Citation
The Mayo free press

Material Information

Title:
The Mayo free press
Uniform Title:
Mayo free press (Mayo, Fla. 1958)
Place of Publication:
Mayo, FL
Publisher:
Mayo Free Press, Myra Regan - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 6, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Mayo (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lafayette County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Lafayette -- Mayo
Coordinates:
30.053276 x -83.177674

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 70, no. 27 (June 20, 1958)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Mayo Free Press. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
002042475 ( ALEPH )
33286672 ( OCLC )
AKN0339 ( NOTIS )
sn 95047189 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Mayo free press and Lafayette County news

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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SEE BOCC, PAGE 2A SEE MIDDLE, PAGE 2A Lafayette Countys news source since 1888. Were proud to serve! Thursday March 29, 2018 Mayo Free Press rfn tb f 866-246-0455 rountreemoorechevrolet.com Your Hometown Chevy DealerJeff Mosley 53186-1 MAYO The Lafay ette FFA Middle School Livestock Evaluation team once again placed at the state meet. The team competed in the 2018 Florida FFA Middle School Live stock Evaluation Career Development Event on March 9 at the Florida Strawberry Festival in Plant City. The CDE included 55 teams, with the La fayette team placing third. It marks the sixth straight top 10 nish. The livestock evalu ation CDE included a written exam covering breeds, body parts, wholesale cuts, six eval uation classes and two sets of questions from the selected evaluation classes. The team members Middle School FFA team places at state Barrington to run for BOCC ELECTION 2018 ELECTION 2018 MAYO I, Kevin Barrington, would like to announce my intent to run for Lafayette County Com missioner District 2. I will qualify at the appropriate time. rrfnt alexis.spoehr@ganews.com MAYO The Lafayette Activ ities Group and the Town of Mayo held its third annual Easter Under the Oaks on Saturday at the Veter ans Memorial Park. We had a good turnout of about 40 children who came and met the Easter Bunny, Kelli Joyner said. We love doing this for the commu nity and it gives the kids something to look forward to before Easter. Easter music was played for the children to dance and sing along with. The Easter Bunny danced along with the children and LAG members. Along with all the candy and mu sic, there was hamburgers and hot dogs with chips and a drink avail able for purchase. There were a few children who did not want to meet the Easter Bunny and even the promise of a Mayo celebrates Easter Under the Oaks bb b b bag of goodies did not help. There were two Easter Baskets with treats inside as rafe prizes for people to win. The group had piec es of paper with the names of the children and their parents. The rst winner was Thomas Wood and the second was Michelle Williams. b b rrfnt alexis.spoehr@ganews.com MAYO The La fayette County Board of County Commissioners approved some techno logical improvements for the Supervisor of Elections ofce Monday night. Supervisor of Elec tions Travis Hart asked the board for a new serv er and two new comput ers for about $6,000 at the boards meeting. Hart said the new equipment was needed to upgrade the system and keep everything safer than on the old system. I had a meltdown of the whole network in 2014 and I pieced together some of the equipment and got some help from other ofces to make it work, Hart said. They are hitting us pretty hard with all this cyber security, with all the threats that are out there. It is one good step in that direction. This will bring our ofce up to speed with everything and on elec tions night help run things better. Jana Hart, the Lafay ette County Extension r frn Free Press to offer more Suwannee Valley news MAYO For 130 years, the Mayo Free Press has served the residents of Lafayette County. That is not changing. The Free Press will continue to be the news source for Lafayette County, including Mayo, Day and Hatch Bend. Starting next week, though, Free Press read ers will also notice more regional coverage from North Florida in the paper in order to better serve and inform those subscribers. News doesnt stop at the county line and with staff also covering news and events in Suwannee and Hamilton counties, it makes sense to pro vide more of that content to the readers in Lafay ette County. The focus will re main on Mayo and La fayette County, editor Jamie Wachter said. But now there will be more from around the Suwannee Valley as well. As part of the expand ed regional coverage, the Free Press will also fea ture a combined regional North Florida sports sec tion with news and notes from Lafayette High as well as Suwannee, Branford and Hamilton County.

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PAGE 2A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL 52284-1 DATE School Lunch Menu LAFAYETTE ELEMENTARYBREAKFAST LUNCH LAFAYETTE HIGH SCHOOLLUNCH BREAKFAST Chicken Strips with Honey Barbecue Sauce Potato Salad Low Sodium Green Beans Homemade Rolls Diced Pears Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted MilkEntree #1 Chicken Strips served with Honey Barbecue Sauce Entree #2 Hot Ham & Cheese Croissant Baked Potato served with Sour Cream Butter Low Sodium Green Beans Homemade Rolls Diced Pears Oranges Assorted Milk Sponsored By:Lunch and Breakfast are served at Lafayette Elementary and High School each day. Varieties of Milk choices are available at both schools each day. Alternate High School menus are in parentheses. Menus are subject to change due to availability of goods.4/2 Mon. 4/3 Tues. 4/4 Wed. 4/5 Thurs. 4/6 Fri.Ground Beef Lasagna Romaine Salad served with Ranch Dressing Mixed Vegetables Bread Sticks Mandarin Oranges Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted MilkEntree #1 Rib-B-Q Entree #2 Turkey Corn Dogs Turnip Greens Lima Beans Cornbread Applesauce Seasonal Fruit Assorted MilkEntree #1 Pepperoni Pizza Entree #2 Cheeseburger on a Bun served with Lettuce, Tomatoes, Dill Pickles, Mayonnaise, Mustard, Ketchup Carrots Broccoli Fruit Cocktail Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted MilkEntree #1 Pepperoni Pizza Entree #2 Cheeseburger on a Bun served with Lettuce, Tomatoes, Dill Pickles, Mayonnaise, Mustard, Ketchup Carrots Broccoli Fruit Cocktail Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted MilkEntree #1 Blueberry Pancake served with Syrup Cups Entree #2 Assorted cereal served with Scooby-Doo Graham Crackers Pineapple Tidbits Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted Milk Entree #1 Blueberry Pancake served with Syrup Cups Entree #2 Assorted Cereal served with Scooby-Doo Graham Crackers Grape Juice Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted Milk Entree #1 Egg & Cheese Sandwich Entree #2 Assorted Cereal served with Zoo Animal Crackers Apple Juice Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted MilkEntree #1 Honey Bun Entree #2 Assorted Cereal served with Dick and Jane Crackers Diced Pears Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted MilkEntree #1 Honey Bun Entree #2 Assorted Cereal served with Dick and Jane Crackers Diced Pears Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted Milk Entree #1 Breakfast Burrito Entree #2 Assorted Cereal served with Honey Maid Graham Crackers Grape Juice Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted Milk Entree #1 Cherry Frudel Entree #2 Assorted Cereal served with Bear Cinnamon Cracker Grahams Fruit Cocktail Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted Milk Entree #1 Cherry Frudel Entree #2 Assorted Cereal served with Bear Cinnamon Cracker Grahams Fruit Cocktail Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted MilkEntree #1 Mini Ravioli Entree #2 Bean and Cheese Burrito Romaine Salad served with Ranch Dressing Mixed Vegetables Bread Sticks Mandarin Oranges Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted MilkEntree #1 Breakfast Burrito Entree #2 Assorted Cereal served with Honey Maid Graham Crackers Applesauce Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted Milk Hot Dog on a Bun served with Mayonnaise, Mustard, Ketchup Baked Beans Cabbage Saute Pineapple Tidbits Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted MilkEntree #1 Hot Dog on a Bun served with Mayonnaise, Mustard, Ketchup Entree #2 Grilled Chicken Sandwich served with Lettuce, Tomatoes, Dill Pickles, Mayonnaise, Mustard, Ketchup Baked Beans Cabbage Saute Pineapple Tidbits Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted MilkEntree #1 Egg & Cheese Sandwich Entree #2 Assorted Cereal served with Zoo Animal Crackers Diced Peaches Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted Milk Rib-B-Q Turnip Greens Lima Beans Cornbread Applesauce Seasonal Fruit Assorted Milk MAYO The Lafay ette County Public Library has released its events for April. The Teen Blackout Poet ry Workshop will be held April 17 at 3 p.m. Teen Maze Runner Triv ia Hour will be held Mon day, April 23, at 3:30 p.m. The library invites all the gladers and cranks to test their knowledge on the Maze Runner book series. Zumba will be held ev ery Monday and Wednes day at 7 p.m. Story Time will be held every Wednesday at 9:30 Maze Runner trivia hour coming to Lafayette library MAYO Learn CPR and save lives. United Way of Suwannee Valley is partnering with var ious organizations throughout Columbia, Hamilton, Lafay ette and Suwannee counties to provide CPR classes to local residents. The program is one of several initiatives the Unit ed Way Planning Committee elected to undertake using funds received through an anonymous grant. The Plan ning Committee determined to direct grant funding to support initiatives designed to address goals in the County Heath Im provement Plans. CPR Anytime is a self-di rected, self-paced training program that provides par ticipants with the core skills of adult hands-only CPR in 22 minutes. United Way pur chased 113 CPR Anytime kits to be distributed among 20 different organizations within the four counties. Participat ing community organizations include senior service centers, county extension ofce 4-H programs, the Pregnancy Care Center, Suwannee Valley 4Cs Head Start Program and churches in each of the four counties. Each kit comes with a bilin gual watch-and-do DVD, a personal inatable CPR man ikin, a skills reminder card, a replacement lung and manikin wipes. The kits are being used to educate members of the or ganizations who, in turn, will teach other organization par ticipants, family members and friends in their communities. According to the Florida Department of Health Health, Billions of dollars are spent every year in the U.S. on med ications that reduce the risk of heart disease the No.1 killer in Florida. Heart disease accounts for three out of 10 deaths in Florida, and in 2014 there were 42,835 heart attack hospitalizations, or an average of 117 heart attack hospitaliza tions each day. The CPR Anytime initiative supports the American Heart Association goal to increase the number of individuals in the U.S. with skills needed to perform CPR. CPR Anytime is exible in that it can be used by individuals at home or multiple people in a small group setting. It is innovative; the proven-effective, self-di rected watch-and-do format keeps people engaged in learn ing. It is effective, because kits are easy to share with family members and friends to increase the number of people who can perform CPR in an emergency. CPR Anytime is for anyone who wants to learn basic CPR skills, choking relief and AED awareness and does not need a course completion card to meet a job requirement. A listing of those community partners which have already initiated their CPR Anytime program through their receipt of training and the training kits is available on the United Way of Suwannee Valley website at www.unitedwsv.org. United Way ghts for the health, education and nan cial stability of every person through community impact and fundraising efforts utiliz ing volunteers on all levels to advance the common good by identifying unmet community needs and seeking to alleviate those needs through United Way of Suwannee Valley initiatives and the funding of local, afliated health and hu man service agencies. United Way, community organizations seek to spread CPR knowledge rffntb fnrffnff fffffnf fbfnrffntbr f fffnrffnfff b frfrfnbnff fnrbrf ffffbff NEW SIGN INSTALLED Ofce director, provided the board information about Elder Options and the 16 counties it helps by providing programs and help for the community. Elder Options has provided 367,661 home delivered meals, served 579,465 elders, 60 years and older, and SHINE Counselors provided 11,320 hours of volunteer service worth $273,265. Prior to the regular board meeting, the Board of Adjustments denied a Special Exception petition SE 18-01 by Julian and Carol Pearce to set up an animal shelter. The board tabled the petition at its February meeting in order to get more information and provide a chance for the Pearces to attend. The Pearces currently have a non-prot shelter in California, The Sanctuary at Soledad Goats, and are looking to expand to Flor ida, the board was told at the February meeting. They have been rescuing abused, abandoned and neglected animals for years and have decided to create a location in North Florida, choosing Lafayette County. The shelter was proposed to be located halfway be tween Branford and Mayo. Commissioner Antho ny Adams motioned to deny the petition due to the Pearces not providing additional information and Continued From Page 1A BOCC not being able to attend the meeting. The adjustment board did approve a Variance petition V 18-02 for Jef fery Phillips to reduce side yard setbacks. The Variance petition was for Phillips to place electricity to his property by making a setback from 50 feet to 35 feet. He had originally bought the property for hunting and has now de cided to retire on it with his wife. It will be just for the house to have electric ity and not the whole 60 acres. Following a public hearing, the board passed a road name change from SE C A Howell Drive to SE Howell Drive. The sign will be changed within 30 to 60 days. were Cooper Nemcovic, Savannah King, Seth Greaves and Jack Peter son. The top ve teams were Trenton, Fort White, Lafayette, Marianna and Okeechobee. McCray advances to Ornamental Horticultural Demonstration nals Hannah McCray compet ed in the 2018 Florida FFA District III Ornamental Horticultural Demonstra tions in Branford on March 12, advancing to the state nals. The purpose of the OH Demonstrations Career Development Event is to stimulate careful planning, thorough knowledge and the ability to explain, by work and action, the how and why of various horti culture practices. McCray competed in the area of Artistic Arrange ment of Horticulture Crops and this is her second District OH Demonstration Championship. The demon strations are limited to a maximum of 10 minutes and a minimum of seven minutes and at the conclu sion of the demonstration judges may ask questions. McCray will compete against the remaining 11 district champions at the 2018 Florida FFA OH Demonstrations Finals at the University of Florida on April 27. Continued From Page 1A Middle fffbf f ffbnrf ffffnff bnf a.m. Participants are asked to register. Kids Craft Friday will be held every Friday at 3:30 p.m. The library is located at 120 NE Crawford St., Mayo. For more information, call 386-294-1021.

