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 Section A: Main
 Section A: Main: Viewpoints...
 Section A: Main: Around Madison...
 Section A: Main: Around Madison...
 Section A: Main: In the Spotli...
 Section A: Main: Church
 Section A: Main: Madison County...
 Section A: Main continued
 Section B: Community
 Section B: Community: School
 Section B: Community: Sports
 Section B: Community: Outdoors
 Section B: Community: Farm...
 Section B: Community continued
 Section B: Community: News Around...
 Section B: Community: Classifi...
 Section B: Community: Legals


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PAGE3
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PAGE4 4
PAGE5
PAGE6 6
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PAGE7 8
PAGE8 9
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PAGE9 7
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The Madison enterprise-recorder
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028405/00025
 Material Information
Title: The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title: Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title: Enterprise-recorder
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: T.C. Merchant
Place of Publication: Madison Fla
Creation Date: May 13, 2005
Publication Date: 1933-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates: 30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note: Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33284795
lccn - sn 95047180
System ID: UF00028405:00025
 Related Items
Preceded by: Enterprise-recorder

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        Page A 1
    Section A: Main: Viewpoints & Opinions
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
    Section A: Main: Around Madison County
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
    Section A: Main: Around Madison County continued
        Page A 8
        Page A 9
    Section A: Main: In the Spotlight
        Page A 7
    Section A: Main: Church
        Page A 10
    Section A: Main: Madison County History
        Page A 11
    Section A: Main continued
        Page A 12
    Section B: Community
        Page B 1
    Section B: Community: School
        Page B 2
    Section B: Community: Sports
        Page B 3
    Section B: Community: Outdoors
        Page B 4
    Section B: Community: Farm & Outdoors
        Page B 5
    Section B: Community continued
        Page B 6
    Section B: Community: News Around the World
        Page B 7
    Section B: Community: Classifieds
        Page B 8
    Section B: Community: Legals
        Page B 9
        Page B 10
Full Text



Cowboys Looks Ahead |


o 2005 Football Season i


ACA Art Show Display


Work Of 30 Students


CD



5040


En tcrpritc


=Servilffir Mdisolf Coulf~lfs Am i~elteatil oietrtal l o o.


Our 140th Year, Number 30


Friday, May 13, 2005


MIadison, Florida 32340


Man Kiled In Automobile Crash


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc. Hig
A man died Wednesday, fred
May, 11, from injuries he .us- lah,
trained in a car crash on Tues- in t
day evening. NMa 10.' terms


Sex Offender
7t vll l 2oin


Raymond Jessie Evans. Jr.
By Jacob Bembr..
Greene Publishing, ic. .
A Greenville man has


According to a Florida'
;hway Patrol report. Al-
1 Lee Waddell, 62, of Tal-
assee, was traveling west
he %westbound lane of In-
tate 10 near the 246-mile


Registers
istered as a sex offender.
Accordino2 to infornia-
Sfrom the Madison Coun-
Sheriff's Department.
ans registered and listed
home address as 189 SE
mpic \Va\ in Green' ille.
Evans is 6'1" tall and
ighs 150 pounds. He has
w n hair and brown e\es.
has a medium build and
dium complexion.
Evans' date of birth is
ed as August 27. 1961.


County. Rakes In Millions


BN Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishinv. Inc.
Most of Madison Coun-
ty 's legislative funding dreams
came true, as the count\ raked
in millions in money from the
state.
North Florida Community
College garnered almost
$10.000.000 in funding wi]th
$5.362.196 going towards col-
lege program funds. Another
$3,350,586 went towards the
college's science labs. The
college also received


$714.613 in loterN funds and
$561.303 for its critical jobs
imtiati\e. amon2 other fund-
inmg allotments.
The counts also received
money for three local bridges.
The Ten Mile Pond Bridge. the
Sand Pond Creek Bndge and
the Norton Creek Bridge all
received oxer $1.000.000
each.
MNadison County Senior
Services received $25.000
from the state.
Please See Millions, Page 2A


marker at approximately 9:56
p.m. For unknown reasons,
he traveled snouith ei into
the center median. He at-
tempted to steer his 2003
Ford Explorer back onto the


roadway.
Waddell over-corrected.
causing the Explorer to rotate
clockwise until it o returned
onto its left side.
The Explorer rolled o er


twice, before coming to a fi-
nal rest in the inside \'est-
bound lane, facing north.
Waddell l as transported
via helicopter to Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital. He \as


pronounced dead on Wednes-
day morning. May I1.
FHP Trooper Timoth\ J.
Routa \as the investigating
officer and the homicide in-
\ estiator.


Teen Missing


By Jacob Beimbr
Grt enei Publis lii. Inc.
Sarah Elizabeth Wild.' 16.
who was in foster care in
Panama CitN has apparently
run a\%a from the home
where she was staying.
Sarah. who is from Pinet-
ta, has run awa\ from place-
ments 16 times, according to
her mother. Katherine Wild.
Katherine describes Sarah as
one of Florida's "uncontrolled
children."
According to law officers,
Wild is a troubled child vwho
has run away a number of
times but never runs far.


Sarah Elizabeth Wild
If \ou knoN\ of Sarah's
whereabouts, please call the
Madison County Sheriff's De-
partment at 973-4001.


BN Mike Moore
Grtlwne Piubsh'in,,. 1ic.
It appears that Mladison
County is ,etting \ert close to
hiring a count\ manager.
Count\ commis-ion chairman
Alfred Martin said \Wednesday
afternoon that the number one
candidate. Joe Miranti. is set
to sign and return the contract
offered b\ the board.
An original field of 21 ap-
plicants was rharrowed to i:.
Four of these were still inter-
ested and were inter liew ed b\
the commission. Miranti
emerged as the top choice.
Miranti met with Martin
,nd mci'. r lorncr T.-inir
Ree\ e 1to neguitale d COUIItCit.
The deal offered to Niranti in-
cludes a $55.000 salary and a
one-year agreement. If he
signs and returns the contract.
commissioners will then vote
on %whether to hire him at ei-
ther a special called meeting.
or next Wednesday's regular


Joe Miranti. from Cen-
tral Florida, is close to sign-
ing a contract to become
Madison County's manager.
session.
The Central Florida man
has 20( years of experience in
local government. His wife
has worked for Disnes for 28
Sears.
The' Madison Counity
Commission will hold its reg-
-ular meeting \\ednesday. MaN
18. beginning at 9 a.m.


Student Assistants Attend School Board Meeting


By Jacob Bembry
GrItene Publisl/mn_. IrI.
Madison CountN now has
a 24-hour. seen day a week.
Christian radio station.
WAPB FM is located at
9,1.7 on the radio dial and in-
side Greene Publishin,,. Inm.'s
offices on Highw as 53 South.
The station plays a %ari-


$15,000 Donat


ety of Christian music, from
Southern gospel to contem-
porary Christian to black
gospel music. There is some-
thing for eery Chnstian mu-
sic fan to listen to on WAPB.
Make sure and set
sour radio station to 91.7
for the finest in Christian
musi wc. ,

med To Library


Danny Hales, left. presents a check to Alfred Martin,
right, Madison County Commission Chairman, on behalf of
Max Smith. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Mike Moore,
May 4, 2005)


Students who work as teacher's aides at the high school attended the Madison Count3 School Board meeting on Tues-
da. evening. May 3. Some of the students %who attended are pictured, left to right: Cody Tuten, Morgan Howard. Mary
Niemenen. Josh Smith. Andrew Hendry. Gene Sim. Lane Gniewick, Zach lolt, Ximenia Castro and Tiffan3 Floyd. (Greene
Publishing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 3, 2005)


By Mike Moore
Grecne Publishing, Inc.
A local citizen has made a
donation of $15,000 to be used
for county library capital pro-
jects. Max Smith made the gift'
in honor of his grandmother,.
Mrs. R. L. Millinor, who,
served as the first library man-
ager for Madison County.


County commissioners re-
ceived. the donation at the
WednesdaN, May 4. board
meeting.
In accepting the check, the
board agreed .to name the pub-
lic meeting room at the Madi-
son Public LibrarN after 1,illi-
nor. In addition to her work in
Please See Librar.. Page 2A


FRIDAY 10 FRI. NIGHT


Patchy morning fog;
mostly sunny


The Suwannee
Valley Humane
Society To Hold
Spring Fling
Saturday, May 14,
10 a.m.-1 p.m.
at the
Animal Shelter on
Bisbee Loop in Lee


AA5bP*Z~.3
Clear


3 Sections. 38 Pages
Annie's Mailbox ..............6B Obituaries.. .... ... .............5A
Around Madison............4-9A Outdoors. ..................4-5B
Church................... .....10A The Remote
Classified ....... ........ ..SB G uide................... C Section
Comm Calendar.............5... .. A School........................ .......2B
Jail R eport....................... 3A Sports.............................. .3B
Legals......................... .B Step Back in Time......... .6B
Mad. Co. HistorN........... 11A Viewpoints................... 2-3A
Nation & World... .. .Page 7B Weather.......................12A


IL 1


wwvi. greenepublishing.corn-


County Commission


ClOse To Signing

County Manager


Madison Has

Christian Radio

Station On Air


T P.,ARabis ].-111.








2A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Embracing Competition As A Policy Tool


By Geoffrey F. Segal
Governor Bush has taken a lot of flak for his strong support
of making government compete with the private sector. During
his tenure, more than 120 projects, ranging from prison food
service to maintenance in state parks have been initiated, saving
the state millions of dollars while simultaneously improving ser-
vices.
Yet what often gets lost in the ongoing debate about "out-
sourcing" is the fact that competition has enjoyed bi-partisan
support in each of the last three administrations.
Moreover, the success of Florida's projects has garnered na-
tional attention. Indeed, managers around the country turn to
Florida for ideas and examples in their home states. They per-
ceive Florida as an example of how to conduct competitions.
Furthermore, Florida consistently ranks at the top in manage-
ment surveys and reports.
Over the last few months, however, the administration has
faced increasing criticism for its management policy. Truth be
told, not every initiative has gone perfectly. Indeed, some high
profile project has been criticized justifiably for poor perfor-
mance. There are legitimate concerns with how the contracts
were handled. However;, partisan critics have gone much further,
unfairly putting a black mark on all initiatives in Florida. The
problems need not be fatal to the policy at large. Clearly, there
is much to be learned and.room for improvement with Florida's
competitive sourcing initiative. To ensure success, any future
initiative will have to apply previous experience and lessons
learned to better the process and fully tackle any challenges they
may face. Unfortunately, the excellent results of most public-
private competitions go unnoticed and unreported because
they Work.-For example, Florida's vast highway system is large-
ly the result of public-pri% ate competitions. In an overwhelming
majority of cases, contractors %\ere selected to plan, design, con-
struct, and maintain Florida's higher a\ s. More than $84 million
has been saved throughout the life of these kinds of contracts on
highway maintenance alone. Recognizing the problems and pit-
falls,' Governor Bush, set out to create a stronger process for
competitive sourcing. That led to the creation of the Center for
Efficient Government, the nation's most transparent, results-ori-




Jacob's Ladder


Jacob Bembry
Columnist


(fi&


Is There Blood On My Hands?
A few years ago, I took a hit. It felt like I \vas quarterback-
ing a football team when someone came out of the blue and hit
me from the blindsidl i,ft1fe &round 'and-screamned in
*agony.
SThe hit I took wasn't a physical hit. It was emotional. I did
scream in pain, but my screams were silent and heard only to
myself.It hurt and it did cause me physical problenis. I got to a
point' \ here I could hardly breathe and my blood pressure shot
through the roof. .
Fm hurting now, but not because I got hit. I'm hurting be-
cause I feel like I may have hit someone else and caused them
the same type of pain. I don't know% ho"w I got involved. I know
that it isn't my fight, but, for some reason. I feel as if I have
blood on my hands. I, don't want to be a. stumbling block that
%would keep anyone from entering the Kingdom of Heaven. -
Although this incident has nothing to do w ith my job, it has
affected my job. MN nerves are frayed at this point. My temper
is short. I'\e spent a couple of nights, tossing and turning in the
bed, worrying about it.
.The weird thing about the whole situation is I feel guilty, al-
though I don't really knowt if I have a reason to feel this %way. I
haven't done anything %wrong. but I question myself time and
time again about the guilt. I never %want to deliberately hurt anN-
one and I definitely never %want anyone to feel the same anguish
that I felt. I ask for my readers to pray for me and ask God to
grant me the peace I desire in this situation.
God bless .ou all!


Library


7tCofi?;dfrom PaIgElA


Madison County. Millinor was instrumental in establishing the
Suwannee River Regional Library system.
Danny Hales, of the Suwannee River Regional Library.,
made the presentation of Smith's check.


Friday, Ma' 13, 2005


The Ginger Jar
Ginger Jarvis
Columnist


t


floda Press ASsocitio


T4Vffaso


nterprise- ecorbher
Award inning Newspaper
W Ns 111 SE Shelby St Madison, FL 32341
S.--^ (850) 973-6361 Fax: (850) 973-6494
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Emerald Greene Kinsley
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PRODUCTION MANAGER
Lisa Greene
STAFF WRITERS
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and Mike Moore
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Kerry Cohen
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and Shanna Colvin
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There will be a 13' charge for .Affiddaita.
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Subscription Rates:
In County $26 Out-of-County $31
(State &'local taxes included) '-


http://www.greenepublishing.comrn
-Since 1865-
"'Tellirg it like it is with honest and integnry"

tnh'trpri H e-Rcrorber
Madison Recorder established 1865.
Net Enterprise established 1901.
Consolidated June 25. 1908
Published weekly b. Greene Publishing. Inc.,
Ill S. E. Shelb\ St.. Madison. FL 32340. Penod-
icals posiage PAID at Madison Post Office 32340.
Publication No. 177.400.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
The Madison Enterprise-Recorder, 111 S. E. Shel-
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tos beyond said deadline.


By:Bill McCrea


"Is There A Need For A Wal-Mart Here In Madison?"


MARIE WILLIAMS

"I think we sure do. .4 lot of
times I have to go out of
town to Valddosta or Live
Oak to go to Wl-Alarr. \\'e
need one right here in
Madison."
SHAMARA GIBSON

"I believe it's a good idea
because it will provide a lot
of opportunity for young-
sters. There are only so
many places that will hire
teenagers."


KEITH QUICK


"No, It will
awtay from
chants."


take business
local mner-


KEITH WEBB

"I think it will provide the
community' with a different
place to shop. Hopefidly, it
will drive gas prices down."



JAN SMITH

"Hopefully, it will provide
more jobs, and save a lot of
time, spent going out of
town."


ELORIS LEE

"I think it would be great.
The people of Madison will
have more jobs, because a
lot of people need more
work. especially those on
welfaree"


0


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS.


/


AML


44


ented, and accountable publicprivate competition. The Center,
in turn, devised the GATE Management process to review an
initiative at critical stages. The review is conducted ind epen-
dently of the project team, and a project will move ahead only if
it can demonstrate benefits and/or savings.
While the recent focus has been on improving the contract-
ing process, we must not lose. sight of competitive sourcing's
overall importance and value. Other states are already looking
to capitalize on the efforts going .on in Florida.:Several other
states, including South Carolina and Indiana, have reviewed
Florida's experiences and are in the process of implementing
their own versions for their own competitive sourcing initia-
tives.
Competitive sourcing is likely to continue growing because
of the human capital challenges that governments now face. In.
many situations, it gives managers the flexibility the\ need to
deal with burgeoning needs. For instance, a recent study by the
National Association .of State Personnel Executives found that
some states' governments could lose more than 30 percent of
their workforce by 2006 because of baby-boomers' retirements'
and other factors.
Outsourcing more positions will help agencies tackle this
problem by pro% hiding them with maximum flexibility in getting
the job done effectively and efficiently In turn, agencies %-vill be-
come more focused on their core missions while using: the best
mix of in-house assets and outside contractors.
This lets agencies focus more on sen ice planning rather
than actually participating in ser ice delivery. Furthermore,
agencies gain valuable access to expertise and a tremnendotius
amount of flexibility in performing their missions. Thinking
strategically allows an agency to have the right people in the
right place at the right time.
Political partisanship should not blind us to management re-
alities; and experience. Most Floridians want their tax dollars
spent in the most effective and efficient manner possible. If
there is something to learn, it's that competition works to pro-
mote efficiency and restrain costs. It has worked in Florida. De-
-spite the bumps along the way. Florida's experience remains
.among the best in the country. Oversight is critical, and the new
GATE process shouldhelp Florida a% oid the pitfalls it previous-
1y experienced. .
If there is a moral to this story, it's this:
.Florida ought,to embrace competition and its awesome
powers to reform how government operates. -
Geoffrey F Segal is an adjunct scholar at, the James Madi-
son Institute and the director of government reform policy at
Reason Fotundation.
As a 501(c)(3) organization,. The James Madison Institute
does not support, endorse, or oppose candidates or proposed
legislation. For more information, visit http://www.jamesmadi-
son.org.


.. Cont'd from Page4A

The hospital received $50,000 for the radiographic room and for
health scan renovation.
The Town of Greenv ille received funding for its communi-
ty recreation park ($200.000). a Ray Charles Memorial
($20,000) and for renovation of the old Green% ille Primary
School ($130,579).
The City of Madison received $587.500 in funding for its
Madison Railroad and H&R Block lift stations and $200.000 for
its Lanier Field Recreation Area.
The county received an additional $200,000 for its recre-
Satonal complex.
The To\ n of Lee received $75,000 for funding of its Eloise
G. Stew art Park.


A Song Is Only As

Meaningful As Its Message
You'"e heard young people iand maybe older people) say,
"I don't listen to the %words of the songs: I just listen for the
beat." That'snot true, of course. They do listen to the %words:
they even sing along with the lyrics. Too often, they just don't
pay attention to that thdie song is saving.
This hit me bletmreen the eyes the other day in my car. I had
the radio tuned to a nearby gospel station, singing along with
"'Looking for a City" and "Give the World a Smile Each Da\." I
was having'a good time. Then the deejay put on a song that
alarmed me. A mixed group began to sing. "Build my mansion
next door to Jesus." The chorus ended twith the plea, "Just build
my mansion close to the throne." I listened in disbelief to the
first verse, all about ho" this person loved Jesus so much he
%wanted to be nght up under His arm in heaven. Then horror of
horrors! the second terse told of lot ing that dear old mother
w\ho had won him to the Lord, and how the mother's mansion
should be ACROSS THE ROAD from Jesus. not next door. I felt
absolutely appalled.
The harmony w"as beautiful, the music sounded good. and
the song contained magic %words like "throne" and 'Jesus" and
"Heaven" that produce feelings of peace and contentment. Yet a
close ear to the message lets us hear the selfishness and pride in
the ly rics. Is this not the same request made by the mother of
James and John? In Matthewv 20: 21, she asked, "Command that
in Your kingdom these two sons of mine may sit, one on Your
right hand and one on Your left." Jesus had two comments about
her plea. One, "It is not Mine to give." Two. "Whoe\er wishes
to become first among you must become a sla\e."
I have know n "Christians w ho studied the Prayer of Jabez
because the\ want God to "enlarge their borders." not in the
sense of wanting greater responsibility in bringing in the King-
dom. but in the sense of wanting more stuff for themselves and
their children. Where did \we get these decidedly un-Christ-hke
notions? Not from Scripture, that's for sure.
Certainly the "Build My Mansion" thesis is discussed in the
Word. Phrases like "Pride goeth before a fall" and "Thou fool!
This night shall th\ soul be required of thee" and "If you ha\e
done it to the least of these, you have, done it to me" spring to
mind.
How foreign is the message of that song compared to the
prayer in another old tune: "Lord, build me just a cabin in the
comer of Gloryland." In light of this idea. let's boy cott the Build
My Aansion CD or tape, and write letters to any station that
plays it. (The statibrii's, required by law to program In 'response
to. letters, nbotto phone calls and emails.) We .oannotp,as. true
Christians, allow such a greedy message to spread through the
airmat es in the name of our Lord. iA movement against a song
is not unprecedented. Several years ago. country singer Holly
Dunn recorded "When I Say No, I Mean Maybe and Maybe I
Mean Yes." It lasted about a month before it was banished be-
cause rnomen rose up in protest around the country. The song is
never heard any more, and the singer has sunk into oblivion. We
can do this, too.)
It's just one song, not many people %%ill hear it, it doesn't
matter that much I can hear some people saying it, but Satan
does not want us to play raunchy. offensive music on Christian
stations; he can get his w\ay by persuading us to lower our stan-
dards just a little. And this song is a definite lowering of the',
Christian standard of loving others and putting self last.
Yes, even on Christian radio stations, living for Jesus is a
battle. If we allow this song and others w- ith similar messages to
represent us to the world, then we are willingly losing that bat-
tle. And we will deserve to hear on that day, "Depart from Me
into everlasting darkness."
The message we hear and the message we send is too im-
portant to our eternal lies and to God's mission in this \world.
No\\. through the music we disseminate. God's work is in our
hands.







VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


Around Lee

Thelma Thompson
Columnist

Summer ?Ornitt' lsin
Beautiful and bright
Seen on the horizon
Such a golden sight
Good Morning seems as if summer has arrived. When this
cold-natured body feels toasty warm, it definitely has.
Our month of May began quite merrily on the first day with a
wonderful homecoming at Macedonia Church. That grand old
building was practically 'filled to the rafters' and its roof symbol-
ically raised as John Daughtry preached and the Cana family sang.
The Canas consisted of choir director, Margaret Moncrief's broth-
er, Spencer Gay, his son, Norman, and Norman's wife and daugh-
ters. Margaret can be justifiably proud of those talented people.
The huge fellowship hall was filled to overflowing and the tables
'groaned' under the weight of all the delicious food for the meal
which followed. The mood of the day was joyous as old friends
greeted. We were glad to see Margaret's another, Cora Tindall Gay,
whom we had not seen since high school in the '30's. The day
was highlighted by news of the birth of Pastor Michael and wife
JoAnne's first son early that morning. We send our congratula-
tions.
On the third day, Tuesday evening, from 6:30 to 7:30, NFCC
hosted a courtyard party on the lawn of the mansion in honor of its
retirees, friends of the college and outstanding alumni. We were
indeed honored that we were included among the illustrious alum-
ni. The entire back lawn was filled with white linen covered tables
at which guests enjoyed a delicious array of food from the buffet
table after standing in a very long reception line and being wel-
comed by NFCC President Morris Steen and his lovely wife,
Judy. We were also honored to have one of our poems included
in the Sentinel Review, the college !literary and arts magazine
which was printed just in time to make copies available that
evening. We send our own congratulations to all of the honorees
and a special one to those from the Lee area who were, besides
myself, Carson Cherry and Jim Searcy. It was a wonderful and
enjoyable evening and we appreciate and thank everyone from the
college who worked so hard to make it perfect. We also sincere-
ly thank the one (or ones) who nominated us as an outstanding
alumnas.
The last of three events which made a perfect week was
Mother's Day. This is always a day when our family makes us
'Queen for a Day', and this Sunday was no different. Our chil-
dren from Atlanta, Jacksonville, and Middleburg came bearing
flowers, gifts and food and we spent two wonderful days togeth-
er. We consumed four pots of coffee Sunday morning while rem-
iniscing and laughing o\er things from the past We always en-
joy and cherish time spent together And made earl\ plans for the
next reunion which will be during our August birthday it will
probably be in Atlanta this year.
We send belated congratulations to Bobby Bembry, who be-
came a great-grandfather recently via granddaughter Morgan, and
to his family who became great aunts and Uncles.
am And ,th.i. Leonard Millers have returnedfrgqthei, New ,York ,
trip Janice is bubblingoverethe arrival oflher first granddaugh-
ter.
Our sincere condolences to the family of Hazel Williams who
passed away on April 30 making Mother's. Day one of sadness for
them.
Since the past week has kept us'too busy to gather much news
for you, we will leave you with this advice to succeed in life,
make dollars from sense.
Thelma Thompson


Madison County Ex-

tension Service
Dianne Douglas
Columnist


Mission Possible

It's National High Blood Pressure Education Month and the
National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute wants consumers to
know it is time to take action to find out what your blood pres-
sure numbers are, what they mean and what you need to do to
prevent or control this common condition. This year's theme is
"Prevent and Control High Blood Pressure; Mission Possible."
High blood pressure is a dangerous condition. Often called
the "Silent Killer", it usually doesn't have symptoms, so you
may not even know you have it. And, it can lead to heart dis-
ease, stroke, and kidney disease. All of these are among the
leading causes of death in the U.S.
There is good news, however, according to the NHLBI. It
is possible to prevent and control high blood pressure.. Health
experts suggest the following lifestyle changes:
Maintain a healthy weight it may mean you need to lose
a few pounds. If so, check with your physician and be sensible
about your food intake.
Start being physically active No, you don't have to
take up running, walking will do, any activity that gets you
moving is fine. Get outside and ride a bike, play a game of ball
with the kids in the back yard and take stairs instead of eleva-
tors.
Follow a healthy eating plan. Reduce your intake of fats,,
saturated fats, sodium and salt. If you consume alcohol, do so
in moderation.
Research has shown that DASH (Dietary Approaches to
Stop Hypertension) a healthy eating plan can reduce your
chances of developing high blood pressure and lower your
blood pressure if it's already high. The NHLBI strongly rec-
ommends this plan.
The DASH eating plan emphasizes fresh fruits and vegeta-
bles and low fat dairy products. It is moderate in total fat and
low in saturated fat and cholesterol. It also includes whole
grains, poultry, fish, and nuts. Of course, it has you reduce your
salt and sodium intake. Most people think that means eliminat-.
ing the salt shaker, but the reality is we get more sodium from
prepackaged convenience foods and fast foods.
Next week, I'll give you an outline of the DASH eating
plan. For more information on healthful eating, contact the
Madison County Extension Service.


Madison Couniity


\ "< CRIME:

ALL SUSPECTS SHOULD BE CONSIDERED INNOCENT'
UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY IN A COURT OF LAW


Woman Arrested

For Battery
A woman was arrested for battery on Tuesday night, May
10, following a fight at Winn-Dixie.
According to a Madison Police Department report, officers
responded to a fight in progress at Winn-Dixie. The alleged vic-
tim stated that she and Tartacher Michell Christian, 27, of Madi-
son, had been having problems for a year. Christian exited the
store with the alleged victim and the two witnesses. The com-
plainant said that Christian had exited in the store, ran to her
truck and threw her bag in and ran back to where the com-
plainant was standing.
Witnesses said that they tried to keep Christian from at-
tacking the complainant, but Christian struck her in the head,
knocking her down and then kicked her in the chest several
times.
Christian was, arrested for the incident..
MPD Sgt. William Greene was the investigating officer.


graduation 0
Watch for the upcoming special graduation Section
in the Madison County Carrier, May 18, 2oo5 issue.








229.242.6105 1501 N.Ashley St., Valdosta, GA
Across from the Honda dealership behind Macadoos.


Pabst Lt 12-PK $4.99
Keystone Lt 12-PK 5.99
Guinness 12-PK 9.99
Red Stripe 12-PK 9.99
Coors Light 20-PK 11.99
Bud/Bud Lt 24oz Case 13.99
St12 -G9 Michelob Ultird2'W 1 5.w99


Beringer 998








Kendall Jackson88
750ML

Clos Du Bois $Q 99
Chardonnay & Zinfandel 750ML

Robert Mondavi" $ 99
Private Selection (ALL Types) 750ML

Sterling $ 99
Sauvignon Blanc T 750ML

Almaden $ 99
(ALL Types) 3.OL


GEORGIA'S PRICE LEADER FOR THE PAST 25 YEARS


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3A


Fixing People
I have decided. I can't fix everybody. I still want to, do so,
but it's just too big a project. I can't even fix me.
First, the other drivers. Most people do not drive at the
speed limit, at least not on the interstate highway. They do what-
ever they choose to do, in effect, making their own laws. I am
positive of this. I have been driving for 44 years and have been
on most of the nation's interstate highways. I drive many miles
each week. I have a love-hate relationship with these roads, but
these big highways are usually good places to drive when I am
in a hurry.
Turn signals? Lane changing. Bright headlights. Pulling out
in front of me. Most people are not good drivers. I have tried to
help by saying things quietly. It has not helped. I have even
prayed. I am sure this will help.
Then, there is the grammar. The spelling, punctuation, cap-
italization habits are not good. Someone must have thought it
was important that people learn the use of the English language.
It is taught in school during all 12 years, although by twelfth
grade, .students have moved to literature. I have taught most
middle school and high school levels of English and even some
college classes. Many people must have slept through English
class. Perhaps they were just promoted to the next grade. Maybe
the\ forgot most of \w hat thie\ learned. Something ain't right.-
In addition to poor dri\ ing habits and poor language skills,
there are many things which I want to fix. Strange fashions?
Poor manners. The nuclear threat of North Korea. Terrorists.
Terrible conditions in Sudan. Illegal aliens. E\ery one except me
and mi family seems to be slipping back to the Dark Ages.
I can't fix everybody. What can I do?
I can decide what things are most important. I can decide
which things I can help chafige. If I see someone dn n\ing around
with an open container of alcohol, do I call the police? Yes. The
person injured by the drinking driver could be one of my loved
ones.
I should vote and wiite to editors and support missionaries
and do business with the right people and take a thousand other
positive steps.
There is a great verse in Matthew, Chapter 7, in the Bible.
"Why do you look at the speck of sa% dust in your brother's eye
and pay no attention to the plank in your own eye?" Another
translation says, "a log in your own eye."
I will do what I can. I can see that as man\ of my own prob-
lems are taken care of, clear the say\ dust first, and then help oth-
ers. I can ask God to show me what needs fixing in m\ life and
then move on to help others..
I can't fix me or anyone else. God can.

Madison County...


Jail Report


5/5/05
Terry Wendell Mc-
Daniel--VOP (circuit)
Raymond Jessie Evans,
Jr.--Criminal registration
sexual offender
Nancy Rew Grantham--
Crinmnal registration
Reginald Daniel Miles--
Failure to appear, (arraigni-
ment)
.Devin Vashawn Alexan-
der--VOP (circuit"
SMarsha Dijine
Grantham--Cheatng,. grand
theft III
5/6/05
Nicolas, Peralos Ruiz--
No valid or expired drivers
license
Takara Demetrica
Thompkins--Aggravated as-
sault with a deadly weapon
John Christopher
Barfield--Arson
Lester Earl Thompkins,
Jr.--DWLSR or cancelled
5/7/05
Juan Mejia--Expired dri-
vers license (more than four
months)
Don G. Myers--Failure
to appear (arraignment)


Jerome Davis, Jr.--Fail-
ure to appear
Joseph Clyde Thomas--
VOP (circuit)
5/8/05
Miranda Lynn Mims--
DWLSR or cancelled, VOP
(county)
SCordele Lee--Battery on
law enforcement officer,
DWLSR or cancelled, resist-
ing an officer with violence
5/9/05.
Cordele Lee--VOP
Kendrick Lamer Weath-.
erspoon--Domestic violence
(battery), VOP (circuit)
J.R. Lawson--Failure to
appear (arraignment)
5/10/05
Marcia Lakay Bellamy--
Cheating, conspiracy to
commit offense
Joshua Shawn Mercer--
DWLSR or cancelled, VOP
(circuit)
Lee Ann Webb--VOP
(circuit)
Kristy Ann Stephenson--
Failure to appear
Tartacer Michell Christ-
ian--Battery ,(touch or strike)


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Friday, May 13, 2005





Friday, May 13, 2005


4A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder AROUND M1ADISON COUNTY


ncement
The Madison County Parks
& Recreation Dept. wouldd
like to announce that regis- / '"
tration for the adult church
softball league % ill begin on q / //
May 9, 2005. Teams may (L- "L' '/ '
register at the Parks & "
Recreation office located atI
~(~6'/ / i(';6';/I/ f/4/ 1 )'tlld7~~
the Recreation Complex.
The fees for the 2005 church
league %%ill be $250.0-).
league w'ill be $250.00. Because you have shared in their hves by your
These fees are to help cover
These fees are to help coer friendship and love. we invite vou to join In t/he cele-
the cost of umpires and ration of the 50 year wedding anniversary of our par-
awards for the end of the
awards for he end of theents. Robert and Robbie Walker on Sunday. thefifteintlh
year. Teams must be signed ot av o thousand and five. from o mtil tour p.m. .
:.;:;UP by _Ma 271h. Church I
up by m lay 27th. Church at Pinerfa First Baptist Church Felloiwship Hall. Pinet-
...league games ill be played ta Florida.
on Tuesday and Thursdays. an f
'The season begins on Cindv and Pat Cood'. DavidandChristine Italker
...onTuesda s andThurdandPlae o.its.(
! : "Tuesay.June 7th.
Tuesday. June 7th. andfnnilY, and Glen and .-hisha Wialker and family
For more information.
contact Tommy Garner at
_973-4640 or.464,0898. .


*Si


New customer

subscribe beti
Friday, May 13t
Tuesday, May 31,
get a

one yeai

subscription

only $13

(New Subscribers.


Passing up this de
just wrong; it's. ,:S
." ....


rs can
veen -- ----- .

h, and day theth Special
st, and Send payment to:
Greene Publishing, Inc.
RO. Drawer 772
r Madison, Fl. 32341

Sfor
SName

1:Only): :- Address...--'
-, n


cili..h
"h-' "-
-.11 ,. f ,. .I


U


. 1- &A"m






Friday, May 13, 2005


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5A


2005 CXUSmuni i Ca lendar-


May 13
Singles Party, hosted by
Positive Christian Singles,
meets every Friday at 1650
River Street (1/4) mile east of
Sam's Club, in Valdosta. The
theme for tonight is Bachelor
Auction. Dance lessons at 8
p.m., DJ plays country, oldies,
and rock from 8:30 p.m. Fun
mixers and karaoke. $8 ad-
mission includes food and
drinks. For more. info, call
229-242-3797.
May 14
Cherry Lake First Baptist
Church invites you to come
and enjoy a day of missionar-
ies, seminars on missions and
How to be an effective Christ-
ian in the work place from 10-
4. There will be face painting,
clowns, children's stories and
concert on the lawn. Bring a
lawn chair and plan on spend-
ing the day. Lunch will be

S.-


STrina Ann Wollschlager.
age 44, died Thursday, Ma, 5,
2005,. at her .home, in
Greenville.
Graveside funeral services
were Sunday, May 8, 2005 at
Oak Ridge Cemetery, NMadi-
son. The family .received.
friends at the Beggs Chapel on
tarirJ.,, May 7.
She \\as born in Key West
and lived 'most of her life in
Greenville. She was a gradu-
ate of Greenville High School
and began her career in law
enforcement. Her love of be-
ing around people led her to
working in the fast food indus-
try. She was of the Catholic
faith. She will be greatly
missed by those who knew her


served. Listen to local singers
as well as enjoying cloggers
from Valdosta. Something for
everyone. Tell a friend and
we'll see you there. The
church is located 1 miles west
of Cherry Lake crossroads on
53N and 150W. For more in-
formation, call 850-929-4920.
May 15
New Zion Missionary
Baptist Church of Greenville
is sponsoring a gospel musical
program at 3:00 p.m. in honor
of James Williams, Jr., son of
Rev. and Mrs. James Williams
of Greenville. We are inviting
everyone to come out and join
us in praising the Lord with
songs of praises.
May 16 18
Lee United Methodist
church is sponsoring and old
time Tent Revival starting at'
6:30 p.m. Preaching will start
around 7 pm each night. The






ITUARIES


and loved her. -"
She is sur\ied
parents. Schley and L
Warren of Greenville:
Cathy Ale. and h
Chuck: t .o sons, Chr
son of Greenville and
Wollschlager of Talla
her grandsons Brand
Jordon Lawson of Mel
a niece Catie Joe Ale c
hassee and her pet dog




Have you beenturned d


revival will be held across the
street from Stonewall Ceme-
tery in Lee. For more infor-
mation, call the church office
at 971-5585.
May 20
Singles Party, hosted b\
Positive Christian Singles,
meets every Friday at 1650
River Street (1/4) mile east of
Sam's Club, in Valdosta. The
theme for tonight is Tropical
Luau Part\ Dance lessons at
8 p.m., DJ plays countrN.
oldies, and rock from 8:30
p.m. Fun mixers and karaoke
$8 admission includes food
and drinks. For more info.
call 229-242-3797.
May 20
The 20th of May Pageant
will be held at the Madison
County Recreation Center at 7
p.m. For more information,
call Mrs. Parrish at-464-0610
or 973-6262.
May 21
The 2nd annual free
Gospel Concert at Yogi Bear
Jelly Stone Park is at 7 p.m. in
Madison. The Dixie Echoes
and 'The Singing Reflectson s
will be playing. Concessions
and RV Hook Up will be
available. A free loving offer-
ing will be received. For
more information, call 850-
973-4622.


May 22
The annual Homecoming
at Ochlat illa Baptist Church.
1315 Ochlawilla Church Rd..
Quitman, Ga i ill be held \%'ith
services beginning at 10:30
by her a.m. A covered dish luncheon
Lorraine will be served at noon and af-
a sister, ternoon siring \ill be en-
iusband joyed by all. Everyone is cor-
is Law- dially invited to join us for a
Warren day of celebration and fun.
ahassee; May 22
on and St. Matthews A.M.E.
bourne; Church in Greenville will be
)f Talla- hating their \Vashungtou Fam-
. Toby. ily and Friends Day. There
will be two services, one at
11:00 a.m. with Rev. D.J. Bal-
loon as the speaker and one
service at 3'00 p.m. "\ ith Re\.
E. 0. Washington as the
speaker. You are invited to at-
tend both services and make
this a joyful occasion.
May24
Congressman Ander
Crenshav\ \ ill hat e a mobile
it office at the ladison County
SrCourthouse. Room 26. from
I I a.nm. to 3 p.mn. Staff from
Con ressman Crenishaw's of-
t ffice \\ ill be on hand to assist
constituents with casework
and issues of a federal nature.
Advance appointments can be
ige made by calling District Rep-
resentative Chris Calabucci at
386-365-3316.
: l : MAy 25 '
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild will hold it's
monthly) meeting at the
Suwannee County Regional
Library on US 129 S in Live
Oak. This is a change of lo--
cation for the summer months
onl Gloria Comistock of the
Ga nest ille Guild will share
with us a form of applique
ge technique called Broderie
Perse.: The public is wel-
come. For more details, con-
tact Sandy Lindfors at 386-
362-6850 or riverfolk@all-
tel.net. M -
May 26
The officers of the Perry
Shrine Club has changed the
time of their meetings. They
ms. \x\ ill meet the 4th Thursday of
the month at 5:30 for board,
meeting, 6:00 for fellowship
and dinner at 7:00.
S May 27
Singles Party, hosted by
Positive Christian Singles,
meets every Friday at 1650
River Street (1/4) mile east of
Sam's Club, in Valdosta. The
theme for tonight'is Beach
Ball Party. Dance lessons at 8
p.m., DJ plays country,
oldies, and rock from 8:30
p.m. Fun mixers and karaoke.


$8 admission includes food
and drinks. For more .info,
call 229-242-3797.
June 25
The Pihetta School Re-


union is scheduled for 10 a.m.
at the Pinetta Elementary
School in Pinetta. Former
students and their guest -are
invited to come and have a


good time .visiting ith
friends and classmates. You
may bring a covered dish to
be shared at the noon day
meal.


UIMORE THAN 50, WAYS TO PREVENT DIABETES

#15



Eat a small meal, Lucille


"Staying active has done a lot for me. Best of all, it was simple.
I started doing small things like using the stairs and taking walks
during my lunch break. When eating meals I began making healthy
food choices and controlling my portion sizes. Because diabetes runs
in my family, I know that it is important for me to take control of
my health. Now I'm on a roll to preventing type 2 diabetes! I feel
like a new woman and I have more energy for my granddaughter.
That's my big reward!"

YOU ARE INVITED to participate in these FREE services if
you have diabetes or want to prevent diabetes:


Group Diabetes Classes
2 Saturday morning sessions on May 14, and 21, 2005,
Call the Madison County Health Department to register:
973-5000, extension 112


Doers Club Diabetes Support Groups
Monthly meetings
,* Call Madison County Health Department for more information
at 973-5000 extension 101


Individual Diabetes Counseling
Contact your doctor for a referral to the Madison County Health Department
* Call the Madison County Health Department for more information at 973-5000


Take Your First Step Today. For more information
about diabetes prevention, call 1-800-438-5383 and ask "


for PMore Than 50 Ways to Prevent Diabetes"

"Funding provided by the Florida Department of Health's
Diabetes Prevention and Control Program and the center
for Disease Prevention and Control."


birg ran~nrds
PmovnttvpfuQtxabetes
www.ndep.nih.gov


A message from the National Diabetes Education Progra, sponsored by the National Institutes or Health and the Conter for Disease Control and Prevention.


