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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Viewpoints...
 Section A: Main: Around Madison...
 Section A: Main: Leaders for Today...
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main: Madison County...
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Community
 Section B: Community: School
 Section B: Community: Sports
 Section B: Community: Regional...
 Section B: Community: Main...
 Section B: Community: Nation &...
 Section B: Community: Classifi...
 Section B: Community: Legals


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mods:note additional physical form Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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PAGE2
PAGE3
PDIV3 Around County
PAGE4 4
PAGE5
PAGE6 6
PDIV4 Leaders for Today and Tomorrow
PAGE7 7
PDIV5 Church
PAGE8 8
PDIV6 History
PAGE9 9
PDIV7 continued
PAGE10 10
PAGE11 11
PAGE12 12
PDIV8 B: Community
PAGE13 B
PDIV9 Community: School
PAGE14
PAGE15
PAGE16
PAGE17
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PAGE18
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The Madison enterprise-recorder
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00026
 Material Information
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title: Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title: Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Creation Date: May 20, 2005
Publication Date: 1933-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID: UF00028405:00026
 Related Items
Preceded by: Enterprise-recorder

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        Page A 1
    Section A: Main: Viewpoints & Opinions
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
    Section A: Main: Around Madison County
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
    Section A: Main: Leaders for Today and Tomorrow
        Page A 7
    Section A: Main: Church
        Page A 8
    Section A: Main: Madison County History
        Page A 9
    Section A: Main continued
        Page A 10
        Page A 11
        Page A 12
    Section B: Community
        Page B 1
    Section B: Community: School
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
    Section B: Community: Sports
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
    Section B: Community: Regional News
        Page B 8
    Section B: Community: Main continued
        Page B 9
        Page B 10
    Section B: Community: Nation & World News
        Page B 11
    Section B: Community: Classifieds
        Page B 12
    Section B: Community: Legals
        Page B 13
        Page B 14
Full Text







FOR TODAY ADER TOMORROW
FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW >


www. greenepublishing.com


MCHS FFA Hosts


25th Annual Banquet


3-DIGIT326 50 0
PK. YONGE LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
100 SMATHERS LIBRARY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


er


-te


0 1 0 S 0 4
I -


Our 140th Year, Number 31


County Hires Manager I


Friday, M'lay 20, 2005


IMadison, Florida 32340


Bassett Milks County


Joe Miranti
By Mike Moore
Greene Publishing. Inc.
Madison Counts has a
new manager and he w ill off i-
cially begin his duties on June
1.c
In the county commission


meeting, WednesdaN. Joe Mi-
ranti %\as officially approved
b\ the board in a 4-1 tote.
Commissioner CI)de King
cast the lone dissenting tote.
but made it clear that it \\as
from no dislike or disapproval]
of Nliranti. He thought the
count\ could not afford a full-
time manager, but pledged his
support of the new man.
Mitranti was the board's
top choice from among 21 ap-
plicants for the position. He is
from the Central Florida area.
and plans to begin getting set-
tled in his ne%' surroundings as
early as next week.
Please See County Manager.
Page 12A


School Board Votes To

Change Hiring Policy


By Jacob Bembr)
Greene Publi.shing. Inc. .
The Madison Count)
School Board %oted Tuesday
evening. May 17, to look clos-
er at how applicants for teach-
ing jobs are screened.
Larry Alderman. the
hool f 'ibo:ird' pers-onnel di-


rector, expressed concern over
finding out if teachers did in-
deed hate degrees in the field
that the) are hired to teach in.
and if the teachers have an\
degree at all. He suggested
that the school board be able
Please See School Board.
Pa.e 12.t


Local Men Honored


For Heroism


Daniel Havard and Ray Pike were recognized for their
heroism at Progress Energy's Pinnacle Awards.


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Daniel Havard and Ray,
Pike, employees of Progress
Energy, were honored for their
heroism at the company's Pin-
nacle Awards in North Caroli-
na.
Havard and Pike had been
fishing at the Gulf of Mexico
in Taylor CountI last year and
as they were about to go home,
they noticed a man preparing
to back his boat down a ramp
into the water. Two children, a
five-year-old girl and a three-
year-old boy, were waiting in
the front seat.
Pike heard a loud popping
sound, as apparently one of the


children accidentally hit the
gearshift. The truck rolled
backwards toward the lake. As
the children screamed, Pike
ran to try to pull the children
from the truck as it went into
the water. Ray's arm couldn't
fit inside the partially open
window and the children were
crying and too scared to un-
lock the door.:
Havard jumped into the
water to assist Pike. He swam
to the truck and was able to
open the truck's rear sliding
window. Havard and Pike
\ ere able to pull the girl
through the rear window.
Havard swam with the girl to
Please See Heroes, Page 12A


Following in the footsteps of her mother, Anderlyn Elli-
son. right, checks the blood pressure of School Board Chair-
man Bart Alford. Anderlyn's mom. Amy, is pursuing an R.N.
degree. Anderlyn is a student in the Central School's
SSTRIDE program. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob
Bembry, May 17, 2005)


School Board Takes It In SSTRIDE


For Unemployment


B\ like Moore
Greene Puilishing,. Inc.
The former Madison
County property appraiser has
been receiving unemploy-
ment compensation even
though Florida la\\ clearly
states an elected official ma\
not do so.
"The appraiser \was re-
ceiing these funds because
someone at the state level
messed up." said county at-
torney Tom Reetes. "The la\\
is clear, she should not have
received the mone.." Reeles
did not sa% \\h\ Debbie Bas-
sett even applied for the
funds. She correctly filled out
the forms and stated she \\as
unemployed because she \\as


Debbie Bassett
"defeated in an election."
Bassett has been denied
additional benefits, and offi-
cials w ill ask that the $825.00
she has already received be
returned. If she does not re-
fund the mone. the county
ma\ need to pa) it back.


Results Are In For FCAT Re.Takes


B3 Jacob BembrN
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The results for students
who re-took the Florida Com-
prehensie e
Assessment
Test (FCAT) -.
have come
back from
the Florida
Department
of Educa-
tion.
Students who had earlier
failed the test had to retake
the exam in order to meet the
state's graduation require-
ments.
At Madison County High
School, 123 students (10th,
llth and 12th graders re-test-
ed on the reading portion of


Madison County Central School has a class called Sci-
ence Students Together Reaching Instructional Diversity
and Excellence (SSTRIDE), which is administered by the
FSU College of Medicine. Five SSTRIDE students appeared
at the school board meeting with their advisor. Lynn Sapp.
Pictured left to right: Jimmy Smith, Jr.. Theo McGee, Lynn
Sapp. David Sanders. Kayla Sapp and Anderlyn Ellison.
McGee %%ants to be a heart surgeon when he is an adult.
tGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry. May 17,
2005)


County Commission Allows


Senior Citizens To Use Old Jail


By Mike Moore
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Old Jail building in
downtown Madison will have
additional use during the com-
ing summer month.
The historic building on
Pinckney. Street is not being
used as much now that the
Treasures of Madison County
Museum has been relocated.
The only current use for the
building is the meetings held
there by the Madison County
Historical Society. The county


ow ns the building and paN s the
utilities.
The neighboring S-enior
Citizens Group asked the His-
torical Society for permission
to use the building for some
classes during the summer.
Officers of the society refused,
.so the Senior Citizens Center
requested the county commis-
sion grant them use- of the old
building. The board approved
the use after discussion during
Please See Senior Citizens,
Page 12A


the FCAT. Only 20 of those
students met the minimum
scale score of 300 to attain
their graduation require-
ments.
Also

NI CHS .
84 stu-
dents re-
.took the
math por-
(ion of
the FCAT. Ten of those stu-
dents met the requirement of
300 on the test.
Madison Excel School
had 26 students retaking the
reading portion of the FCAT
and 25 retaking the math
portion. One student met the
minimum scale score of 30Q,


Aucilla's State Title

Dream Ends

In Close One


By NMike Moore
Greene Publishing. Inc.
It was not supposed to end
this way. For the third year in
a row, Aucil-
la Christian
Academy's
baseball sea- ,
son stopped
one game
short of the '
state tourna-
ment. The
Warriors
dropped a
heartbreaker, a 3-2 loss to Ea-
gle's View, who sported a 16-
12 record, in Jacksonville
Wednesday evening.
ACA finished with a
sparkling 26-4 record and the
most wins in school history.
But it was small consolation


for a team w ith its sights set on
the first state appearance since
1981.
The .game. had been re-,
scheduled for
Wednesday after a,
Tuesday rainouit.
The Warriors
. were returned to.
the field in the
-, sixth inning be-,
cause of a time
out call and saw
the winning run
cross the plate in
that frame.
"It was a tough. disap-
pointing loss," said, ACA
coach Ray Hughes. "We cer-
tainly had a great season, but
really thought this .was the
year we would break through
and go to state."


8 FRI. NIGHT


Some sun with a
thunderstorm


Mostly cloudy, a couple of
t-storms


Sharon Quackenbush,
left, clowns. around with
Elisa Dewitt, as Cheryl Reg-
ister looks on.


Clowns

Entertain As

United

Methodist

Women Host

Salad Luncheon
Page 8A


Annie's Mailbox.............10B
Around Madison............4-6A
C hurch............. ................ 8A
C lassitieds.. ........ .......... 12B
Comm. Calendar............... 5A
Jail Report................. 3A
Legals........................1...13B
Mad. Co. History............ 9A
Nation & World.........B.....11.B


Obituaries.......................5A
Outdoors......................4-5B
The Remote
Guide................. C Section
School.......................... 2-5B
Sports...........................6-7B
Step Back in Time...........10B
Viewpoints..................2-3A
Weather............................2A


'Jr


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FRIDAY


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I Accul Weathe'll, I


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Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


Thank You,


Beggs Funeral Home
Letter to Editor
Our family would like to thank the staff at Beggs Funeral
Home for all their help and kindness in the loss of our loved one
Margaret Pittman.
Patsy and Archie Davis of Lee prepared a delicious meal for
us on our arrival in Madison Monday night. Tuesday Anna
Davis made room in her schedule to do the ladies hair and after
visitation Tuesday night Myrtle Lorene and Victor Hutcherson
of Madison also served a wonderful buffet.
The fellowship of Faith Baptist served a bountiful luncheon
before the funeral services on Wednesday.
Donald and Doris Bishop opened their home for us to stay.
We want to offer our sincere thanks for all the cards, flow-
ers, prayer, and love shown to us by those who traveled from far
and near and to Pastor Rusty Bryan of Faith Baptist for his kind-
ness and consideration.
The folks of Madison County have surely shown their love
and goodness to us during our time of sorrow.
Our entire family joins me in offering our gratitude to each
and every one of you and pray God's richest blessing upon you
all.
Sincerely,
Joyce Menhennett
Miami, Florida

I Would Like To See


Wal-Mart Come To Madison
I would like to see Wal-Mart in Madison also!
Yes the local merchant's prices are to high, however, in their
deferise if you look at the rent they pay for their business space
you will understand why.
Now go a step further who owns most of that rental proper-
ty?
I don't have any facts but I'll bet that a lot of it is divided up
between four or five of Madison's Old money families. If this
is the case, then there's your answer.
Check out the names signed to the articles written which are
against new business or industry coming into Madison County.
If they can't own it, manage it or share in the direct profits they
don't want it here.

Anonymous because I live here.


Money For Distress'


Makes Me Sick
Dear Editor and Fellow Citizens.
I am outraged! Our taxes are going to pay someone with
DISTRESS in the lower track. It makes me want to puke! But
I can't sue I'm a white male, middle aged and I WORK!!
Thank you
Sincerely
A Madison County Citizen


Dive
Diversity is what started and built this great nation. People
from all different culture, races and religions came together in
this land and built a new nation, the United States of America. At
least that is the political correct version we espouse today. It
sounds great. Maybe it should have been that way. But in the
real world the United States was created by a group of people of
mainly European stock, the majority from England. As such
.their race, culture and religion were very similar.
Due to this similarity this became the core culture and reli-
gion that this Nation was founded on and has sustain it for the last
200 plus years. Over the years we have been blessed with people
from other nations, races, cultures and religions joining us here in
this land. ,They come here with many talents that they shared
with us as full partners in helping make the United States the
great nation it is today.
They came and joined with us in our core culture and reli-
gion, are at least accepting it as the fusion that held us together.
They did not try to change it. If they chose to maintain part or all
their past culture and religion that was acceptable as long as
they did not try to change our basic core that was sustaining this
Nation so well.
Now we seem bent on destroying this core structure our an-
cestors built and that made the United States into the


Emerald Greene Kinsley
Publisher/Editor
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Lisa Greene
STAFF WRITERS
Jacob Bembry, Bill McCrea
and Mike Moore
GRAPHIC DESIGNERS
Georganna Sherman, Kerry Cohen,
Carla Barrett and Lisa Greene
TYPESETTER
Kerry Cohen
ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES
Mary Ellen Greene, Dorothy McKinney and
Shanna Colvin
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS
Susan Grimes
Deadline for cla.-sirled; is Mondao at 3.00 p im
Deadline for Legal Advernm-eent is Monda. at 5pm
There will be a '3' ,charge for Affida jlit
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Subicripuon Rates:
In County $26 Out-of-Counry $31
(State & local taxes included)


"Thunderbird


Made Me Do It"
Response to M. G. Letter
"Wow," I asked for responses to my article about voting to
legalize bottle sales of Whiskey and wine in Madison Co, but I
don't know if the person who responded is for or against what I
wrote about, somebody please help me understand. I'm not go-
ing to use her name, just her initials M. G., seems she knows her
cheap wines, high proof, I didn't even know they made Thun-
derbird or Boones Farm anymore, that's what sold so good back
in the 70's, must was drank to inhance those left handed ready
role cigarettes, "m. G. some people called them "Mary Janes,".
"Taters" and "Joints" I sold about 40 different types, domestic
and imported, which my favorite was Christian Bros. Wine and
Sherries, which the profits went back to their private schools and
churches, which they no longer owne in Napa Valley Calif. The
way you described me, a rattle snake I think you might have
been consuming some of that Mad Dog 20-20 If you really
know and study wines, you \\ill find them to be a very good in-
vestment, wine is a living thing, a good wine has a cork, a red
wine you uncork and let breathe at a cool room temperature,
white chill for awhile.
M. G. don't jump on me for placing my article next to Erick
Vick; our maybe if the country received taxes, instead of GA,
Taylor Co, FL and other counties, maybe the county comm.
Could find the extra money to help and why wait three more
years to put on ballot, comm. Could ote at theii next meeting.
also city talking about rattlesnakes, they really aren't aggressive,
you really have to mess with them for them to strike back, they
are when they shed (go blind) or have babies, but working in the
woods looking for illegal honor we never had any' problems,
what scared me was moccasins %\ while v ading a creek or branch
they would come out of nowhere, bushes trees and try to attack
trees and try to attack another snake that scared me, wasn't a.big
snake, it was fairly small, just blowed up its jaws and hissed,
"Spread Natter" I think they are about extinct. But they would
make your blood pressure go up for a moment just drink threes
beers and will drop about 15 or 20 points. Think I'll just do that
its five o'clock somewhere, no offense meant M. G. none taken.
Like I wrote April 29 05 there three sides to a story, yours, mine
and the truth, maybe it will get others not only non-drinkers to
thinking let's hear from the other side? I'll still have more facts
I believe to be the truth "trust me I haven't lied yet."
P.S. Speaking of private schools I've paid school taxes all
these years and never had a child or 4 grandchildren 2 daughters,
school teachers, the most under pad for what they do. along with
people in Law Enforcement. Go to Private school my youngest
has Masters FSU oldest has EED FSU, no loans or grants. I'm a
:'sharecroppers,son .
I ......P.S I-. ook BBQ, for-good causes, trained by a black man
"Phenix City Ala" Sin City" designed 18 ft grill on wheels, was-
n't drinking Thunderbird, just beer, will be glad to cook any-
place any time, "Aint none gooder" Hope Eric gents the help he
needs, cause I believe in Education, cause you can tell I aint got
much. Thanks for your response. For real.
Regards M. G. Call me on my unlisted phone.
Bob Harden
P.P.P.S. Bet I won't be citizen of the month get to know me
before you judge me. Also I didn't know Thunderbird or'any
other alcohol came in gallons except moonshine I believe, half
gallons is the largest size.

rsity
great nation it is today. We are doing it to ourselves under the
concept that we are making everything better for the individual.
We are doing it by re-arranging history. We are doing it by re-in-
terpreting, not changing, the Constitution not as it was written but
as we think it, should have been written.
.We are doing it by not looking upon the United States as a
nation and haven for Americans but as a haven and for the whole
world. We are letting anyone come in and leave when ever they
choose. We are changing our society to fit the people who have
come to join us not them to fit our society.
I know of no society where true diversity ever worked. The
more homogeneous a society the better chance it has. And I be-
lieve the moreIfreedom it has. For the last forty plus years our so-
ciety has push diversity to the extent that they have all but
drowned out the voices for a more homogeneous society. It is
not political correct to question the swing to diversity. The Unit-
ed States is loosing its' strong core of believes, as a society, that
has held us together all these years. Our cohesive society is fast
scattering in all direction. It may already be too late for the pen-
dulum to swing back.
If it is may God help us. But we are not supposed to believe
in God.
Gene Abbett


-Since 1865-
dto ^ i7 "Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity"

n te rprisIe-3Recarber -
Madison Recorder established 1865,
ria freSS ASSOc i. INew Enterprise established 1901,
0dord r101 Consolidated June 25, 1908
Published weekly by Greene Publishing,
Inc., 1695 South State Road 53., Madison, FL
32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post
W inn ing N ewa-S 1 f Office 32340. Publication No. 177.400.
Award Winning Newspaper POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
T h ir* The Madison Enterprise-Recorder, P.O. Drawer
772, Madison, FL 32341.
S This .newspaper reserves the right to reject
ft g E rf any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions
rL that, in the opinion of the management, will not be
1695 South SR 53 for the best interest of the county and/or the own-
ers of this newspaper, and to investigate any ad-
Madison, FL 32340 vertisement submitted.
(850) 973-4141 All photos given to Greene Publishing, Inc. for
Fax: (850) 973-4121 publication in this newspaper must be picked up no
greenepub@greenepublishing.com later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off.
http://Www.greenepublishing.com Greene Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for pho-
tos beyond said deadline.


