Citation
The Mayo free press

Material Information

Title:
The Mayo free press
Uniform Title:
Mayo free press (Mayo, Fla. 1958)
Place of Publication:
Mayo, FL
Publisher:
Mayo Free Press, Myra Regan - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 6, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Mayo (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lafayette County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Lafayette -- Mayo
Coordinates:
30.053276 x -83.177674

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 70, no. 27 (June 20, 1958)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Mayo Free Press. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
002042475 ( ALEPH )
33286672 ( OCLC )
AKN0339 ( NOTIS )
sn 95047189 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Mayo free press and Lafayette County news

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Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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Lafayette Countys news source since 1888. Were proud to serve! r ffntbbtbnftf r btfnbfb r ffbnfffbtftb r bt r tbtft Thursday March 15, 2018 Mayo Free Press btfbft btf ffntbbtbnf 866-246-0455 rountreemoorechevrolet.com Your Hometown Chevy DealerJeff Mosley 53186-1 SEE MAYO, PAGE 2A jessie.box@ganews.com BRANFORD A Mayo man was arrested after dragging a Su wannee County deputy down the road while eeing on Saturday. According to the Suwannee County Sheriffs Ofce, a deputy conducted a trafc stop on a vehi cle, occupied by three people, for running a stop sign. During the trafc stop, all three occupants were asked to exit the vehicle. The report states the backseat passenger, Reginal Daniel Byrd Jr., 43, Mayo, reentered the vehi cle in an attempt to ee. According to SCSO, the deputy attempted to get the suspect out of the vehicle, but the suspect began punching him. As the deputy was partially inside the vehicle, the suspect grabbed the deputys arm and be gan dragging him down the road, the report states. According to the report, the deputy attempted to stop the suspect by deploying his taser to no avail. The suspect eventually released the deputys arm causing the deputy to fall to the pavement while the vehicle was traveling at 30 mph. During this struggle, the taser fell into the vehicle. According to SCSO, the suspect ed the scene and headed east on U.S. Highway 27 at high speed. The deputy was able to get back Mayo man arrested for dragging deputy rff DOWLING PARK A Mayo man died Tuesday in a single-car accident in western Suwannee County. According to the Florida High way Patrol, 22-year-old James Conrad Hayden III was traveling west on County Road 136 near 102nd Place around 3:45 a.m. when it drove off onto the north ern shoulder of the road. The FHP report states that Haydens car struck a tree as it continued traveling northwestern on the shoulder and then over turned. Hayden was pronounced de ceased at the scene. Mayo man killed in accident Tuesday ntrbfbfbfrfbr n alexis.spoehr@ganews.com MAYO The La fayette County Board of County Commissioners declared April as Water Conservation Month on Monday. Lafayette County is calling on each citizen and business to help pro tect the precious resource of water, by practicing water safety measures and becoming more aware of the need to save water. The Ezell Boat Ramp has been nished for three weeks and is wait ing for the state to inspect the boat ramp. The board agreed to remove the closed signs and open the ramp back up. According to Scott Sadler, head of the Public Works Department, the restriping of Highway 53 is completed and the rum ble strips will be repaired by the end of the week. Some of the tree trimmers will be transitioning to mowing teams by the end of the month. Robert Hinkle, head of the Building and Zoning Department in formed the board Julian and Carol Pearce of The Sanctuary at Soledad Goats will be at the March 26 meeting. Marty Tompkins, head of the EMS Department asked for two new radios for the re department. The radios are less than $400 each. The radios will be funded by the EMS budget instead of the re department. April declared Water Conservation Month for Lafayette County MAYO An Eas ter celebration will be coming to town in one week. Easter under the Oaks will take place March 24 at the Mayo Park. The event starts at 11 a.m. and is scheduled to last until 2 p.m. There will be ham burgers or hot dogs with chips and a drink for $4 and a special appearance from the Easter Bunny. Goody bags for the children will be handed out. Easter Under the Oaks one week away SEE SUWANNEE, PAGE 10A bff f jessie.box@ganews.com LIVE OAK The Su wannee County Fair will kick off its 103rd consec utive year since 1915 on Friday at the Coliseum with a ribbon cutting ceremony at 6 p.m. The fair will be open Fri day, March 16 to Sunday, March 25 with live enter tainment, food vendors and rides. On most days, admis Suwannee County Fair celebrates 103rd year this Friday brf bfr b fb fbr tf f t n tf rf n tb

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PAGE 2A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL 55807-1 Saturday, March 17, 2018North Main Street (US 129) 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.Trenton, Floridarfntbftf btfbtt bfrtf ftftfftfQuilt Show & Saletfbfftfrt tbf Visit us on Facebook and our website www.trentonquiltfestival.com (352) 463-3842 or (352) 463-4000Crafts & Antiques Antique Tractors Food & Live Music Demonstrations Museum Exhibits Kids Activities 52274-1 DATE School Lunch Menu Mayo riway LAFAYETTE ELEMENTARYBREAKFAST LUNCH LAFAYETTE HIGH SCHOOLLUNCH BREAKFAST Chicken Nuggets Carrot Sticks Ranch Dressing Green Peas Macaroni and Cheese Ketchup Honey Mustard Dressing Diced Pears Oranges Assorted Milk Entree #1 Chicken Nuggets served with Ketchup or Honey Mustard Dressing Entree #2 Rib-B-Q Carrot Sticks served with Ranch Dressing Green Peas Macaroni and Cheese Diced Pears Oranges Assorted Milk Sponsored By:Lunch and Breakfast are served at Lafayette Elementary and High School each day. Varieties of Milk choices are available at both schools each day. Alternate High School menus are in parentheses. Menus are subject to change due to availability of goods.3/19 Mon. 3/20 Tues. 3/21 Wed. 3/22 Thurs. 3/23 Fri.Chicken & Rice Collards Black Eyed Peas Cornbread Mandarin Oranges Fresh Apples Assorted MilkEntree #1 Hamburger Steak Entree #2 Chicken Patty Low Sodium Green Beans Mashed Potatoes served with Gravy Applesauce Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted Milk Cheese Pizza Baked Sweet Potato Broccoli Fruit Cocktail Fresh Blueberries Assorted Milk Entree #1 Cheese Pizza Entree #2 Buffalo Chicken Pizza Carrots Broccoli Fruit Cocktail Fresh Blueberries Assorted Milk Blueberry Pancake Assorted Cereal Scooby-Doo Graham Crackers Pineapple Tidbits Seasonal Fruit Assorted Milk Buttered Pancake W/ Syrup Assorted Cereal Scooby-Doo Graham Crackers Grape Juice Seasonal Fruit Assorted Milk Egg & Cheese Sandwich Assorted Cereal Zoo Animal Crackers Apple Juice Bananas Assorted Milk Honey Bun Assorted Cereal Dick and Jane Crackers Applesauce Bananas Assorted Milk Cinnamon Rolls Assorted Cereal Dick and Jane Crackers Diced Pears Oranges Assorted Milk Breakfast Pizza Assorted Cereal Honey Maid Graham Crackers Apple Julee Bananas Assorted Milk French Toast Stick Syrup Cups Assorted Cereal Bear Cinnamon Cracker Grahams Fruit Cocktail Oranges Assorted Milk Cherry Frudel Assorted Cereal Bear Cinnamon Cracker Grahams Fruit Cocktail Oranges Assorted Milk Entree #1 Chicken & Rice Entree #2 BBQ Pork Collards Black-Eyed Peas Cornbread Mandarin Oranges Fresh Apples Assorted Milk Breakfast Burrito Assorted Cereal Honey Maid Graham Crackers Grape Juice Diced Peaches Assorted Milk Turkey Corn Dogs Baked Beans Cabbage Saute Ketchup, Mustard Dill Pickles Pineapple Tidbits Bananas Assorted Milk Entree #1 Chicken Sliders served with Ketchup Mustard Dill Pickles Entree #2 Turkey Corn Dogs served with Ketchup Mustard Baked Beans Cabbage Saute Pineapple Tidbits Bananas Assorted Milk Egg & Cheese Sandwich Assorted Cereal Zoo Animal Crackers Apple Juice Bananas Assorted Milk Hamburger Steak Pearled Mashed Potatoes with Gravy Green Beans Homemade Rolls Applesauce Assorted Fresh Fruit Assorted Milk to his vehicle and pursue the suspect, the report states. During the pursuit, the suspect threw a large dark bag out of the window of the vehicle before stop ping the vehicle at the intersection of U.S. 27 and County Road 49. According to the report, the suspect attempted to ee the scene on foot, but the deputy was able to catch him. The suspect continued to ght and resist arrest while the deputy attempt ed to take him into custo dy, the report states. According to SCSO, the large bag was located and contained approximately 368 grams of methamphet amine and approximately $24,500 in U.S. currency. Byrd was transported to the Suwannee County Jail and charged with tamper ing with evidence, eeing and eluding, battery on law enforcement, resist ing arrest with violence, trafcking of methamphet amine and theft of law en forcement equipment. His bond has been set at $85,000. Sheriff Sam St. John said he is relieved that the deputy survived this encounter with only minor injuries, and commends him for his actions in tak ing this large amount of methamphetamine off of the streets of Suwannee County, as well as arrest ing this drug distributor. Continued From Page 1A Mayo sion will be $5 for adults and $3 for children age 6-12 and opens at 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 20 will be senior citizens day. Senior citizens will have free admission between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. and lunch will be served at noon. Participants will need to buy a wrist band to go on the rides, and on Sunday admission will be $10 for everyone and will include a wristband. We are the longest, continuos running county fair in the state of Flor ida, Tim Alcorn, fair president said. He added that this event is all about good, family fun. Events and entertain ment throughout the week will include the hog and dairy shows, a perfor Continued From Page 1A Suwannee mances by local dance classes, the Gateway City Big Band, the Suwannee High School Band and more. The demolition derby will be back this year on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. but will have a twist. The Suwannee County Fair along with Love Inc. rfrnr tb LAKE CITY Motorists traveling Interstate 75 over the next several weeks can expect to see large, digital message signs being installed as part of a $12 million Florida Depart ment of Transportation project. Once completed, the project will assist motorists with cur rent travel information and im prove interstate communication for emergency responders. The ITS (Intelligent Trans portation System) project began in late 2016 and is currently in its second phase before its expected completion this summer. The project spans from Archer Road (State Road 24) in Alachua County to the Florida/Georgia line. The ITS project involves in stalling trafc cameras and ve hicle detection sensors on the roadway. ITS allows emergen cy agencies to utilize enhanced technology to better detect traf c slowdowns and incidents. This information can then be passed along to motorists through digital message boards installed on the interstate and through the FDOT 511 system. The rst digital message sign was installed on southbound Interstate 75 in Columbia County on Monday. The sign displays are approximately eight-feet tall and 25-feet wide. Additional signs are sched uled to be installed in Alachua and Columbia counties in the coming weeks and the proj ect will continue north to the Georgia line until all signs are installed. Once completed, the Dis trict 2 ITS system will consist of 101 detectors on an 86-mile stretch of roadway. These sen sors will be placed every halfmile in the city of Gainesville and every mile outside of the city limits. There will also be 24 digital message signs 11 northbound and 13 southbound and 95 camer as located on Interstate 75. Additionally, the system will sync up with another project on Interstate 10, which is cur rently under construction and will run from Interstate 295 in Jacksonville to U.S. 90 in Leon County. Installation of the signs will take place during daytime hours and will require a lane closure for crews to safely install the signs. Expected lane closures relating to this and all FDOT projects can be found on FDOTs weekly lane closure report, which can be found at NFLRoads.com. FDOT begins ITS message board installation on I-75 have been selling rafe tickets for one lucky win ner to have a chance to drive a car in the derby. Lisa Kriehn, Love INC executive director, said only 250 tickets will be sold and the proceeds will go towards Christ mas gifts for local chil dren. Tickets are available at the Suwannee County Sheriffs Ofce, Napa Auto Parts, ORiellys Auto Part, Advanced Auto Parts and Love INC. Kriehn said the ticket holder must be present at the demolition derby to win. Alcorn said they are always looking for vol unteers. If interested, call 386-362-3247. A complete list of events and times can be found on page 8A-9A. frnrttnrffrbb