Trina Ann


Wollschlager


Certificates of Depos

Provided by Keith Hargrove., State Farn
FIXED RATE
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT
Effective from Annual Percenta
05/11/2005 05/M/200S ntere Rates Yield APY
90-da3I 2.62 2.65%
180-dai 'I' 3.00h( 3.05%,
1-year 3.20 % 3.25%
2-year 3.83% 3,90%.
3-%ear 4.02%. 4.10%.
4-year 4.16% 4.25%
5-year 4.26% 4.35%
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Effective from interest Rates Annual Percenta
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90-day ** 2.71% 2.75 %
180-day** 3.10% 3.15%
1-year 3.30% 3.35%
2-3ear 3.92% 4.00%
3-year 4.11% 4.20%
4-year 4.26% 4.35%
5-year 4.351% 4.45 c
Minimum opening deposit required for a Jumbo CD is 100.000.
** IRA Certificates of Deposit are hot available in 90 and 180-day ter





STATE FARM SELECT AGENT
KEITH G.

HARGROVE
200 W. Base St.
S (850) 973-6641

moaM FDIC





Friday, May 13, 2005


6A The MadisonEnterprise-Recorder AROUND MADISON COUNTY


omed GoMd


From the union of Napoleon and Catherine
James Honeywell emerged two children, Mar-
ion Shunn and Dana Lynn Honeywell; both are
currently practicing respectively in the fields of
pharmacy in Tallahassee, and law in Jack-
sonville.
On May 14, 1972, the first-born, Shunn,
was and within him over the years, his parents
instilled the importance of education and a
spirit of excellence and achievement. With
tenacity and perseverance, he matriculated
through the Madison County School system
and graduated fourth in his class in May 1990.
While in high school, he marched with the
band for four years, two of which he served as
the drum major. Determined to attend college,
Shunn enrolled in preparatory courses that
would enable him to be marketable to universi-
ties nationally and maintained a 3.75 grade-
point average until he received his diploma.
Subsequently, he attended the nationally
renowned Florida A&M University College of
Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences from
1990 to 1997. In 1995, he received a Bachelor
of Science degree in Pharmacy and immediate-
ly, reenrolled at his alma mater to study doctor-
ate courses in pharmacy; he was awarded the
Doctor of Pharmacy degree in 1997. Because
of his zeal to pursue a career in higher educa-
tion, in 1998 and 1999, he completed two one-








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year post-doctorate residencies in home-health cepted by the office of student activities and the
care and community pharmacy. Successful res- vice president of student affairs to become the
idency completion would allow him to lead advisor of the Pan Hellenic Council.
apply for professorship at any major This organization, comprised of all
university or ivy-league school in nine social fraternities and sorori-
the United States. ties, is arguably, the most influ-
January 2000 marked a ential student organization at
pivotal point for Honeywell, Florida A&M University, sec-
as he transitioned from a re- ond only to the student gov-
search and practicing resident ernment association. He is
to an assistant professor of also an advisor of Alpha Phi
pharmacy practice. During his Omega, a national service fra-
five-year tenure as an assistant eternity, and the first student orga-
professor, he has amassed a number nization that he joined while in col-
of accolades, some of which include: lege, as well as, a past advisor of the Al-
"Teacher of the Year" three times, once from pha Xi Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity,
the student body and twice from the pharmacy Inc., under the tutelage of Dr. Edward R. Scott
faculty; "Preceptor of the Year" from the Class II, a native Madisonian and Well-known dentist
of 2003; and "Who's Who among America's in Tallahassee.
Teachers," an awarded bestowed upon a He is member of several professional and
teacher or professor that has greatly influenced social organizations including: Kappa Alpha
a student in the top one-percentile. Moreover, Psi Fraternity, Inc., Alpha Phi Omega National
his greatest accomplishment has been nomina- Service Fraternity, Inc., Kappa Psi Pharmaceu-
tion and acceptance to write chapters in two of tical Fraternity, Inc., Rho Chi Pharmaceutical
the five most notable pharmacy instructional Honor Society, and International Masonic
textbooks, Remington: the Science and Prac- Lodge #433, Florida Pharmacy Association,
tice of Pharmacy and Pharmacotherapy Essen- American Pharmacist Association, American,
tials, which are both heavily referenced and Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists and the
utilized by pharmacists and pharmacy students Non-Prescription Medicines Academy, a facul-
around the nation. This year, he has also been ty-based organization, _sponsored by Proctor
accepted as a contributing edi- and Gamble Cooperation, which for participa-
tor for US Pharmacist, a popu- tion, elects and sponsors annu- -
lar journal for pharmacists' ed- ally, only one professor from
ucation, and nominated to two each of the major universities
I other editorial boards and one involved in teaching o\er-the
Board of Directors in promi- counter drugs;. .ou
$C k nent pharmacy organizations. Last year, Dr. Honeywell
Additionally, his appoint- was promoted to an associate
ment, in 2002, to the Center of professor and is, currently,
Excellence affords the oppor- awaiting an official letter in
tunity to train the brightest stu- June granting tenureship, a
dents at Florida A&M Univer- document declaring that he
sity in research methodology, can never be fired from his
publication and public speak- current position, from the
ing. Dr. Honeywell has been a Board of Trustees. The
lIl speaker for over 15 pharmacy process of promotion and
4k ~conferences around the state, tenure is grueling and requires
educating pharmacists about an applicant not only to be
k the newest trends and informa- judged in the areas of teach-
B tion in clinical practice. ing, research, publication and
Because of .his willingness service, by his peers, but ulti-
to contribute to overall student mately, by the president of the
S development, in 2003, he was university. Both processes re- -
;,*,*-> i,:ji ..ffieially nominated and' ac.' quire one year for application .-'. .,


review.
Yet, in his spare time, he still manages to
work for a number of national pharmacy com-
panies which include: American Home Patient,
a home-health care facility, as a clinical phar-
macist and residency preceptor; HEALTH-
SOUTH Rehabilitation Hospital as a clinical
pharmacist and intern preceptor; and CVS
pharmacy as part-time retail pharmacist.
Finally, when asked to provide recommen-
dations to the youth of. Madison County, 'he
commented, "Keep GOD first. Stay humble.
Respect your parents. Always remember your
manners-because in many cases- it will ad-
vance you farther and faster than education
alone. Study hard, put your best foot forward
and surround your self with positive and influ-
ential people because only 'iron can sharpen
iron'. With hard work and determination, you
can dream and achieve anything you desire if
you truly believe in yourself: GOD assures, in
his word, a man is only what he thinks of him-
self. Laistl, au. m) mother would say, a memo-
rable life or career is not remarkable because of
money or awards, but because of the people
one manages to help along the way."
"And Momma, for ALL of your inspiring
words of wisdom, encouragement, love and
support, I thank you. You are an. angel from
Heaven and truly, a virtuous woman. Ma N
GOD always Bless Madison, Florida." he.said.


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Friday, May 13, 2005


8A The Madison Enterpise-Recorder ARO UND MADIS ON COUNTY


Senior Citizens Learn




About Work oMCDC


Camp Keystone,

Where Every Kid

Can Be A Star
Bill McCrea
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Camp Keystone, in conjunction with the Salvation Army is
providing a program for under-privileged kids cannot afford the
$175 camp fee. The camp has set space for a dozen or so boys
and girls, but Salvation Army volunteer Lo Taylor feels like the
organization and camp will allow for more.
The camp is located in Starke and is mainly a wilderness-
camp that has made space for children who qualify for the Com-'
munity Service Camp for ages 7-12 who meet the low income
requirements.
Children will be placed in cabins by age and there will be
separate living quarters for boys and girls.
Camp begins with supper on Thursday, July 14 and ends
with'breakfast on Monday, the 18th.
Campers should plan to arrive at camp shortly after 12:45
p.m. and no later than 3 p.m..
A parent or guardian must sign camp application forms
(Parent Authorization and Summer Food Sern ice Program i.
All camp registration forms must sent in b\ June 1, 2005.
Campers,should phone in program changes by the date listed on
the registration form.
"The Community Service Camp is for low income house-
holds. So, I'm looking forward to signing-up at least 25 kids in
Madison County who meet the requirements; however, if I go
over 25, the Salvation Army will make the necessary accommo-
dations," said Taylor.
If more information is needed, call Lo Taylor at 973-4572.


HAIR STYLIST

Julie Wood
. .:ba .,mass^SiSSS..


Now available

,. for appointment

at

STACY & COMF
30,5 Sumter St. in Madiso


CIL. 973- I


e

nts


)ANY
n, FL


385


By Mike Moore
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The 55 Plus group in
Madison County gathered for
its regular lunch and meeting,:
Wednesday, May 11, at the
United Methodist Coopera-
tive Ministries Building on


Ed Nleggs. of the NMadi-
son County Development
Council, was the speaker at
the May 11 meeting. tGreene
Publishing,' Inc. Photo by
Mike Moore. Maa 11. 2005).
Highway 145.
And once again, a cro\\ d
of between 90 and 100 seniors
was in attendance. Ten times a
year, events are sponsored by
area Methodist churches This
month, the meal and decora-
tions were provided b\ the
First United Methodist
Church of Madison.
The group will gather
again in June, but no meetings
are held during July and Au-
gust each year.
, In addition 1t a light
lunch, the senior citizens are
treated to an informative pro-
gram. There have been repre-
sentatives from go ernment
agencies and presentations on
health care, among other.
Wednesday's speaker was
Ed Meggs, President of Madi-
son County Community
Bank, How ever, Meggs % as
not at the luncheon to discuss


banking or investments. He
spoke about the history and
work of the Madison County
Development Council.
Meggs briefly explained
how the organization began.
In the late 1990s, a group of
30-35 concerned citizens be-
gan to seek ways to help im-
.prove Madison County. They
believed that communication
was extremely\ important, es-
pecially between count\ com-
missioners and the public.
The citizens started with an
old-fashioned towi n hall meet-
ing.
Meggs praised the \\ork
of Tim Sanders. Elizabeth
Bolton. and others \\ho
helped %\ith the MCDC.
Bolton is from the Uni\ersil\
of Florida and offered man\
good suggestions to 1 the
group.
The community leader
explained that changes are
taking place in Madison


Couiity v\ ith more on the \\a .
Many problems confront the
county and the MCDC wants
to help solve them. .
The MCDC recentlN as-
sisted the Madison County
Commission in the search for


a county manager. They \%ere
asked to help narr6\\ the list
of applicants and did so, tak-
ing the original list of 21 and
cutting it to six.
Meggs serves as MCDC
chairman.


Publishing. Inc. Photo by Mike Moore,. la 11. 2005.1
"- : .' '






Publishing, Iic. Photo b) NMike Nloore, Ma) 11. 2005.j


A large crowd of about 91) people attended the noon luncheon and meeting. lGreene Pub-
lishing, Inc. Photo by Mike Moore, Ma) 11, 20051


Suwannee Valley Humane Society
Hosts

Spring Fling On May 14 m
ByJ acobBembry. till p.m. at the animal shelter.
Grccnt PublishingQ. Inc. located on Bisbee Loop, in,
The Suwannee \alle\ Hu- Lee. .


mane Societs will host its
2005 Spring Fling on Satur-
daN. May 14. from 10 a.m. un-


At the Spring Fling, the
Humane Societ3 will also
have a big yard sale and plant
sale, as well as free food.
drinks and other goodies.
The Humane Society now
hihas two thrift stores, a plant
nursery. a dog park and a pet
.cemetery, which are all run by
volunteers.
The animal shelter is lo-
cated on Bisbee Loop. south
of Lee, just off County Road
255, north of 1-10 exit 262.


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Friday, May 13, 2005


AROUND MADISON COUNTY


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9A


ALUCILLA CFRJISTIAN A0ADEMy


DISPLAY YS WORK OF 30T ST4D NTS


By Mary Ellen Greene
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Aucilla Christian Academy held Open House at a delightful
Art Show, which showed the art works of 30 ACA students, at
the Monticello Opera House in Monticello Monday, May 9.,
Linda Rose, the art instructor at Aucilla Christian Acade-
my, told this reporter, "Our exhibition at the Monticello Opera
House included the works of 30 students. We had over 200
works of art, ranging from painting, sculpture, photography, and
ceramics, to jewelry making."
There were about 250 people in attendance at the art show,
which was from 6:00 8:00 p.m. Friends, family, and invited
guests were amazed at the quantity and were pleased with the
quality of the students' art, Rose stated. She added, "Our stu-
dents really outdid themselves."
The Madison County students who showed art included:
Caroline Blair, who said, "I like art because it is a way for
people to express emotions and feelings, sometimes in a beauti-
ful unique way." Caroline is a senior and will be attending North
Florida Community College in the fall. At Aucilla. her acti\ cities
include: Beta Club; Anchor Club, (Historian); Senior Class Sec-
retary; Prayer Warriors group; Yearbook (Co-Editor: Graduation
Committee; Senior Superlative (Wittiest): Honor Graduate;
Who's Who Among American High School Students, and Phi
Theta Kappa. Caroline is the daughter of County Judge and Mrs.


Wetzel Blair of Madison.
Alexandria Searcy, who says, "I like art because it is very,
liberating." Alex will be a senior at Aucilla Christian Academy
next fall. Her school activities include: Beta Club; Cross Coun-
try, (Captain); Class President; Who's Who in American High
Schools; Beta Club; National Honor Society;, Anchor .Club'
(President-elect); and Student Council. Alex is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Searcy of Madison.
Jeremy Tuckey son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Tuckey who
said, "I like art because I can travel a thousand miles with one
picture." Jeremy is a senior and will be attending North Florida
Community College in the fall. His activities include: Golf;
Football; Basketball; Baseball; Beta Club: and Key Club.
Drew Sherrod son of Mr. and Mrs. Jimm\ Sherrod of
Greenville. Drew is quoted as saying: "I like art because it
gives me a way to express how I really feel about myself."
Drew is a senior and will be' attending the North Florida Com-
munity College next fall. His activities at ACA include Baseball
(Pitcher); Basketball, (Forward); and Beta Club.
Brittany \illiams tfhe daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ray-
mond Williams. Brittan' sa\ s. "I. like art because it helps me
express my emotions in a unique and interesting way." Brittany
will be a junior at Aucilla Christian Academy next fall. Her ac-
tivities include: Beta Club. and Cheerleading.


Kelli Greene daughter of Harvey and Janice Greene of
Madison and Tracy and.Larry Spooner. of Bainbridge, Ga. Kel-
li says, "I like art because it helps me demonstrate my unique-
ness. It helps to let go of a lot of stress. It lets me forget the
things around me, and really focus on beauty and importance. It
is m3 refuge." Kelli will be a junior next fall. Her acti\ iries at
Aucilla have included being a Class Favorite; being on the ten-
nis team; Beta Club, and Student Council. Kelli has been an in-
tegral part of the junior varsity football games this year, where
,she sings the Star Spangled Banner before the games begin.
Kelli \\as also the Teen Miss Florida for Madison CounrN. and
represented her county at. the state Miss Florida Pageant in
2004.
Kyle Day son of Tim and Connie Day of Green\ ille.
Kle sa s. "I like art because it gives me something to do."
KN le is a senior at ACA and will be attendin-, Soudliest Geor-
aia Technical College in the fall. His activities at Aucilla haxe
included Basketball and Baseball.


Mrs. Linda Rose, the art in-
structor at Aucilla Christian
Academy, told this reporter, "Our
exhibition at the Monticello
Opera House included the works
of 30 students. lie had over 200
works of art, ranging from paint-
ing, sculpture, photography, and
ceramics, to jewelry making."


Kelli Greene stands in front of her table which displays
her various art exhibits. Kelli is in. the 10th grade at ACA.
(Greene Publishing, Inc. photo by Tommy Greene)


Caroline Blair. a senior at ACA beams as she shows
guests her art exhibit. (Greene Publishing Inc. photo by Tom-
my Greene)


Kyle Day, a senior at ACA, proudly shows guests the var-
ious forms of his art projects he did this year. (Greene Pub-
lishing, Inc. photo by Tommy Greene)


Drew Sherrod, a senior at Aucilla Christian, stands be-
hind his art display at the Art Exhibit this past week.
,(Greene Publishing, Inc. by Tommy Greene).


Jeremy Tuckey, an ACA senior, is proud of his art exhi-
bition and proudly shares his work with visitors. (Greene
Publishing. Inc. by Tommy Greene)


Brittany Williams, of Madison County, shows her art to
friends and family during the Art Show at the Opera House
in Monticello Monday evening. (Greene Publishing, Inc. by
Tommy Greene)


Alex Searcy had a variety of art forms on her table at the
Opera House in Monticello during the ACA's Art Show. Alex
is a junior at ACA. (Greene Publishing, Inc. photo by Tom-
my Greene)


Mrs. Debby Demott, left, a senior sponsor and Music
teacher at Aucilla Christian Academy is pictured with Mrs.
Linda Rose, the art instructor at ACA during the Monday
evening Art Show. The ladies are just two of the outstanding
instructors at the private school. (Greene Publishing, Inc.
photo by Tommy Greene)


Kyle Day, (left), is pictured at the ACA art show Monday
evening in Monticello with his grandparents, Lawrence and
Sandra Day, and the youth advisor at Greenville Baptist
Church, Mary Ann Hughes. (Greene Publishing, Inc. photo
by Tommy Greene)


'






The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7A


Friday, May 13, 2005


David Cook and Matt Odom started out their business venture first dabbling in real estate, but decided to direct their efforts in develop-
ing a lawn care and landscaping business that is still in operation today. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Tommy Greene, February 21, 2005)


Bi Bill McCrea
G,C,:tii Publishing, Inc.
Border to Border Nursery, located on US 90, 12 miles
%kest of Monticello, and 3 miles east of 1-10, offers a vari-
eti of trees and plants and a landscaping service for those
\\ ho don't feel like working in the yard.
"\Ve have Japanese Magnolia, Southern Magnolia,
Drake Elms, Florida Maple, Palm Trees, Azaleas, shrubs,
bedding plants and all kinds of grasses. We have a variety
,,t things to choose from,"-said Matt Odom, co-owner of
the nursery.
B.-,iider to Border has been in operation for about four
\ ears now, and started outas- alandscapingtbusiness.-,gw-
"The nursery has been open for about a year, before
that it served as home base for our landscaping and lawn
care service that has been steadily growing for about four
years," said Odom.


Odom and David Cook started out their business ven-
ture first dabbling in real estate, but decided to direct their
efforts in developing a lawn care and landscaping business
that is still in operation today.
"We-started the lawn care and landscaping service,
buying 10 yard accounts at a time and then buying other
services out. Now, we have about 150 accounts. It's get-
ting bigger every day," said Odom.
Cook became interested in horticulture by experi-
menting with plants in his own back yard.
"I learned about plants and landscaping by playing
around in my own back yard," said Cook.
..f;aw-They sell-plenty of la% n care products at the nursery
such as ferulizer. planung seed, weed killer, sprinklers and
gardening' utensils.
Their business angle is solid. They have diversified
"the landscaping service to cover both home owners and


local businesses, and sell the benefits of having a well kept
lawn.
"Proper landscaping can increase the value of an\
home or business and will also give the yard a better pre-
sentation," said Odom.
On top of all the benefits landscaping has on increas-
ing your home's value, a properly groomed yard is fire
safe as loose branches and fallen trees can easily start
brush fires.
"It's not so much a hazard to have a lot of trees, but
just to have the lawn well kept. Wooded lots can be %erN
pretty, but if there are still trees from the last hurricane la, -
ing around in the \ard. it can be a fire hazard." said Cook.
Border to Border Nursery is open seven, days a x\eek
from 8a.m. to 6p.m. For any other information, call Man
Odom at 877-4550, or 508-1826, or David Cook at 508-
7894.