Friday, May 20, 2005


Jacob's Ladder
Jacob Bembry
Columnist


Hug Me

I'm A Reporter
My colleague Mike Moore made a very good observation in
his column this week about all the holidays and "special" days
there are in May. Most people probably don't e' en think about'
these days, with the exception of Mother's Day and Memorial
Day, but, if you work at a newspaper, it becomes a part of your
life. While I can understand the native Hawaiians wanting to ex-
perience the joy of "Hawaiian Lei Day," I also think it's about
time that reporters can have a special day, a special week or even
a special month.
Among my proposals are, a National Send a Reporter to
Hawaii Month, a National Give a Reporter a Hug Day, a Na-
tional Give a Reporter a Card Filled With Cash Week. a Nation-
al Buy a Reporter a Brand New Car Day and a National New s-
paper Reporter Appreciation Week.
There is a joy in newsprint. There is a joy in v writing excit-
ing stories or stories about nice people like the folks in our com-
munity. There is a great thrill in %% riding about Jesus Christ and
His saving grace in this column. Sometimes, though, we just
need to know we're appreciated.
As Susan Grimes, one of the office staff said to me today.
"You truly have your finger on the pulse of Madison." Another
person in the office saod, "That's scary!"
Well, whether I'm a scary reporter or a friendly person who
listens to the heartbeat of Madison to see if it's still alive, I do
think that I, and my two fellow reporters, need a little love and
attention. Perhaps I could write to my Congressman, or even to
President Bush, and have a national holiday declared for re-
porters!


The Ginger Jar
Ginger Jarvis
Columnist


A House Can Be A Home
Occasionally, my daughter waxes nostalgic about the days
when she first came into our home. She was a scared, nervous,
scrawny thirteen-year-old who had never had a normal home.
Sometimes she recalls those early days with great thanksgiving.
,After The Kid us born. The Road Runner and 1, moved to
Georgia and decided tq adopt the rest of our family., To ,ur coin-
sternation and disappointment, we learned that in Georgia a cou-
ple could not adopt a child older than one they already had. Our
son was almost four, and finding a younger baby meant a wait-
ing list several years long. Even though many children were
ready for adoption, we could not have them.
One of our church members worked in foster care, and
asked us one day if we had considered that option. We had not.
but we began to study the proposition. Our, payers led us that
way, and we joined the legion of foster parents. When the case-
worker asked us \\hat age child we anted, we said. "'Which do
you have the most trouble placing?"
She replied, "Teenage girls. Nobody v ants them."
Without hesitation, we said, "We'll take them."
Since our Mary could never return to her original home. we
signed permanent foster care for her. That's the closest thing to
adoption, and we all agreed o\ er the \ears that she is our child.
The others were not permanent. Carla cane to us pregnant
at 16. Her motherrefused to have her in the house while she was
expecting. We kept her until she could be placed in a Crittendon
Home in Chattanooga; then we went up to visit her and take her
gifts for herself and the baby. Once the baby was adopted, she
returned to us until her mother % as ready to take her back.
Tracey came at age 15. She and her sister had come, home
from school one day to discover that the friend their mother had
left them with had packed up the entire house (their belongings
included) and moved away., Reached by DFCS, the mother in
Arizona said she could not take them because her new boyfriend
did not want them. Tracey stayed with us until a home could be
found that had space for both sisters.
Amy and Allison came at ages 13 and 14. Their mother and
stepfather had played bedroom games with the girls and sold
marijuana as their major source of income. Taking those girls to
visit their mother in prison was some of the hardest work I have
ever done, but it was required. Somehow I got up the strength to
do it.
Fostering is not easy. The foster parent must never make a
negative comment about the natural parents. Sometimes I had to
literally bite my tongue to keep those comments in my mouth.
The foster parent must learn to take "You're not my mother!"
and reply quietly, "No, but I'm the mother in this house." The
foster parent must stay two jumps' ahead of whatever the child
might get up to. For instance, calling to the too-old boyfriend to
come on in the house, then explaining to him that he may see
Amy only in your living room with one of you present; other-
wise, you will have to report him. Yeah, the house gets real
chilly'for a while, but once you've showed that you will stick to
your guns, you've won that battle.
Why would anyone choose to take on such a challenging
task? For the children, of course. All the girls that stayed with us
can look back on at least one period in their lives where they had
regular meals, loving hugs, a consistent bedtime, clean clothes,
and fun family give and take. Normal? Maybe not, but family
nevertheless.
In her "remembering" moments, Mary often states, "I don't
know where I would have been if you all had not taken me in."
I shudder to think of her possible outcomes. And, I believe that
each of our children has those special moments of assurance that
they were loved.
Does your home have an extra bedroom? Does your heart
have extra love? Then you might consider foster care. Yes, it is
work. But the rewards go with you forever.


4. V


2A The Madison Enterorise-Recorder


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS








VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A


When God Made Paramedics


When the Lord made Paramedics, he was into his sixth day
of overtime when an angel appeared and said, "You're doing a'
lot of fiddling around on this one." And the Lord said,."Have
you read the specs on this order? A paramedic has to be able to
carry an injured person up a wet, grassy hill in the dark, dodge
stray bullets to reach a dying child unarmed, enter homes the
health inspector wouldn't touch, and not wrinkle his uniform."
"He has to be able to lift 3 times his 'own weight, crawl into
wrecked. cars with barely enough room to move, and console a.
grieving mother as he is doing CPR on a baby he knows wi/f
never breathe again." "He has to be in top mental condition/at
all times, running on no sleep, black coffee and half eaten meas.
And he has to have six pairs of hands." The angel shook her
head slowly and said, "Six pairs of hands...no way." "It's not the
hands that are causing me problems," said the Lord, "It's the
three pairs of eyes a medic has to have." "That's on the standard
model?" asked the angel. The Lord nodded. "One pair that s es


Madison County

Extension Service
Diann Douglas .....
Columnist


DASH Your Way To

Lower Blood Pressure
May is National High Blood Pressure Education Month. It
is a time to get your blood pressure checked and know your
numbers. Last week I mentioned.the DASH eating plan. This
is a researched based eating plan that has been proven to reduce
blood pressure.
Conducted in the early 90's, the Dietary Approaches to Stop,
Hypertension (DASH), ,as a scientific dietary study to deter-
mine if a diet plan without medication could reduce blood pres-
sure. The study w as funded by the National Institute of Health
and conducted at Harvard, Duke John Hopkins and Louisiana
State University. Results showed that both men and omen'eat-
ing the DASH plan experienced a significant drop in both their
systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings.
The DASH eating plan emphasizes fresh fruit and vegeta-
bles and low fat dairy products. .It is moderate in total fat and
low in saturated fat and cholesterol. It also includes whole'
grains, poultry, fish and nut. It also recommend reducing salt.
and sodium intake.
' ''Siiri on the DASH eating plati is easy. It requires no
special foods and has no hard to follow recipes. Here are some
tips to help you get started:
Make gradual changes like adding a serving of fruit or
vegetables at lunch and dinner.
.Gradually increase your use of fat free and low fat dairy
products to 3 servings a day.
If you now eat large portions of meat, cut them back by aI
half or third at each meal.
Try 2 or more meatless meals each week.
Try serving casseroles and stir-fry dishes, which have
more vegetables, grains and dry beans.
Eat baked or grilled fish during the week but be careful of
boiled marinades, they aire often high in sodium.
Eat fresh fruit, raw vegetables, or low fat and fat free y.o-
gurt' for snacks.
Use herbs and spices to enhance the flavor of you foods.
Limit your meals eaten out, since most prepared food is
high in sodium.
Make one or two changes each week. Eat a variety of foods
and cut back on serving sizes. For more information about the.
DASH eating plan and recipes, visit the NHLBI's "Your Guide
to Controlling High Blood Pressure at
w- ww.nhlbi.nih.gov/hbp/inde\.html and click on Prevention.
For a free copy of our fact sheet "Alternatie Seasonings-,
call or stop by the Extension office. This \ ill give your several
spice and herb recipes to use when preparing meals.


open sores as he's drawing blood and asks the patient if they
may be HIV positive," (When he already knows and wishes
he'd taken that accounting job.) "Another pair here in the side
of his head for his partners' safety. And another pair of eyes here
in front that can look reassuringly at a bleeding victim and say,
"You'll be:all right ma'am" when he
knows it isn't so."
"Lord," said the angel, touching his sleeve, "rest and work,
on this tomorrow." "I can't," said the Lord, "I already have a
model that can talk a 250 pound drunk out from behind a steer-
ing wheel without incident and feed a family of five on a private
service paycheck." The angel circled the model of the para-
medic very slowly, "Can it think ?" she asked. "You bet," said
the Lord. "It can tell you the symptoms of 100 illnesses; recite
drug calculations in it's sleep; intubate, defibrillate, medicate.
and continue CPR nonstop over terrain that any doctor w would
fear...and still it keeps it's sense of humor. This medic also has
phenomenal personal control. He can deal with a multi-% ictim
trauma, coax a frightened elderly person to unlock their door,
comfort a murder victim's family, and then read in the daily pa-
per how paramedics were unable to locate a house quickly
enough, allowing the person to die. A house, which had no street
sign, no house numbers, no phone to call back."
Finally, the angel bent over and ran her finger across the
cheek of the paramedic. "There's a leak," she pronounced. "I
told you that you were trying to put too much into this model."
"That's not a leak," said the Lord. "It's a tear." "What's the tear
for?" asked the angel. "It's for bottled-up emotions, for patients
they've tried in vain to sale, for commitment to that hope that
they will make a difference in a person's chance'to survie. for
life." "You're a genius," said the angel. The Lord looked
somber. "I didn't'put it there," He said.

NATIONAL

-1- i







May 15-21, 2005

Madison County.
+ : ,


5/11/05
'Alexis Robiel Taylor--
DWLSR or cancelled, failure
to 'appear, resisting an officer
without violence
: Robert Anthony .Seago--
VOP (circuit)
Christopher -", Wyman
Reynolds--VOP (circuit)
\William Lee .Ha\ines--
DWLSR or cancelled
5/12/05 :
'Alexis Robiel Taylor--
VOP (circuit)
John Thomas Whipple--
Possession of drug parapher-
nalia, possession of marijuana,
less than 20 grams
John Patrick Winter--Pos-
session of marijuana less than
20 grams
Andrew Charles Bush--
Possession of marijuana less
than 20 grams
Wilbert Clarence Sears--


By:Bill McCrea
"What do you think newly appointed
Madison County Muwager, Joe Miranti, should do first?"


Tracy Howard
"I think he should fix the
drainage problem around
Lake Francis. And, fix the
roads, instead of the way it is,
there should be drainage.sys-
tems with curbs that direct
water away from the houses."


Marlos Alexander
"I would like to see more
restaurants. If he could zone
an area for more restaurants,
that would be great."


Liz Harris
'"I would like to see things
available for the youth like at-
tracting local businesses to
sponsor some summer camps
or programs, because, right'
now I know of absolutely
nothing for kids."


Rachel Gee
"I would like .to see more
parks around here. So,
teenagers will have a place
to go and stay out of trouble
because right now they have
no place to go."


Victoria La Moreux
"He should make a public
playground for kids. And,.
also a dance club for kids, so
they don't go off and go
crazy." -



Tiffank l\I'right
"I think that he should build
something for the kids like a
movie theater or a skating /.
rink. "


Contempt of court (non-sup-
port.)
Dawn Katherine Jorgen-
son--Unknow n charge
Ernest Otis Brooks--Con-
tempt of court (non-support).
David Allen--Contribuit-
ing to child abue,. contempt of
court
Carl Andrew Long--Fail-
ure to appear i pre-trial) .
5/13/05
Rodney Thompson--VOP
(circuit)
Sandra Denise Gee--
Criminal registration
Kenneth Eugene New-
some--Expired drivers license
(more than four months)
Derenza Marcel Cherry--
Battery (felony)
Derrick Jermaine Alexan-
der--DWLSR or cancelled
5/14/05
.Efrain Rosario,, Jr.--Con-
tempt of court (non-support)
Renee Mariell Rote--
Worthless checks
5/15/05
Michael J. Duffy--Disor-
derly intoxication, indecent
exposure
Reginald Maurice Epkins-
-DWLSR or cancelled'
Alonzo Frazier--Dofmestic
violence/battery
Vivian Ann Turner--Culti-
vation of marijuana, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia,
possession of marijuana less
than20 grams, possession of
marijuana with intent to sell
5/16/05
Araka Deneace Brown--
Attaching a tag not assigned,
no valid or expired drivers li-
cense
5/17/05
Stephen Ural King--DUI
Jason Kenneth Adams--
DWLSR or cancelled.
Claude Austin Jones--Bat-
.tery (touch or strike), domestic
'violence/battery, VOP (circuit)
Lacey McLeod Jones--
Possession of drug parapher-
nalia,
Brittany Nicole Ragans--
Possession of cocaine, posses-,
sion of drug paraphernalia


Moore Thoughts
Mike Moore
Columnist



May is Everyone s Month
Everyone must have a special place in the heart for the
month of May. When a person works at a newspaper, it becomes.
apparent that there are many, as in lots,, of interest groups o'ut
there. Dozens, maybe hundreds, of people send letters, emails,
FAXES, and other signals about their organizations. It is amaz-
ing ho6\ many of these clubs. agencies. groups. and associations.
;ha'e chosen to make May their month of special emphasis.
May is State Parks Month. It is Armed Forces Month. This
works out well, since May includes Armed Forces Day and
Memorial Day. Closely related to this is Military Appreciation
Month. May is Older Americans Month. American Wetlands
Month. Arthritis Month, Skin Cancer Awareness Month. Blood
Pressure Month, and ALS Month. remembering those %with Lou
Gehrig's Disease.
lNay is Flower Month, Salad Month, Bar-B-Q Nlonth.
Transportation Month. Asparagus Month. Egg Month. Hani-
burger Month. Mental Health Month, Physical Fitness and
Sports Month, Strawberry Month, American Bike Month. Asi~in
Pacific American Heritage Month. Duckling Month, and Photo
Month. We must not forget it is Better Hearing and Speech
Month, and Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month.
Some groups specialize and have their own week. Recently.
it \\as Drinking Water Week in a Florida cit). Two other cities
had Tourism Week. There is a Safe Kids Week and we must not
forget Nursing Home Week. La%% Enforcement Week and EMS
Week are in May.
Some folks have their own da\. Some of these are: Kite.
Tulip. Chocolate Chip, Red Cross. Teacher. Circus. Space, and
No Socks Day. We also have Clean Up Your Room Day. Tap
Dance Day, and Mother Goose Day. And of course,. there is
Mother's-Day. -
Poor January. Pity August. Does no one love these deserv-
ing months? Even hot Jul\ has the 4th. And of course, w ith all
of its other special times. Ma\ shares graduations with June. It
is also Get Ready For the June Wedding Month.
When I was a child, we danced around a pole w while dressed
inobur best ,clothes. It %\as called the May Pole and this May Day
took place in May. Isn't that amazing?
Those of us old enough to remember the Soviet Union
watched the May Day parade on TV. We sa%% the unsmiling rmen
in Red Square watch their troops march and their missiles roll.
Not many people still have parades show ing off weapons.
What if we added a few more special observances to May?
Is there room for several more? Can you think of an' activities
that could be added to May? Do we get the idea'? If nearly every
group on the planet has a special obser\ ance this month. w hy not
include these suggestions After all. if good old NIMa can ha\ e all
of these; we can add some more. ..
Could there be a Love Your Country Month? What if some-
one had a Be Kind to Children Month? Not to be left out would
be a National Go To Work Month. Even though I talk on my cell
phone while driving, I think a National Pay Attention While Dri-
ving Even if You Must Take the Phone From Your Ear Month
would be good.
The Book of Philippians in the Bible speaks of integrity. We
are told in Philippians 3:17 to be an example to others. We could
ha\e an Integrity Month. Ho%% about Ephesians 4:25, "So put
awa\ all falsehood and tell your neighbor'the truth." We could
have an Honesty Month.
Good old May...
Asparagus Month?


City Of Madison


SLPublic Announcement

The City of Madison requests that you please
call us before you dig. We will be glad to. ,
locate utility lines before you begin digging.:
In case of an emergency,
please call the following numbers:
(850) 973-5081 City Hall during working hours,
(850) 973-5075 City Fire Department after hours.


City of Mairmo

Natural

Gas
A gas leak could Gas
be dangerous but gas
itself has no odor. So, for your
safety, a smell like rotten eggs is
added. If you smell such an odor:
1. Don't use the telephone.
2. Don't turn lights on or off, or
use anything electrical.
3. Go outside right away.
4. Ask a neighbor to call the gas
company.
5. Don't go back into the house
until the gas company says it's
safe.
Please keep gas safe.
(850) 973-5081 City Hall Working Hours
(850) 973-5075 Fire Department After Hours
^ ^


FWday, May 20, 2005


017--Foi r..







4A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Immunizations

Are Required

For

Kindergarten

And

Seventh Grade











By Mike Moore
Greene Publishing, Inc.
It is time to begin thinking about and
planning for those things called "shots."
Children entering kindergarten must
have proof of required immunizations.
Children entering seventh grade will be
required to have completed Hepatitis B Se-
ries and Tetanus Diphtheria Booster shots.
All shots must be completed before the
first day of school. Children not immunized
will not be permitted to attend school.
Parents may call the Madison County
Health Department at 973-5000 or their pri-
vate physician. Parents are re-
minded to have these shots 7 T
completed to make sure their j U
child gets. into kindergarten
and seventh grade.


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Halie Wetherington Will Compete

In The Florida Sunburst Pageant


















Greene Publishing, Inc.
Halie Wetherington will compete in the Florida Sunburst Pageant on May 27, 2S and 29 at the
Florida Mall in Orlando.
Halie, who will turn 18 months old on Saturday, May 21, has been entered in the Supermodel
Search, Daycare Schoolwear and the Photogenic portions of the pageant. She has also been entered in

pans.
"She loves books," said Michelle. "She likes the water. She loves to go swimming."
Michelle said, "Halie iould rather go to bed with a book than a stuffed animal."
Halie is following in the footsteps of her mother, the former Michelle Booth, who was Miss Madi-
son County in 1998. JHalie was the second runner-up in hier division of the Miss Madison County
pageant in 2004.
Halie is the daughter of Sam and Michelle Wethenngton. of Madison. She is the granddaughter
of Lester and Debbie Wetherington, of Lee, and Ray and, Sharon Boothe. of Green.ille.
Halie attends Kountry Kids Daycare in MNadison.
Halie's family wishes her the best in the state Sunburst Pageant.


lnior Auxilitary Attended The Natio

Association Of Junior Auxiliaries'


Friday, May 20, 2005


New National

Director Of

Health And

Wellness


Edward R. Scott. II. the National Direc-
tor of the Health and Wellness Committee,
'is a dentist in private practice in Tallahas-
see, FL. He is President/CEO of Faith Den-
tal Center and Presiden0CEO of Correc-
'tional Dental Associates, both based in Tal-
lahassee. He is a past president of the Na-
tional Dental Association, past chairman of
the Florida Board of Dentistrn. and legisla-
tive liaison of the Florida Dental Associa-
tion. Scott is a fellow of the International
College of Dentists and the American Col-
lege of Dentists. .
An expert, witness and dental consul-
tant. Scott serves on the American Dental.,
Education Association Ad% isory board and
the Robert Woods Johnson Foundation
Dental Pipeline Grant Advisory Board..
He earned a B.S. from Florida A&M
University and the Doctor of Dental Medi-
cine from the Har ard University School of
Dental Medicine.
A 1973 Alpha Xi initiate, Dr. Scoot is a
member of the Southern
inal Province Board of Directors
andpast Pole march of the Tal-
lahassee alumni and Beaufort
Alumni Chapters. He \ as
named Man of the Year in the
-- Tallahassee Alumni `chapter,
and he received the Souithern
Province Achievement A\\ ard.
Scott is pastor of Mt. Zion
AME Church in Tallahassee
di. pnd, p,plationalres4ient 9f.,
.tbheFlorida A&M Unli\ersitN
Boosters.