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THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 3A GREAT FOOD GREAT MUSIC DOORS OPEN AT 6PM MUSIC STARTS AT 8PM MARCH 16, 2018 FRIDAY SATURDAY 386-364-16833076 95th Drive, Live Oak, FL 32060www.MusicLivesHere.com MARCH 17, 2018IN THE MUSIC HALL rfn tnbn b bbn tnbtbn nnrt rfn tnbb bbn tnbtnnr t rfn tnbn b bbn tnbtbnrb nt 57806-1 57804-1 Kimekomi craft coming to Quilt Festival TRENTON Quilters love fabric and design. They often have bits and pieces left over from quilting projects or just hold onto fabric whenever it does not seem to t in anywhere. What to do? Well, quilters can use these scraps to make Japanese Kimekomi (pronounced kee may ko me). The word means a method of tacking some thing into a groove. Kimekomi is a fun craft for decorating smooth foam balls with fabric, ribbons, lace and net. They make beauti ful decorator accents for the home, can symbolize and commemorate special events or holidays, or are lovely gifts for friends and family. Kimekomi evolved from a specialized doll making technique developed in the Kyoto area in the early 1700s that used willow tree wood and fabric scraps. The wood was carved with grooves so that the doll clothes could be tucked into them. This local craft waned, but a similar Japanese doll making tech nique originated in the 1800s MAYO Lafayette County Elementary School an nounced their students of the month for March. Student of the Month for Kindergarten through sec ond-grade is Aniston Bonade. Student of the Month for third-grade through fthgrade is Nicole Arreguin. LCES names Students of the month rf ntfbrrtnt trf tfrbt LCHS names Students of the month MAYO Lafayette County High School announced their students of the month for March. Student of the Month for the middle school is Zamario Thomas. Student of the Month for the high school is Yonathan Perez-Binuelo. National Nutrition Month is a nutrition education and information campaign created annually in March by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The campaign focuses at tention on the importance of making informed food choices and develop ing sound eating and physical activ ity habits. Here are some tips to help you get started! Eat right for your lifestyle. Theres no one special diet that is right for everyone, so its important to follow a healthful eating plan thats packed with tasty foods and that keeps your unique lifestyle in mind. Reduce the calories density of the solid foods you eat. Foods with a high calorie density generally provide less satisfaction per calorie than foods with a low-calorie densi ty. Fruits, vegetables, legumes and nonfat dairy are all much lower in calorie density than processed foods that are made with sugar and white our. Fatty meats and other high-fat foods are very high in calorie densi ty. Choose lean poultry, seafood and leaner cuts of meat instead. Increase high-ber foods. Foods with more dietary ber tend to make people feel satised longer than those with less dietary ber. Fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains are all high in ber. Dont eat when you are not hun gry. Research has shown that the same snack provides more satisfac tion if eaten when hungry than when consumed in the absence of hunger. Increase consumption of foods with a greater volume if their calorie density is similar. For ex ample, choose popcorn rather than corn chips or puffed rice rather than Grape-Nuts cereal. Avoid foods high in fat and/ or sugar. Research suggests that foods with more protein, starch and ber provide more satisfaction per calorie than do those high in fat, sugar or rened grains. Foods that are high in fat in clude fried foods, cheese, butter, margarine, rened oils (vegetable, corn, canola, soybean), fatty meats and many fast foods such as burgers and pizza. Foods that are high in sugar include candies, pastries, cook ies and most dessert foods. Avoid liquid calories. Research has shown that sugar in a solid form (jelly beans) provides more satisfac tion for a given calorie than it does if it is dissolved in water (soda). Submitted by Eva Bolton UF/IFAS Family Nutrition Program Assistant Go Further with Food: National Nutrition Month 2018 nb LIVE OAK The Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park is planning to celebrate St. Patricks Day with The Titans of Rock performing a pair of tributes. The weekend will begin, Friday with an old-time country band, Snake Blood Remedy. The Suwannee County band has played a number of dates at the Music Park since 2017 and recently was named one of the bands that will play at the Suwannee Riv er Jam from May 2-5 at the SOSMP. The ddle, banjo, drums and guitar music that takes place has a tendency to draw the au dience to the dance oor. Doors open at 6 p.m. for dinner, music from 8 p.m. until midnight. Admission is free. The Music Hall is turn ing green for St. Patricks Day on Saturday, begin ning at 7 p.m. with games, contest, prizes and loads of fun with an Irish twist. The Titans of Rock will also be performing a Journey tribute, Never Stop Be lieving as well as a Bon Jovi tribute Livin On A Prayer. Call 386-364-1683 to get tickets now before the show sells out. Titans of Rock to perform at St. Patricks Day celebration for making larger, more elaborate dolls using pressed wood. These dolls with round faces and bodies are still popular in Japan today. Over time, just making decorated balls became a major interest, and was also called Kime komi. Kimekomi is easy and fun. The skills can be learned with just a little practice and do not require expensive tools and materials. The three-step process is: 1) use a template to mark a design onto the ball as a guide for cutting grooves, 2) cut out fabric to cov er the ball to tuck into the grooves, 3) nish off with decora tive trim. Bettie Rowe, who works at the Fabric Arts Shop in Lake City, will be at the quilt festival demonstrating the steps for making Kimekomi, and will have some of her completed Kimekomi cre ations available for sale at the Florida Quilt Museum. She is excited about telling festival goers all about Kimekomi. She rst learned about it from a quilt shop newsletter and ordered a book they were selling about it. She has made these decorated balls for the last seven or eight years and estimates she has made sev eral hundred of them. Rowe enjoys introducing others to the craft. Typically, she holds two Kimekomi classes each month at Fabric Arts; one during the week and another on Sundays. For March, Rowe will have one class in Trenton at the Suwannee Valley Quilt Shoppe on Thursday, March 22, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. She supplies the materials and tools (except for scis sors). Students make a Kime komi ball, executing the process from start to nish, and will leave this class with a completed decorated Easter egg. Generally, classes cost $25-35 depending on the materials. Rowe will teach a second class on Sunday, March 25, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Fabric Arts Shop in Lake City. The 12th annual Trentons Suwannee Valley Quilt Fes tival, Floridas only outdoor quilt show and sale, will be held Saturday, March 17, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Trenton. Located in north central Florida just 20 miles west of Gainesville, Trenton will be festooned with quilts ying from shops, businesses and government buildings up and down Main Street and beyond. For more information about the festival, visit the festival on Facebook, go to the festival website www. TrentonQuiltFestival.com, or contact the Suwannee Valley Quilt Shoppe at 352-4633842.

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PAGE 4A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL Opinion rf rfnftrbfb fftfr rbfbf WASHINGTON Iceland must be pleased that it is close to success in its program of genocide, but before congratulating that nation on its nal solution to the Down syndrome prob lem, perhaps it might answer a ques tion: What is this problem? To help understand why some people might ask this question, todays column is being distributed together with two photographs. One is of Agusta, age 8, a citizen of Iceland. The other is of Lucas, age 1, an American citizen in Dalton, Georgia, who recently was selected to be 2018 Spokesbaby for the Gerber baby food company. They are two examples of the problem. Now, before Iceland becomes snippy about the descrip tion of what it is doing, let us all try to think calmly about genocide, without getting judgmental about it. It is simply the deliberate, systematic attempt to erase a category of people. So, what one thinks about a genocide depends on what one thinks about the category involved. In Icelands case, the category is people with Down syndrome. This is a congenital condition resulting from a chromo somal defect. It involves varying degrees of mental retar dation (although probably not larger variances than exist between the mental capabilities of many people who are chromosomally normal say, Isaac Newton and some people you know). It also involves some physical abnor malities (including low muscle tone, small stature, atness of the back of the head, an upward slant to the eyes) and some increased health risks (of heart defects, childhood leukemia and Alzheimers disease). Average life expectan cy is now around 60 years, up from around 25 years four decades ago, when many Down syndrome people were in stitutionalized or otherwise isolated, denied education and other stimulation, and generally not treated as people. Highly (almost but not perfectly) accurate prenatal screening tests can reveal Down syndrome in utero. The expectant couple can then decide to ex tinguish the fetus and try again for a normal child that might be less trouble, at least until he or she is an adoles cent with hormonal turbulence and a driv ers license. In Iceland, upward of 85 percent of preg nant women opt for the prenatal testing, which has produced a Down syndrome elimination rate ap proaching 100 per cent. Agusta was one of only three Down syndrome babies born there in 2009. Iceland could have moved one-third of the way to its goal if only Agusta had been detected and eliminated. Agustas mother is glad the screening failed in her case. An Iceland geneticist says we have basically eradicat ed Down syndrome people, but regrets what he considers heavy-handed genetic counseling that is inuencing de The real Down syndrome problem The Mayo Free Press welcomes letters from readers on matters of public interest, with the following guidelines: Letters must contain your full name, address, daytime phone number and city of residence. Only your full name and city of residence will be published with the letter. Letters must reect issues of current interest to the general public and be concise. Management has the right to refuse any material it believes does not meet standards of publication. You can email letters to nf.editorial@ganews.com fax them to 386-364-5578 or mail them to: Letters to the Editor The Mayo Free Press P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 Mayo Free Press www.nflaonline.com Jeff Masters Publisher jmasters@cnhi.com Follow us: facebook.com/suwanneedemocrat @suwanneedemocra (Twitter) Jamie Wachter Editor jamie.wachter@ganews.com To Submit Letters Monja Slater General Manager monja.slater@ganews.com Open government is not a political platform. It is a basic American right. The political landscape is more polarized than ever and there seems to be little com mon ground for conservatives and progressives. Transparency keeping the light on the peoples busi ness ought to be something everyone can agree on. Instead, conservatives want to reveal the se crets of liberals and liberals want to expose the actions of conservatives. Openness in government is not a liberal, con servative, Republican, Democrat, independent, Libertarian or freedom caucus issue. It often appears that whatever party is in the minority becomes the champion of transparency right up until the time it is in the majority. Politicians stump on transparency and are all about open access, until they have something they want to keep secret. The need for transparency in local, state and federal government transcends parties and politi cal ideologies. Checks and balances provide few checks and little balance when ofcials broker deals behind closed doors and conceal documents that contain important information that the public has the right, and often the need, to know. Local government has the biggest impact in the lives of people on a day-to-day basis. Whether it is in the form of property taxes, sales taxes, business taxes, state-shared dollars or federal grants, loans and funding, local govern ment is 100 percent taxpayer-funded. The public has the right to know how its mon ey is being spent. The decisions being made, the dollars being doled out and the records being kept by city hall, the county commission, the board of education or the utility district all belong to liberals, conser vatives, Republicans, Democrats, independents, Libertarians and even politically disinterested individuals. All stakeholders have a stake in open meetings and public records and should care about trans parency issues. The lack of and need for true government transparency should be about the most bipartisan cause that exists. Any elected ofcial who truly cares about pub lic service in a real and meaningful way and fully understands what a representative form of gov ernment is all about, should not only champion openness in government, but should be the most effective watchdogs, looking out for the public trust. Sadly, those kinds of elected ofcials are hard to nd. The press tries to keep an eye on government and expose clandestine actions and in response journalists are often ridiculed, belittled and even threatened for just doing their jobs, as they work to keep government honest by making use of ac cess laws. But, the public needs to understand that access to government documents and actions is not just a media right. It is your right. Jim Zachary is the deputy national editor of CNHI, editor of the Valdosta (Georgia) Daily Times, president and chairman of the Red & Black Publishing Company serving the Universi ty of Georgia, vice-president of the Georgia First Amendment Foundation, director of the Trans parency Project of Georgia and a member of the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Commu nications Board of Trust. He can be reached at jzachary@cnhi.com. rfntb The more closely I watch what the Florida legislature does, the more disturbing I nd their actions to be. This is the second year in a row that the legislature will need extra time to complete what should be com pleted in the regular session. This means the taxpayers will be paying for their food and housing, and each one of the legislators may spend up to $150 a day. Some of our legisla tors will be spending more in one day for their hotel rooms and lattes than their proposed increase per year of student funding. Some will say, Well, since the tragedy in Parkland occurred, they had more legislation to work on. I say that is a load of crap. School shootings have been happening in earnest since 1999. The big trav esty here is that the legislature could not be moved to do something about it until tragedy struck here in our state. The state budget is the one thing the legislature is re quired to do each year, but the state budget is the reason they will need extra time again this year. It would be almost understandable if the legislature was evenly split between Democrats and Republicans and they were hav ing earnest debates about issues that matter, but this is a case of Republicans trying to out-Republican each other. It is also a matter of them wasting time on bills that are frivolous. Our state legislators want to become the only state with year-round daylight savings time. The fact that our elected leaders found the time to craft and pass this ridiculous legislation, but could not nish their session on time, is mind blowing. I am glad the legislature will be spending an extra $400 million for school safety next year, but when you look into the history of the safe schools program it will make your stomach turn. Our legislature has kept the amount going into the safe schools program the same since the r Too little, way too late fntbnbnb tttn ftnbtf ntnt ttt tnbt nntt n SEE LATE, PAGE 6A SEE PROBLEM, PAGE 6A

