
Greene attended the Flori-
da Press Association's National
Newspaper Placement Services
convention in Orlando on Au-
gust 31 'and September 1, along


with Emerald Kinsley, Greene
Publishing, Inc. Publisher.
While at the convention,
Kinsley sat on- a panel that
discussed and displayed niche
publications. Kinsley pointed
out those niche publications,
such as The Path of'Faith and
an award-winning sports sec-
tion from several years ago
entitled Where Are They Now?
are different for smaller news-
papers, such as The Madison
County Carrier and The
Madison Enterprise-Recorder
than they are for larger daily
newspapers.
During the day, Kinsley
and Greene attended small
table discussions, including
one on how to run an expo
and another on how to train
sales representatives.
Following the discus-
sions, they were treated to a
luncheon, where the guest
speaker spoke about fluctuat-
ing interest rates and expen-
ditures.
That evening, the Florida


Greene



Publishing



Wins 12



Advertising



Awards,


Press Association honored its
,members with a. trip to Plea-
sure Island. ,
The following day, Bar-
rett joined Greene and Kins-
ley for more workshops and
the awards' presentation and
luncheon. They returned
. home that Friday evening.
"Greene Publishing,. Inc.
is trying to work really hard
for our' customers," Kinsley
said. "We're trying to make
our newspapers better
through advertising and news
for our customers and the
people of Madison County."
The Florida Press Asso-
ciation is a conglomeration of
, newspapers ranging from
larger dailies to smaller
weeklies throughout the State
of Florida. Headquartered in
Tallahassee, the FPA helps
the newspapers with legal is-
sues, as well as providing
helpful information and
workshops for journalists,
graphic artists and sales rep-
resentatives.


If You've Had Our Food In The Past, Then You Know How It Is.-
If You Haven't, You Don't Know What You've Missed!
Open for Lunch & Dinner
Mon.-Thurs. 11:30 to 9:00 * Fri. & Sat 11:30 to 10:00


Voted Best Pizza
In rIh ,t ) log

Home of the
Bucket of
Spaghetti &'
Bucket of
Salad.
Feeds 6-7!
$18.95


$5.95 Lunch Specials Daily


Monday thru Wednesday
is Family Night - All You Can Eat
Spaghetti or Ziti w/ meatsauce, salad,
dessert & beverage $6.95

We Make Fresh Pizza's
From 4-9 Daily


I


ing that FHP requires is unique. All
of the FHP trainees attend the same
academy." noted Manuel Smymios.
The three brothers' father was an
FHP trooper, and always presented a
healthy image of his job. "I remem-
ber being extremely interested in be-
ing a trooper. I always thought it was
a neat job."
He commented, "The people of
Madison; County have genuine re-
spect for the law, it is nice to work
here.Y Manuel Smymios has been
married to his wife, Misty for 16
years and has three children. His
spare time includes working out and
spending time with his family.
George Smyrnios has been a
preacher, a teacher and presently an
FHP trooper for the last 10 years.
The area of jurisdiction is, much
larger than that of any other law en-
forcement agency. His job includes
traffic and drug enforcement, public
service and ensuring safety. "I truly)
enjoy helping people. I take a lot of
pride in this uniform, mainly be-
cause what I saw in my Dad as an
.FHP trooper. He always created a
positive image of what a trooper
should be,/' he said.
"The small' town atmosphere and
hospitality makes Madison a great
place to work," he added. He re-
sides in Perry and enjoys exercising,


.







www.greenepublishing.com




CHURCH


Friday, September 29, 2006


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A


Covenant Bible


College & Seminary
Due to numerous requests for Tuesday night classes,
Covenant Bible College and Seminary will begin having classes
on Tuesday evenings instead of Thursday. The first Tuesday
class will be held October 3, 2006. at 6:30 p.m. at New Life
Christian Church. The October course is entitled "Biblical Fi-
nance." Anyone wishing to take classes may register at any time.
New students are enrolling each week. Orientation for the New
October Students will be held Sunday, October 1, 2006 from
3:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. at New Life Christian Church. For
more information or an application, please contact Connie Pe-,
terson at 973-3950..

Out Of The Mouths


Of Babes"!!! ?? ?


A nurse on the pediatric
ward, before listening to the
little ones' chests, would plug
the stethoscope into their ears
and let them listen to their own
hearts. Their eyes would al-
ways light up with awe, but
she never got a response to
equal four-year old David's
comment. Gently she tucked
the stethoscope into his ears
and placed the disk over his
heart. Listen, she said...........
what do you suppose that is?
He drew his eyebrows togeth-
er in a puzzled line and looked

CHURCH

COMMUNITY

CALENDAR
September 30
Sirmans Baptist will hold
a building-fund fundraiser
starting at 4 p.m. This will
include a gospel sing,
spaghetti supper, silent auc-
tion, and a cake auction.
October 6
Lee Worship Centers
first Friday night sing will be
a benefit sing for Teresa Sug-
gs, who has cancer. She is
part of the "Willing Vessels"
who came down and put sid-
ing on the church.. There will
be a silent auction, and they
are accepting. items for the
silent auction, cakes for the
cake walk and monetary do-
nations. Checks can be made
to the Lee Worship Center.
Please call Brenda Mc-
Cormick for information at
971-4135 or 673-9490. The
concert will start at 6:30
p.m., and will be followed by
supper. Please bring a cov-
ered dish of veggies, salads
or dessert, as the meat will be
provided.
October 8
Midway Church of God
will host their homecoming
featuring the McCormick.
Family and Rev. Charles Las-
seter as the guest speaker.
Services will begin at 10 a.m.
with dinner on the grounds to
follow. Everyone is cordially
invited for a time of Christian
fellowship and love.









GI t leadstones,
i classifieds,
itheCommun (
SCalendar


Iso muchmore!

I **All Itq


up as if lost in the mystery of
the strange tap - tap - tapping
deep in his chest. Then his
face broke out in a wondrous
grin and he asked,? "Is that Je-
sus Knocking?"


Barbara Memorial Church
Of The Nazarene
High, i', ."..4 * ,5a-.,-'0.4 I.U
Siinda. Schoiol..........................................11:00 a.m .
Morning \\oi .hip......... .............................11:1111 a.m .
EF ening %\\orship.......... ......... ....... 5:30 p.m.
% tdni-daa Bible Stud ..... ......................7:30 p.m.


S . I ,, l . :r. 1:. FL. * H. i- , *aU
Sunday SchoIl................ ..........................10:00 a.m .
M morning \\nr fhip......................... . ........... .11:0011 .m
Evening 1 or hip .......................................... :0l p.m .
WEdndj Niiht Se in............................ . . "311 p.m.
\l j 11 ... ' H i,. . 1 .. . " . . i 1 , ." rn .. i. . '' . i

F\ERIONE .ISA XI.\ _ FLCOME:


St. Vincent DePaul Roman
Catholic Church
I'k,..,,; A, S.ni,,i 5o * � I*,'.,'*.2-2:.
Sunday. .......................... ..................... :..... a.11 .
M on.. Tut ., \\-ed. M J . . . ......... ... ..........7:311 1.m .
Thur.dj, M as;.................. ... .. . .......... :311 a.l.
Saiurda Ala .. ...........................................5.311 p.m



St. Mary's Episcopal Church
i 4 i NIE FI.,.I-, ,- ,. A l r I-1,ji rL � ,', .i"'" ;.37

Sunday) Churh Schii.'ol........ ...... .. ......10:10 a.m.
Munda h11l) Fuchari-1. . .....................1..I|:|ltl a.in.
Mkliion Boa rd - 2nd Sunda... .. .......... 1::11 p.m.
E piLi.pal Church \,isoin - 3rd Sunda% ....11:1110 p.m.


Faith Baptist Church
I I 1 11' -I") E .i M r..-. j' ..J ' FL * - I .' 'I - -
pf .1 1. , 13- i, , " .1 , .. ., r. l .,, ,. : '. L.. r,
.. ..... . Sunday S mhI il........................................ 1:45 a.m .
r Mo rung 11urihip................ ................11:111 .m.1
. hurch raini ............................. ........................ p.m .
EL s ning, \\.rl lp.......................................7:01) p.m .
II Ira.ti MA ltingi . ti ldnc adalt. .....................7.8:1111 p.m.
L. i .. iFaiih Night upptr. li \\tdn-.da ........6- 7:ill p.m.
.', ,, PlpptltMinistMr. undai,......................... (:1 p.in.
-G;ROl \ iMiali..n. o di.ndj ............. ..........6:.31l p m.


Grace Presbyterian Church
I , ..I,,.h, .,,, ..... I

Sundjai 'tl....l F,,r AllI \L .. ............... 9:45 a in.
"und.las liarninlg I Ih|ip......................Il:0iI ip.ni
\\td Frtllilhiip Suppr Hibl li luds........i. li p in.
louth (jtoup . Wl - 12tlh (.r.il ......... .... .31 p.nm .
(hui Pi .................... ............. . ..:31. p.m.
I ridia Mcn'. Pira. r Br-.,kla,... . .... ......7-ln a.m.
-. ,. . n . . . , . , l . .. . . ,t. ] , '

Lee United Methodist Church
II , ', 'IL I. .. .H I.'..- .

M r i nin i. ..i I,ip ..l... .. . . .. . . . ... i .i.m.
M irrnin i-I, iip . ... . . ..... ...... . IIIi n. 1.
Sund.o E ,u l.un \t -Jrlhip . . ............ . . :11 p Ill
iMen I I..u.l.ip Brt.kik i
S H.ln iii .11 ... .. . ... MI i 111n I




Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church

i , .. ' I , , . .

Suiindi Schjol.............. . . . .....9-14 :,.n.,
Pastoral Sunday (1st & 3rd Sunday)..................11:00 a.m.
Youth Church (2nd Sunday).............................11:00 a.m.
l';lh,.r A m udc . J11, o ,.-.i.i , ... . ..... .. .. . .. ..... . I I 0l a.mi.


Hanson United Methodist Church
'"n NF ,I'.D,- . .,.i . H.,ro .r,. FL
I 7 ,. -n i tr . M jJ, , I '... , I I ., lu rr , , ;;
Sunday; School..... . .................................. 11.... :01 a.m .
M morning orsluip........ .............................. 11:15 a.m .
Sunday F -I ning Biblk Iudi .......... ............:.... 111 p.m.
Choir Practice Sundal Fisning. ..................5:11 p.m.
W'ednesda> Fcnin, Praser s .ri... ......7...O p.m.
All! Are \klconte. Please o',-_Cme'

Fellowship Baptist Church

.3 . i - i Cr. -l , n ,M l , L. . .. . . , �* i ' . i i. . , i ' l l i ,f t r , r t [n' i . . ,
...iil ^ C . A . r . ~ .' . . . r; uIV , .. .r
Morning %\nim hip........... ........8:31i a.m. & 11:01) a.m.
Nuinda) Schiml. .................................... 111:0U .mi.n .
l\edn.ldal: Familh Night................Call for schedule
*\ ',in . .,', ?.6.,, ,0 * i . .. .' . i , ii..r" " n .


First United Methodist Church

-'. F . . . L.i, Iin
* Tt l r ,,.,I,. ' ..,, I ,. . . , , * t, '1 ,l, r, L ,, Lt, 1''
S . S -r iri Ill \ ..rd A aihilu..........................8:3110 a.m .
. S unda d ,liinijl............................................Y:45 a.m .
S" ,,, Su1 dn Mornini 1\% I lhip..... ................... ..11:010 a.m.
S %'iiiitl d.i) All l1 .utii i grlatits- .i8 . .....6:311-8:11Is p.m.
l , , , outh.ll aradd 9- '- 2 . ...............................7:(N1 p.m .
S. M"tn'1\ Iell, i- hip BrItak.i sl i3rd Sun.i........8:00 a.im.
1Im\\ it n'. i MAltin A L .unIch I i 't Mi.i i,....1 2:011 noon

Greenville Bantist Church


Sundl l LinI . 11 \ - . ..............11.111t J.m
Simnd.s~ M.r %nl ; .r- lipr.h. . . .. .... .... .. . . 11:11j m.
'iuildlI I r linin , \t .-.li.. . .. .. ... "..l.ii p in
i ltJnd.. Pr % li'.- ,,u.h _lu- , il. ..it 1,nd
dldill Lhi.n r hl n .,l ... . . . ... . . .:31, p m
.,tltlli & \. Jill BRit. 1-.l.i . . .. .. .".il p.m
I1'[ dnLl i ur ir,.llll, kin' [in kl..Ikl l .... . .i. r .i.m
.Ih I,-d


Phone Home

[ It's Me - God!

"[Jesus] said to them, 'He who is without sin:l
among you, let him throw a stone at her first.' And
again He stooped down and wrote on the ground,
Then those who heard it, being convicted by their.
conscience, went out one by one, beginning with the oldest even to the last,
And Jesus was left alone, and the woman standing in the midst, When
Jesus had raised Himself up and saw no one but the woman, He said to her,
'Woman, where are those accusers of yours? Has no one condemned you'
, She said, 'No one, Lord,' And Jesus said to her, 'Neither do I condemn
you; go and sin no more'."-John 8:7-11
Divine forgiveness is yours for the asking Yei, do not mistake this for-
giveness for condoning your sins.,
You must make a real effort to, as Jesus said, "Go and sin no more,"
Your heart must be pure, your intentions clear, your goals focused.
My love for you is eternal as is My forgiveness for your sins, You need
only repent sincerely.
� 2006 DBR Media, Inc.


Lee Worship Center
,', MN:r,.:.hu Li * Le e.L ?2'.',9
,itf.., 'h ,r,.:. L.Ir ,'t, r
Sunday ............... .. .........................10:11 a m.
Sunday Es ninu 1\\r,.hip.............................6.01) p.m.
Thur-. Prayer Meeting & Bible Studi............6:110 p.m.
A C'iurcli A i-,r E. -.:,:.rc i S.,rrcneuni
adll Pa.r:.r Charlet & A.l..r-,i.:'u L i: .:ic- :.. .M l wI' . .ic -& Breindi
C rm l f.-.r . , [ , . . ...r Ji r.- . cChurCL '971-27 ' 41


a'


St. John Damascene
Orthodox Catholic Church
141 S\ Broad V .e * Greeni, lie. FL '23 1 �* 5u.9i4- --2S22
Rct ri Fd Fthr .L.I. Pa.Vite
Bishop .4\/c tini B,r , th..loit om
Sunday - Eucharist Mass (Di'ine Lilurg) i
10:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.


Readers Of The Harvest Church


Madison Church of God
"* I NL Hr, I... I I l i.,. .:.I FL-

'iinil.ia %.Chil..Il. .. . .. . ... . ................... 111: a l.
M orniiin \\ ,, ship.......... ....... . .......... 11:1111 u m.
[. nnii \\,irship. ..... . . . ...................... . :1) p.111.
dii. iJ ilhk i tlud ... . . . .. ...............7-01. p.m .


Happenings At

Madison First Baptist
Oh, the truth of the words of the song we sing "How Great
Thou Art"! All my needs he doth supply! Beautiful flowers
were placed in church by the family of Mr. and Mrs. Van H.
Priest, who were married in the 1898 Sanctuary. Prayers of
thanks for them and all they were and all they did in church,
family, community, and prayers of thanks for their family's con-
tinued love of church and community.
Liane Wakefield blessed us singing. Geoff Hill led singing.
Preacher mentioned that September 20-October 2 the Florida
Singing Men & Women were in Sidney, Australia, on the way to
Malaysia, and Billy is on a music worship mission tour. We give
thanks for Misty Lamb joining us and pray special blessings on
her.
Please remember Margaret Morris in South Georgia, Room
518; in Madison Hospital: Lynn Wrey, Sue Raines, Shelton
Williams, and at home, Al Spurlock, with severe back problems
and in much pain, Vernon Adams recovering at home from a
broken hip, and caring for Virginia, and for Alex Agner, recov-
ering from a stroke and able to be back in church. We pray for
all the other ill ones.
Someone said... Have confidence that if you have done a
little thing 'well, you can do a bigger thing well, too. We pray
comfort for the family of Mr. Herb Spaulding. Mary left not
long ago and they were so important to the community where
they lived and loved.
I asked for a flower...
and ,He gave me a garden.
I asked for a tree...
and He gave me.a forest.
I asked for a river...
-and He gave me an ocean.
I asked for a friend...
And He gave me you.
.. ' . -Unknown' .
My sentiments... The many loved ones and friends He has
given me and I thank Him! And I thank you!. May He continue
to bless us, oneand all. Amen!


. .-. -- . . - . 2:L.!L.