15 1 a itl icl


Members of the Madison Junior Auxiliary are pictured at the National Meeting in
Biloxi, Mississippi. Shown seated, left to right, are Kim Washington, Heather Beggs, Tonja
Davis and Kara Washington. Standing, left to right, are Amy Webb, Jessica Galbraith,
Maria Greene, Paula Bass, Ansley'Beggs, Jennifer Copeland, and Danetta lott.


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Madison recently attended the
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pi. Participants enjoyed a va-
riety of informational pro-,
grams and workshops, includ-
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ipants attended workshops on
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cluding workshops for local
association offers. The meet-
ing culminated with an awards
banquet and installation of the
2005-2006 officers of the Na-
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Auxiliaries. The local chapter
was awarded the Efficiency
Award and the Norma Delong
Education Award.


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AROUND MADISON COUNTY


In Wednesday's Madison County Carrier, we accidentally
put the wrong date for the Excel School graduation. We listed it
as May 25. The actual date will be May 24. We apologize for the
error.

2005

Community

Calendar ...
May 20
Singles Party, hosted by Positive Christian Singles, meets
every Friday at 1650 River Street (1/4) mile east of Sam's
Club, in Valdosta. The theme for tonight is Tropical Luau
Party. Dance lessons at 8 p.m., DJ plays country, oldies, and
rock from 8:30 p.m. Fun mixers and karaoke. $8 admission
includes food and drinks. For more info, call 229-242-3797.
May 20
The 20th of May Pageant will be held at the Madison
County Recreation Center at 7 p.m. For more information,
call Mrs. Parrish at 464-0610 or 973-6262.
May 21
The 2nd annual free Gospel Concert at Yogi Bear Jelly
Stone Park is at 7 p.m. in Madison. The Dixie Echoes and
The Singing Reflectsons will be playing. Concessions and
RV Hook Up will be available. A free loving offering will be
received. For more information, call 850-973-4622.
May 22
The annual Homecoming at Ochlawilla Baptist Church,
1315 Ochlawilla Church Rd., Quitman, Ga will be held with
services beginning at 10:30 a.m. A covered dish luncheon
will be served at noon and afternoon singing will be enjoyed
by all. Everyone is cordially invited to join us for a day of
celebration and fun.
May 22
St. Matthew's A.M.E. Church in Greenville will be hav-
ing their Washington Family and Friends Day. There will be
two services, one at 11:00 a.m. with Rev. D.J. Balloon as the
speaker and one service at 3:00 p.m. with Rev. E. 0. Wash-
ington as the speaker. You are invited to attend both services
and make this a joyful occasion.
May 23
Senior Citizens council will hold an Outreach at Harvey's
Shopping Center from 1 p.m..till 3 p.m. Please stop by for in-
formation pertaining to our agency.
May 24
Congressman Ander Crenshaw will have a mobile office
at the Madison County Courthouse, Room 206, from 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Staff from Congressman Crenshaw's office will be
on hand to assist constituents with casework and issues of a
federal nature. Advarice appointments can be made by call-
ing District Representative Chris Calabucci at 386-365-3316.
May 24
Madison Senior Citizens \\ ill have our 6th Annual Health
Fair from 10 a.m. till 2 p.m. at the First United Methodist
church on 200 South Rutledge Street in Madison. The public
is welcome. Refreshment will be provided for your enjoy-
ment. Over 27 different health related organizations and
businesses will be set up with information for your needs:
Guest speakers will be Mr. Lee Norris, Pharmacist; Sherice
Simmons from Area Agency on Aging; Madison Fire Dept.;
Senior Citizens Council; Robert Beckhorn, SHINE Program;
ICS Cremation and many more. Come enjoy the morning
with us. For more information, pleasecontact Joan Beck at
850-973-6002.
May 25
The Lady of the Lake Quilting Guild will hold it's month-
ly meeting at the Suwannee County Regional Library on US
129 S in Live Oak. This is a change of location for the sum-
mer months only!. Gloria Comstock of the Gainesville Guild
will share with us a form of applique technique called
Broderie Perse. The public is welcome. For more details,
contact Sandy Lindfors at 386-362-6850 or riverfolk@all-
tel.net.
May 26
The officers of the Perry Shrine Club has changed the
time of their meetings. They will meet the 4th Thursday of
the month at 5:30 for board meeting, 6:00 for fellowship and
dinner at 7:00.
May26
A'benefit BBQ lunch for Toni Chaney, para-professional
at Pinetta Elementary, from 11:00 until on the Madison Coun-
ty Courthouse Lawn. The plates will costs $6 and the menu
includes a BBQ pork sandwich, baked beans, chips, dessert
and drinks. All proceeds go to help cover medical expenses
incurred in her battle with cancer. An account has been set up
at the Madison Education Association Credit Union and do-
nations can be made for her there.
May 27
Singles Party, hosted by Positive Christian Singles, meets
every Friday at 1650 River Street (1/4) mile east of Samn's
Club, in Valdosta. The theme for tonight is Beach Ball Party.
Dance lessons at 8 p.m., DJ plays country, oldies, and rock
from 8:30 p.m. Fun mixers and karaoke. $8 admission in-
cludes food and drinks. For more info, call 229-242-3797.
June 3


Free gospel concert every 1st Friday of the month at the
Lee Worship Center, 398 Magnolia Dr., in Lee at 7:30 p.m.
Open Mike, so any groups, singers, or pickers interested in
performing on the show, please contact Allen and Brenda Mc-
Cormick at 850-971-4135 after 6 p.m. A free will love offer-
ing will be taken for the expenses of the singe and to benefit
the building'fund.
June 8
The June meeting of the 55 Plus Club will be held at
United Methodist Cooperative Ministries at 12:00 noon. The
55 Plus Club is for anyone in the community 55 years old and
older. The program follows the luncheon, and is planned
with seniors in mind. There are no costs of any kind and no
reservations are necessary for the luncheon.


Lewis Nathan Christmas
Lewis Nathan Christmas, 67, of Cherry Lake, passed
away May 17, after a brief illness.
Born October 25, 1937 in Ty Ty, Ga., he was the son of El-
bert Daniel and Anna Lee Calhoun Christmas. A proud veteran
of the US Army, two years, in the Army National Guard for sev-
en years, and an Avionics Design Engineer for Gables Engineer-
ing, Inc. for 35 years. He was a loving son, husband, father and
grandfather who retired from Miami to Cherry Lake in Novem-
ber 2003.
He is survived by his wife of 45 years, Dorothy Fay Barrow
Christmas, of Cherry Lake; daughter and son-in-law, Rochelle
Connie and Kenny Velez of Middleberg; daughter and son-in-
law, Renee Diane and Craig Guadagni of Miami; a son, Lewis
N. Christmas, II of Cherry Lake; son and daughter-in-law,
Daniel Irvin and Jiselle Christmas of Omaha, NE; eight grand-
sons, Michael Lewis Christmas, Benjamin Leevi Christmas,
Jesse Brian Velez, Eric William Velez, Christopher Felix Ro-
driguez, Cameron Joseph Guadagni, Lewis N. Christmas, III,
Zachery Alan Christmas; one granddaughter, Amelia Danielle
Christmas; one brother, James Christmas, of LaBelle; and one
sister, Susie Kyle of Boston, MA.
Funeral services will be held Monday, May 23 at 11:00 a.m.
at the Maxwell-Miller Chapel in Quitman, Ga. With Rev. Philip
Hudson officiating. Burial will follow at Salem Church Ceme-
tery in TyTy, GA..
The family will receive friends at the funeral home Sunday
night from 6 to 8 p.m.
Maxwell-Miller Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Camp Keystone-Where

Every Kid Can Be A Star
Bill McCrea
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Camp Keystone in conjunction with the Salvation Armiy is
providing a program for under-privileged kids who will forgo
the $175 camp fee. The camp has set space for a dozen or so
boys and girls, but Salvation Army volunteer.Lo Taylor feels
like the organization and camp will allow for more.
The camp is located in Starke and is mainly a wilderness.
camp that has made space for children who qualify for the Com-
munity Service Camp for ages 7-12 who meet the low income
requirements.
Children will be placed in cabins by age and there will be
separate living quarters for boys and girls.
Camp begins with supper on Thursday, July 14 and ends
with breakfast on Monday the 18th.
Campers should plan to arrive at camp shortly after 12:45
p.m. and no later than 3 p.m.
A parent or guardian must ,in camp applications forms
kParent Authorization.and sumnier Food Service Program).
All camp registration forms must sent in by June 1, 2005.
Campers should phone in program changes by the date listed on
the registration form.
"The Community Service Camp is for low income house-
holds. So, I'm looking forward to signing-up at least 25 kids in
Madison County who meet the requirements; however, if I go
over 25 the Salvation Army will make the necessary accommo-
dations," said Taylor.
If more information is needed, call Lo Taylor at 973-4572.


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5A


..


ICS CREMATION SOCIETY, INC.
"PAY YOUR RESPECTS, NOT YOUR LIFE SAVINGS"



ALL FLORIDAs
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227 E. Jefferson Street
Quincy, Florida 32351


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Friday, May 20, 2005








6AThe Madison Enterprise-Recorder AROUND MADISON COUNTY


Friday, May 20, 2005


EMS TraumaOne And AirMedic One


Land At Lanier Field


By Bill McCrea
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Trauma One and
AirMedic One landed in
Lanier Field on Tuesday af-
ternoon, May 17, to celebrate
EMS week.
"This is Trauma One LC
(Lake City)-based out of the
Lake City Airport. There is a
1ight crew that consists of
three members, a nurse, a
paramedic and a pilot. And,
this is our brand new aircraft-







CAi-800952
Fo re osltto


it's only about a year and a
half old. It's a EC-135 made
by Eurocopter. A lot of newer
technology goes into this he-
licopter-an all glass cockpit
and twin GPS iGlobal Posi-
tioning Systems i." said Trau-
ma One Pilot Al Lew is.
According to Lewis. the
GPS twin system helps the pi-
lot ao na\ igate w while the other,
is used to plan the othei leg of
flight.
"We have no idea here
the next flight is. We stick
around just like firemen %\ait-
ing for a call. When the bell
goes off, we get the launch
from our dispatch center in
Jacksonville and the\ ask us
if we can take a flight to; let's
say, Madison, we then check
with the w weather station and:


Left to Right-Alfred NMarlin, Pilot of AirMedic One-Don Onley, Lucas Williams. ENIS
Director-Juan Botino, John Smith, Christy Holmes, Tim Alexander. Jody McClung and Lisa
Jordan. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Bill McCrea NMay 18, 2005)
plan the rout to the nearest Fortner and pilot-Al Lewis. knowledge to make the
hospital," said Lewis. "The reason we fly with transfer to which ever hospi-
The crew consists of a nurse and paramedic is dur- tal easier. The paramedic's
RN/paramedic-Vickie ing ainnerfacilitytransfer, a strong suit is the fact that
Huggett, paramedic-Jerry nurse has all of the clinical they have had several years


experience on a ground am-
bulance crew and that
knowledge directly transfers
Over the pick-up site," said
Lewis.
The second helicopter
team is AirMedic One.
"This is a DK-117 twin
engine. The configuration
that, we fly is with a pilot and
two paramedic, a'id can car-
ry two patients at a time,"
said pilot Don Onley.
The DK-117 is powered
by twin jet-turbine engines.
"They are phasing out
the piston engines, the jet
turbine engines are much
more reliable," said Onle. .
Medic One's top speed is
150 mph.
"From here, it took us 15
minutes to get from Perry,"
said Onley.
The crew of Medic One
is Pilot Don Onley, and para-
medics. Tim Alexander and
John Smith.


Nes


Toni Brandon Promoted In Georgia's 224th


Toni Brandon of rank of Technica
Madison, was promoted to Sergeant in the 224t


m


al Joint Communications
th Support Squadron of the
Georgia Air National
-Guard at military cere-


A six-year veteran of
the Georgia Air National
Guard, Brandon is the
Non-Commissioned


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CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT
Effective from o R Annual Percentage
05/18/2U05 05/24/200s Interest Rates Yield tAPY)
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Bus* ss Spotlight


Il--







Friday, May 20, 2005 The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7A








LEADERs


FOR TODAY AMND TOMORROW


Olivia, 15 months old &
Grace, 3 years old
Parents:
Lenny & Jessica Galbraith


'". "- ,
; .




'S
1'



A. a1'T


Trinity Nicole Miller,
10 months old
Parents:
Christopher & Jennifer Miller


Dalton Cochran, Anna, 5 years old &
18 months old Luther, 3 years old
Parents: Parent:
Allen & Julie Cochran Kim Collins


it?


-r -


N-


9
Jr


J;~ .t:


Karic Miller,
9 months old
Parents:
Melissa & Kevin Miller, Jr.


Donovan Miller,
3 1/2 months old
Parents:
Thomas & Tonisha Miller


Justin NMcLeod, Andrew Pennington
2 1/2 years old 2 years old
Parent: Parents:i
Michel McLeod Tom & Lisa Pennington





Michel M eo


Kristi, 10 years old &
Bridgette, 6 years old-
Parents:
Scott & Kitty Ferrell


Reed, 8 years old &
Mason, 4 years old
Parents:
Carol Beggs & Richie Gaston


Tanashiya Jordan,
2 years old
Parents:
Watanna Pickett &
the late Terence Jordan


Sha'Deja Jordan, 3 years old Taylor, 12 years old &
& Kei Marion Mobley, Sage, 10 years old
2 months old Parents:
Parent: Cris & Terry Douglas
Adrienne Jackson


Daniella, 9; Will, 8;
Trace, 4; & Kassid3, 2
Parents:
Tammy Floyd &
Tim Robinson


Dawson Herring
23 months old
Parents:
Brody & Stacey Herring


K.C. 2 years old &
Sissy, 2 years old
Parent:
Odessa Bird


Jordan, 8 years old
Parents:
Susan McClain &
Jason Hayling


Kendal, 12; Jadyn, 2
& Carter, 7 months old
Parents:
Jeff & Rhonda Gore


Dustin & Dylan,
5 years old
Parents:
Doug & Kim Bass


Brandone, 12 years old &
Russ Swope, 9 years old
Patents:
Shanna & James Swope


Joshua, 6 years old & Bo, 7 years old &
Jade, 4 years old Jackie, 5 years old
Parents: Parents:
Harvey & Janice Greene Jimbo & Christy Roebuck


Darey Wood Cheltsie, 12 years old &
2 years old Brooke, 10 years old
Parents: Parents:
John & Lisa Wood Paul & Emerald Kinsley


Daniel, 16 years old;
Forest, 10 years old;
& Matthew, 5 years old
Parents:
William & Lisa Greene


WIaMPM,


I


h


P


400









8A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


CHURCH


Friday, May 20, 2005


Lee First Baptist

Church Celebrates New

Worship Center


We would like to invite
3ou to join us in our tirst ser-
vice ih our new worship p Cen-
ter on Sunda\. MaN 22nd at
11:00 a.m Come see t hat the
Lord has accomplished
through the faithfulness of his
believers. If \ou don't hate a
Church home. \we welcome
you to come be a
part of Lee
First Bap-l
list Church.
God has pro-
vided some
w wonderful
ni memories
through the
construction of
our new building.
'We also owe Campers,


on lMission and the Tennessee
Brick Masons a huge thank
\ou We hope to see \ou Sun-
day. Come celebrate %with us'


UNITED METHODIST WOMEN HOLD SALAD SUPPER


Salads by the score were
enjoyed by Methodist
Women of Madison County
on Monday night May 9 at
the United Methodist Coop-
eratile Center. Each \\oman
brought a salad of her
choice, which made a beauti-
ful and delicious banquet
table.
The hosts for the annual
e\ent \were the Lee United
Methodist Women. The din-
ing tables were decorated
with spring, silk flowers set
on glass pedestals., which
added to the festite atmos-
phere of the evening.
Wanda Hodnett, Presi-
dent of the Lee UMIW, gave
the invocation and blessing.
She introduced the program
which wtas the Clown Min-
istrs of the Lee United


Methodist Church called
"The Gospel in Greasepaint"
The clowns, who ranged
in age from middle school
children to include adults.
were expertly costumed and
had fantastic clown faces!
They performed several skits
depicting well know n Bible
sto les, and truths such as.
Tht Good Samaritan. sharing
otr\ material resources, the
best reasons for attending
church and church school.
and the reasons for building
our lit es on the solid founda-
ion (if Jesus Christ. The very
friendly, and talented clown% ns
came to the Salad Supper
w ith their clown directors,
Ginny Quackenbush and
Cherryl Register.
The ladies %went home
with thanks for the delicious


salads and for the enjoyable
evening of fellowship and
Greasepaint memories. This
event is held each year on the'


first Monday after Mother's
Day at the United Methbdist
Cooperative Ministries Cen-
ter.


Front row,. left to right are: Sharon Quackenbush. Second
row, left to right are: Brittany Miller. Randee Bilyou, Amanda
Price. Third row. left to right are: Candace West. Daniel Bar-
ron, Jamal Thornton. Jabaris Thornton. Zac Roberts. Ginny
Quackenbush. Cheryl Register.