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THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 5A My heart is burdened over the topic that I feel compelled to share in this column. This one ranks near the top of most difcult ones I have written, because parenting is the hardest job on the planet and it matters so much that we do this job well. Up front, I want to ask you: please do not read it with one ounce of judgment. If anything hits home with you I pray that you hear it as the voice of one who doesnt always get parent ing right either, but is cheering all of us on to a healthier relationship with our children. Over the past 28 years of parenting and 15-plus years of counseling, I have often encountered heartbroken parents. Parents who love their sons and daughters more than their own lives, but have lacked the ability to promote responsibility and respect through instruction and discipline. As a re sult, by the time the children hit the teenage years, everyone in the house can be very miserable. Most often these parents suffer from an increasingly common malady that I call Parenting By Guilt. Parenting by Guilt is simply making decisions for your children based on the guilty feeling that you are responsible for their lack of respect, re sponsibility or their disobedience. Parenting by guilt presents in many situa tions, but here are a few that I have encoun tered: no doubt, but taking away discipline takes away their security and sets them up to blame someone or something else for bad choices the rest of their lives. Allowing dis respect of the other parent may make you feel better, but it is very harmful to your child. Best-case scenario is for divorced parents to continue to co-parent consistently and be emotionally supportive during the difculty of divorce but do not excuse dis obedience. may haunt us to the point that we feel hyp ocritical to correct our own children. King that his son raped his daughter and one son killed another while he remained silent. (See 2 Samuel 11 & 13). Think about this: if you were given a supervisors position at your job, would you not correct those who worked for you simply because you had made mistakes in learning the job early on? Our role as parents is not contingent on doing life perfectly. On the contrary, our past mistakes (and what we learned from them) should help us be more insightful parents and help us teach our chil dren all the more. raising grandchildren: This has become an epidemic in our culture! Grandparents often feel guilty because their children have failed their grandchildren and they may feel an underlying responsibility. Parenting is so hard for grandparents be cause the role of a grandparent is so differ ent than a parent. If you are a grandparent who has taken on the challenge of raising a grandson or granddaughter, you must make sure that you switch the role. If a child can only have either a parent or grandparent, the most important need is for a parent. Giving them monetary rewards or too much freedom will not replace what is missing from their lives, but teaching respect and responsibility will help them navigate those troubled waters. to tread lightly herebut I have seen this struggle. Parents who have much more than their parents did nancially may feel the need to do much more for their children in terms of gifts and privileges. This can be a slippery slope, and one where the parent understands the value of money but the chil dren do not. I have heard it said that if one does not have what it takes to acquire some thing, they likely will not have what it takes with parental obligations. Teaching your children to get something for nothing will not serve them well in life, especially if you become unable or unwilling to support their appetites. Responsibility always accompa nies privilege. Because as parents, we all want the very best for our children. And every heart mat ters. Blessings, Angie Heart Matters is a weekly column written by Angie Land, Director of the Family Life Minis tries of the Lafayette Baptist Association, where she teaches bible studies, leads marriage and family conferences and offers biblical counseling to individuals, couples and families. Contact An gie with questions or comments at angieland3@ windstream.net. expressed on our Religion pages are those of the individual authors and not necessarily of The Mayo Free Press. Try to avoid Parenting by Guilt Heart Matters WEEKLY BIBLE VERSE Religion Your Guide To Local Houses Of Worship 44884-1 AIRLINE BA PTIST CHUR C H rf rfn ftr bfbfbr ffrrb rbf tfr Helping Families Follow Jesus rfntbrf ntfrftbfrrrfnffn nrrb rff f nf bfrnfrf ff Freedom is Herer fffntbtbt n b n ttb n n tnt n Pastor: Ronnie Sadler rfrr rf ntt bbfbb b fff ftb tt bftbt fntnbt rfnt Pastor: Bruce Branche rfntrbt fntfnr n btrfn n rtrttttf n tf n brt nr rfrntb rnn rb rn n rn rfntb rf ntnnb tnb n rfn rf ntbnb rf btn rf bntb rf f rf b rf Sunday Wednesday Pastor: Rev. Kenny Sullivan Youth Pastor: Daryl FletcherLocated at 294 SE Mill Street, Mayo Renewing Hope and Building Lives r fntb rf nftb b nftffb tftf rfntbbn tttttt 57194-1 TO ALL TRADESMEN & SERVICE PROVIDERS:Havent you always heard the old saying, Big things come in small packages?Well,this is the idea behind the new Tri-County Service Directory coming soon to the Suwannee Democrat, e Jasper News & the Mayo Free Press!Call 386-362-1734Extension 102 for more information on how to place a small ad (thats the small package) to appear in all 3 of our publications which means the opportunity for your ad to be seen by approximately 4,600 potential customers (and thats the big things). burn anywhere from 500 to 750 calories depending on the in tensity level. Thirty minutes of jogging at 12 mph will burn about 325 calo ries. Thirty minutes of walking at 3.0 mph which is a moderate pace will burn about 140 calories. How do these numbers compare with average household chores? Below are some common household activities along with what you can expect to burn if you did these chores for 30 minutes: ing 50 calories carrying boxes about 275 calories burn more calories? I did too actually. But even a combination of household chores at a vigorous level will only burn about 100 calories in 30 minutes. Keep in mind that if you are cleaning for several hours you will be able to burn enough calories that might replace your workout for the day but it will take you longer than 60 minutes to do so. The good news? Anyway you look at it, when you get moving your health and wellness benets. No matter what you choose to do, get up and get moving. Have an amazing week. To your health, Denise Denise Sanger is a certied tness instructor, Silver Sneakers Instructor, AMPD Kettlebell Instructor, licensed Zumba, STRONG by Zumba instructor, gentle ow yoga, teaches morning class es at Country Strong Health & Fitness. Denise may be reached at DeniseSanger. com, 386/292-6105 or denisesanger@ gmail.com. Healthy Living rf My mother-in-law, whos gone to be with the Lord, struggled with her weight from childhood on. She actually had her rst yes her rst of many heart at tacks in her late 30s. She tried every pill and potion on the market in an attempt to lose weight. I can relate because I went through the same struggle of looking for a quick x. There was one big difference between us though. I nally got that weight is only one part of the health picture and that its about lifestyle choices versus looking for a magical cure. Back then, the easiest time of my day to workout was on lunch at work. I was lucky that the company I worked for, BP Oil Corporate in Cleve land, had a tness center for its employ ees. I would time my lunch to be able to take a 30-minute aerobic class which left enough time to take a quick shower and grab a salad for lunch. My mother-in-law never quite under stood why I wanted to get sweaty in the middle of my work day. I would explain to her how it not only made me feel better physically but mentally as well. Exercise keeps my stress in check. The conversation would always circle back around to weight loss and I would tell her if she wanted to lose weight, she should exercise. Her response was always dont you think I do enough around used to doing as far as exercise would not be enough for her to lose weight. She needed to increase her activity and focus on her nutrition. ing was not enough? Youve heard me say it before our bodies are amazing things that quickly adapt and overcome anything comes easy for your body to handle. and said that cleaning, laundry, cooking, etc. has to burn calories. Yes, that is correct. Any activity burns calories but the question is how many calories? As a comparison, a 60-minute Zumba class can Is cleaning the house enough activity to burn calories for weight loss? And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose. Romans 8:28 NIV

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PAGE 6A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL 58563-1 58567-1 2010-2011 school year. Af ter the Sandy Hook school shooting in 2012, our leg islature did not increase safe schools funding. Year after year, the governor asked for increases for safe schools funding, but year after year, our legislators denied his requests. It took the deaths of 17 students and teachers in Florida to get our legislature to increase safe schools fund ing. I applaud our legislature for passing some common sense gun legislation, but why did it take a tragedy like Parkland to make them realize how foolish our gun laws had become? The sale of bump stocks, like the one used in the Las Vegas shooting last October, will be prohibit ed in our state, and there will be a three-day wait ing period and a minimum age of 21 to purchase a rie. I think they went a little too far in requiring a minimum age of 21 to purchase a shotgun or bolt-action rie, but trying to dene and single out assault weapons probably would have delayed the close of the legislative session even further. I am glad the legislature will be spending some where in the neighborhood of $50 million next year to combat the opioid epi demic in our state. It is a shame that our state had to have more overdose deaths than any other state (4,728 in 2016) before our elected leaders could be moved to do something about the problem. It is a sad state of affairs when many people have to die in this state just to get the legislature to do its job. Eric lives in Suwannee County and is a public school educator. He is an independent contractor. You can reach him at mi amistyle8@gmail.com. Continued From Page 4A Late cisions that are not medi cal, in a way. One Icelan dic counselor counsels mothers as follows: This is your life. You have the right to choose how your life will look like. She says, We dont look at abortion as a murder. We look at it as a thing that we ended. Which makes Agusta and Lucas things that were not ended. Because Icelands population is only about 340,000, the problem (again, see the photos of problem Agusta and prob lem Lucas) is more man ageable there than in, say, the United Kingdom. It has approximately 40,000 Down syndrome citizens, many of whom were con ceived before the develop ment of effective searchand-destroy technologies. About 750 British Down syndrome babies are born each year, but 90 percent of women who learn that their child will have ac tually, that their child does have Down syndrome have an abortion. In Den mark the elimination rate is 98 percent. America, where 19 per cent of all pregnancies are aborted, is playing catchup in the Down syndrome elimination sweepstakes (elimination rate of 67 percent, 1995-2011). So is France (77 percent), which seems determined to do better. In 2016, a French court ruled that it would be inappropriate for French television to run a two and a half video (Dear Future Mom) released for World Down Syn drome Day, which seeks to assure women carrying Down syndrome babies that their babies can lead happy lives, a conclusion resoundingly conrmed in a 2011 study Self-per ceptions from people with Down syndrome. The court said the video is likely to disturb the con science of women who aborted Down syndrome children. So, the photos of Agusta and Lucas are probably inappropriate. It speaks volumes about todays moral confusions that this the disruption of an un ethical complacency is the real Down syndrome problem. George Wills email address is georgewill@ washpost.com. Continued From Page 4A Problem Doobay sentenced for fraudulent land scheme JACKSONVILLE, Fla. A former Hamilton County busi ness owner has been sentenced to more than 12 years in federal prison and must pay more than $8 million in restitution for con spiracy to commit mail and wire fraud. U.S. District Judge Timothy J. Corrigan sentenced Karamchand Raj Doobay, 44 of Orlando, to 12 years and seven months on March 1. Doobay was also or dered to pay 85 victim-investors a total of $8,663,264.58 and must forfeit the property used in the commission of the offenses. He pled guilty on Jan. 31, 2017. The sentencing comes from a scheme to defraud investors in an RV Park and immigrant investors in a senior citizen facility, both in Hamilton County. Having no remorse or sympa thy for those he stole from, Doo bay continued to defraud vic tims even after his 2015 arrest, FDLE Tallahassee Special Agent in Charge Mark Perez said in a release. I appreciate the efforts of the investigators and the U.S. Attorneys Ofce in stopping Doobays continued hunt for new victims. According to court docu ments, Doobay operated busi nesses in Hamilton County, ac quiring a parcel of land located at 7516 SE 113th Boulevard in western Hamilton County, just east of Interstate 75. From around March 2009 through around December 2015, Doobay solicited inves tors to purchase subdivided lots on the land, guaranteeing returns between 9 to 41 percent for investments in RV lots and other lots for sale by his enti ty, Florida Gateway resort, the court documents state. He utilized various bank ac counts to collect funds for the purchase of RV lots that he pur ported to sell to investor pur chasers, according to the court documents. However, Doobay failed to disclose that he had previously contracted to sell and purportedly sold the same RV lots to other investors. The court documents also state that, from about May 2011 through about May 2016, Doobay conspired to commit wire fraud by promising to im migrant investors to use their investments for the develop ment, renovation and/or new construction of Senior Premier Living, a retirement community in Jasper, along I-75. Innstead, Doobay used a portion of the investors funds to pay Florida Gateway Resort investors and for his own personal use and enjoy ment. This case demonstrates the lengths that some criminals will go to target and take advantage of innocent victims, Charles P. Spencer, the Special Agent in Charge of the FBI Jacksonville Division, said in a release. But the FBI will work equally hard to hold those criminals accountable and protect their victims both here and abroad. Doobay was arrested in De cember 2015 after an investiga tion, which began in 2014, by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Hamilton County Sheriffs Ofce and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorney Kelly S. Karase prosecuted the case. (StatePoint) Sometimes the smallest changes to your daily habits can have the biggest impact on your wellness. With that in mind, here are a few easy ways you can change your routine for a better you. Sit Less Does your job require you to sit still most of the day? Even if you work out regularly, an otherwise sedentary lifestyle can be bad for your health. Be sure to get up throughout the day in order to stretch and walk around. It only takes a minute to reap the benets, so dont skip these breaks. Consider installing an app on your phone to remind you at periodic intervals when its time to move, and if possible, alter your workstation to make it easier to assist in this effort. Standing desks, tread mill desks and even biking desks can keep you active throughout the day. Rethink Brushing Good oral health includes taking great care of your gums -and research shows that harmful bacteria and plaque that lurk below the gum line can have a big impact. A healthy mouth needs healthy gums, and even diligent brushing may not re move all harmful plaque, said Sarah Thiel, RDH. Toothpaste that goes below the gum line to destroy plaque bacteria in the mouth is a great addition to your brushing routine. Because if youre not taking care of your gums, youre not tak ing care of you. Consider switching to a toothpaste specically developed to improve gum health, like Crest Gum Detoxify, which uses Activated Foam Technology to seek out harmful bacteria in hard to reach plac es in order to neutralize it, even below the gum line. More information can be found at Crest.com. Spice it Up If you rely on fat and sugar for the bulk of avor in your cooking, consider im proving your seasoning routines for more Small ways you can change your routine for a better you nutritional meals. Reduce your reliance on these ingredients without getting bored by adding healthier boosts of avor to dishes. Chop fresh herbs onto your pasta or salad, add spices to your stew, include garlic, ginger and even hot peppers in your stirfry. Drink More Water What are you drinking during the day? If the answer is juice and soda, consider replacing at least some of that with wa ter. Water doesnt have to be avorless. Infuse your water bottle or pitcher with your favorite fruits, vegetables and herbs. From cucumber and strawberry slices to watermelon and mint, you can have fun while hydrating, without resorting to high calorie beverages that offer little or no nu tritional value. Focusing on sweeping lifestyle changes can leave anyone feeling overwhelmed. For lasting and meaningful impacts on your health and wellness, nd small tweaks that you can make to your daily routine. r fnt

