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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028404/00355
 Material Information
Title: The Mayo free press
Uniform Title: Mayo free press (Mayo, Fla. 1958)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Bernard Guthrie
Place of Publication: Mayo Fla
Publication Date: 07-07-2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Mayo (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lafayette County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Lafayette -- Mayo
Coordinates: 30.051944 x -83.175556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 70, no. 27 (June 20, 1958)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002042475
oclc - 33286672
notis - AKN0339
lccn - sn 95047189
System ID: UF00028404:00355
 Related Items
Preceded by: Mayo free press and Lafayette County news

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SCHOOL GRADES

Lafayette


Elementary


gets good


marks
The Lafayette County School Dis-
trict kept their B grade, according to
data released last week by the Florida
Department of Education.
School grades are based largely on
Florida Comprehensive Assessment
Test results. The recent school term
marked the first year tougher stan-
dards on the FCAT were administered.
Lafayette Elementary School did
well moving from a B school to an A
school. The school didn't make Ade-
quate Yearly Progress, a component of
the federal No Child Left Behind Act.
Not making adequate yearly
progress does not mean that a school
is failing, though. It simply means that
the school has not met a certain stan-
dard for at least one group of students
in a curriculum.
High school grades will be released
later this fall.


A view of the Suwannee River from the bridge on SR 6 in Eastern Hamilton County. - Photo: Joyce Marie Taylor


Lafayette High students Sara Kolvinsky and
Logan Luse speak to the Rotary Club of
Mayo. - Photo: Joyce Marie Taylor


RYLA


teaches


leadership

and trust


Joyce Marie Taylor
joycemarie.taylor@gaflnews.com


Epic drought raises concerns
By Stephenie Livingston
stephenie.Iivingston@gaflnews.com
An erstwhile thriving tourist destination built
on the banks of its White Sulphur Spring, resi-
dents of the now-quiet town of White Springs in
Hamilton County say their life-source is drying
up. With the upper Suwannee experiencing
record lows during this year's epic drought sea-
son, and some area springs remaining dry year-
round, many wonder, "Will my children's chil-
dren know this river as I did?"
"As our springs, streams and rivers, including
the Suwannee River, dry up, so does our fu-
ture," said Dr. Helen Miller, mayor of White
Springs.
The month of May was the driest since 1932,
as the Suwannee basin experienced a 25 inch
rainfall deficit compared to an average year, ac-
cording to the Suwannee River Water Manage-
ment District. Several months of drought has led
to the record-breaking lows on the upper
Suwannee, which includes White Springs with
records going back to 1906. Gages on the upper
Santa Fe reported that flow has ceased. Coastal
rivers fell much below normal after five months
of near-normal flow, and all 16 District-moni-
tored lakes were below their historical average
level.
District Executive Director David Still said
flow levels are low all over the state. Although


SEE VANISHING, PAGE 7A


A view of the Suwannee River at Suwannee Sprin
- Photo: Suwannee River Water Management District

SUWANNEE RIVER
Dowling Suwannee
Park Springs
Flood stage 50 feet 67 feet
Historic low 21.12 feet 35.96 feet
(June 2002) (June 24, 2011)


Previous N/A
Historic low
Current elevation 21.14 feet
(As of July 6, 2011)


36.04 feet
(May 2007)
36.03 feet


DATA
White
Springs
77 feet
49.25 feet
(June 25, 2011)
49.49 feet
(May 2007)
49.39 feet


Data: Suwannee River Water Management District. The current elevations are slightly
higher due to recent rain activity, according to SRWMD's Megan Wetherington.