Border to Border Nursery, located off of US 90,12 miles w est of loftitclo, -mtleseast -i'10On',
Mayhan Drive, offers a variety of trees and plants. (Greene Pubhslihkng;hJ I Photos bTosy-1 Greene, Feb-
ruary 21, 2005) .


aidCook b~emxielretdIhocu

t ure by experimentidug.with plants in his own
lack ard.. (Greene Pulishing, Inc. Photo by
David Cook surveys the yard at Borbe ,order Tm -yison'.En rreeie, Febrr21,,2005)e




., ,P" ., -, I ,.... .








1 OA The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


CHURCH


Friday, May 13, 2005


Happenings At Madison First

By Nell Dobbs mother, Sally Johnson, played piano
May 13, 2005 Brown, Willa and Amy Robinson sand
Indeed Mother's Day was great at church and at home! Very Spirit-filled, Knee." Chamber Orchestra did 'I've(
spirited service Sunday with so much going on. First off, Preacher thanked two /"Jesus Loves Me;" chancel Choir sang
of the fellows for doing what it took to heat the baptismal water. Then he put I.k:... a guest sermon.
a stand in for Little Taylor Copeland so she could see and be seen, asked for / / Prayers of comfort for the family of
her testimony, then baptized her. Then, Brenda Bass gave her testimony and loved by all and touched many lives.
was baptized. Geoff Hill asked for Annette McClamma's (sorry I had her last ... '. Clark and her long life loving people a
name wrong last week) testimony, and then baptized her. Special blessings for everybody every day. Bless her fa
upon them and their families. -family of Preacher Austin Kelley and h
Sweet Baby Dedication for Nathan and Amy Kendrick's Little Jackson, years of preaching, through all he wen
now eight months and full of life and for Eddie and Melinda Richie's Little Kyler %\ ho was third Rutherford, a medic, who picked him up when he steppe
generation to wear the baptismal outfit and slept through it all. Korean War. Earnest prayers for all service people fight
Beautiful Amaryllis arrangement by Bern, Jan, and Mack Smith in lo% ing memory of longer live. Bless all sad people.
Frances and John Smith. Prayers for this family, We give thanks Thursa Williams now\\ lies %\ith he
A neat gift, a long-stemmed pink carnation to all mothers from our church. Thanks! sick among us Lynn Ulrey, \ ho's had surger\: Clyde
So very thankful for so many being in church with their mothers. Hotw blessed we are and still giving thanks for love from God and from eterN bo
also we give thanks for mothers no longer with us. Several mothers had three children present. Jane Wilson; Hettie and Gordon Selman, A.J. Gay: and
The \ouneesi mother as Milton and Donna Driggers daughter with a seven-week old one. Nlay the Lord help us "trust and obey for there's no
Will and Mark Branham were blessed for his mother and her parents to be with them. Her trust and obe'y" and help us pray. "Th\ Will be done in


Baptist

for "4 Joy," Shirley Prentiss, Cindy
"Leaning on Jesus" and later "Bow the
Got Jo\:'" \e all sani china's favorite.
. "Jesus, Lover of My Soul;" and then

Mr. Mack Primmn He was known and
We'll always all be grateful for Ethel
nd living for the Lord and for praying
mily. Also we'll keep praying for the
is life, lo\e for the Lord. for his many
t through. We give thanks for Buddy
,d on a mine carried him for help in the
citing and the families of those who ,no

r sister in Tallahassee. Prayers for the
Paine: Margaret Morris. still sad but
)dy; for Ste\e and Debbie Bass: Bett\
all others.
) other \\a\ to be happy in Jesus bit to
earth as it is in heaven." Amen!


i a


Christian Motorcyclists Meet In Madison

By Mike Moore
Greene Publishing, hIc.
Many of the motorcycles in MNadison County were in one
,place last MNonday evening. The bikes and their riders were gath-
-.'.,'ered at Fat Daddy's Restaurant, 110 East PinckneN Street. It as
--the second meeting of a Christian motorcycle group ihich has
formed in the county. About 25 men and women met to eat. talk
and share their interest in Christianity and motorcycles.
Local resident Nlike Kirkland is one of the group's organlz-
ers. "We welcome people who are interested in motorcycles and
who want to learn more about our faith," he said.
resent at Monday's gathering "%as Ethan Gramm. Florida
state coordinator for the Christian MNlotorcycllsts Association.
His wife Elizabeth was also there.. The couple travels throughout
S Florida, helping the local groups.
-"There are 27 chapters of our association in Florida, al-
though three of them work with-the Alabama group," said .
--Gramm. The organization has a national headquarters in
., .Arkansas. The group encourages members to attend motorcycle
Motorcycles are lined up in donton Madison. Mon- events throughout the country, speaking to bikers and distribut- The Christian bikers enjoyed supper at Fat Daddy'
day evening. (Greene Publi/shing. Inc. Photo by Nilke Moore, ing literature. (Greene Publishing. Inc. Photo b) Nlike Nloore, NIa 9. 20051


May 9,2005)


- it


BARBARA MEMORIAL CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Highwaa 254
Rev. Robert Agner 973-4160
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning wVorship 11:00 a.m.
Esrning \lorship r:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Studi 7:30 p.m.

FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH
1505 East Base St.. Madison Ft.1 32340
Phone 973-2887
Pastor Rusty Bryan ,
Music Director Minnie Lee Newborn
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Church Training 6:00 p.m.
Evening %%orship 7:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting. 11ednesda) 7-8:00 p.m.
Famil3 Night Supper. Ist \Vednesda3 6-7:00 p.m.
Bapnst ,lnBapaprtit \\omen. Music, )iuth Children.
and Fun .After Fibfr programs available
"Where Love Has No Limits"
FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH
One mile north of Madison on 145.
Steve McHargue, Pastor
Gary Gazla, Music Direcior
Jackie %VaILs. Student Pastor
Youth & Cbildren's Ministries.
Active 'bung Adult Ministn .
Office: 973-3266
Morning Worship 9:00 a.m.
Sunday) School 10:30 a.m.
\VednesdaN: Famils Night Call For Schedule
"A Family of Families" "Contemporary Worsh/p"
If interested in a home group, call: 850-973-326
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1113 SE Pinckney St., Madison Fl. 32340
Pastor George Stinson
Sunday School .......:........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 6:00 p.m.
Pastor George Stinson invites you to come and enjoy God's Blessings.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Since 1830)
Horry at Rutledge St., Phone 973-6295
Rev. Lee Monroe FerDon, O.S.L.
Brian Sanderson, Youth Pastor
Jim Catron, Lay Leader
Service of Word & Table 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Sunday NMorning worship p 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday A.11 outh grades 6-81 6:30-8:00 p.m.
Youth (grades 9-12) 7:00 p.m.
Men's Fellowship Breakfast (3rd -Sunday) 8:00 a.m.
Women's Meeting & Lunch (1st Monday) 12:00 Noon
Sunday 11 AM Service Now On WMAF 1230 AM
Everyone is welcome to all events!


GRACE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church in America
1200 North Washington St. 973-2692
Sunday) School For All Ages 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 1 i:00 a.m.
%Wed. Fellow ship Supper/Bible Study 6:00 p.m.
Youth Groups 1st 12th Grades 6:30 p.m.
Choir Practice 7:30 p.m.
Friday Men's Prayer Breakfast 7:00 a.m.
Come Worship And Senrre \ith L's
GREENVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH
1365 SW Main St Greenville. FL
948-2353
Sunday School For All Ages 10:00 a.m.,
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.-
Sunda3 Evening Worship 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Pre-school. Students. Adults Choir Rehearsals ......5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Pre-school Children,
Youth & Adult Bible Studies 7: 00 p.m.
First Sunday even month Men's Breakfast 8:00 a.m. ,
ALL INVITED -

LEE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Caron Ham
Lee Florida Corner of 255 & 90
Sunday Bible Study 9:45 a.m.
Sunday) Morning Worship I 1:00 a.m.
Wed Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Children / Youth Activities 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Adult Choir 8:00 p.m.


LEE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
SHy. 255 South, Lee. Florida 971-5585
Richard Quackenbush, Pastor
Morning Worship 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.
Youth Group :00 p.m.
United Methodist Women
Monday) after Ist Sunda) 7:30 p.m.
Men's Fellowship Breakfast
Second Sunday 8:00 a.m.
Multiple Weekly Bible Studies / Acti cities
S"Connecting The Community With Christ"'


MADISON BAPTIST CHURCH
303 Range St., Madison, FL.
(352) 361-3055
Pastor Daniel Riggs
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Preaching 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Love To Have You Come And Visit Us.


MADISON CHURCH OF GOD
771 NE Colin Kell% Hl)., Madison. FL.
973-6307
Re%. Do Ie Glass. Pastor
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday3 Night Ser ice 7:00 p.m.
MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
"A Friendly Church"
Cherry Lake. FL
850-929-4355
Res. Johnnie Merrick. Pastor
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Pastoral Sunda, Ist & 3rd Sunda, 11:15 a.m.
Youth Church 2nd Sunday 11:15 a.m.
M1ission/Lay3men -4lh Sunday 11:15 a.m.
REAPERS OF THE HARVEST CHURCH
3 Miles West Of Greemille. FL. Hwy 90
Samuel Bass. Sr., Pastor
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night Service 7:34) p.m.
S.4and hen the day of Penteco' wasi fully come.
thty were all ith one accord in one place.'" 4cs 2:1
Everyone' is always welcome
ST. MARY'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
108 N. Horry St.. 973-8338
The Rev. Ben Pfeil Vicar
Joe Boyles Senior Warden .
Sunday) Church School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday) Holy Eucharist 10:00 a.m.
Nlission Board 2nd Sunda) 11:00 a.m.
Episcopal Church Women 3rd Sunday 11:00 a.m.
Visitors always welcome

ST. VINCENT DEPAUL
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH
Meeting & Sumter St., 973-2428
Rev. Ernest Sylvestre, OMI
Sunday 9:00 a.m.
Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday Mass 7:30 a.m.
Thursday Mass 7:30 a.m.
Saturday Mass 5:30 p.m.





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May 9, 2005)







MADISON COUNTY HISTORY The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 11A


Cemeteries


ces In


By Mike Moore
Greene Publishing, Inc.
History in Madison
County goes back quite a
long way. People have been
born, lived, and died here for
many years. So of course,
there are cemeteries in the
county. Lots of them. In fact,
researchers have located over
100 cemeteries in Madison
County. But, before listing
this number in a book of
world records, be informed
that another North Florida
county, Jackson, has about
350 cemeteries.
Hard to believe, but true.
Research into the loca-
tion, and ownership, these
cemeteries have been under-
taken by several individuals
and groups. Elmer Spear of
Elmer's Genealogy Library
and Leigh Barfield of the
Madison County Property
Appraiser's Office are two
people who have done much
to locate some of these al-
most-forgotten places.".
Many of the .cemeteries
are at churches or are private
family -burial plots. This
newspaper has included a list
on this page. It is the most
complete available and_ we
%welcome more information
from readers. Our list has the
cemetery name and the own-
er if known.
A large map on the wall
of the county commission
chamber in the Madison
Count, Courthouse Annex
li-t, man\ of these old ceme-
tc-ner ti IlCS lidcrus "-ho lliaj\
wish to locate a grave or just
visit. Some are not easily ac-
cessible.
Wh\ would someone
,\ant to know about these old
bur ing grounds? In addition
to locating the grave of a
loved one. man\ things about
the count' s history can be
learned there. Nlan) times.
information or e\en a color-
ful saying was inscribed on a
gravestone.
One of the best-kno\w n
cemeteries in the county is
Oak Ridge. located at 601
NW Washington Street. in
the Ciry.of Madison.
An early community
cemetery. Oak Ridge pre-
sents a profile of North Flori-


re 7portnat






county's historyy


Oak Ridge Cemetery, located at 601 NW Washington Street.
(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Mike Moore, May 9. 20051


is one of the best known cemeteries in Madison County.


A historical marker stands at the entrance to Oak Ridge These Confederate soldiers lie in two neat rows at the
Cemetery in Madison. tGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Oak Ridge Cemetery. (Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by
Mike Moore, May 9. 2005) Mike Moore, May 9, 2005)


da history. Located on ap-
proximately eleven acres, the
cemetery was established on
land donated b\ two pioneer
citizens. Among those buried'
there are: William Archer
Hammerly. master builder:
Angus Paterson. former may-
or of Madison and delegate
to the Florida Constitutional
Convention of 1885: Cary
Augustus Hardee, Governor
of Florida; Colin P. Kelly, Jr.,
World War II hero; and 31
Confederate soldiers killed at
the Battle of Olustee.
These soldiers probably
died of wounds received in
the battle, or of complica-
tions, rather than being
killed on. the field. The)
were among those cared for
at the well-know"n Smith
mansion. All 31 are in graves
marked onl) CSA (Confeder-
ate States of America). Fresh
flowers were placed on their
graves on April 26. Confed-
erate Memorial Day by
members of a nearby chapter
of..the United Daughters of
the Confederacy.
The Battle of Olustee
was fought east of Lake City.
on February. 20. 1864. It was
Florida's largest Ci\il War
battle and involved more
than 11,000 men. NlanN be-
came casualties.
The last Confederate
veteran in the county,. James
Wiley Lanier, is buried at
Pineview/Pineland Ceme-
tery.
In the county cemeteries.
S'agraves were-o'ften w ell-tend-
ed for several years. But
gradually, children and then
grandchildren of those
buried in a family plot or
churchyard, also passed
- away, and later generations
did not always keep the
\\eeds cleared, and fresh
flowers on the grave.. The
markers often crumbled or
simple wore away in the
weather.
A brief walk through a
historic cemetery is time
\well-spent.
Area residents owe a
*debt of gratitude to those
who ha\e helped in locating
and preserving these re-
minders of Madison County
history.


^^Cemeterf~fflKes n MaisonCouny..

Cemetery a a a Ow n ( gnown)


Allen Cemetery. Barksdale estate


Allen CemeterN. Barksdale estate
Andrews Family Cemetery
Antioch Cemetery, Antioch Church Cemetery
Archtillery Missionary Baptist Church Cemeter
Aucilla Fire Tower Cemetery, Jefferson Smurfit Corporation,
Barclay Family Cemetery
Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery
Blue Springs Primitime Baptist Church Cemetery, church
Brady Cemeteir
C L United Methodist Church Cemetery
Campbell Famraily Cemetery
Campbell Sink Cemetery, Ron Mathis
Campbell's Church Cemetery
Cherry Lake Baptist Church Cemetery; Cherry Lake Bapti st
Church Cemetery
Concord Missionary Baptist Church North Cemetery,
church property
Cood\ Family Cemetery
Cooksey Famik Cemetery.
"Allen Barbara Sheats of Pinellas County
Corinth Church Cemetery. Corinth Church
Cross Roads Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery
Drew Family Cemetery
Ebenezer United Methodist Church Cemetery
Edwards Family Cemetery
Ellis Property Cemetery, probably Leroy and Patricia Ellis
Evergreen Cemetery, City of Greenville
Faircloth Cemetery
Fellowship Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Fellowship
Primitive Baptist Church
Friendship Cemetery, Friendship Cemetery
t Garner Cemetery
Greenville Pall Bearers Cemetery, James Stephens Greenville
Hacker Gravesites


Hanson United Methodist Church Cemetery, church
Harby Family CemeterN. Green Chapel A.M.E. Church
Harmony Baptist Church Cemetery. Harmony' Missionary Bap-,
fist Church
Hays Cemetery .
Henrderson Cemetery
Hensey Cemetery. Sharon Baptist Church!
Hickor\ Grove Cemetery, Hickory Grole Methodist Church
Hicks Cemetery
Hickstowvn (Hixtown) Cemetery
Hope%%ell BaptistChurch Cemetery.
Hurst Family Cemetery
Jeslamb A.M.E. Church Cemetery, Trustees of Jeslamb Church
A.M.E. Madison
Lanier Cemetery
Lee Memorial Cemetery, Lee First Baptist Church
Leggitt Cemetery
Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery
Midway Baptist Church Cemetery, Midway Baptist Church
Mount Horeb Church Cemetery. Church Association
Mt. Nebo Church Cemetery, Mt. Nebo Missionary Baptist
Church
Mt. Olive Church Cemetery
Mt. Zion A.M.E.. Church #2 Cemetery
Nazarene Church Cemetery
New Hopeful Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery, Mount Zion
Church
Norton Creek (Rowe-Rutherford) Cemetery, Norton Creek
Methodist Episcopal Church South
Oak Grove Cemetery
Oak Ridge Cemetery
Old Oakland Cemetery, Old Oakland
Old St.. Matthews Church Cemetery
Old Walker Cemetery, CJ Reams, Donald Eugene Bailey and


Willianm Sever
Pine Grove Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery
Pinevie\w/Pineland Cemetery, City of Madison
Porter Family Cemetery. Foley Timber and
Land Company in Perry
Radford Denson Family Cemeteri. Church property
Madison, FL
Reaper Cemetery, J.A. & Martha Miller
Redding Family Cemetery, Sylvia and Ralph Paulsen
Redding Hammock Cemetery, Maybe Paul and Lillian Day of
Green\ ille
Rocky Springs United Methodist Church Cemetery
Rye Cemetery, Needham and Harriet Rye Cemetery
S an Pedro Cemetery
Shackleford Gravesite, probably Claude W. Pratt, Greenville
Shaw Bowens Cemetery,
probably Raymond and Frances Mercer
Shiloh Southern Methodist Church Cemetery, United Methodist
Church, Lakeland
Smith Cemetery, John and Sandra Day of Greenville
St. Lukes Church Cemetery, Church
St. Matthews Church Cemetery
Stonewall Cemetery, Stonewall Cemetery
Stroud Cemetery, Suwannee River Water Management District
Townsend Duval Cemetery, Estace Duval Cemetery
Walker Cemetery, Lamont Henderson Cemetery
Washington Family Cemetery,
probably John F. Johnson of Sparr, FL
Wiggins\ ille Church Cemetery North,
Wigginsville Baptist Church
Wigginsville Church Cemetery South,
Wigginsville Baptist Church
Winquipin Pond Cemetery,.
Champion Paper, Lemuel Roberts


Friday, May 13, 2005






12A The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


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School Board Members, Employees

Recognized For Participating In

Excel Fashion Show


School Board Nlember Kenny Hall, left,
receies a certificate of appreciation for par-
ticipation in the Excel School fashion show
from Deloris Jones, right. (Greene Publish-
ing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 3,
2005)


I I



0


School Board NMember Bart Alford, left,
receives a certificate of appreciation for par-
ticipaling in the Excel School fashion show
from Deloris Jones, right. (Greene Publish-
ing, Inc. Photo by Jacob Bembry, May 3,
2005)
By Jacob Bermbr
S Greene Publishing,


U L A Deloris Jones
.. was at the Madison
^^^"i, County School Board
.. meeting on May 3 to
S..'.." recognize school
~ . board members and
employees for partic-
A 25 b. bags $12.00' ipating in the Excel
S School fashion show.
The first-ever Ex-
""c" el fashion show was
Call after dark held to raise money
for the Excel
School's, Parents
8286 I. Teachers Organiza-

948-4816 Priscilla
0- Deloris Jones is
- :. :- ::: ..the president of the
,. ....PTO for the alterna-
':W" y. 360 South 17 miles tive school.


~ul S


*6 *e


Sf m


~uIi~I


FWday, May 13, 2005


,ID o


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7 X.7.,


Section


Qktc 4Ii iohin ntcrpr.se -
4 1 *


. .. "' ". v ',-*
Sports 3B "
Outdoors 4-5B
Annie's Mailbox 6B. .


Students' Poetry

Selected To Be In Book


Maiso Cunytuen


Serves As Stt SntePg


By Mike Moore
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A local high school student has participated
in the legislative process and learned much at the
same time.
Jim Stephens, a sophomore at Aucilla Chris-
tian Academy, served as a Senate Page in Talla-
hassee during the recent Legislati\ e session.
Stephens was sponsored by State Senator Al Law-
son of District 6 and served from April 11-15.
During the session, young men and %% omen
help with the work of the Florida Senate and get


to see first-hand how the, Legislature works.
Stephens was able to ser\'e as Senate President
during a mock session.
Senators nominate \ oun'g people to serene as
pages during the session. The Legislature meets
for 60-days each '.ear and each page \works for
one week during that time. This was the second
year Stephens has served as a page.
The Florida Senate has 40 members, each
representing about 400.000 citizens.
Stephens li es in Green\ ille and is the son of
Rebecca Stephens, and the late Rand\ Stephens.