............. 1--











10A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



HEALTH


Friday, September 29, 2006


aL_ AhIlI [Ieing OverlccKed In Ycung Cirls


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing Inc.
There is a whopping 4.4 million chil-
dren within the United States who have
been diagnosed with attention deficit hy-
peractivity disorder (ADHD), a serious
condition which makes it difficult for
children to control their behavior and pay
attention.
Studies have shown that boys are
three times more likely than girls to be di-
agnosed with ADHD. ;One main reason,
that is also a reason that could be devel-
oped into a life changing problem, is that
girls are simply not being targeted for the
benefits that these particular treatments
provide.
Clinical psychologist, Kathleen G.
.Nadeau, Ph.D., who is internationally
known for being one of the top ADHD
experts, comments that parents, teacher,
and mental health professionals need to
be able to identify this issue efficiently.
* ADHD ha, always been an issue
when it comes to the classroom. It is be-
coming more of an issue, keeping in mind


AGING
As we age, we will continue to develop in many different ar-
eas. The most obvious development will be within ourselves. Be-
coming an elder will ring the process of discovering hidden as-
pects of our past. Standing back from the experiences, .the elder
will sift through the layers of emotions and actions of their life.
Advancing through life becoming an elder will bring a de-
crease in self-centeredness. The elder discovers that they, as an in-
dividual, are not the center of the universe. During the lifetime of
an adult, .usually the "I" takes priority over every decision lhat is
made. An elder has had the time of life to realize that the "I" can
only do so much, and that the world requires more.
An elder has had the joyful experience of rediscovering child-
hood, not by. becoming one, but being able. to savor the recollec-
tions of their years of being a child. Being able to recollect the
various episodes of childhood is an enriching experience e el-
der, and a teaching too for them to share with us.
An elder becomes more selective with their social contacts lat-
er in life. They are less concerned with superficial relationships.,
Elders are more drawn to relationships that enrich their souls, with
honest feelings. An elder has more of a need for solitude. They.
are relaxed, within themselves, and enjoy quiet time for reflection.
Attitudes regarding wealth are an obvious change. An elder
prefers not to be bothered with acquiring wealth and power. They
are aware that possessions andpower can ensnare a person, rob-
bing them of relaxation 'and tranquility.
Becoming an elder also. holds the promise of renewed interest
in nature. An elder has the opportunity of becoming a spectator of
all the-miracles'.and consequences of life. They realize they are
connected with the ;ast living world that surrounds all of us. Na-
ture holds the daily unfolding of sunrises, breezes, clouds, sunsets.
and the moon that w ill continue to make them. as well as us, at one
with the world. .
"The ignorant man mar'e s at the exceptional; the wise man
marvels at the common: the grcates wonder of all this is the reg-'
ularity of nature."
-George Dana Boardman


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HEALTH SNUFFED

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that many girls are' being missed through
surveys, studies and research regarding
ADHD: E erone knows that a teacher's
pet is more likely to be a girl than a:boy.
Why?. Girls are more motivated to
please teachers and earn the title as their
favorite. Therefore, there are less behav-
ioral problems in the classroom 'when it
comes to girls.:The majority of girls are
more hN pertalkati\ e than hyperactive, so
most teachers look at this as girls being
chatty, which h is normal. They might dis-
miss the issue due to the fact that they are
just trying to become popular and become
their own social butterfly, than recogniz-
ing a condition that is getting in the way


of learning.
Girls have to deal with .several prob-
lems and challenges when they are diag-
nosed with ADHD. Recent studies have
shown that students who are in elemen-
tary school really do not have all that
much to worry about when it comes to
learning and behavioral issues. When stu-
dents hit puberty, that is when the prob-
lems startto occur. When girls make it to
middle school, the demand to be this or
that, act this way, have an opinion on this
certain topic...all of these demands may
seem a little overwhelming. As a result,
their grades start to fall. Relationships be-
come rocky with parents, friends,
boyfriends and everything is chaos.
Can ADHD be diagnosed as an adult
in women?' Yes, adult diagnosis. often
comes through a child. If a child has
ADHD, most lkely the parents also have
the disease; it's a genetic disorder.
For additional information on ADHD
please visit, ADDvance at www.ad-
dvance.com and the Attention Deficit
Disorder Association at www.add.org


Madison County Volunteers Complete Community Investment
Process; Set To Distribute Funds To Agencies Serving Madison


Madison County volun-, agency, volunteer, youth, mili-
teers completed the United tary services), Amenca's Sec-
Way of the Big Bend UiU BB) 'ond Harvest of the Big Bend
Madison community invest- (562-3033. Provides surplus
ment process recently , and the. food to the needs through-
funds will soon be distributed n o n pro f'i t
to 17 human-service agencies agencies); Big
that provide services in Madi- Bend Cares.
son Count. . (656-243,7,
A group of know ledge- Provides edu-
able Madison volunteerss spent cation and
many hours at the North Flori- comprehen-
da Community College Li- sixe support to
brary to ensure the $80,654 people infect-
was allocated in a fair and un- ed with or af-
biased manner so that these fected by HIV/AIDS), Big
select agencies can provide Bend Hospice (878-5310, Pa-
services for local people in tient/family hospice care and
need throughout the year. bereavement), Boy Scouts of
The 2006 Madison>Coun- America, Suwanee River Area
ty Agencies, their telephone Council (576-4146, Youth
numbers, and the rt pes of ser- leadership development and
%ices, they offer, .ae. sbfj.,,_pr\ mention pcogran:sj,.Brehpon,
lows: 2-1-1 Big Bend 1211, Institute for FantilN Services
24-hour crisis, suicide and (656-7110, Shelter for home-
HIV/AIDS hotline), Ability less pregnant women, sert ices
1st (575-9621, Assistance to for at-risk families), Citizens
persons with disabilities), for a Progressive Madison,
American Red Cross, Capital County (973-9664, Provides
Area Chapter (878-6080, Dis- ' academic support to low-in-.
aster, health, safety, emer- come students), Consolidated
Christian , Ministries (973-
SU 6208, Provides food to fami-'
U T BY lies in need), Early Learning
. Y Coalition of the Big Bend
(385-0551, Provides early
LLN E S S? learning and school readiness
programs for children), Elder
Care Services (921-5554,
Comprehensive programs for
senior citizens in need), Fel-
'lowship of Christian Athletes
(383-1144, Serves middle and
high school students and aims
S: to teach honesty, respect for


.' 3 ! . ';


-4


A Florida jury has found that Tobacco companies engaged in extreme and
outrageous conduct in the sale and marketing of cigarettes. Now, the.
Florida Supreme Court has held that the tobacco companies are liable for
their conduct and individuals suffering from smoking related illnesses
may pursue claims for compensatory and punitive damages.

If you or a loved one developed a smoking related illness
between 1990 and 2000, call your Florida Consumer justice Attorneys
for a free consultation.





1 , , P. ,


The hiring of a lawyer is an Important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written Information about our qualifications and experience.


authority. racial harmony, self-
lessness. sexual responsibility.
and substance abuse preven-
tion), Girl Scout Council of
the Apalachee Bend (386-
S. . -. 2 1 3 1 ,
Camps, in-
ner city pro-
gram and
other. pro-
I grams to en-
, courage
hea healthy
S lifesty les),-
, Kids Incor-
porated of the Big Bend (414-
9800, Family -oriented earlyy
childhood services), Madison.
County Senior Cidzens Center
(973-424, Comprehensive
program for senior citizens in
need), and Refuge House
(681-211 i assistance for vic-
tims of domestic and sexual
violence, including safe shel-
ter and 24-hour crisis hotline).
The Madison County
Community ,Investment Team
included Mary .Frances
Mauldin, Judy McGee, Ann
Sapp, Stephen Pike, and Hazel
Mitchell.
The team's agency review
process includes several com-n
ponents that take time to com-
plete properly. Madison agen-
cies or new applicants submit
an application to remain or be-
come, a UWBB agency for
Madison. ,This application is
comprised of a description of
their .programs offered to
clients, numbers of clients
served in that county, how the
'lives of their local clients


changes for the better because
.' of their programs. budget in-
formation on the agency, and a
list of their board of directors.
The team also makes on-site
visits to the agencies, studies,
their budgets, and hears testi-
monials from clients and/or
agency volunteers . Upon com-
pletion. they determine which
agencies and how much %\ill
be funded for that particular
year.
"It's inspiring to see these
volunteers in Madison take
time out of their busy sched-
ules to go through this agency
review process," said Mary
Carol Kaney, ULWBB Cam-
paign manager for ,Madison.
"This process is critical to en-.
suring.that these funds are al-
located properly and make the
most impact in this county.
We're very proud of the bot-
tom-line results these agencies
are producing and how they
help people in need through-
out Madison County."
For more information
about becoming a UWBB vol-
unteer, or the agencies funded
in this process, please call
Mary Carol Kaney at 488-
8207 or Arnold McKay at
414-0844.




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Friday, September 29, 2006


www.greenepublishing. corn


The Madison Eiirr'prise-Recorder 11A


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973-6326

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12A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder www.greenepublishing.cOm Friday, September 29, 2006


PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS



TO BE VOTED ON NOVEMBER 7, 2006



NOTICE OF ELECTION


I, Sue M. Cobb, Secretary of State of the State of Florida,
do hereby give notice. that an election will be held in each coun-
ty in Florida, on November 7, 2006, for the ratification or rejec-
tion of proposed constitutional amendments of the State of
Florida.

NO. 1
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE III, SECTION 19
(Legislative)


Ballot-Title:
STATE PLANNING AND BUDGET PROCESS

Ballot Summary:
Proposing amendments to the State Constitution to limit the
amount of nonrecurring general revenue which may be appro-
priated for recurring purposes in any fiscal year to 3 percent of
the total general revenue funds estimated to be available, unless,
otherwise approved by a three-fifths vote of the Legislature; to
establish a Joint Legislative Budget Commission, which shall
issue long-range financial outlooks; to provide for limited ad-
justments in the state budget without the concurrence; of the full.
Legislature, as provided by general law; to reduce the number of
times trust funds are automatically terminated: to require the
preparation and biennial revision of a long-range state planning
document; and to establish a Go\ernment Efficienc3 Task Force
and specify its duties.


Full Text:


ARTICLE III
LEGISLATURE


SECTION 19. State Budgeting, Planning and Appropria-
tions Processes.-
(a)ANNUAL BUDGETING.
(1) Effective July 1, 199, General law shall prescribe the
adoption of annual state budgetary and planning processes and
require that detail reflecting the, annualized costs of the state
budget and reflecting the nonrecurring costs of the budget re-
quests shall accompany state department and agency legislative
budget requests, the governor's recommended budget, and ap-
propriation bills.
(2) Unless approved by a three-fifths vote of the member-
ship of each house, appropriations made for recurring purposes
from'nonrecurring general revenue funds for any fiscal year
shall not exceed three percent of the total general revenue funds
estimated to be available at the time such appropriation is made.
(3) As prescribed by general law. each state department and
agency shall be required to submit a legislative budget request
that is based upon and that reflects the long-range financial out-
look adopted by the joint legislative budget commission or that
snecificallv explains any variance from the long-range financial


outlook contained in the request.
(41 For purposes of this section subsection, the terms de-
partment and agency shall include the judicial branch.
(b) APPROPRIATION BILLS FORMAT. Separate sections
within the general appropriation bill shall be used for each ma-
jor program area of the state budget; major program areas shall
include: education enhancement "lottery" trust fund items; edu-
cation (all other funds); human services; criminal justice and
corrections; natural resources, environment, growth manage-
ment, and transportation; general government; and judicial
branch. Each major program area shall include an itemization of
expenditures for: state operations; state capital outlay; aid to lo-
cal governments and nonprofit organizations operations; aid to
local governments and nonprofit organizations capital outlay;
federal.funds and the associated state matching funds; spending
authorizations for operations; and spending authorizations for
capital outlay. Additionally, appropriation bills passed by the
legislature shall include an itemization of specific appropria-
tions that exceed one million dollars ($1,000,000.00) in 1992
dollars. For purposes of this subsection, "specific appropria-
tion," "itemization," and "major program area" shall be defined
by law.. This itemization threshold shall be adjusted by general
law: every four years to reflect the rate of inflation or deflation
as indicated in the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Con-
sumers, U.S. City Average, All Items, or successor reports as re-
ported by the United States Department of Labor, Bureau of La-
bor Statistics or its successor. Substantive bills containing ap-
propriations shall also be subject to the itemization requirement
mandated under this provision and shall be subject to the gover-
nor's specific appropriation veto power described in Article III,
Section 8. This subsection thall bo effective July 1, 1991
(c) APPROPRIATIONS REBi9W PROCESS. /
(1) No later than September 15 of each year. the joint leg-
islative budget commission shall issue a long-range /financial
outlook setting out recommended fiscal strategies for the state
and its departments and agencies in order to assist the legislature
in making budget decisions. The long-range financial outlook
must include major workload and revenue estimates., In order to
implement this paragraph, the joint legislative budget commis-
sion shall use current official consensus estimates and may re-
quest the development of additional official estimates. /
(2) The joint legislative budget commission shall seek input
from the public and from the executive and judicial branches
when developing and recommending the long-range financial
outlook.
(3) The legislature shall prescribe by general law conditions
under which limited adjustments to the budget, as recommend-
ed by the governor or the chief justice of the supreme court, may
be approved without the concurrence of the full legislature. Ef-
fective July 1, 1993, general law shall proscribe roquir.monts
for each department and agency of stato government o submit
a planning document and supporting budget r.. u.st for review
by the appropriations conmittoos of both housob of tho logisla
turo. Tho review shall include a comparison of tho major issu-s
in tho planning document and budget requests to thoso major is
sues included in the governor's r.ocommondod e udg.t. . For pur
posos of this subsoction, the to - dpa.m.net d.nd agency shall
iloludo the judicial branch.


(d) SEVENTY-TWO HOUR PUBLIC REVIEW PERIOD.
All general appropriation bills shall be furnished to each mem-
ber of the legislature, each member of the cabinet, the governor,
and the chief justice of the supreme court at least seventy-two
hours before final passage by either house of the legislature of
the bill in the form that will be presented to the governor.
(e) FINAL BUDGET REPORT. Effcctivz Nov6mber 1,
4992-, A final budget report shall be prepared as prescribed by
general law. The final budget report shall be produced no later
than the 120th 9 lk day after the beginning of the, fiscal year,
and copies of the report shall be furnished to each member of
the legislature, the head of each department and agency of the
state, the auditor general, and the chief justice of the supreme
court.
(f) TRUST FUNDS.
(1) No trust fund of the State of Florida or other public body
may be created or re-created by law without a three-fifths (-3/4
yote of the membership of each house. of the legislature in a sep-,
arate bill for that purpose only.
(2) Stat. trust funds in .xistonc. before the off ctivo dato of


' effective date of this subotion. State trust funds ereated-after
th.e eoffOctiv date. of 's subsoti'n 'shall terminate not more
than four years after the effect' e date of the ac-t authorizing the
initial creation of the trust fund. By law-'the legislature may set
.a shorter time period for which any trust fund is authorized.
(3) Trust funds required by federal programs or mandates;
trust funds established for bond covenants, indentures, or reso-
lutions, whose revenues are legally., pledged by the state or pub-
lic body to meet debt service or other financial requirements of
any debt obligations of the state or any public body; the state
transportation trust fund; the trust fund containing the net annu-
al proceeds from the Florida Education Lotteries: the Florida re-
tirement trust fund; trust funds for institutions' under the man-
agement of the Board of Governors Regents, where such trust
funds are for auxiliary enterprises'and contracts, grants,,and do-
nations, as those terms are defined by general law; trust funds
that serve as clearing funds or accounts for the chief financial
officer or state agencies; trust funds that account for assets held
by the state in a trustee capacity as an agent or fiduciary for in-
dividuals, private organizations, or other governmental units;
and other trust funds authorized by this Constitution,. are not
subject to the requirements set forth in paragraph (2) of this sub-
section.
(4) All cash balances and income of any ,trist funds abol-
ished under this subsection shall be deposited into the . general
re %enue fund.


(5) T1hz provisions of ts subsoction shall be otftotive No
vember 1,41992.
..(g) BUDGET STABILIZATION FUND. B inning ith
teie t 9 an.,9am.fin.tJeqar. a least 5%f of an lmaunst , cmlethed
Ilas! yearplc'sd tal t ,cr'> ne t reve nue oolccdfone tg r the gene
oral revenue fund shall bo retained in a, -budget stabilization


said amount for tho. 1996 1997 fisolee y ca l years a n% of sai
amount for the 1997 1998 fiscal year, afnd at loat 5% of said
amount for the 1- 18 1..999 fiscal yer. Subject to the povisions
of this subsection, tho budgt stabilizoation fund hall bo main
tained at an amount equal to at least 5% of the last completed
fiscal year's, net revenue collections for the general revenue
fund shall be retained in the budget stabilization fund. The bud-
get stabilization :fund's principal balance shall not exceed an
amount equal to 10% of the last completed fiscal year's net rev-
enue collections for the general revenue fund. The legislature
,shall provide criteria for s\ ithdra\ ing funds from the budget sta-
bilization fund in a separate bill for that purpose only and only
for the purpose of covering revenue shortfalls of the general rev-
enue fund or for the purpose of providing funding for an emer-
gency,, as defined by general law. General law shall provide for
the restoration of this fund. The budget stabilization fund shall
be comprised of funds not otherwise obligated or committed for
any purpose.
(h) LONG-RANGE STATE .PLANNING DOCUMENT
AND DEPARTMENT AND AGENCY PLANNING DOCU-
MENT PROCESSES. General law shall provide for a long-
range state planning document. The governor shall recommend
to the' legislature biennially any revisions to the long-range state
planning document, as defined by law. General law shall require
a biennial review and revision of the long-range state planning
document, shall roquiro the, go;'ror to report to tho legislature
on the progress in achieving tho state planning document's
geal , and .shall require all departments and agencies of state
government to develop planning documents that' identify
statewide strategic goals and objectives, consistent with the
'long-range state planning document. The long-range state plan-
ning document and department and agency planning documents
shall remain subject to review and revision by the legislature.
The long-range state planning document must include projec-
tions of future needs and resources of the state which are con-
sistent with the long-range financial outlook. The department
and agency planning documents shall include a prioritized list-
ing of planned expenditures for review and possible reduction in
the event of revenue shortfalls, as defined by general law. Te-en
sure productivity and efficiency in tho executive, legislative,
and judicial branches, a quality management and accountability
program shall bo implomontod by general law. For the purposes


of tiss su ,cCtion, the c trsE ,eprtmt ntan and goncy snaii in


elude the judicial branch. This subsection shall bo effcftivo July
41--1993-
(i) GOVERNMENT EFFICIENCY TASK FORCE. No
later than January of 2007. and each fourth year thereafter, the
president of the senate, the speaker of the house of representa-
tives, and the governor shall appoint a government efficiency
task force, the membership of which shall be established by
general law. The task force shall be composed of members of
the legislature and representatives from the private and public
sectors who shall develop recommendations for improving
governmental operations and reducing costs. Staff to assist the
task force in performing its duties shall be assigned by gener-
al law, and the task force may obtain assistance from the pri-


approved by vote of at least sixty percent of the electors vot-
ing on the measure, it shall be effective as an amendment to or
revision of the constitution of the state on the first Tuesday af-
ter the first Monday in January following the election, or on
such other date as may be specified in the amendment or revi-
sion.