Two special guests stood before mem-
bers of the Rotary Club of Mayo
Wednesday, June 29. Lafayette High
School students Sara Kolvinsky and Lo-
gan Luse spoke to the Club about their
experiences at a Rotary Youth Leader-
ship Awards (RYLA) camp. It was held
at Wallwood Boy Scout Reservation
near Lake Talquin, which is close to
Quincy.
This year Kolvinsky and Luse were
chosen to be sponsored by the Rotary
Club of Mayo.
"RYLA is a leadership gathering of
10th graders from across North Florida
from Lake City to Pensacola," said Ro-
tary president Leenette McMillan.
The students are encouraged to speak
to their group and share ideas with re-
gards to the projects they took on,
McMillan said.
"We talked about leadership stuff and
how we can help our community and
bring it
back," Luse
said of the
many ac-
tivities in
SEE RYLA,
6 97113 07521 8 PAGE7A


Public safety director on back-up crews


Editor's note: Lafayette County Pub-
lic Safety Director Donnie Land want-
ed to clarify the issue of back up crews
for Lafayette County Rescue.
Lafayette County Rescue is a ser-
vice consisting of six full-time paid
employees and several part-time
employees, these employees con-
sisting of paramedics and EMTs.
The full-time employees work a 48
hour shift with rotation of each Sat-
urday between the shifts. The


Lafayette County Volunteer Fire
Department are all volunteer em-
ployees. Several fire department
volunteers also are certified in extri-
cation, operating the ambulances
when a driver is needed, and two
members of the fire department are
also EMTs.
There is only one ambulance
serving the county at any given 48
or 72 hour shift. The state statutes
require that all patients be taken to


Your car insurance is in Florida.
Why does your payment go to Illinois?
Everything you want to protect is right here where you live. So why insure
it through a company that's not? Call now for a Get Real Review from your
local Farm Bureau Insurance Agent.
386-294-1399
Ropo,13 I le.c.a .;'7 . 322
Freddly Pills Lance Braswell
Iraa,,Pa UeM, T o. .name Latew1. arfb coEn
. = .


the closest facility for treatment
with these four facilities being
Shands of Live Oak, Doctor's
Memorial in Perry, Lake City Med-
ical Center, or Shands of Lakeshore,
the facility of transport depending
on the area where the patient may
live in the county. If the patient is in
need of air transport but air trans-
port cannot be provided due to


SEE PUBLIC, PAGE 7A

-


Publix


For Kids 12 & Under
No Purchase Necessary
Must Present Coupon 1
Limit 1 Per Person
L -----------


HISHING


J











PAGE 2A -~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


Vacation... time away
from work, household
chores and the normal
fast-pace of life! As I
write this, my family is
spending a week at the
beach, doing all the
things that make up
what we call "a good va-
cation:" sleeping late,
eating meals together,
playing board games,
watching movies, and
especially enjoying the
water. And yet, I wonder
if any of you wrestle
with yourself over how
to spend that "down
time" like I do.
My struggle is that I
hate to waste time. By
nature, I am fairly orga-
nized and need an over-
all plan each day in or-
der to get things accom-
plished. It can be really
hard for me to turn that
off while on vacation. As
a much younger mom
and wife, the struggle to
accomplish something
even on vacation had the
potential to make me, (as
well as everyone else)
miserable. Funny how
the older I get, the more
value I find in rest, fun,
and time with my family.
Still, as I packed for this
week away, my bag held
four or five books that I
want to read, my laptop,
a planner for next year
that needs to be orga-
nized, as well as a Bible
study that I am working


on. There was barely
room for my clothes!
So it was quite appro-
priate for God to bring
this to me during my
quiet time yesterday
morning. I was reading a
devotion based on the
life of Jacob found in
Genesis. In Genesis 47,
Jacob and his family
have traveled to Egypt to
see his estranged son,
Joseph, and to live in the
land of Goshen because
of the terrible famine in
the land.
"Then Joseph brought
his father Jacob in and
presented him before
Pharaoh. After Jacob
blessed Pharaoh,
Pharaoh asked him,
"How old are you?" And
Jacob said to Pharaoh,
"The years of my pil-
grimage are hundred
and thirty. My years
have been few and diffi-
cult, and they do not
equal the years of the pil-
grimage of my fathers."
Genesis 47:7-10.
The word "difficult"
can be translated: evil,
distress, adversity, afflic-
tion, calamity, mischief,
trouble, wretchedness,
and wickedness. Jacob
spent much of his life de-
ceiving his family, run-
ning from God and look-
ing out for number one.
My take on his explana-
tion to Pharaoh is that Ja-
cob understood his sin to