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THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 7A Sports Bulldogs top Hornets 7-3 L and 1-3, RBI, HBP Perry 1-4, 1-2, HBP, Purcell BB Pearson 1-3, HBP Crow 3 Pitching Mock 3.2 IP, 4 hits, 4 earned runs, 5 ks Richardson .2 IP, 4 hits, 2 earned runs, 1 k Pearson 2.2 IP, 0 hits, 0 runs, 3 ks rf Bulldogs top Hornets 7-3 MAYO The Lafayette High baseball team took an early lead against Suwannee on Thursday before falling 7-3 to the Bulldogs. Lafayette (2-2) went ahead 2-0 after the first inning behind an RBI double from Caleb Land and Joseph Perrys run-scoring single. The Hornets strung together four straight hits off of freshman starter Ryan LeNeave, but they didnt record a hit after the first inning off of reliever Wyatt Morrill. The Hornets celebrate after taking the lead in the first inning. Jarrett Pearson threw 2.2 hitless innings. Holden Richardson slides safely into second base. Photos: Mike Jones R H E Suwannee 0 0 0 5 2 0 0 7 8 2 Lafayette 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 4 1 Land 1-3, RBI, HBP Perry 1-4 Purcell 1-2, HBP, BB Pearson 1-3, HBP Crow 1-3 Pitching Mock 3.2 IP, 4 hits, 4 earned runs, 5 k's Richardso n .2 IP, 4 hits, 2 earned runs, 1 k Pearson 2.2 IP, 0 hits, 0 runs, 3 k's michael.jones@ganews.com MAYO The Lafay ette High baseball team took an early lead against Suwannee on Thursday before falling 7-3 to the Bulldogs. Lafayette (2-2) went ahead 2-0 after the rst inning behind an RBI dou ble from Caleb Land and Joseph Perrys run-scoring single. The Hornets strung together four straight hits off of freshman starter Ryan LeNeave, but they didnt record a hit after the rst inning off of re liever Wyatt Morrill. ntb rrrr Ellefson named to FACA All-Star basketball team michael.jones@ganews.com MAYO Lafayette High senior Haley Ellefson has been chosen to participate in the Florida Athletic Coaches Association (FACA) All-Star Basketball game on March 24 at the RP Funding Center in Lakeland. Ellefson averaged 13 points and 10 rebounds per game this season and led the Hor nets to their second straight Final Four appearance. In two years with the LHS basketball team, Ellefson, a forward/center, had a 39-17 record. She was also a FACA AllStar in volleyball.

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PAGE 8A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL 55919-1Karens Tack10243 US Hwy 129 South Live Oak, FL (386) 208-0761 info@karenstack.netWe have a large selection of Boots, Belts, Hats, Tack and Livestock Show Equipment for the Fair DAIRY QUEEN OF LIVE OAK 817 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak FL 386-362-7009 Roy & Shirley Guercio John & Suzanne Dunn Locally Owned & Operated Sam Walton Award Winner Interstate Dairy Queen Operators of the Year rfn 55922-1 DAIRY QUEEN OF LIVE OAK 55924-1 Herbert C. Mantooth, D.D.S., P.A. GENERAL AND RESTORATIVE DENTISTRYHerbert C. MantoothD.D.S., P.A.602 Railroad Avenue Live Oak, Florida 32064 www.mantoothdental.comTelephone (386) 362-6556 1-800-829-6506 FAX (386) 362-5769 56020-1 56024-1 202 W. Howard St. (Hwy 90) Live Oak Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 9am-12pm386-362-4085 rf all your other cleaning needs!n 56030-1 J. Sherman Frier & Associates130 West Howard Street Live Oak, FL 32064 rfRegistered Land SurveyorsJ. Sherman Frier, R.L.S. Tim Alcorn, P.S.M.ntbntb FRIDAY Armbands from 6 p.m. until close: Admission: for adults; for youth (ages 6-12) SATURDAY Armbands from 6 p.m. until close: Admission: for adults; for youth (ages 6-12) SUNDAY Hispanic Musical Entertainment Night Pay one price for admission and rides from 6 p.m. until close: per person (children under age 3 are free) MONDAY Armbands from 6 p.m. until close: Admission: for adults; for youth (ages 6-12) TUESDAY Armbands from 6 p.m. until close: Admission: for adults; for youth (ages 6-12) WEDNESDAY Value night armbands from 6 p.m. until close: Admission: for adults; for youth (ages 6-12) THURSDAY Dollar night from 6 p.m. until close r FRIDAY Armbands from 6 p.m. until close: Admission: for adults; for youth (ages 6-12) SATURDAY Armbands from 6 p.m. until close: Admission: for adults; for youth (ages 6-12) March 16-24, 2018 Fair Suwannee County Fair Livestock show & Sale Friday, March 16 6 p.m. Saturday, March 17 6 p.m. Sunday, March 18 6 p.m. Monday, March 19 5 p.m. Tuesday, March 20 5 p.m. Wednesday, March 21 6 p.m. Thursday, March 22 6 p.m. Friday, March 24 6 p.m. Saturday, March 25 Gates open at 4 p.m., midway opens at 6 p.m.

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THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 9A 55921-1 www.svec-coop.com 529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131 Evening 362-2990 S.C. Sullivan Agency 55923-1 203 Pinewood Way, SW Live Oak, FL 1150 NW Hwy 41 Ste 4, Jasper, FL Suwannee River Federal Credit Union858633386-362-2225/386-792-2301 1-888-441-3894 Toll-Free suwanneeriverfcu.com See Our Booth at the Fair56018-1 1400 S. Ohio Avenue Live Oak, FL 32064368.208.0634 56021-1 56025-1 SURREY PLACE 110 SE Lee Ave. Live Oak, FL 32060 (386) 364-5961 rfrfntbrrt t t 56031-1 March 16-24, 2018 From the North: Take I-75 S to the US-129 S exit; exit number 451 toward Live Oak. Turn LEFT onto US-129/FL-51/FL-57. Continue to follow FL-51 S FL-51 S becomes 11TH ST SW/CR-136 From the West: Take I-10 E to US-90 E/FL-10 E; exit number 275 toward LIVE OAK Turn RIGHT onto US-129/FL-249/FL-51. Continue to follow FL-51 FL-51 becomes 11TH ST SW/CR-136 rf r f n nt b r t n t n n t n t t b r n t 1302 11th St SW Live Oak, FL 32064 Friday, March 16 6 p.m. ........................ Fair Opens 6 p.m. ........................ Ribbon Cutting Ceremony 6:30 p.m. ................... Danceology 7:30 p.m. ................... Dairy Show 8 p.m. ........................ Let it Ride 10 p.m. ...................... All Exhibit Buildings Close Saturday, March 17 6 p.m. ........................ Fair Opens 7 p.m. ........................ Pee Wee Dairy Show 7:30 p.m. ................... Demolition Derby 8 p.m. ........................ Sondra Hunt 10 p.m. ...................... All Exhibit Buildings Close Sunday, March 18 6 p.m. ........................ Fair Opens 8 p.m. ........................ Las Centellas De Guerrero 10 p.m. ...................... All Exhibit Buildings Close Monday, March 19 5 p.m. ........................ Fair Opens 6:30 p.m. ................... Youth Hog Showmanship 7 p.m. ........................ Gateway City Big Band 8 p.m. ........................ Karoake with Dave 10:30 p.m. ................. All Exhibit Buildings Close Tuesday, March 20 11 a.m. 1 p.m. ......... Senior Citizens Day Free Admission & Lunch 12 p.m. ...................... Seniors Lunch Will Be Served 5 p.m. ........................ Fair Opens 6:30 p.m. ................... Youth Hog Show 6:30 p.m. ................... Suwannee Spirit 7:30 p.m. ................... Karoake with Dave 10 p.m. ...................... All Exhibit Buildings Close Wednesday, March 21 6 p.m. ........................ Fair Opens 6:30 p.m. ................... Steer Show 6:30 p.m. ................... Twirling by Kary 7 p.m. ........................ Jeremiah Ross & Dominion 10 p.m. ...................... All Exhibit Buildings Close DOLLAR NIGHT Thursday, March 22 9 a.m. ........................ Youth Livestock Sale 6 p.m. ........................ Fair Opens 6:30 p.m. ................... Dance Shop 7 p.m. ........................ SES Chorus 10 p.m. ...................... All Exhibit Buildings Close Friday, March 23 6 p.m. ........................ Fair Opens 7 p.m. ........................ Heifer Show 7 p.m. ........................ SHS Band 8:30 p.m. ................... Snake Blood Remedy 10 p.m. ...................... All Exhibit Buildings Close Saturday, March 24 4 p.m. ........................ Fair Opens 4 p.m. ........................ Kids Crafts 6 p.m. ........................ Rides Open 6:30 p.m. ................... Talent Show 7 p.m. ........................ Goat Show 8 p.m. ........................ Chasin Dixie 8 p.m. ........................ Rowdy Ranch Relay 10 p.m. ...................... All Exhibit Buildings Close Fair Suwannee County Fair Livestock show & Sale D e m o l i t i o n D e r b y S a t u r d a y @ 7 : 3 0 p m