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THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 3A LHS FBLA Reporter MAYO Lafayette High Schools Future Business Leaders of Amer ica sent 18 members along with their advisor Toni Sherrell to the Florida FB LA-PBL State Leadership Conference and Conven tion in Orlando on March 16-19. The theme Dare to Dream was echoed by guest speakers like Ben Glenn (The Chalkguy) and Patrick T. Grady. More than 4,500 students attend ed the conference and all were vying for placement spots to advance to the National FBLA Leadership Conference in June. Rep resenting the LHS FBLA chapter as State Voting Delegates were Davis Jackson as Middle Level Chapter President Dele gate, along with Flor San tiago and Lydia Laguna for the High School Delegates. District winners advanc ing to state competition nals were LHS FBLA members Blance Vences and Jackie Rameriz in Sports and Entertainment, Yomeida Hernandez in Business Calculations, Dawson Jackson in Client Services Help Desk and Graham Jackson and Leesa Price in Broadcast Jour nalism. Advancing in the state Lafayette FBLA has three win state rffrrntrbffrrbffrrrbrbrr bffrrbbnrffrrbrrfrbrr rbnrrbrbfbnrbbrfrb nals from 20 competitors in Round 1 and then eight competitors in Round 2 were Dawson Jackson placing rst in the State FBLA Client Services Help Desk competition. Also advancing in the state nals were Graham Jackson and Leesa Price, who made it to the nals competition in the top ve and were named rst place champions in the State FBLA Broadcast Journal ism competition. All three LHS FBLA members com peted live before judges and/or audiences. Lafayette High School FBLA would like to thank all the community business leaders, school staff, com munity leaders, parents and students who have supported them throughout the year. The help provid ed by attending activities and fundraisers in which helped the students achieve their goal of attending the Florida FBLA State Lead ership Conference this year. State winners Dawson, Graham and Price will represent Lafayette High School again at the Nation al FBLA Leadership Con ference in Baltimore at the end of June, where they will compete for national titles in their competitive events. On April 16, Lafayette FBLA will hold its annual member banquet at 6 p.m. frbffrfrrfrrbrfrr rrbrrffrrrrfrbf frrrfr Chris Tyler Band, Terry Cole Band to perform in Music Hall LIVE OAK To close out March, the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park has a weekend planned of outdoors and country music. Filling the music portion Friday and Saturday on stage in the Music Hall will be the Chris Tyler Band and the Terry Cole Band. The Chris Tyler Band of Jacksonville will kick off the weekend Friday with great dancing and listening country music with a little bit of other musical genres thrown in. Longtime musician/band leader/singer Chris Tyler knows what the audience likes, and his band will bring it Friday. On Saturday night, the Terry Cole Band of Central Flor ida will be in the house rocking the rafters with country, Southern rock and more great music genres. A longtime guest band at the SOSMP, Terry Cole is all about music and loves to rock the house. Doors to the Music Hall open at 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday for dinner with music from 8 p.m. midnight. Admission is free. In addition to the music, people are invited to tour the 800-acre SOSMP located on the banks of the famous Su wannee River and can rent a golf cart, rent a cabin, bring their own RV or primitive camp. There is also a disc golf course, hiking, canoeing and homemade ice cream avail able. To rent a cabin, a spot to park an RV/camper, primitive camp or just need additional info, please call the SOSMP at 386-364-1683, email spirit@musicliveshere.com or go to www.musicliveshere.com. The SOSMP is located 4.5 miles south of Interstate 75 and 4.5 miles north of Inter state 10 at the beautiful Suwannee River off U.S. Highway 129 at 3076 95th Drive. rbbrfrbbrrfrbffbrb

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PAGE 4A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL Opinion rf rfnftrbfb fftfr rbfbf WASHINGTON Because John Bolton is ve things Presi dent Trump is not intelligent, educated, principled, articulate and experienced and because of Boltons West Wing proximity to a president responsive to the most recent thought he has heard emanating from cable television or an employee, Bolton will soon be the second-most dangerous American. On April 9, he will be the rst national security adviser who, upon taking up residence down the hall from the Oval Ofce, will be suggesting that the United States should seriously consider embarking on war crimes. The rst two charges against the major Nazi war criminals in the 1946 Nuremberg trials concerned waging aggressive war. Emboldened by the success, as he still sees it, of Americas Iraq adventure that began 15 years ago this month, Bolton, for whom a trade war with many friends and foes is insufciently stimulating, favors real wars against North Korea and Iran. Both have odious regimes, but neither can credibly be said to be threatening an imminent attack against America. Nevertheless, Bolton thinks bomb ing both might make the world safer. What could go wrong? Much is made of the fact that Bolton is implacably hostile to strongman Vladimir Putin, whom the U.S. president, a weak persons idea of a strong person, admires. And of the fact that the president has re peatedly execrated the invasion of Iraq that Bolton advocated. So, today among the uneducable, furrowed brows express puzzlement: How can the president square his convictions with Boltons? Lets say this one more time: Trump. Has. No. Convictions. Even this scatterbrains Swiss cheese-style tariffs are too sloppy to reect forethought. He has senti ments, and visceral reactions to which he is attentive. But to speak of, say, a sincere sofa is to commit what philosophers call a category mistake sofas are incapable of sincerity and to speak of this presi dents convictions (or plans, or policies) about this or that is a category mistake. It is frequently said that the decision to invade Iraq was the worst U.S. foreign policy decision since Vietnam. Actually, it was worse than Vietnam, and the worst in American history, for two reasons. One is that so far we probably have paid no more than 20 percent of the eventual costs of that decision that enhanced Irans ascendency. The other reason is that America gradually waded waist deep into Vietnam without a crossing-the-Rubicon moment a single clear, dispositive decision. In contrast, the protracted preparation for invading Iraq was deliberative and methodical. It is not true that, as the current president and the virulent left insist, President George W. Bush and his senior advisers lied about Iraq possessing weapons of mass destruction. They simply got things wrong, which conservatives, especially, understand was an event not without precedent in the annals of Boltons beliefs are a recipe for diplomatic delusions The Mayo Free Press welcomes letters from readers on matters of public interest, with the following guidelines: Letters must contain your full name, address, daytime phone number and city of residence. Only your full name and city of residence will be published with the letter. Letters must reect issues of current interest to the general public and be concise. Management has the right to refuse any material it believes does not meet standards of publication. You can email letters to nf.editorial@ganews.com fax them to 386-364-5578 or mail them to: Letters to the Editor The Mayo Free Press P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 Mayo Free Press www.nflaonline.com Jeff Masters Publisher jmasters@cnhi.com Follow us: facebook.com/suwanneedemocrat @suwanneedemocra (Twitter) Jamie Wachter Editor jamie.wachter@ganews.com To Submit Letters Monja Slater General Manager monja.slater@ganews.com There were so many exciting things going on in our area this past weekend. The county fair was nishing up, there was a beer and wine festival in Columbia County, and the Spring Reunion festival was taking place at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park. One of my favorite things about going to a festival at the Spirit of the Suwannee is the interesting peo ple you meet from all around the state and the country. This week I will be telling you about some of the interesting people I met. I will only be using rst names in case some of these people told their boss or their spouse they were somewhere else this weekend. I met many people from other areas who were com ing to an event in Suwannee for the rst time. Stan and Katie, from Jacksonville, were rst timers at the SOS Park. Their friend Adam has been inviting them to come join him for years, and they nally decided to try it. They were in a very festive mood because it was Katies birthday. Adam said he loved the laid-back at mosphere, and Katie enjoyed seeing so many families with kids in attendance. I got the feeling they would be coming back for other events. On the other end of the experience spectrum, was Bean from Tampa. He has been coming to the SOS Park since 1999. He loved the venue so much he got married at the Magnolia Festival in 2000. I asked Bean what he likes so much about the Spirit of the Su wannee he said, everything. He said he has enjoyed sharing his passion for art with others at the many kids art camps he has attended over the years. Jim and Linda, from West Virginia, had an amazing plan for this weekend. They trailered their Harleys down and planned to ride all day and listen to music all night. The couple was blessed with a perfect day for riding on Saturday. I drove down to the south end of the county to jump in the river, and the sky was blue, the air was warm, and everything looked so green from our recent rains. Near Luraville, I talked to Mike from the Jacksonville area. He is in the process of having a house built on the Suwannee River. He is looking forward to the slower pace of life in our coun ty compared to the east coast of Florida. I met Eric who is originally from New Hampshire, but now lives in Perry. He loves coming to the SOS Park because he gets to be surrounded by people from diverse backgrounds. He feels that many of these peo ple would never meet if it were not for the Spirit of the Suwannee. It is hard to disagree with him. I had not met a banjo player until this past Saturday night. George from the band Grandpas Cough Medicine said he loves it here because of the people who love all types of music. George had his banjo with him and he played us all a few songs before saying goodbye. One of the greatest things about our country is that you are free to live, work, and play wherever you would like. I am so glad that so many people are choosing Suwannee County as their weekend destina tion. Be kind to our weekend visitors; some of them will end up being our neighbors. Eric lives in Suwannee County and is a public school educator. He is an independent contractor. You can reach him at miamistyle8@gmail.com. You never know whom you might meet in Suwannee County SEE BOLTONS, PAGE 5A You have read about the new tariffs on imported aluminum and steel, and on products from China. Now it seems our own business newspaper printing and publishing will take some casualties in a trade war over paper. This month, the U.S. government piled huge tariffs onto the imports of newsprint from Canada, including those from our biggest supplier. As a result, the price will jump from $600 to $800 for every ton, and we use about 17,000 tons every year. That increase is more than 30 percent, and would add more than $3 million to the Tampa Bay Times annual newsprint bill. You can multiply our example across the American news paper industry, which is already facing strong headwinds. Historically, advertising provided the lions share of newspa per revenue, but in just 10 years, the recession and other mar ket forces have cut those ad revenues by more than half. Newspapers remain vital civic assets nobody else will report on your community with the depth and breadth of a newspaper but publishing them is not an easy business, and these tariffs will make it even harder. This is a kick in the teeth. These tariffs will hurt our readers, because they create pressure to raise our prices, and they will force publishers to re-examine every other expense. Maybe we will drop some puzzles and comics no big deal, unless we cut one that is your favorite. These tariffs will also hurt our employees, because payroll is the only expense that is bigger than newsprint. To help offset the extra expense of paper, publishers will eliminate jobs. Make no mistake: These tariffs will cause layoffs across American newspapers, including this one. These tariffs started with a single American newsprint manufacturer who complained that Canadian companies were dumping their product in the U.S. at below-market prices. In the current political climate, that complaint found a friend ly ear in Washington. Other American manufacturers opposed these tariffs be cause they know they will damage newspapers and reduce the demand for newsprint. But now that the tariffs are taking effect, the American companies are hiking their own prices, so we have little room to shop around. Just about every American newspaper and all our trade associations are joining the ght to challenge these tariffs, but even if we succeed, it will take months to reverse this terrible decision. Meanwhile, prices will go up. Jobs will be lost. Im portant stories will go uncovered. If you believe that newspapers do essential work, we would be grateful for your support. Please let your members of Con gress and senators know that these reckless tariffs must be re pealed not just because they hurt newspapers, but because they will damage the customers and communities we serve. Thank you for hearing us out. Paul C. Tash is the chairman and CEO of the Times Pub lishing Company. Tariffs on paper will hurt us, and our readers rfrntbtrrrnfnt rbnrnnnrt rrrnrrttn rfrbrtnfnnbnrr