7


f


vate sector. The task force shall complete its work within one
year and shall submit its recommendations to the joint legisla-
tive budget commission, the governor, and the chief justice of
the supreme court.
(j) JOINT LEGISLATIVE BUDGET COMMISSION.
There is created within the legislature the joint legislative bud-
get commission composed of equal numbers of senate mem-
bers appointed by the president of the senate and house mem-
bers appointed by the speaker of the house of representatives.
Each member shall serve at the pleasure of the officer who ap-
pointed the member. A vacancy on the commission shall be
filled in the same manner as the original appointment. From
November of each odd-numbered year through October of
each even-numbered )ear, the chairperson of the joint legisla-
tive budget commission shall be appointed by the president of
the senate and the vice chairperson of the commission shall be
appointed by'the speaker of the house of representatives. From.
November of each even-numbered year through October of
each odd-numbered year, the chairperson of the joint. legisla-
tive budget commission shall be appointed by the speaker of
the house of representatives and the %ice chairperson of the
commission shall be appointed: by the president of the senate.
The joint legislative budget commission shall be governed by
the joint rules of the senate and the house of representatives,
uhich shall remain in effect until repealed or amended b\ con-
current resolution. The commission shall convene at least
quarterly and shail con' ene at the call of the president of the
senate and the speaker of the house of representatives. A ma-
jority of the nmminssion members of each house plus one ad-
ditional member from either house constitutes a quorum. Ac-
tion by the commission requires a majority vote of the com-
mission menibers present of each house. The conmissmon may
conduct its meetings through teleconferences or similar
means. In addition to th[lie powers and duties specified in this
subsection, the ioint legislative budget commission shall exer-
cise all other powers and perform an othlier duties not in con-
flict vith paragraph mic113) and as prescribed by general la% or
jointirule.


NO. 2
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VI, SECTION 4
(Legislative)

Ballot Title:
TERM LIMITS

Removed from the ballot by the Florida Legislature.

, , . . , ,. . . . , . - , -.. . . , . . _ , . . . . . , ., , , . . , I , - ,
. CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDNIENT .- ..,
ARTICLE XI, SECTION 5
(Legislative)

Ballot Title:
REQUIRING BROADER PUBLIC SUPPORT FOR CONSTI-
TUTIONAL AMENDMENTS OR REVISIONS

Ballot Summary:
Proposes an amendment to Section 5 of Article XI of the State
Constitution to require that any proposed amendment to,or re-
vision of the State Constitution, whether proposed by the Leg-
islature, by initiative, or by any other method, must be ap-
proved by at 'least 60 percent of the voters of the state voting
on the measure, rather than by a simple majority. This pro-
posed amendment would not change the current requirement
that a proposed constitutional amendment imposing a new
state tax or fee be approved by at least 2/3 of the voters of the
state voting in the election in which such an amendment is
considered.

Full Text:
ARTICLE XI
AMENDMENTS �

SECTION 5. Amendment or revision election.-
(a) A proposed amendment to or revision of this constitu-
tion, or any part of it, shall be submitted to the electors at the
next general election held more than ninety days after the joint
resolution or report of revision commission, constitutional
convention or taxation and budget reform commission propos-
ing it is filed with the custodian of state records, unless, pur-
suant to law enacted by the affirmative vote of three-fourths of
the membership of each house of the legislature and limited to
a single amendment or revision, it is submitted at an earlier
special election held more than ninety days after such filing.
(b) A proposed amendment or revision of this constitu-
tion, or any part of it, by initiative shall be submitted to the
electors at the general election provided .the initiative petition
is filed with the custodian of state records no later than Febru-
ary 1 of the year in which the general election 'is held.
(c) .The legislature shall provide by general law, prior to
the holding of an election pursuant to this section, for the pro-
vision of a statement to the public regarding the probable fi-
nancial impact of any amendment proposed by initiative pur-
suant to section 3.
(d) Once in the tenth week, and once in the sixth week im-
mediately preceding the week in which the election is held, the
proposed amendment or revision, with notice of the date of
election at which it will be submitted to the electors, shall be
published in one newspaper of general circulation in each
county in which a newspaper is published.
(e) Unless otherwise specifically provided for elsewhere
in this constitution, if the proposed amendment or revision is


-1 11 1-








Friday, September 29, 2006
NO. 4
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE X, SECTION 27
(Citizen Initiative)

Ballot Title:
PROTECT PEOPLE, ESPECIALLY YOUTH, FROM ADDIC-
TION, DISEASE, AND OTHER HEALTH HAZARDS OF US-
ING TOBACCO

Ballot Summary:
To protect people, especially youth, from, addiction, disease, and
other health hazards of using tobacco, the Legislature shall use
some Tobacco Settlement money annually for a comprehensive
statewide tobacco education and prevention program using Cen-
ters for Disease Control best practices. Specifies some program
components, emphasizing youth, requiring one-third of total an-
nual funding for advertising. Annual funding is 15% of 2005 To-
bacco Settlement -payments to Florida, adjusted annually for in-
flation. Provides definitions. Effective immediately.

Full Text:

BE IT ENACTED BY THE PEOPLE OF FLORIDA THAT,
Article X, Florida Constitution, is amended to add the fol-
lowing:
Section 27. Comprehensive Statewide Tobacco Educa-
tion And Prevention Program. In order to protect people, es-
pecially youth, from health hazards of using tobacco, including,
addictive disorders, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and lung
diseases; and to discourage use of tobacco, particularly among
youth, a portion of the money that tobacco companies pay to the
State of Florida under the Tobacco Settlement each year shall be
used to fund a comprehensive statewide tobacco education and
prevention program consistent with recommendations of the
U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as fol-
lows:
(a) Program. The money appropriated pursuant to this sec-
tion shall be used to fund a comprehensive statewide tobacco
education and prevention program consistent with the recom-
mendations for effective program components in the 1999 Best
Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs of the
CDC, as such Best Practices may be amended by the CDC.
This program shall include, at a minimum, the following com-
ponents, and may include additional components that are also
contained within the CDC Best Practices, as periodically
amended, and that are effective at accomplishing the purpose of
this section, and that do not undermine the effectiveness of these
required minimum components:
(1) an advertising campaign to discourage the use of tobac-
co and to educate people, especially youth, about the health haz-
ards of tobacco, which shall be designed to be effective at
achieving these goals and shall include, but need not be limited
to, television, radio, and print advertising, with no limitations on
any individual advertising medium utilized; and which shall be
funded at a level equivalent to one-third of each total annual ap-
propriation required by this section;
(2) evidence-based curricula and programs to educate youth
about tobacco and to discourage their. use of it, including, but
not limited to, programs that involve youth, educate youth about
the health hazards of tobacco, hipi youth develop skills to
refuse tobacco, and demonstrate to youth how to stop using to-
bacco;
(3) .programs of local community-based partnerships that
discourage the use of tobacco and work to educate people, espe-
cially youth,' about the health hazards of tobacco, with an em-,
phasis,on programs that involve youth and emphasize the pre-
vention and cessation of tobacco use;
(4) enforcement of laws, regulations, and policies against the
sale or other provision of tobacco to minors, and the possession
of tobacco by minors; and
(5) publicly-reported annual evaluations to ensure that mon-
eys appropriated pursuant to this section are spent properly,
which shall include evaluation of the program's effectiveness in
reducing and preventing tobacco use, and annual recommenda-
tions for improvements to enhance the program's effectiveness,,
which are to include comparisons to similar programs proven to
be effective in other states, as well as comparisons to CDC Best
Practices, including amendments thereto.
(b) Funding. In every year beginning with the calendar year
after voters approve this amendment, the Florida Legislature
shall appropriate, for the purpose expressed herein, from the to-
tal gross funds that tobacco companies pay to the State of Flori-
da under the Tobacco Settlement, an amount equal to fifteen per-
cent of such funds paid to the State in 2005; and the appropria-
tion required by this,section shall be adjusted annually for infla-
tion, using the Consumer Price Index as published by the United
States Department of Labor.
(c) Definitions. "Tobacco" includes, without limitation, to-
bacco itself and tobacco products that include tobacco and are in-
tended or expected for human use or consumption, including, but
not limited to', cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, and smokeless to-
bacco. The "Tobacco Settlement" means that certain Settlement
Agreement dated August 25, 1997, entered into in settlement of
the case styled as State of Florida, et al. v. American Tobacco
Company, et al., Case No. 95-1466 AH (Fla. 15th Cir. Ct.), as
amended by Stipulation of Amendment dated September 11,
1998; and includes any subsequent amendments and successor
agreements. "Youth" includes minors and young adults.
(d) Effective Date. This amendment shall become effective
immediately upon approval by the voters.

Financial Impact Statement:
This amendment requires state government to appropriate ap-


proximately $57 million in 2007 for the Comprehensive
Statewide Tobacco Education and Prevention Program. There-
after, this amount will increase annually with inflation. This
spending is expected to reduce tobacco consumption. As a result,
some long-term savings to state and local government health and
insurance programs are probable, but indeterminate. Also, minor
revenue loss to state government is probable, but indeterminate.

NO. 5
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE III, SECTION 16
(Citizen Initiative)

Ballot Title:
INDEPENDENT NONPARTISAN COMMISSION TO AP-
PORTION LEGISLATIVE AND CONGRESSIONAL DIS-


www.greenepublishing. corn
TRICTS WHICH REPLACES APPORTIONMENT BY LEGIS-
LATURE

Removed from the ballot by the Florida Supreme Court.

NO. 6
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 6
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 26
(Legislative)

Ballot Title:
INCREASED HOMESTEAD EXEMPTION

Ballot Summary:
Proposing amendment of the State Constitution to increase the
maximum additional homestead exemption for low-income se-
niors from $25,000 to $50,000 and to schedule the amendment to
take effect January 1, 2007, if adopted.

Full Text:


ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION


SECTION 6. Homestead exemptions.-
(a) Every person who has the legal or equitable title to real
estate and maintains thereon the permanent residence of the
owner, or another legally or naturally dependent upon the own-
er, shall be exempt from taxation thereon, except assessments for
special benefits, tip to the assessed valuation of five thousand.
dollars, upon establishment of right thereto in the manner pre-
scribed by law. The real estate may be held by legal or equitable'
title, by the entireties, jointly. in common, as a condominium, or
indirectly by stock ownership or membership representing the
owner's or member's proprietary interest in a corporation own-
ing a fee or a leasehold initially in excess of ninety-eight years.
(b) Not more than one exemption shall be allowed any indi-
vidual or family unit or with. respect to any residential unit. No
exemption shall exceed.the value of the real estate assessable to
the owner or, in case of ownership through stock or membership,
in a corporation, the value of the proportion which the interest in
the corporation bears to the assessed value of the property..
(c) By general law and subject to conditions specified there-
- in, the exemption shall be increased to a total of twenty-five thou-
sand dollars of the.assessed value.of the real estate for each school
district levy. By general law and subject to conditions specified
therein, the exemption for all other levies may be increased up to
an amount not exceeding ten thousand dollars of the assessed val-
ue of the real estate if the owner, has attained age sixty-five or is
totally and permanently disabled and if the owner is not entitled
to the exemption provided in subsection (d).
(d) By general law and subject to conditions specified there-
in, die exemption shall be increased to a total of the following
amounts of assessed value of real estate for each levy other than
those of school districts: fifteen thousand dollars with respect to
1980 assessments; twenty thousand dollars with respect to 1981
assessments; twenty-five thousand dollars with respect to assess-
ments for 1982 and each year thereafter. However, such increase
:shallnot apple) with respect to anN assessment roll until such roll
is"first'deterinid 'to be in cimpfiliaice'ith 'the 'prbvif6'ntfed-
tion 4 by a state agency designated by general'law. This subsec-
tion shall stand repealed on the effective date of any amendment
to section 4 which provides for the assessment of homestead
property at a.specified percentage of its just value.
(e) By general law and subject to conditions specified there-'
in, the Legislature may provide to renters, who.are permanent res-
idents, ad valorem tax relief on all ad valorem tax levies. Such ad
valorem tax relief shall be in the form and amount established by
general law.
(f) The legislature may, by general law, allow counties or mu-
nicipalities, for the purpose of their respective tax levies and sub-
ject to the provisions of general law, to grant an additional home-
stead tax exemption not exceeding fifty twentyfive thousand dol-
lars to any person who has the legal or equitable title to real estate
and maintains thereon the permanent residence of the owner and
who has attained age sixty-five and whose household income, as
defined by general law, does not exceed twenty thousand dollars.
'The general law must allow counties and municipalities to grant
this additional exemption, within the limits prescribed in this sub-
section, by ordinance adopted in the manner prescribed by gener-
al law, and must provide for the periodic adjustment' of the in-
come limitation prescribed in this subsection for changes in the
cost of living.

ARTICLE XII
SCHEDULE

SECTION 26. Increased homestead exemption.-The amend-
ment to Section 6 of Article VII increasing the maximum addi-
tional amount of the homestead exemption for low-income se-
niors shall take effect January 1, 2007.

NO. 7
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VH, SECTION 6
(Legislative)

Ballot Title:
PERMANENTLY DISABLED VETERANS' DISCOUNT ON
HOMESTEAD AD VALOREM TAX

Ballot Summary:
Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to provide a
discount from the amount of ad valorem tax on the homestead of
a partially or totally permanently disabled veteran who is age 65
or older who was a Florida resident at the time of entering mili-
tary service, whose disability was combat-related, and who was
honorably discharged; to specify the percentage of the discount as
equal to the percentage of the veteran's permanent service-con-
nected disability; to specify qualification requirements for the dis-
count; to authorize the Legislature to waive the annual application
requirement in subsequent years by general law; and to specify
that the provision takes effect December 7, 2006, is self-execut-
ing, and does not require implementing legislation.

Full Text:
ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION


SECTION 6. Homestead exemptions.-


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13A
(a) Every person who has the legal or equitable title to real es-
tate and maintains thereon the permanent residence of the owner,
or another legally or naturally dependent upon the owner, shall be
exempt from taxation thereon, except assessments for special
benefits, up to the assessed valuation of five thousand dollars,
upon establishment of right thereto in the manner prescribed by
law. The real estate may be held by legal or equitable title, by the
entireties, jointly, in common, as a condominium, or indirectly by
stock ownership or membership representing the owner's or
member's proprietary interest in a corporation owning a fee or a
leasehold initially in excess of ninety-eight years.
(b) Not more than one exemption shall be allowed any indi-
vidual or family unit or with respect to any residential unit. No ex-
emption shall exceed the value of the real estate assessable to the
owner or, in case'of ownership through stock or membership in a
corporation, the. value of the proportion which the interest in the
corporation bears to the assessed value of the property.
(c) By' general law and subject to conditions specified there-
in, the exemption shall be increased to a total of twenty-five thou-
sand dollars of the assessed value of the real estate for each school
district levy. By general law and subject to conditions specified
therein, the exemption for all other levies may be increased up to
an amount not exceeding, ten thousand dollars of the assessed val-
ue of the real estate if the owner has attained age sixty-five or is
totally and permanently disabled and if the owner is not entitled
to the exemption provided in subsection (d).
(d) By general law and subject to conditions specified there-
in, the exemption shall be increased to a total of the following,
amounts of assessed value of real estate for each levy other than
those of school districts: fifteen thousand dollars with respect to
1980 assessments; twenty thousand dollars with respect to 1981
assessments: tw enty-five thousand dollars with respect to assess-
ment, for 1982 and each year thereafter.
Ho\ve\er. such increase shall not apply tith respect to any
assessment roll until such roll is first determined to be in compli-
ance with the provisions of section 4 by a state agency designat-
ed by general law. This subsection shall stand repealed on the ef-
fective date of any amendment to section 4 which provides for the
assessment of homestead property at a specified percentage of its
just value.
(e) By general law and subject to conditions- specified there-
in, the Legislature may provide to renters, who are permanent res-
idents, ad t alorem iax relief on all ad valorem tax levies. Such ad
valorem tax relief shall be in the form and amount established by
general law.
(f) The legislature may, by general law, allow, counties or mu-
nicipalities, for the purpose of their respective tax levies and sub-
ject to the provisions of general law, to grant an additional home-
stead tax exemption not exceeding twenty-five thousand dollars
to any person who has the legal or equitable title to real estate and
maintains thereon the permanent residence of the owner and who
has attained age sixty-five and whose household income, as de-
fined by general law, does not exceed twenty thousand dollars.
The general law must allow counties and municipalities to grant
this additional exemption, within the limits prescribed in this sub-
section. by ordinance adopted in the manner prescribed by gener-
al law, and must provide for the periodic adjustment of the in-
come limitation. prescribed in this subsection for changes in the
cost of living. . ... . ... . ..... ... ... ...
... i Each veterann v. ho is age 5 o older -\ho is partially 'r
'totall) permanently disabled lshll receive a discount from the
amount of the ad valorem tax otherwise owed on homestead
property the veteran owns and resides in if the disability was
combat related, the veteran was a resident of this state at the time
of entering the military service of the United States, and the vet-
eran was honorably discharged upon separation from military
service., The discount shall be in a percentage equal to the per-
centage of the veteran's permanent, service-connected disability
as determined by the United States Department of Veterans Af-
fairs. To qualify for the discount granted by this subsection, an
applicant must submit to the county property appraiser, by March
1, proof of residency at the time of entering military service, an
official letter from the United States Department of Veterans Af-
fairs stating the percentage of the veteran's service-connected
disability and such evidence that reasonably identifies the dis-
ability as combat related, and a copy of the veteran's honorable
discharge. If the property appraiser denies the request for a dis-
count, the appraiser must notify the applicant in writing of the
reasons for the denial, and the veteran may reapply. The Legisla-
ture may, by general law. waive the annual application require-
merit in subsequent years. This subsection shall take effect De-
cember 7, 2006, is self-executing, and does not require imple-
menting legislation.