Students whose poetry was published, pictured left to right: Leroy
(K.C.) O'Neal, James Williams. Gary Givens and Zach Cherry.


Many of Carroll R\als' students at Madi-
son County Central School %%ere selected to
be published poets in the latest edition of "A
Celebration of Young Poets 2(004 Edition"
that was published in April 2005. Lero1 Mo-
bely, a 4th grader; James Williams. a 5th
grader; Carroll (K.C.) O'Neal. a 5th grader:
Gary Givens, a 4th grader and Zach CherrN. a


5th grader %were among the Noung poets na-
tionwide to be chosen.
Rvals integrates a great deal of w rating
into her reading and language arts programs
during the year. She is %ery proud of the
achievement that these young men hate made
and hopes that they \\ill continue to develop
the love for %writing in the years to come.


Adrian Graham Is A Seventh


- reader With, High pes


By Bill McCrea
Grene Piubli sing. Inc.
Adrian Graham is a set -
enth grader who; certainly has
high expectations. He -has al-
ready taken the ACT college
entrance e\am and pased w ith
a score of 17, -'which is im-
pressive for a 13 year-old.'"
says his mother, Joyce Gra-
ham.
This sununer he will at-
ptend the Duke Universitr talent
*program. Graham is current\
enrolled at Madison County
Central School and has a GPA
kof 3.8. The talent program is on
the Unmversirt of Kansas cam-
pus in Lau rence.
Football is another interest
tof Graham's, as he hopes to
ake the squad when he at-
tends Madsi-n County High
School.
.'.


Jim Stephens, a student at Aucilla Christian Academ3 and a Greenville resident, is
shoun with State Senator Al Lawson during the Legislative session. Stephens worked as.a



ni Academy Hon1


.:5th Six Weeks


Adrian Graham is a seventh grader who certainly has
high expectations. He has already taken the ACT college en-
trance exam and passed with a score of 17. (Greene Publish-
ing, Inc. Photo by Bill McCrea, May 6, 2005)


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His mother said he loves to
read- and especially enjoys,
mystery novels..
"I like to read spooky
books like Stephen King
writes," said Graham. '
Some of his favorite sub-
jects are math and science and
he hopes to studs chemistry at
MCHS to prepare himself for a
* future,in medicine.
"I want to go to medical
school after 1 graduate col-
leae.' said Graham.
He is already\ planning to
take oliege level calculus in
12th grade at the MCHS Col-
lege,Dual Enrollment Program.
Graham w as born in St.
Petersburg, but has lived in
Madison since he \\as five
weeks old.
Graham dreams of being a
physician one da\ and opening
his ow% n hospital.
When asked \what kind of
physician he wants to be, he
replies.."The kind that makes a
lot of money!"


Fourth Grade
A Honor Roll
Saba Akbar,, Josh
Williams. Joshua Wood
A-B Honor Roll
Tres Copeland. Russell
Fraleigh, Daryl Frith. Garrett
Holman, Brooke' Kinsle\.
Kailee Morris. Rachael Webb,
Audrey WyVnn

Fifth Grade
A Honor Roll
Abigail Blanton, Taylor,.
Money, Lindsey Pinkard
A-B Honor Roll
Dustiin Bezick. Aaron
Brown, Brigitte Blanton.
Meghan Maultsby. Kasey
Odom, Alaina Pickels

Sixth Grade
A-B Honor Roll
Tar\ n Copeland. Jarrett
Da% is. Nlatthew\ Da\. Cheltsie
Kinsley. Bek\ Miller. Ceira
Roland. Sadie Stokes. Abigail
Vasquez. Emnilv \\ebb. AshlI n
Welch

Seventh Grade
A-B Honor Roll
Brooke Bezick, Wilson
Lewis. Zacc Salsgiver. Brooke


Stewart. Elee Store.\, Josh
Timmons
Eighth Grade
A Honor Roll
Taylor Bowen. Randi Lyn
Flo d. Chelsea Stevens


A-B Honor Roll
Bushra Ak bar, -rittahn
Bezick. Ariel Bl g(i,KKaragan
Hunter. Laturen Ma.iltsby, Kris-
ten O'Quinn. Trent Ragans,
Evan SchrfiLtker. Ale.ji W


ELK'S LODGE




EVERY TUESDAY 7:00 P.M.

JACKPOT- $250
CONSTELLATION $100
SINGLE GAME WINNINGS $25+
$25 PER PACKAGE (PLAYS 29 GAMES)
BINGO PROCEEDS GO TO MADISON ELK'S LODGE CHARITY


The home you want... 0-


where you want it!
*NOT Prefab
*NOT Modular
*Over 70 Customizable Floor Plans


CALL FOR AN.
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229-245-8560 Video
1525 Baytree Road, Suite I *Cosation
Valdosta, GA 31602 H Pre-Qualification
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2B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Training Opportunities


Compiled by Bill McCrea
Digital photography, grant writing, lan-
guages, child care, art and computer courses are
just a few of the online courses now available
from the Community Education department at
North Florida Community College..NFCC is
partnering with ed2go, the world's single largest
provider of online learning opportunities, to of-
fer more than 290 online courses in 30 different
subject areas.
All courses are available in six-week inter-
vals with this month's session beginning May
18. Following sessions begin June 15.
The instructor-led courses are affordable,
informative, convenient and highly interactive.
A seasoned professional educator that takes stu-
dents through their lessons, answers questions
and makes sure no one is left behind teaches
every six-week online course from ed2go.
"All the community education classes are
not college credited classes, so anyone can en-
roll. The classes are less expensive than the col-
lege classes. The ed2go classes, which are on-
line and separate from community education
classes are as low as $79 and escalate from
there. Some of the community education class-
es may be free as the cost will be determined on
how much the instructor wants to charge," said
Suzie Godfrey, Community Education Special-
ist.
Getting started is easy. First visit the Online
Instruction Center at www.ed2go.com/nfcc.
Then click the Orientation link and follow in-
structions to enroll. Orientation will provide


important course information and set up a per-
sonal name and password for students. Enroll-
ment and payment is handled, quickly online
and when the course begins simply return to
the website, click Classroom and log on with
name and password provided during orienta-
tion.
This summer the college will also be offer-
ing adult and children community education
classes.
There are over 20 different classes for kids.
"The Kid's Camp Classes are two to six
hours long and run Monday through Thursday,"
said Godfrey.
"If somebody wants to teach, or if they
have an interesting hobby or skill, they can call
me and offer their services," she added.
The Kid's Camp Classes have morning and
afternoon sessions.
"The first week of June, we have girls soft-
ball, golf, basketball and guitar and voice le-
sions," said Godfrey.
The morning sessions run from 8 a.m. to. 12
p.m. and afternoon classes from 1 to 5 p.m. Stu-
dents are able to choose the classes that they
want and are urged to sign-up soon for their de-
sired schedule.
Students wishing to enroll in ed2go courses
through NFCC must have Internet access, e-
mail and either Netscape Navigator or Mi-
crosoft Internet Explorer. For more information,
contact Suzie Godfrey at (850) 973-9453, or
communityed@nfcc.edu, or visit
www.ed2go.com/nfcc.


Friday, May 13, 2005


F~ I i e ry 1 1 ~ I I


lor~~id'MoieSmltoLa

Mae It irtStpAtNC


They breathe, bleed and even have
seizures. New state-of-the-art SimMan and
SimBaby were the perfect practice for
North Florida Community College's Emer-
gency Medical Service students. The new
one-of-a-kind Mobile Simulation Lab made
its premier stop at NFCC April 26.
The Emergency Medicine Learning &
Resource Center created the lab, which fea-
tures realistic emergency room and ambu-.
lance settings housed within a 45-foot motor-
coach. The lab brings a realistic emergency-
medicine feel to Paramedics/EMTs, nurses,
and physicians throughout Florida. I
Karen Crowe, instructor and part of the
International Medicine Simulation Societi\,
was on board to educate NFCC EMS students
on the specifics of these phi siologically cor-
rect mannequins.


Featured in the SimLab are the Sim-
Man and SimBaby, both of which are
realistic, anatomically accurate mannequins
equipped with a number of features, includ-
ing a realistic airway system; an intravenous
arm; physiologically .correct carotid,
femoral, brachial and radial pulses; and more
than 2,500 cardiac rhythm variants, to allow
for a variety of realistic patient care scenar-
ios.'
"SimLab gives our students the opportu-
nity to wvork with breathing simulators \ ith
full capabilities in a real life scenario % without
having to w ork on actual living beings." said
Rebecca Cash. NFCC Emergeenci Medical
Ser ices Instructor.
For -,more information about NFCC's
EMS program please contact Rebecca Cash
at 850.973.1673 or email CashRO(nfcc.edu.


Immunizations Are Required For

Kindergarten And Seventh Grade J


By Mike Moore
Greene Publishing. Inc.
It is time to begin thinking about and
planning for those things called "shots."
Children entering kindergarten must
ha\e proof of required immunizations.
Children entering seventh grade \\ill
be required to have completed Hepatitis B
Series and Tetanus Diphtheria Booster
shots.


9I~r!Iv -~ 'u~ ~


All shots must be completed before
the first day of school. Children not im-
munized will not be permitted to attend
school.
Parents may call the Madison CountN
Health Department at 973-5000 or their
private physician. Parents are reminded to
have these shots completed to make sure
their child 2ets into kindergarten and sev-
enth grade.


~-


Bill Underhill (Suwannee Co.) is shown inserting a feeding tube with help from the Lab
Operator


Eddie Hand (Suwannee Co.) and Da id Kell3 (Leon Co.i work %with the Lab operator.


Stephanie Dula (Tallahassee) is shown starting an IV.


Please be sure to complete a separate form for each graduate you are honoring.
Enclose a check or money order made out to Greene Publishing, Inc.
for the amount of ads multiplied by $30.
Send your form, the graduate's or graduates' photos) and payment to:
Greene Publishing, Inc.
ENE P.O. Drawer 772.
REENli E ng c Madison, FL 32341
Publishing, Inc -- ggr-d;' 'T. ;-T"" ,
i- ^- ^^w^.^ ^^TOFC^^ ^-7^e- 7**


SUWANNEE-
HAMILTONT
TECHNICAL CENTER


Childcare &

' Pre School

Workers
CDA Equivalency Renewal Class
45 clock hours Make & Take Workshop
May 23 June 16
Mon.-Thurs. 5:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m.
Includes all Curriculum


S415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32064


SCHOOL


FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING
BENEFITS. ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC. 1671260H-F


m -a






Friday, May 13, 2005


SPORTS


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3B


Spring Football Is Going


Strong In Cowboy Country


By Mike Moore
Greene Publishing, Inc.
The opening kickoff for the 2005 football season is still
about four months away, but the Cowboys of Madison County
High are hard at work. It is spring football, and the coaching
staff knows replacements are needed for the talented seniors
soon to graduate.


But, there is no panic at MCHS. An experienced group of
juniors, some sophomores who saw playing time, and the
graduates of an undefeated junior varsity squad are working to
catch the coaches' attention.
"We have about 80 players working out," said Head Coach
Frankie Carroll. "This includes varsity and JV candidates."
High schools may conduct a spring practice in pads after


the first three days. The Cowboys began practice May 2.
The spring game will be played at Boot Hill, Saturday,
May 21, against East Gadsden.
The Cowboys are 24-2-1 in the last two seasons. They
have played in the Class 2A state championship game in three
of the last four years and hope to keep the strong tradition go-
ing.


The Cowboy offense lines up to run a play during spring workouts. (Greene Publishing,
Inc. Photo by Mike Moore, May 10, 2005)


Players on the sidelines await their turn to get into the action. (Greene Publishing, Inc.
Photo by Mike Moore, May 10,2005)


.. :


It is offense against defense at Tuesdai's workoul under
a hot sun. iGreene Publishing. Inc. Photo bi Mike Moore.
Mai 10. 20051


/1I


Baseballers Win,


Softballers Lose At Aucilla


By Mike Moore
Greene Publishing, Inc.
There was one win and one loss in Tues-
day's playoff action at Aucilla Christian
Academy.
The Warrior baseball team defeated First
Coast Christian from Jacksonville, 5-3. The
softball team lost 8-1, to Bethlehem.


K;


It 14


The girls finished with an impressive 18-
6 record and a district title.
In the softball game, Bethlehem pounded
out 15 hits, while holding the Lady Warriors
to six. The visitors took control early, scoring
four runs in the first inning. They added one
in the third, and three more in the fourth.
Bethlehem moves on to a game at Graceville.
The baseball team scored four runs in the
first inning and another in the second in
the victory. It was enough; as First Coast
tallied a run in the fifth and two more in
a seventh-inning rally.
Drew Sherrod threw a complete
game and improved his record to 7-1.
Chris Tuten, Ridgely Plains, and Josh
Carswell led the way at the
!) plate.
The squad, now sporting a
gaudy.,25-3 record, moves on
to the regional sehiifinal game.
That contest will be held at
Aucilla on. Friday, at 4:00.
The opponent will be Rocky
Bayou (15-5), a 9-1 winner
over Altha. Both of Tuesday's
games were also played at Aucilla.


Daniel Sanders works
on punting and place-
kicking during spring
practice. (Greene Pub-
lishing, Inc. Photo by
Mike Moore, May 10,
2005)


131 East 5th Street Tifton, GA 31794 (229)382-9819


Softball Sign-Ups!
The Madison County Parks &
Recreation Dept. would like .
to announce that registra- /
tion for Adult Co-Ed Softball
will begin on May 9, 2005.
Teams may register at
the Parks & Recreation
Dept. located at the _
Recreation Complex. All -
teams must be signed up by Friday, May.
,a 27, 2005. League play will begin
49 on Wednesday, June 1, 2005.
The fees for this year's Co-ed
League will be $300.00.
Teams may pick up a roster
S& oat the Recreation Complex;
\ For more information, contact
j)I Tommy Garner at 973-4640
-- -, or 464-0898.


B MADISON E


BLUEPRINTING & SERVICES


"Affordable House Plans"


Rex Miller, Certified Draftsman
1415 W. Base St., West Hwy 90 Phone: 850-973-9742
Madison, FL 32340 Fax: 850-973-9741


Your Army-Navy Store and More!

SOUTH GEORGIA








4B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder





By Bill McCrea June 13-15
Greene Publishing, Inc. All About Art, June 20-22
The 4-H Day Camps pro- Exploring the Sciences,
vide new responsibilities in (Greenville Elementary) July
leadership, conquering fears, 11-13
practicing new skills, and; dis- All About Art, (Greenville
covering opportunities for, in- Elementary) July 18-20
dividual differences in an envi- These camps are help
ronment that reinforces the val- Monday Wednesday from'9.
ue of each person. a.m. to 3 p.m. (unless otherwise
Campers learn new skills noted).
and test new ideas in a non- There are three-day camps
threatening environment. Spe- for ages 13-18:
cial attention is given to indi- Career Exploration, June
vidual interests and rate of 16-17
progress, and learning how to Natural Wonders, June 23-
work with in small groups, co- 24 (Thursday's Session from 9
operatively making decisions a.m. 5p.m.)
that affect the group. Making & Managing
Kids experience adventure Money, July 14-15
and challenge not usually These camps are held
found in daily home life, and Thursday & Friday from 9 a.m.
develop an appreciation of to 3 p.m. (unless otherwise not-
their natural environment. ed).
Day Camps provide a All camps will be held at
place for youth to make new the Madison County Extension
friends, and to develop mean- Office unless otherwise noted.
ingful relationships with ad- Please do not drop your child
mired and trusted adults and off before 9 a.m. There will be
older teens, having an opportu- no supervision before this time.
nity to play and develop It is important that your child ar-
healthy leisure habits. rive at camp on time; field trip
"Most of the Day camps departure times will be as
will be held at the IFAS Exten- scheduled unless otherwise 'not-
sion Office with two sessions ed.
being held at Greenville Ele- Your child will need to
mentary. There are also going bring a lunch every day; we.
to be a couple of field trips recommend a small cooler (la-
planed to the Mary Brogan -beled with your child's name).
Museum in Tallahassee,. to 4-H: will provide juice and
Camp Cherry Lake for swim- snacks at least twice a day.
ming and one of the teenager Registration forms can be
camps is going to Gainesville picked up at the IFAS Exten-
to visit the Kanapaha Botanical sion Office. All registration
Gardens and the Florida Muse- forms and a $10 deposit are due
um of Natural History's Butter- by May 20. All day camp bal-
fly Rainforest," said Rachel ances are due June 6, 2005.
Kudelko, 4-H Extension Agent. Space is limited, so register
This summer there are early. 4-H Day Camp fees are
five-day camps for ages 7-12: non-refundable. Exceptions to
Intermediate Sewing, June this are required summer
6-8 (Monday 9 a.m.- 12 p.m., school and illness as deter-
Tuesday 9am 12 p.m., mined by doctor's note.
Wednesday 9 am 12 p.m.) For more information, call
Exploring the .Scienc.-e.-. Rachel Kudelko a, s3--4 s


OUTDOORS


Friday, May 13, 2005


Celebrate International Migratory Bird Day


At Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge


The U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service invite the
public to celebrate Interna-
tional Migratory bird Day
(IMBD) on Saturday, May 14,
2005, at the east entrance of
Okefenokee National Wildlife
Refuge. This is part of a na-
tion-wide celebration to focus
attention on one of the most
important and fascinating
events in' the natural world -
the yearly migration of million
of birds between their summer
and winter habitats. Nearly
350 bird species migrate be-
tween nesting habitats in
North American and non-
breeding areas in the southern.
United States, South and Cen-
tral America, Mexico, and the
Caribbean. Spring comes
alive with a dash of brilliance
as many of these colorful
.species, such as the Yellow--
throated Warbler and the
Bachmans Sparro 10to name a
few, wing their way through
southeastern Georgia. The
Refuge, celebration will in-
clude a special birders boat
tour, a beginner's bird walk,
an exhibit showcasing IMBD
posters, activities and crafts,
atid 'an evening "Owl Prowl
program.
The celebration begins
with a special twio-hour Bird-
ers Boat Tour by Okefenokee
Adventures from 8:00 a.m.
until 10:00 a.m. .Egrets,
herons, hawks, cranes, a vari-
ety of songbirds and alligators
are frequently encountered
and the s a.imp scenery is al-
ways spectacular.
At 10:30 a.m. meet at the
Visitor Center for a ran-ger-led
1 1/2 hour Beginner's Bird
Walk. Learn how to look and
listen for one of more than 200
bird species that may bPe found
,-"*- ..... . ..


in the refuge. Listen for shrill
song of the gnatcatchers or
try to spot the canary yellow
Prothonotary Warbler. The
theme for this yea's event,
"Collisions: Clear the Way
for Birds," will also be dis-
cussed.
From 10:00 a.m. 3:00
p.m. at the Visitor Center there
will be Birding Activities and
Crafts along with a special ex-
hibition .of this year's IMBD
poster. Live birds from Sanc-
tuary on the Sapelo will also
be present! Spend the rest of
the day exploring the refuge,
discovering why many diverse
bird species are attracted to
Okefenokee national Wildlife
Refuge.
End a day exploration by
joining the Owl Prowl four
from 6:00- p.m. 8:30 p.m.
Meet at the picnic shelter for a
short presentation by a refuge
iainer about o\ls. From there
participants \~ ill drive their


vehicles along Swamp Island
Drive to the Boardwalk park-
ing lot. The group will walk
less than one mile to the Owl's
Roost Tower, while listening
for Barred Owls and other
nocturnal species. For the
walks and tours, bring binocu-
lars, bug spray, water, and
comfortable walking shoes.,
Space is limited for this pro-
gram so advanced registration
is required for the' evening
Owl Prowl. Contact the Visi-
tor Center at, (912) 496-7936
by 5 p.m. to register and ob-
tain a special jfter-hoaurs pass.
A fee is charged for enter-
ing the refute beloie 4:1)00
p.m. All programs and activi-
ties are free except for boat
tours. Okefenokee Adven-
tures is-offerinc discounted
prices for boat tours if seats
are reserved by Frida\. Ma\y
13.' Reserted seat prices for,
the early niorning boat tour
are $18.50 per adult iage 12


and up) and $11.00 per child
(ages 5-11). Children under 5
are free. Regular prices apply
on day of the event. For tour
reservation contact Okefeno-
kee Adventures at (912) 496-
7156,.
The Visitor Center and
Okefenokee Adventures are
located twelve miles south-
west of Folkston, Georgia, off
highway 121/123. For more
information, about this and
othei special events, please
contact the \isitor Center at
(912) 496-7836 or isit the web-
site at hup://okefenokee.fit s.gov.
Informaton about I\BD and
migratory birds can be found at
http://\, wiw.t:\ s.go/birds/imbd.
The U.S. Fish and
\ildhfe Ser\ ice's nussion is.
\\orkinl,2 ith others, to con-
ser e. protect and enhance
fish, Mildlife. and plants and
their habitats for the continu-
ing benefit of the American
people.