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THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 5A He is not here; he has risen! (John 24:6) This week we celebrate Good Friday and Easter Sunday! I hope you take time to be reminded of all the events leading up to the empty tomb found on that rst Easter morning! Go back to the Gospels and read the accounts carefully. It is remarkable for an empty tomb to signify the potential for fullness, but it does ex actly that! In John 10:10, Jesus said, I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full. Jesus conveys to us the necessity of being lled by His over whelming love and forgiveness, so that we can overcome the natural desire to live to please only ourselves. While it promises great results, living for our selves will leave us searching, dry, and empty every single time. We live in a culture that champions the paradox of being empty to the point of excess! We cant eat enough, drink enough, spend enough, sleep enough, exercise enough, work enough, take enough medicine, or do enough drugs. All excess is rooted in emptiness. Emp tiness screams to be lled, and there is never enough! Enough is enough! Emptiness also impacts our relation ships by draining the people around us! Living on empty turns us into emotional beggars holding out our cup for the peo ple in our lives to make daily deposits to make us feel good about ourselves. The problem is that even those who love us the most cant keep our never-ending cup lled. Because they are human, they will let us down, and we will fall hard if our self-worth is tied to their opinions and care for us. The fullness that Jesus offers consists of His forgiveness for our mistakes, His grace for our lack and His purpose for our lives. Bring your cup before Him and He promises to ll it with a never-ending spring of living water! We have worth in Christ that is not measured by what we own, who we know, what we look like or what we can accomplish. We can rest in His fullness knowing that the price has been paid, His life for ours. And to receive it, all we have to do is askbecause your Heart Matters! Happy Easter! Angie Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, Director of the Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches Bible studies, leads marriage and family conferences and offers Biblical coun seling to individuals, couples and fam ilies. Contact Angie with questions or comments at angieland3@windstream. net. Doctrinal views expressed on our Religion pages are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of The Mayo Free Press. Empty tomb signies Gods full love Heart Matters For there is one God and one mediator between God and mankind, the man Christ Jesus, who gave himself as a ransom for all people. This has now been witnessed to at the proper time. 1 Timothy 2:5-6 NIV WEEKLY BIBLE VERSE Religion Your Guide To Local Houses Of Worship 44884-1 AIRLINE BA PTIST CHUR C H rf rfn ftr bfbfbr ffrrb rbf tfr Helping Families Follow Jesus rfntbrf ntfrftbfrrrfnffn nrrb rff f nf bfrnfrf ff Freedom is Herer fffntbtbt n b n ttb n n tnt n Pastor: Ronnie Sadler rfrr rf ntt bbfbb b fff ftb tt bftbt fntnbt rfnt Pastor: Bruce Branche rfntrbt fntfnr n btrfn n rtrttttf n tf n brt nr rfrntb rnn rb rn n rn rfntb rf ntnnb tnb n rfn rf ntbnb rf btn rf bntb rf f rf b rf Sunday Wednesday Pastor: Rev. Kenny Sullivan Youth Pastor: Daryl FletcherLocated at 294 SE Mill Street, Mayo Renewing Hope and Building Lives r fntb rf nftb b nftffb tftf rfntbbn tttttt 57194-1 TO ALL TRADESMEN & SERVICE PROVIDERS:Havent you always heard the old saying, Big things come in small packages?Well,this is the idea behind the new Tri-County Service Directory coming soon to the Suwannee Democrat, e Jasper News & the Mayo Free Press!Call 386-362-1734Extension 102 for more information on how to place a small ad (thats the small package) to appear in all 3 of our publications which means the opportunity for your ad to be seen by approximately 4,600 potential customers (and thats the big things). Healthy Living The MOST important healthy eating tip to follow Clean Eating. Zone. Paleo. South Beach Diet. Should you eat potatoes? What about bread? Is it OK to eat fruit? There is one thing though that all of these programs have in common and probably the most important healthy eat ing tip you need to know. Healthy or clean eating can be confus ing for many of us. Our doctors tell us to eat healthy. Magazines tell us clean eating is the way to go. But what exactly do those terms mean? Before you decide to give up, lets clear up some of the con fusion with one simple but important tip. Ready? Eat less sugar. You expect to nd sugar in candy or cookies but sugar, especially processed sugar such as white sugar, fructose, glucose, is in foods you would never expect. The rst time I looked at the ingredients in salad dressing and read sugar, I was speechless. Its in ketchup, cereals, and bread which makes sugar public enemy No. 1. Did you know there is a chocolate chip energy bar marketed as organic that actually has 2 grams more sugar than a Snickers candy bar? Sugar is not all bad though. In its nat ural state in fruit or vegetables, it help our bodies function. It is the added sugar you have to watch out for. Not only can sugar lead to major weight gain, it shoots your insulin levels up which can lead to other serious diseases. Do I have your attention now? Its time to get control of that sweet tooth once and for all. These two simple tips will help you cut back on sugar: your own meals, you know EXACTLY what ingredients you are using. If you dont cook from scratch, take your time and read the labels of everything you put into your shopping cart. one small change before making another. For example, in stead of cutting out your weekly dessert, eat half. Love soda and sweet tea? Have some but only drink half a glass instead of a full glass. As you do this your body will become accustomed to less sugar. Take it nice and slow. The best thing for me when I cut out sugar was my energy level increased. I no longer experience that mid-afternoon slump that used to have me making a bee line for the candy machine. Now I stay on track by simply asking myself this one question: Do I re ally need this? Remember you CAN do it! Have a wonderful week. To your health, Denise Denise Sanger is a certied tness instructor, Silver Sneakers Instructor, AMPD Kettlebell Instructor, licensed Zumba, STRONG by Zumba instruc tor, gentle ow yoga, teaches morning classes at Country Strong Health & Fitness. Denise may be reached at DeniseSanger.com, 386-292-6105 or denisesanger@gmail.com. government. For the rst time since World War II, when the mobilization of U.S. in dustrial might propelled this nation to the top rank among world powers, the American president is no longer the worlds most powerful person. The pres ident of China is, partly because of the U.S. presi dents abandonment of the Trans-Pacic Partnership without an alternative trade policy. Power is the ability to achieve intended effects. Randomly smashing crock ery does not count. The current president resembles Winston Churchills de scription of Secretary of State John Foster Dulles the only bull I know who carries his china closet with him. Like the Obama admin istration, whose Iran pol icy he robustly ridicules, Bolton seems to believe that America has the pow er to determine who can and cannot acquire nuclear weapons. Pakistan, which had a per capita income of $470 when it acquired nuclear weapons 20 years ago (Chinas per capita income was $85.50 when it acquired them in 1964), demonstrated that almost any nation determined to become a nuclear power can do so. Boltons belief in the U.S. power to make the world behave and eat its broccoli reects what has been called narcissistic policy disorder the belief that whatever hap pens in the world happens because of something the United States did or did not do. This is a recipe for diplomatic delusions and military overreaching. Speaking of delusions, one died last week the belief that this president could be safely cocooned within layers of adult supervision. Boltons pre decessor, H.R. McMaster, wrote a brilliant book (Dereliction of Duty) on the failure of ofcials, par ticularly military leaders, who knew better but did not resist the stumble into the Vietnam disaster. Mc Master is being replaced because he would have done his duty regarding the impulses of the most dangerous American. George Wills email address is georgewill@ washpost.com. Continued From Page 4A Boltons

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PAGE 6A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL MAYO Forty-seven Lafayette 4-H and FFA members participated in the 2018 Suwannee Valley Youth Livestock Show and Sale last week at the Suwan nee County Fairgrounds in Live Oak. The swine and steer projects are de signed to allow 4-H and FFA members to learn real-life skills in the area of husbandry skills, animal care, respon sibility, record-keeping, feed manage ment, communication, professionalism, animal-health, competition and charac ter. The youth program has been a tradi tional staple of our community for more than 50 years. The market hogs are evaluated based on certain criteria such as muscle, leanness, structure and overall design. Fat steers are evaluated on muscle, n ish (fat), structure and overall design. Showmanship competition includes the partnership between the exhibitor and the animal, in how well they present their steer/pig to the judge. The swine judge was Will Taylor of Illinois and the steer judge was Darren Rehberg of Grady County, Georgia. Swine Showmanships Members from the Lafayette 4-H and FFA placed in Junior, Intermediate and Senior Showmanship on March 19. The Junior Showmanship winner was Noah Lamb with Kelbey Grac Lyons placing second and Carra Clark nishing third in Junior Showmanship. Emily Lyons was the winner of the Intermediate Showmanship. Mark Crum was the winner of the Senior Showmanship and third place in Senior Showmanship went to Krista Lyons. Swine Show The Swine Show took place March 20 with several Lafayette County 4-H and FFA members placing rst. Crum placed as Reserve Grand Cham pion and the Division 1 Champion was Jaxson Beach. Crum, Beach, Brelan Ferrell, Molly Hamlin and Emily Lyons won rst place as well as Lafayette FFA Chapter Pig, exhibited by Hayden Hingson. Steer Show The Steer Show took place on March 21 with Cooper Nemcovic winning Grand Champion. Reserve Grand Cham pion was won by Luke Adams. The Senior Steer Showmanship winner was Blake Adams and second place was Chase Buchanan. The Intermediate Steer Showmanship winner was Nemcovic. First-place steer winners were Nemcovic, Brian Keen, Buchanan and Luke Adams. Sale/Awards Ceremony The Sale/Award Ceremony was March 22 with Miley McCray taking second place in Junior Swine Record book and Clark taking third place in Junior Swine Recordbook. The Lafayette 4-H and Lafayette FFA members appreciate the continued support of the countless businesses and individuals who either bid, purchase or added-on toward their livestock proj ects. The Lafayette FFA Chapter appre ciates the following families and busi nesses for contributing to the chapter animals at the Suwannee Valley Youth Livestock Show and Sale. The chapter also appreciates Sarah Hart and Sheriff Brian Lamb for leading both groups. In addition, the chapter appreciates Single tary Trucking for buying the Lafayette FFA Chapter Pig at the 2018 North Florida Livestock Show and Sale in Madison. Contributors of the Chapter pig in clude: Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Bass, C&C Insurance of North Florida, Darabi & Associates, Mr. and Mrs. Darren Driver, Mr. and Mrs. Dwayne Koon, Starling Farms, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ward, Hamil ton Auto Supply, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Shaw, J&J Gas Services, Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Witt, Land Dairy, Lyons Family Farm, Ms. Marion McCray, Mayo Auto Parts, Mr. and Mrs. Micah Hart, Mr. and Mrs. Mikie Hart, Putnals Premi um Pine Straw, Mr. and Mrs. Ramon Celedon, Mr. and Mrs. Mike Harris, Roundtree Moore Ford and Chevrolet, S&K Barrington Farms, Sheriff and Mrs. Brian Lamb, Suwannee Sky Walk er, Mr. and Mrs. Travis Walker and Tri ple L Cattle. Contributors of the Chapter steer in cludes: Anderson Columbia, Rutherford and Associates, Darabi & Associates, Commissioner Ernest Jones, Commis sioner Lisa Walker, Commissioner Thomas Pridgeon, Commissioner Lance Lamb, Commissioner Anthony Adams, Tax Collector Chuck Hewett, Property Appraiser Tim Walker, Supervisor of Elections Travis Hart, Judge Darren Jackson, Sheriff Brian Lamb, Clerk of Court Steve Land, Superintendent Robbie Edwards, McMillan Law Ofce, Triple L Cattle and Deberry. Lafayette 4-H, FFA members win big at Livestock Show rfnntbb tb bffb brrf bf b rtbrf b