be the cause of his diffi-
cult life, and he regretted
the "waste." God clearly
impressed on my heart
that time spent resting,
creating memories with
my family, and enjoying
His creation is not wast-
ed time... as long as He is
in His rightful place in
my heart. On the other
hand, no amount of
work will bring real ac-
complishment if He is
not. Because every heart
matters....
Blessings, Angie
Heart Matters is a
weekly column written
by Angie Land, Director
of the Family Life Min-
istries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association,
where she teaches Bible
studies, leads marriage
and family conferences
and offers Biblical coun-
seling to individuals,
couples and families.
Contact Angie with
questions or comments
at angieland3@wind-
stream.net


Sparkleberry Chapter of the Florida

Native Plant Society, Meeting: July 12, 2011


The Sparkleberry Chapter of the Flori-
da Native Plant Society will meet the
second Tuesday of the month, July 12,
2011 starting at 6:30 PM, at Hatch Park,
Branford (403 SE Craven St). Directions:
Once you have turned onto 247 in Bran-
ford, SE Craven St is the 7th block from
129 - you make a right onto SE Craven,
Hatch Park is a few blocks down the
road on the left. The Public is invited!
The program will be featuring a video
from the Master Naturalist Program en-
titled "Pineland Habitats".
For more information contact: Presi-
dent, Betsy Martin, 386-935-2453, betsy-
martin@windstream.net, Vice-Presi-
dent: Carol Sullivan, 386-364-9309, for
more information on the Florida Native


Plant Society: www.fnps.org.
The purpose of the Florida Native
Plant Society is to promote the preserva-
tion, conservation and plant restoration
of the native plant communities.


Ezell Family Reunion
When: July 10, 2011 (2nd Sunday
in July)
Where: Day Community Center
Time: 11 a.m. - Until
What to bring: Basket Lunch, chil-
dren, gandkids
Contacts: Zelda Ezell Dietrick,
386-294-2080, or Libby Ezell Single-
tary, 386-294-1168.


II: iT I


Margie Browning
Paulk

Margie Browning
Paulk, age 77, passed
away on Thursday, June
30, 2011, at Haven Hos-
pice in Lake City, Flori-
da. She was born in
Palatka, Florida, to the
late Wilbur, and Beatrice
Clorita Pearson Brown-
ing. Coming from
Hialeah, Florida, she had
lived in Mayo since 1989.
Mrs. Paulk was a mem-
ber of the Northside
Church of Christ and a
former member of Mayo
Red Hats Society. She
was a loving and devot-
ed grandmother who
was very involved with
her grandkids, and en-
joyed cooking, crochet-
ing, and spending time
with her family.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Fred Paulk in 1987.
Survived by (6) sons;
Ronnie Davis, Jr., and
wife Ginger of CA, Mike
Davis,of PA, Greg El-
lis,of, NC, Tim Ellis, of St
Petersburg, Larry Ellis,
and Alan Ellis and wife
Lynette, all of Mayo, FL,
(1) step-son; Larry Paulk
and wife Jill of GA, (1)
brother; Wilbur "Buck"
Browning of PA, (8)
grandchildren, (5) great-
grandchildren, numer-
ous nieces, nephews,
other relatives and
friends.
A Memorial Service
will be held at Burns
Mayo Chapel on Satur-
day, July 9, 2011 at 11:00
A.M. with Bro. Robert
Scomp, and Bro. John
Zellner officiating.
You may sign the
guestbook at:
www.joepburnsfuneral-
homes.com

"Virginia Lee Tackett"

Virginia was born on
January 24, 1927 in
Kansas City, Missouri.
Jack and Virginia and
their two boys moved to
Mayo, Fla. in November
1951. They owned and
operated Western Auto
for 38 years.