NO. 8
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE X, SECTION 6
(Legislative)

Ballot Title:
EMINENT DOMAIN

Ballot Summary:
Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to prohibit the
transfer of private property taken by eminent domain to a natur-
al person or private entity; providing that the Legislature may by
general law passed by a three-fifths vote of the membership of
each house of the Legislature permit exceptions allowing the
transfer of such private property; and providing that this prohibi-
tion on the transfer of private property taken by eminent domain
is applicable if the petition of taking that initiated the condemna-
tion proceeding was filed on or after January 2, 2007.

Full Text:


ARTICLE X
MISCELLANEOUS

SECTION 6. Eminent domain.-
(a) No private property shall be taken except for a public pur-
pose and with full compensation therefore paid to each owner or
secured by deposit in the registry of the court and available to the
owner.
(b) Provision may be made by law for the taking of easements,
by like proceedings, for the drainage of the land of one person
over or through the land of another.
(c) Private property taken by eminent domain pursuant to a pe-
tition to initiate condemnation proceedings filed on or after Jan-
uary 2, 2007, may not be conveyed to a natural person or private
entity except as provided by general law passed by a three-fifths
vote of the membership of each house of the Legislature.






Friday, September 29, 2006


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IHNSTD.


Taylor County Game Will Be


First District Game For The cowboys


By Janet Schrader
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Cowboys pack their
bags and head for Taylor
County tonight to take on the
Taylor County Bulldogs in the
first district game of the sea-
son. Currently Taylor is 1-3.
They run the flex-bone of-
fense, a three-back formation.
Their quarterback is new in-
the position this year. Marquis
Ellis is a senior that played as
a receiver last year. Coach
Price Harris said his best run-
ning back at the moment is
Brychoski Jackson. Taylor
plays a 4/4 defense.
Defensive coordinator for,
the Cowboys Rod. Wilhlams
said Tai!or has a good group
of athletes. "W\e've seen t"u\
.or three different offense out
of Taylor this year," Williams
said. "Sowe'don't kno\,. ex-
actly what to expect." '
The Cowboys are pretty
healthy according to Williams.


The only player still on the in-
jured list is Bernard Brinson
Williams said Brinson is iff\
for the Taylor game. He hasn't
been practicing yet, just jog-
ging around tri ing out that an-
kle.
Williams said he plans to
work on his defense to correct
some of the mistakes he felt
they made: against Mainland
last week.
"Physically, the\ are
there," Williams said. "The\
just made some mental nis-
takes."
Taylor County has a simri-
lar size team to Madison.
Mainland had 99 pla ers on
their roster h bile Madison had
only 37. Ta\lor ill be able to
field'around the same number
of players.
Williams was optimistic
about the outcome of thus first
district game. "We're just
gonna do what we do and get
better," Williams said.


The top-notch, tough-as-nails, Madison County 0-line. (Photo submitted by Daniel Douglas.)

_x ' . "
n, t l . . . . . . -


A l "Cowboy Offensive co-
ordinator Mike Coe. (Pho-
Coach Bubba Carroll alks to the players during the Mainland game.( Photo sub- #11 Travis Arnold gets some yards for Madison to submitted by Daniel
mitted by Daniel Douglas.) against Mainland. (Photo submitted by Daniel Douglas.) Douglas.)


ACA JV Warriors Lose To Florida High ACA Lady Warriors Place Third
Tin Praefynta'inc 5k Runn


Trent Roberts


By Janet Schrader
Greene Publishing, Inc.
' Aucilla Christian Acade-
my JV hosted the Florida
High JV team September 21.
The JV ACA Warriors lost
36-6. According to JV ACA
coach Daryl Adams, 10 JV
players missed the Monday
practice due to illness. The.
coach eien mised Tuesday
out sick along with four
starters. Adams said the
sickness really hurt the team
against Florida High.
"Florida. High has al-
ways been a tough oppo-


nent," Adams said.
Adams said his players
played a strong second half,
but it was already too late.
"Hopefully, this week every-
one will be healthy," Adams
said. "And wp'll be ready to
go against a tough Bell."
, The JV Warriors fum-
bled once for a loss. Quar-
terback Trent Roberts was 2
of 9 for six yards with two
interceptions. Tyler 'Jackson
went in briefly at quarter-
back and was 0 for 1 with an
interception.
Wilson Lewis led in
rushing with four carries and
15 yards gained. Mason
Shiver recovered a fumble.
Shane Westberry had five
solo tackles and one assist.


Wilson Lewis


Ill J.. 1 . Il'UIJLJ .liU .PAXV WJA.I. .ILbULX


ninih o\era]l. Sarah 's sister
Tnsten vwas the second fiimsh-
er foi Atucilla.
"I'%e seen some improve-
ment,." Nieonstel said. -'"But
\we defintlelb ha'.e work to
do -
NIhchaela Roccanti and
Sai all Sorenson get the offici.il
pat on the back fiomn Nienstiel
"'Thce [t. o are real!b perform-
ing welll" he slaid "Thie\ ure
lnot rIunning their fastest. but
look c .li, Ihe\'re trainintl
,,ell. the\ ha'.e ciu ifidence
and ,_ood form EF ei \thin.' is


B\ lane Schradei
GrIUn Puhlishing?., hIn..
It \\as a repeat of last
week's Cougar Challenge re-
sull. fot the AC.A Lid\ \\al-
rior ClOS,, couintri\ eaml. The
Aucilla gll placed thud be-
hind laclacv in Isrt iand Lin-
coln in second.
"It \\ a plettl, g'od size
l e." said coach Dan Nien-
suiel. "There rerce eioghl cor-

Sarah Sorensonl \'a thil
weekss top timtshei for .-1' ucilla
Chnistian. Solo. iaID| tiirlied


goeng right."
This is officially the mid-
die of die cross-countr\ sea-
son. The girk have no meet
dhis ,.week. The\ travel to the
FSU In\itational ne\t Satur-
da\. October 7. to run on the
Sliccostiuke Greenrv. a..
Nienstiel -aid the team is
running lie or \ix miles a day
and plan t) start some speed
\ork in the upcoming weeks.
"All of the girls are \working
hard.'" Nienstel said. "There is
a lot ol room for improve-
ment.


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Fax: 850-973-6536
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Neighbors
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Kim Sanders, PT Cindy Geick, PT
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School
Farm
Outdoors
Classifieds
Legals


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Midway Church Road and take a left. Tanya's U Pick will be down
the first dirt road on the left (Gunsmoke). Look for the signs.
Mon. - Fri. 9:00 - 1:00 and after 4:00 &
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2B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing. corn



SPORTS


Friday, September 29, 2006


Cowgirls Beat Hamilton County 3-1


#21 Ashley Haynes (middle) gets set for a return. #14 Lauren Maultsby is on one
side with #17 Alexis Stalnaker on the other side. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by


Janet Schrader, September 20,.2006.)
Re*Elect

BART

IALFORD
Madison County School Board
District 5
l. h , I ..,I ,I , . . ..I ,I , , ' I I , - 1,


By Janet Schrader
Greene Piiblishing.. Ji.-.
Madison volleyball host-
ed Hamilton County Thurs-
da\, September 21. and won
the match, three games to two.
The Co\ girls lost the first
game of the match in a close
game, 26-24, But, the Cow-
girls bounced back and swept
the last :three games of the:
match to take three out of four


The Cowgirls take a break on the sidelines during a rough game. (Greene Pub-
lishing, Inc. Photo by Janet Schrader, September 20, 2006.)
and win. They \\on the second
game 25-22, the third 25-23
and the last game of the match
25-23. Hamilton put up a fight
and made the Cowgirls. per-
form to' wiff Each game was
close and the lead switched
back and forth -seeral times in
each game.
Ashley Haynes lad da gi-
gantic match with 34 kills
over the four, games: Haynes
had 10 blocked shots at the net
as well.
Megan Jackson played
well for the Cowgirls with 31
kills. Jackson emerged as the
premier setter with 52 assists.
Jackson also had five aces.
Lauren Maultsby had 44
assists and three aces.
Alexis Stalnaker had 24
kills and three aces.
Naquita \Valton had 12
kills for the Cowgirls.,
Alexis Sowell had .11
kills, six blocked shots and
three digs. Alexis Sowell had 11 kills against Hamilton County.
Brittany Davis had 10 (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet Schrader, Sep-


digs.


et mber 20, 2006.)


Walker Grabs Pass




















ACA Warrior Reggie Walker (#28) catches the pass and gets ready to run ex-
tra yardage for the Warriors, during last Friday night's win against Panama City
Christian. Walker was misidentified in Wednesday's Madison County Carrier.
(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Emerald Kinsley, September 22, 2006)


Stay In Touch With All The
Local News
Subscribe Today!!!
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Just $28.00 per Year In-County,
$35 per Year Out-of-County
ri~ - - - -- -- - - - --- ---- -- - - -i
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I -I
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IAddress I
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ICity /State/Zip
IPhone# 'I
I
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I or bring by the Enterprise-Recorder office.
-.J - I - - - - - - -


e slow traffic of September,
d Ford will be having


ISMN m [SIAN^i �SI






www.greenepublishing. corn


SPORTS


Friday, September 29, 2006


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3B


Cowboy Golf Beats Branford By 54 Shots
By Janet Schrader
Greene Publishing, Inc.
"We had our best day
of the year," Cowboy golf
coach Bruce Thames said.
The Cowboys beat Bran-
ford on their home course,
the . Madison -Country
Club, 160 to 214.
Evan Schnitker was
low medalist for the
match, shooting a 36.
Trent Ragans had a 38 and
Jameson Thompson shot a
40. Chris Day had a score
of 46 to round out the top .
four.
The win sends the
Cowboys' season record to ''
10-4. Cowboy golf has
one more home match Oct.,
3, against Columbia Coun- :
ty. After that, it's the dis- -.
trict tournament, which
Madison will host this year . . ,, ..,
at the Madison Country
Club. The district tourna-
ment is set for Oct. 9.


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Evan Schnitker was low medalist against Branford. hitting a 36.
(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet Schrader, September 13,
2006.)


Sv. . , ;"




Jacob Whitaker practices putting before a big
match. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet
Schrader Sept. 13, 2006.)


Jake Sullivan Golf

Tournament Set

For October 15th
B\ J.ianei Schiadei
G . j� ,1 Pll,hill l . InI,
It's that tine a2 nlln. [lime for the aiilnn,-l
Jake Sullr.n Golf Tournament This \ear's
eent \,.ill be held at the Madison CO-urintr\
Club S.attidaj'. October 14 arnd SIunid.i. ( )c-
tobei 15
Sign up io.t for 1 v.eekend ot golt
.aind lun. The tournament is limied to die
tii't S -olter t, sijn up Plai \\ill be iln
t',\o-mn ri tea;nis. Sjattrda', iS P "Beit
Ball"' comipetincin and Sunda\ is a
Scr.tnible I SLipci-Ball i coilipeniiion
There \k ill be p.i.outs for both giro _ ,
and inet ' iinner.
Shoitguin stI'ts '\ill begin .iat S.3 I
a m and iun [lthl il0h 1 p m The en-
tr fee is .l125 pei 'ltler_ \ ithi pa, - .
ment due b', Oct I Ft ida\i. Octohbeil
!3. a . tiee pi.tct[i.'e tloind ti all
ic.isteCcd ,l noinjn -':l le.. n, u i.
F d 1, ', nih I. there v dill be a
li Ll'er . it Il Iln,2elC-t V'ld r.id so-
ciili7 ne .S luliid3 ', iiehl t s

sth a2rill ! The ltCl-\11 il t.iIlI-n
'i-l_,h 1,1i [lie tI", IL'_2<
For mIiore in I',-l iiria i, - l, - .
contact the MNLdis>on CoLntr",
C lub [ . S1 '-- ".-:, -


Trent Ragans hit a 38 against Branford. (Greene Publishing. Inc.
Photo by Janet Schrader, September 13, 2006.)

SBest Wishes & Good Luck'
to all the participants of
The MCHS Golf
Tournament.
855 W. Base St. * Madison. FL
(850) 973-3333
Hours:
Sun.-Thurs. 11-10O* Fri.-Sat. 11-11


Jackson's
Drug Store
1308 SW Grand Street
Greenville. FL
850-948-3011


Emergency: 850-997-3977
Danny Jackson, R.Ph


Congratulations and Best of
Luck To All Participants In
- This Year's MCHS
Golf Tournament.




I&mnore

Yi SE Dut.al St. Nl. * M dison. FL * '3-,1-1.


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4B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



SCHOOL


Friday, September 29, 2006


Smith Assigned Yearbook And Art Teacher For MCHS


Donn Smith of Madison worked with JimBob Print-
ing since 1987, and has carried on his trade to perfect-
ing the yearbook staff and the art classes at MCHS.
(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, Sep-
tember 25, 2006)


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Who is a well-known resi-
dent of Madison who knows
everything there is about lay-
out formats and graphic de-
sign? That would be Donn
Smith, former long-time em-
ployee of JimBob Printing and.
now a teacher at the Madison
County High School (MCHS).
Smith has been assigned
the yearbook, will be an art
teacher and is the girls' 2006-
2007 soccer coach for MCHS.
This school year is his sec-
ond year as a MCHS teacher.
Before taking on these three
roles, he was a math teacher
and he taught Cowboy students.


Algebra 1, Geometry and Lib-
eral Arts.
Smith stated, "Students are
working the same projects that
my old job required so to teach
kids what I did for so long, it
comes natural for me."
. The .yearbook class is
slowly but. surely becoming a
vocational class, focusing
mainly on journalism, digital
design and desktop publishing.
It is extremely helpful for train-
ing students for a career in
journalism. This class holds
approximately 23 students.
Smith instructs a photo
class of 20 students who prac-
tice .and obtain journalism,
skills from hands on experi-


ence in the classroom.
.Smith's Art Class is by far
the largest class, holding 38
students, split into two separate
class periods. The art class fo-
cuses on students who are as-
piring artists, art teachers, or
who just want to' gain more
creativity, thinking outside of
the box.
"These classes tie together
with chemistry, physics and
other academic courses at the
high school," noted Smith.
Smith was actually a stu-
dent at MCHS and was a stu-
dent of former yearbook, and
art teacher, Debbie Scott.
"It was a big change for
me to come to the high school,
but it has been a good one.
These students don't have pre-
conceptions of what art can be-
or should be. They are open to


new ideas and it is a very open
and .relaxed learning environ-
ment."
Donn Smith's family in-
cludes his wife, Robin, who is
the Family and Consumer Sci-
ence teacher at the high school
and a Family Community and
Career Leaders of America
(FCCLA) sponsor and two
daughters, one at MCHS and
one at Madison County Central
School (MCCS). They all at-
tend First United Methodist
Church of Madison.
In his spare time, he en-
joys spending time with family,
watching old movies, reading,.
drawing and painting.
Smith said, "I am really
glad to be here. I graduated
from MCHS and it is cool to be
able to give back to the high
school and to the community."


Roberts Enjoys His

First Year At GES


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GES Principal Mel Roberts, standing, enjoys hang-
ing out with students. Pictured left to right are: Kasha
Proctor, Brianna Hodge and Albert Bright. (Greene
Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, September
18, 2006)


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The 2006-2007 school
9 ',ear marks lie first \ear thatl
\ M \lel Robei s filled the position
that George Pridgeon held for
38 years.
There were many high ex-
pectations left by Pridgeon and
Roberts is fulfilling them.
Roberts stated, "This is a
neighborhood school. Students
still walk to school and that is
really hard to find in today's'
world. It is very rare within the
majority of other schools in the
state."
Greenville Elementary
School (GES) started off the
school year right, on a positive
note.
The children already knew
where to go and when the bell
rings in the morning, although
they may still be sleepy, they
scurry to their classes to make
it in time before the tardy bell
sounds off.
The halls of GES are never
found with students lingering
around, they are all in their
classrooms with their heads
down working diligently or all
eyes on their teachers.
The teachers get to GES
extra early, preparing every
small detail for what the school
day may bring.
Before Pridgeon left, GES
received a grant from the Pan-
handle Area Education Consor-
tium (PAEC) that was originat-
ed in Chipley. This grant was to
provide students with two im-
portant programs: Reading
First School and Title One Pro-
grams. These two programs are
coaching students with reading
skills and knowledge to be-
come better prepared for the
Florida Comprehensive As-
sessment Test (FCAT). Roberts
is going along with these two
programs within his school be-
cause he feels they are benefi-
cial to the students AT GES.
Each day, all grade levels
have a 90-minute block sched-
ule that allows them to do noth-
ing, but read.
Roberts has also imple-
mented a Continious Improve-
ment Model (CIM) that is
mainly short focus lessons
which target certain skills that
students may be deficient in.