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PAGE 10A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL Top opioid prescribers include non-specialists Nation rfn Raycom News Network Editors Note This is the second of three-part series on ways doctors, regulators and drug companies contribute to the nations opi oid addiction epidemic. Family physicians, nurse practitioners and doctors whose health care focuses on non-narcotic therapies are some of the nations most prolic opioid prescription writers in recent years. Federal guidelines say they shouldnt be. Medical professionals not specializing in oncology, surgery, emergency medi cine or pain, accounted for more than half of the 1,000 highest opioid prescribers in the Medicare Part D, a government-spon sored drug benet for the elderly and dis abled, over a three-year span beginning in 2013, a Raycom Media national investi gation has revealed. Pain doctors, whose use of opioids has come under increasing scrutiny by medical experts doubting the drugs ef fectiveness in curbing pain, represented nearly a third of the nations highest pre scribers. They include three doctors at an Alabama clinic who wrote 33,084 opioid prescriptions during a three-year period. Compare that to 40,124 prescriptions written by 900 doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota did during the same time. Whats more, just 10 percent of the top providers have been disciplined by state medical boards for prescribing-related issues. And even after sanctions, the majority has been allowed to continue practicing. 1,000 opioid prescribers, breaking down their medical specialties, the number of prescriptions they wrote and their pre scribing rates compared to non-opioid drugs. The analysis was important because Medicare pays for at least one in four drug prescriptions nationally. The data included nurse practitioners and physician assistants medical care providers who can write prescriptions for the same controlled substances as the doctors they work for, raising concern among government regulators and law enforcement ofcials. Last year, the inspector general for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services analyzed 2016 Medicare data that identied questionable patterns of 401 prescribers and a third of them were nurse practitioners and physician assistants. Between 2013 and 2015, Medicares highest opioid prescribers included 60 nurse practitioners and 58 physician as sistants. None was higher than Darius McGee, a nurse practitioner at the Laurel Pain Clin ic in Laurel, Miss. He was the sixth high est prescriber in the Medicare program in the U.S. During that 3-year span, McGee wrote nearly 43,000 opioid prescriptions nearly three times as many opioid pre scriptions than his supervising doctor, Vivek Barclay. Barclay was the nations 274th highest prescriber under Medicare D. Detecting abusive prescribers That surprised John Dowdy, director of the Mississippi Bureau of Narcotics and a former assistant U. S. attorney. It would be uncommon for a nurse practitioner to write more prescriptions than the doctor running the clinic, said Dowdy. That would certainly raise red ags. Any medical professional who is not a pain specialist and writes a lot of opioid prescriptions should cause concern, he said. If its a family practitioner or a gen eral practitioner, and theyre showing up on a list as a high-volume prescriber, we probably have a problem with that doc tor, Dowdy said. Among the top prescribers are 199 general practitioners including Dr. John Richard, a family medicine physician in Lexington, Kent. At No. 40, he is the highest ranked family-practice doctor on the list. In 2013, the Kentucky medical board led a complaint against him for prescrib ing excessive amounts and combinations of addictive drugs. The case settled when Richard agreed to pay a $7,500 ne and, among other things, maintain a drug log. Between 2013 and 2015, Richard wrote 28,099 opioid prescriptions for his 3,318 patients. Each year, his volume of prescriptions increased noticeably even though the number of patients he treated with opioid drugs only rose slightly. He still practices medicine and declined to comment. Overall, doctors have written fewer opioid prescriptions in the last ve years, according to the American Medical Soci ety. But of the top Medicare providers, 70 percent increased the number of opioid prescriptions they wrote each year from 2013 to 2015. Consider the top three: cialist in Missouri, went from writing 23 prescriptions in 2013 to 7,511 two years later. in Lumberton, North Carolina, went from 256 to more than 5,700 prescriptions. in Asheville, North Carolina, had a threefold increase from 1,052 prescriptions to nearly 4,700. Sanders case load during that time nearly doubled. The others had only mod est increases in the number of Medicare patients they treated over those years and they still hold active medical licenses. Each declined comment. There are also two doctors on the Medicare list who didnt write a single opioid prescription in 2013 only to write thousands of prescriptions in each of the following two years. Opioids popular pain drug Dr. Stefan Kertesz, professor and ad diction-opioid safety specialist at the University of Alabamas Medical School in Birmingham, cautions there may be a logical reason for the doctors writing more opioid prescriptions: They may be taking on more chronic-pain patients as other doctors leave the opioid-prescribing business. Physicians have gotten the message loud and clear: Be very afraid, said Kertesz. Whoevers willing to see these vulnerable patients is the next target for law enforcement. Dr. Patrick Waring was surprised to see so many of his interventional pain management colleagues among the top prescribers. Nearly a fth of all top pre scribers listed that as their specialty. The nature of the medicine they prac tice is to treat pain patients without pre scribing opioids, said Waring, who prac tices in Slidell, La. Opioids should not be the rst, sec ond or third options for the treatment of chronic pain, he said. It should be a last resort. Yet among Medicares top 10 highest opioid prescribers, four are interventional pain specialists. Some studies show the path to addic tion for at least half of all heroin users started with a valid prescription for a painkiller. Still, opioids remain a popular drug prescription. In 2015, for example, 130 general prac tice health care providers including nurse practitioners and physician assistants wrote more prescriptions for opioids than all other drugs combined. The same was true for more than two-thirds of the top listed Medicare providers, data shows. Kolodny, the opioid-addiction expert at Brandeis University, said these examples underscore the need for vigilant monitor ing of prescribing habits. We dont have to wait for doctors to harm people, he said. As law enforcement ofcials raced to shut down pill mills in the mid-to-late 2000s, regulators largely ignored inno cent prescribers, said Dr. Kent Harsh barger, the coroner for Ohios Montgom ery County, a hotbed for overdose deaths nationally. Those innocent prescribers were family doctors, nurse practitioners and other health-care professionals who serve as the front door to medical care and who were persuaded opioids were good for treating pain and related ailments. It was assumed the person who over dosed was abusing and doctor shopping, Harshbarger said. We assumed goodfaith prescribing. Now we realize we were wrong. Investigative producer Tom Wright and News Content Specialist Erin Snodgrass contributed to this report. tbbbbbbtbbbbbbb bbbtbbbbbbbbbbb bbfbbbtb fbnbb bbtb btbb b bbbb These examples are a red ag for in appropriate and dangerous medical treat ment, said Andrew Kolodny, co-director of the Opioid Policy Research Collabora tive at Brandeis University. Federal ofcials, for years have been sounding the alarms about the excessive use of opioids. In 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recom mended opioids should be used to miti gate pain from cancer, at the end of life, after a surgery or serious accident, and, in some cases, for severe chronic pain. Yet the top prescribers included no on cologists, and only four emergency medi cine doctors and 15 surgeons. Evaluating Medicaid data Raycom Media analyzed the public ly-available Medicare data for the top fbbbbbfbb bbbbbbbbbbbb fb bbbb bbtb bbrbbb bbbbb bbb

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THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 11A r fnt rf ntbft rb tfb rr nftrt tft ftrttt ntttb bb bnb fbrbnnb nr rrnrn trrnrbn nb fbrbnfrnb f brb nbfrrrrnf rbbrbrbbb rnbnr nrbbbbrbbb brrb brfbnr brnrr nrrbrr nbn fr ftf fnn nntbfb f nf tbfntb tbfb n nftrt ftrtbffrt ntbfrtttf rbnb bfnbnb rbbbnrb nnbbbbb bbbbbf rbr rnbtr nnr tbnbnrb bnrb bb fnt nntbfb ntbfb nff nf nf nftrt ftrtt ftrtffb ntbft n tbfbr rbnn nbnbnbf rfnnb bnbbbb fbnrbnr br bb bbb f nr ntn ttbr b

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PAGE 12A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL Share Your Blanche Stories We are looking for people to share their or their family stories and pictures about the Blanche Hotel. We hope to include former employees, guests, event attend ees and businesses that were located in the Blanche Building. The interviews will be videotaped and the photos scanned. All par ticipants will receive a free eBook version of the book, The Blanche A History when it is published in the fall. Check out our website: http://TheBlancheAHistory.websa ndblogsforwrtiers.com to sched uled a time at the Columbia Co. Public Library on Mon. or Tues. from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in March or April. Mar. 15 Herbs in the Landscape Work shop Noon-1 p.m. Learn about gardening with herbs. Presented by Suwannee County Extension Agent, Carolyn Saft. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Mar. 18 Mt. Olive 131st homecoming Mt. Olive Church of Christ invites the community to its 131st home coming on March 18. Minister Dan Chaney will be pre senting Gods word beginning at 10 a.m. 10 a.m. Bible Class (Dan Chaney) 11 a.m. Morning Services (Dan Chaney) Meal to follow morning services 6 p.m. Evening Worship (Bob Farley) Mt. Olive Church of Christ is lo cated at 5084 153rd Rd in Live Oak, ve miles west of Live Oak off of U.S. Hwy 90. For more in formation, contact the church at 386-842-2174 or esmusgrove@ hotmail.com. Mar. 19 Chad Mobley to speak at Live Oak Church of God Live Oak Church of God Mens Ministry presents Chad Mobley. He will speak on March 19 at Live Oak Church of God, sharing his testimony of how God has truly blessed his life in many ways. The service begins at 6:30 p.m. with a covered dish supper. Mar. 21 Crocheting Class 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn how to crochet. Please bring needles and yarn. Taught by Debra Barney Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Mar. 22 Cooking Demo Noon-1 p.m. Cooking Demo by Bonnie Box, Suwannee County Extension Of ce. Sample mango salsa and learn about smart snacking op tions. Bonnie will share recipes that are low-cost, healthy, easy, and tasty. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Mar. 24 CPR & First Aid Class 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free class taught by Suwannee Fire Rescue. Space is limited. Please pre-register. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Mar. 24 Annual Share Saturday New Hope Baptist Church an nounces its annual Share Satur day for March 24 from 8 a.m. until noon. This is the churchs gift to the community as every item is free. There will be clothes of all sizes, toys, household goods and other items. New Hope is lo cated at 6592 N.W. 48th Street, Jennings, 1 mile off State Road 6 West. The public is invited to attend. Please note: this event will not begin until 8 a.m. Mar. 28 One for the Money Book Club 2:00-3 p.m. Join us to discuss One for the Money by Janet Evanovich. Cop ies available for checkout at the front desk. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Apr. 1 Easter Celebration Christ Central in Suwannee Coun ty announces the start of two Sunday morning services on April 1. Their two Sunday morning ser vices are a permanent addition, with the times being at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. They invite the com munity to join them for their Eas Community Calendar Community Calendar event submissions Want to place your upcoming event(s) in our weekly Community Calendar? Email your events to aimee. buckner@ganews.com Include basic details such as who, what, where and when. Please note: protable events will need to be handled by our advertising department. For more information, contact Aimee via email. Deadline for submissions is Monday at 3 p.m. ter celebration. The church is located at 15445 U.S. Hwy 129 in McAlpin. For more information, call 396-208-1345, ccmlo.org or on Facebook. Apr. 4 Francis Gary Powers, Jr. Presen tation and Book Signing 6 p.m. Francis Gary Power, Jr., inter national lecturer on the Cold War and son of Francis Gary Pow ers, the U2 pilot shot down over Russia in 1960, will speak on the spy plane incident. He recently published a book Letters from a Soviet Prison: the personal journal and correspondence of CIA U-2 pilot Francis Gary Powers. Copies of this book will be available for purchase and signing. Suwannee River Regional Library 386-362-2317 Apr. 10 Iron Sharpens Iron event The all-mens event, Iron Sharp ens Iron, Proverbs 27:17 will be held on April 10, with former FSU coach Bobby Bowden sharing a word to the men and boys of how God can change your life in many ways. Doors open at 6 p.m. A love offering will be received. The event is free to at tend. For more information, con tact the Live Oak Church of God. Apr. 14 Alligator Lake Spring Festival The Alligator Lake Spring Festival will be held Saturday, April 14 at Alligator Lake Park in Lake City from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Enjoy a free community festival celebrat ing nature. Bird walks led by experts start at 8 a.m. on the Florida Birding Trail. Walking workshops highlight butteries, native plants and bird habitats. Featuring a Full Flight Raptor Pro gram, with live owls, falcons and hawks by Accipiter Enterprises. Vendors and exhibitors offer na ture and garden related items, and native plants. Many free ac tivities will be offered for children, music, food and drinks will be available. www.fourriversaudu bon.org Apr. 14 60th Anniversary Diamond Jubi lee Gala The North Florida Community College Foundation has an el egant night of dinner, dancing, entertainment and reminiscing planned for its 60th Anniversary Diamond Jubilee Gala (student scholarship fundraiser) on Satur day, April 14. For more informa tion on sponsorship opportunities, contact the NFCC Foundation at 850-973-9414 or foundation@ nfcc.edu. To make seating and table reservations: (850) 973-9414 or www.ticketsource.us/nfcc. Apr. 20 John McEuen and The String Wizards to Perform The NFCC Artist Series presents John McEuen and The String Wizards on Friday, April 20 at 7 p.m. at Van H. Priest Auditorium. Join Grammy-award winning host John McEuen (founding member of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band), with his banjo, guitar, ddle and man dolin, and The String Wizards on an incredible journey interwoven with music, stories and memo ries of the iconic Circle album including Dirt Band favorites and hot bluegrass. Tickets: (850) 9731653 or www.ticketsource.us/nfcc. Apr. 21 Annual Fitness Run NFCCs annual Fitness Run is set for April 21 in conjunction with the Madison County Florida Down Home Days festival. 5-K Run/Walk begins at 8 a.m. One-mile Fun Run/Walk begins at 9 a.m. Pro ceeds from this event will support Relay for Life. Register at www. nfcc.edu/tness-run or contact Tyler Coody at (850) 9731639. Apr. 27 & 28 The Curious Savage Perfor mance at NFCC The NFCC Sentinel Upstage Play ers (Community Theatre) presents The Curious Savage on Friday & Saturday, April 27 & 28 at 7 p.m. at Van H. Priest Auditorium. In this comedic production, the eccen tric Mrs. Savage is left 10 million dollars by her late husband and wants to make the best use of it. Her wish is to use the money to help others realize their dreams, but her grown stepchildren will do anything to keep her from squandering away their money. With the help of Mrs. Savages new friends, she leads the step children on a merry chase, and learns the true meaning of family in the process. Tickets: (850) 9731653 or www.ticketsource.us/nfcc. Weekly Meetings Savvy Caregiver Training at Jo Kennon Library Jo Kennon Public Library 10655 Dowling Park Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 Are you caring for someone with dementia? Become a Savvy Caregiver! This training is pre sented by Elder Options and is designed for caregivers who assist persons with dementia and Alzheimers. Join them for these free classes each Tuesday, 1-3 p.m. for seven weeks, February 6-March 20. To register, please call Johnnie Jones III at 352-6925277. 386-658-2670 Savvy Caregiver Training at Su wannee Regional Library Savvy Caregiver is a free, sev en-session training program de signed for caregivers who serve family members and friends with any form of dementia (i.e. Alzhei mers). Training begins Wednesday, March 7. It will be held at the Suwannee River Regional Library, 1848 S. Ohio Ave., in Live Oak. Sessions are from 10 a.m. until noon. Space is limited to the rst 15 who register. For information, or to register contact Johnnie Jones III at 352692-5277 or by email at jonesj@ agingresources.org. Pre-registra tion is required. Bridge Club seeking players Monday Bridge Club meets every SEE COMMUNITY CALENDAR, PAGE 13A