Happenings At Madison First Baptist


By Nell Dobbs
May 20, 2005
,How blessed indeed we are to be part of the Family of God and to be part of his fam-
ily at our church. We give thanks for each member and his life and work in the family.
Such a gorgeous pink arrangement by Ho"w ell and Carolyn Edw yards in honor of their
Sunday School teachers, Rev. Jake and Judy Phillips. Blessthem as teachers and all their
pupils. Earnest prayers for a very ill Dav id Smith at Shands/Jacksonm ille and Betty Jane
Wilson at a Tallahassee Rehab standing in need of prayers and visits) and their loved
ones. Bless all other sick ones, Little Henry Fisher Pike and parents, our Lil Jess and fam-
ily and all others with virus or. other illnesses. Earnest prayer-, for E% ie Lamb at South
Georgia. .
Steve Bass gave announcements; David Fries sang "After the Rain," Chancel Choir
sang, "Days of Elijah;' Preacher asked special prayers in working all things right for Brad
"Clark to come to be our Student Nlinister. Then his message was about GRACE..
G God's
R Rescue
A at
C Christ's
E Expense


Good crowd at night serve ice. Danielle Fries sang "'Building MNI World Around Him.'"
Preacher's message was from Acts 26 and interesting as always. King Agrippa granted
Paul to speak for himself. He testified of his life, his strict upbringing his persecution of
Christians;' his turnabout and becoming a Christian. and his preaching the gospel. Fetus
said loudly. "Paul, you are beside yourself, much learning hath made thee nrvad--Kin-g
Agrippa said the saddest words of tongue or pen really "Almost thou persuadeth me to
be a Christian." Preacher said to order our days around God's will and don't fret over the
\%a\ it ends up. Paul learned his mission %%as to take the Gospel to the Gentiles. Sunday
afternoon \\e heard a TV Preacher say GOSPEL really means Go and tell others!
Such a sweet graveside service for Ethel Clark by Preacher Greg Ragans as he told
how she lived the life she claimed. Special prayers for her remaining family. Pray for
Kelly and Mary Bailey and family in the death of his sister. Hannah.
Met Aaron and Norma Webb at South Georgia and they gave thanks for our Church's
tender lo\ ing care for their Bill when he w\as our Music Director. His \wife and he are do-
ing well. And then, we are so blessed to hate his brother. Lex. and Deanie withh us.
Think about Mildred Tibbals as she celebrates her 90th birthday on Saturday.
Bless all activities of our church.
May our prayers be to so lie that we'll li\e forever in a land where we'll neter grow
old! Amen and Amen!


BARBARA MEMORIAL CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Highway 254
Re%. Rohert gner 973-41601)
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening worship p ;:30 p.m.
edmesda) Bible Study 7:301 p.m.

FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH
1505 East Base St.. Madison FL. 32340
Phone 973-2887
Pastor Rusrt Bryan
Music Director Minnie Lee Newborn
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning %Worship 11:00 a.m.
Church Training 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship 7:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting. Wednesday 7-8:00 p.m.
Family Night Supper. Ist W\ednesda) 6-7:00 p.m.
Baptist ,len. Baptist Women. Music, louth Children.
and Fun After Fifty programs available
"Where Love Has No Limis" .
FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH
/ One. mile north of Madison on 145.
S,. et NMcHargue. Pastor
Gary Gazlay, Music Director
SJackie Watts, Student Pastor,
Youth & 'Children's Ministries,
Active Young Adult Ministry
Office: 973-3266
Morning Worship 9:00 a.m.
SSunday School 10:30 a.m.
SWednesdah: Family Night Call For Schedule
'"A Fami/ir of Families".. *Cntemporary f worship"
Ifinterestedin a home group, call. 850-973-3266
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1113 SE Pinckney St., Madison Fl. 32340
Pastor George Stinson
Sunday School 9!45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 6:00 p.m.
Pastor George Stinson invites you to come and enjoy God's Blessings.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Since, 1830
Horry at Rutledge St., Phone 973-6295
Rev. Lee Monroe FerDon, O.S.L.
Brian Sanderson, Youth Pastor
Jim Catron. Lay Leader
Service of Word & Table 8:30 a.m.',
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .......11:00 a.m.
Wednesday All Youth (grades 6-8) 6:30-8:00 p.m.,
Youth (grades 9-12) 7:00 p.m.
' Men's Fellowship Breakfast (3rd Sunday) 8:00 a.m.
Women's Meeting & Lunch (1st Monday) 12:00 Noon
Sunday 11 AM Service Now On WMAF 1230 AM
Everyone is welcome to all events!


GRACE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America
1200 North Washington St. 973-2692
Sunday School For All Ages 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Fellowship Supper/Bible Study 6:00 p.m.
southh Groups 1st 12th Grades 6:30 p.m.
Choir Practice 7:30 p.m.
Friday Mlen's Prayer Breakfast 7:00 a.m.
Come Horship And Serve 11With s
GREENVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH
1365 SW Main St Greenmille, FL
948-2353
Sunday School For All Ages 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Esening Worship 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Pre-school. Students. Adults Choir Rehearsals ......5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Pre-school Children.
Youth & Adult Bible Studies 7:00 p.m.
First Sunday e'ero month MNen's Breakfast 8:00 a.m.
-ALL INX ITED -

LEE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Caron Harn
Lee Florida Corner of 255 & 90
Sunday Bible Study 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Wed Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Children / Youth Aclti cities 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Adult Choir 8:00 p.m.


LEE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
H%%. 255 South. Lee. Florida 971-5585
Richard Quackenbush. Pastor
Morning Worship 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Youlh Group ;:00 p.m.
Liniled Methodist Women
Monday after Ist Sunda3 7:30 p.m.
Nlen's Fellowship Breakfast
Second Sunday 8:00 a.m.
Multiple Weekly Bible Studies / Acti iries
"Connecting The Community With Christ"

MADISON BAPTIST CHURCH
303 Range St.. Madison. FL.
(352) 361-3055 .
Pastor Daniel Riggs
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Preahin I I-fn v.


Sunday Evening
Wednesday Service


Love To Have You Come And Visit Us.


6:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.,


MADISON CHURCH OF GOD
771 NE Colin Kelly Hu).. Madison, FL.
973-6307
Re%. Doyle Glass. Pastor
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesdayy Night Sern ice 7:00 p.m.
MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
"A Friendly) Church"
Cherry Lake. FL
850-929-4355
Rev. Johnnie Merrick, Pastor
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Pastoral Sunday Ist & 3rd Sunday 11:15 a.m.
'oulh Church 2nd Sunday 11:15 a.m.
Nlission/Laymen 4th Sunday 11:15 a.m.
REAPERS OF THE HARVEST CHURCH
3 Miles West Of Greenmille. FL. Hsiy 90
Samuel Bass, Sr., Pastor
Sunday) School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11 00 a.m.
Esenipg Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night Service 7:30 p.m.
"*.-4nd when the day of Pentecost was fully come.
they were all with one accord in one place." Acts 2:1
Everyone is always welcome
,.ST. MARY'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
108 N. Horry St., 973-8338
The Rev. Ben Pfeil Vicar,
; ', Joe Boyles Senior Warden, ,
Sunday Church School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Hol) Eucharist 10:00 a.m.
Mission Board 2nd Sunday 11:00 a.m.
Episcopal Church Women 3rd Sunday 11:00 a.m.
visitorss al"a3s welcome

ST. VINCENT DEPAUL
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH
Meeting & Sumter St.. 973-2428
Re%. Ernest SlIeslre. OMII
Sunday 9:00 a.m.
Mlonda3. Tuesday & Wednesday Mass 7:30 a.m.
Thursday Mass 7:30 a.m.
Saturday Mass.... 5:30 p.m.





ATMR







Friday, May 20, 2005


By Mike Moore
Greene Publishing, Inc.
adison is known as
//the City of the Four
( Freedoms. And last
Friday, our Ameri-
can Profile magazine carried
a story about Franklin De-
lano Roosevelt and his Four
Freedoms speech. The story
is on page 10, and is a part of
the "Profiles in History Se-
ries."
The magazine points to
several similarities between
the America of 1941 and our
present day.
FDR gave his State of
the Union Speech, January 6,
1941, not quite a year befo.
Pearl Harbor was attacked a
thrown into World War II.
"We look forward to a w or
tial human freedoms," FDR sai
speech and expression, freedom
God in his own way, freedom f
fear.


re
and America was suddenly

rid founded upon four essen-
d. He named ithe freedom of -
n of e\er\ person to w)orship -*
rom % ant. and freedom from
.a a AV4


On December 7, 1941, Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. and
the following day, FDR asked Congress to declare \\ar On
December 10, Madison native Colin P. KellN. Jr. \"as killed
in action during an air-sea battle in the Philippines.
The Four Freedoms Monument stands at the northeast
corner of Base and Range Streets in dow\nto\ n Mladison.
This monument commemorates the four \alues of Roo-
sevelt's speech. It was designed and sculpted by Ne\\ York-
er Walter Scott Russell and is dedicated to the memory of






Here is the part of FDR's speech in which h he explained his
thoughts on the four freedoms.
"The first is freedom of speech and expression evern-
where in the world.
"The second is freedom
of every person to \or .,ip
God in his own Na\ e\er.-
where in the world.
"The third is freedom
from want, which. translated
into world terms, means eco-
nomic understand ing trs which
will secure to ever\ nation a
healthy peacetime life for its
inhabitants evwr~ here if
the "orld.
"The fourth is freedom
from fear, which, translated
into world terms, means a
world-wide reduction of armaments to such a point and in
such a thorough fashion that no nation %\ill be in a position to
commit an act of physical aggression against any neighbor -
anywhere in the world.
"That is no vision of a distant millennium. ht is a definite
basis for a kind of world attainable min our o% n time and gen-
eration' That kind of world is the very antithesis of the so-
called new order of tyranny which the dictators seek to create
with the crash of a bomb."


The Four Freedoms NMonument can be seen in
downtown Madison. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo
by Mike Moore, May 17, 2005)


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A


Kelley.
The sculpture features
four sides. On one side,
the human figure is
bending a sword-free-
dom from fear. On an-
other side, the figure
holds a basket full of
food freedoin from
want. On another side,
the figure has hands
clasped in prayer free-.
dom of worship. On the:
-last side, the figure it
reading from a scroll"
freedom of expression. a,
A dedication ceremo-
ny was held in Madison,
June 14, 1944. Speaker
for the occasion was
Florida Governor Spessard L. Holland. The governor later became a
United States Senator.
Original plans called for the monument to be placed in Tallahas-
see. but the Kellk famnil requested that it be located in Madison.
KelleN's father and Go\. Holland \ere friends and the decision \\as
made to place the monument in the \\ar hero's hometo\1 n.
The Down Homnes Da s Festival held each April \\as renamed a
fe\% ears ago. Four Freedoms Festt al. The do" nto" n park is offi-
ciall\ Four Freedoms Park
In recent \ears, an actor has portrayed FDR giving his famous
speech to Congress. The session has been held in the courthouse and
\\ as \er\ \%ell done according to those \\ ho saw\ and heard it.
One of the best-remembered lines from FDR's speech is still very
appropriate. "Those \\ho would g.i\e up essential libert\ to purchase
a little temporary saferN deserve neither liberty nor safer\.'"
The President probably\ had no idea that his speech would still
sound so time\ o\er six decades later or that those \\ho pass b\ a
monument in a small Florida to"\n can be reminded of their free-
domns.


This plaque stands near the Four Freedoms monument, in the
city park. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Mike Moore. Ma) 17,
2005)

,..... ...-..;...







."?";:s"":'"'" ::.;y ...


This historic photograph shows sculptor Walter Scott Russell at work on the monument. On the easel in his studio is a picture of Colin Kelly, Jr. (Photo Courtesy of Florida State
Archives)


MADISON COUNTY HISTORY






Friday, May 20, 2005


1 OA The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Cosmetology Is A Career




With Many Opportunities


By Mike Moore
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Those interested in a career change may wish to consider cosme-,
tology. People who want to get into the field can obtain the necessary
training, but it is no longer offered in Madison County.
For many years, North Florida Community College had a Cos-
metology Department, providing the required courses to qualify stu-
dents for the state licensing exam. The school discontinued the de-
partment, so those interested must now travel to Perry for courses at
Taylor County Tech, or to Live Oak at Suwannee-Hamilton Techni-
cal Center.
Florida requires 1,200 hours of classroom work with students


, 1r Fneiil St- ff I Here to 'cU!
r Perms Styling Mani res
Massage Therapy" -

~ -2 2 55,..
I 100pp South Ohio Avenue .'Liv e Oak, Florida
I 100 South Ohio Avenue Live Oak, Florida


taking courses
dealing with the
many aspects of
the profession.
Other states have
different require-
ments. Classes ,in-
clude studies in
hair cutting and
care, manicure,
pedicure; overall
skin care.


Lorraine Brown headed up the department at NFCC. She is still
at the college but now works as a student recruiter.
"We had an excellent program here," she said. "Students now
will need to travel to get the training, but it is a good career, and
there is a demand."
After completing the coursework, students take an exam, usually
in Tallahassee. The test costs $86.00.
At Live Oak, the coursework takes from one year to a year and
one-half. Students receive credit for class hours if they participate in
out-of-town hair shows. Classes run from August through May and
are from 9:00 to 3:00 daily.
Interested residents. may call (386) 364-2760 for information.
Carolyn Burkett
heads up the pro- S ty
gram. Brenda's Styles
pro r the Your Family Hair Care Center
program also runs 1303 West Base Street Madism, c'ida 32340
from August 850-973-3536
through May, 8 9
from 8:00-3:30.7
with classes held .-'. . The number there
is (850) 838- .
2545. tBrand'Fic t 'r of t


HAIR STYLIST

Julie Wood


II '7


- PITonern St.
LivOaF
386362452


A*
1 .'


603 S. Range St. Madison, Florida

973-3692
Open: Tues. Fri. 9-5 Sat.9
ChbWylG 'W Orn- Owrer/Opegrtor I .


r, cr. i% r. I C Q ,1 c
I f i fr I rljr, r






The Madison Enterprise-Recorder llA


Friday, May 20, 2005


Ho eFrnsig eti -
-Funiur
-Aplane


NManuta:uredJ & Modular Home,
Neu! WVe Can Finance.!
Land/Home Package.-
Home-. on Leajed Loi.
Single Multi-Sectionn Modulas ,



UNIlERSITY HOMES
850-576-2106

LAND CLEARING




Excavating &
Tractor Services
SNJ..l.nL' ,. Illp itnfllr n .li
ltrullC. ln ( l i in l'.n'.-
( I.er I.. 1",s
Paul lkinlu'
973-6326


Steel Buildings
FREE ESTIMATES
RfI, Up Do.i & Windows Oppv1nrl
Ti "^-


NEWSPAPER






A3A-s. ro

973-4141


PAINTING





Bus. Phone:
850-342-3288
Cell Phone:
850-528-3262


SECURITY

*William Greene

k7


Ili!ll Hl~nuwnd liAIhi dHi I

[fa #1a111tHurd 123118


Littleton

Well Drilling
Cartifitd Ndl Drillr
FI LiO# 2611
, Ril 2 B,, 475
Madiinm, FL
(850) 929-4504


AIR CONDITIONING

Jayson's Heating

Air Conditioning

f? Refrigeration
*(s1 & EIcrii Furru s Hcal Pumps
N. Hwy. 255 Pinetla, FL

929-2762


%%e pro% ide nex I da) ;tmice (in
Conmmerchial &%Reidential Job,.
If ',ou're interntetd In sa% ing
mon nwntoninsulation. giit? the pro-
lt-;Siol)sI it M ll ln-w~alion a call!
1229) 242-1270
44(34 %.,In..rihiDr .Ii..CA.'

* PLUMBING
Biiriette Pliiumbing
&
I Veil Service


850-973-1404


Wilkinson's
The Home Store

Decor For Every Room
SOf Your Home
1701 W. Gordon St.
Valdosta, GA
(229) 244-2662

LUMBER
i RO-MAC VISA
LUMBER
h,,'-I I ,, I .,mid, I, I in, of
,,,I. A, Itilll ,: l h;'lfi,', "

631 W. Madison*Tallahassee.FL
850-224-0167
Shelving*Hardwoods
Pine Finish-Mouldings-Doors
Plywood.Windows*Oak Flooring
Cedap-rFirp-Spruce


6. 5
S(KVICEPOM EP^slK


I [TI, Ren6e
,,,n ]roe
Inc.
Niq Nwil, Will lool






Friday, May 20, 2005


12A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


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.- Syndicated Content
" Available from Commercial News Providers


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lop.


County Manager
Cont'd from Page IA
County Attorney Tom Reeves discussed the contract offered to Miranti. The new manager
will receive a yearly salary of $55,000 and a one-year contract to run from Junel, 2005-May 31,
2006. He will also be reimbursed for up to $250.00 per month in expenses.


School Board
Cont'd from Page IA
to request college transcripts from people who are hired by the board to be schoolteachers.
Alderman suggested that the board go ahead and hire the people, and do background screen-
ings and fingerprint checks on them to assure the students' safety around them, but give them sub-
stitute teacher pay until the transcripts are produced.
Alderman said the days are gone when a person could give the school board their word that
they had a college degree and it could be believed.
School Board Member Kenny Hall made a motion to accept Alderman's recommendation.
Susie Williamson second the motion, which passed unanimously.

Heroes
Cont'd from Page IA
safety and he returned to the truck to help Pike pull the boy through the window. The water was
only five inches below the boy's head.
Havard is the son of Mike and Lisa Havard and Stan and Beverly Pickels. He is the grandson
of Charles and Louise Stout, Charles Kelly and Mattie and Gene and Weta Bratcher.
Pike is the son of Ray and Monica Pike. He is the grandson of the late John and Edna Pike
and Tom and Mae Evancho.

Senior Citizens

Cont'd from Page IA
Wednesday's meeting.
Two leases on the building have expired. The Historical Society and the Treasures group no
longer have leases.
A Department of Transportation grant in the late 1980s permitting the structure's renovation,
stated that the building was to be used as a public building.



SIfYou Have Beeji Activated/Deployed..,
By The US Mlitary \
We Woi4d Like To Give You \t"' ,
S .- A FR0EE UICRIPTIOI' To
The Madlain County Carrier
& The Madison Enterprise-Recorder.
Let Us KInow Where To /
Send Your Newspapers.. .. -
NaOme. .
FPO/Address --"'-" --" k----- ~ -, //


MAY IS TRUCK MONTH

B lEUNE rmO 'rS OOilK
lBwith purchase of any awm
New or Pre-Owned Pickup.
2005 EXPEDITION KLT


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'7


May 20, 2005


Section


- ..., V. .- '.* i --. .. ^


Sports- B .
Ann Landers 10B


Celebrate Conservation


7 Jake Carpenter appeared
cipni and collected" a hlie
W gaje his speech before the
i Judmes at the NMadison Soil
S and \Water Conser'ation Dis-

The Topic of the Contest
this .,ear ik "Celebrate Con-
ser action Jake spoke of the
history \ of the Soil and Water
fv^ ViConlservtion organization,
purpose and accomplish-
Sinients. He said. "Madison
Count\ has redyon to 'Cele-
braLe Con;erk nation' a, tlhe
District has \\ell-ser ed the
Count\ in helping landok% ners
% ith their Conser\ nation
needs."