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THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 7A 61699-1 61698-1 MAYO Lafayette Elementary School fth-graders have spent this spring learning about Overcoming Adversity. The past few weeks, the fthgrade students have learned about ar chery during physical education class in a program called Overcoming Adversity. The program is based on the concepts of the 4-H archery program. Deputy Jacquelyn Knight and Sergeant Geoff Condy with the Lafayette County Sheriffs Ofce facilitated the program along with PE instructor Jerod Brock. Cody and Knight are both certied 4-H archery instructors. Brock is an experienced archery hunter and adds extensive knowledge of that aspect to the pro gram. The program emphasizes sports manship, ethics and proper archery etiquette. Each student that participates be gins with safety rules and training. They also learn a little bit of the his tory of archery as well as Olympic archery. Learning more about archery, the students also practiced shooting in small groups for a week at a time. At the end of each week, the students were scored and the top boy and girl archer from each class as well as a wild card boy and girl (the next highest overall score) advanced to a nal round. During that nal, the students competed for the fth grades top archer. Joylyn Mora was the top girl ar cher in the fth grade at LES, while Landon Dunn was the top boy ar cher. rfrnrntbtrft fttr trnf LES fth graders learn archery Perks of moving to North Florida DOWLING PARK Florida has long been known as one of the best retirement destinations in the United States. Stud ies reveal that Florida is actually the No. 1 state in the country for retirement living, with around 55,000 Americans age 55 and old er moving to Florida every year. In fact, 19 percent of the population in Florida is above age 65. For those who seek a warm climate, affordable housing and a lower cost of living plus plenty of social opportunities and fun area attractions retirement in Florida is the perfect choice. North Florida: The per fect choice for seniors North Florida in partic ular is a great region for seniors. It is comprised of the top half of the state, including the Panhandle. Cities like Live Oak in Suwannee County offer small-town charm in a qui et atmosphere with plenty of things to do and see. What are the main reasons seniors chose Florida for retirement living? Here are just a few: Lower cost of living and taxes. A lower cost of living entices many seniors to the state of Florida, where theres also no state income tax. Retirement income and Social Secu rity benets are not taxed, either, nor are there estate or inheritance taxes. An escape from cold winters. The year-round warmth makes moving to Florida highly appealing to seniors who have grown tired of frigid winters. This means that most outdoor activities and social op portunities can continue throughout the year, and you can leave your puffy winter coat buried deep in the closet or donate it to your friends in the northern states! A light jacket is enough for most winter days. A variety of activities for everyone. The temper ate climate makes it easy to enjoy a variety of ac tivities, both outdoors and indoors. Get some enjoy able exercise by playing golf or tennis, go hiking or canoeing along any of the many beautiful rivers, visit a local museum or theater, or enjoy a night of music, dance or drama (perhaps as part of Advent Christian Villages Live! at Dowling Park artist se ries). Theres truly some thing for every lifestyle in North Florida. Plenty of quality health care. Youll nd plenty of area hospitals and medical facilities to support your health care needs. In fact, Copeland Clinic, located at Advent Christian Vil lage, is a public health clinic open to men and women of all ages living in North Florida. Not only does the staff at Copeland Clinic provide quality medical care, but they also team up with specialized care centers, doctors and specialists in various elds to provide the highest lev el of care possible. Community living for a carefree lifestyle. Down sizing offers denite ben ets to older adults, and moving to a North Florida retirement community provides a true way to successfully age in place. Retirees will be relieved of many of the burdens of home maintenance, enjoy a higher level of inde pendence, and delight in plenty of options to stay engaged physically, men tally and socially. Advent Christian Vil lage: Senior living in North Florida Those thinking about moving to Florida should consider the lifestyle of fered at Advent Christian Village. The North Florida senior living community offers a compassionate continuum of care with a hometown feel. Contact the ACV to schedule a tour or to re quest more information.

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PAGE 8A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL Sports MAYO Lafayette High Schools Sarah Hamlin has committed to play volleyball at Santa Fe College. Hamlin, a junior, has been a standout player for LHS the past three years. She has one more season left with the Hornets. rff n tb Hamlin commits to Santa Fe volleyball ttrf michael.jones@ganews.com LIVE OAK Former Lafayette High quarterback Alex Scarborough is continuing his education and football career at Illinois College in Jack sonville, Illinois. He signed with the Blueboys on March 21 at Suwannee Middle School. I took a visit there about a month ago. It was a really good vibe from there. I loved the people, the place, coaches, Scarborough said. Its a blessing. Without my family and ev eryone Im around, I couldnt do this. In two varsity seasons rst at Lafayette in 2016 and then at Hamil ton County in 2017 Scarborough completed 128 of 233 passes (57 percent) for 1,821 yards. He threw 14 touchdown passes to eight inter ceptions. Scarborough helped the Hornets achieve an 8-3 record in his junior year, which included a memorable last-second win against Jefferson County. Down by ve points with less than two minutes remaining in the game, he took Lafayette down the eld in a no-huddle offense and threw the game-winning touchdown with less than a second left. Ive been coaching for 26 years, and we had one of the single greatest moments ever at a time when we re ally needed it, Lafayette coach Joey Pearson said of the win. Jefferson County game 93 yards in a minute and a half and we score on the last play. That was a great night. Also at the signing was Seth Steb bins, who coached Scarborough at HCHS. Alex and I have a pretty long his tory, said Stebbins, who also coached Scarborough while they were at Su wannee. I always have a good time with Alex. We talk about living the dream. Thats the good thing about to day hes going to get to continue to play football, get an education, grow more as a young man by getting away from home a little bit and being on his own. Illinois College has an enrollment of around 1,000 students and com petes at the Division III level. The football team had a 5-5 record in 2017. Lafayette High gradu ate Lacey Swafford was named the Patriot League Player of the Week for the week of March 12-18. Swafford, a sopho more infielder at Army West Point, hit .524 in six games for the Black Knights, with a .619 slugging percentage and a .565 on-base percent age. She tallied five straight multi-hit performances against Manhattan, Quin nipiac, Butler, Buffalo and Chattanooga. Swaf ford scored five runs and hit two doubles. rfnr tbtnn ntnnn ff n f n Purcell lifts Lafayette to win against Madison County By Mike Jones michael.jones@gaflnews.com MAYO The last time Lafayette and Madison County met on the baseball diamond was 10 months ago when the Cowboys ended the Hornets season in a regional final that was decided by one run. LHS hosted Madison County on Thursday, March 22 with revenge on its mind. The Hornets got some redemption, edging the Cowboys 3-2 behind a solid pitching performance from Chi Chi Purcell. Purcell got the win, giving up two runs in six innings while striking out six. He also led Lafayette on offense, extending his hitting streak to five games with two doubles while scoring one run. Since last year, that loss killed us, Purcell said of the regional final. We were all hungry for this game. I know all those guys from travel ball. I faced that whole lineup two years ago in JV. We wanted it so bad. A clutch two-out hit from Austin Severance gave Lafayette the lead, and momentum, in the bottom of the second inning. Severance drove in Purcell and Caleb Land (2-3, double, RBI) with a blooper that found grass in right-center field to put the Hornets ahead 2-1. Purcell took over from there, keeping a potent Madison County (3-7) offense at bay. His biggest moment on the mound came in the fifth inning. With LHS clinging to a 3-2 lead, Madison County had a runner on third with one out. Purcell struck out Dustin Bass, walked Dilan Lawson and then struck out Logan Lepper to get out of the jam. After throwing 94 pitches in six innings, Purcell gave way to Dylan Mock, who came in to pitch the final inning. Mock retired three straight hitters to get the save. For LHS (4-4) coach Tim Hanson, it was a good way to start district play. This was a good win for us, Hanson said. To me, thats (Madison County) the team to beat. Hamilton is always right there, but Madison is pretty doggone good. UP NEXT: Lafayette hosts Hamilton County today at 7 p.m. Richardson 1-3, 1 run Mock 1-2, BB Land 2-3, double, RBI, 1 run Purcell 2-3, two doubles, run Severance 1-3, 2 RBIs Pitching Purcell 6 IP, 5 hits, 2 runs, 6 ks Mock 1 IP, 0 hits, 1 k Caption: Chi Chi Purcell threw six strong innings to get the win against Madison County. Photo: Mike Jones R H E Madison County 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 5 1 Lafayette 0 2 1 0 0 0 3 7 1 michael.jones@ganews.com MAYO The last time Lafayette and Madison County met on the baseball diamond was 10 months ago when the Cowboys ended the Hornets season in a regional nal that was decided by one run. LHS hosted Madison County on Thursday, March 22 with revenge on its mind. The Hornets got some redemption, edging the Cowboys 3-2 behind a solid pitching performance from Chi Chi Purcell. Purcell got the win, giving up two runs in six innings while striking out six. He also led Lafayette on offense, extending his hitting streak to ve games with two doubles while scoring one run. Since last year, that loss killed us, Purcell said Purcell lifts Lafayette to win against Madison County f of the regional nal. We were all hungry for this game. I know all those guys from travel ball. I faced that whole lineup two years ago in JV. We want ed it so bad. A clutch two-out hit from Austin Severance gave Lafayette the lead, and momentum, in the bottom of the second in ning. Severance drove in Purcell and Caleb Land (2-3, double, RBI) with a blooper that found grass in right-center eld to put the Hornets ahead 2-1. Purcell took over from there, keeping a potent Madison County (3-7) offense at bay. His biggest moment on the mound came in the fth inning. With LHS clinging to a 3-2 lead, Madison County had a runner on third with one out. Purcell struck out Dustin Bass, walked Dilan Lawson and then struck out Logan Lepper to get out of the jam. After throwing 94 pitch es in six innings, Purcell gave way to Dylan Mock, who came in to pitch the nal inning. Mock retired three straight hitters to get the save. For LHS (4-4) coach Tim Hanson, it was a good way to start district play. This was a good win for us, Hanson said. To me, thats (Madison Coun ty) the team to beat. Ham ilton is always right there, but Madison is pretty dog gone good. UP NEXT: Lafayette hosts Hamilton County to day at 7 p.m. Richardson 1-3, 1 run Mock 1-2, BB Land 2-3, double, RBI, 1 run Purcell 2-3, two doubles, run Severance 1-3, 2 RBIs Pitching Purcell 6 IP, 5 hits, 2 runs, 6 ks Mock 1 IP, 0 hits, 1 k Scarborough signs with Illinois College

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THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 9A 51767-1 1506 S. Ohio Ave. Live Oak, FL 32064Phone 386-208-1414 386-755-8680 Fax 386-208-1411 healthcorelibby@bellsouth.net John C. Palmer Physical erapist Lacey Bailey PT Assistant Locally Owned & Operated 51771-1Family Dentistry HERBERT C. MANTOOTH, D.D.S, P.A. Now Oering BOTOX!(386) 362-6556 1-800-829-6506 45937-1Please call Ninan at 386-362-1734 to place your ad hereStaying hydrated while avoiding overhydration is one way for men and women to protect their kidneys. Kidney disease is a widespread issue made all the more disconcerting by the fact that many people are unaware they have it. According to the National Kidney Foundation, 26 million American adults have kidney disease, and most dont know it. Healthy kidneys are something many people take for granted. But those who want to do everything they can to keep their kidneys healthy can consider the following tips, courtesy of the Cleveland Clinic. familiar with the benets of drinking water each day, and adequate hydration denitely promotes healthy kidneys. But over-hydrating has not been proven to enhance kidney function. e Cleveland Clinic recommends adults drink between four and six glasses of water per day. human body, including the kidneys. High blood pressure and diabetes are two of the biggest risk factors for kidney disease, and regular exercise can reduce a persons risk of both conditions. However, overexertion can strain the kidneys, so adults who exercise, especially novices who need to improve their conditioning, should avoid going too hard at the gym. vitamin supplements or herbal remedies. Vitamin supplements and herbal remedies have become very popular in the 21st century, but excessive supplementation can harm the kidneys. Discuss any supplements or herbals remedies with a physician before taking them. Quit smoking. Just as exercise benets the body in myriad ways, smoking harms the body in myriad ways. Smoking decreases the blood ow in the kidneys, decreasing their ability to function at optimal capacity. Smoking also increases a persons risk of high blood pressure and cancer of the kidneys. blood pressure and diabetes. Adhering to a healthy diet and controlling portion sizes can help control weight and blood pressure and contribute to healthy kidneys as well. blood pressure or diabetes should make sure their physicians screen for kidney dysfunction during routine appointments.Learn more about kidney disease at www.kidney.org. HOW TO PROMOTE HEALTHY KIDNEYS Staying hydrated while avoiding overhydration is one way for men and women to protect their kidneys. Sports LHS hosts four-team track meet rfntbt brtrf btbbbbtrbtf The LHS boys placed third out of four teams while the girls were fourth. Individual winners for Lafayette were: 1600m boys Dakota Hilton, 5:04 Triple Jump girls Jasmine Lewis, 32 .5 Long Jump girls Lewis, 14 10 bbfbntt f