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THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 13A Community Calendar Monday at 5:30 p.m. at a local restaurant in Live Oak. Club needs players. Contact Diana at 904254-8923 for details. Grace Lutheran Church hosting educational prayer classes Would you like to learn more of Jesus? Do you have questions about the Christian faith? Are you going through a difcult time and seek Gods council? Classes starting soon, those who attend can do so to t their schedules best. Different class times will be available. Please contact Pastor Doug Pries tap at Grace Lutheran Church Live Oak, 386-364-1851 or gracelutheranliveoak@gmail. com Childrens Table Food Distribution The Childrens Table Food Distri bution will be at Peace Baptist Church, 7794 S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL each Wednesday between 2:00-2:30. Bring a large laundry basket or other container to put food in. Donations will be accepted. For further information, 386-9354681 Beginners AA meeting Beginners AA at Dowling Park meets Monday-Wednesday-Sat urday, 7 p.m. at The Lighthouse 23595 CR 250, Live Oak, 32060 For more information call 305407-0895. www.LiveOakAA.com Live Oak Seed Library Every Wednesday from 1-3 p.m. Presented by the Suwannee County Master Gardeners. Check out seed packets and get all your gardening questions answered at the Suwannee River Regional Library. 386-362-2317 GriefShare Support GriefShare is a pastor-super vised, lay-led, Biblically based, Christ-centered, video assisted support group for persons who have lost loved ones or friends by death. The group will meet each Thurs day at 10 a.m. beginning May 18 and run through August 10. This 13 week support program will be scheduled throughout the year on different day and time to give those on varying person al schedules an opportunity to participate. All who have experi enced the death of a loved one are cordially invited to become a participant in GriefShare. For more information call 383-7921122. Finding Your Roots? The Suwannee Valley Genealo gy Society is the place to start! The library, located at 215 Wilbur Street SW near the football eld in Live Oak, is open to the public on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. to help you nd your ancestors. You do not have to be a member to use the library. Meetings are held on the rst Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the library. For further information, including member ship prices, call Jinnie Hancock at 386-330-0110 or email JinnieS VGS@windstream.net SREC, Inc. Senior Center weekly events The SREC, Inc. Senior Center, lo cated at 1509 Martin Luther King Continued from Page 12A Dr. SW in Jasper hosts weekly sup port counseling every Wednesday beginning at 10 a.m. and Bible study every Friday at 10:30 a.m. For more information, contact Barbara Daniels at 386-792-1136. Events are subject to change. Quilting Friends Each Tuesday from 9 a.m.-noon Jasper Public Library, 311 Hatley St. in Jasper. 386-792-2285 He Speaks to Me bible study for women He Speaks to Me, a Priscilla Shirer Bible study for women, will be held on Tuesdays from 9:3011 a.m. beginning Jan. 17 at Pinemount Baptist Church on Hwy 129 in McAlpin led by Chaplain Judy. For more information, con tact her at 364-5558. We hope to see you there! Suwannee River Church of the Nazarene schedule The Suwannee River Church of the Nazarene is located at 18763 SE CR 137 in White Springs. For more information, call 386-3972309. Sunday School9:45 10:45 a.m. Sunday Morning Service11 a.m. noon Afternoon PotluckNoon Sunday Evening Service6 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service6 p.m. TOPS #662 (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) Meets every Thursday. (8 a.m. for weigh-in, meeting at 9 a.m.) at Advent Christian Church, 911 Pinewood Ave., Live Oak, Fla. For more information, call Mary at 386-330-2535. Branford Seed Library Every second and fourth Tuesday from 2:30-4:30 p.m. Presented by the Suwannee County Master Gardeners. Check out seed packets and get all your gardening questions answered at the Branford Public Library. 386-935-1556 TOPS #9798 TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) TOPS #9798 is a support group that offers weekly weigh-ins and programs. The programs pro vide participants with health and weight loss information. Those ready to achieve weight loss and wish for more informa tion may call Barbara at 386-3625933 or Dori at 386-658-2767. Mayo AA Group Located at the First United Meth odist Church, meet every Sun day, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday at 8 p.m. For more information, contact 386-294-2423 or 386-647-6424 AWANA Club New Hope Baptist Church, Mayo on Hwy. 51. From 6-8 p.m. and runs throughout the school year. Open to children ages two through sixth grades. For more in formation, call 386-294-2742. Grief Share GriefShare, a special support group for people experiencing grief and loss, will be held on Wednesday evenings from 6-8 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Live Oak. The church is located at 401 W. Howard St. Childcare is provided. Please call the church at 386-362-1583 if you would like to attend.