Jake i, the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Guy Carpenter, of Shady
Grove. He will receive a $100
savings bond.
The Contest was held in
the Conference Room at the
Ag. Center, April 25, at 3:00.
Judging the contest was Joel


Jake Carpen. ter

/ ''. . -:- ',; *.,


Lole. FDACS Field Rep.
Robbie Robinson. Soil Con-
servation Tech. and Rachel
Kudelko, 4-H Coordinator for
Madison County. Jake will
represent the Madison SWCD
at the Regional Competition
in Jacksonville.
The Conservation District


sponsors the Speaking Con-
test ever3\ ear for students
between the sixth and twelfth
grades.
If you are interest in par-
ticipating in the Contest next
year, contact the Soil and Wa-
ter District Office at 97'3-
6595.


In a strong, bipartisan show of sup-
port for America's wildlife, 128 mem-
bers of the U.S. House of Representa-
tives and 55 senators have signed letters
urging a substantial increase in funding
for wildlife conservation. The letters,
addressed to the chairman and ranking
members of the Interior Appropria-
tions Committee in both the House
and Senate, support a funding level
of $85 million for the State Wildlife
Grants Program in fiscal year 2006.
"State Wildlife Grants is the na-
tion's core program for preventing
wildlife from becoming endangered
in every state. I'm glad to see so many
of my colleagues pull together to sup-
p.''(t a program that will enhance
laTdlifcOnseorv-ation,'" said Se- Jhohrr.
\Varner (R-VA). 'This support shows
'the growing priority our nation is
X placing on conserving wildlife for fu-
ture generations to appreciate."
Last year, the State Wildlife
Grants Program secured just under
$70 million. President George Bush's
FY2005 budget proposed increasing
the program to $74 million. This re-
quest by members of Congress for
$85 million recognizes an even.
greater need.'
"This letter clearly\ shows that the
fight for additional funding for State
Wildlife Grants is a bipartisan issue,"
said Rep. Mike Thompson (D-CA).
"We should make every attempt to ful-
ly fund sound conservation efforts to
prevent environmental problems and
further loss of important fish and
wildlife habitat."
Created by Congress in 2001 to be-
Sgin early strategic investments in
wildlife and habitat conservation, the
State Wildlife Grants Program helps
states protect declining fish and


wildlife habitat. The program saves both
wildlife and taxpayer dollars and reduces
costs and conflicts over endangered species
listings. A matching requirement leverages
federal funding from state and private
sources, often doubling the impact of every
dollar of federal funding.
"In a tight budget year, this bipartisan
group of leaders is standing up- for a pro-
gram that really works," said John Baugh-
man, executive vice president of the Inter-
national Association of Fish and Wildlife
Agencies. "These legislative leaders have
demonstrated that they are true champions
for America's fish and wildlife."
The campaign for the letters was led by
a bipartisan group of congressional leaders
from across the nation. In Florida, Sen. Bill
",Nelsonf "(D-Mel.taurte),- Rep. Alcee Hst-
ings (D-Miami), Rep. Adam Putnam (R-
Bartow), and Rep. Robert Wexler (D-Boca
Raton) have joined in the efforts.
"We are extremely grateful to our Con-
gressional leaders who have joined together
in this strong show of support for wildlife
conservation" said Vicki Tschinkel, The Na-
ture Conservancy's Florida state director.
"The increased funding will allow the pro-
gram to move forward more ambitiously in
our efforts to address conservation for Flori-
da's fish and wildlife."
"The continued broad-based support for
the State Wildlife Grants Program both
within Florida and throughout the country
shows how important and significant this
ground-breaking effort to keep common
species common has become," said Dr.
Thomas Eason, leader of Species Conserva-
tion Planning, Division of Habitat and
Species Conservation, -Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission.
For more information on Florida's
State Wildlife Grants Program, visit the
www.MyFWC.com/wildlifelegacy Web
site.


Under Secretary Brown

Unveils "Building On Success


Recently, Department of Homeland Securi-1
ty Under Secretary and head of the Federal
Emergency Management Agency Michael D.
Brown announced FEMA's "Building on Suc-
cess" plan that details program evolutions during
the 2004 hurricanes now in place. to help the
Agency respond to the 2005 hurricane season
and all future disasters.
"The unprecedented 2004 hurricane season
tested our programs and systems like never be-
fore and we were able to react in an able artd

Success' plan outlines some of the specific areas
where FEMA's response and recovery opera-
tions evolved during the 2004 hurricane season
to better serve disaster victims, and now we will
be able to use these great evolutions for the 2005'
hurricane season and all future disasters for'
years to come," Brown said.
With the official start to the 2005 hurricane
season almost a month away, Brown stressed
some of the great feats the Agency made in 2004
that will be used again in future disasters. High-
lights in "Building on Success" include the pre-
positioning of disaster supplies which most
states used for the first time during the 2004 hur-
ricane season; the deployment of the National
Disaster Medical System which treated more
than 10,000 patients during the 2004 storms; and
disaster victims being able to apply for individ-
ual assistance from FEMA for the first time


through the FEMA \ebsite. These three ad-
vances in FEMA's programs along with the oth-
ers detailed in "Building on Success" demon-
strate the Agenc 's dedication to serving the
needs of disaster t victims \\ ith ongoing program
checks and performance reviews following
every major disaster.
Last year. FEMA responded to a record-set-
ting 27 total major declared disasters for hurri-
cane-related damage in 15 states, Puerto Rico
and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Florida was hit by
four:huiT1eCg wAw... ,$,re also declared
in Alabama. Delaware. Georgia. Louisiana. Mis-
sissippi, New Jersey, New York. North Carolina,
Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee,
Virginia and West Virginia due to damages from
'the storms.
For more information on hurricanes and
how to prepare your home for the upcoming hur-
ricane season, please visit: www.fema.gov/haz-
ards/hurricanes/hurinfo.shtm.
FEMA prepares the nation for all hazards
and manages federal response and recovery ef-
forts following any national incident. FEMA
also initiates mitigation activities, trains first
responders, works with state and local emer-
gency managers, and. manages the National
Flood Insurance Program and the U.S. Fire Ad-
ministration. FEMA became part of the U.S.
Department of Homeland Security on March 1,
2003.


JeiaRnc Jis Membrshi


Of Ameica AguAsoiaio


Jemia Ranch, Madison, is a new member
of the American Angus Association, reports
John Crouch, executive vice president of the
national breed registry organization in Saint
Joseph, Missouri.
The American Angus Association, with
more than 34,000 active adult and junior
members, is the largest beef cattle registry
Association in the world. Its computerized
records include detailed information on more
than 14 million registered Angus.


The Association records ancestral infor-
mation and keeps production records on indi-
vidual animals for its members. These per-
manent records help members select and
mate the best animals in their herds to pro-
duce high quality, 'efficient breeding cattle
which are then recorded with the American
Angus Association. Most of these registered
Angus are used by the U.S. farmers and
ranchers who raise high quality beef for U.S.
consumption.


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Nation's Leaders Take


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I,


'Ii


3z







2B The Madison Enterprise-Recordei


SCHOOL


Friday, May 20, 2005


Greenville Elementary Students



Lea About Cattle


By Rachel Kudelko
The students of Greenville Elementary got a "hands-on"
learning experience on Wednesday, May 11th. Jeff and Alacia
Cone and their three children, William, Amanda, and Allison,
brought five head of their beef cattle to give the students a bet-
ter understanding of the meat we eat. All of the classes except
for pre-K participated.


The children were instructed by Alacia and William on the
different breeds of beef cattle, cattle nutrition, the different
cuts of meat from beef cattle, and the different products that
are made from cattle. Amanda and Allison demonstrated how
the steers and heifers are shown in the ring.
After the informational session, the students were able to
feed the cattle. For a lot of the students, this was the first time


they had ever seen a cow up close. Many made comments
like, "Her tongue feels weird!"
The Cone children are all members of the 4-H Livestock
Club and their ability to share their knowledge and experi-
ences are invaluable to the community. When teaching others
in this classroom-type setting, the Cone's provide a communi-
ty service while learning public speaking and teaching skills.


MCCS Students Visit Wakulla Springs


On Tuesday, May 3, two Central School students visit-
classes of Madison County ed Wakulla Springs. The stu-


5'-

OS


Pictured left to right on the front row: Devon Jacobs, Derrick Gallon, Joshay Monlyn &
Ben Melvin (son of the teacher), back row left to right: Shankayia Williams, Montoya Paige,
Marissa Nuttall, David Scott, Wesley Ford, Troy Siplin, Johnny Morris & Harvey Spencer


Local School System Personnel

Attend NFCC Education Summit


School superintendents and
personnel from Hamilton, Jeffer-
son, Madison, Suwannee and
Taylor counties met at North
Florida Community College for a
district-wide Education Summit
on April 25. Madison County
School Superintendent Lou


Miller was among participants.
"I am so glad to see the Col-
lege's commitment to network-
ing the six counties together,"
said Miller. "It is a strong part-
nership that benefits everyone in-
volved."
According to NFCC Vice


President Doug Brown, the Edu-
cation Summit was an ideal
venue for discussion of issues
common to the K-12 and com-
munity college school systems
with the hope of strengthening
successful partnerships between
those institutions.
"I applaud the College for
hosting the summit," said Walter
Boatright, Suwannee County
School Superintendent. "It was
an opportunity for us as a district
to network, share some of our
, barriers and obstacles and pro-
vided a best practices sharing
session."
NFCC President Morris G.
Steen, Jr. welcomed participants
to the summit. NFCC grant con-
sultant Phillip Mantzanas and in-
structor Enid Mazzone gave a
presentation on the Educator
Preparation Institute while Vice
President Brown led discussions
on the K-12 and community col-
lege system.
"It was an excellent confer-
ence, well organized and very re-
ceptive," said Harry Pennington,
Hamilton County School Super-
intendent. "I appreciate the Col-
lege listening to our input."
The one-day summit is one
of many outreach efforts by
NFCC to help improve the edu-
cation system and build commu-
nity and personal partnerships
that will benefit students.
For more information, con-
tact NFCC Vice President Doug
Brown at (850) 973-1603 or
email VP@nfcc.edu.


MORE THAN 50 WAYS TO PREVENT DIABETES,


#15


Eat a small meal, Lucille


"Staying active has done a lot for me. Best of all, it was simple.
I started doing small things like using the stairs and taking walks
during my lunch break. When eating meals I began making healthy
food choices and controlling my portion sizes. Because diabetes runs
in my family, I know that it is important for me, to take control of
my health. Now I'm on a roll to preventing type 2 diabetes! I feel
like a new woman and I have more energy for my granddaughter.
That's my big reward!"

YOU ARE INVITED to participate in these FREE services if
you have diabetes or want to prevent diabetes:

Group Diabetes Classes
2 Saturday morning sessions on May 14, and 21, 2005
Call the Madison County Health Department to register:
973-5000, extension 112

Doers Club Diabetes Support Groups
*Monthly meetings
Call Madison County Health Department for more information
at 973-5000 extension 101

Individual Diabetes Counseling
Contact your doctor for a referral to the Madison County Health Department
* Call the Madison County Health Department for more information at 973-5000


ahoiit diabhteso nravention call 1-80fl-438-5383 and ask


for "More Than 50 Ways to Prevent Diabetes"

"Funding provided by the Florida Department of Health's
Diabetes Prevention and Control Program and the center
for Disease Prevention and Control."


big rewards
www.ndep.nih.gov


A moees fro hm the N~tielotml bete.EdeetledwPmegrw, peeeeed bythNatloeewt letter f lguib end the Cente fre orlleeContret ed Pmveentott


r






The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3B


Friday, May 20, 2005 CHOOL,


SCHOOL BOARD PRESENTS


CREATIVE WRITING AWARDS


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County School Board held its creative writing
awards ceremony on Tuesday, March 10, recognizing the finest
stories and writers in grades Kindergarten through eighth.
Jan McHargue coordinated and emceed the event. Lou
Miller, Madison County School Superintendent, presented the
trophies and the medals to each student.
Albert Bright was the overall winner for the Kindergarten
through second graders. Najee Manor, was the third through
fifth grade overall winner. Ana Carrasco was the sixth through
eighth grade overall winner.
In the Kindergarten division, Steven Walden took home the
gold medal for his story "My Tadpoles." Mariah Schrier won
the silver medal for her story, "The Girl and the Fox." Michael
Goley won the bronze medal for his story, "A Boy Named
Jack."
In the first grade division, Alexis Mendheim won the gold
medal for her story, "The Lonely Dolphin." ALI'lexica Scurry
won the silver medal for her story, "Best Friends." Corey
Brandies and Ni-Yah Hall each received bronze medals.
Brandies' medal was for his story, "At the Zoo," and Hall's was
.. ..a *..i. f ..* -


* 4".


9'

v..


Sharon Bontrager, bronze medalist; Dylan Hammock, bronze medalist; Kayla Pippin,
silver medalist; and Najee Manor, gold medalist; and Lou Miller are pictured left to right.
The students were winners in the fifth grade division of (he creative % riding contest. (Greene
Publishing. Inc. Photo b) Jacob Bembrn. NMa 10. 2005)


for the story, "My Dream."
Albert Bright took home the gold in the second grade divi-
sion for his story, "Fairy's World." Crystal Mack won the silver
medal for her story, "The Spotted Elephant." Cearra Williams
won a bronze medal for "A Child's Wish." Kylie Greenlee won
a bronze medal for "Mr. Golden Sun."
In the third grade division, Colby Panaro won a gold medal
for the story, "Turning Into a Goat." Gail Johnson won a silver
medal for her story, "The Vampire." Jacob Williams won a
bronze medal for his story, "Dragon's Nest." Raquel Johnson
was awarded a bronze medal for her story, "What If...The World
Was Chocolate."
Blaise Mendheim won the gold for the fourth grade division
for the story, "FW." Jacob Light won the silver medal for his
story, "Stinky Returns." Kynadi Edwards was awarded the
bronze medal for her story, "The Missing Yarn."
Najee Manor was the gold medal winner for the fifth grade
division for the story, "The Foster Child." Kayla Pippin was the
silver medal winner for her story, "Remembering." Dylan Ham-
mock earned a bronze medal for his story, "The Robot Genie of
Mars." Sharon Bontrager won a bronze medal for her story,
"Going Back to the Olden Days."


Chasmeque Rachel won
the gold medal for the sixth
grade division with her story,
"My Mom, Lakiecha Warren."
Aaron Pitts won the sliver
medal for his story, "Montana
Smith and the Sacred Cheese."
Magan Ward earned a bronze
medal for her story, "A Story-
book Romance."
Ana Carrasco took home
the gold in the seventh grade
division for her story, "The
Morbid Butteifly." Kira Poole
won the silver medal for her
story, "Jack and Sally." Cody
Belinski won the bronze
medal for his story, "Blake's
Life."
Brittany Collins' story
"Chance of a Lifetime" earned


her a gold medal in the eighth grade division. Caitlin Griffin
won the silver medal for her story, "Marvelous Madison." Terri
Roessler won the bronze medal for her story, "The Accident."


School Superintendent Lou Miller is pictured with
Steven Walden, left, who won the gold medal, and Mariah
Schrier, right, who won the silver medal in the kindergarten
creative writing division. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Jacob Bembry, May 10,2005)


Ana Carrasco was the 61h-81h grade district winner of
the creative writing contest. She is pictured with School Su-
perintendent Lou Miller. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Jacob Bembry, May 10, 2005)

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Classes start August 5
10 Month program. Financial Aide Available.
Call Student Services To Register,
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TECHNICAL CENTER


Albert Bright won the district creative writing contest
for K-2nd Grade. He is pictured with School Superintendent
Lou Miller. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry,
May 10, 2005)


Lou Miller is pictured with the third grade creative writ-
ing contest winners. Pictured, left to right, are Jacob
Williams, bronze medalist, Raquel Johnson, bronze medalist
and Gail Johnson, silver medalist. (Greene Publishing, Inc.
Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 10, 2005)


CDA Equivalency Renewal Class
45 clock hours Make & Take Workshop
May 23 June 16
Mon.-Thurs. 5:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m.
Includes all Curriculum


415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32064


Terri Roessler, bronze medalist; Caitlin Griffin, silver medalist; Brittany Collins, gold medal-
ist; and Lou Miller are pictured left to right. The eighth grade students were honored in the dis-
trict creative writing contest. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 10, 2005)


Najee Manor was the district creative writing contest
winner for 3rd-5th grade. She is pictured with School Su-
perintendent Lou Miller. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Jacob Bembry, May 10, 2005)
/


Lou Miller is pictured with Ni-Yah Hall, bronze medal-
ist, ALI'lexica Scurry, silver medalist, and Corey Brandies,
another bronze medalist, (pictured left to right) in the first
grade creative writing divi-


sion. (Greene Publishing, Inc.
Photo by Jacob Bembry,
May 10, 2005)


FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING
BENEFITS. ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC. 167126DH-F







4B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


SCHOOL


Friday, May 20, 2005


wFArHt 2th*'AInn~rml Bancrr*L'Th


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The Madison County Chapter of National Future Farmers of
America (FFA) held its 25th Annual Awards Banquet on Monday
evening, May 9, at 7 p.m., at Madison County High School.
The 2004-2005 Chapter officers opened the program with
officer introductions. Will Sapp served as this year's president.
Justin Wesson served as vice-president. Richie Sowell was the
treasurer. David Agner was the treasurer. Heather Chamblin was
the sentinel. Jacqueline Ratliff was the reporter. Bryan Phillips
was the chaplain. Cody Holden was the parliamentarian.
Jordan Wesson welcomed everyone to the ceremony before
Bryan Phillips gave the invocation. The meal was prepared by
the MCHS Lunchroom Staff and served by the MCHS Family
Consumer & Career Leaders of America (FCCLA). It featured
tossed salad, farm-raised channel catfish, grits, hush puppies,


peach cobbler and iced tea.
Will Sapp introduced special guests and Heather Chamblin
recognized special supporters of FFA.
Will presented his father, Ed, the FFA sponsor, and his moth-
er, Gina, with a gift certificate to the Texas Steakhouse on behalf
of the FFA students.
Tori Lyons, from Lafayette FFA, was the keynote speaker.
She gave a speech about success and what it really means to suc-
ceed. She is the Area II State Secretary for FFA.
Justin Wesson came up and introduced the winners of the
Star Greenhand, Chapter Farmer, and Star Agribusinessman
Awards. Principal Ben Killingsworth presented each award.
Jordan Wesson received the Star Greenhand award. Will
Sapp received the Star Chapter Farmer Award. Ashley Norwood
received the Star Agribusinessman Award.
Jeff and Mina Bloodworth presented a $500 scholarship


award to Will Sapp.
The chapter officers gave out the Chapter Awards.
Ed Sapp, FFA sponsor, presented the DeKalb Award on be-
half of Eddie Curl, manager of Farmer's Cooperative, who
couldn't attend for health reasons. Will Sapp was the recipient of
this year's award.
Justin Wesson received this year's Farm Bureau Leadership
Award, which was presented by Jeffrey Hamrick.
School Board Member Bart Alford and MCHS Principal
Ben Killingsworth were honored with the Honorary Chapter
Farmer Degree.
Killingsworth, School Superintendent Lou Miller and Ed:
Sapp all made closing remarks about the FFA program and its-
students.
This year's officers, before the closing ceremony, installed
new officers for the 2005-2006 school year.