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PAGE 10A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL Share Your Blanche Stories We are looking for people to share their or their family stories and pictures about the Blanche Hotel. We hope to include former employees, guests, event attendees and businesses that were located in the Blanche Building. The interviews will be videotaped and the photos scanned. All participants will receive a free eBook version of the book, The Blanche A History when it is published in the fall. Check out our website: http://TheBlancheAHistory.web sandblogsforwrtiers.com to scheduled a time at the Columbia Co. Public Library on Mon. or Tues. from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in March or April. March 30, 31 & April 1 Revival Services Peace Baptist Church will be hosting its revival services on March 30, 31 and April 1. The Evangelist will be Bro. Jack Yarbrough. The church is located at 7794 S. U.S. Hwy. 27 in Branford. Ser vices on March 30 and 31 begin at 6:30 p.m., on April 1, services begin at 10:30 a.m. For more information, call 386-935-4681. March 31 Walk For Christ The annual Walk For Christ will be held on March 31 beginning at 10 a.m. The walk will start and end at Paul Langford Stadium. The walk will be a brief 30 min ute walk. Surrounding counties may par ticipate by walking, driving a golf cart or even pulling children in wagons. Fami lies are encouraged to join the event. No donations of any kind will be ac cepted or asked for. For more infor mation, contact Bud Smith at 386-2085182. March 31 Easter for Kids Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church will be hosting an Easter for Kids celebration that includes bible stories, singing, crafts and more on March 31. The celebration will last from 10:30 a.m. Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church is located at 9989 CR 136 in Live Oak. April 1 Easter Celebration Christ Central in Suwannee County an nounces the start of two Sunday morn ing services on April 1. Their two Sunday morning services are a permanent addition, with the times being at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. They invite the community to join them for their Easter celebration. The church is located at 15445 U.S. Hwy 129 in McAlpin. For more information, call 396-208-1345, ccmlo.org or on Facebook. April 1 Easter Sunrise Service Branford Area Inter Church Ministries will be hosting a continental breakfast at 7:30 a.m. at Hatch Park in the com munity building, following the Sunrise Service. The community is invited to attend, however guests are asked to dine in. April 1 Easter Breakfast Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church will be hosting an Easter breakfast on April 1, beginning at 8:30 a.m. In addition to the breakfast, bible study and Sunday school will be held at 9:30 a.m., and Sunday worship will be held at 10:30 a.m. The church is located at 9989 CR 136 in Live Oak. April 4 Francis Gary Powers, Jr. Presentation and Book Signing 6 p.m. Francis Gary Power, Jr., international lecturer on the Cold War and son of Francis Gary Powers, the U2 pilot shot down over Russia in 1960, will speak on the spy plane incident. He recently published a book Letters from a Soviet Prison: the personal journal and corre spondence of CIA U-2 pilot Francis Gary Powers. Copies of this book will be avail able for purchase and signing. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 April 7 Yard Sale/Car Wash Mt. Olive Baptist Church youth will be hosting their annual yard sale and car wash on Saturday, April 7 from 7 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the Masonic Lodge build ing in downtown Wellborn on CR 137. A chicken and rice dinner will also be available starting at 11 a.m. This is a fundraiser to help the youth go to summer camp. Guests are welcome to get their car washed for a donation, shop the yard sale and stay for lunch. Mt. Olive Baptist Church thanks the community for their support. For pricing information, contact Mt. Ol ive Baptist Church. April 7 Spring Fling, yard and bake sale The Live Oak Garden Club will be host ing a spring ing on April 7 from 8 a.m. until noon. The spring ing will be held at their clubhouse between Shands Hos pital and the Coliseum. In addition to the plant sale, there will be a yard and bake sale with plant and craft vendors. A Hibachi Highway food truck will be present so guests may buy a snack or stay for lunch. April 10 Iron Sharpens Iron event The all-mens event, Iron Sharpens Iron, Proverbs 27:17 will be held on April 10, with former FSU coach Bobby Bowden sharing a word to the men and boys of how God can change your life in many ways. Doors open at 6 p.m. A love of fering will be received. The event is free to attend. For more information, con tact the Live Oak Church of God. April 14 Alligator Lake Spring Festival The Alligator Lake Spring Festival will be held Saturday, April 14 at Alligator Lake Park in Lake City from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Enjoy a free community festival celebrating nature. Bird walks led by experts start at 8 a.m. on the Florida Birding Trail. Walking work shops highlight butteries, native plants and bird habitats. Featuring a Full Flight Raptor Program, with live owls, falcons and hawks by Accipiter Enterprises. Vendors and ex hibitors offer nature and garden related items, and native plants. Many free ac tivities will be offered for children, music, food and drinks will be available. www. fourriversaudubon.org April 14 60th Anniversary Diamond Jubilee Gala The North Florida Community College Foundation has an elegant night of din ner, dancing, entertainment and remi niscing planned for its 60th Anniversary Diamond Jubilee Gala (student scholar ship fundraiser) on Saturday, April 14. For more information on sponsorship oppor tunities, contact the NFCC Foundation at 850-973-9414 or foundation@nfcc. Community Calendar edu. To make seating and table reservations: (850) 973-9414 or www.ticketsource.us/ nfcc. April 20 John McEuen and The String Wizards to Perform The NFCC Artist Series presents John McEuen and The String Wizards on Fri day, April 20 at 7 p.m. at Van H. Priest Auditorium. Join Grammy-award win ning host John McEuen (founding mem ber of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band), with his banjo, guitar, ddle and mandolin, and The String Wizards on an incredible jour ney interwoven with music, stories and memories of the iconic Circle album including Dirt Band favorites and hot bluegrass. Tickets: (850) 973-1653 or www.ticketsource.us/nfcc. April 21 Annual Fitness Run NFCCs annual Fitness Run is set for April 21 in conjunction with the Madi son County Florida Down Home Days festival. 5-K Run/Walk begins at 8 a.m. One-mile Fun Run/Walk begins at 9 a.m. Proceeds from this event will support Relay for Life. Register at www.nfcc.edu/ tness-run or contact Tyler Coody at (850) 973-1639. April 26 Hamilton County Brotherhood meeting The Hamilton County Brotherhood will meet at First Baptist Church in Jasper on April 26 at 7 p.m. Bring a covered dish and enjoy a meal and message. First Baptist Church is located at 207 2nd St NE in Jasper. April 27 & 28 The Curious Savage Performance at NFCC The NFCC Sentinel Upstage Players (Community Theatre) presents The Curi ous Savage on Friday & Saturday, April 27 & 28 at 7 p.m. at Van H. Priest Audi torium. In this comedic production, the eccentric Mrs. Savage is left 10 million dollars by her late husband and wants to make the best use of it. Her wish is to use the money to help others realize their dreams, but her grown stepchil dren will do anything to keep her from squandering away their money. With the help of Mrs. Savages new friends, she leads the stepchildren on a merry chase, and learns the true meaning of family in the process. Tickets: (850) 9731653 or www.ticketsource.us/nfcc. July 4 Talent and vendors needed The Fourth of July committee in Branford is in need of volunteers and vendors for the Fourth of July celebration this year. Those interested may call Peggy at 386-365-3700, or search the Facebook page at Branford Florida River Reunion. Monthly Meetings Mens Community-wide Church Fellow ship and Supper The Live Oak Church of God invites the community to join them for their din ner on the third Monday night of each month for their Mens Community Wide Church Fellowship and Supper at 7 p.m. Each month, there will be a guest speaker. For more information, call Johnnie Phil man Mens Ministry at 386-842-5494 or Pastor Wes Tanksley at 386-362-2483. History of Suwannee County Presented by County Historian Eric Mus grove Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 1st Thursday of the month, 12-1 p.m.. 386-658-2670 McAlpin Community Club meeting The McAlpin Community Club meet ings are held on the second Monday every month at 9981 170th Terrace in McAlpin. A covered dish dinner is served at 6 p.m. with the meeting beginning at 7 p.m. Find them on Facebook by searching McAlpin Community Club. For more information, contact Susan Fennell at 386-688-1267 or s.fennel@ windstream.net. Seed Library and Gardening Workshop Presented by Master Gardener Rhonda Lepper Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 1st Thursday of the month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. 386-658-2670 Recipe Swap Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 2nd Thursday of the month, 1-2 p.m. Bring in a favorite recipe or dish, meet other foodies and exchange ideas. Call 386-658-2670 for featured recipe of the month. Florida Native Plant Society The Sparkleberry Chapter meets on the second Tuesday of the month at Hatch Park Community Center, 403 S.E. Cra ven Street in Branford, presenting a va riety of educational programs concern ing our Florida native plants, the birds, bees and other wildlife that visit our plants, their place in our landscapes, and the contributions they make to our Florida environment. Meetings are al ways open to the public. More at www.sparkleberry.fnpschapters. org, or call 407-319-2488 or 386-3649309. Rock Painting Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 3rd Tuesday of the month, 6-7 p.m. Paint rocks and visit with other rock star artists. All supplies are provided. 386-658-2670 EAA monthly pancake breakfast The EAA Chapter 797 hosts a pancake breakfast every third Saturday of the month from 8:30 a.m. in the EAA building at Suwannee County Airport. The EAA building is located at 13302 80th Terr. in Live Oak. For more informa tion, contact 817-308-9752. Armchair Travels Presented by Don and Joanne Mott Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 3rd Friday of the month, 10-11 a.m. Travel around the country and learn about exciting new places to visit. Dementia Support Group Location: Good Samaritan Center Pri vate Dining Room 10676 Marvin Jones Blvd. Dowling Park, Florida When: the fourth Tuesday of each month Time: 10 a.m. This is for anyone who is a caregiver for someone who is suffering with Dementia or Alzheimers. There is no charge for this support group. You do not have to have a loved one residing in the Good Samaritan Center to attend this meeting. For more information please feel free to contact Ginger Calhoun at 386-6585594. Book Club for Adults Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 Last Friday of the month, 10-11 a.m. Join us to discuss our latest read. 386-658-2670 Suwannee Valley Branch of the NAACP meeting The Suwannee Valley Branch of the NAACPs regular monthly meeting will be at New Bethel Baptist Church located at 205 4th St in Jasper from 7 p.m. every third Monday. Meetings will begin after May 22, 2017. SREC, Inc. Senior Center monthly events The SREC, Inc. Senior Center, located at 1509 Martin Luther King Dr. SW in Jasper has monthly birthday parties the third Fri day of every month at noon, as well as monthly karaoke the fourth Wednesday of every month at 10 a.m. For more information, contact Barbara Daniels at 386-792-1136. Events are subject to change. Mom 2 Mom The community is invited to Mom 2 Mom on the fourth Thursday of the month from 1-2 p.m. at the Lafayette Three Rivers Library. Get together with other parents. Door prizes and goodies will be provided. Call Healthy Start at 386-294-1321. Estas invitada a Mom 2 Mom, un even to que se celebru el cuarto Jueves de cada mes la 1p.m. hasta la cas 2 p.m. en la Biblioteca de Lafayette. Reunirse con otras mams. Se propocionarn premios y regalos. Llame a Healthy Start al 386-294-1321. All-You-Can-Eat Wellborn Blueberry Pancake Breakfast The All-You-Can-Eat Wellborn Blueberry Pancake Breakfast will be held the rst Saturday of each month from 7:30 a.m. All new menu items including blueberry pancakes, scrambled eggs, sausage, grits, bacon, orange juice and coffee. Located at the Wellborn Community Association Building 1340 8th Ave. Well born, FL. For pricing and other informa tion, call 386-867-1761 or visit us online on Facebook or www.wellborncommu nityassociation.com. Come join us for great food and help benet the Well born community. SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 11A