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PAGE 14A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL Public Notices Protecting Your Right to Know Lafayette County Courthouse Legals AGENDA LAFAYETTE COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD REGULAR MEETING, MARCH 20, 2018 TO: Lafayette County School Board FROM: Robert Edwards, Superinten dent of Schools SUBJECT: Regular School Board Meeting, March 20, 2018 in the School Board Administration Building begin ning at 6:00 p.m. = == = = = = = = = = = = = CALL TO ORDER Prayer Pledge to the Flag RECOGNITIONS/PRESENTATIONS Students of the Month Suwannee River Economic Council SRP of the Year 1. ADOPTION OF AGENDA 2. APPROVAL OF MINUTES 3. CONSENT ITEMS 3.01 Approve updated list of signa tures for LHS Internal Accounts 3.02 Approve 2018-2019 Title IX, Part A, Project Application: Education of Homeless Children and Youth 4. ACTION ITEMS 4.01 Personnel: (a) Notice of Retire ment; (b) Recommendations-Non-In structional, Substitute Workers; (c) Request for Illness in the Line of Duty leave 4.02 Approve 2018 Summer School Calendar 4.03 Approve fundraiser request: Sale of Field Day T-Shirts for Awards & Incentives for Students Fund 4.04 Approve Hearing (6:30 p.m.)-Approve as advertised: Revi sions to Student Progression Plan 4.05 Approve revised 2017-2018 Assessment Schedule 4.06 Approve Report No. 2018-110 Lafayette County District School Board Financial and Federal Single Audit, for Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2017 4.07 Approve Florida School Boards Association annual dues for 2018-2019 4.08 Approve bills for payment 4.09 Approve budget amendments 5. ITEMS FOR INFORMATION 5.01 Principals Monthly Financial Report on Internal Funds 5.02 Purchase Orders 5.03 Financial Statement 6. CITIZEN INPUT The Lafayette County School Board will hear any citizen who wishes to ad dress the Board, on a one time basis, pertaining to a relevant topic. If the Board wishes to hear more about the topic, that topic will be scheduled for a future Board meeting. Each speaker is limited to three minutes and the time dedicated to this topic will not exceed twenty minutes. ADJOURNMENT ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT SUCH MEETING WILL NEED A RE CORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS, AND THAT, FOR SUCH PURPOSE, HE OR SHE MAY NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PRO CEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RE CORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. Attachment to Agenda Action Item 4.01 (a-c) Personnel 4.01(a) Notice of Retirement -Ce celia Kelley, LES Secretary. Mrs Kelleys last day of employment will be June 30, 2018. 4.01(b) RecommendationsNon-InstructionalApprove Ross Wimberley for the position of Mainte nance Worker for the remainder of the 2017-2018 school year. RecommendationsSubstitute Workers -Approve the individuals named below to serve as substitute workers for the remainder of the 2017-2018 school year: Dana Swords Maureen Boatright Kira Whittington Brittany Camille Alex Lira Johnathon Gilliam 4.01(c) Approve request from Tim Hanson, LHS Dean/Asst. Football Coach, for one (1) hour of Illness in the Line of Duty leave on February 22, 2018. 03/15/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 17000076CAAXMX WILMINGTON TRUST, NA, SUC CESSOR TRUSTEE TO CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE F/B/O HOLD ERS OF STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II INC., BEAR STEARNS ALT-A TRUST 2006-5, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-5, Plaintiff, vs. CLARENCE CHESNUTT, JACKQULINE CHESNUTT, U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF AMER ICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CERTIFICATEHOLDERS TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF BEAR STEARNS MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST 2006-SL1, MORTGAGE BACKED-CERTIFICATES, SERIES 206-SL1, AND UNKNOWN TEN ANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Fi nal Judgment of Foreclosure for Plain tiff entered in this cause on March 5, 2018, in the Circuit Court of Lafayette County, Florida, Steve Land, Clerk of the Circuit Court, will sell the property situated in Lafayette County, Florida described as: LOT 11 AND 12, SUWANNEE HIGH LANDS SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 118 NE SU WANNEE TRAIL, MAYO, FL 32066; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on the front steps of the La fayette County Courthouse, on April 20, 2018 at 11:00 A.M. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 5th day of March, 2018. (Court Seal) Clerk of the Circuit Court Steve Land By: /s/ Hannah Owens Deputy Clerk 03/15, 03/22/2018 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 34-2017-CP-000002 IN RE: ESTATE OF DEBORAH SUE HILL Deceased. NOTICE OF SUMMARY ADMINISTRATION The summary administration of the Estate of Deborah Sue Hill, deceased, is pending in the Circuit Court for Lafayette County, Florida, Probated Division, the address of which is 120 W Main Street, Mayo, FL 32066, File number 17-02-CP. The estate is intes tate. The names and addresses of the pe titioner and the petitioners attorney are set forth below. The fiduciary law yer-client privilege in Florida Statutes Section 90.5021 applies with respect to the petitioner and any attorney em ployed by the petitioner. Any interested person on whom a copy of the notice of summary admin istration is served who challenges the validity of the will or codicils, venue, or the jurisdiction of the court is re quired to file any objection with the court in the manner provided in the Florida Probate Rules WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Summary Administration on that person, or those objections are forever barred. The 3-month time peri od may only be extended for estoppel based upon a misstatement by the pe titioner regarding the time period with which an objection must be filed. The time period may not be extended for any other reason, including affirma tive representation, failure to disclose information, or misconduct by the pe titioner or any other person. Unless sooner barred by Section 733.212(3), all objections to the validity of the will, venue, or the jurisdiction of the court must be filed no later than the earlier of the entry of an order of final dis charge of the petitioner or 1 year after service of the Notice of Summary Ad ministration. A petition for determination of exempt property is required to be filed by or on behalf of any person entitled to ex empt property under Section 732.402, WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the later of the date that is 4 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Summary Administration on such person or the date that is 40 days after the date of termination of any proceed ing involving the construction, admis sion to probate, or validity of the will or involving any other matter affecting any part of the exempt property, or the right of such person to exempt proper ty is deemed waived. An election to take an elective share must be filed by or on behalf of the surviving spouse entitled to an elec tive share under Sections 732.201732.2155 WITHIN THE TIME RE QUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the earlier of the date that is 6 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Summary Ad ministration on the surviving spouse, or an attorney in fact or a guardian of the property of the surviving spouse, or the date that is 2 years after the date of the decedents death. The time for filing an election take an elective share may be extended as provided in the Florida Probate Rules. /s/ A. Scott Toney, Esquire A. Scott Toney, Esquire Attorney for Petitioner Florida Bar Number: 982180 925 NW 56th Terrace Park Avenue-Suite B Gainesville, FL 32605 Telephone: (352) 376-6800 Fax: (352) 376-6802 E-Mail: scott@thetoneylawfirm.com Secondary E-Mail: donnajo@thetoneylawfirm.com /s/ Reba M. Kohn Reba M. Kohn Petitioner 03/08, 03/15/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 34-2017-CP-000002 IN RE: ESTATE OF DEBORAH SUE HILL Deceased. NOTICE OF SUMMARY ADMINISTRATION The summary administration of the Estate of Deborah Sue Hill, deceased, is pending in the Circuit Court for Lafayette County, Florida, Probated Division, the address of which is 120 W Main Street, Mayo, FL 32066, File number 17-02-CP. The estate is intes tate. The names and addresses of the pe titioner and the petitioners attorney are set forth below. The fiduciary law yer-client privilege in Florida Statutes Section 90.5021 applies with respect to the petitioner and any attorney em ployed by the petitioner. Any interested person on whom a copy of the notice of summary admin istration is served who challenges the validity of the will or codicils, venue, or the jurisdiction of the court is re quired to file any objection with the court in the manner provided in the Florida Probate Rules WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Summary Administration on that person, or those objections are forever barred. The 3-month time peri od may only be extended for estoppel based upon a misstatement by the pe titioner regarding the time period with which an objection must be filed. The time period may not be extended for any other reason, including affirma tive representation, failure to disclose information, or misconduct by the pe titioner or any other person. Unless sooner barred by Section 733.212(3), all objections to the validity of the will, venue, or the jurisdiction of the court must be filed no later than the earlier of the entry of an order of final dis charge of the petitioner or 1 year after service of the Notice of Summary Ad ministration. A petition for determination of exempt property is required to be filed by or on behalf of any person entitled to ex empt property under Section 732.402, WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the later of the date that is 4 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Summary Administration on such person or the date that is 40 days after the date of termination of any proceed ing involving the construction, admis sion to probate, or validity of the will or involving any other matter affecting any part of the exempt property, or the right of such person to exempt proper ty is deemed waived. An election to take an elective share must be filed by or on behalf of the surviving spouse entitled to an elec tive share under Sections 732.201732.2155 WITHIN THE TIME RE QUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the earlier of the date that is 6 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Summary Ad ministration on the surviving spouse, or an attorney in fact or a guardian of the property of the surviving spouse, or the date that is 2 years after the date of the decedents death. The time for filing an election take an elective share may be extended as provided in the Florida Probate Rules. /s/ A. Scott Toney, Esquire A. Scott Toney, Esquire Attorney for Petitioner Florida Bar Number: 982180 925 NW 56th Terrace Park Avenue-Suite B Gainesville, FL 32605 Telephone: (352) 376-6800 Fax: (352) 376-6802 E-Mail: scott@thetoneylawfirm.com Secondary E-Mail: donnajo@thetoneylawfirm.com /s/ Reba M. Kohn Reba M. Kohn Petitioner 03/08, 03/15/2018 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2017-CA-000092 FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF FLORIDA, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER JOYNER JR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHRIS TOPHER JOYNER JR.; JESSICA JOYNER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JESSICA JOYNER, Defendant(s) CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accor dance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on February 22, 2018 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on April 20, 2018 at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Standard Time (EST) at the North door of the Lafayette Coun ty Courthouse, 120 W. Main Street, Mayo, FL 32066. LOT 2, GREEN ACRES, ACCORD ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A, PAGE 156, OF THE PUBLIC RE CORDS OF LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2009 SCOTBILT DOUBLE WIDE MANUFACTURED HOME ID # SBHGA1120903964A AND ID # SBHGA1120903964B Property Address: 346 Southeast Ferret Road, Branford, FL 32008 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTER EST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AF TER THE SALE. Dated: February 22, 2018. (Court Seal) STEVE LAND, CLERK LAFAYETTE COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Hannah Owens As Deputy Clerk AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Persons with a diability who need any accommo dation to participate should call the ADA Coordinator, Jacquetta Brad ley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice impaired call (800) 955-8770. 03/08, 03/15/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2017-CA-000092 FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF FLORIDA, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER JOYNER JR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHRIS TOPHER JOYNER JR.; JESSICA JOYNER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JESSICA JOYNER, Defendant(s) CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accor dance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on February 22, 2018 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on April 20, 2018 at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Standard Time (EST) at the North door of the Lafayette Coun ty Courthouse, 120 W. Main Street, Mayo, FL 32066. LOT 2, GREEN ACRES, ACCORD ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A, PAGE 156, OF THE PUBLIC RE CORDS OF LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2009 SCOTBILT DOUBLE WIDE MANUFACTURED HOME ID # SBHGA1120903964A AND ID # SBHGA1120903964B Property Address: 346 Southeast Ferret Road, Branford, FL 32008 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTER EST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AF TER THE SALE. Dated: February 22, 2018. (Court Seal) STEVE LAND, CLERK LAFAYETTE COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Hannah Owens As Deputy Clerk AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Persons with a diability who need any accommo dation to participate should call the ADA Coordinator, Jacquetta Brad ley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice impaired call (800) 955-8770. 03/08, 03/15/2018 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL ACTION NO. 2013-138-CA FORECLOSURE AND OTHER RELIEF LAFAYETTE STATE BANK Post Office Box 108 Mayo, Florida 32066 Plaintiff, EVA BOLTON, as Personal Repre sentative of the Estate of HARRY FLOYD KOON 226 SE Russell Drive Mayo, Florida 32066; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE 111 North Adams Street, Fourth Floor Tallahassee, Florida 32301; unknown tenants; and other un known parties in possession, in cluding the unknown spouse of any person in possession of the property, and if a named Defendant is deceased, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, credi tors, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, per sons or parties, natural or corpo rate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the named or described Defendants, Defendants. THIRD AMENDED NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pur suant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered on February 7, 2017, as amended by Order Granting Plaintiffs Motion to Amend Final Sum mary Judgment of Foreclosure and Reschedule Judicial Sale entered on March 5, 2018, in the above styled ac tion I, Steve Land, Clerk of the Court, will sell at public sale the following de scribed real property: The West Half (W 1/2) of the North west Quarter (NW 1/4) of Section 22, Township 5 South, Range 12 East, Lafayette County, Florida, Less and Except existing road right of way. AND ALSO: The East Half (E 1/2) of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4), less and except the West 23 acres of the Northeast Quar ter (NE 1/4) of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) as recorded in O.R. Book 42, Page 440, Public Records of Lafayette County, Florida, of Section 21, Town ship 5 South, Range 12 East, Lafay ette County, Florida. AND ALSO: The SE 1/4 of the NW 1/4; the SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4; and the N 1/2 of the SE 1/4, all of Section 21, Township 5 South, Range 12 East, Lafayette County, Florida. The sale will be held on May 10, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. (or as soon thereafter as possible, provided that said sale must be commenced prior to 2:00 p.m.) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the North side door of the court house in Lafayette County, in Mayo, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the owner of the above described property as of the date of the lis pen dens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Sondra Williams, court administrator, Post Office Box 1569, Lake City, Florida 32056, tele phone:(386)758-2163, within 2 work ing days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated: March 5, 2018. (Court Seal) STEVE LAND, As Clerk of the Court By: / s/ Hannah Owens As Deputy Clerk 03/15, 03/22/2018 Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL ACTION NO. 2013-138-CA FORECLOSURE AND OTHER RELIEF LAFAYETTE STATE BANK Post Office Box 108 Mayo, Florida 32066 Plaintiff, EVA BOLTON, as Personal Repre sentative of the Estate of HARRY FLOYD KOON 226 SE Russell Drive Mayo, Florida 32066; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE 111 North Adams Street, Fourth Floor Tallahassee, Florida 32301; unknown tenants; and other un known parties in possession, in cluding the unknown spouse of any person in possession of the property, and if a named Defendant is deceased, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, credi tors, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, per sons or parties, natural or corpo rate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the named or described Defendants, Defendants. THIRD AMENDED NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pur suant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered on February 7, 2017, as amended by Order Granting Plaintiffs Motion to Amend Final Sum mary Judgment of Foreclosure and Reschedule Judicial Sale entered on March 5, 2018, in the above styled ac tion I, Steve Land, Clerk of the Court, will sell at public sale the following de scribed real property: The West Half (W 1/2) of the North west Quarter (NW 1/4) of Section 22, Township 5 South, Range 12 East, Lafayette County, Florida, Less and Except existing road right of way. AND ALSO: The East Half (E 1/2) of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4), less and except the West 23 acres of the Northeast Quar ter (NE 1/4) of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) as recorded in O.R. Book 42, Page 440, Public Records of Lafayette County, Florida, of Section 21, Town ship 5 South, Range 12 East, Lafay ette County, Florida. AND ALSO: The SE 1/4 of the NW 1/4; the SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4; and the N 1/2 of the SE 1/4, all of Section 21, Township 5 South, Range 12 East, Lafayette County, Florida. The sale will be held on May 10, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. (or as soon thereafter as possible, provided that said sale must be commenced prior to 2:00 p.m.) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the North side door of the court house in Lafayette County, in Mayo, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the owner of the above described property as of the date of the lis pen dens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Sondra Williams, court administrator, Post Office Box 1569, Lake City, Florida 32056, tele phone:(386)758-2163, within 2 work ing days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated: March 5, 2018. (Court Seal) STEVE LAND, As Clerk of the Court By: / s/ Hannah Owens As Deputy Clerk 03/15, 03/22/2018 NOTICE OF HEARING The Lafayette County School Board will conduct a public hearing on Tues day, March 20, 2018 at 6:30 P.M. to consider revisions to the STUDENT PROGRESSION PLAN (The School Board approved for advertisement of a Public Hearing at their regular meeting on February 20, 2018.) The Board has considered the eco nomic impact of the amended Rule, and upon approval and adoption of this policy by the School Board, Lafay ette County Schools will comply with the guidelines set forth for student progression. Statutory Authority: Section 1001.41, Florida Statutes Laws Implemented: Section 1008.25; 1003.43, Florida Statutes State Board of Education Rule: 6A-1.09411 Copies of this amended Rule of the La fayette County School Board are avail able for public inspection at the Office of the Superintendent of Schools, La fayette County School Board, 363 NE Crawford Street, Mayo, Florida. /s/ Roberts Edwards Robert Edwards, Superintendent of Schools IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD, WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS MEETING OR HEARING, HE/ SHE WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS, AND, FOR SUCH PURPOSE, HE MAY NEED TO EN SURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. 03/01, 03/08/, 03/15/2018 NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The District Board of Trustees of North Florida Community College will hold its regular monthly meeting Tues day, March 20, 2018 at 5:30 p.m. in the NFCC Board Room, NFCC, 325 NW Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL. A copy of the agenda may be obtained by contacting: NFCC, Office of the President, 325 NW Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL 32340, 850-973-1618, or email gaylardc@nfcc.edu. For disabil ity-related accommodations, contact the NFCC Office of College Advance ment, 850-973-1653 or news@nfcc. edu. NFCC is an equal access/equal opportunity employer. 03/15/2018 Legals NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to en gage in business under the fictitious name of Faith Transpor t located at: 468 N.E. Candy Lane in the Coun ty of Lafayette in the City of Mayo Florida 32066 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corpo rations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Live Oak Florida, this 7th day of March 2018. Owner(s) Name(s): Bruce Donaldson 03/15/2018 PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL INFORMATION Pursuant to Section 324 of the Emer gency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, the following in formation is available to the public upon request during regular business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Mon day thru Friday, at the North Central Florida Local Emergency Planning Committee, located at 2009 NW 67th Place, Gainesville, FL 32653-1603. Hazardous Chemical Inventory (Tier Two) Forms Shelter In Place Training Assistance Safety Data Sheets Emergency Release Follow-up Reports Hazards Analyses for Section 302 Facilities Local Emergency Planning Commit tee Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Plan How-to-Comply Information for Hazardous Materials Users Free Hazardous Materials Response Training for First Responders The North Central Florida Local Emer gency Planning Committee serves Alachua, Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafayette, Levy, Madison, Suwannee, Taylor, and Union Counties. To obtain information on the above items, please contact Dwayne Mundy at 352.955.2200, ext. 108, email mundy@ncfrpc.org or visit www.ncflepc.org 03/15/2018 PUBLIC NOTICE The Lafayette County Commission will hold a public hearing to consider the following petition to change the name of a road by Gretchen Howell Boyd. Listed below is the information to change the name of the road. The public hearing will be held during a regular scheduled meeting on Mon day, March 26, 2018 at 5:30 p.m. or as soon thereafter as it can be heard, and will be held in the County Commissioners meeting room on the second floor of the Lafayette County Courthouse located at 120 West Main Street, Mayo, Florida. By Order Of: Earnest L. Jones, Chairman Lafayette County Commission PETITION TO CHANGE NAME OF ROAD Comes now the undersigned, and pe titions the Board of County Commis sioners for Lafayette County, Florida to rename the following road, to wit: CURRENT NAME: SE C.A. HOWELL DRIVE TO BE CHANGED TO SE HOWELL DRIVE. In support of this petition the under signed alleges that said road affects only the property of the undersigned owners. Executed this 15th day of January, 2018. Gretchen Howell Boyd 195 SE C.A. Howell Drive Branford, FL 32008 All members of the public are wel come to attend. Notice is further here by given, pursuant to Florida statute 286.0105, that any person or persons deciding to appeal any matter consid ered at this public hearing will need a record of the hearing and may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeals is to be based 03/08, 03/15/2018 Stay Informed!Exercise Your Right To Know! Public Notices keep you up to date on government announcements, hearings, meetings, and more.Subscribe and Stay Informed!521 Demorest Street SE Live Oak, FL 32064386.362.1734www.suwanneedemocrat.comeMF S