She is survived by her
husband, Jack Tackett,
two sons, Patrick Tackett
and Michael E. Tackett
both of Mayo, Fla., Two
granddaughters, Angela
Tackett and Launa Prine
both of Mayo, Fla., and
two great grandchildren,
Cole and Calyn Prine of
Mayo, Fla.
She was a member of
the Church of Christ in
Mayo for many years.
She was a loving mother,
housewife, and friend to
many.
The family requests no
flowers. Donations can
be made to Haven Hos-
pice of Lake City or your
favorite charity.
Funeral Services will
be forthcoming.

Betsy Byrd Ward

Betsy Byrd Ward, age
70, passed away on
Wednesday, June 29,
2011, at Marshall Health
Care Center. She was
born in Mayo, Florida, to
the late Tweed, and
Teasie Walker Byrd.
Mrs. Ward was a Regis-
tered Nurse and loved
her grandchildren.
Survived by (4) sons;
Doug Ward, Devlon
Ward and wife of Holly,
all of Perry, FL, Dennis
Ward and wife Donna, of
Illinois, Donnell Ward, a
daughter; Donna Lath-
em and husband George
of Atlanta, GA, 4 broth-
ers, 5 sisters, numerous
nieces and nephews, (10)
grandchildren, (7) great-
grandchildren.
Memorial Services
were held at Burns Mayo
Chapel on Saturday, July
2, 2011 at 10 A.M. with
Bro. Cricket Watson offi-
ciating.
You may sign the
guestbook at:
www.joepburnsfuneral-
homes.com

Hazel Brown Wilson

Mrs. Hazel Brown Wil-
son, age 72, passed away
on Friday, July 1, 2011, in
Mayo. She was born in
Cross City, Florida, to
the late Henry Matthew,


and Irene Hurst Brown.
Coming from Orlando,
she had lived in Mayo
since 2005. Mrs. Wilson
worked as a Secretary in
Retail Clothing. She was
a loving, devoted wife,
mother, and grandmoth-
er who enjoyed spending
time with her family, es-
pecially her grandchil-
dren. She enjoyed paint-
ing, ceramics, puzzles,
and reading in her spare
time.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Charles H. Wilson in
April 2010.
Survived by 2 daugh-
ters; Carrie Fiorey and
Whitney Wilson, both of
Mayo, FL, a brother;
Henry Brown of Orlan-
do, FL, a sister; Gay Stan-
ley of Mayo, FL, (2)
grandchildren, and (2)
great-grandchildren.
Funeral Services were
held at Airline Baptist
Church on Tuesday, July
5, 2011 at 10:30 A.M.
with Bro. Charlie
Walker, and Bro. Chip
Parker, officiating. Inter-
ment followed at Airline
Church Cemetery. Fami-
ly received friends at the
Church from 10:00 A.M.
- 10:30 A.M. prior to the
service.
You may sign the
guestbook at:
www.joepburnsfuneral-
homes.com

Gospel

Meeting at

Northside

Church of

Christ
Featuring Kent Heaton

Presenting:
Sun. July 10, 9:30 a.m.
"How Can We Trust
God's Word?"
10:45 "Authority and
Truth

Monday July 11 - 7:30
p.m. "Why Are There So
Many Churches?"

Tues. July 12, 7:30 p.m.
"Why Do Bad Things
Happen To Good Peo-
ple?"


AIRLINE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC)......294-2676
P astor.......................................................... ........... C hip P arker
Y south Pastor............................................. ............ O rry A gner
Sunday
Sunday School.................... ..... ........................... 9:30 a.m .
M morning W worship ............................................................10:30 a.m .
Evening W orship ..............................................................6:30 p.m .
Wednesday
Fellow ship Supper ............................................................6:00 p.m .
AW AN A & Bible Study ...................................................6:30 p.m .
Located Four Miles East of Mayo on Highway 27
"0 Come Let us Worship The Lord" Ps. 95:6 644260-F