The new FFA officers for 2005-2006 are pictured. Back row, left to right: Max Bailey, Parliamentarian; Ashley Norwood, Sentinel; Norabeth Agner, Treasurer; Cody Holden, Re-
porter; and Justin Wesson, President. Front row, left to right: Heather Chamblin, Chaplain; Melissa Bass, Secretary; and Savannah Burns, Vice-President. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Pho-
to by Jacob Bembry, May 9, 2005)


Jeff and Mina Bloodworth present the $500 scholarship that they donate each year to
the FFA to Will Sapp. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 9, 2005)


Ashley Norwood, left, receives the FFA Chapter Profiency Award from Ed Sapp, FFA
sponsor, right. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 9, 2005)


Jeffrey Hamrick, left, presented the Farm Bureau's Leadership Award to Justin Wesson,.
right. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 9,,2005)
*.I


MCHS Principal Ben Killingsworth, left, presents the Star Greenhand Award to Jordan
Wesson, right. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 9, 2005)






SCHOOL


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5B


w !T3T*h4gP7n F77T1TFNcfijliII4


Will Sapp, left, presented a gift certificate to his parents, Gina, center, and Ed, right. Ed
is the FFA sponsor. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 9, 2005)


Farm Judging awards were given to Ashley Collis, Jordan Wesson, Heather Olson and Paul
Webb, pictured left to right. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 9, 2005)


Ashley Collis, Melissa Bass and Megan Jackson, pictured left to right, were given awards
for the Horse Judging team. Ed Sapp pictured at the end presented the awards. Samantha
Hall is not pictured. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 9, 2005)


Kilt Hunter, left, and Will Sapp, right, received the Ag. Nlechanics Team awards. iGreene
Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 9, 2005 1


Beef Showmanship award winners are pictured left to right: Melissa Bass, Ashley Norwood, Charlie Brooks, Kitt Hunter and Matt Brooks. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob
Bembry, May 9, 2005)
- I -. ... -- ... ..r .ra w a, ,,r r a ea S .. .. . ., X-0


. '. -I-'- : "

Will Sapp, left, receives the Dekalb Award. Ed Sapp, FFA sponsor, presents the award
on behalf of Eddie Curl, manager at Farmer's Co-op in Madison, who was unable to attend
due to illness. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 9, 2005)


Norabeth Agner, left, receives a $10 check for her calf-scrambling efforts at the North
Florida Livestock Show and Sale. Ed Sapp, FFA sponsor, presents the check. (Greene Pub-
lishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 9, 2005)


Michelle Morgan; left, is pictured with Ed Sapp, right. Morgan was the third place raf-
fle ticket seller for the MCHS FFA Chapter at the North Florida Livestock Show and Sale.
(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 9, 2005).


Ashley Norwood, left, receives the Star Agribusinessman Award from MCHS Principal
Ben Killingsworth, right. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 9, 2005)


Friday, May 20, 2005







SPORTS Friday, May 20, 2005


Auciia Christian Academy




Hands Out Athletc Awards


By Mike ...l.n
Gr me Fu.N!';i;,,:. Inc.
It was awards time last
S1)Wi,, .1 M1.I, 14. forAucil-
la 'lin ,ai.in Academy.
The annual sports ban-
q,,i was held fli.ii evening
with coaches, players,
.c ..t... and parents -.iilic lcd
The event was held at the
First Mui1thlis, Church in
NMii..eid, ibilh about 300
i:.,'1k present,
After a welcome by
Principal Richard Finlayson,
and ,liimit, ili- presentation
of awards l'.uiii
The Academic 'Athlete
Awards went to Amanda
S.ipp and Daniel Roccanti.
In football, the Out-
.-;t.idling IlflLcn i c Ba-'l: and
MVP Awards went to Casey
Gunnels, The Offensive Line


Award was won by Colby
Roberts and Ben Gratham
won Top Defensive Line-
man. The Defensive Back
Award went to Jason Holton
with Daniel Roccanti win-
ning the Coaches Award.
All-State plaques went to
Drew Sherrod and David
Boyd.
JV football awards, were
MVP, Kyle Barnwell and
0.-.,'. e A,, aid. Daniel
Greene.
In weightlifting, the
MI\ P was C cb;. Roberts.
The Cross Country
Awards were: MVP, Olivia
S".ne,-ne... Mo:, Impro c-d.I
Abby Hunt, and Coachs
Award, Rikki Roccanti.
In anr:;. -et'-lI. the
MVP Award went to Drew
Sherrod, Offense Award,


Ridgely Plaines, Defense,
Jeremy Tuckey, and Most
Improved, Daniel Roccanti.
In JV basketball, the
MVP Award went to Kyle
Peters and Most Improved to
Wade Scarberry. The 7th and
8th grade basketball MVP
was Matt Bishop.
In Varsity cheerleading,
the MVP was Fran Walker,
Most Spirited, Ramsey Rev-
ell, and Most improved,
Courtney Kinsey. In JV
cheerleading, the MVP was
Savannah Williams and most
Spirited was Dana Jane
Watt.
In girls varsity basket-
ball, Fran Walker was MVP,
Defense Award went to
Amanda Sapp. Hustle, Abby
Hunt, Sportsmanship, Corie
Smith, Most Improved, Rik-


ki Roccanti. In girls JV bas-
ketball, Mallory Plaines was
MVP and Bethany Saunders
won Offensive Award.
In tennis, the MVP for
girls was Amanda Sapp,
Most Improved, Rebekah
Aman, Best Match Record,
Kaitin Jackson.,
In golf, the MVP was
John Stephens.
In varsity softball, the
MVP Award went to Kayla
Gebhard. The JV softball
awardswere MVP, Paige
Thurman, and Coaches, Nik-
ki Kisamore.
The ACA Athlete of the
Year Awards went to Amada
Sapp and Kayla Gebhard and
Drew Sherrod.
Varsity baseball awards
were not presented since the
team's season is still going,
on. In JV baseball, the MVP
.Award went to Matt Bishop,
uhile the Pitchiin Ace \"%%i
Stephen Doll.ir.


Academic Awards are presented to Amanda Sapp and
Daniel Roccanli. iGreene Publishing, Inc. Pholo 1)3 Lisa
Greene, Ma\ 14. 2005)


IJuniar 'arnitv dlche.rladers receive ai yards. From left, Kalyn Owens, Savanna Williams,
Casefy Joiner. Erin K'elly, Dana Jane Watt, and Kaitlin Lavin. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Pho-
to by Lisa Greene, May 14, 2005)


isr n ar~it i(.otbilal ph~, ers'. re pkitured w ith awards. Back row, Elliot Lewis, Casey
AndomK 1.yie ~.ar-ia,;-e.i. Rhfb. Searey, and Luke Wittmer. MAiddle row, Brent Jones, Matt'
Bm 'fapWp.- G wree, WiHDartlsield Michael Kinse. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by
L if Caer ,M',, 14, 2Wi3-f


The junior varsity basketball team was honored at the banquet. The players are, front
row, A. J. Conell, Daniel Greene, Kyle Barnwell, and Michael Kinsey. Middle row, Kyle Pe-
ters, Elliot Lewis, Wade Scarberry, Rob Searcy. Back, Hunter Greene. (Greene Publishing,
Inc. Photo by Lisa Greene, May 14, 2005)


Varsity cheerleaders received awards. Shown are Jenny Tuten, Taylor Rykard, Amanda
Hunt. Joanna Cobb. Brittany Hobbs, Suzanne Walker, Melissa Kinsey, Fran Walker, Ram-
se) Revell. iGreene Publishing. Inc. Pholo b3 Lisa Greene, MaN 14. 2005)


The seventh and eighth grade basketball players are recognized. Front row, Luke Wit-
mer Middle row, Casey Anderson, Joe Mizel, Matt Bishop. Back, Stephen Dollar. (Greene
Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lisa Greene, May 14, 2005)


The JV girls' basketball team is shown. Front row, Michaela Roccanti, Jody Bradford,
Nicile Mathis. Back row, Bethany Saunders, Mallory Plaines, Hannah Sorensen, Courtney
Brasiiigloii, Savanna Williams, Stephanie Dobson. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lisa
Greene, May 14, 2005)


I.'


6B ,niv






SPORTS


Friday, May 20, 2005


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7B


Aucilia Chris tan Academy



OHands Out Athtete Awards


Boys' "arsity basketball players were honored. Front row. Jeremr Tuchey. Stephen Grif-
fin, Kyle Day. Middle row, Daniel Roccanti, Kyle Peters, Ridgely Plains. Back, Drew Sher-
rod. (Greene Publishing. Inc. Photo by Lisa Greene. May 14. 20051


Girls' %arsity basketball players received awards. Front ro". Fran Walker, Amanda
Sapp. Brittan) Hobbs. Caillin Nlurph3. and Bethan. Saunders. Back row from left to right,
Lisa Bailey, Rikki Roccanti, Abby Hunt. and Lindsey Day. (Greene Publishing. Inc. Photo by
Lisa Greene, IMa 14, 2005)

.. "

.4,-,. .A P, .%
,' .,:i.= : >- ,:W i!
};"t t':.',,,.,, : W .. -


'Am 'I"P''M Li" ;I,
The tennis team was honored Saturday night. Front row. Ridkk Roccanti, Nlicheala Roc-
The girls' cross country team received their certificates at Saturday's banquet. (Greene canti, Nicole Mathis, and Savannah Sorensen, Back row, Olivia Sorensen. Abby Hunt. Elizabeth
Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lisa Greene, May 13, 2005) .Shirley, and Tristen Sorensen. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lisa Greene, May 14, 2005)


The junior varsity softball squad was honored at the dinner. (Greene Publishing, Inc.
Photo by Lisa Greene, May 14,. 2005)


Girls' varsity softball players were recognized. Front row, Amanda Sapp, Rebecca
Aman, Alfa Hunt, Ramsey Revell, and Dana Jane Watt. Back row, Elizabeth Shirley, and
Kaitlin Jackson. (Greene Publishing. Inc. Photo b3 Lisa Greene, May 14. 2005)


Bo)ys' arsitl baseball players were honored. The team set a school record for victories.
Front row, Jeremy Tuchey, Stephen Griffin, and Kyle Day. Middle row, Daniel Roccanti,
Kyle Peters, and Ridgely Plains. Back, Drew Sherrod. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Lisa
Greene, May 14, 2005)


Colby Roberts won the
w weightlifting award. (Greene
Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Lisa Greene, May 14, 2005)


Athlete of the Year Awards went to Drew Sherrod, Kay-
la Gebhard, and Amanda Sapp. (Greene Publishing, Inc.
Photo by Lisa Greene, May 14, 2005)








8B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


REGIONAL NEWS


Friday, May 20, 2005


Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens proudly
announces they are the host site for the Jack-
sonville Regional Chamber of Commerce
"Business After Hours," Wednesday, May 25,
from 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm. Business After Hours
is an open format two-hour networking social
to help businesses leaders connect with other
businesses and business leaders.
Jacksonville Mayor John Peyton is the
guest speaker; the Mayor is scheduled to speak
at 6:00 p.m. Other business leaders speaking
include: Dennis Pate,. Jacksonville Zoo and
Gardens executive director; John Hayt, the
Zoo's chairman of the board of Directors; and
Ed Burr, president and CEO of LandMar
Group, and Chairman-Elect of the Jacksonville
Chamber of Commerce.
The Zoo's Business Partner Membership
will also be featured. A company can join the
Zoo as part of this new program and receive
great benefits and at the same time, be a part of
a wonderful community resource. A permanent
recognition sign at the Zoo will be unveiled at
the event.
Guests will be able to experience the
Zoo's newest exhibits Giraffe Overlook and
Savanna Blooms Garden. At Giraffe Over-
look, guests will have the opportunity to hand-
feed the world's tallest mammal from the ele-


vated viewing platform. Also, new at the Loo
and on exhibit is a baby giraffe born on March
26.
Admission to Business After Hours at the
Zoo is $5.00 per person. At the event, guests
can also enter to win a Behind the Scenes Tour,
ride the new Wildlife Carousel and tour The
Range of the Jaguar.
For more information about "Business af-
ter Hours," contact Anna Chapman at the Jack-
sonville Regional Chamber of Commerce
(904)366-6684 or Linda Crofton at the Jack-
sonville Zoo(904)757-4463 ext. 134.
For 90 years, the Jacksonville Zoo and
Gardens has been dedicated to inspiring the
discovery and appreciation of wildlife through
innovative experience in a caring environment.
Starting in 1914 with an animal collection that
consisted of one red deer fawn, the Jacksonville
Zoo and Gardens has grown to house more than
2,000 rare and exotic animals and over 1,000
unique plant species. The Zoo. is a non-profit
organization and is an accredited member of
the American Zoo and Aquarium Association
(AZA). Located on Jacksonville's Northside at
370 Zoo Parkway, ? mile east from 1-95. The
Zoo is open year-round, 7 days a week, 9 a.m.
- 5 p.m. For more information on the Zoo, log
on to www.jacksonvillezoo.org;


Over 3,000 people attended the "Quincyfest
presents Blues and Barbecue" held last Saturday on
the courthouse square in Quincy. The crowd en-
joyed the blues music of the Charles Atkins Trio
and of Johnnie Marshall and the Blues Boys, while
barbecue competitors vied for the top prizes of the
barbecue cook-off. Meanwhile, the kids were
treated to a variety of art activities at the Gadsden
Art Center. "The people really seemed to enjoy
themselves," said Arleen Houston, an employee
with the City of Quincy and one of the festival or-
ganizers.
Those walking away with trophies and
cash prizes of $500 for first place, $200 for second,
and $100 for third were:
Pork


1st Place:


2nd Place:
lowship


Team Name: Cripple Dog
Chief Chef: Clay VanLandingham
Location: Quincy, Florida
Team Name:. Agape Christian Fel-


Chief Chef: Reginald Washington
Location: Quincy, Florida
3rd Place: Team Name: Blakes B-B-Que


mincyfest 2005

3BQ Winners


Chiet Chet: Phillip Blake
Location: Tallahassee, Florida
Ribs
1st Place: Team Name: Blakes B-B-Que
Chief Chef: Phillip Blake
Location: Tallahassee, Florida


2nd Place:
lowship


3rd Place:



1st Place:
lowship


Team Name: Agape Christian Fel-

Chief Chef: Reginald Washington
Location: Quincy, Florida.
Team Name: Jack's BBQ
Chief Chef: Willie Thompkins
Location: Tallahassee, Florida
Chicken
Team Name: Agape Christian Fel-


Chief Chef: Reginald Washington
Location: Quincy, Florida

2nd Place: Team Name: Cripple Dog
Chief Chef: Clay VanLandingham
Location: Quincy, Florida
3rd Place: Team Name: Jack's BBQ,
Chief Chef: Willie Thompkins
Location: Tallahassee, Florida


FLORIDIANS To RECEIVE


PROPERTY TAX REFUND CHECKS


-Law signed by Governor gives rebate to
those displaced for more than 60 days-

Thanks to legislation Governor Jeb Bush
signed into law last December, more than
19,000 Floridians will receive hurricane relief
payments totaling $9.5 million over the next
several days. The checks are property tax re-
funds given to those who were' forced out of
their homes for 60 days or more as a result of
a .named tropical .storm in 2004. The first
cleclks were mailed out yesterday and \\ill
continue through this week. .Flonda Depart-,
ment of Revenue Director Jim Zingale told
the Governor and Cabinet today, the average


refund is about $500.
"While last year's hurricane season dev-
astated our state it united us as Floridians,"
said Governor Bush. "Those whose homes
were uninhabitable because of the storms
should not be expected to pay a tax on proper-
ty they can't use. I hope these payments help
defray some of the costs incurred by Floridi-
ans during their recovery from the historic
2004 hurricane season."
The relief payments will help offset prop-
erty taxes paid by Floridians who were unable
to occupy their home for 60 da} s .or longer be-
cause of a named storm in 200-1. To be eligi-
ble for the relief, Floridians were required to


have had a homestead exemption in effect onw
their home in 2004 and to have applied on or
before March 1, 2005, for relief to their coun-
ty property appraiser, under legislation .adopt-.
ed in December 2004 by the Florida Legisla-
ture.
Relief payments will go out in batches of
about 3,000 to 4,000 per day during the week
of May 16-20. All relief payments will have
been mailed by the end of the week and
should arrive in the mailboxes of relief recip-
ients 3 to 4 days after mailing., The paN ments
Se, being .mailed, out approximately three,
weeks earlier than initially estimated. Later
this summer, another group of Floridians will


receive hurricane relief payments repaying
them for' sales tax paid on mobile homes'
bought to replace mobile homes that were.
damaged or destroyed in a named storm in,.
2004. 'Applications for mobile home relief
were due by May 1, 2005. Florida property
appraisers currently are reviewing applica-
tions for this additional form of relief.
Floridians \\ho applied for hurricane re-
lief on homestead property may verify the sta-
tus of their relief payment by going to the
Florida Department of Revenue iDOR) inter-
pet, .Ite at ~.I l m\florida com'dor
. Look for
"Hurricane Relief" on the DOR homepage.