For the week ended May 5. 2005
At the Florida Liestock Auctions. receipts totale0d7.496 compared to last %%eek 8.030 and
6,,972 a \ear ago. According to the Florida Federal-State Likestock Market Ne\\s Service:
Slaughter Co\ s and Bullk ,ere 1.00 to 2.00 higher. Feeder Steers and Heifers stead\.


Feeder Steers:




Feeder Heifers:




Slaughter Cows:


Nledium & Large
200-300 ibs
300-400 lbs .
400-500 lbs

Medium & Large
200-300 lbs
300-400 lbs'
400-500 lbs

Lean:
75.0-1200 lbs


Slaughter Bulls: Yield.Grade
1000-2100 bs,


Frame No. 1-2
S 155.00-210.00
131.00-170.00
124.00- 149.00

Frame No. 1-2
140.00-20" 5.00
125.00-152.00
112.00-136.00

85-90 percent .
46.00-53.00 :

No. 1-2 .
65.00-) 00 O
it+)( ; { ; ,. I







Friday, May 13, 2005 FAR & OUTDOORS


Preserving History At Suwannee Springs


While new construction activities are visible all along the
Suwannee River Wilderness Trail, a team of scientists, architects
and historians is quietly working to uncover and preserve a bit of
history at Suwannee Springs.
The primary goal of the historic preservation project is to
conduct a cultural resources survey of the springs, and to study
the current structural remains and develop a preservation plan for
this famous turn-of-the-century tourist resort.
The work is being financed in part with historic preservation
grant assistance provided by the Florida Department of State's


Bureau of Historic Preservation, Division of Historic Resources,
and by the Suwannee River Water Management District (SR-
WMD).
In the 1800s, visitors from all over the world came to soak in
the sulfur springs, which were thought to have healing properties,
and to be pampered at some of finest hotels of the era. One such
hotel featured a springhouse, the remnants of which still stand.
Today, Suwannee Springs is owned and managed as a park
by the SRWMD, offering recreational activities such as swim-
ming, hiking, biking, fishing, horseback riding and picnicking.


The project team will identify previously unrecorded cultur-
al resources within the park and prepare a final report and man-
agement plan for the park's historic resources.
The .project will provide the underpinnings of a unified ap-
proach for preserving, protecting and managing the cultural re-
sources at Suwannee Springs, and promoting heritage tourism op-
portunities.
Bland & Associates, Inc., a historic preservation consulting
firm with offices in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina, are con-
tractors for the project.


Tobacco


Buyout


Affects

By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Local tobacco farmers will get money when they sell their
quotas this year, but it won't be as much as it was if they had
grown the tobacco
Following a lawsuit, the United States government is forc-
ing the tobacco companies to purchase quotas from tobacco
farmers.
Tobacco leaders tried hard to pass a buyout, and almost
everybody begged for relief from quota declines, high rents and
inflated market prices that made competing in the world market
almost impossible.
Local tobacco growers declined to speak with this reporter
about the buyout, with one noting that it was like "selling your
home. You don't talk about it with anyone because it's private."
The Farm Service Agency website provided the following
information about the buyout:
Overview
All aspects of the Federal tobacco marketing quota and
price support loan programs are ending. Beginning with the
2005 tobacco crop this means, there are no planting restrictions,
no marketing cards, and no price support loans. Signing up for
the Tobacco Transition Payment Program (TTPP) is the final
and only opportunity to receive Federal payments related to to-
bacco production.
The Tobacco Transition Payment Program (TTPP) provides
payments to tobacco quota holders and tobacco producers be-
ginning in 2005.and ending in 2014.
TTPP payments will be made between June and September
2005 for Fiscal Year (FY) 2005. Subsequent payments in future
years will be issued annually during the month of January.
Sign-up
The sign-up period for the TTPP is March 14, 2005, through
June 17, 2005.
r If a tobaceowquota holder or tobacco producer does not sign
up during this period, he or she will not receive a payment for
2005. Sign-ip for this tobacco program is voluntary.
If a producer grows tobacco in more than 1 county, the pro-
ducer must sign up for TTPP in each county.
Eligibility and Payments for Quota Holders
Quota holders are the landowners of the farm where a to-
bacco quota was assigned. To be eligible for TTPP, quota hold-
ers are the owners of a farm with an established 2004 basic mar-
keting quota on their farm as of October 22, 2004, the date the
President signed the bill .that ends the quota system. If you pur-
chased a farm after this date, you will not be eligible to receive
the quota holder payment. Eligible tobacco quota holders will
receive $7 per pound based upon their basic quota at the 2002
marketing year level. -
To prove ownership for TTPP sign-up, a copy of the deed,
contract for deed, will, or other documents that pro\ ide proof of
legal ownership must be provided to the local USDA Service
Center. Parties that have agreed on the distribution of quota in
writing must also provide a copy of the- agreement to the local
USDA Service Center before approval of TTPP contract sign-
up.
If a new farm allotment or quota was established on the


*4-b" Channel Cattish $28.0U0 Per 10
-6-8" Channel Catfish $48.00 Per 100
*Sm. Hybrid Bluegill $34.00 Per 100 *Redear
*Largemouth Bass Black Crappie
*8-11" White Amour Grass Carp Fathead Minnows
WE WILL SERVE YOU
WED. MAY 18 From 8-9 AM at
Farmers.Supply Co. in Valdosta, GA Call 229-242-9911
or Arkansas Pondstockers 1-800-843-4748
Walk-ups Welcome


Local G

farm in crop year 2003 or,2004, the quota holder will not be el-
igible for a TTPP payment.
If the quota holder dies, the right to receive the payment
transfers to the surviving spouse. If there is no surviving spouse,
the right to receive payment transfers to the estate of the quota
holder.
Tobacco quota farms with an existing Conservation Reserve
Program (CRP) contract will be eligible for payments.
Eligibility and Payments for Producers
Producers include owners, operators, landlords, tenants, or
sharecroppers who shared in the risk of producing tobacco dur-
ing any of the 2002, 2003, or 2004 marketing years.
Producers of quota tobacco will receive up to $3 per pound
payment based on their share of the risk in the 2002, 2003, and
2004 crops of quota tobacco.
The annual payment will be calculated by multiplying the
eligible producer's Base Quota Level (BQL) for each farm for
crop years 2002, 2003; or 2004 by $0.10 per pound per year.
For flue-cured and burley producers, the BQL will be equal to
the 2002 effective quota produced on the farm. For tobacco oth-
er than flue-cured and burley, the producer's BQL will be equal


















to the 2002 basic allotment' multiplied by the farm's 3-year av-
erage yield for the years 2001, 2002, and 2003.
To determine an individual's share in the farm's BQL,
USDA's Farm Service Agency (FSA) will use the producer's
share information on the contract in the form FSA-578, Report
of Acreage, for the applicable year..Producers may change the
share percentages. How ever, all producers on the farm for the
applicable year must agree with the division of quota shares, not
to exceed 100 percent. -
If a producer did not share in crop year 2002 but did share
in crop years 2003 and 2004, that producer ineligible for pay-
ment for that producer's, share in the crop in 2003 and 2004.
If the producer dies, the right to receive the payment trans-
fers to the surviving spouse. If there is no surviving spouse, the
right to receive payment transfers to the estate of the producer.
For TTPP contract eligibility, producers must comply each
year with statutory provisions relating to Highly Erodible Land
Conservation/Wetland Conservation and Substance Control ap-
plicable provisions.-Any successor in interest to the contract
must also comply with these provisions
Payments
The contract payments to tobacco .quota owners and pro-
ducerswill be made in annual installments over a 10-ypar peri-
od beginning in 20Q5 and ending September 30, 2014.
TTPP payments will be made between June and September
2005 for FY 2005. FY 2006 through FY 2014, payments will be
made in January of each year.
TTPP payments are subject to administrative offset, under
provisions set forth in the Debt Collection Improvement Act of
1996, which means FSA will collect a producer's TTPP pay-
ments and apply these payments to debts owed to FSA and oth-
er Federal agencies. Payment limitation provisions do not apply


rowe rs

to TTPP producer payments.
The funds required to pay for the TTPP and other related
costs will be obtained through assessments on manufacturers
and importers of all tobacco products totaling no more than
$10.14 billion over the 10-.year period.
Lump-sum Pa} ments. Assignments
and Successor-interest Contracts
The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) will not make a
lump-sum payment to individual tobacco quota holders or pro-
ducers. but a pri\ ate part. may. If a private party enters into an
agreement where an individual quota holder or tobacco produc-
er is to receive a lump-sum pa- ment from them in return for
the individual's rights to TTPP pay ment. the private part\ \\ill
likely request that either the contract payment be assigned to
them as the paj ments are earned over 10 years, or the\ \ ill re-
quest that all rights be transferred under the contract to them by
executing a s-uccessor-in-interest contract with the other prix ate
partN and-CCC. Successor-in-interest contracts W\ill be available
beginning with the FY 2006 payment. Assignment forms are
available from local USDA Serx ice Centers and the3 explain
how to transfer TTPP payments from the CCC to another party.
The successor-in-interest form will be a ailable this summer.
Types of Eligible Quota Tobacco'.
The kinds of tobaccos provided for in the buyout bill and
.the States in which h the) are produced include.
Flue-cured (types 11-14); Flue-cured tobacco is produced in
the States of Alabama, Florida. Georgia, North Carolina, South
Carolina and Virginia.
Burley (type 31); Burley tobacco is produced in the States
of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky,
Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Virginia
and West Virginia. .
Fire-cured (types 21-23); Fire-cured tobacco is produced in
Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia.'"
Dark air-ciured (types 35-36j; Dark air-ctred tobacco is pro-
duced in Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee.
Virginia sun-cured (type 37); Virginia sun-cured tobacco is
produced only in Virginia..
Cigar filler/binder (types 42-44 and 54-55); cigar
filler/binder is produced only in Wisconsin.
For kinds of tobaccos other than flue-cured and burley, the
yield is determined by using the average 3 field for 2001, 2002,
and 2003 for that kind of tobacco in the county in which the al-
lotment is assigned.
When was TTPP created?
On October 22, 2004, President Bush signed the American
Jobs Creation Act of 2004, which included the Fair and Equi-
table Tobacco Reform, commonly referred .to as the "Tobacco
Buyout." USDA,: which is charged with administering the pro-
gram, titled it the Tobacco Transition Payment Program.
More Information
Please go to your USDA Service Center for more informa-
tion. You can also visit the USDA/FSA Tobacco Web site at
wwwX.fsa.usda.sdgo'ithoba.


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The Madison Enterpiise-Recorder 5B













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flaps are invented. They took awhile
to catch on in Britain, where it was "
thought impolite to send your saliva .
to someone else.

In 1856, the British medical journal -
Lancet started publishing a debate ''
among readers concerned about the / ,
health risks of tobacco.

In 1867, M0ther's Day %as created b'
Mary T. Sasseenof Henderson,
Kentucky. It became a national holiday In 164-, in Windsor, Connecticut, Achsah Young
in 1916. became the first person inscribed in the annals of
colonial America for being executed as a witch.,


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.Ma a 13, 1955 Edition
Red De ils Hit Stride
The MHS baseball team started too late to win
the NFC crown, but is riding high at tournament time
with 3 straight w ins. They defeated Monticello, 9 to
S1 Tallahassee, 14 to 6: and Mayo. 12 to 9 as their hit-
ting came to life. Their season record is 'now 7 wins,
5 losses and one tie. due to darkness.

Madison Asking For Timber Damages
Representative Jones of Madison introduced a
bill in the Legislature requesting payment of $6,000'
to Willie J. Rowell and M. P. Tuten for damages to,
their forest lands due to alleged negligence of the
Florida Forestry Service.

Locals At Freshman Week At FSU
Nencie Bevan, La Rae Barber. Barbara Ann
Naughton, Roberta Selman and Jean Ragans were
weekend guests at FSU.last weekend during Fresh-
man week. Be% an was a guest of Kappa Deltas.
Naughton visited A D Pi friends and Barber, Ragans
and Selman visited the Delta Zetas.

May 14, 1965 Edition
Local Boys To Attend Boys State"
The. following boys from Madison High
School have been selected to attend the 1965,
Florida Boys State: Howard Oxford Phillips,
sponsored by Post No. 68 of the American Le-
gion; Stephen Phillip Beck, sponsored by Madi-
son Lions'Club; and Robert Randell Mickler, Jr..
sponsored by Madison Rotary Club. Florida
Boys State is a project of the America Legion,
,Department of Florida, held every summer on the


campus of Florida State University of Tallahas- gram Chairman. Mrs. E; T. Durden: and Emergency
see. Radio Operator. Mildred Reams.: 1


Super Seller Receives Stock
Bill Garrison is back on the job still selling. He
recently returned from Chicago where he was award-
ed shares of stock for his increased sales over a 30-day
period. Bill is a sales representative for International
Minerals and Chemical Co. and was one of four sales-
men chose from the southern operations area. which
employs 100 salesmen. He said he %\as 'ery pleased,
with .the award and wishes to thank the Madison
County farmers for making his success possible.

Dollars From Smoke
Ren Norris. director of the state beverage depart-
ment. reports that the cigarette tax collections for the
month of March 1965, amounted .to $5,354,741. Of
that amount, $1.670,406 '\ill be distributed to the
state general revenue fund and the remaining
$3.684.406 % ill be distributed to qualified municipal-
ities as follows: in Madison County. the City of NMadi-
son "ill receive $5,669, the City of Greenville will
receive $1,133 and the town of Lee will receive $228.

May 16, 1975 Edition
Radio Club Elects Officers
The Greenville Citizens Barid Radio Club held its'
annual election of officers Saturday, night as they
kicked off their.new membership, drive with a fish fry
in Greenville. New officers elected for the. 37-man
club %were: President, Jimmy Fulford; Vice President.
Paul Bailey; Secretary, G.I W. Pridgeon; Treasurer,
Jimmy Burnette; Public Relations Chairman, Joe
Reams, Jr.; Publicity Chairman, Larry B rummi tt; Pro-.


Military Graduate
Airman Joe Germin, son of Mr. And Mrs. Joe
Gervin,.Sr. of Lee, has graduated at Sheppard AFB.
Texas, from the technical training course for U.S. Air
Force accounting and finance specialists. Airman
Gervin. whose training included special emphasis on
travel and military pay. now goes to Howard AFB.
N.Z., for duty %with a unity of the U.S. Air Forces
Southern Command. A 1972 graduate of Madison
High School, the airman received his associate degree
in 1974 from North Florida Junior College in NMadi-
son .

May 17, 1985 Edition
Nladisonian Appointed :
Stanley A. James, formerly of Madison, was re-
cently appointed to the Board of Directors of the Mi-
ami-Dade Urban League. James attended the public
schools of Madison. After graduating from Florida
A&M University, he attended the University of Flori-
da. He is presently the President of Systematic Con-
struction Company, Inc. of Miami. James is the son
of Mr. Arid Mrs. Sumpter James. Jr.

ACA Accredited
Aucilla Christian Academy has received official
word that it has been granted full accreditation by the
Florida Council of Ifidependent Schools. Aucilla
Christian has been on probationary status %with the
F.C.I.S. for the past three years due to some'areas of
the institution that the Council determined needed
strengthening. :


'I


N


6B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Friday, May 13, 2005


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U.S. Soldier Recalls Horror of Nazi Camp
Bodies stacked like firewood. A concrete slab where dead
victims were dumped for the Nazis to knock out their gold fill-
ings. Former U.S. soldier Harry C. Saunders says he'll never for-
get the searing images first burned into his memory more than
half a century ago.
"The people were just living skeletons," said Saunders, who
came back to Mauthausen Sunday to mingle with former in-
mates, their relatives, Austrian officials and others gathered to
mark the 60th anniversary of its liberation. "Some of them were
too weak even to crawl."
Organizers said more than 21,000 people many wearing
blue and white striped kerchiefs symbolizing the uniforms worn
by camp inmates attended the two-day memorial event ending
Sunday to mark an end to Nazi terror at Mauthausen and its 49
subsidiary camps. Among the foreign dignitaries was Spanish
Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero.
Many survivors have grim stories to tell of the fortress-like
camp and its subsidiaries that claimed more than half of the
200,000 people they held during World War II. Most prisoners
were killed by gassing, shooting, hanging or beating, but in Mau-
thausen itself Nazi guards mostly worked inmates to death in an
adjacent quarry, where starving prisoners had to hoist huge gran-
ite boulders up the 186-step "Stairs of Death."
"We had to walk barefoot on the floor of the quarry,"
Solomon J. Salat, of Elizabeth, N.J., told Austrian chroniclers of
the Mauthausen story several years ago. "We had to run. Pick up
a boulder, shoulder it and then we had to go up those stairs. Then
one had to walk maybe another mile ... before dropping the boul-
der onto a huge pile."
Guards would beat those who fell under the load or set their
dogs on them, and those found too weak to work on were killed,
Threats and intimidation added to the terror. Czech inmate
Bohumil Bardon remembered camp commander, Franz Ziereis
telling inmates: 'The only way back (out) is through the chimney."
Described Sunday as a "piece of hell on earth" by Austrian
Cardinal Christoph Schoenborn, Mauthausen was the last big
Nazi death camp still operating when the U.S. Third Army's 11th
Armored Division arrived on May 5, 1945. Even though its Nazi
guards had fled, locals, were manning the guard towers, when
Saunders, then a young Army sergeant, drove his armored car
through its heavy gates.
U.S. soldiers were not briefed on concentration camps, he
says, and nothing had prepared him for what he would see inside.
"We went through the gas chamber, the crematorium and the
realization ,slowly, grew on us that this was more than just a fqr-
tification of some kind." he told reporters.
"They couldn't burn the bodies fast enough to get rid of
them before we came, and they were stacked like cordwood. You
could hardly recognize them as human beings.
"There was a big cement table, with a groove around the out-
side edge for the blood to run out," said Saunders, of Port Ange-
les, Washington, who on Sunday maneuvered his wheelchair
through the gate to be met by former inmates in a symbolic re-
enactment of what happened 60 years ago., "The inmates said
that's where they knocked out the dead victims' fillings for the
gold.". .. .

pounds of gold fillings to authorities collecting the,metal.,be-
t\ween No% ember 1941. when the practice started there, andApril
1945. .
Keynote speakers at the ceremony moved to May 7, the'
date of Germany's capitulation in Europe spoke in general
terms of such horrors Sunday and said they must never be re-
peated.
Alluding to the responsibility of Austrians who were in-
volved in the mass killings or tolerated them, Schoenborn said
the perpetrators, "were not hordes from somewhere else but peo-
ple like us." Were the present generation, alive during the Nazi
era, he said, no one could say "with any kind of certainty where
we would have stood back then."
Visibly moved, Austrian President Heintz Fischer said that
Mauthausen's horrors remain "unbearable" even though they
were committed six decades ago.
People were tortured and killed for no other reason than "ha% ing
a Jewish mother; coming from a Roma (Gypsy) family; being ac-
cused of being homosexual, or were Christians, or deserters or
Russian prisoners of war or Spanish freedom fighters," he said.


The commemoration was a reflection that official Austria
has acknowledged the country's role in the Holocaust and other
Nazi atrocities after decades of denial fed by arguments that the
country was the first victim of Hitler, who annexed nation in
1938.
That version of history started fraying in the mid 1980s.
Since then, the government has paid hundreds of millions ;of dol-
lars in compensation to Nazi victims or their offspring, and po-
litical and church leaders routinely speak out against anti-Semi-
.tism and other forms of intolerance that fed the rise of Hitler in
this country and Germany.
Still, Joerg Haider led the rightist Freedom Party into the
government 'in 2001 with populist rhetoric sometimes tinged
with anti-Semitism. And a poll published earlier this month had
more than 40 percent of the hundreds of respondents saying that
Nazism brought Austria good things as well as bad.
In his comments Sunday, Fischer touched on lingering reluctance
by some Austrians to face up to the past,
"Looking the other way and suppressing things is not the an-
swer," he said, comparing the barbarity of the Nazi.regime with
the pride Europeans have in their continent as a cradle of culture.