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THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 15A 16013-1 -FOR RENTGREAT RATES FOR NICE LOOKING RENTALS WATER, SEWER, AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS. 386-330-2567 rfnntbrrb rffnnttbft ftnfnnttbt nn tfn tn f The Mayo Free Press Special Notices DEADLINES FOR CLASSIFIED & LEGAL LINE ADS: FOR WEDNESDAY SUWANNEE DEMOCRATNOON FRIDAY PRIOR FOR FRIDAY SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT-9:00 A.M. WEDNESDAY PRIOR FOR THURSDAY JASPER NEWSNOON FRIDAY PRIOR FOR THURSDAY MAYO FREE PRESSNOON FRIDAY PRIOR TO ALL TRADESMEN & SERVICE PROVIDERS:Havent you always heard the old saying Big things come in small packages? Well, this is the idea behind the new Tri-County Service Directory coming soon to the classified pages of the Suwannee Democrat, The Jasper News & the Mayo Free Press!Call 386-362-1734 X102 for more info on how to place a small ad (thats the small packages part)to appear in all 3 of our publica tions which means the opportunity for your ad to be seen by approx. 4600 potential customers (and thats the big things part). General Help Wanted Advent Christian Village Floridas First Retirement CommunityCurrent JOBS Line Advertisement call (386) 658-5627 or visit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs / day, 7 days / week Where People and Ex cellence Meet in a Small Community Setting FT Maintenance Worker Work includes residential and commercial building gener al maintenance; must have experience in all aspects of building maintenance and upkeep, including general renovation carpentry or good working knowledge of building electrical wiring (1 to 2 vacan cies). Valid FL DL required. FT / PT Laborer Position helps maintain clean working areas plus pressure wash and perform minor main tenance on outdoor building / paved surfaces, move mate rials to and from work areas, remove debris, and other simi lar tasks in indoor and outdoor settings. Competitive pay and benefits, great work environment, Christ-centered mission. Visit www.acvillage.net for a downloadable applica tion, or visit our office to apply in person, Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. till 4:00 p.m. EOE / Drug-Free Workplace / Criminal background checks required. OFFICE ASSISTANT L & J Gas and Diesel, Inc 923 Hamilton Ave NE Live Oak Fl 32064 386-208-0808 We are currently seeking a full-time, experienced office assistant/sales person. They will be responsible for ordering parts for all makes and models and Semi and tractor parts. Must be able to work well in a fast paced, high demand at mosphere. Must be energetic, computer literate (knowledge of QuickBooks is a plus); de tail-oriented, self-motivated, dependable, possess effective and positive communications skills, be neat in appearance, and possess a good personal ity. Must be able to work inde pendently and also be a team player. Will be responsible for organization, stocking of inven tory, answering phones, and aiding customers at counter. No phone calls, apply within. General Help Wanted Staff Assistant Extension Ofce Suwannee County is current ly recruiting for the full time position of Staff Assistant in the Extension Office. The deadline to apply is March 30, 2018 or until filled. Appli cations are available online at suwcounty.org the Suwannee County Building Department, 224 Pine Avenue, Live Oak, FL 32064, (386) 364-3407 or the Administration Office, 13150 80th Terrace, Live Oak, FL 32060, (386) 364-3400. The Suwannee County Board of County Commissioners is an equal employment oppor tunity employer that does not discriminate against any quali fied employee or applicant be cause of race, color, national origin, sex, including pregnan cy, age, disability, or marital status. Spanish speaking in dividuals are encouraged to apply. Successful completion of a drug test is a condition of employment. Failure to suc cessfully test free of illegal or controlled drugs will result in non-employment of the appli cant for a minimum of 1 year. EEO/AA/V/D. Professional Vocational Instructors Wanted! Tallahassee Community College is looking for fulltime Vocational Instructors to teach: Carpentry and Plumb ing at the Taylor Correctional Institution. Competitive pay and benefits! Visit www.tcc..edu to apply. For more infor mation contact Workforce Development at (850) 201-8760! Educational CNA CLASSES Nursing Assistants are in GREAT demand! Quest Training offers nurse taught classes. No GED required if age 18 yr. Day and Evening classes available. (386)362-1065 Farm Equipment I PAY YOU THOUSANDS $$$ TO HUNT DEER OR DOVES ON YOUR PROPERTY 850-443-0482 Yard/Estate Sales STOP BY THE SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT OFFICE 521 Demorest Street, SE Live Oak, FL AND PLACE YOUR GA RAGE (YARD, ESTATE, OR MOVING) SALE AD IN TWO EDITIONS OF THE SU WANNEE DEMOCRAT TO RECEIVE A FREE GARAGE SALE KIT* *Kit contains: 3-11X13 Signs 1Pre-Sale Checklist 1Tipsheet for a Successful Sale 1Sheet of Price Stickers Hay for Sale FOR SALE: VERY GOOD PERENNIAL PEANUT HAY Approx. 500-lb rolls. $85 per roll-cash at the farm. Hank Sheddan, Live Oak, FL 386-590-1827 hws332@yahoo.com Misc Merchandise HAVE YOU BEEN MEANING TO CLEAR OUT SOME OF THE CLUTTER? RECYCLE, REDUCE, REUSE? MAYBE GET RID OF THAT UGLY (YOU THINK) VASE AUNT EDNA LEFT YOU IN HER WILL? WE CAN HELP! IF YOU CAN PART WITH ANY SINGLE UNWANTED ITEM FOR LESS THAN $500.00, YOU CAN RUN A 5-LINE AD WITH US FOR ONE WEEK AT NO CHARGE! (Offer restricted to one ad for one item within a 4-week period) CALL THE CLASSIFIEDS DEPARTMENT AT 386-362-1734 X102 Manufactured Homes FOR SALE: 3Bd/2Ba SWMH (14X80). Must be moved at buy ers expense. $9,000.00. Call 386-294-2416, lv msg if no ans. Land/Acreage FIVE ACRES Gorgeous Country Setting. Owner Finance, No Down. $29,900. Only $307/mo. 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com ONE ACRE PAVED ROAD FRONTAGE Beautifully Wooded, Owner Fi nance, No Down. $14,900. Only $153/mo 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com TEN ACRES OBRIEN, FL Paved Rd, well & culvert. Owner financing. NO DOWN $69,900. $613/mo 352-215-1018 www.LandOwnerFinancing.com Autos RUN YOUR TRUCK OR AUTO FOR SALE AD FOR 4 WEEKS FOR JUST A LITTLE MORE THAN THE PRICE OF 1 WEEK: 1 WEEK REGULAR RATE: $25.83 4 WEEK SPECIAL RATE: $30.90 This special rate gets you 8 issues of the Suwannee Democrat, 4 issues of The Jasper News & the Mayo Free Press plus 8 days online!!! ADD A PHOTO FOR ONLY $10.50 MORE CALL NOW TO GET YOUR AD STARTED 386-362-1734 X102 RV Sales/Service WE BUY USED RVS! CALL 229-740-0375 Find it in the Classifieds! ClassiedsAre In 16013-1 -FOR RENTGREAT RATES FOR NICE LOOKING RENTALS WATER, SEWER, AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS. 386-330-2567 53330-1 TRI-COUNTY SERVICE DIRECTORY Serving Suwannee, Hamilton & Lafayette Counties These businesses are ready to serve you.Tradesmen & Service Providers:Call now to place your ads 386-362-1734 x 102 53369-1 BYRDS POWER EQUIPMENTSales & Service All Makes & Models 11860 E. U.S. Hwy 27 Branford, Florida Hours: Mon-Fri 7 a.m. 5 p.m. Open Saturdays 7 a.m. Noon(386) 935-1544 CALL TODAY386-249-9432Buying a new home? Selling your home? Monja Slater Realtor monjaslater@gmail.com 55279-1 6212 US Hwy 129 N Live Oak, FL 32060Cell 53431-1SUBURBAN PROPANE24-Hour Emergency Service Our Business is Customer Satisfaction 17460 High Springs Main St. High Springs, FL 1717 Howard St. West Live Oak, FL www.suburbanpropane.com 386-454-3690 r fntbtf fntntb btnf ftf btfb tttf55200-1 for Week of 3/14-3/20 Auctionsrfntbff bbb ff bbfbtb b brf fbffbf b bfb ffbffb bbr brf bbffbf fbnrrBuilding Suppliesrrrf fbbff bb fEducationrrtbfffffb bfffbfrrff rfbffff Florida Press Service

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PAGE 16A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS Mayo, FL 58397-1 51767-1 1506 S. Ohio Ave. Live Oak, FL 32064Phone 386-208-1414 386-755-8680 Fax 386-208-1411 healthcorelibby@bellsouth.net John C. Palmer Physical erapist Lacey Bailey PT Assistant Locally Owned & Operated 51771-1Family Dentistry HERBERT C. MANTOOTH, D.D.S, P.A. Now Oering BOTOX!(386) 362-6556 1-800-829-6506 45937-1Please call Ninan at 386-362-1734 to place your ad hereStaying hydrated while avoiding overhydration is one way for men and women to protect their kidneys. Kidney disease is a widespread issue made all the more disconcerting by the fact that many people are unaware they have it. According to the National Kidney Foundation, 26 million American adults have kidney disease, and most dont know it. Healthy kidneys are something many people take for granted. But those who want to do everything they can to keep their kidneys healthy can consider the following tips, courtesy of the Cleveland Clinic. familiar with the benets of drinking water each day, and adequate hydration denitely promotes healthy kidneys. But over-hydrating has not been proven to enhance kidney function. e Cleveland Clinic recommends adults drink between four and six glasses of water per day. human body, including the kidneys. High blood pressure and diabetes are two of the biggest risk factors for kidney disease, and regular exercise can reduce a persons risk of both conditions. However, overexertion can strain the kidneys, so adults who exercise, especially novices who need to improve their conditioning, should avoid going too hard at the gym. vitamin supplements or herbal remedies. Vitamin supplements and herbal remedies have become very popular in the 21st century, but excessive supplementation can harm the kidneys. Discuss any supplements or herbals remedies with a physician before taking them. Quit smoking. Just as exercise benets the body in myriad ways, smoking harms the body in myriad ways. Smoking decreases the blood ow in the kidneys, decreasing their ability to function at optimal capacity. Smoking also increases a persons risk of high blood pressure and cancer of the kidneys. blood pressure and diabetes. Adhering to a healthy diet and controlling portion sizes can help control weight and blood pressure and contribute to healthy kidneys as well. blood pressure or diabetes should make sure their physicians screen for kidney dysfunction during routine appointments.Learn more about kidney disease at www.kidney.org. HOW TO PROMOTE HEALTHY KIDNEYS Staying hydrated while avoiding overhydration is one way for men and women to protect their kidneys. Community Calendar event submissions Want to place your upcoming event(s) in our weekly Community Calendar? Email your events to aimee. buckner@ganews.com Include basic details such as who, what, where and when. Please note: protable events will need to be handled by our advertising department. For more information, contact Aimee via email. Deadline for submissions is Monday at 3 p.m.