On Tuesday, September
11, at 6 p.m., GES held a Par-
ent Teacher Organization
(PTO') meetirig that brought ap-
pro, ..uitel\ 40 parents to GES
to discuss, the committees on
the PTO that needed to be
filled.
Principal Mel Roberts
promised the students of GES
that whatever grade had the
most parents show up for the
PTO meeting would receive a
pizza party. Thd party will be
held on Friday and will be for
the first grade, congratulations.
Additionally, the PTO
meeting accomplished organiz-
ing a School Advisory Council
(SAC) which designated peo-
ple to assist the school and the
students with improving the
school as a whole.
The SAC will serve as an
advisory to the school and
funds will be allocated to GES
that SAC will be able to use.
SAC will be in charge of
purchasing and providing the
school with certain materials,
enhancing the school environ-
ment, tutoring and more.
Also, on September 11,
Gwen Hubbard from the
Madison County School
Board organized a Provide
Fair. All types of agencies
provided educational services
and the fair was targeted for
students who are currently on
free or reduced lunch. Also,
the fair pinpointed students
who did poorly on the FCAT,
scoring a level one. There
were approximately 20 peo-
ple who participated in this
event.
The Greenville Woman's
Club and Rebecca Miller of
Madison County 4-H have
been instrumental in arrang-
ing a Butterfly Garden on the
school grounds of GES.
Soon, the students will be
painting rain barrels that will
collect water so they can wa-
ter the garden themselves.
On Monday, September
25, at 6 p.m., there was a
PTO meeting. All parents
were welcomed to join in on
a team effort in helping GES
be the best school possible.
At the meeting, there was a
discussion of priority needs
of GES.


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SCHOOL


Friday, September 29, 2006


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5B


Take ok In Children fHolds Scholarship .Sinin t f MCCS ,
_____________1__01_41 %,aI


Laura Bishop, (sitting), a fifth grade MCCS student,, B.J. Curtis, TSIC Student Advocate, (standing), en-
is pictured with her mother, Derenda Bishop, and Faye joys taking part in the scholarship contract signing for
Browning, (standing), TSIC mentor at the scholarship Iman Taylor, (left) a future pediatrician who is with her
signing at MCCS. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by mother, Katrina Taylor. (Greene Publishing. Inc. Photo
Jessalyn Covell, September 26, 2006) by Jessalyn Covell, September 26, 2006)


By Jessalyn Covell
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Five Madison County
Central School (MCCS) stu-
dents received Take Stock In
Children (TSIC) Scholarships
on Tuesday. September 26.
Parents, members of the
Madison County Foundation
for Excellence in Education,
Inc., (MCFEE), the sponsor-
ing agency . Take Stock in
Children staff. mentors, and
the MCCS Principal, were in


-attendance for the scholarship
contract signing.
The selected students and
parents make a commitment
that the student will maintain
a high grade, point average
(GPA), have good school at-
tendance, pass all necessary
tests for high school gradua-
tion and college entrance,
maintain good school behav-
ior and remain drug and
crime free A college scholar-
ship is there for them when


' a .' % .-'. - +. . -. . " .:' ."
i .m :. .c&i'- - ' ' ., '- , . . ' -- . � .--


Jessica Fralix, (left), is proud to be a new, TSIC four-
year scholarship holder. She is pictured with her moth-
er, Vivian Fralix, right, and B.J. Curtis, top left, TSIC Stu-
dent Advocate. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jes-
salyn Covell, September 26, 2006)


Michael Hammond, (sitting, left), a fifth grade stu-
dent at MCCS, is pictured with his mother, Tameka Ham-
mond, right,and Jo Willis, TSIC Program Coordinator
(standing, left); and MCCS principal, Sam Stalnaker.
(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Covell, Sep-
tember 26, 2006)


-they graduate from high
school and have fulfilled the
Take Stock in Children con-
tract.
Four students, Iman Tay-
lor, Laura Bishop. Michael
Hainionid aind Kaimmeron
Joseph, received MCFEE
t\ o-year scholarships arid-
Jessica Fralix, an eighth
grade student, received a
four-N\ear Take Stock In Clil-
dren contract.
Congratulations to all of


these students who have al-
reaid\ ho\\ n themnsele;s er\
xi north\ of'this honor.
The local Take Stock in
Childri ci would like to thank
MCCS principal, Sam Stal-
naker for his Nspport of the
program through the years
and wish the best as he leaves
to serve our country in the
military. We all look forward
to his return to the Central
School, -\ here he will be
greatly missed.


Kammeron Joseph, left, a fifth grade MCCS student,
is pictured with his grandmother, Kay Joseph, seated,
right, and Faye Browning, standing, TSIC mentor, during
the scholarship signing. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo
by Jessalyn Covell, September 26, 2006)


Take Stock in Children's staff and mentors, (left to
right), Faye Browning, TSIC mentor and MCFEE Presi-
dent; Jo Willis, TSIC Program Coordinator; and B.J. Cur-
tis, TSIC Student Advocate, were instrumental in help-
ing MCCS students sign and receive their TSIC scholar-
ships. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jessalyn Cov-
ell, September 26, 2006)


B\ JessaI n Her fa-
Co aell vorite subject
I Gi-ncu Publish- in school is his-
ilug. .. tory .and her
A mi b e r least favorite
Duncan is the subject is math.
i daughter of In her
Robin Duncan spare time, she
and Dennis enjo s hanging
Nicholson. -- out e ith
She is a ju- Amber Duncan friends.
ruor at the Nladi- is a MCHS fresh- She at-
sonCount High man who wants to tends MNacedo-
'i SchooIl NCHS). become a nurse na Baptist
At the high after graduating Church.
JJ1 sVhosl. h 11 in h e t
school, she is a high school. \ h n
Member of the asked to de-
Ke\ Club. scribe herself in
S After completing high three \%ords
School. she plans on attend- or less.
in- the cormnunnit college Du ncan n
iin Lake CiU to become a stated.
; nurse. - N i c e.
Her fa\urite music is sh and
country . gener-
Duncan's fa\ onte color oiNs."
Saorange.





IlCertificates of DepositI


FIXED RATE
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT
Effective from Annual Percentage
09'27/2J006- 10,3,2006 Interest Rates Yield (APY)
90-da.�*- 4.74% 4.85'
180-da" 5.02�<. - ,, 5.15C
1-year 5.26% 5.40%
2-year '5.45% 5.60%
3-year 5.35 c% 5.50%t-
4-year 4.88% 5.00%
5-year 4.97% 5.10%
*Jumbo CDs are available. **IRA Certificates of
Deposit are not available in 90 - and 180-day terms.
JUMBO FIXED RATE
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT
Effective from Interestnnual Percentage
0%2712006 - 10o'3120i6 Yield (APY)
90-day** 4.74% 4.85%
180-day** , 5.02% 5.15%
1-year 5.26% 5.40%
2-year 5.45% 5.60%
3-year 5.35% 5.50%
4-year 4.97% 5.10%
5-year 5.07% 15.20%
* Minimum opening deposit required for a Jumbo CD is $100,000.
** IRA Certificates of Deposit are not available in 90-day and 180-day terms.




STATE FARM SELECT AGENT
KEITH G.

HARGROVE


OCTOBER 7, 2006


JELLYSTONE PARK
YOGI BEAR'S JELLYSTONE PARK/CAMP RESORT
II South of Madison SR 53 to Old St. Augustine Rd. at 1051
850-973-8269


Concession Stand Open * Karaoke at 1:00 PM
ENTER THE MADISON COUNTY'S
GOT TALENT SHOW
PARK AMENITIES - $5 PER PERSON, 4 & UP
YARD SALE BUYER ADMISSION IS FREE
TIME 8:00 AM TO 5:00 PM


GET READY FOR THE WINTER SEASON... CLEAN OU
YOUR CLOSETS AND BRING CLOTHING IN GOOD
CONDITION TO SWAP, SELL OR TRADE. GET RID OI
THE CLUTTER & TOYS IN YOUR HOME BY SWAPPIN(
SELLING OR TRADING!!!

Rent A Yard Sale Site - $10 Per Site
Set Up Time Begins at 6:00 AM till 8:00 AM
YARD SALE BEGINS AT 8:00 AM


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SITE FEE WILL BE DONATED TO THE
RELAY FOR LIFE BENEFIT
Sponsored by Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park and
The Madison County Carrier


Provided by Keith Hargrove, State Farm


145 E. Base St.
(850) 973-6641
FDIC










6B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



FARM


Friday, September 29, 2006


Andrea Allen Says Slaughtering Horses Must Stop


Horses stand patiently waiting for their turn to die in the horse slaughter plant in
Kaufman, Texas. (Photo submitted)


By Janet Schrader
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Andrea Allen is feverishly
calling her congressmen, her
senators and anyone else she
can convince to help support
her cause. She is stressed out,
sleep-deprived and living on
her last nerve. She spends all'
day and all night on the com-'
puter, keeping track of the
news and the current situation.
with the proposed ban on
horse slaughter, bill number
HR 503.
The bill, known as the
American Horse Slaughter
Prevention Act, would amend
the Horse Protection Act to
prohibit the shipping, purchas-
ing, selling, delivering, or re-
ceiving of horses to be slaugh-
tered for human consumption.
It;c., would probably. close Dallas-,
C'roh n in Kaufman, Te\as and
other slaughter plants in Fort
Worth and DeKalb, Ill. Horse-
meat is not marketed for hu-
man consumption in the Unit-
ed States, but the slaughter
plants process hundreds of
horses each week and ship the
meat overseas, over 90,000
horses per year. Horsemeat is
considered a delicacy in Eu-
rope, Japan and other places.
HR 503 was passed by the
United States House of Repre-
sentatives 263 to 146 on Sep-
tember 7. The bill is now be-
fore the Energy, Commerce
and Agriculture Committee,
renamed S 1915. It looks like
the Senate will adjourn for the
elections before the bill gets
voted on. After that there is a
short session that should be
dominated, by appropriation


and spending bills that will
keep the Senate occupied until
the session ends in December.
The Senate reconvenes the
first of the year and at that
time the bill will have to, be
reintroduced and voted on
again by the House and the
Senate. It's up. to concerned
folks like Allen to keep the bill
alive aid to see it gets passed.
In the mean time. Allen says,
more horses will be slaugh-
tered for their meat and
shipped overseas
Allen got hooked on this
,cause when she became inter-
ested in Barbaro. Remember
Barbaro? Everyone including
Allen watched \ ith interest as
the two-year old colt got ready
to run the Preakness.
"I thought I was watching
. a.Triple Cro\\,n iaaner,'.lAllen
said. "But what \\e %were all
watching was a horse that
could change the world."
. Barbaro broke his leg in
the Preakness and the world
mourned. His owners decided
to try to save him, and his
slow recuperation has drawn
much interest. Allen began
searching for information and
condition updates about the'
injured colt. She happened. on
to the Tim Woolle\ Racing
site. Woolley is a trainer at
Fair Hill Training Center, the
home of Barbaro. Barbaro's
owner, Gretchen Jackson,
learned a lot about horses and
caring for them from her colt.
She took on the cause and is in
Washington D.C. promoting
the ban on horse slaughter.
The website .devoted to Bar-
baro'has become a hub for the


discussion of the proposed
ban.
Agriculture in general and
the cattle industry in particular
has come out against the pro-
posed ban. According to
Allen, a rancher herself who
used to be against the ban, this
is because most farmers, and
ranchers fear and oppose any
more government control o\ er
agriculture than there already
is. "Agriculture is barely ex-
isting now cue to government
intrusion," Allen said.
R-CALF USA, a website
devoted to the cattle industry,
says, "R-CALF USA opposes
legislation that would ban
horse slaughter in, the United
States. Horses are the private
property of ranchers and cattle
farmers all across the country,
,., and under a,.free-enterprise.
system this nation was found-
ed on, horse owners should be
able to maintain their right to
dispose of their private prop-
erty as they see fit. The horse
industry is extremely large in
the United States, and produc-
ers need options to economi-
cally market unwanted hors-
es."
Allen says those who ap-
prove of the slaughter of
American horses claim that
only - old, unwanted animals
are killed. She says this is not
true. The USDA has stated
that 90 percent of the horses
sent to slaughter are healthy,
fit horses. The kill buyers
don't want old or sick horses.
They obviously would want
nice, fat healthy horses be-
cause the animals are sold to
the slaughterhouses by the
pound. And the price per
pound for live slaughter hors-
es is going up. Per-pound
prices have recently risen to as
high as 77 cents and an aver-
age of 60 cents per pound.
Currently, according to
Allen, all three horse-slaugh-
ter plants are foreign-owned.
She said "kill-buyers" all
around the country show up at
horse auctions to buy horses to
sell to the slaughterhouses.
Horse owners whp take their
family .pets to the auctions
hoping to find them a good
home, can unknowingly end
up selling their horse friend to
one of these kill-buyers. Hors-


The journey to the slaughter house for these horses resulted in their numerous
injuries. (Photo submitted.)



* '", 3
. _ - . . ._,, - , . 'Y-
. , : � - .--


Salvation is a yearling that was bought and saved from being slaughtered. His
mother went to slaughter. He's still wearing his slaughter tag. Foreign diners enjoy
themneat of young horses'. ''Photo submitted.) ' ' .9 . , ," n.. , ' "


es have sometimes been .stolen
right out of the pasture and
sold to the slaughterhouse.
Allen said the horse
slaughter plants, are operated
in an inhumane manner. She
said the horses are often
shipped in cow haulers, which
are not designed for horses.
-The low ceilings of the haulers
force the horses to stand in an
unnatural way. Fear. of close
confinement and the horse's
natural instincts- create disas-
ters during shipping where
many animals are killed en
route or arrive at the kill plant
seriously injured., Allen has
literature listing in graphic de-
tail testimony of one kill plant
worker about the conditions at
the plant and the atrocities
that go on inside it. It's not
something many people can
read and not be emotionally
moved. Horse slaughter plants
are designed in a similar fash-
ion to cattle slaughterhouses.
Horses have a far -different
temperament than cows. The
result is pretty terrifying.
Horses are dragged off
the trucks, often with
chains. They are lined up as-
sembly-line style just like in
a cattle kill plant. They get
prodded with a hot shot.'
They can smell the blood
and sense the fear. In the kill
box (knock box) a captive
bolt is shot into their head.
If one shot of the "Bolt"


doesn't hit the right spot,
they do it again and again. A
slaughterhouse worker said,
"You move so fast, you
don't have time to wait until
the horse bleeds out. You
skin him as he bleeds."
.Dallas Crown in K.iuf-
man, Texas owns one of the
kill plants. Allen contacted
the mayor of, Kaufman,
Paula Bacon, who has come
out in opposition to the
plant in her town. Allen
spoke to Bacon Saturday,
September 23. Bacon told
her families in the nearby
Boggy Bottoms neighbor-
hood say odors from Dallas
Crown keep them indoors.
Bacon says the plant's "stig-
ma" stifles development and
job growth in her town lo-
cated 30 miles southeast of
Dallas. At the time Allen
spoke to Mayor Bacon, Ba-
con said there were 400
horses in good condition.
standing in the kill pens.,
Monday, September 25, all
400 were killed. Kill days
are Monday and Thursday.
At 5 a.m., they start the
killing. Prices for horsemeat
in European markets and in
Asia are going sky high. Ba-
con said USDA slaughter
numbers Lare way up.
More obstacles have re-
cently sprung up, slowing
the passing of S 1915. Holds
have been placed on the bill


by senators who don't want
to see it passed. The bill
can't be voted ,on until the
,holds are removed. These
holds are done secretly,, so
one. knows which senators
have placed the holds or ob-
jections against the bill.
When Senate leadership an-
nounces it will bring the bill
to the floor, the names of the
,senators with the holds on
the bill will be revealed. At
that point it becomes public
knowledge and the holds are
usually dropped. But all of
these problems slow the
processing of the bill down
and make it even more like-
ly ,to be tabled until 2007.
There. are 25 more kill
dates before the senate re-
convenes at the Kaufman
plant alone. Hundreds more
horses will be slaughtered
before the Senate even has
a chance to vote on this
bill. The only thing that can
get it passed is if concerned
citizens call their senators
and congressmen and make
their desires known. "I un-
derstand the emotion of it
and the business of it,"
Allen said. '"But if this bill
doesn't pass the first of the
year, it could be buried."
For more information
about this matter log onto
timwoolleyracing. corn or
email Andrea Allen at
JEA72144@aol.com. _


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FARM


Friday, September 29, 2006


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7B


Everything You
Wanted To Know
About Pigs
But Were Afraid
To Ask


Did you know?
Pigs are 'very adaptable
animals that eat many dif-
ferent foods and live in a va-
riety of environments. Pigs
w% ere domesticated thou-
sands of 'ears ago. They are
farmed for their meat dnd
hides leather). There are
still many wild pigs, like the
wild boar. the %\arthog, and
the bushpig. Pigs are found
on every continent on Earth
except Antarctica.
Pigs are also called hogs
or swine The adult female
is called a sow. The adult
male is called a boar. A baby
is called a piglet. A young
female pig is a gilt. A cas-
trated male pig is called a
barrow. When a sow gives
birth it's called farrowing.
Pigs vary in color from
brown. black, white. to
pinkish. Some wild pigs
ha'e large tusks, overgrown
teeth used for fighting and
digging for food. Pigs are
omnivores (eating plants
and meat). They eat a vari-
eh\ of plants and small ani-
mals I like worms and
snakes). Market pigs weigh
about 220 pounds to 260
pounds. It takes 114 days
Three months, three weeks
and three days from con-
ception until a sow gives
birth to the piglets. Most
sows have two litters per
year w ith seven to 12 piglets
in each. Pigs' ears are
notched so that farmers can
identify what luonth they
\\ere born and which so%\
was their mother.
Funtt pig facts
* Pigs are \ern intelli-
gent and learn very quickly.
* Pi,; haxe an excellent
sense of smell.
* Pigs can not sweat be-
cause they have no sweat
glands. They, roll around in
the mud to cool their skins.
* Pigs are some of the
cleanest animals around. re-
fusing to mess anywhere
near their living or eating
areas when glen a choice.
* Nlan\ of the pig's
arnatomical/phN biological
features are similar to hu-
mans.
* Heart valves from pigs
are used to replace damaged
or diseased human heart
S alves.
* A baby pig. or piglet,
weighs about 1.5 kilograms
at birth and %%ill double its
weightt in just 7 days.
* Sw\ine research led to
the development of the CAT
scan. a technology for ex-
amining internal organs
% without surgery.
* A pig can run a 7
minute mile.
- Pork is the most wide-
lI eaten meat in the world.