ALTON CHURCH OF GOD...................294-3133
P astor..................................................................... R ev. Tim H am m
Youth Pastor.......................... .............................Chad M orrin
M usic D director ..................... ............................. H olly Brasw ell
Children's Pastor..................... ............Ryan & Tiffany Perry
Sunday School...................................... ........ 9:30-10:30 a.m .
Worship Service/K.I.D.S. Church ....1........10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Evening W orship........................................... ........ 6:00 p.m .
FamilyNight Youth Club Church ............7:00 p.m. Wednesday
State Road 27 644265-F

HATCHBEND APOSTOLIC CHURCH..935-2806
Pastor.................. ............................ .............. Rev. Steve Boyd
Sunday School................ ........................... ............. 10:00 a.m .
W wednesday Service............................... ...................... 7:30 p.m .
Located 4 miles South on Hwy. 349,
then left on CR 138, follow signs.
644267-F
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD ...................294-1811
Sunday School................................................10:00 a.m .
S nday W orship Service..............................................10:45 a.m .
S K id's Church...................................................11:00 a.m .
, , _ ..., ]"1 ".. "~ P .m .
, ,, Y south Im pact ...................................................7:00 p.m .
edl C Adult Bible Study ............................................7:00 p.m .
Pastor: Rev. Kenny Sullivan
Youth Pastor: Daryl Fletcher
Located at 294 SE Mill Street, Mayo "Renewing Hope and Building Lives"
Brewer Lake Baptist Church
Off Hwy. 53 in Day, FL 386-294-1578
"We're Going, Growing and Glowing for God"
Sunday.
Sunday School .....................................................................10 a.m .
M morning W worship ...............................................................11 a.m .
T raining U nion ......................................... ..................... 6 p .m .
S . ,. i- 1. -, in 7 p.m .
. I ,. I ,
Children, Youth & Adult ............................... ............ 7 p.m .
Matt Swain, Pastor
"Come To Day...Come Today!" 644287-F


S Wed. July 13, 7:30 p.m.
- "Uprisings in Egypt"

From the stoplight in
- town, the Northside
Church of Christ in
o if \ ofrshiT Mayo, is located about
s ofI ( Wo~ I Itwo miles towards Live
4 1 II ' OakonSR51.


zh NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH Free Gospel
1 Pastor..............................................................Rev. C harlie W walker
T H R H Sunday Early Service ......................................................y8:30 a.m . i n i
DIST CHURCH Sunday School................................. ......................10:00 a.m. S inging and
SFL 51Mayo I ,,,,, . ,
V ll I .. . . ,' 1,e.a....... .c h in g
............. 10:00a.m. I Preaching
.............11:00 a.m . Bible Study ........................................................................7:00p.m. at M ayo C o m m un ity
..............6:00 p.m . M mission Classes............................ .................................... 7:00p.m . H o lin e ss C hu rc h
S 67 Located Two Miles North of Mayo Off Highway 51
hodist" 644273-F "Come And Hear, All Ye That Fear God" Ps. 66:16 644288F Tr e l1
11 There will be a free


MAYO BAPTIST CHURCH........... (386)294-1020
916 N. Fletcher Ave.
Pastor: Brother Jimmy Legg
M usic D director ............................................. ............ D ale Croft
Sunday Schedule
Bib le Stu dy ....................................................................................9:45 A .M .
W orship Service .........................................................................11:00 A .M .
Sunday N eight Service ....................................................... ...... 6:00 P.M .
Wednesday Night Schedule
Prayer Service & Youth & Children Meeting ..........................7:00 P.M.
mavobapttstchurch@wmdstreamrlet 660833-F

MIDWAY BAPTIST CHURCH .....................935-4993
Pastor: Danny Rogers
Sunday School................................................... ........... 9:45 a.m .
W orship Service................................................................11:00 a.m .
D iscipleshi i ....... . : i" ' 1
Evening W. ..I 1In '"
Prayer Meeting - Wednesday...........................................7:00 p.m.
Located on County Road 354
"For If Ye Forgive Men Their Tresspasses Your Heavenly
Father Will Also Forgive You" Matt. 6:14 644283-F


PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC).294-1306
Pastor........ ......................... .............................. Todd Babione
Sunday School........................... .............................. 9:45 a.m .
W orship Service................. ....................... .............. 11:00 a.m .
Wednesday Discipleship I ......... 7:00 p.m.
Evening Training............................................................ 6:00 p.m .
Seven miles West of Mayo,
left on CR 534 then right on 350A
-- Jesus Saves-- 644289-F


NEW HARMONY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
160th St.
(Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right)
Pastor: Stan Posey
Phone (386) 776-1806


SUNDAY
Sunday Worship
Bible Study........
WEDNESDAY
Women's Bible S


...9:30 am
.10:30 am

..10:00 am
644290-F


tudy..


singing and preaching,
July 10, at 10 a.m. at the
Mayo Community Holi-
ness Church located at
308 N. Clyde Street with
Bluegrass and Southern
Gospel recording artist,
Linda Senn from Mid-
land City, Al, Pastor
Charles and Tim
Williams invites every-
one out.


I -.--- I I


LdS


HEART MATTERS


Methodist Churc
Phone: 386-294-166
MAYO FIRST UNITED METHO]
Located SE corner of Hwy. 27 &
Pastor: Geary Rowe
Sunday School.................................
Morning W orship...........................
Evening W orship............................
"The Friendly Mayo Meth


LIGHTHOUSE CHRISTIAN CENTER
"Freedom is Here" HATCH BEND BAPTIST CHURCH
PO Box 458, Mayo, FL 32066 * 386-294-3089 (386) 935-0943
www.lccmayo.com (386) 935-0943
Sunday School.......................................................................... :45 anm .
M morning W orshiop...................................... Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship................................................... 11:00 amn.
Kids of the - .... - ,,, I, j 10:30 a.m . Sunday Evening....................................................................... :00p n.
I .. . . .I i. I 7:00 p.m . W wednesday Evening.............................................................. 7:00 p n.
Bible Study..............................................Wednesday 7:00 p.m. | 3029 S.E. CR 500
Army of Fire Youth ..................................Wednesday 7:00 p.m. ! 661501-F


ST. MATTHEW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Contact Number in Mayo (386) 294-1839
Sr. Warden............................. Eva Bolton (386) 208-4024
Celebration of Holy Eucharist at 7:00 PM
each Wednesday to be followed by light
refreshments and Christian Education.
Located One Block North of the Courthouse in Mayo. ,


New Beginnings Church
a place for you
Pastor............... Wayne Hudson
Phone Number........386-294-1244
newbeginningschurch@alltel.net
Purpose Statement:
New Location: 163 W. Main Street, Suite 500
Service Schedule:
Swww.....newbeginningschurchmayo.com 644291-F......
www.newbeginningschurchmayo.com 644291 -F


I I I


tl�


i I I


1 11


PAGE 2A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


l

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I


Linda Seen


I











Lafayette Elementary School participates in American

Heart Association's 31st Jump Rope for Heart
LES participated in the American Heart Associa- Jump Rope for Heart Banner to display in their room Coaches Danny Glover, Stephanie Sipe and Jessica
tion's 31st Jump Rope for Heart. We are very proud Most donations raised by a single student is Jack- Lee, would like to extend our deepest thanks to the
of our students raising more than their goal again son Ward for the second year in a row. Our top boy staff and volunteers of Lafayette Elementary School
this year. and girl fundraisers, by grade were: Landen Gerrard for supporting us and volunteering their time to
Our heartfelt thanks to the community for sup- and Elisabeth Cook for Kindergarten; Jackson Ward help make this another successful event.
porting this worthy cause and encouraging kids to and Karah Williams for 1st grade; Landen Brock tied A special thanks to S.W.A.T. for managing a station
be active for a healthy heart. The American Heart with Hayden Hingson and Maka Swinson for 2nd at the event and teaching our students about the
Association uses the money raised to further re- grade; Dawson Jackson and Aleks Sullivan for 3rd dangers of smoking. The students were very grateful
search and awareness in this disease that now claims grade; Jared Cook and Gabrielle Perry for 4th grade; to have the 1st grade PTO providing snow cones this
an American life every 34 seconds. Brian Keen and Kaylin Morgan for 5th grade. These year so they could cool off.
Our class that raised the most money was Mrs. students get to be "Coach for a Day" for their PE At field day on June 3, students got to "slime"
Leah Jackson's third grade class and they got the class. Coach Lee for reaching their goal this year.