IL QI






Friday, May 20, 2005 The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9B


iin


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0%
Financing
WAC
Come on
new car,


,,, a6 F250'S


42 CROWN VIC


~Ik "26i)092T


ESCAPE FREES AR. ...-


C-: MUSTANG $141


2001 Ford Escape
XLT, V/6, Auto, 4x4
stk. #250074D


2001 Ford Taurus 2002 Ford Taurus 2002 Ford Taurus RE0A ,,
SES, V/6, Leather CD, Alloy Wheels SEL, Wagon, Leather, CD, Alloy Wheels Low Miles
sU, #P465 sr* NP460 s# fr250023A -
-ik 'OW RATE
g'1'r~rf^j^^ i ^I^^^B*.. *N


2002 Chevrolet Tahoe
LS, 4x4, Loaded
stk. #250029A


2002 Ford Expediltion
Eddie Bauer, Leather
stk. #250121A
viISO1


1991 Lincoln
Towncar
'stk. #250117B
P P,


2003 Ford Windstar
V/6, Dual Sliding Doors, AC,
Entertainment System
stk. #P463
iNi


2001 Ford Ranger
SuperCab, Auto, V/6, Bed Liner
stk. #P462


2002 Mazda
V/6, Auto, Cab Plus, 4x4
stk. #P458A


2003 Chevrolet
Silverado
V/8, Auto stk. #250061B
U I


2002 Ford F150
XLT, SuperCab
stk. #250039A
UMt iH3


2003 Ford F150
XLT, SuperCab, V/8, Auto
stk. #P454A
ITI


2002 Ford F150
XLT, SuperCab, V/8, Auto
stk. #P453
kiPAA


2001 Ford
F350.
Crew Cab, Auto,
7.3 Diesel
stk. #P457


2002 Ford
F150
Lariat, FX4, Crew
Cab, 5.4, V/8
stk. #P464
LLk '


2003 Ford
F150
Super Crew, FX4,
Lariat
stk. #P452

2000
Chevrolet
Blazer
Auto, A/C
stk. #250038B
gIB'


2004 Ford
F150
Lariat, Crew Cab,
Leather, FX4
stk. #P449 ,
smm


2002 Ford
F250
Lariat, Crew Cab,
Diesel
stk. #P456
it H3:


2001 Ford
F250
XL, Reg. Cab,
Super Duty
stk. #P451A

2001 Ford
F350
XLT, Dually, Crew Cab,
Hard Cover & Pull-out Bed
stk. #P457
FnjiMI


in to your local truck center her in Perry for the best deal you will ever get on a
truck or 9UV! You get the rebates, big discounts and tell us how much we can
make over factory invoice. I

YOU MAKE YOUR


TIGERS $ 50 OW N PRICE! F150'S A


FORD 500'S $1500


The Madison Enterpise-Recorder 9B


ffiday, May 20, 2005







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May 20,1955 Edition
Madison To Revive Jaycees
Following the lead of 100 other progressive Florida communities,
Madison is looking to the Jaycees to develop the young leadership it
needs to insure healthy community development and improvement.

May 21, 1965 Edition
New Student Officers Elected
New Student Council officers were elected Thursday at Madison
High School. The new officers are: President, Ray Williams; Vice Pres-
ident, Jimmy Cherry; Treasurer, Bill Brown; Historian, Peggy Clark;
Rec. Secretary, Dana French; and Cor. Secretary, Geraldine Almand.

May 23, 1975 Edition
Students Go To Track
The 4th graders at Lee Jr. High School were invited to the O.K.
Duke Racing Kennels, Thursday, May 15th. The entire group went to
the racetrack, and then to the farm to see the puppies and racing dogs,
as well as the training rabbits.

May 24,1985 Edition
Jail Break
Joseph Valverde IlI and Thomas Geers, whose legal moves to sup-
press evidence against them were recently unsuccessful, took matters
into their own hands sometime between 9:30 Wednesday night and
7:30 Thursday morning, walked out of their cell, pushed out a wire
mesh screen, dropped to the ground, scaled the outer perimeter fence,
and crawled into a waiting automobile near Madison House and de-
parted.


But ot



ForIgtten?
By McKinsey






In 1972, singer Loretta Lynn of Butcher
Hollow, Kentucky, was the first
woman to be named Country Music
Entertainer of the Year.


In 1963, Valentina Tereshkova became -
the first woman in space. ,


In 1904, iced tea was invented at the
St. Louis World's Fair. In 1914, Thotnas Edison said the real danger
of cigarettes was their paper wrapper. He
said the burning paper emitted a chemical
that damaged brain cells. Edison refused
to employ smokers.


Friday, May 20, 2005


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U.K. Blasts U.S. On Iraq Charges
British lawmaker George Galloway vehemently rejected a
U.S. Senate subcommittee's claim that Saddam Hussein award-
ed him lucrative allocations under the UN oil-for-food program
and accused its chairman of maligning his good name.
The subcommittee, chaired by Minnesota Republican Norm
Coleman, claimed that Galloway allegedly funneled allocations
through a fund he established in 1998 to help a 4-year-old Iraqi
girl suffering from leukemia and received allocations worth 20
million barrels from 2000 to 2003.
"I am not now nor have I ever been an oil trader and neither
has anyone on my behalf," Galloway testified Tuesday. "I was an
opponent of Saddam Hussein when British and American gov-
ernments and businessmen were selling him guns and gas."
Coleman later questioned Galloway's testimony. "If in fact
he lied to this committee, there will have to be consequences,"
Coleman said at a news conference after the hearing.
Asked whether Galloway violated his oath to tell the truth
before the committee, Coleman said: "I don't know. We'll have
to look over the record. I just don't think he was a credible wit-
ness."
The daylong hearing was reviewing three major reports from
the subcommittee of the Committee on Homeland Security and
Government Affairs, which studied in great detail how Saddam
made billions in illegal oil sales despite UN sanctions imposed in
1991 after Iraq's invasion of Kuwait.
Coleman said Galloway and others, who received oil alloca-
tions, including prominent Russian politician Vladimir Zhiri-
novsky, then paid kickbacks to Saddam as part of the deal. He
claimed that Saddam received more than $300,000 in surcharges
on 'allocations involving Galloway.
"Senior Hussein regime officials informed the subcommittee
that the allocation holders in this case, Galloway were ulti-
mately responsible for the surcharge payment and therefore
would have known of the illegal, under-the-table payment," he
said.
Galloway rejected that and accused Coleman of never hav-
ing contacted him about the charges. He also defended his oppo-
sition to the UN sanctions and the U.S.-led Iraq war.
"I gave my heart and soul to stop you from committing
the disaster that you did commit in invading Iraq," Galloway
said. "And I told the world that the case for war was a pack of
lies."
Before the hearing, Galloway told reporters that the sub-


committee's investigation was intended to take attention away
from failed U.S. efforts in Iraq. "It's the mother of all smoke-
screens," he said.
Statin Drugs May Reduce Breast,
Prostate and Lung Cancer
Evidence continues to mount that cholesterol-lowering
drugs called Statins can reduce the risk of a variety of cancers.
New research shows that the popular Statin drugs may slash a
person's chance of developing breast, prostate, and lung tumors
in half.
Three new studies show that "Statins prevent healthy cells
from transforming into cancerous cells," says researcher Ruby
Kochhar, MD, a medical oncologist at the Naval Medical Center
in Portsmouth, Va. "There was a protective effect in every type
of cancer studied."
The new studies were presented at the annual meeting of the
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).
Statins are one of the most widely prescribed drugs used in
the U.S. to treat high cholesterol. They include medications such
as Lescol, Lipitor, Mevacor, Pravachol, and Zocor and work by
blocking the body's ability to produce cholesterol.
In the studies presented, researchers collected health infor-
mation on more than 1.4 million men and women from the Vet-
erans Administration. The' studies all took into account risk fac-
tors for the type of cancer being studied, including age, smoking,
and alcohol use.
For the breast cancer analysis, they compared Statin use
among 556 female veterans diagnosed with breast cancer and
39,865 women of similar ages without the disease.
They show that Statin use was associated with half the risk
of breast cancer. -
During a six-year period, women who used Statins reduced
their risk of breast cancer by more than half (51 percent) com-
pared with nonusers, says researcher Vikas Khurana, MD, assis-
tant professor of medicine at Louisiana State University Health
Sciences Center in Shreveport.
A second analysis shows a reduction in the risk of lung can-
cer. Statin users were 48 percent less likely to develop lung can-
cer than nonusers, Khuranatells WebMD. This studN included
nearly 450,000 people, 10 percent of whom were women.
A third analysis shows that Statin use reduces the rate- of
prostate cancer by 54 percent, says researcher Rakesh Singal,
MD, associate professor of medicine at the University of Miami.
The longer the men took the cholesterol-lowering drugs, the


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11B


greater the benefit, he tells WebMD.
Men who took them for a year or less had almost no protec-
tion, while those who took them for more than four years saw
their risk of prostate cancer drop by nearly 90 percent.
The researchers did not look at whether the type or dose of
Statins affected the results, although they plan to do so in future
studies. Also, the information about Statins is based on prescrip-
tion records, Signal says,, so it's not possible to say whether the
men who were prescribed the drugs actually took them properly.

Solar and Wind Energy Potential
Provide Alternative Power
Integrated strategies unleashes thousands of megawatts of
new renewable energy potential in Africa, Asia, South and Cen-
tral America, and have been discovered by a pioneering project
to map the solar and wind resource of 13 developing countries.'
The multi-million dollar project, called the Solar and Wind En-
ergy Resource Assessment (SWERA), is proving that the poten-
tial for deploying solar panels and wind turbines in these coun-
tries is far greater than previously supposed.
"In developing countries all over the world we have re-
moved some of the uncertainty about the size and intensity of the
solar and wind resource," said Klaus Toepfer, UNEP's Executive
Director. "These countries need greatly expanded energy ser-
vices to help in the fight against poverty and to power sustain-
able development. SWERA offers them the technical and policy
assistance to capture the potential, that renewable energy can.of-
fer," he said.
Since its beginning in 2001 and with substantial support from the
Global Environment FacilitNy (GEF), the US$9.3 million
SWERA project (http://swera.unep.net) has been developing a
range of new information tools to stimulate renewable energy de-
velopment, including detailed maps of wind and solar resources.
"As energy planners seek cleaner energy solutions using re-
newable energy technologies, the availability of reliable, accu-
rate, and accessible solar and wind energy information is critical
and can significantly accelerate the deployment of these tech-
nologies," says Toepfer.
Toepfer'cited the case of California, here the a\ ailabilitr of
good wind data greatly accelerated the development of wind-
farms and a global wind industry. Likewise, he says, SWERA's
aim is to support informed decision-making, develop energy pol-
icy based on science and technology, and increase investor con-
fidence in renewable energy, projects.


Of Your World




Do you know what happened in your community

last week? The Madison County Carrier &

The Enterprise-Recorder help keep you informed

about the happenings in your world.


~kc t~ridsi~rn


Chosen one of Florida's Three Outstanding Newspapers


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--- -- ---am m ---,

, NEW RENEW


IName

IAddress
I I ,,


ICity/State/Zip

IPhone#


SMailTo: Greee Publishing, Inc,, P.O Drawr 772, Madison, FL 32341

I or bring by the EnterpriseRecorder office,
L ----mm-- --- I


Friday, May 20, 2005


NATION & WORLD NEWS


I ii "^K'!.-,






Friday, May


12B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Everybody's talking about what's in the classified.


Security Systems
Lifetime Warranty
Monitored 24 hours. Burglar and
Fire. Hardwire or wireless mo-
tion detectors. door contacts,
glass break detectors, heat and
smoke detectors, panic buttons,
and many brand new and innov-
ative ideas offered only by this
company. BEST PRICES!!
William Greene-Security Con-
sultant 973-6131


Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Irrigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
(850) 973-2848

Excavating Work
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Re-
moval, Demolition, and Roads. No
Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call
Paul Kinsley at 850-973-6326






25%



Off

On new "For Sale" or
"Yard Sale" Ads.
Now a $10 ad only costs
you $7.50!
So get your sale items to-
gether and give us a call to
advertise.
850-973-4141
This offer is good until:
May 27, 2005.




Black/lab npu--




85C --,82.
Young Orange Tabby
This truely sweet cat got lost or
dumped on my dirt road. He needs
a home. He has developed a great
personality and loves to eat. Please
call evenings before 8pm. if you are
interested. PLEASE NO CALLS
FROM CHILDREN. 948-5097




197"'

. ,. ave
tt. ..y and all bids.
Ci -11y Greene 850-973-4141

2001 Honda ATV
Fourtrax 300, new tires, excel-
lant condition $2300'.
850-973-2301


1965 Plymouth Fury
Good Condition!
$1,500 CASH. 383 Engine. This
car is driven everyday. First person
withothe cash gets it. 850-673-1837



5 PC BEDROOM SET New in
boxes. Headboard, frame, dresser,
mirror, nightstand. $475.
850-425-8374
New Bedroom: 7 piece sleigh bed
set, $775. In storage, unopened
boxes, can deliver. 850-222-2113
QUEEN PILLOW TOP matress
set. New in plastic with warranty,
Sacrifice $175. 850-222-9879
BED $275, Solid wood cherry
sleigh bed. New, still boxed.
850-222-2113

251bs. of
Clean Bundled
Newspapers
$2. each.
850-973-4141

Matress Set, NEW King Pillow Top
Matress and Base in sealed plastic,
factory warranty, $275.
850-545-7112 :
Brand new Micro Fiber Sofa.
Hardwood frame, lifetime warran-
ty. Must sell, $275. 850-425-8374




Sitter
Homes Livestock -
Dogs Cats Parrots
Keep your animals in their own
environment. I'll come and feed,
water and play with your pets.
No more worry, about kennel
cough or the stress of being
away from home. Farm owner
ith 30 years ,,.peneric "..thh
livestock, cats, dogs and Parrots.
Home Visit and Care
$10. daily
Services Available:
Bring in your mail Turn
lights on/off Check air/heat,
doors, locks, windows. check
property, gates, fences. give
feed/hay. custom services
negotiable.
References gladly given.
Call Susan at 850- 948-5097
evenings before 9 pm

Rabbits For Sale
850-948-6733


Registered
Chesapeake Bay Retriever
puppies, ready to go. 4 males and 6
females. Call Tanya at 971-5362




Qouthiem Villas of

C adison apartments

HUD vouchers accepted. 1,2, & 3
BR, HC & non-HC accessible apts.
Call 850-973-8582/ TDDTTY 711.
200 Southern Villas Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
Martin House
Downtown Madison
1 Large efficiency $275.
1 Large 2 bedroom $450.
Heat & Air, mature responsible
adults. No children and No pets.
Call 850-578-2781


reenvile Pointe

Apartments

1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC
accessible apts. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-3036..
TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW
Greenville Pointe Trail,
Greenville, FL 32331.
Equal Housing Opportunity!

Trailer for Rent
2 bedroom, Mobile Home.
Gibson Trailer Park, lot 17
Day phone: 973-4506
Night phone: 973-6596


Cambridge Manor
Apartments for Senior's and
Disabled. 1 & 2 bedrooms, HUD
vouchers accepted Call 850-973-
1786 TTY Acs 711 Equal Hous
ing Opportunity

Home For Lease
Lake Front
2 bedroom, 2 bath home, conve-
nient to town, tish from backyard
or launch boat' from ramp. $1-1'0imo
+-.$700dep.-> One )ear. lea.'e. No,
pets. 850-973-3025




5 Wooded Acres
On Nixon Way. Ready for your
house and horses!
Partial Fencing. $49,500.
Call Jan today at 386-364-8407.
Poole Realty.


Commercial Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage-23
acres. Comer lots. Front both
Harvey Greene Drive and HWY
53 South. Natural gas line, 8
inch water main, access to the
city. utilities, fire hydrant, and
service from two power compa-
nies. Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14. Will
build to suit tenant.
Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141


Pioneer Excavating
& Tractor Services
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump
Removal, Demolition, Roads,
Mowing, Discing, Box-Blading,
and Tilling.
-No Job Too Small-Free Estimates-
. Call Paul Kinsley 850-973-6326
$CASH$ Paid for land, acreage,
homes or mobile -homes with
property. Top dollar paid with
quick closing. Call Ben (386)
365-7653

New Cypress Log Home
1500sf, 3/2 on 4.5 wooded acres.
Owner financing a possibility.
$199,500. Call Jan today at
386-364-8407. Poole Realty.



APALACHEE CENTER
Behavioral Health Care Center is
currently seeking:
Adult Case Manager #2211
A minimum of a Bachelor's Degree
with a major in counseling, social
work, psychology, criminal justice,
nursing, rehabilitation, special edu-
cation, health education, or a relat-
ed human services field; or, other
bachelor's degree and 2 years full-
time or equivalent experience
working with adults experiencing
serious mental illness. Valid dri-
ver's license required. 8:00am to
5:00pm, Monday Thru Friday. Reg-
ular status rate: $10.75 per hour/ex-
cellent benefits or Temporary QPS
status rate: $12.92 per hour/no ben-
efits.
For More Information:
www.apalacheecenter.org.
(850)523-3217 or 1(800)226-2931
Human Resources
2634-J Capital Circle N.E.,
Tallahassee, FL.
Pre-Hire Drug Screen & FDLE
background check.
An Equal Opportunity
Affirmative Action Employer.
Drug Free Workplace.
DIRECTOR OF NURSING
for Madison Nursing Center
60 bed SNF in Madison, FL.
Current DON relocating.
Excellent Salary/benefits for exp.
RN with proven leadership skills
Call (850) 973-4880
Fax (850) 973-2667
ATTN Administratoi

Housekeeper
Weekends only
850-973-2504

Suwannee Health Care
is seeking a Staffing Coordinator
Must have positive attitude, good
organizational skills, computer
knowledge and must be able to
work well with others. Please con-
tact Angela Akins at 386-362-7860
or apply at 1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064. Delta Health
Groups
EEOE/V/D/M/F
Cracker Barrel
Now Hiring
Full, part time employees for all
positions. Flexible schedules,
weekly paychecks, health insur-
ance and other great benefits.
Apply in person at the Lake Park
location, 4914 Timber Drive. EOE


English Instructor
North Florida
Community College
Madison, FL
English instructor to teach composi-
tion and developmental writing
reading at small, rural community
college in Madison, FL. Begins
8/1/05. MA in English required.
Graduate work in composition
and/or developmental writing read-
ing strongly preferred. Community
college teaching experience
preferred. Will teach 15 credit hours
semester, establish office hours;
participate in department, college
activities. May teach, day/night
classes both on off
campus. Interviews will include
presentation using instructional
technology. Application to Director
HR, North Florida Community Col-
lege, 1000 Turner Davis Drive,
Madison, FL 32340. Only
complete application packets
considered (letter of interest,
resume, application, copy of
transcripts unofficial OK).
Application, job description online:
www.nfcc.edu. Questions, call
850-973-9487.
Deadline 05/20/05. EOE
Director of Nursing-Lake Park of
Madison, a 120 Bed Skilled
Nursing Facility in Norli Central
Florida. Seeking high energy,
experienced RN to help us become
a 5-Star Facility. Proven'
leadership & management skills,
including scheduling, regulatory
compliance and budgeting
required. Long-Term Care
experience is preferred with
expertise in Patient Outcomes.
Excellent starting salary/benefits.
Mail resume to 259 SW Captain
Brown Road Madison, FL 32340.
$$ AVON $$
Be your own Boss!
*Earn 50%
Sell $500, earn $250
Starter Kit is only $10
Call Dorothy 973-3153





FOR SALE: three rental
mobile homes in an
established trailer park.
Current renters have rent-
ed these homes for
approximately ,three
years. Always pay on
time; -'anid" takee"'ate' of
house. $24,000. for all
three homes. Will sign lot
rent contract to assure re-
turn of your investment.
Call: 850-973-6131


Summer Employment
with
Madison County
Parks and Recreation


Where: Cherry Lake Beach
Positions: Attendant and Lifeguard
Positions Available
(No certification to be an attendant)
When: May 28th, 2005 (Memorial
Day Weekend) Through September
5th, 2005 (Labor Day Weekend)
(Temporary Employment for Sum-
mer of 2005 Only!!!)
Days of Operation: 10:00 a.m. -
7:00 p.m.
Employee Work Hours: 25-35
Hourd/Week
Contact: Madison County Parks
and Recreation Department
Tommy Gamer, Director
P.O. Box 237
Madison, Florida
850-973-4640
850-464-0898
"APPLICATION'ARE BEING
RECEIVED NOW"
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fi(.l /,7lc 'E :. .