-Fire Chief, County Commissioner, And



Hog Farmer, Chief Alfred Martin Does It All


Big boy and the girls. Alfred Martin's boar (center)
gets some attention from the sows. (Greene Publishing,
Inc. Photo by Janet Schrader September 21, 2006.)


tion. The -s ill is cooked in a
gigantic cast-iron cooker
mounted on a trailer He col-
lects food trash from the
prison, which is just about
anything the inmates don't
eat, cooks it up and feeds it to
the pigs. The law sa- s all
swill must be cooked He's
been getting the swill from
the prisons for about 10
Sears.
All of the doctoring,
feeding and castrating chores


Alfred Martin is pictured at his pig farm on the outskirts of Madison. (Greene
Publishing, Inc. Photo by Janet Schrader September 21, 2006.) . . , , .,s,
By Janet Schl.ahJer - -..... . ,tuLe,.c.rjtes. There is a -a. l-T-e tin ' Thea -confine hte so'.'.
Greene Publishing, Inc. way in front of the crates to somewhat, but save the ba-'
Local Madison City Fire allow for access to the sows bies.
Chief and County Commis- and-the piglets. Crates keep Martin feeds his pigs.
sioner of District 4, Alfred the sow from squashing her corn and swill and his far-
Martin, has loved hogs all his offspring, according to Mar- rowing sows a prepared ra-
life. As a child, he showed
hogs and steers for the 4-H
and the FFA. As an adult, he
raises about 200 head of feed-
er pigs on his 40-acre farm.
I've been raising hogs E
since I was a boy," Martin IRU EAS
'said. "My grandfather raised
,hogs."


When Martin was a boy
he loved the calf and pig
scramble at the livestock
show. "I won Best Record
Book one year and I won the
Showmanship Award one
year," Martin said. He said he
doesn't show animals any
more but looks forward to at-
tending the livestock show
every year. He added, he's
been thinking about sponsor-
ing a steer or a hog this year.
Martin buys three-month
old feeder pigs at Townsend
Livestock Market and feeds
them up for three or four
months. When they're old
enough, back they go to the
sale.
According to Martin, be-
cause of the low price of
hogs today, he doesn't clear
much profit. It's mostly
about the cash flow. Martin
said the price of hogs might
have been a little better be-
fore Smithfield closed down,
but nothing big. "It wasn't a
whole lot better," Martin
said.
Martin has just started
getting into farrowing hous-
es. Currently, he has 20 sows
and two boars. He can put 10
sows to one boar. Martin's
main boar is a
Yorkshire/Land Race cross.
He bought the boar in Lam-
ont. Martin said he picked
this boar because of his
length and big bones. So far,
Martin said the boar has
proved to be a good sire.
The farrowing house fea-


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lay, he has no tear of the
pigs. "I get right out there in
ihe middle of them." Martin
said He said he is careful of
his huge boar when the ani-
mal is around a sow in heat.
"He can get a little aggres-
site.'" Martin said.
Martin hal- tmo daugh-
ters: Alfreda and Keisha.
"Neither one of them will
ha'e an thing to do with the
pigs." Martin said.


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8B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing. com



OUTDOORS


Friday, September 29, 2006


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Quality Craftinanship & Competitive Rates
156 Cusom Additions &
Screenovonoms Fresh & Saltwater Fish
Decks
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Replacement North.4 American or Exotic
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Development, Inc. Brooksville, Florida * (357) 799-8845

850.973.6661


Steel Buildings
Roll Up Doors & Windows Optional







ofr.ss'J-ona Inhst lic rirble
Hwy. 12; 5 : ~N- ... .... ..
,:o-, . - :. .....,s . ow : _ . j.....


Kea3ton


3eua-chau


aing Repnort


Trout fishing has been picking up since the after r temps first dropped last
\ aro'i.nid irtin'i to find the bait \, hen the \xater temps cool oft. This \xas evi-
denced b' Pegg', and Richaid Romine of Lake Cit\ do% n for the entie \\eek.
v, hit fished FrtdJL and Saltmdaa\ and didn't ha.Ie fit e keepers between them for
the ti. o da\ . . then Suiida\ had their liiit in less than three hours. Monday\
and Tuesda\ the, litmted out on trout and reds' The Romines wished grubs both
under Calun, and bouncing the bottom in 5.5 to 6.5 feet of x after the last three


Sdai s.
". .. .N. chi;.- N.,i 'h llet SaIr tuirda . Re\ Wi\Vlliinson of \aldosta. Ga . his son Clint, aind


his Dad, J.D Williamsoin. had si, i1out, three Spanish and tv.o reds. fishing in
si\ feet ot xx aier %ith li'e pirinfish murder Cauins.
Nlonda\. I had Jim Soriells. and Chat lie Cov, art it South Carolina and Ar--
lin t-,ton. G respectiels and the\ ,got their limit of trout. ti.,o'Spa[ii h. - [ro
Black Sea Bass and a four-pound Blue. hule fishing i'.ie piifrih under C(aiuni
Thunders i\\ th a 40-inch leader and Assassin Shrimp Cocktails in Orange Gl:m'
and Chandeleur Isle. \Ve tished 5.5 to 6.5 feet of x\ater on the using tide.
Last xeek. Jack linchc,, of Keaton xxith Eati Bex ns of Greensboro. Ga.


had seen trout and one red from se\ en feet of v,,ater.
Still no reports trom offshore . ..

' Ne....w ,....a - .....


Two Plant City Residents Injured
FWC Wildlife Laws Have New Teeth BoatingAccident On Suwannee


Florida Fish and \Wildlife
Conservation Commissioners
(FWC) approved a measure
Wednesday to join 23 other
states in a pact to suspend
hunting and fishing license
privileges for anyone commnnt-
ting a conservation law N i-
lation that costs him his !i-
cense in any other partici-
pating state.
If no one reque-ts a
hearing during the next 21
days, the new rule will take
effect 20 days after ihat
deadline.
The rule honors license
suspensions for like-vicla-
tions from other participating
states. In cases, such as tres-
passing, however, in v. hch
other states may suspend hunt-
ing licenses, Florida will not
suspend the violator's license
privileges in this state because
laws do not provide for li.enise
suspension for the same '. iola-
tion here.
FWC Law Enforcement
Capt. Curtis Brown said the
rule will make FWC officers


more efficient b\ allowing
more time for enforcement du-
ties rather than processing
procedures,


"'It will make violators
more accountable for their il-
legal acti cities " Brow n .said.
"Wildlife la\ breakers no
lon.-er 1-ill be able to escape
consequences just b\ cioss-
trig a state hne."
Othei participating states
include Arizona, Calitornia.


Colorado. Georgia. Idaho. In-
diana. Iow a, Kansas. Mary-
land. Michigan, Minnesota,
Missouri. Tennessee. Mon-
tana. Ne ada. Nexw Mexico,
New\ York, North Dakota.
Oregon, South Dakota. Utah.
Washington and \V\oming.
There's more bad news
for repeat violators: lai l
time and mandator\ fines
grow stiffer with each oo:-.
latton undei new en-
hanced-penalties laws al-
read. in effect iu Florida.
For instance, a violation
that carries a nominal fine
for a first offense has not
changed, but the same %iola-
tion w ill carr\ a minimum
mandatory line of $2'50i for a
second offense within three
\ears and a minimum manda-
torN fine of $500 and a one-
\ear suspe'fsiin of all recre-
ational licenses for a third of-
fense within fi\e years
More details are adail-
able at AvF IFC.coin.' .A)m
ini' ,ion.200 "6 'Sent.inde t.lI


Two Plant City residents
were injured in a boating acci-
dent Thursday when their ves-
sel struck a piling of an old
train trestle on the Suwannee
Ri\ er near Old Town.
Jesse Lee Carr, 51, and his
passenger, Brend.a Carr, 51,
\ ho suffered serious injuries,
were taken to Shands Hospital
iii Gainesville for treatment.
According to Florid.i Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) investiga-
tors. the vessel was traveling
south at approximately 40 mph
at 12 30 p.m. when Jesse Lee
Carn saw a large fish (possibly
a. sturgeon) jump in front of the
� e,.sel and attempted to steer
clear. The fish did not strike
the boat or the Carrs.
The vessel's bow struck
thle round center concrete sup-
pnrt piling of a trestle bridge
that spans the Suwannee and is
pa t of the Nature Coast State
Trail. Upon impact, Brenda
Ca.rr was ejected from the ves-
sel while e Jesse Carr was


thrown forward to the port
side, investigators said.
The vessel continued for-
ward, turned sharply to the
right and traveled to the south-
west bank where it left the wva-
ter and came to rest on the high
river bank, completely out of
the water.
Two pedestrians on the
bridge at the time of the acci-
dni went to help the Cani A
nearby homeowner heard the
accident and called 911.
One of the pedestrians, Frank


S


Brian Evans, swam out to help,:
Brenda Carr who was floating:!
face down and unconscious..
He took her back to, shore..
Dixie Emergency Medical Ser-,
vices arrived and transported;,
the Carrs to the helicopter pad:
in Old Town. The Carrs were
then flown to the Gainesville,
hospital, investigators said.
The vessel was recovered and
stored at :he Gilchrist"Count\
Sheriff's Office in Trenton.
The accident remains under in-.
vestigation by FWC officers.


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6046 W. Tennessee St. STallahassee. FL
850-576-5702
Tray Brittle, Owner * seminoleoutdoors.comn *tray@seminole outdoors


LIMITED

OUT
C('U A DTrI2Dl


|V ,,, ..J ^ ,
%' .ITH I ti iL*
'CAPT. GARY M EARS
Ce irified I'SGA Ceiquain LOUT

Flat Fishing At Its Best ,

No License Required - "
Cal! lFor i n rn-i.in ii I , ' i. .' '
(850) 584-4532


.MOR ..FWC Approves
IF, I Commercial Blue Crab Rule


The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWC) held a special meeting in Tampa and approved a rule
to extend the moratorium on issuance of new commercial
blue crab endorsements and delay the start of the blue crab
effort management program until July 1, 2007. This rule will
replace a similar 90-day rule approved by Commissioners in
June.
The FWC approved a blue crab effort management pro-
gram in April 2005 and scheduled it for July 1, 2006 imple-
mentation. However, fees and penalties for the program re-
quire approval by the Legislature, and the bill that would
have set those fees and penalties failed to pass in the recent-
ly concluded Legislative session.


The Enterprise.Recorder ,in fiTF[


Fish & Game Feeding ChartLDP0I.

oitiv. T he.~Bc i andjo r c'r ti d riiir lcoii iime.b,i lit h da-� i-vlistW c l ". -m Thc na iv io ccdni iin~nrr uc [lie best Imtheik'r o ar r A "r K
�poririj mid1LL'1 31111t 101i�, he nsivihutdrI;. iinv- o ibh r oc.id a e sbut 'iq rnk b ut Ihim 0 `
,,: Y ..-.Goo ld !c, and be caideM ,1411tz thee.

ForThe.Wekfepeme9- O ber5,www.flhuntingdogs.org

: a I. I. I. S InI K
. . 1A I I. ,e I I
S .un ay 23 I. . * 8: I0p.
S'*. 2a e - : I2a. m2p : 50 FDH&SA
Ri s : 1a II :aI m.30p .94915 Bloxham Cutoff Rd. Crawtordville. FL
Thus *ae45a oe5II. III I I m:1850-575-3333


ISH JAY,

4-6" Channel Calfish $30 per 100
6-8" Channel Catfish $50 per 100
Largemouth Bass * Black Crappie (if avail.)
Bluegill (Coppernose & Hybrid) * Redear
8-11" Grass Carp * Fathead Minnows
We will service you at:
Farmers Supply Co. in Valdosta, GA
WED., Oct. 4 From: 8-9 AM
or To Pre-Order, call Arkansas Pondstockers,
1-800-843-4748 * Walk-ups Welcome


I -Y--,,% - - - - -Y-**Ifk . - - "77


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The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9B


OUTDOORS

Non-Motorized Vessel Registration

Not Recommended


A committee assigned to
examine issues involving non-
motorized vessels voted to
recommend not requiring reg-
istration of non-motorized
vessels when the state's Boat-
ing Advisory Council (BAC)
meets in December. The rec-
ommendation passed by a 4-3
vote.
The Non-motorized Ves-
sel-Subcommittee will, how-
ever, recommend non-motor-
ized vessel operators be in-
cluded in Florida's boater ed-
ucation requirements. It also
will recommend state-ap-
proved education courses
strengthen their educational
component for non-motorized
vessels..,
The BAC will review
these recommendations and
decide if a formal proposal to
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission is
appropriate for future legisla-
tive action.,


Non-motorized vessels
include canoes, kayaks, row-
boats, non-motorized sail-
boats- and paddlecraft. They-
do not include "watertoys"
such as air mattresses, inner
tubes, flpat tubes, boogie
boards, surf boards, beach
rafts or other similar devices
designed to be used by bathers
at beaches, lakes or swimming
pools.
Of Florida's 70 reported
fatal boating accidents in
2005, 10 involved non-motor-
ized vessels, which resulted in
12 of the 81 boating fatalities.
The Non-motorized Vessel
Subcommittee was formed in
December 2005, at the request-
of BAC chair FWC Col. Julie
Jones, to address the stake-
holder request for registering
all vessels.
For more information on
*the Boating Advisory Council,
go to http://MyFWC. corn/law/
council/index, html.


Oooh...That's





*-- ~By Janet Schrader, Columnist
Penning cows is an important issue many small cattle pro-
ducers forget to take into consideration. For example, the man in
my house often hauls cows for other folks. He will arrive at the
location to discover the cow owners. have no idea what loading a
cow requires. -Oh. they'll just follow me into the trailer if I'm
carrying a bucket of feed," the owner will say. No way any right-
minded cow will EVER get into a trailer voluntarily. They just
aren't that stupid. Enter the panel.
Panels are the building blocks of many cow pens. They come
in all sizes, are made of metal tubes welded into sections of fenc-
ing. Usually there are gate sections available and they are com-
pletely-puriabl Wid- eight or 10 panel sections,, a.cowpnan can
create a useful cow pen. It will have to be reinforced. Failure to
reinforce the panels with fence posts driven into the ground and
other bracing could result in a disaster. I know. I've seen one.
One day, the man of the house and a couple of cowmen were
trying to load a single bull calf for transportation. The seller of
the calf had this 400 hundred pound bull calf and some of his fel-
lows trapped in a pen made of panels. It was not reinforced. The
pen was in the middle of the pasture. There were 20 or 30 head
of upset momma cows milling around the pen. While trying to
transfer that one bull calf to the trailer, all the calves escaped. The
man of the house had to rope the calf in the middle of the herd
and then drag it into the trailer. The rodeo began as chaos ensued.,
The calf's momma was trying to attack the man of the
house. The rest of the cows were trying to help her. The calf was
bawling, choking and struggling at the end of the rope. It was
scary. The cow dogs brought for the purpose of helping in just
this kind of situation were nowhere to be found. I looked for
them, and being the clever dogs they are, they were hiding un-
der the truck. It took five men to finally load the calf. The new
owner got head-butted and stepped on. (He was wearing shorts
and flip flops as well, which is another, complete story . .prop-
er attire while working cattle or horses.) The seller had tried to
make a proper pen but forgot one key feature . . .the loading
chute.
The man of the house hauls cows for the same family every
year. They have been trying to load a bull for at least the past
five years. Every year, the man of the house asks them if they
have "stoutened" up their pens. (In our home, "stouten" is actu-
ally a verb.) Every year, they say, "Oh yes, the bull will never
get out this year." Hah! That bull will die of old age before he
gets hauled off to the market. He's gotten out every way imag-
inable. He's jumped over the pens and run right through them
He knows they can't hold him. He's got to weigh at least 2,000
pounds. There's not too many pens that will hold him if he de-
cides to break out.
Panels can be used for many other things as well. I've seen
them made into round pens, portable stalls, impromptu walls of
barns and they are very handy when used as gates. I've seen
them roped into a temporary chute for loading cows. They are
the Lincoln Logs of stock management. Just remember, they
need to be reinforced if you're planning to use them for penning
cows.

0% INTEREST. 100% QUALITY.