Cooling off with snow cones.


~iI


Sign me up.


Up and over.......... See more photos, Page 5A.


Exercising for the heart.


July Special

Sofi & Chair
NO Upliol stred i l

fabric we stock!
S489w)
Price includes fabric & labor.
More than 300 fabrics to select from!
Price also includes spring & frame repairs,
new padding added to entire piece.
New cushion foam is extra if needed.
NO Seconds * NO Close-Outs ALL First Quality Material.
"I personally guarantee all work to suit you"

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MADISON, FLORIDA
1-850-973-6006 OR 1-850-973-4667 6844mv


MAYO FREE PRESS
Published weekly every Thursday, USPS #334-600
Phone: (386) 362-1734 * Fax: (386) 362-6827




Myra Regan, Jeff Waters, Linda Smith,
Publisher Group editor Manager
Annual subscription rate:
$17 in county / $25 out of county
Periodicals postage paid at Live Oak, Florida
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
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Office located at 211 Howard St. East, Live Oak, FL
Editorial Policy: The Mayo Free Press encourages readers to write letters to the
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selected for publication (we reserved the right to accept or reject all letters) may be
edited for space reasons. Letters must be signed and include the writer's address and
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The Mayo Free Press.


THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 3A


-.0-e


Get ready to exercise.










PAGE 4A -~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


Day


Has big town i
come to our s
towns? Last wee]
Madison, Florida,
the courthouse, a yo
man was headed h
after he had been to
his girlfriend. His
dow was down in hi
and he stopped at a
sign. While stopped
man stepped up t(
car, with pistol in
hand and had it poi
at the young m
head. He told the yo
man to hand over ev
thing he had. So he
As of this date they
not found the man
the gun.
The young man
to a line up but the
that held him up wa
one of them.
Folks, it is here. WV
not safe anymore jus
cause we are in a s
town. There are al1
those wanting so
thing they did not
Stay alert at all ti
Lock your doors an
your windows up \
you get into your c
is so hard to comr
grips with the fact
not everyone can
trusted. God bles
one and all.

Last week a co
sent this to me. Tho
you would enjoy


Mailbox


read.
My curfew was light-
ening bugs. My parents
didn't call me on my
cell, they yelled my
name. I played outside
with my friends, no on-
line. If I didn't eat what
mama cooked, then I
didn't eat. Sanitizer did
not exist, but you could
get your mouth washed
* out with soap. I rode my
ways bike without a helmet,
small getting dirty was okay,
k in and neighbors cared as
near much as my parents did.
young Did you ever drink from
ome, a garden hose? And sur-
visit vived???? Ha Ha!! You
win- bet we did!!
is car ***************
stop If God's Word offends
ed a you, it was probably meant
o his for you!!
his
inted "There's more happiness
nan's in a single moment of
young God's presence than in
very- ,itilhin,. else in life."
did. ***************
have 60th Wedding Anniver-
with sary Celebrated
A grand affair was
went held last Saturday to
man honor, former Lafayette
s not County resident, Clyatte
Dees and his wife Pat.
e are Their adult children
st be- Butch Dees and daugh-
;mall ter Karen hosted the spe-
ways cial day. Some 45 rela-
ome- tives and friends filled
earn. the private dining room
mes. of Golden Corral in
id let Ocala.
when Their great grand-
ar. It daughter, Erica and her
ie to dad Eric Holmes, gifted
that the couple with this
be event. Eric Holmes is the
s us owner of the restaurant.
The cake was a replica
0** of their original cake in
)usin 1951. It was very beauti-
ught ful and delicious. A great
the time of fellowship was


enjoyed and "wishing
many more years." was
the many wishes in the
air.
Pat is the sister of Bob
Dart of Jacksonville,
Florida and Clyatte is the
brother to Peggy Under-
wood, of Pierson, Flori-
da, also formerly of
Lafayette County and
Mary Martha Santerfeit,
resident of Day.