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THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 11A Taylor County Beekeeping Club meeting Taylor County Beekeeping Club meets the second Monday of every month at 6:30 p.m. at the Taylor County IFAS center: 203 Forest Park Dr, Perry, Fla. 32348 www.facebook.com/tcbeeclub tacobeekeepers@gmail.com WoodmenLife monthly member meet ing, bring a dish WoodmenLife monthly member meet ing is held on the rst of every month. Located at 1339 SR 47 in Lake City. RSVP with your local WoodmanLife representative Kristen Hunt at 386-6887942. Singspiration at Suwannee Church of the Nazarene Every 5th Sunday, the church will host a Singspirationa night where members of the congregation sing, read poems, share testimonies, etc. Want to participate? Visit the church, or call at 386-397-2309, to be added to the list. The more participation, the longer it goes. Afterwards, there will be snacks and refreshments in the fel lowship hall. The church is located at 18763 SE CR 137 in White Springs, FL 32096 The Florida Gateway Bee Club meeting The Florida Gateway Bee Club meets at 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at the Suwannee Valley Agricul ture Center located at 8202 CR 417, Live Oak. Professional and hobby beekeepers are welcome, as well as anyone with an in terest in learning about honeybees. San Juan Mission Catholic Church public Rosary The community is invited to join San Juan Mission Catholic Church, 304 SE Plant Ave, Branford, for the public Rosa ry on the rst Saturday of every month at 9 a.m. The community will pray for religious freedom, traditional moral stan dards and freedom of conscience. The Suwannee Chapter, Florida Trail Association meetings The Suwannee Chapter, Florida Trail Association holds its monthly meetings on the second Monday, 7-9 p.m. at the Suwannee River Water Management District, 9225 CR 49, Live Oak, corner of US 90 and CR 49, 2 miles east of Live Oak. Programs and activities available, and public is welcome. For more information, call 386-7761920 or visit Suwannee.FloridaTrail.org. Disabled American Veterans Chapter 126, Suwannee Memorial Meets the rst Tuesday of each month at the hall in John Hale Park, 215 East Duval St., Live Oak. Disabled veterans and their spouses are encouraged to attend and join. Suwannee Republican Executive Committee Meets the 1st Thursday of each month at 7 p.m., Live Oak City Hall 101 White Ave SE Contact Sherri Ortega 386-330-2736 for more information. www.suwanneegop.com Suwannee County Republican Execu tive Committee Live Oak City Hall, 101 White Ave SE, Live Oak Meets rst Thursday, 7 p.m. www.suwanneegop.com Suwannee Valley 500 Club Third Saturday of each month, Suwan nee Valley 500 Club will meet at 1 p.m. at Thunder Alley, located at 1605 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak. 386-364-7778. Clothes Closet open donations The Jasper First Methodist Church is accepting donations of clean and gen tly used items of clothing for children, women and men to be offered in the monthly Clothes Closet. The Clothes Closet is open to everyone on the fourth Saturday of every month from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Christmas and Thanksgiv ing months the schedule is subject to change). All items are offered free of charge. For more information call 386397-2316. *The Clothes Closet will be closed due to the Christmas holiday on December 16. Suwannee County Historical Commission The Suwannee County Historical Com mission meets on the third Thursday of the month at 3:30 p.m. at the Su wannee County Historical Museum (old Freight Depot) on Ohio Avenue in Live Oak. Meetings are open to the public. Public rosary rst Friday Join St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church for the public rosary every rst Friday of the month at 3 p.m. The church is located at 928 Howard St West. Con tact Sheri Ortega at 386-364-1108 or Paul Schmitz at 386-362-5710 for more information. MOAA-Military Ofcers Association of America The Suwannee River Valley Chapter of MOAA meets monthly (September through June) in Lake City. All active duty, retired, and former military of cers of all services, including Reserve and National Guard, and spouses/ guests are welcome. For informa tion and reservations call Mo Becnel (386)755-0756 or Steve Casto at (386)497-2986. The Suwannee River Valley Chapter, founded in 1990, is one of over 400 MOAA chapters around the world. Suwannee County Riding Club Bob Holmes Arena, Live Oak We have roping events on the second and fourth Fridays of the month. Sign ups at 7 p.m. and rides begin at 8 p.m. Speed events are held on the second and fourth Saturdays of the month. Sign ups begin at 6 p.m. and rides begin at 7 p.m. We ride from the fourth weekend of January until No vember with the exception of March where we have no rides. If you have any questions contact Brittney Smith at 386-688-1482. Recipe Swap Suwannee River Regional Library 1848 Ohio Ave. S, Live Oak 1st Tuesday of the month, 12 p.m. 1 p.m. Bring in a favorite recipe or dish, meet other foodies, and exchange ideas. Call 386-362-2317 for Featured Recipe of the Month Christian Singles Meet every other Saturday at 5 p.m. Call for more information: 386-6235810, 386-288-0961, 386-438-3394. Branford Camera Club Hatch Park Community Center 403 SE Craven St. Branford Meets 3rd Thursday with an occasion al exception 386-935-2044 or 386-590-6339 Critter Corner Suwannee County Animal Shelter 11150 144th St., McAlpin, Fla. (approx. 8 miles South off Hwy 129). If you are missing a pet or would love to adopt a pet, please come see us. An imals can be viewed Monday-Friday 9-1 and Saturday 9-12. Volunteers and transporters are desperately needed; Tues.-Sat., 9-9:30 a.m., see Ms. Nor ma. Spay/Neuter 386-208-0072 Suwannee County Seniors Free Breakfast and Lunch Suwannee River Economic Councils Senior Center 1171 Nobles Ferry Road NW, Live Oak. Monday-Friday 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Break fast8:30 a.m./Lunch11:30 a.m. (make reservation for lunch by 9:30 a.m.) Bingo: (Wednesdays) 10 a.m. Meeting/Service: (Fridays) 10a.m. 386362-1164 First Baptist Church of Live Oak Clothes Closet 515 SW 5th Street, 1st and 3rd Thurs day, 8 a.m.-12 p.m. (The Old Red Barn) Suwannee Valley Branch NAACP-Unit #5137 PO Box 6105, Live Oak, FL 32064 President: Alonzo Philmore Triumph The Church & Kingdom of God in Christ, 410 Taylor Ave. SW off of 7th St. 1st Monday each month, 7 p.m. Email: a1101st@comcast.net 386-205-9132 American Legion Post 107 10726 142nd St., Live Oak Off of Hwy 129 S, post is 1 mile on the right. Meets 1st Thursday at 12 p.m. 386-362-5987 Social Sewing Club Center Ave., off of 7th St. 2nd and 4th Tuesday For more information: 386-362-4062 Live Oak Garden Club 1300 11th St. SW, Live Oak 3rd Friday of each month, 11 a.m. liveoakoridagardenclub.com 386-364-4189 Stars Widow Group Antioch Baptist Church 5203 CR 795, Live Oak, FL 4th Monday, 10:30 a.m. 386-362-3101 Suwannee Amateur Radio Club 1st Tuesday, social at 6:30 p.m., regu lar meeting at 7 p.m. North of I10 & US Hwy 129, Live Oak. Call for exact location and directions. www.suwanneearc.org 386-249-3616 Live Oak Art Guild Suwannee River Regional Library 1848 Ohio Ave. S, Live Oak Meets 1st Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Judith Adams-386-776-2675 Suwannee Democratic Executive Committee Live Oak City Hall 101 White Ave. SE, Live Oak Meets 2nd Thursday, 7 p.m. Suwannee County Bassmasters Poole Realty Inc 127 E. Howard St., Live Oak Meets 1st Tuesday, 7 p.m. 386-688-0978 or 386-590-2885 Save the Cats of Live Oak Help needed at the shelter with feed ing and cleaning Monday through Sundays. Help is also needed within the city limits with feeding several cat colo nies Monday through Sundays. Items always needed are food, litter and resalable items for the thrift store located at 217 W. Howard St. down town. For more information, contact 386-364-1006 or 407-748-0396. The Arc North Florida Recycle with us We recycle cardboard, name brand ink cartridges, laser toners, working cell phones w/charger, digital cameras, GPS, MP3, and laptops. 386-362-7143 ext. 0 Book Club for Adults Suwannee River Regional Library 1848 Ohio Ave. S, Live Oak Meets 4th Wednesday of the month at 2 p.m. Join us to discuss our latest read! 386-362-2317 Lunch & Learn History of Suwannee County Presented by County Historian, Eric Musgrove Suwannee River Regional Library 1848 Ohio Ave. S, Live Oak Meets 2nd Thursday of each month from 12-1 p.m. Bring your lunch & learn about our historic county! 386-362-2317 Weekly Meetings Savvy Caregiver Training at Suwannee Regional Library Savvy Caregiver is a free, seven-ses sion training program designed for caregivers who serve family members and friends with any form of dementia (i.e. Alzheimers). Training begins Wednesday, March 7. It will be held at the Suwannee River Regional Library, 1848 S. Ohio Ave., in Live Oak. Sessions are from 10 a.m. until noon. Space is limited to the rst 15 who register. For information, or to register contact Johnnie Jones III at 352-692-5277 or by email at jonesj@agingresources. org. Pre-registration is required. Bridge Club seeking players Monday Bridge Club meets every Monday at 5:30 p.m. at a local restau rant in Live Oak. Club needs players. Contact Diana at 904-254-8923 for details. Grace Lutheran Church hosting educational prayer classes Would you like to learn more of Jesus? Do you have questions about the Christian faith? Are you going through a difcult time and seek Gods council? Classes starting soon, those who attend can do so to t their sched ules best. Different class times will be available. Please contact Pastor Doug Priestap at Grace Lutheran Church Live Oak, 386-364-1851 or gracelu theranliveoak@gmail.com Childrens Table Food Distribution The Childrens Table Food Distribution will be at Peace Baptist Church, 7794 S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL each Wednes day between 2:00-2:30. Bring a large laundry basket or other container to put food in. Donations will be accepted. For further information, 386-935-4681 Beginners AA meeting Beginners AA at Dowling Park meets Monday-Wednesday-Saturday, 7 p.m. at The Lighthouse 23595 CR 250, Live Oak, 32060 For more information call 305-407-0895. www.LiveOakAA.com Live Oak Seed Library Every Wednesday from 1-3 p.m. Presented by the Suwannee County Master Gardeners. Check out seed packets and get all your gardening questions answered at the Suwannee River Regional Library. 386-362-2317 GriefShare Support GriefShare is a pastor-supervised, lay-led, Biblically based, Christ-cen tered, video assisted support group for persons who have lost loved ones or friends by death. The group will meet each Thursday at 10 a.m. beginning May 18 and run through August 10. This 13 week support program will be scheduled throughout the year on different day and time to give those on varying personal schedules an opportunity to participate. All who have experienced the death of a loved one are cordially invited to become a participant in GriefShare. For more information call 383-792-1122. Finding Your Roots? The Suwannee Valley Genealogy So ciety is the place to start! The library, located at 215 Wilbur Street SW near the football eld in Live Oak, is open to the public on Tuesdays and Thurs days from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. to help you nd your ancestors. You do not have to be a member to use the li brary. Meetings are held on the rst Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the library. For further information, in cluding membership prices, call Jinnie Hancock at 386-330-0110 or email JinnieSVGS@windstream.net SREC, Inc. Senior Center weekly events The SREC, Inc. Senior Center, located at 1509 Martin Luther King Dr. SW in Jasper hosts weekly support counsel ing every Wednesday beginning at 10 a.m. and Bible study every Friday at 10:30 a.m. For more information, con tact Barbara Daniels at 386-792-1136. Events are subject to change. Quilting Friends Each Tuesday from 9 a.m.-noon Jasper Public Library, 311 Hatley St. in Jasper. 386-792-2285 He Speaks to Me bible study for women He Speaks to Me, a Priscilla Shirer Bible study for women, will be held on Tuesdays from 9:30-11 a.m. be ginning Jan. 17 at Pinemount Baptist Church on Hwy 129 in McAlpin led by Chaplain Judy. For more information, contact her at 364-5558. We hope to see you there! Suwannee River Church of the Nazarene schedule The Suwannee River Church of the Nazarene is located at 18763 SE CR 137 in White Springs. For more infor mation, call 386-397-2309. Sunday School9:45 10:45 a.m. Sunday Morning Service11 a.m. noon Afternoon PotluckNoon Sunday Evening Service6 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service6 p.m. TOPS #662 (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) Meets every Thursday. (8 a.m. for weigh-in, meeting at 9 a.m.) at Ad vent Christian Church, 911 Pinewood Ave., Live Oak, Fla. For more informa tion, call Mary at 386-330-2535. Branford Seed Library Every second and fourth Tuesday from 2:30-4:30 p.m. Presented by the Suwannee County Master Gardeners. Check out seed packets and get all your gardening questions answered at the Branford Public Library. 386-935-1556 TOPS #9798 TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) TOPS #9798 is a support group that offers weekly weigh-ins and programs. The programs provide participants with health and weight loss information. Those ready to achieve weight loss and wish for more information may call Barbara at 386-362-5933 or Dori at 386-658-2767. Mayo AA Group Located at the First United Methodist Church, meet every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday at 8 p.m. For more information, contact 386294-2423 or 386-647-6424 AWANA Club New Hope Baptist Church, Mayo on Hwy. 51. From 6-8 p.m. and runs throughout the school year. Open to children ages two through sixth grades. For more information, call 386-294-2742. Grief Share GriefShare, a special support group for people experiencing grief and loss, will be held on Wednesday evenings from 6-8 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Live Oak. The church is located at 401 W. Howard St. Childcare is provided. Please call the church at 386-3621583 if you would like to attend. Community Calendar