Nevada Looks At Taxing Prostitutes
Nevada's legal brothels are feeling like the wife who slips
into her sexiest negligee and still can't get her husband to put the
newspaper down.
The bordellos are practically begging the state of Nevada to:
tax them, hoping the extra revenue for schools, parks :and health
care will endear them to the, public and give them more political
security and, ultimately, more business.
But the politicians are not interested.
Last month, one proposal to impose the tax failed to come to
a vote,in an Assembly committee: another was gutted in a Sen-
ate committee. A spokesman for Republican Go\. KennM Guinn
said the idea was "not something the governor is going to waste
any time,on."
Nevada is the ,only state where prostitution is legal. But the
state keeps the industry at arm's length. It does not levy a busi-
.ness tax on houses of ill repute, it bars them from advertising.
and it doesn't allow them in the state's biggest urban, area, Las
Vegas.
In fact, the decision of whether to allow prostitution is made
on a county-by-county basis, with state law largely silent on the
matter.. .
"We're the only industry in the state that in one move of the
Legislature or the governor can be swept aay\ entirely." sa1id
Nevada Brothel Associauon lobbN ist George Flint. "If more peo-
ple mo'e to ttus state %with Nebraska or Iowa or California li-
cense plates, the old Net ada mentality) that al] ai s tolerated us is
going to be diluted."
So Flint came up with a solution: "Look, if we contribute and
do nice things for the state, ma\be the state 'will like us better."
Two years ago during a budget shortage, the brothels came
close to getting their wish, but last-minute negotiations inadver-
tently exempted them from a tax on live entertainment.
This year, they had an unlikely ally in an anti-prostitution
lawmaker who sponsored a measure proposing a tax of about $2
Super cu.tomrner It .: eC\pec.'d to brain$ '-i 2 n milli>'n i t, ihe
state overthe next two fiscal
years. H S I
I iV~~rMo -S.al fX ..


"I don't believe in legal
prostitution, but I'm not a
zealot about it, either," said the
sponsor, Assemblywoman
Sheila Leslie, a Democrat from
Reno. "They're a legal buisi-
ness, they should contribute
like every other legal business,.
and I'm willing to make that
happen."
Brothels are legal in 10 of
Nevada's 17 counties, which
charge a quarterly business fee
ranging from; $100 to $20,000
and a work permit fee of $50
per prostitute.
Some counties, get as,
much as 25 percent of their


The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7B


business fees from brothels. Lyon County, home to the famous
Moonlite Bunnyranch, will collect $316,000 in brothel business
fees and $25,000 in permit fees next year.
But many brothel owners are willing to pay more. The
state's-28 bordellos make $20 million to $50 million annually,
said Geoff Arnold, president of the Nevada Brothel Association.
Many think paying a tax will ultimately help them lift the
ban on advertising. They want to be able to use billboards or
fliers, or at least advertise openly in the phone book. I Brothels
are now listed under "massage" in the Yellow Pages.)
Bobbi Davis, owner of the Shady LadN Ranch. a brothel
about 120 miles outside Las Vegas, said paN ing taxes is the w ay
to go.
"There's a price, sometimes, for legitimacy." he said.-,,;
Prostitutes at Shady Lady Ranch make up to $1.000 daily
during peak tourist season, she said: (Brothels and prostitutes are
subject to federal income tax on their overall earnings, but Neva-
da has no state income tax.)
Flint said the tax offer stands, should future legislatures w ant
to take him up on it. In the meantime, he said, "I bow% to the w is-
dom of the Legislature."

Renee Zelhlweger, Kenny Chesney Wed
Actress Renee Zell, eger, ho plaN ed the lovelorn title char-
acter in "Bridget Jones's Diary." was married Monday to coun-
try music star Kenny Chesney in a small ceremony on the
Caribbean island of St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
The ceremony took place in front of close friends and fami-
ly, Los Angeles-based publicist Nanci RNder said in a statement.
It is the first marriage for both.
The bride'wore a dress designed by Carolina Herrera. she
added.
Chesnev. 37. grew up in eat Tennessee and now lies on the
island of St. John. whilee Zellwieger. %%ho turned 36 two weeks
ago. is from Kat\. Texas.
The couple met at the Concert of Hope tsunami relief bene-
.fit Jan. 15, where Chesne\ waas singing and Zellieger %%as an-
swering telephones, the syndicated television news magazine
"The Insider" reported.
Zellweger won a best supporting actress Oscar for Cold
Mountain. She was nominated for Oscars for her work in Chica-
go and Bridget Jones's Diary.
Chesney currently has two albums on Billboard's top 10
country albums chart. and his single "Any thing But lMire" i& No.
6 on the magazine's hot country songs list.
Chesney \\as named Countr\ Music Association entertainer
of the N ear in No\ ember. \ lhile his -When The Sun Goes Down"
w\as named album of the year. Other of his hits include "Me and
You" and "She Thinks M, Tractor's Sexy."
According to Counniy 11eekly magazine. Chesney long ago
named Zellweger as his fa orite actress and %was inspired to write
his 1999 hit "You Had Me From Hello" after seeing her in Jerry'
Maguire.
Zellweger appeared at a recent Chesne\ concert in Jack-
sonsville, presenting him with a margarita and a kiss on stage,
Country Weekly magazine reported.
Zellweger has dated White Stripes singer Jack White and
./1 A1 s/& A lixii i i Caj .....
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Friday, May 13, 2005


NATION & WORLD NEWS







Friday, May 13, 2005


8B The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Security Systems
Lifetime Warranty
Monitored 24 hours. Burglar and
Fire. Hardwire or wireless mo-
tion detectors. door contacts',
glass break detectors, heat and
smoke detectors, panic buttons,
and many brand new and innov-
ative ideas offered only by this
company. BEST PRICES!!
William Greene-Security Con-
sultant 973-6131


Peacock's Landscaping
Lawn Irrigation
Drip Irrigation
Design & Free Estimates
(850) 973-2848

Excavating Work
Land Clearing, Ponds, Stump Re-
moval, Demolition, and Roads. No
Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call
Paul Kinsley at 5 .-" ''3-6326


a a



25%



Off

On new "For Sale" or
"Yard Sale" Ads.
Now a $10 ad only costs
you $7.50!
So get your sale items to-
gether and give us a call to
advertise.
850-973-4141
This offer is good until:
May 27, 2005.


1974 VW
--' "Thing". .
Runs Good, Accepting bids,-hae
the right to refuse any and all bids.
Call Tommy Greene 850-973-4141


2001 Honda ATV
Fourtrax 300, new tires, excel-
lant condition $2300. 850-973-
2301


1965 Plymouth Fury
Good Condition,
$1,500 CASH. 383 Engine. This
car is driven everyday. First person
with the cash gets it. 850-673-1837


BED $275, Solid wood cherry
sleigh bed. New, still boxed. 850-
222-2113
5 PC BEDROOM SET New in
boxes. Headboard, frame, dresser,
mirror, nightstand. $475. 850-425-
8374
QUEEN PILLOW TOP matress
set. New in plastic with warranty,
Sacrifice $175. 850-222-9879
251bs. of
Clean Bundled
Newspapers
$2. each.
850-973-4141

Brand new Micro Fiber Sofa. Hard-
wood frame, lifetime warranty.
Must sell, $275. 850-425-8374,
New Bedroom: 7 piece sleigh bed
set, $775. In storage, unopened
boxes, can deliver. 850-222-2113
Matress Set, NEW King Pillow Top
Matress and Base in sealed pl.tisic.
factory warranty, $275. 850-545-
7112


Liesoc


Sitter
Homes Livestock -
Dogs Cats Parrots
Keep your animals in their own
environment. I'll come and fced.
water and play with .'iun pets.
No more worry about kennel
cough or the stress of being
away from home. Farm owner
with 30 years experience with
livestock, cats, dogs and Parrots.
Home Visit and Care
$10. daily
Services Available:
* Bring in your mail Turn
lights on/off Check air/heat,
doors, locks, windows. check
property, gates, fences. give
feed/hay. custom services ne-
gotiable.
References gladly given.
Call Susan.at 850- 948-5097
-,.; evenings before 9 pi.'

ag "


Place to Hunt Wanted
I'm looking for a place that my son
and I can hunt on. We can't afford
big hunting clubs. Willing to ex-
change work for hunting in the Lee
or Pinetta area. Please call 971-
4474




Registered
Chesapeake Bay Retriever
puppies, ready to go. 4 males and 6
females. Call Tanya at 971-5362

Pointer Puppies
3 puppies, 4 months old,: all are
chocolate speckled pups. If in-
terested please call:
386-364-1652


BEAUTIFUL 131 ACRE FARM NEAR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA, PLUS FOUR
OTHER PROPERTIES!

ISATURDAY, JUNE 11, 2005 10:00 A.M.

IROPERTY-0. -5 WAREHOUSE BUILDINGS IN VALDOSTA


PROPERTY #2 -COMMERCIAL BUILDING IN LAKELAND
PROPERTY 3-7 ACRE HOMESITE IN S. LOWNDES CO.
PROPERTY #4 131 ACRE FARM IN SOUTH


SLOWNES COUNTY. Beautiful Homesites,
Ce nlton Oak Trees, Good Cropland, 17
Yeair Old EPlanted Pines, Deer & Turkey
| wamg, Only 6 Miles From Valdosta Near
Wild Advetures. Will Be Offered Divided
.tao 8 Twactx, Buy One, Buy Several, or Buy
AMI Opr, Htouse: Sunday, June 5, 2005 from 2 till 5 p.m.

SALE SITE: Lwndcs County Civic Center, Building "D", 2102
East Hill Avenue, Valdosta, GA. 10% Buyer's Premium
Call for a FREE Brochurol 242-5412 or 800-334-9724
Brochure on Line at www.professionalauctioneer.com


ACel.ebranng Florida's Di'verse
FOLKIFESTIAL in "u.~lfteSpring. FL
Music.HERiTAoE.LEGEND. NMAN' 2 T.2 9. -7003
Exp.--rm-. Id I 1.,ru. 'fed Fi I-r~um %Lom lelLnrg crift' did CUlture-.
PIUS lr n-M%1'. Ii .~ irrI.. .~lo 7.cr3 -,pr ~i' fo~Irmer,

-1,41 ...... me C, 'Isj.... 11g 10p. llJ i.111l 1 ).i fn
I,.,. f ,.,il.Cobcl..,Iaf'f.lfIf.Qatl lt ,1 (~t itL


l-. '

southern m Villas o

\(acdison (apartments/

HUD vouchers accepted. 1,2, & 3
BR, HC & non-HC accessible apts.
Call 850-973-8582/ TDDTTY 711.
200 Southern Villas Circle, Madi-
son, FL 32340. Equal Housing Op-
portunity.
Martin House
Downtown Madison
1 Large efficiency $275.
1 Large 2 bedroom $450.
Heat & Air, mature responsible
adults. No children and No pets.
Call 850-578-2781


Greeriville Pointe

Apartments

1,2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible apts. HUD vouchers accept-
ed. Call 850-948-3036. TDD/TTY
711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal
Housing Opportunity
For Rent Near Blue Springs
3 bedrooms/2 bath, mobile home.
All electric, central air, large, front
deck & screened rear porch. 1 year
lease, $500 per month, $500 securi-
ty deposit. 971-5152
Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed foi Se-
nior's and Disabled. 1 &,2 bed-
rooms, HUD vouchers accepted
Call 850-973-3786 TTY Acs
711 Equal Housing Opportunity

For Rent Cherry Lake Area
Doublewide mobile home, 3br/2ba,
central air. Located on Fish Lake. 1
year lease, $600 per month, $600
security deposit. 971-5152
Home For Lease
Lake Front
2 bedroom, 2 bath home, conve-
nient to town, fish from backyard
or launch boat from ramp. $700mo
+ $700dep. One year lease. No
pets. 850-973-3025



WANTED
3 to 5,.acres, rural, large,oaks,,
will pay up to $5,000 an acre.
810-733-9945
brianjlowe @ comcast.net



a
$CASH$ Paid for land, acreage,
homes or mobile homes ~ ith
property. Top dollar paid \.ith
quick closing. Call Ben (386)
365-7653


Help ante


Employment Opportunity
Madison Counl
Building Department
Job Title:
Administrative Assistant
Job Duties: General office work of
a complex nature performing a va-
riety of tasks involving bookkeep-
ing, intermediate to advanced com-
puter skills, and constant interac-
tion with the public and other
County offices on a professional
level.
Minimum Qualifications: Consid-
erable knowledge of business' Eng-
lish, spelling, and commercial
arithmetic Ability to conduct re-.
search, collect and analyze data,
and prepare written reports Abili-
ty to prepare and monitor budgets *
Knowledge of office equipment
(computers, fax, etc.) Ability to
act. independently and make re-
sponsible decisions* Ability to es-
tablish and maintain cooperative
working relations with government
officials, other employees, and the
public* Associates Degree from an
accredited college, or university and
four (4) years secretarial or admin-
istrative experience.
Pay Range: (Hourly $8.27-$12.44);
Application Deadline:Friday,May
13, 2005 at 12:00 P.M.
Employment applications must be
'obtained from and submitted to the
County Commission Office be-
tween 8:00 a.m. and 5!00 p.m.I
Monday thru Friday located in the
Courthouse Annex at 112 E. Pinck-
ney Street, Room 219. Nadison.'FL
32340. For further inlormaion on
the job itself, contact Heidi He-
manes, Administrative Assistant to
the Board of County Commission-
ers at phone number (850) 973-
3179.
Madison County is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer and a Drug
Free Workplace.

$$ AVON $$
Be your own Boss!
Earn 50%
Sell $500, earn $250
Starter Kit is only $10
Call Dorothy 973-3153


Director of Nursing-Lake Park of
Madison, a 120 Bed Skilled Nurs-
ing Facility in North Central Flori-
da. Seeking high energy, experi-
enced RN to help us become a 5-
Star Facility. Proven leadership &
management skills, including
scheduling, regulatory compliance
and budgeting required. Long-Term
Care experience is preferred with
expertise in Patient Outcomes. Ex-
cellent starting salary/benefits.
Mail resume to 259 SW Captain
Brown Road Madison, FL 32340.
LPN's PRN 11pm 7am
CNA's FT 3pm-llpm / llpm-7am
Madison Nursing Center
973-4880
English Instructor
North Florida
Community College
Madison, FL
English instructor to teach compo-
sition and developmental'
writing/reading at small, rural com-
munity college in Madison, FL. Be-
gins 8/1/05.; MA in English re-
quired. Graduate work in composi-
tion and/or developmental writ-
ing/reading strongly preferred:
Community college teaching expe-
rience preferred. Will teach 15
credit-hours/semester, establish of-
fice hours; participate, in depart-
ment, college activities. May teach
day/night classes both on/off cam-
pus. Interviews will include presen-
tation using instructional technolo-,
gy. Application to Director HR;
North Florida Community College,
1000 Turner Davis Drive, Madison,
FL 32340. Only complete applica-
tion packets considered (letter of
interest, resume, application, copy
of transcripts unofficial OK). Ap-
plicati,.,n, job description online:
www.nfcc.edu. Questions, call 850-
97 3-(4'7. Deadline ,05/20/05.
EOE

Summer Employment
with
Madison County
Parks and Recreation


Where: Cherry Lake Beach
Positions: Attendant and Lifeguard
Positions Available
(No certification to be an attendant)
When: May 28th, 2005 (Memorial
Day Weekend) Through September
5th, 2005 (Labor Day Weekend) .
(Temporary Employment for Sum-
mer of 2005 Only!!!)
SD:a.N of Operation: 10:00 a.m. -

Employee Work Hours: 25-35
Hourd/Week
Contact: Madison County Parks
and Recreation Department
Tommy Garner, Director
P.O. Box 237
Madison, Florida
850-973-4640
850-464-0898
"APPLICATION ARE BEING
RECEIVED NOW"
Madison 'County is an Equal Op-
portunity Emploit 1 and Drug Free
Workplace!!!


Suwannee Health Care
is seeking a Staffing Coordinator
Must have positive attitude, good
organizational skills, computer
knowledge and must be able to
work well with others. Please con-
tact Angela Akins at 386-362-7860
or apply at 1620 E. Helvenston St.
Live Oak, FL 32064. Delta Health
Groups
EEOE/V/D/M/F
Cracker Barrel
Now Hiring
Full, part time employees for all
positions. Flexible schedules,
weekly paychecks, health insurance
and other great benefits.
Apply in person at the Lake Park
location, 4914 Ti mberDrive.


850-973-4/ //




PERRY FLEA MARKET
Antiques Glassware Collectibles* Gifts & More

Yard Sale Visit the Tool Shop FRI- SUN 10 A.M.4 P.M. We B
Set.Ups $5 & up Hwy. 19 S. (Old Motel)(850) 838-1422 (850) 584-7124Call Us


NURSING-PRN
RN $25/hr LPN $19/hr
* RN Qtrly bonus up-to-$500,.
* LPN Qulh It.,ntu up-.t $250i
* Statiie-uf-the-ait fUcllt,
* Pr',lc-_i''nals that [ are
SPicr-up Post-op or O.R.
* D.a Shilit
* No \\eckend 'Holida,
Nauiire Co.i. Rei''lnail Surei\
Center Perry, FL.
Call (850) 584-2778 ext. 639 or
fax-resume (850) 838-39.37


Housekeeper

Weekends only

;850-973-2504


APALACHEE CENTER
Behavioral Health. Care Center is
currently seeking:
Adult Case Manager #2211
A minimum of a Bachelor's Degree
with 'a major in counseling, social
work, ps\ cholog,. criminal justice,
nursing. rieh.bi lit'anon. special edu-.
cation, health education, or a relat-
ed human services field; or other
bachelor's degree and 2 years full-
time or equivalent experience
working with adults experiencing
serious mental illness. Valid dri-
ver's license required. 8:00am to
5:00pm, Monday Thru Friday. Reg-
ular status rate: $10.75 per hour/ex-
cellent benefits:or Temporary OPS
status rate: $12.92 per hour/no ben-
efits.
Mental Health Assistant #1448
High School diploma ,:'r its equiva-
leni Prir p.,cihiatnc experience
preferred Valii dr \eis license
Salajd, %).15 per hour
For More Information:
% i %%.apalachvecenier.org.
l850 )523-3217 or l1800I220-2931
Human Resources
2634-J Capial Cicle N.E Tall.i-
h.ia.se. FL
Pie-Hire Dru-, Srieen & FDLE
bjckcround checkA .-n Equal Op-
portunit./Affirmatie. Action
Employer.
Drug Free workplacee .

POSITION AVAILABLE
Madi.on HospitaI
Director of Nursing
Call .5(i-973-22'1
or tda
Resume to .50-973-1.158


Tractor Work.
free estimates
NO JOB TOO SMALL
Mov. irn Diciring. illin and bo'.
bl.idirn Call 9-3-032.- .







ATTENTION!!
Work From Home.
$500-$4500/month Part-time or
Full Time. 1-888-223-0829
www.income386.com


EOE
Yarbrouigh Corp.
will be sponsoring a school to ob-,
tain a security license for security
employment. The class will be held
May 16,'17 & 18 at the Kountry
Kitchen Restaurant, in Lee, on I-
10.
Employment positions available
at present time.
Call Jim Tucker at 386-364-7780
or Joe Peavy 850-929-4747
The City of Madison
will be accepting applications for a
Natural Gas Tech Trainee. Appli-
cants must be 18 years of age, pos-
sess a valid Florida Drivers Li-
cense, high school diploma or
GED, pass a drug test, background
check and physical examination.
We would prefer someone with at,
least one year of field experience in
pipefitting or gas related work.
Job applications and descriptions of
work required may be picked up, at
City Hall between the hours of 8:00
a.m. and' 5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday. We will be accept-
ing applications for this position
from May 4th, until May 16th.
2005.