$15,978
Complete Package. '
32 HP 4WO 8FPsR
Transmisscn
Inrdeperdent PTO
Loader .
wIBucI"� ea

MODEL 3215
Come See Bnan or ,limmie Toda !
DEMOTT TRACTOR
COMPANY
1659 Sylvester Hwy - Moultrie, GA 31768
www.demotttractor.com
229-985-5006 * 1-800-832-8017


DD D50MEBODY 5R9


I Morgan's I
Garage I
US 19 North
Monticello, FL

850-997-2798

S$15 Off
I Any Repair
I Over $60
I with this ad




Suwannee
Insurance
of Madison
"02 \\ Base St.
Madison, FL
(850) 973-8312
(850) 9"3-8341l
fax:
(850) 973-3774,
v'. .u nrjt nsur.irice corn
tr. nkj beli ieanh]ink net





FTiaiir
Tire & Muffler
14 -12 East Base St. �
S Madison, FL
(Beside Clover Farm)
(850) 973-3026
Owners
DanI & Lee Anne Hall


Von's
.Automotive
Sae & Sewice
1108 East Base St.
Madison, FL

4 (850) 9"3-6450

limes \on Rhoden
Mike Dowdy










ALIGNMENT

813 S. St. Augustine
Valdosta, GA

(229) 245-8880

77,


I


Sorenson
Tire Center, Inc.
Lawn mower to light truck
to semi and tractor,
we've got your tires!
We have an ASE Cprtified,
Mechanic on duty for all
your repair needs.


Don't Jorger, we are also a
S- * * lull service and lube station.
" * * * *,l50 N.Jeffrsnm St. * Montkello





i Jimmie's Madison
ml Firestone Metals
Service Center M I t
Tire Co. i & rowing n FL
oI ll * Madison, FL
uAurt T .c SalTes (850) 973-4172
, , TrAd, Au& Tires
TRUCK ACCESSORlf & PA,.RI 'e buy Copper.
IMNST ETCR AVALABHE S 53 & 10, |, oppr
ni DMt svIE ASE LsH SR 53 & I ', Brais. Aluminum,


' Jio N i iPteron St.
(229) 242-4830
M F 1 ?inm. 1 i'.pm
/m m I




'Don't Let Boh'h Shop
Prices Wreck Mour Day
Southern
Paint & Collision




1817 Howard St. West.
r Lhe Oak, FL
(386) 330-0211
Jay George, ownropcrator


Skinner's
Paint & Body Shop
"ie meet byr accident"
FREE ESTIMATES
24 Hr.
Wrecker Service
1016 LIS H i90 East
Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-1708
Attee \ A ,f,
* tS --00-'


M
Transmission
Foreign
Domestic
Front &
Rear Wheel
Full Drive Trainr
Differential
and
Parts
Finder
2000
Vehicle Parts
Foreign &
Domestic
5084 NE
Colin Kelly I -v.
Madison, FL
850-973-6677
1-800-592-1257
.partsfinderook con


Exit 258
Madison, FL
850-973-8546
24 Hour Towing


909 E. Base St.
Madison, FL
850-973-2676
Reg# MV10618




IF I
71 L


State
Farm
Insurance
Keith Hargrove
Agent


l5 F" B-:iS- .t ,M.idJis.n, FL
(850) 973-6641


S nmen
302 E. Hill Ave.
Valdosta, GA
(229) 242-2170

Located In
Downtown
Valdosta


Pou0las

Auto Repair

& Domestic
405 S. Ohio Si.
Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-1225
A. C, .Alternator Brakes,
EHawust, DualExhaust
CV Axles & Tune-Lps







Automotive
& Marine
Dennisjorgenson
505 Goldkisr Ave.



1'1a ' ' I.






Auto rim

Vinyl Aps
Carpet &
Furniture
Ipholstry
Terrn' & ,Ann Hasty
Owx ners
171 W. Gordon St.
Valdosta, GA
(229) 333-0106


America's
Body Shop
4317 W Pensacola St.
Tallahassee, FL
850-575-7124
Seamless Panel Repair
FREE ESTIMATES


He, . v ,s


40


Friday, September 29, 2006


I I


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Friday, September 29, 2006


lOB The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


1..................................
2bdrm/1 bath MH in park on .
Highway 53 in Madison, .
$135/wk includes, elect, ten
ant to pporna propane.p,


I Clean For You!
Rentals - Offices - Homes
$10 hour References Available
Pet care available in your home.
850-971-5684 .

We Do Backhoe &
Front End Loader Work.
By The Hour Or By The Joib.
386-364-8393 or 386-208-9792

Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Irrigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
(850) 973-2848





AUCTIONS
FLORIDA
LAND TRACTS
Selling By Order of A Major, Na-
tional Timber Company

October 10 & 12

* 853 Acres in
NASSAU County

* 183 Acres in .
FRANKLIN County

* 314.41 Acres in
HAMILTON County,

Photos, Plats &,Details @
www,HUDSONMARSHALL.comn
Free Brochure:
(800) 841-9400

H&M# AB110; CQ220129
'Ben G. Hudson, Jr
AU230; BK3006464


AUCTION
Saturday, September 30th
at 6:30 PM
. 1(3 S.'1\ M ,-i ,a Hall Rd.
(CR360) Madison,Florida
For Information Call 973-2959
NEW TRUCKLOAD-
HAS ARRIVED FROM
MAJOR RETAILER AND
MUST BE SOLD!
Air conditioned
with Comfy Seats!.
Cookout Starts at 5:30 PM
GET THE BEST
BARGAINS AROUND !!
LOTS OF FUN &
GIVE-A-WAYS
Directions From 1-10: Take SR14
SW to stop sign.Turn right on
SR14/360, at fork in road bear right,
onto SW Mosley Hall (CR36), past
fire house on left. AU691 AB2409














I


I


I,














SSubscript
GIIn Cou




I Out Of Cc
InclI


EXTREMELY FUN -BIG BOY",
TOY, 1978 FORD, MUD BOG-.
GER, WILL WIN EVERY RACE,
HUGE TIRES $55i500 00 ENGINE'
ROARS LIKE A BEAST, JAKE,
850-933-6363
FarmPro tractor 3 yrs old, used 4
hrs, 2 cy;. diesel,. 20hp, canopy, 3
pt. hitch w/hydraulic. scoop. Paid.
$4,600, take best offer by October
10th. View at 1111 29 NE Colin Kel-
ly Hwy, Pinetta. Call Richard at
(423) 2'2-:3. 91


CalI Alan Lein
at 850-570-0742


Greenvile Pointe

Ap ^artments
1,2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible apts. HUD vouchers accept-
ed. Call 850-94-1-3i036 TDD/TTY
711. 12 N\\ Green'.ille Pointe
Trail, Glen' ille. FL 32331
S'Equal Housing Opportunity.


travel trailer2005 27 ft. wilder- Mobile Home For tnt
ness extra slide-out. A/c, heat, full 2 bedroom 1 1/2 t s; .no
bath, epa _te bed io..i, like new, pets 35 elecrici
list $15,500 reduced to $i2,5i.iu. but i l Deetod Inn
but Decr. ood Inn
850-948-2788 "MadiPl.campgrounds. 850-973-
l.94 Lincoln T:,'nca . Sicna- I. .l ' .
ture Series. Runs great, $3,700 e ForRent
850-948-2788 House For Rent
.................................. ............ .. ...... .... 3 B edroom , 1 B a til . C central H eat
& Air,., 616 W. Bunker St.
850-575-1330


Furniture For Sale
Day bed with trundle, mission
style, walnut finish..$150. Glass
top table t, -1 4Chair'. $'5 850-
253-1227


Wanted: planted pines for
pine straw. Call Larue Tippett
at 971-5495 minimum of 20
acres.





For Rent: 3bd, .2bth home,'
washer/dryer included, quiet
residential area Call for info
8 5 0 -8 6 9 -0 9 o ...'. . . .- .
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for Senior's
and Disabled. 1 & 2 bedrooms,
HUD vouchers accepted Call 850-
973-3786 - TTY Acs 711 "This in-
stitution is an equal opportunity
provider and employer."
2 Bedroom, 1 Bath Apartment. Lo-
cated Near Downtown And
N.F.C.C. Recently Remodled,
Clean And Comfortable. Call 850-
973-6341
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Mobile Home,
HUD accepted, $300 security de-
posit. (407) 616-2637 or (407) 758-
6748




- I



/**^"
k^r ^ h',


ving Of Things,

rrent On
lews, Church,
Area Growth.
ion Rates:
nty $28
county $35


udes:


The Madison County Carrier
&

I The Enterprise Recorder.

I -Major Credit Cards Accepted-
Order Your Paper Today!

(850) 973-4141
li il M illll MiuII Ill i


COuthern qliaS sof

Ckf)adison Cpartments

HI D 'ouchers accepted. 1.. & 3
BR HC &' ri.n,-HC j-ce'ujble apts.
Call 850-973-8582/TDDTTY 711.
200 Southern Villas Circle, Madi-
son, FL 32340.
E ual Housing Opportunity.


315 Leggette A% e. Green' ille Fl. 3
bedroom 1 bath home in quiet area,
hardwood floor. panelinii, separate
diriing room, separate living room,
eat-in kitchen, recent insulated win-
dows and central heat/ AC. Utility
building in rear with washed/dryer
hookups, carport. Offered at,
$85,500. Call:
Alan A. Levin Broker-Associate
SMcClellan Realty
St.c,... - .: *850:5 0-0742 , ,....


GREENVILLE, Oak floors, open
concept, 4 BD,:2 BTH, Two acres,
$169,000, SHIP approved, Lynette
C. Sirmon, Agent 850-933-6363
R. Winston Connell, Realtor.




5 Mobile Homes For
. Less Than
$30,000 Each!
Delivered And Set Up On Your
Land! Call Mike At:
(386) 364-1340.





$$ AVON REPS $$
NEEDED NOW
50% COM.
Could Win $1,000
HURRY CALL
Dorothy
973-3153
Jefferson County Road Dept. is
seeking applicants for Mechanic
shop Foreman. Experience in. gas
and diesel engines, light and heavy
equipment, class A license, salary
. range 9.75 to 15.42. apply in per-
son. 997-2036
Jefferson County Road Dept. is
seeking applicants for Equipment
Operator IV. Must have experience
in operating a road grading ma-
chine. Apply in person at our office
1484 S. Jefferson, Monticello, Fl.
Office phone is 997-2036.
Local Insurance Agency
Seeking Employee.
(850) 973-2281

Advent Christian Village
call 850-658-5627
www.acvillage.net
CNA / LPN

Got a Passion for Compassion?

Direct Care Staff in long-term care
setting, FT and PT positions and
various shifts available. Florida
certification (CNA) or license
(LPN) required. Experience desired
but not required.
FT positions include health, dental,
life, disability, supplemental Insur-
ance; 403b retirement account; paid
time off, access to onsite daycare
and fitness facilities.
Apply in person at Personnel Office
Monday through Friday from 9:00
a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax re-
sume/credentials to 386-658-5160;
EOE; Drug Free Workplace, Crim-
inal background checks required.


Jefferson Couni3 Road Dept. 'i
seeking applicants for Equipment
Operator/Dri er Class A license,
backhoe e \pe.rence, dump truck,
pipe installation.
Sa!jtr' range 8.88 to 13.32. apply
in person 97'-2036 -
Senior Citizens Council of Nladi--
son Counts. TInc. is now accepting
applicauvon for a pair-tnie driver
to transport meals to homebound
consumers in the Lee area.
SQualifications: High school edu-
cation preferred, but experience,
will be cn'idered in ltieu of the ed-
ucation. Must have a valid driver's
license, good driving record and
dependable transportation.


The Greater Madison County
Chamber orCommerce is nrov. ac-
cepting application, tor an Admiri-
istrative Assistant. Duties include
providing customer service, book-
keeping,, general clerical support,
and office management. Min. qual-
ificaruons. 2 yrs secretarial experi-
ence using Microsoft Word, Excel,
and Access. Some'
bookkeeping/acctg. experience
helpful. Salary range 7.00 to 8.50
'per hour, based upon experience.
Please submit resume to 125 NE
Range Avenue, Madison,. FL
32340. Deadline October 9, 2006
- No phone calls please.
Madison County [
Solid Waste/Recycling, Dept.
Attendants- Part -Time

Collection Center Attendants. Ma-
jor responsibilities will include the
opening and closing of the collec-
tion center, assisting residents with
proper disposal and recycling tech-
niques as well as the distribution of
educational 'material. Attendant
must maintain center grounds in a
clean and orderly fashion. Employ-
ee must have the ability to establish
and maintain a positive working re-
lationship with the residents who
use the Drop Off Center. Employee
must report any problems and con-
cerns to the office of the Solid
Waste Coordinator. Other related
duties may be required as assigned
by the Administrative Staff. A 25 -
30 hour work week is required,
with flexible hours being a must, to
cover weekends and holiday time
schedules. Position will remain
open until filled. For additional in-
formation contact the office of the
Solid Waste Coordinator at 973-
2611. A completed Madison Coun-
ty Employment Application is re-
quired. Madison County is an equal
opportunity employer and a Drug I
Free Workplace. Deadline is Fri-
day, September 29, 2006 at 5:00
p.m.
Madison County
Board of Commissioners
Attn: Paula Arnold
Courthouse Annex, Room 219
112 East Pinckney Street
P. 0. Box 539
Madison, Florida 32341
(850) 973-3179
Tractor 'and loader operators
wanted in the Lee area. Please
call (800) 447-3304 ask for
Chad or Mas.

Administrative Assistant position
available at professional training
center in Monticello. Must have
excellent written, verbal, organiza-
tional, computer and people skills.
Responsible for general office co-
ordination and management, in-
cluding clerical and bookkeeping.
Must be able to work independent-
ly, exercise good judgment, and be
multitask and detail orientated. For
detailed job description, please
contact gale@greenindustries.org.
Salary based on education and ex-
perience. Application available at
www.nfcc.edu . Send application
and resume to NFCC Human Re-
sources, 325 NW Turner Davis Dri-
ve, Madison, FL 32340. Applica-
tion deadline 9/29/06. EOE

Kountry Kitchen
Now Hiring
Full-Time Servers
(850) 971-0024


APALACHEE CENTER


A Behavioral Health Care Center
currently seeking:

MASTER'S LEVEL THERA-
PIST #2267
A MINIMUM OF A MASTER'S
DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN
COUNSELING, SOCIAL
WORK,
PSYCHOLOGY, NURSING, RE-
HABILITATION, SPECIAL ED-
UCATION, HEALTH EDUCA-
TION, ORARELATED HU LIAN
SERVICES FIELD AND TWO
YEARS OF PROFESSIONAL
EXPERIENCE 'IN PRO\ HIDING
SERVICES TO PERSONS \\ IT-HI
BEHAVIORAL ILLNESS. SUB-
STANCE ABUSE KNOQE DG E
PREFERRED. SOME LOCAL
TRA\E L REQUIRED. LICENSE
PREFERRED '.,

ADULT CASE MANAGERS
(POSITIONS LOCATED IN
GADSDEN. JEFFERSON,
LEON. '.MADISON AND
TAILOR COUNTIESsi
A BACHELOR'S DEGREE
FROM AN ACCREDITED U[NI-
\ ERSITY OR COLLEGE \IrTH
A MATOR IN COUNSELING,
SOCIAL \\ ORK. PSYCHOLO-
GY, CRIMINAL JUSTICE,
NURSING, REHABILITATION
SPECIAL . EDUCATION.
HEALTH EDUCATION, OR A
REL \TED HUMAN SERVICES
FIELD (A RELATED HUMAN
SERVICES FIELD IS ONE IN
WHICH MAJOR COURSE
WORK INCLUDES THE STUDY
OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND
DEVELOPMENT) AND HAVE A
MINIMUM OF ONE YEAR OF
FULL TIME OR EQUIVALENT
EXPERIENCE WORKING
WITHADULTS EXPERIENC-
ING SERIOUS MENTAL ILL-
NESS OR A 'BACHELOR'S DE-
GREE FROM AN ACCREDITED
UNIVERSITY OR ,COLLEGE
ANDr M' THREE'- E -KS - FiULL
TIME OR EQUIVALENT EXPE-
RIENCE, WORKING WITH
ADULTS EXPERIENCING SE-
RIOUS MENTAL ILLNESS.

CHILD SPECIALIST #2200
MINIMUM OF A BACHELOR'S
DEGREE FROM AN ACCRED-
ITED UNIVERSITY OR COL-
LEGE WITH A MAJOR IN PSY-
CHOLOGY, SOCIAL WORK,
COUNSELING OR A RELATED
HUMAN SERVICES FIELD
AND ONE YEAR OF RELATED
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE.

CHILDREN'S CASE MANAG-
ER #1830
A BACHELOR'S DEGREE
FROM AN ACCREDITED UNI-
VERSITY OR COLLEGE WITH
A MAJOR IN COUNSELING;
SOCIAL WORK, PSYCHOLO-
GY, CRIMINAL JUSTICE,
NURSING, REHABILITATION,
SPECIAL EDUCATION,
HEALTH EDUCATION OR A
RELATED HUMAN SERVICES
FIELD WITH ONE (1) YEAR OF
FULL-TIME OR EQUIVALENT
EXPERIENCE WORKING
WITH CHILDREN WITH SE-
VERE EMOTIONAL DISTUR-
*BANCE; OR OTHER BACHE-
LOR'S DEGREE FROM AN AC-
CREDITED UNIVERSITY OR
COLLEGE WITH THREE (3)
YEARS FULL-TIME OR
EQUIVALENT EXPERIENCE
WORKING WITH CHILDREN
WITH SEVERE EMOTIONAL
DISTURBANCE.