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PAGE 12A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL Public Notices Protecting Your Right to Know Lafayette County Courthouse Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 18-48DR BRITTANY TOWNSEND, Petitioner, and FRANCISCO GARCIA-BIZA, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: Francisco Garcia-Biza LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: Mexico Neveo Balza gro YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defens es, if any, to it on Brittany Townsend whose address is 4929 NE CR 354, Mayo, FL 32066 on or before April 27, 2018 and file the original with the clerk of this Court at P.O. Box 88, Mayo, FL 32066 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Cir cuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Cir cuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file No tice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks of fice. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclo sure of documents and informa tion. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated: March 21, 2018 (Court Seal) Steve Land CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Hannah Owens Deputy Clerk 03/29, 04/05, 04/12, 04/19/2018 FIND IT IN THE LEGALS Public Notices keep you up to date on government announcements, hearings, meetings, and more.Subscribe and Stay Informed!eMF S 521 Demorest Street SE Live Oak, FL 32064386.362.1734www.suwanneedemocrat.com Public Notices Protecting Your Right to Know Lafayette County Courthouse Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 18-48DR BRITTANY TOWNSEND, Petitioner, and FRANCISCO GARCIA-BIZA, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: Francisco Garcia-Biza LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: Mexico Neveo Balza gro YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defens es, if any, to it on Brittany Townsend whose address is 4929 NE CR 354, Mayo, FL 32066 on or before April 27, 2018 and file the original with the clerk of this Court at P.O. Box 88, Mayo, FL 32066 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Cir cuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Cir cuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file No tice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks of fice. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclo sure of documents and informa tion. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated: March 21, 2018 (Court Seal) Steve Land CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Hannah Owens Deputy Clerk 03/29, 04/05, 04/12, 04/19/2018 FIND IT IN THE LEGALS Public Notices keep you up to date on government announcements, hearings, meetings, and more.Subscribe and Stay Informed!eMF S 521 Demorest Street SE Live Oak, FL 32064386.362.1734www.suwanneedemocrat.com LIVE OAK The UF/IFAS North Florida Research & Ed ucation Center Suwannee Valley is hosting a hydroponic workshop next month. The workshop will last from 8:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. on Sat urday, April 7. The NFREC-SV is located at 8202 County Road 417 near Live Oak. Among the topics to be cov ered are: plants, hydroponics, ment. The workshop is being offered by the Small Farms Academy as a result of an in creased demand for information on hydroponic use in a back yard setting. The workshop is designed for homeowners who want to learn how to grow their own vegetables, herbs or ow ers with various hydroponic systems. The NFREC-SV facility is one of the best in the southeast for teaching hydroponic grow ing systems in an actual operat ing greenhouse setting. The registration fee for the workshop is $20, which covers educational materials and re freshments. To register online, For more information, con tact Dilcia Toro at 386-3621725, ext. 102, or at dtoro@ u.edu. UF to host hydroponic workshop for homeowners

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THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 13A 53330-1 TRI-COUNTY SERVICE DIRECTORY Serving Suwannee, Hamilton & Lafayette Counties These businesses are ready to serve you.Tradesmen & Service Providers:Call now to place your ads 386-362-1734 x 102 53369-1 BYRDS POWER EQUIPMENTSales & Service All Makes & Models 11860 E. U.S. Hwy 27 Branford, Florida Hours: Mon-Fri 7 a.m. 5 p.m. Open Saturdays 7 a.m. Noon(386) 935-1544 CALL TODAY386-249-9432Buying a new home? Selling your home? Monja Slater Realtor monjaslater@gmail.com 55279-1 6212 US Hwy 129 N Live Oak, FL 32060Cell 53431-1SUBURBAN PROPANE24-Hour Emergency Service Our Business is Customer Satisfaction 17460 High Springs Main St. High Springs, FL 1717 Howard St. West Live Oak, FL www.suburbanpropane.com 386-454-3690 r fntbtf fntntb btnf ftf btfb tttf55200-1 16013-1 -FOR RENTGREAT RATES FOR NICE LOOKING RENTALS WATER, SEWER, AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS. 386-330-2567 rfnntbrrb rffnnttbft ftnfnnttbt nn tfn tn f The Mayo Free Press DEADLINES FOR CLASSIFIED & LEGAL LINE ADS: FOR WEDNESDAY SUWANNEE DEMOCRATNOON FRIDAY PRIOR FOR FRIDAY SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT-9:00 A.M. WEDNESDAY PRIOR FOR THURSDAY JASPER NEWSNOON FRIDAY PRIOR FOR THURSDAY MAYO FREE PRESSNOON FRIDAY PRIOR The Best Deals Can Be Found Here In the CLASSIFIEDS TO ALL TRADESMEN & SERVICE PROVIDERS:Havent you always heard the old saying Big things come in small packages? Well, this is the idea behind the new Tri-County Service Directory coming soon to the classified pages of the Suwannee Democrat, The Jasper News & the Mayo Free Press!Call 386-362-1734 X102 for more info on how to place a small ad (thats the small packages part)to appear in all 3 of our publica tions which means the opportunity for your ad to be seen by approx. 4600 potential customers (and thats the big things part). FIND IT IN THE General Help Wanted Advent Christian Village Floridas First Retirement CommunityCurrent JOBS Line Advertisement call (386) 658-5627 or visit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs / day, 7 days / week Where People and Ex cellence Meet in a Small Community Setting FT Maintenance Worker Work includes residential and commercial building gener al maintenance; must have experience in all aspects of building maintenance and upkeep, including general renovation carpentry or good working knowledge of building electrical wiring (1 to 2 vacan cies). Valid FL DL required. FT / PT Laborer Position helps maintain clean working areas plus pressure wash and perform minor main tenance on outdoor building / paved surfaces, move mate rials to and from work areas, remove debris, and other simi lar tasks in indoor and outdoor settings. Competitive pay and benefits, great work environment, Christ-centered mission. Visit www.acvillage.net for a downloadable applica tion, or visit our office to apply in person, Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. till 4:00 p.m. EOE / Drug-Free Workplace / Criminal background checks required. Professional EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY CITY OF LIVE OAK POLICE DEPARTMENT OFFICERDuties: Provides law enforcement services and police duties associated with the protection, safety and welfare of the citizens within our community. Minimum Requirements: Must be at least 19 years of age, possess State of Florida Law Enforcement Certification, U.S. Citizen, High School Diploma or GED, no felony or misdemeanor convictions for perjury or false statement, never have received a dishonorable discharge from any of the Armed Forces, successfully pass a background investigation as required by Florida Department of Law Enforcement, successful completion of pre-employment testing requirements (drug screen, psychological examination and physical examination). Possess valid Florida drivers license. Entry Level Salary: $ 32,352.57 Holiday Pay: $1,728.10 Total Package (excluding overtime) $34,021.25Benefits: All equipment including uniforms and other required equipment are provided. Florida State Retirement System. Ten paid holidays and one personal paid holiday. Those employees required to work on a holiday are paid at time and one half for the hours they work. Paid PTO and employee Health Insurance Package (includes life and disability insurance). Take home car program based on position, seniority and providing you live in Suwannee County.Application Deadline: Application must be submitted to the Office of the City Manager, 101 S.E. White Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064. Open until filled. First review of applications will begin on 04/9/2018 .FIREFIGHTER/EMTDuties: Performs firefighting and EMT rescue activities; operates and maintains fire equipment; performs inspec tions and recommends fire prevention measures; and ad ministers first aid. Minimum Requirements: Graduate from a standard high school and must possess a fire fighter certification as required by Florida Statutes and State of Florida or National EMT cer tification. Applicant must meet required health and physical standards and possess a valid Florida Driver License. The ap plicant must possess a certifi cate of compliance by the Fire Fighters Standards and Train ing Council in accordance with Chapter 633.34 and 633.35 Florida Statutes. Salary Range: $ 32,293.15 to $48,776.00 annually, plus $1,500.00 EMT stipend. Application Deadline: Appli cation must be submitted to the office of the City Manager, 101 White Avenue SE, Live Oak, Florida 32064. Applications will be accepted until April 20, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. Physical Agility/Written Testing for this position will be held on April 28, 2018 at 8:00 a.m. at the City of Live Oak Fire Depart ment. For further information please contact the LOFD at (386) 362-1313.The City of Live Oak is an Equal Opportuni ty/Affirmative Action/Drug-Free Workplace employer and does not discriminate in hiring. Minorities, Women and Disabled are encour aged to apply. If you have a disability and require special accommodations during the selection process, please notify the City Man agers Office at (386) 362-2276. Madison, FL: Director of Curriculum and Instruction. See www.nfcc.edu for details. Educational CNA CLASSES Nursing Assistants are in GREAT demand! Quest Training offers nurse taught classes. No GED required if age 18 yr. Day and Evening classes available. (386)362-1065 Yard/Estate Sales 3289 101st Ln Live Oak, FL. at Suwannee Station Bap tist Church. Sat, 3/24, 7a-2p. Church-wide Yard Sale. Over 20 families items. Lots of great stuff!! Yard/Estate Sales STOP BY THE SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT OFFICE 521 Demorest Street, SE Live Oak, FL AND PLACE YOUR GA RAGE (YARD, ESTATE, OR MOVING) SALE AD IN TWO EDITIONS OF THE SU WANNEE DEMOCRAT TO RECEIVE A FREE GARAGE SALE KIT* *Kit contains: 3-11X13 Signs 1Pre-Sale Checklist 1Tipsheet for a Successful Sale 1Sheet of Price Stickers Hay for Sale FOR SALE: VERY GOOD PERENNIAL PEANUT HAY Approx. 500-lb rolls. $85 per roll-cash at the farm. Hank Sheddan, Live Oak, FL 386-590-1827 hws332@yahoo.com Jewelry Elephant Ivory Pendant trimmed in gold & multiple gems 1.5 long. Unique & beautiful. $275.00 OBO. (386)208-0728 Live Oak, FL Misc Merchandise FOR SALE: 8 Standard pool table w/sticks & all accessories $400.00. Up-standing walker $250.00 OBO. (386)688-0679. HAVE YOU BEEN MEANING TO CLEAR OUT SOME OF THE CLUTTER? RECYCLE, REDUCE, REUSE? MAYBE GET RID OF THAT UGLY (YOU THINK) VASE AUNT EDNA LEFT YOU IN HER WILL? WE CAN HELP! IF YOU CAN PART WITH ANY SINGLE UNWANTED ITEM FOR LESS THAN $500.00, YOU CAN RUN A 5-LINE AD WITH US FOR ONE WEEK AT NO CHARGE! (Offer restricted to one ad for one item within a 4-week period) CALL THE CLASSIFIEDS DEPARTMENT AT 386-362-1734 X102 Two Bikes For Sale: One 3-wheeler $65.00 One beach cruiser $35.00 Call (386)364-1247 Land/Acreage FIVE ACRES Gorgeous Country Setting. Owner Finance, No Down. $29,900. Only $307/mo. 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Land/Acreage ONE ACRE PAVED ROAD FRONTAGE Beautifully Wooded, Owner Fi nance, No Down. $14,900. Only $153/mo 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com TEN ACRES OBRIEN, FL Paved Rd, well & culvert. Owner financing. NO DOWN $69,900. $613/mo 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Homes For Rent ATTENTION RENTERS The Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority is now ac cepting applications for its Pub lic Housing units in Jasper, FL. Applications are being accepted for 1, 2, 3 and 4 bedroom apart ments. For additional informa tion, call 1-800-365-9527 ext 5302 or 5307. Equal Housing Opportunity. FOR RENT: 3bd/2ba home. Newly renod, all new appl, in city of Live Oak, FL. quiet nbrhood. Credit check reqd. $1000/mo, 1st last, & $500 sec. 386-208-8545 Manufactured Homes On 5 beautiful ac near Dowling Park, FL: 3/2 MH. Fully furn & equipd. Avail 5/15 for 6mos-1yr. $1200/mo + 1 mo sec dep. Call 863-843-5469 for more info & appt to see. Autos RUN YOUR TRUCK OR AUTO FOR SALE AD FOR 4 WEEKS FOR JUST A LITTLE MORE THAN THE PRICE OF 1 WEEK: 1 WEEK REGULAR RATE: $25.83 4 WEEK SPECIAL RATE: $30.90 This special rate gets you 8 issues of the Suwannee Democrat, 4 issues of The Jasper News & the Mayo Free Press plus 8 days online!!! ADD A PHOTO FOR ONLY $10.50 MORE CALL NOW TO GET YOUR AD STARTED 386-362-1734 X102 ClassiedsAre In RV Sales/Service WE BUY USED RVS! CALL 229-740-0375 FIND IT IN THE CLASSIFIEDS TODAY!! Find it in the Classifieds! ANFADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA FLORIDA STATEWIDE Building Supplies rfntb frr rfbf brrb b Education r r br rbrr nntb