The City of Madison is an Equal
Opportunity Employer and recog-
nizes veteran's preference.
Part Time Help Wanted
Cook.& Waitress ,
Apply 'in Person
Yellow Pine Restaurant
973-2414


I


ai


mim IFNI


4 8A








The Madison Enterprise-Recorder 9B


Lea als


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.



CIVIL ACTION
CASE NUMBER: 2005-173-CA


DIVISION:



THE ESTATE OF MATTHEW ROTTER, De-
ceased, in the Circuit Court in and for Pinellas
County, Florida, Probate Division, Case No; 04-
9753-ES-003, by and through its Personal Rep-
resentative, BEATA ROTTER; BEATA ROT-
TER, his surviving spouse, and by and through
any unknown heir and creditors at law,
Defendants.




NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: All unknown parties claiming interest by, through, under or against
MATTHEW ROTTER, Deceased; and, All unknown parties having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the property herein described, YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Madison County, Florida:

Lot 48 of River Country, as more particularly described in the Declaration of
Restrictions and Protective Covenants recorded at O.R. Book 136, Page 216 of
the Public Records of Madison County, Florida plus the Southerly most 200
feet of Lot 49, River Country, more particularly described as follows: Com-
mence at the southerly most point of Lot 49 for a Point of Beginning, thence N
0038'09"' E 200 feet, thence S 8934'11"E 209.40 feet, thence S 46050'35"W
290.08 feet to said Point of Beginning.



has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on H. EDWARD GARVIN, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is Post Office Box
358041, Gainesville, Florida 32635, within 30 days from the first publication of this notice,
and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attor-
ney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 3rd day of May 2005.



TIM SANDERS
Clerk of the Court


BY: April Herring
As Deputy Clerk



If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate
in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the Court Administralor. 145 N. Hernando SI.. PO Bo% 1569. Lake Citi. FL
32056, (386) 758-2163, within 2 workingg da.s of lour receipt of this notice: if rou are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8778.

5/6. 5/13 .
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRDJUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

WELLS FARGO BANK MINNESOTA, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, IN TRUST FOR
THE HOLDERS OF AMAZING RESIDENTIAL
COLLATERAL TRUST SERIES 2002-BC6
Plaintiff,
CASE NO. 2004-578-CA
vs. DIVISION

ED%%,IN CURTIISM1CMULLEN A/K/A EDWIN CUR- .
T1S MCMULLEN, JR., metal, .
Defendantisi.


NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage
Foreclosure dated May 04, 2005 and entered in Case NO. 2004-578-CA of the Circuit Court
of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for MADISON County, Florida wherein WELLS
FARGO BANK MINNESOTA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, IN TRUST
FOR THE HOLDERS OF AMORTIZING RESIDENTIAL COLLATERAL TRUiST SE-
RIES 2002-BC6, is the Plaintiff and EDWIN CURTIS MCMULLEN A/K/A EDWIN CUR-
TIS MCMULLEN, JR.; LINDA MCMULLEN; PEOPLE'S CHOICE HOME LOAN,
INC.; TENANT #1 N/K/A JACK BLAIR are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at EAST DOOR OF THE MADISON COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on
the 7th dayof Jaunr. 2005. Ihe following described property as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment:

1 IrTH DIRECTIONS FROM THE CENTER LINE OF THE SEABOARD AIR
LINE RAILRO-D OF SOUTH 75 DEGREES AND 18.5 MINUTES EAST AT
THE [RON PIPE %T THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWES-T
QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP
1 SOUTH, RANGE 10 EAST IN THE TOWN OF LEE, MADISON COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 52:3 MINUTES WEST ALONG
THE FORTY LINE 92.8 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AT THE WEST EDGE OF
THE PUBLIC SIDEWALK TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE HERE-
IN DESCRIBED TRACT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 6 DEGREES 22.7 MINUTES
WEST ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF SAID SIDEWALK 137.3 FEET TO AN
IRON PIPE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED
TRACT; THENCE RUN WEST 580.5 FEET TO AN IRON AXLE AS A FENCE
CORNER AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED
TRACT; THENCE RUN NORTH 32 DEGREES %EST 112.4 FEET TO AN
IRON AXLE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE HEREIN DE-
SCRIBED TRACT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 32 MINUTES EAST
420 FEET TO AN IRON AXLE; THENCE RUN NORTH 115 FEET TO AN
IRON PIPE ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF A PUBLIC SIDEWALK AND 68 FEET
MORE OR LESS FROM THE CENTER LINE OF THE SEABOARD AIR LINE
RAILROAD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 18.5 MINUTES EAST
ALONG SAID SIDEWALK 186.5 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 6 DEGREES
22.7 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE WEST EDGE OF THE FIRST MEN-
TIONED SIDEWALK 34 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; CONTAIN-
ING 1.75 ACRES, MORE OR LESS.
LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING:
A PORTION OF SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 10 EAST, BE-
ING A PORTION OF THOSE LANDS DESCRIBE D IN O.R. 496, PAGEi 295 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MADISON COUNTY. FLOOR IDA. BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED 5S FOLLOWS:

BEGIN AT A REBAR NO. 963 MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SOUTHEAST FARM ROAD WITH
THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF LEE SCHOOL AVENUE (40
FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY), SAID POINT BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER
OF SAID O.R. 496, PAGE 295; THENCE SOUTH 06 DEGREES 40 MINUTES
06 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
LEE SCHOOL AVENUE A DISTANCE OF 171.25 FEET TO A 11/2 IRON PIPE
MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID O.R. BOOK 496, PAGE
295; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID O.R. BOOK 496, PAGE 295 A DIS-
TANCE OF 167.25 FEET TO A REBAR NO. 6431; THENCE NORTH 05 DE-
GREES 21 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 214.07 FEET TO
A REBAR NO. 6431 ON SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE
SOUTHEAST FARM ROAD; THENCE SOUTH 75 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 17
SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF
172.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 0.745 ACRES
MORE OR LESS.
SAID LAND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN MADISON COUNTY, FLORI-
DA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MOBILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON, DESCRIBED AS A 1998 PLAIN DOUBLEWIDE WITH ID NUM-
BERS GAGVTD0962A & GAGVTD0962B AND TITLE NUMBERS 75705223
AND 75705222 AND RP NUMBERS 12080064 AND 12080060.

A/K/A 7326 SE Farm Road, Lee, Ft 32059

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 4, 2005


Tim Sanders
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk


5/13. 5/20


- w rity ol ". qj


Legals


,uegais


MADISON BLUE, INC.,
a Florida corporation,
IPlaintiff,


"OLE STYLE PLANTATION"
SUMTER UNTY, GA,








MAY 14TH 10:15A.M. SHARP



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AUCTION GROUP Upcoming Auctions Visit Us On-line @
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Announcements

Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read DIANETICS by Ron L.
Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send $7.99 to Dianetics, 3102
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BuildingMaterials

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ Buy Direct From Manufacturer.
20 colors in stock with all Accessories. Quick turn around!
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Business Opportunities


ALL C.SH CANDt ROUlE Do ou earn Ht .J0,a.' 30'l.
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$50,000 FREE CASH GRANTS*****- 2005! Never Repay!
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Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay & B ' for Experienced Drivers, 0/0, Solos, Teams & GraduateSti-
dents. Bonuses Paid Weekly. Equal Opportunity Employer.
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Now hiring qualified drivers for OTR positions. Food grade
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S/E & 3-State Run: T/T Drivers. HOME WEEKENDS. Mileage
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Leaals


*Driver-GREAT & PLENTY! Teams Start up to.47 cents. Com-
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National publishing company loc-Ling foLr 1le representa-
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BEAUTIFULNORTHCAROLINA. MUSTSEETHEBEAUTI-
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LAND WANTED Land Investment company seeks large acre-
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Ride out your backdoor to millions of acres of national forest!
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REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
FOR
CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT SERVICES FOR
MADISON CITY POLICE BUILDING HISTORICAL RESTORATION


I. INTRODUCTION
The City of Madison is requesting writtenproposals from qualified construct
tion firms to provide Professional Construction Management Sen ices for
the Construction Phase on the Cir[ of Nfadison Police Station.

H. It is the City's intention to employ the Construction Firm to provide overall
Project Construction Management, Co benefit Studies, Information
Management, Construction Contract ent, Claims Management and
Technical Inspection during the Construction on a c a fee basis, with a guar-
anteed maximum price.

HI. PROPOSAL INSTRUCTIONS AND GENERAL INFORMATION
Proposal Submissions: Submit five (5) copies of a written proposal no later
than 5:00 PM on Monday, May 23, 2005 to:

Will Rutherford, Project Manager
Clemons, Rutherford & Associates
2027 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
850-385-6153

Proposals must be responsive to the requirements and questions of the Request for Pro-,
posal.

Reservations: City of Madison reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, to negoti-
ate changes in the new scope of work or services to be provided, and to otherwise waive any
technicalities or informalities.

Method of Selection: Proposals will be reviewed by a Selection Committee. The Selection
Committee will then select and recommend a ranking of firms. Upon acceptance of the rec-
ommendation by the City, negotiations or bids will or may be entertained.

Please respond by including but not limiting your response to the following:

1. Company name and length of time in business.
2. Company location.
3., Bonding capability and name of bonding company.
4. Insurance carrier and applicable coverage.'
5. Qualificaiions of rtaff to be utilized on this project with names,
short resumes, length of rime wilh firm and press ious clients
-ersed.
6. Names of several pre ious cents nilhin the past five (5) years
with phone numbers and contact person.
7. Description of previous experience, to include budget, final cost, t
ime schedule, change orders, etc. Part of the experience should
reference projects worked on of similar nature.
8. Past experience %ith historical preservation funded b3 Dihision of
State, Bureau of Historic Precsenation.

Request for information shall be in writing.. :

5/06, 5/13,5/20
v ,


NEW MEXICO-20 Acres $29,900. Scenic region, views, can-


NEW MEXICO-20 Acres $29,900. Scenic region,.views, can-
yons, trees, rolling hills, wildlife. Enjoy huritngi hiLung h-..r .
great climate. Power, great access. lI1)'. Fima, ing 'all
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. s e. l. ceriecc.alle,;cc-.m Price : 990011 I0' do.-n bil lii
12 mno ,' 4 49'- fi-ed one ',d balloon, OAC.

5 minutes to Greenbrier Resort MTN LAND BARGAINS 20
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ATTENTION INVESTORS: Waterfront lots in the Foothills of
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.. a ncIietrontpToperCtie 'COm .i601)i -L.U. ,

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RVs/Campers

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Steel Buildings

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(800)668-5422.


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Find out how quick and easy
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Mary Ellen Greene
Greene Publishing, Inc
(850) 973-4141
greenepub@greenepublishing.com




ANF



Advertising Networks of Florida

Week of May 9, 2005


SUWANNEE VALiEV
HIIIMANE SOCIETY
CRITTER CORNER

Suwannee Valley Humane Society
1156 SE Bisbee Loop
Madison, Florida 32340

Two miles south' of Lee .off C.R.'
255From 1-10 Exit 262. Take C.R..
255 north. 1/2 mile We are a Limit-
ed Space Shelter (no kill). YouI
must check with us prior to bring-
ing a drop-off animal to the shelter.
Hours: Tues. to Sat. 10am to 2pm
or by appointment. Visit our web-
site and see the animals that need a
really good home at:

Swww.geocities.com/Suwanneehs.

If you have lost a pet or found one,
the humane society will help you.
find your pet. Call us at (850)
971-9904 or toll free at 1-.866-236-
7812. Leave a message if we are
closed, we will return your call.Re-
member to always call your local
animal controls, or shelters if you
have a lost or found pet.

Due to the generous gift of a new
building, we are now able to ac--
cept donations of furniture....and
\\e now have some nice pieces to
sell. .

WE REALLY CAN USE
FURNITURE DONATIONS !!!!
Newspapers and Aluminum Cans:
We have a recycle newspaper bin'
at 305 Pinewood Dr. just west of
Johnson's Appliance/Radio Shack.
We also collect aluminum cans to
recycle, jusi bring them to the shel-
ter. All the money goes to help the
homeless animals.

Featured Animals
For Adoption

DOGS
2742 CHARITY 8 week old
Black Female with a tan muzzle
This litter of pups is going fast.
Each member is cuter than the one
before and will find that place in
your heart that onl a dog can fill
2746 TIMOTHY 1 4n eek old
Black( %%ith a White tiup on it's
back).Male. Another member of
this family of great pups. They
are simply aquiver with delight
when you just look at them!
2726 MOLLI 1 year old
B'rindle Female. Old enough to be
called a lady; young enough to be
a playmate. You'll find Miss Mol-
J li to be a wonderful addition to
-yourfamily. ,,
2702 DOUG 5 month old
White with Brown Male, He
comes with all the standard dog


equipment, plus a tendency to be a
comedian and an all around good
fellow.
2691 PEE-WEE 7 year old
Brown Male. There are many
folks who prefer a more ma-
ture....and considerately more se-
date dog companion.. For those
adopters we u would like you to con-
sider Pee Wee. He is gentle, good
looking and read% to have a home
of hisown,

CATS

2761 OREO 1 year old Black
and White Male. This little lay-
ered boy is well named and sweet
enough to eat. His enthusiasm is
contagious.
2760 JETTA- 7 week. old Black
Female. A precious handful of
black magic. If you are looking for
a spell-bounder come and meet
Jetta.
2'752 MUFFIN 8 week old Or-
ange and White Male. If you can
see this kitty without saying,
"Ooooh and Ahhhh" you're a
stronger guy than I am: Oh, what
a beauty.
2749 TAMRA 8 week old Tab-
by Female. The equally lovable
sister to Muffin, this girl is busy
being a kittenl that you just can't
resist. I dare you to come to see
these two and go home empty
handed.
2740 LIGHTENING 8 week
old Black and White Male. You :I
\\ ill be enchanted by this fat and
happy fellow He is read,, to pla\,.
to cuddle, and to be your best V
friend.
LOST AND FOUND ANIMALS

DOGS LOST
Red Nosed Pit Bull. 5 month old
Female. Brindle and reddish
brown in color. Lost near 92rnd
Trace and Houck Rd.,in Live Oak.
Friendly and healthy. Call 386-
362-5201.

We have many more kilten. and
cats that are spayed or neutered,
wormed, Fel. luk tested, rabies
shots. Adoption -45.00
The Suwafinee Valley Humane So-
ciety depends on adoptions tor
$45.00, whichh INCLLIDES.
spay/neuter, dehorming, hearl-
worm/feline availability of space.
Starting August 3, 2004, adoption
fees will be (leukemia) testing and
rabies shot. Please come and visit
us, our animals would love to meet
you.
REMINDER: DO NOT LEAVE
PETS IN EI-HCLES FOR ANY
LENGTH OF TIME DUE TO
THE HEAT AND
HUMIDITY.
*Ai


FWdav. Mav 13. 2005


i






1OB The Madison Enterprise-Recorder


CERTIFIED PRtEOWNED
LOW HASSLE, LOW MILES, LOW PAYMENTS

HUGE INVENTORY, HUGE SAVINGS

GREAT STAFF-GREAT SELEcTION

LOCAL PEOPLE-LOCAL TRADES...
(brome.lcessories VP410 Automatic Wheeklhaly Loaded! tra & nli ills nlleh



2003 Hummer H2 2004 Hyundai Elantra GLS 2003 Ford Econoline E-150 2004 Hyundai XG 350L 2003 Cadillac Escalade EXT
fo n589A Gnl driven 8 A2' 3h 1u drite CK 'iade Q' 10K tiies c
miles per Year' t i l7 r. ar


'188,o o $39916.1 17..0
2002 Toyota Camry XLE 1995 Ford Thunderbird LX 1999 Mercury Grand Marquis 2000 Nissan Maxima GLE 2004 Honda Civic LX
Ir i l i i l ,, 1 I I l -:. I :..11. .I i i r, 'i n .l i. .l .l 1 I .' an bll i u ,r- I ii- i. if i n f,,i L. I i I,11 i i n nT -i I i.. I c i i Lr r MI.rri.l bitr I. r. : c ,.I i 6I. e 1 I i i II i U 11.i 1 I'll I 0.,' iij
l,, -iOE" i



2004 Chrysler Pacifica 2003 Chrysler PT Cruiser 2005 Grand Caravan Sport 2004 Chrysler Town & Country 2001 Nissan Xterra





2001 Grand Cherokee Laredo 2003 Jeep Liberty Sport 2004 Jeep Liberty Limited 2004 GMC Envoy SLT 2002 GMC Yukon SLE
.r FU mloades d yIeaIdfr 3G m 3 ilesu 7r&ife W"
Sunroof SOUTH
CEORaA'sS
#1 VOLUME
DEALER
ACCORDING To
DAIMLERCHRYSLER THE YEARS,
2002 Chevy Tahoe LS 2004 Ford Explorer Limited 2002, 2003, 2004, 2002 Isuzu Rodeo 2004 Ram 2500 4x4 SLT
L. Ir Tri lr L,-* l.M&e A i.f nr. *,.1..mI Allo. rn r &.iEijl a '1ru- A 1 i l.T. .| (l...i.l JANUARY-A PRIL 2005! 6Coliil Awou ri|W .: A.r A I lr : s 16U, L. b I (Ir L ,- L6 il T if-V 1 :: A11: I A .l.l t .rP.jh 2. I
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-.- Vo d (rn r n/n "turb $1e *di.g -oors **-OPn,6o o O 5lA r



n onl- A miles arear! -,909 o ii.
1997 Dodge Dakota Sport 2001 Ram 2500 Quad SLT 2005 Ram 1500 Quad SLT 2001 Ram Quad Cab SLT 2004 Ram 2500 Quad 4x4
.iallri. Allj ii r rli :. 1,N.I .! i rw Tn L ...L iTl. I ,. .ll t IL'' I i L-: L iW l li u.(. I l Pli fn l L-.. il *ir' Ir l r .it-i w U iIpTirnll AllL irc l i.l.lul. L:l li.- HiT All Al ,'"-'li i lr- K-
;`0 ... Onr30K lOiles W OO5 2 0" eels& Poe .0474Anslkbo is;3TA0(i'liO Miles uammins. el




2002 Ram 1500 ST 2004 Ram 1500 Quad SLT 2002 Ram 2500 Quad 4x4 2004 Ram 1500 Quad SLT 2003 Ram 2500 SLT 4x4





2003 Ram 1500 SXT 2003 F-150 Lariat 4x4 2003 F-250 Lariat 4x4 2004 Ford F-150 4x4 2003 Ford Lariat Super Cab
*IrI (r I I ril...ii ra l: i.l1i iill I..ii .. *;,(n i, 'r.|.l.'. i.-ri .it' .. EIIi IrL r *,*t-.. :]l ir L r .irni IIi lI 1 5n- l Ii LrdIii L E. i TLrw U ij 1 ii ii IT CU r lIult:lu I. 1 L i..- ,i t-lujI.'T i -' i,
;05 OED! 05245A ..1 OA onr2K ils 05357






.... ,299t e Pt er ding Rear Windou
1998 Ford F-1 2001 GMC Sierra SLE 2001 GMC HD Crew SLT 4x4 2003 Chevy Silverado 2004 Tundra SR5 Crew Cab
.il i A i ll. _i I Io l :. il',. mi r i ei-i i. .I:i. Li,:r. L i li ,iL LJALT i I ti IAila ii Li Aiji Lluri All ,'ii -. ii.rI- .l .P.. r i L". E -r T i ., J i .-r i l *i. ;T-i ,: '.I
-JAH vehldfe qutaity fpr 40 dwn.i. AfF prices &.payments reflect your $3906Qtrake-in If you don't have a trded,7itupan put $3900 VeIBteA V eS areIrB p^ wArranty
.Wd guaiantee everythi g we sellArini 5 bthehW '0 ate!,' Vehicleh advertised are.suhi ot to priol s. P~iitp d thadaprcring on the
vehicle. Spite paymne'i are tb :qnance your purchase ant some reflect an gptlon 1o Ieap your purchase, leases vary, besed pn va.lrole Sde a aespee rp'g t.dIAU5SpIeSpo d ehlole yo fooe
,U 6, Sook
z~n on drmile a ear 1L


SEXIST 16, HIGHWAY 84, Wr
QUITMAN 263 2277 I nr1'I" CHRY'SLER Jeep Stick with the Specialists


Friday, May 13, 2005