For more information and a com-
plete listing of available positions:

www.apalacheecenter.org
(850)523-3218 or 1(800)226-2931
x2218
Human Resources
2634-J Capital Circle N.E.,
Tallahassee, FL 32308
Pre-Hire Drug Screen & FDLE
background check An Equal Op-
portunity /Affirmative Action Em-
ployer Drug-Free Workplace.


Apply in person at the Lake Park
location, 4914 Timber Drive. EOE






Carpentry Work Wanted
Decks - Ramps - Stairs - Sheds
Call Bob 850-948-2788 or
* 850-242-9342


ii


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PLANNER
This administrative and clerical po-
siti9n is responsible for planning
work in conducting independent
studies, completing planning pro-
jects, and regulating the growth and
development of the County in ac-
cordance with the Comprehensive
Plan and other statutes, ordinances,
and regulations related to land use
and community studies,. develop-
ment of special area plans and com-
prehensive plan amendments. This
position is under the direct supervi-
sion of the County Coordinator.

Job duties include but are not limit-
ed to: review of applications, sub-
missions to local Planning & Zon-
ing Board, Board of County Com-
missioners, North Central Florida
Regional Planning Council, and the
Department of Community Affairs;
analyze requests for land use and
zoning changes, plates and develop
staff recommendations, prepares
and presents agenda items in com-
pliance with County's Comprehen-
sive Plan and Land Development
Regulations for Planning & Zoning
Board and County Cormiislon,
conduct site plan review of devel-
opment proposed,: interpret County
land uc policies and Land Devel-
opment Code; process 'applications
for zoning changes and other cur-
rent planning petition-. reviews
plLn. and specification,_ for compli-
ance with County policy and sound
pl.aninir; prini ples. Will perform
any other related work as may be
assigned or required by the Board
of County Commissioners and/or
County Coordinator.

Qualifications include: Basic
knowledge of land use planning
concepts and rioith nmanagemerts
functions, knowledge of land de-
velopment process; ability to read
and interpret maps, legal descrip-
tions, plats and technical material,
methods of compiling, organizing,
and analyzing' data,' knowledge of
'basic c,-.mputer and internet 'kill,
ability to prioritize workload, abili-
ty to communicate effectively,, abil-
ity to rise problem solving tech-
niques. Must have valid driver's li-
cense., Bachelor's Degree and 2,
years of professional planning ex-
perience preferred.

Application and job, description
may be picked up from the Madi-
son County Board of County Com-
missioners Administrative Office
located in the Court House Annex,
229 SW Pinckney Street, Room
219, Madison, Florida. For further
questions please contact Allen
Cherry, County Coordinator at
(850) 973-3179. Application dead-
line is Monday, October 16, 2006
@ 5:00 P.M.
Madison County is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer and a Drug
Free Workplace.


Cracker Barrel
Now Hiring
Full and part time experienced
Grill Cooks, Cashiers and Servers.
Flexible schedules, weekly pay-
checks, health insurance and other
great benefits.








The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11B


dirF a Se member 29 20 6


S.I',y, -'- i-'.-'- - '- - -9 -, -


Suwannee Valley Humane
Society
1156 SE Bisbee Loop
Madison, Florida 32340
Two miles south of Lee off
C.R. 255 From 1-10 Exit 262.
Take C.R. 255 north 1/2 mile
follow the signs.
WOULD YOU LIKE A DOG
OR CAT THAT HAS ALREADY
BEEN SPAYED AND
NEUTERED, CURRENT ON
BOOSTERS, WORMED,
HEARTWORM TESTED, FE-
LINE LEUKIMIA TESTED
AND CURRENT ON RABIES
COME SEE OUR ANIMALS
AT THE SUWANNEE VALLEY
HUMANE SOCIETY.
You must check with us pri-
or to bringing in a animal. A
drop-off donation is required
for any animal brought to the
shelter. Our' Hours: Tues. to
Sat. 10:00 to 2:00 or by ap-
pointment. Visit our website
and see the animals that need a
really good home at www.geoc-
ities. com/Suwanneehs or e-mail
us at suwanneevallevy@earth-
link.net.
Lost or Found Pets:
If you have lost a pet or
found one, the humane society
will help you find your pet.
Call us at (850) 971-9904 or
toll free at. 1-866-236-7812.
Leave a message if we are
closed, we will return your call.
We really appreciate dona-
tions; ne couldn't operate k% ith-
out them. The\ are the heart
and soul of our 'Thrift Shops'
income. Please consider bring-
ing us donations of clothes,
household goods, furniture and,
toys. \\WE ASK THAT ALL
DONATIONS BE IN GOOD
CONDITION.
Newspapers and
Aluminum Cans:
We have a recycle newspa-
per bin at 305 Pinewood Dr.
just west of Johnson's Appli-
ance.Radio . Shack We, also
collectTal-tnaitnum cans to recy-
cle, just bring them to the shel-
ter. All the money goes to help
the homeless animals.
Featured Animals
For Adoption
DOGS:
3078 - May - she is a 6 week
old female mixed. She is brown
and has a tan streak down her
nose. She is a very sweet pup-
py.
3067 - Ester - Is a 1 _ old Bas-
sett/ mix. She is brown and
small in size, a very friendly
dog.
3037 - Russell - This 41/2
months old Jack Russell /mix.
Is tri- color and very loveable.
3025 - Buddy - A 71/2 month
old, black and white Labrador.
He is good with kids but, is
rough. Not good with cats, is
food aggressive and shakes
hands. , Is a very good dog for
the right home.
2944 - Dallas - Is a black
Lab/mix. He is 2 years old and


has been neutered.
2902-Lewis - This male is a
Heeler/mix, he is brown, black
and silver in color. He is very
good with kids and other ani-
mals.
CATS:
3057 - Sam - This 8 month old
cat is gray and white. He has,
been neutered and is very
friendly.
3049 - Smokey - He is a gray
tabby and is 1 _ year old and
would love to go home with


someone.
3028 - Toby - Is an orange tab-
by, this male kitten is 4 -
months old. He has long .hair
and is very sweet.
3008 - Prissy - is a black 4 ,
month old female. She is very
sweet and loveable.
2998 - Jenny - Is a 4 _ month
old, white, and orange tabby.
She lo\es to play and be paited.
2592 - Millie - is a 3 year old
cat, who is v'ery sweet. She is a
white Tabby and has. been
spayed. Older cats make won-
derful pet for an older person.
Does not like children and does
not like to be held all the time.
This is a very special cat and
you cah adopt her for $60.00
because she has a micro - chip
in case she gets lost.
2240 - Sisst - This is a real
special kitty. She is 3 years old
and is a black and gray Tabby.
She does not like children but,
would make a wonderful l com-
panion for and older person.
She does have to have special
food. If there is an older person,
who would love to have this
cat, she can be adopted for a
special price of $25.00. Come
in and see her.
We have kittens tooand we
always need people to hold,
pet, love, hold and walk ani-
mals so if you can't adopt you
can always come help in many
other ways. WE ALSO OFFER
OPTIONAL/, 1M(ICRO-CHIP-
'PING -Wte-nTYOU',DOP'l' FOR
$10.00 MORE.
Lost and Found:
Lost: In the Madison.
could be around the college. A
large orange fluffy eat. If found
please call Carol Gibson 850 -
673 - 9208 or 850 - 929 - 4609
Lost: A tan lab/mi., is 5
months old, weigh between, 30
- 35 lbs. His name is Rosco and
has sores on left side near
shoulder. If you find him please
call Jennifer Stevens at 386-
364-6008 Or cell phone 3S6-
590-1552
Lost: A male rotti, 3 years
old, Weigh 130 lbs. His name is
Conon, has no collar. If found
please call Jennifer Stevens at
386-364-6008 or cell 386-590-
1552


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S r T10N C0


Suwannee Vl//ey Humane Society Presents..



C 1 0
ritter Corner


IN RE: ESTATE OF
LL OYD COLEMAN
RICHARDSON, JR.


File No. 2006-92-CP

Division


Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of Llo'd Coleman Richardson, Jr., deceased,
whose date of death vas June 18, 2006. is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Diision. the address of which is 125 'S.W. Range AMenue. Madison..
Florida 32340. Then names and addresses of the personal represenLatne and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or deman.sj
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must fil,
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIMEI
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SE RICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOT ICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or de-l
mands against decedent's estate must Illl their claims with this court \MTHTIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. I
ALLLCLALMS NOT SO FILEDWITHBEFOREVERBARRED,.'
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE. ANY)
CL %IM FILED TWO 12- \ EARS OR MORE, AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DEATH IS!
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is Septembei 29, 2006
Attorney. for Personal Represnciante: Personal Representarite: .
Lynne French Davis . Rex G. French
Florida Bar No. 0112968 2962 N.E. Rutherford
44 W Flapltr St. Ste. 1675 . Lee. Florida 320159


Miami. Florida 33130 .
'Telephone:i365l 374-7900 .
Facsimile: 1305O 374 .-903

/29 10/06



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HE RINGS
CONCERNING N\MENDMENTS TO THE
MADISON COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PL N

BY THE PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD OF MADISON COUNTY. FLORID%.
SERVING ALSO AS4 THE LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY OF MADISON COLiNTY,
FLORIDA. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant lo Section. 163.3161 through
163.3215. Florida Statutes. as amended, and the Madison Counti Land Deselopment
Code,. as amended, hereinafter referred to a. the Land Deselopmrnt Code. objections.
recommendations and comments concerning amendments, as described below. will br
heard bs the Planning and Zoning Board of Madison Count). Florida. serving also as
the Local Planning Agenc of Madison County. Florida. at public hrarnmgs on Octobrr
12. 2006 at 5:30 p.m.. or as soon thereafter as the matter' can be heard., n the Court.
house Annex. Board Room. located at 229 Souithwes Pinckney Sireet. Madison. Florida.
(I CPl 06-2. an application by Clint and Catherine Rogers. to amend the Future Land
lise Plan Map of the Comprehtnsie Plan changing the future land use classification
from RESIDENTIAL-1 less than or equal to 2 dwelling units per acrel to COIMMER-
CIAL for properly described, as follows: ,

A parcel of land lying within Section 21. Township I North. Range 9 East. Madison
County, Florida.- Being more particularly described, as follows: Commence at the
Northeast corner of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 21; thence South 271.75 feet to the
Southerly right-ol-%as line of L.S. Highly ay 90 Stalt Road lii: thence North 65 2700"
Vest. along the Southerly righl-of-way line of said L.S. Highway 911 stale Road 10), a
distance of 457.76 feet to the intersection of the Southerly right-of.sta) line of said U.S.
Highway 90 (State Road 10) with the Southerly right-of-way line of Southwest Captain
Brown.l'lnd: Illence Norlh 89 35'11ll" tst. along the Southerls. riehti*,-f*a line of said
Southuest'Captai Biir'on Road. 372.82 feet to the Point of Beginning: hence South
0020'26" West 263.93 feet; thence South 77:11'21" East 711.21 feet; thence South
15�04'19" West 271.92 feet; thence North 81�59'37"West 343.56 feet; thetnce North
07 01'3S" East 499.97 feet to the Southerl) right-of-'ays line of said Southwest Captain
:Brown Road: thence South 89 35'41" East. along tihe Southerl' righi-oif-ia. line of said
Southwest Captain Brown Road 282.87 feet to the Point of Beginning.
Containing 3.95 acres, more or less
(2) CPA 06-3, an application by JJH&T Properties LLC., to amend the Future Land Use
Plan Map of the Comprehensive Plan changing the future land use classification from
AGRICULTURE-2 (less than or equal to 1 dwelling units per 10 acres) to RESIDEN-
TIAL-1 (less than or equal to 2 dwelling units per acre) for property described below
and to expand the Madison Designated Urban Development Area toinclude the proper-
ty described, as follows:
A parcel of land lying within Section 31, Township 1 North, Range 9 East, Madison
County, Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows The East 1/2 of the
Southeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 31.
Containing 20.00 acres, more or less The public hearings may be continued to one or
more future dates. Any interested party shall be advised that the date, time and place of
any continuation of the public hearings shall be announced during the public hearings
and that no further notice concerning the matters will be published, unless said contin-
uation exceeds six calendar weeks from the date of the above referenced public hearings.
At the aforementioned public hearings, all interested parties may appear and be heard
with respect to the amendments.
Copies of the amendments are available for public inspection at the Courthouse Annex,
Office of the County Coordinator, located at 229 Southwest Pinckney Street, Madison,
hlorida. during regular business hur.
All persons are advised that if they.decide to appeal any decision made at the above ref-
erenced public hearings, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, they may need to ensure that a %erbatim record ol the proceedings is made.
which record includes the t-snimons and si dence upon mhich the appeal is to be ba'ed.
9/29







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NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING

The Board of Commissioners of the Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority will
hold a Special Meeting October 12, 2006, Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center, 10405
NW. Theo Jacobs Way, Bristol, Florida..Meeting will begin at 11:30 A.M., E.S.T. The
meeting will-be open to the public.
9/29 � .


NOTICE.OF MEETING
CITY COMMISSION
rMADISON, FLORIDA "

The regular meeting of the Cit} Commission of the City of Madison. Florida will beheld
Tuesday, October 10, 2006 at 5:30 p.m. in Cit} Hall.
An) person who decides to appeal an) decision made bi the Commission with respect to
an) matter considered of such meeting -ill need a record of the proceedings, and that
for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal
is based.
9/29 '


f4


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THETHIRD
JUDICLL CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY. FLORIDA..
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 2006-94-CP ;


9/.139./-15.9H/..9I.h 2. .Y/79 .i2,10.41/o.6-01ii.U113


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MADISON COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION


LEGAL$


i, DTU


IN RE: ESTATE OF

ERNEST M. PAGE. JR., Deceased
'r* � /__________ _, ,*','*... /


NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration or the estate or ERNEST M. P.GCE. JR., deceased, whose date of
death was June 11, 2006: is pending in the Circuit Court for Madison County. Florida,
Probate Division: File Number 2006-94-CP; the address of which is Madison County
Courthouse. Madison. Florida. The name and address of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Representatise's allorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons., ho hate claims or demands against
decedent's estate. including unmatured. contingent or unliquidaled claims, and who
hase been seed a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court VI1THIN
THE LATER OF THREE 13i MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PLiBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY 130t DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors or the decedent and other persons who hate claims or demands
against the decedent's estate, including unmamrrd. contingent or unliquidated claims.
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE 03I MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FORE\ ER BARRED.
NOT% WITHSTANDING THETIME PERIODSSET FORTH ABOVE. ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO 1,2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.

THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS SEPTEMBER
29, 2006.
Attorney for Personal Representative: Personal Representative:
/sI ERNEST NM. PAGE. 111. /s/ Margarel Page
Floridt Bar No. 308536 Post OQfie Drawer 91)
Post Office Drawer 90 Madison. Florida 32341
Madison. Florida 32341
9/29, 10/06




SECTION 00100:
AD% ERTISEMENT FOR BID

PROJECT: RAILROAD AND LAKE PARK NURSING HOME
LIFT STATION IMPROVEMENTS
JONES EDMUNDS PROJECT NO, 07101-098-01
MADISON, FLORIDA

OWNER: City of Madison,
321 S% Rutledge Street
"Madison, Florida 3234U-2498

ENGINEER: Jones Edmunds & Associates, Inc.
1100 Cesery Boulevard, Second Floor
Jacksonville, Florida 32211
Telephone: (904) 744-5401

1.0 WORK DESCRIPTION

The Project is located in two separate locations:

Railroad Lift Station is located at the north end of Happy Stireet, north of Bentles Av-
enue, in the northwest area of the City of Madison, Florida.

The Railroad Lift Station Work is generally described as construction of a new sanitary
lift station, valve vault valves, fittings, fencing, sitework, force main. gravity sewer con-
nect to edisling wetwell. rehabilitation of'existine wetwell., electrical and related appur-
tenances.

Lake Park Nursine Home Lift Station is located along Captain Brown Road off U.S.
Highway 90 in the west side of the City of Madison, Florida.

The Lake Park Nursing Home Lift Station Work is generally described as construction
of approximately 900 linear feet of 8-inch gravity sewer by open cut. asphalt removal
and replacement, sanitary manholes, rehabilitation of the Lake Park Nursine Home Lift
Station, sitework. electrical, a 250 linear foot water main extension, and related appur-
tenances

The Opinion of Probable Construction Cost is $800,000 to $900,000.

All work shall be in accordance with the construction drawings, specifications, and con-
tract documents. Bids must be submitted on both sections of work.
2.0 RECEIPT OF BIDS
Bidding and contract documents may be examined at:
City of Madison
321 SW Rutledge Street
Madison, Florida 32340-2498
Copies of the documents may be obtained from:
National Graphic Imaging
7999 Philips Highway, Suite #202
Jacksonville, Florida 32256
Phone (904)-448-1600
Attn: Robert Landon
for 250.00 dollars per set, which constitutes the cost for reproduction and handling.
Checks shall be payable to National Graphics Imaging. Payment is non-refundable.
Only complete sets of plans and specifications may be purchased.
Bids shall be completed on the enclosed Bid Form as set forth in the Instructions to Bid-
ders and otherwise be in compliance with the Bidding Documents. Sealed bids will be
received at City of Madison. 321 SW Rutledee Street. Madison. Florida 32340-2498 un-
til 10:00 A.M. (local time) on October 18. 2006, at which time and place all bids will be
opened. Any Bids received after the specified time and date will not be considered.

For further information or clarification, contact Brian F. Hepburn, MPA, at Engineer's
office at (904)-744-5401 or e-mail at bhepburn@jonesedmunds.com







12B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


Friday, September 29,' 2006


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