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PAGE 14A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL terry.richards@ganews.com MAYO The smell of hot dogs, the sound of bands and the sight of children jumping in the bouncy house: these are the signs that a towns big festival is un derway. The SunLight Project coverage area, which includes Live Oak, Jasper and Mayo, Fla., and Valdosta, Moultrie, Tifton, Thomasville, Milledgeville and Dalton, Ga., and the surrounding com munities, are taking a look at where to go across North Florida and South Georgia for festival fun. rfrntbtrtr trbbntnt fnt Lafayette County, Fla. second Saturday of October. This year will mark the 38th Annual Pioneer Day. The event takes place throughout the town starting with a parade the morning of and continuing at the park. During the festival, there are local ven dors and entertainment by a local band and D.J. as well as an art show, crafts, toys, food vendors and games to win prizes. rttn ntrnttr ntrrtrt t tntr Suwannee County, Fla. will be held Saturday, April 14, at Green way Park in Branford. and an adult bass tournament. The chil drens groups are separated into 7-yearolds and younger, and 8to 15-year-olds. a boat. The youth tournament will start 8 a.m. The festival is scheduled to start 9 a.m. with vendors, music performances, a 5K run and food. the festival. For more information, visit suwannee the Square in the citys historic downtown. This years event is planned to span across three days with the tree lighting ceremony, ribbon cutting and Jingle Bell Fun Run to be held Thursday, Nov. 29. The Snow on the Square, which de buted last year, with snow and snow slides will be held Friday, Nov. 30. will also open Friday evening. After set ting up Friday morning, booths will open at 4 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 30, and remain open until 10 p.m. The vendors will then also be open all day Saturday, Dec. 1. Festival is a great opportunity to stock up on everything blueberry, from blueberry dies, syrup and plants. The festival will be June 2 with ap proximately 100 arts-and-crafts and food vendors, the country store, a car show, parade, childrens amusements and the blueberry pancake breakfast. organizing a local Fourth of July celebra tion for more than 35 years. The annual event will begin with the Branford Rotary Duck Race will take place at Ivey Memorial Park and the opening ceremony takes place at Hatch Park. The parade will be in the evening fol serving its 27th year. The festival will be from May 2 to 5 at the Spirit of Suwan nee Music Park. Among the headliners are Alan Jackson, Josh Turner, Easton trntn tnttntnt rntrttrn ntrn btt Hamilton County, Fla. Festival on the second Saturday in June. Blackberry Festival and will be June 9 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The festival takes place at the Heritage Village, 502 First Ave. NE. the 66th Annual Florida Folk Festival from May 25-27. The event is held along the Suwannee River at the Stephen Foster State Park Festival was in 1952 when Ada Hold ing Miller attended a Florida Federation Stephen Foster Memorial, she told Lillian be the ideal place for a folk festival. the Pines has not been announced but among the artists last year were Miranda Lambert and Keith Urban as well as Flor and Adam Sanders as well as Brothers Osborne, Maren Morris, Ryan Hurd and Raleigh Keegan. The Party in the Pines music festival is held at Bienville Planta Lowndes County, Ga. celebrates the abundant azaleas as well as the culture of Valdosta and Lowndes The festival started in 2000 and has settled into a Saturday and Sunday event in mid-March at Drexel Park. The festival features dozens of arts & crafts vendors, food vendors, a Kids Zone, classic car show, various attractions, concerts by lo cal bands, etc., all open to the public. More than 220 arts, entertainment and food vendors were expected at this years event, held March 10-11, said H. Aaron Strickland, festival executive director. About 25,000 people were expected to attend, he said. In 2000, Joanne Griner proposed a festival to celebrate Valdosta and its sta val and served as its director for several years. She remained deeply involved in the festival until her passing in 2016. Among other festivals around the Val dosta area are: Quitman in October. Includes arts, crafts, leading crops. in October. Vendors, arts, crafts and a large parade are offered. The honey bee theme celebrates the citys past as one of the nations leading providers of queen bees for beekeepers. Thomas County, Ga. April 26-28, at various times and loca tions The 97th Annual Rose Show and Fes tival features a childrens parade, Rose and truck show, Rose Show, Orchids on the Park, annual Thomasville Police De Most events are free. More information is at thomasvillega.com. nttntrnn ttnt 14, 6-9 p.m. each night, downtown Thom asville/Park and Amphitheater. Turn-ofthe-century downtown ushers event par ago. The event has been redesigned to better highlight Thomasvilles Victorian history and heritage. Stroll through down town and enjoy food vendors, authentic to the period performances, musicians and more. Free admission. downtown Thomasville, 1-5 p.m. Sunday, season at the Holiday Open House. Fea turing shopping and dining at participat ing downtown shops and restaurants, plus a chance to win Downtown Dollars. Free trolley rides to and from the Plantation Thomasville, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 24. Shop Small this holiday season. Supporting local businesses keeps dollars local, employs hundreds of people each year and supports the dreams of friends and neighbors. is the last Saturday in October. The event originated in 1979 as an opportunity for local runners to have a friendly compe tition. A 5K walk and one-mile fun run are for non-runners. Festival events begin in downtown Boston the night before the runs and walks. swells to between 30,000 and 60,000 on Mule Day. More than 350 arts and crafts exhibitions, concessions, cane-grinding and syrup-making take place during the Colquitt County, Ga. Festival will return with an outdoor con cert featuring the Swingin Medallions Friday, April 20, and will follow with activities on the courthouse lawn and on the streets and sidewalks of the square the following day. tnntrtt nnntnt rtbtt tfnt A downtown festival to celebrate the to-do calendar for more than 30 years. The annual barbecue contest was start ed a number of years ago by the late Rocky Jones, his wife, Joy, and Greg Hersey. Peachtree Park, Doerun. Moultrie Square Tift County, Ga. weekend in April in Fulwood Park, allows the local black community to showcase talented artists and musicians. the last Saturday in September, spotlights the unique culture and heritage of the lo cal Latino population. Pepper Festival every September to mark the towns spicy past. on for several decades and brings to life the regions rural history and heritage. It the Georgia Museum of Agriculture and Historic Village at Abraham Baldwin ple can learn how to shear sheep, make pine-needle baskets and sew quilt squares. Antique tractors are on display and blue transported back in time with fun events and intriguing exhibits. Whiteld County, Ga. October raises money to help preserve a historic mill built in 1855. mill, said Judy Alderman, former longtime head of the Praters Mill Foundation. month from May through December. That was awfully ambitious. The fair continued as a twice-yearly event for almost 30 years before being scaled back to once a year. This years fair will run from Oct. 1314, at 5845 Highway 2, Dalton. The fair focuses on Appalachian history, culture, music and food. There are also demon strations of blacksmithing, spinning, quilt ing, rug hooking, woodcarving and hand tufting as well as tours of the mill, pony rides and canoe rides. Admission is $7. free. St. Dalton. The festival is free and opens at 10 a.m., Saturday and 11 a.m., Sunday. There will be live music and other perfor mances and tours of the Guilds sculpture garden. Artists from around the nation will be displaying and selling their art. food, music and plenty of arts and crafts on sale. Baldwin County, Ga. festivals is the Deep Roots Festival, a daylong event combining food and craft vendors, a car show, a Georgia Barbecue Association-sanctioned barbecue contest and touring musicians from across the country. The event normally takes place in late October in downtown Milled geville. Street Downtown Development Authority bration, which brings music, activities, and tables from local organizations to downtown. Held in celebration of Milled gevilles inclusion on the National Main been held in April for the past two years turnout in 2016. Festival annually draws huge crowds to west Baldwin for a weekend of food, country and bluegrass music and a car show. Started by local residents Randy Newton and Bobby Kitchens on Kitch ens grandfathers land, the festival is slated this year for Nov. 3 and 4 and is expected to draw several local musical guests. The SunLight Project team of jour nalists who contributed to this report includes Alexis Spoehr, Will Woolever, Wayne Grandy, Jessie R. Box, Pat Dona hue, Eve Guevara and Terry Richards. To contact the team, email sunlightproject@ ganews.com. State & Region

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THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 15A 60134-1Christ has risen! Christ has truly risen!Father Anthony Basso May the risen Lord bless you and yours this Easter Season.Easter Vigil Saturday, March 31st 8:00 pm Easter Sunday Mass Sunday, April 1st 9:00 am (English)/11:30 am (Spanish)928 East Howard St(386) 364-1108St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church ST. LUKES EPISCOPAL CHURCHWEDNESDAYEucharist & Unction SUNDAYEucharist Sunday School For More Information Call 386.362.1837. 60139-1 Lighthouse Hwy 51 N. Mayo, FL Sunday 10:30 am Pastor Ronnie Sadler 60142-1 60433-1 First Baptist Church401 West Howard Street Live Oak, FL Ph. 386-362-1583Come Worship with us March 26 29th 6:30pm Life Action Summit Revival Conference April 1st Easter Sunday 9:00 am & 11:00 am Worship 6:00 pm Worship 52121-1 15445 US Highway 129 S. (7 miles South of Town) (386) 208-1345 www.CCMLO.org email: ccmlo@windstream.net Starting Sunday April 1st NEW Sunday Morning Service Times ...... 9:00 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Night Service ............................................. 7:00 p.m.Pastor Wayne Godsmark, Lead Pastor 61075-1 CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES/Suwannee County 61410-1Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church Phone 386-364-1851 Easter For Kids!Saturday March 31st 10:00 am 11:30 am Easter Sunday Everyone Welcome 61414-1rf ntbfn 61523-1 at Community Easter Sunrise Service 386-362-2323 Everyone Welcome Community Presbyterian Church

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PAGE 16A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL 52119-1 W.B. Howland Building Supply 60149-1 386-362-1235 610 11th St. at the Round-a-Bout Live Oak, FL BROWNS FLOWERS & GIFTS386-792-1120PO Box 1647 60225-1 r FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 60235-1 rfntbfPF bffnbfnnbnfbn nffnnfnfffb @suwanneertc 60223-1J. Sherman Frier & Associates130 West Howard Street Live Oak, FL 32064rfRegistered Land SurveyorsJ. Sherman Frier, R.L.S. Tim Alcorn, P.S.M.ntbntb 60236-1 HAL AIRTH Attorney 112 Howard St. W. Live Oak, FL 386-362-4915 60220-1 Sheriff Brian N. LambLafayette County Sheriffs Ofce,wishes everyone a Happy Easter Jesus Is Risen 60158-1 B. W. HELVENSTON & SONS, INC. 60152-1 Live Oak Jewelry P.O. Box 189 Live Oak, FL 32064 Tel (386) 362-1140 Fax (386) 364-3654 Email liveoakjewelry@windstream.netEstablished 1946Jon C. Boggus Bart L. Boggus 60482-1Karens Tack Large selection of Horse Equipment, Boots, Hats, and Accessories for the WHOLE Family. Oak, FL (386) 208-0761 info@karenstack.netrfn rfrnrtbrrnrfrr rfntbnr nrbttnnr60481-1 60162-1 110 SE Lee Ave. Live Oak, FL 32060 (386) 364-5961 SURREY PLACE P.O. Box 1089 102 Hatley Street West Jasper, Florida (386) 792-1688 (386) 792-3224 (386) 697-3697HitsonRealty.comHitson Realty, Inc. 60227Easter A Special Season for Christians rfnt bfftPalm Sundaytbbtrb ttttt ftbrfbbbb rtttfr tttfttbb Good Fridaytbfbtb tbtfbtbf bbtb ttfEaster Sundayfftbftt fbbft btftft bftbftftSymbols of EasterThe Crosstftbfttt ttttffftThe Empty Tombttttbbt The Lambttftt ttfttt brttbttftt rfbbftbttf tbftfftf ttt fbtfttt