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* RN Qtrly bonus up-to-$500
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* State-of-the-art facility
* Professionals that care
* Pre-op Post-op or O.R.
* Day Shift
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Nature Coagt Regional Surgery
Center Perry, FL.
Call (';5'% 54.-1778 ext. 639 or
fax resume (850) 838-3937





Tractor Work
free estimates
NO JOB TOO SMALL
Mowing, Discing, tilling and box
blading. Call 973-6326.









FREE prep classes
M-TH: 9am-1 pm @ NFCC
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SUWANNEE VALLEY
HUMANE SOCIETY
CRITTER CORNER

Suannee Valley
Humane Sociels
1156 SE Bisbee Loop
Madison. Florida 32340

Two miles south of Lee off
C.R. 255 From 1-10 Ext 262.
Take C R. 255 north 1/2 mile

We are a Limited Space
Shelter ino kill. You must
check with us prior to bring-
ing a drop-off animal to the
shelter. Hours: Tues to Sat.
Ii1:01 to 2 I 10( or b\ appoint-
ment. \Vi't our %websine and
see the animals that need a re-
all\ inood home at:
Ssu .geocities.com/Susanneehs.

Lost or Found Pets:

If wou ha\e lost a pet or
found one. the humane soci-
etN \%ill help you find \our
pet. Call usj at 18501 971-
0904 or toll free at 1-866-236-
7812 Lea\e a message itf we
are closed. w\e \\ 1ll return our
call Remember to al\\a\s call
\our local animal controls or
shelters it \ tou have a lost or
found pet.


Due to the generous gift of
a new building, we are now
able to accept donations of
furniture....and %we no\\ haxe
some nice pieces to sell.

WE REALLY CAN USE
FURNITURE DONATIONS

Newspapers and Aluminum
Cans:

We ha\e a recycle nes<-
paper bin at 305 Pine\wood Dr.
just \\est of Johnson's Appli-
ance/Radio Shack. We also
collect aluminum cans to re-
c\cle. just bring them to the
shelter. All the money\ goes to
help the homeless animals.

Featured Animals For
Adoption

DOGS

2775 DONUT -10 week
old \\ hie, Tan and Black Fe-
male. E\ern time \ou sa\ her
name you think of something
s\eet. which she most cer-
tainly is. This, is definitely the
time to choose a donut.

2774 BOOGIEMAN Ten
w eek old Black and Tan Male.
Don't let his name scare 'ou


off. He is sweetness itself
and in lo\e with the %world.

2773 WHISKERS 9
w eek old Brow n and Black
Male. Who doesn't loxe a
puppy? Impossible not to
lo\e this one:. he is all play ful
bo\ with an attitude that sa\s.
" Here I am., \ours to lo\e."

2771 TRISKET I \ear
old Cream Male. This boy is
as handsome as a mo\ ie star
and a delight to be \\ith. He
wants a home of his ow n and
\ill gi\e as much as he gets.

2767- BABY I ear old Tan
Female. No longer quite a
pupp.; she is still in the
process of becoming an en-
chantress. You'll know when
\ou meet her that its your
luck\ da\.

CATS

2788-SABLE 10 week old
Light Tabby Female Look-
ing for a cuddle' When \ou
see Sable you %\ill definitely\
get the urge. She is bonafided
irresistible.

2753- THUMPER 8 %week
old Orange Male. This amaz-


ing boy is a garden of de-
lights. \Watch him play. \watch
him eat. watch him sleep!
Ever thing he does is
adorable.

2723 BOBBINS One and
a half \ear old Calico Female.
Affectionate and %with a
serene demeanor designed to
lower your blood pressure and
erase \our stress.

2237 THERESA Two and
a half \ear old Black Female.
This, is a great choice for
someone v\ho \would like a
more mature animal. Theresa
is well behaved and has a
peaceful nature that \ill
charm all \who meet her.

2776-TANSY- 10 week old
Tortoiseshell Female. Some
kitties come equipped w ith a
beguiling personalib that is
hard to ignore. Ready to lose
\our heart? Come meet Tan-
s\.

We have nan\ more kit-
tens and cats that are spayed
or neutered. wormed. Feline
luk tested. rabies shots. Adop-
tion $45.00
The Sutiannee Valle\
Humane SocietN depends on


adoptions for $45.00 \which love to meet you.
INCLUDES, spay/neuter. de- REMINDER: DO NOT
w\orming.heartitorm/feline LEA\ E PETS IN VEHICLES
availability of space. Starting FOR ANY LENGTH OF
August 3. 2004. adoption fees TIME DUE TO THE HEAT
\\ill be ileukemnianesune and AND HUMIDITY.
rabies shot. Please come and W_


Sisit us, our animals would


Please Help Us!



We're Here To Love!



850-971-9004
,^


v


i I


2005


006







The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13B


Friday, May 20, 2005


PERRY FLEA MARKET

,;Antiques Glassware* Collectibles Gifts & More

SYard Sale visit the Tool Shop FRI SUN 10 A.M.4 P.M. We Buy
set-Ups s5 & up Hwy. 19 S. (Old Motel)850)o838-1422 (850) 584-7124 Call Us


6SONH








oblgaio. Noonewil cll.WrteS r allforfre bok



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MAY 21ST 10:15A.M. SHARP


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DON TEE UOLRC l iR-jR.TiJ: 'K i F -[ 'T i TOL D '0,
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$50,000 FREE CASH GRANTS*****- 20051 Never Repay!
For personal bills, school, new business. $49 BILLION Left
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IMMEDIATECASH!!!USPension Fundingpayscashnow for
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For Sale

SPA. MustSe L7 Person Deluxe. NeverUsed, Includes Cover.
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I


NOTICE: The District School Board of Madison County,
Florida, will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, June 21, 2005, at 6:00 p.m. The meeting will
be held in the School Board Meeting Room of the Superintendent's Office, 312 N.E. Duval
Street, Madison, Florida.


Change to Policy 6.17





The proposed document may be viewed at the School Board Office, 312 NE Duval St.,
Madison, Florida.
Statutory Authority: 120.54, 1001.43 F.S.
IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD, WITH
RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS MEETING OR HEARING,
HE/SHE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH PUR-
POSE, HE/SHE MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE
PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND
EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
05-20-05.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

CONCERNING A SPECIAL EXCEPTION AS PROVIDED FOR IN THE

CITY OF MADISON LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS

BY THE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT OF THE CITY OF MADISON, FLORIDA, NO-
TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the City of Madison Land Development Reg-
ulations, as amended, hereinafter referred to as the Land Development Regulations, objec-
tions, recommendations and comments concerning a special exception, as described below,
will be heard by the Board of Adjustment of the City of Madison, Florida, at a public hear-
ing on June 2, 2005 at 5:15 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the
City Commission Meeting Room, City Hall located at 109 West Rutledge Street, Madison,
Florida.

SE 03 4. a pFtition by Nu Omega Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., and'
Nu Omega Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., as agent for Timothy Mc-
Cray, to request a special exception be granted as provided for in Section 4.4.5 of the Land
Development Regulation.. to permit the construction of a priate school olftring curricula
comparable to that of a public school in a RESIDENTIAL. MULTIPLE FAMILY-2 i R-2i
zoning district in accordance ith a site plan daed ljanuar, 31, 2005. raised March 25.
2005, revised March 30, 2005, revised May 10, 2005 and submitted as part of a petition dat-
ed February 25, 2003, to be located on property described, as follows:

A parcel of land lying within Section 21, Township 1 North, Range 9 East,
Madison County, Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: Lot
4, Block 6 of Fraleigh Smith Subdivision, as recorded in the Public Records of
Madison County, Florida.

Containing .13 acre, more or less.

AND

A parcel of land lying within Section 21, Township 1 North; Range 9 East,
Madison County, Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows:
The West 10 feet of Lot 3, Block 6 of Fraleigh Smith Subdivision, as recorded
in the Public Records of Madison County, Florida.

Containing .03 acre, more or less.

All said lands containing .16 acre, more or less.

AND

A parcel of land lying within Section 21, Township 1 North, Range 9 East,
Madison County, Florida. Being more particularly] described, as follows:
The East 40 feet

of Lot 3, 'Block 6 of Fraleigh Smith Subdivision, as recorded in the Public
Records of Madison County, Florida.

Containing,.10 acre, more or less.

Total of all said lands containing .26 acre, more or less

The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates., Any interested party
shall be advised that the date, time and place of any continuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hearing and that no further notice concerning the matter
,l .1 1 ijuulli h d. uInk .jid .iinulO.ailui.in ds Si.\ e~.indiir .il.k Iruoni t dalt ot f lh
' aboe referenced public hearing. At the aforementioned public hearing, all interested par-
ties may appear to be heard uith respect to the special exception.

Copies of the petition for special exception are available for public inspection at the Office
of the Director of Community Development, City Hall located at 109 West Rutledge Street,
Madison, Florida, during regular business hours.

All persons are advised that if they decide to appeal any decision made at the above refer-
enced public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which.
record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

5/20


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Week of May 16, 2005


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION


WELLS FARGO BANK MINNESOTA, NATION-
AL. ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, IN TRUST
FOR THE HOLDERS OF AMAZING RESIDEN-
TIAL COLLATERAL TRUST SERIES 2002-BC6
Plaintiff, .
CASE NO. 2004-578-CA
vs. DIVISION

EDWIN CURTIS MCMULLEN A/K/A EDWIN
CURTIS MCMULLEN, JR., et al,
Defendant(s).
/

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage
Foreclosure dated May 04, 2005 and entered in Case NO. 2004-578-CA of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for MADISON County, Florida wherein


WELLS FARGO BANK MINNESOTA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, IN
TRUST FOR THE HOLDERS OF AMORTIZING RESIDENTIAL COLLATERAL
TRUST SERIES 2002-BC6, is the Plaintiff and EDWIN CURTIS MCMULLEN A/K/A
EDWIN CURTIS MCMULLEN, JR.; LINDA MCMULLEN; PEOPLE'S CHOICE
HOME LOAN, INC.; TEN xNT 1I N/K/i. JACk BLAIR are Detendants. I will sell to the
highest bidder for cash at EAST DOOR OF THE MADISON COUNTY COURTHOUSE


at 11:00AM, on the 7th day of June, 2005, .the following described property as set forth
in said Final Judgment:
WITH DIRECTIONS FROM THE CENTER LINE OF THE SEABOARD
AIR LINE RAILROAD OF SOUTH 75 DEGREES AND 18.5 MINUTES
EAST .T THE IRON PIPE AT THE SOLUIHEAST CORNER OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SEC-
TION 11. TONSHI' I SOUTH. RANGE 10 EAST IN THE TOWN OF LEE.
MADISON COUNTT. FLORIDA, -ND RLIN NORTH 81) DEGREES 52.3
MINUTES WEST ALONG THE FORTY LINE 92.8 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE
AT THE WEST EDGE OF THE PUBLIC SIDEWALK TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED TRACT; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 6 DEGREES 22.7 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF
SAID SIDEWALK 137.3 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AT THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF THE HERE IN DESCRIBED TRACT; THENCE RUN WEST
580.5 FEET TO AN IRON AXLE AS A. FENCE CORNER .\T THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED TRACT: THENCE RUN
NORTH 32 DEGREES \ESIT 112.4 FEET TO AN IRON AXLE AT THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED TRACT:THENCE
RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 32 MINUTES EAST -120 FEET TO AN IRON
AXLE; THENCE RUN NORTH 115 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE ON THE
SOUTH SIDE OF A PUBLIC SIDEWALK AND 68 FEET MORE OR L ESS
FROM THE CENTER LINE OF THE SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 18.5 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID
SIDEWALK 186.5 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 6 DEGREES 22.7 MIN-
UTES WEST ALONG THE WEST EDGE OF THE FIRST MENTIONED
SIDEWALK 34 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING: CONT MINLNG 1.75
ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING:
A PORTION OF SECTION 11. TOWNSHIP I SOUTH. RANGE 10 E ST.
BEING A PORTION OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBED IN O.R. 496. PAGE
295 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MADISON COUNTY. FLORIDA. BE-
ING MORE PART ICUL. ARLV DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

BEGINATA REBAR NO. 963 MARKING iTHE INTERSEC TION OF THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SOUTHEAST FARM ROAD
WITH THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF LEE SCHOOL AV-
ENUE (40 FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY), SAID POINT BEING. THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF SAID O.R. 496, PAGE 295: THENCE SOUTH 06 DE-
GREES 40 MINUTES 06 SECONDS AIEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF LEE SCHOOL AVENUE A DISTANCE OF 171.25
FEET TO A 1 1/2 IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
SAID O.R. BOOK 496, PAGE 295; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 43 MIN-
UTES 50 SECONDS WEST ALONG-THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID O.R.
BOOK 496, PAGE 295 A DISTANCE OF 167.25 FEET TO A REBAR NO.
6431; THENCE NORTH iu5 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 24 SECONDS IE ST \
DISfANCE OF 214.07 FEEI TO.A REBAR N0.6431 ON SAID SOU tIHER-'-"
LY RIGHT OF VWAl LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST FARM ROAD: THENCE
SOUTH 75 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST \LONG SAID
RIGHT OFWAY LINE .A DISTANCE OF 172.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. CONTAINING 0.745 ACRES MORE OR LESS.
SAID LAND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN MADISON COUNTY,
FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MOBILE HOME LOCAT-
ED THEREON, DESCRIBED AS A 1998 PLAIN DOUBLEWIDE -WITH ID
NUMBERS GAGVTD0962A & GAGVTD0962B AND TITLE NUMBERS
75705223 AND 75705222 AND RP NUMBERS 12080064 AND 12080060.

A/K/A 7326 SE Farm Road, Lee, FL 32059


W. ITNESS MN HANDand he stalof this Courtlon Ma) 4,2005
Tim Sanders
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk


5/13.5/20

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
FOR:
CONSTRLICTION MANAGEMENT SER ICES FOR
MADISON CITY POLICE BUILDING HISTORICAL RESTORATION


I. INTRODUCTION
The City of Madison is requesting written proposals from qualified construe
tion firms to provide Professional Construction Management Services for
the Construction Phase on the City of Madison Police Station.

H. It is the City's intention to employ the Construction Firm to provide overall
Project Construction Management, Cost Benefit Studies, Information
Management, Construction Contract Management, Claims Management and
Technical inspection during the Construction on a cost plus a fee basis, with a guar-
anteed maximum price.

HI. PROPOSAL INSTRUCTIONS AND GENERAL INFORMATION
Proposal Submissions: Submit five (5) copies of a written proposal no later
than 5:00 PM on Monday, May 23,2005 to:

Will Rutherford, Project Manager
Clemons, Rutherford & Associates
2027 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
850-385-6153

Proposals must.be responsive to the requiirements and questions of the Request for Pro-
posal.

Reservations: City of Madison reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, to negoti-
ate changes in the new scope of work or services to be provided, and to otherwise waive any
technicalities or informalities.

Method of Selection: Proposals will be reviewed by a Selection Committee. The Selection
Committee will then select and recommend a ranking of firms. Upon acceptance of the rec-
ommendation by the City, negotiations or bids will or may be entertained.

Please respond by including but not limiting your response to the following:

1. Company name and length of time in business.
2. Company location.
3. Bonding capability and name of bonding company.
4. Insurance carrier and applicable coverage.
5. Qualifications of staff to be utilized on this project with names,
short resumes, length of time with firm and previous clients
served.
6. Names of several previous clients within the past five (5) years
with phone numbers and contact person.
7. Description of previous experience, to include budget, final cost, t
ime schedule, change orders, etc.- Part of the experience should'
reference projects worked on of similar nature.
8. Past experience with historical preservation funded by Division of
State, Bureau of Historic Preservation.

Request for information shall be in writing.

5/06. 5/13. 5/20

Save time and money in the publication of

your legal documents.

Email Word.doc to:

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LEGAL


*


VILA





Friday, May 20, 2005


14B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


IFIED PRE-OWNED
iSLE, LOW MILES, LOW PAYMENTS

INVENTORY, HUGE SAVINGS

STAFF-GREAT SELECTION

PEOPLE-LOCAL TRADES...
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2002 Ram 1500 ST 2003 Ram 2500 SLT 4x4
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2004 Ford F-150 4x4 2003 F-250 Lariat 4x4 2003 Ford Lariat Super Cab
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Per Sroke Diesel 49 o99 PowerSliding Rear irdow
2003 Ford F-250 XLT 4x4 2001 GMC Sierra SLE 2001 GMC HD Crew SLT 4x4 2003 Chevy Silverado 2004 Tundra SR5 Crew Cab
"All vehicles quality for $0 down. All prices & payments reflect your $390Q trade-i,. If you doi'ft have a trade, yoWcan put $3o00 cash l All voehidles'tre Qrtifed preqqwned,' .M0i .or an.pxtendeid wr.
We gtaianiee everylhino we'sell unless olierwise stated. Vehicles advertised are subject to prior sale,.prices are good tor -d date only luW-fhxa, tag title-.&'d fee Prhnt r~6. Fioptll'de'endip i oi if.
vehicle. Some payments are to finance your purchase and some reflect ar option to lease your purchase, ilases.Ary based hbn'vhde 'ee halMe. persotbdi cs.s.paj'ot iy'i u Ci.e':, '.;:.
EXIT 22, NORTH VALDOSTA ROAD BU an
VALDOSTA *.2421540
EXIT 16, HIGHWAY 64 i |
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QUITMAN o253.2277 wo.ge ICHRYSLER Jeep
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