Cloud Nine Salad
By Anne Carmichael

1 No. 2 can crushed
pineapple, drained
1-oz pkg cream cheese
1 small carton frozen
non-dairy whipped top-
ping, thawed
1/2 c chopped nuts
1/2 c chopped
maraschino cherries,
drained
1 T sugar

Reserve 1/4 cup of the
pineapple juice and
blend in with cream
cheese. Fold in whipped
topping, nuts, pineapple
and cherries. Refrigerate
overnight before serving.


MEMORY LANE:


Eddie Mims


John Bolen


Ouida Drew O'Steen


Robert Bel


Paul Wayne Rowell


Dorothy Hurst


Clyatte and
Pat Dees
celebrated
sixty years
of mar-
riage. Cly-
atte is a
former
resident of
Day,
Lafayette
County,
Florida.


look.what.we. have. here





Glamalicious
A day to shop shamelessly for all things fabulous
and remember why you love being a girl!


CLUES ACROSS
1. Daminozide
5. Celestial body
9. Actress Thurman
12. Wait for an opportunity
13. K-2 Airbase in S. Korea
14. Child's grandmother
15. Aquatic reptile (abbr.)
16. and Ladders
17. Macaws
18. Capital of Yemen
19. 8th Hebrew letter
20. Travels by water
22. Open and genuine
24. Asian country
25. Retail sales establishment
26. Arabian Gulf
27. Atomic #42
28. Repaired a sock
31. A smoky quality
33. __ de, seats you
34. Sodium
35. Turfs
36. Adventure stories
39. Ascetic holy man
40. An unknown person
42. Alt. sp. for Emir
43. A pigmented nevus
44. Farthest from the front
46. Dekaliter
47. Loves intensely
49. Alt. sp. of 13 across
50. They_
51. Container weight deductions
52. Muslim summons to prayer
53. Small amount
54. Geological times
55. Monacle
CLUES DOWN
1. Basics
2. Old Italian currencies
3. Youth loved by Aphrodite
4. A formal retraction


5. Briefly fry
6. 9th Hebrew letter
7. The time someone has existed
8. Perovskia atriplicfolia
9. Unassisted
10. AKA spearfish
11. Squash bug genus
13. Not here
16. A cigar with square ends
21. S. Am. mountains
23. Condole
28. Small gaming cubes
29. Article
30. Rechristens
31. 18th Hebrew letter
32. Atomic #36
33. Created a miniature likeness
35. Maple or elm fruit
36. Shoe bottoms
37. Of a main artery
38. Gets you a gazundheit
39. Egyptian peacemaker Anwar
40. Open lesions
41. MN 55122
43. MN 55051
45. Campaigns for office
48. 1776 female descendants org.


PAGE 4A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011








THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


Lafayette Elementary School participates in American

Heart Association's 31 st Jump Rope for Heart


1 - -W axml


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL - PAGE 5A


- 'S ~ ~ -~ ~
A-


p~i.i.r.


Jumping really high.... for the heart. Sack racing is good exercise and lots of fun.


Learning about the heart.


Hula Hooping is great exercise.


- 0
lta III.4


JOE P. BURNS
FUNERAL HOME and CREMATORY
OF MAYO
386-294-2658
Locally owned & operated since 1953
Located 7 blocks South of the Courthouse
at the corner of Lake St. and Monroe Ave.
642322-F

Byrd's Power Equipment
I Sales & Service
All Makes & Models
HUSQVARNA.
Open Saturday 7 a.m. - 12 Noon
11860 E. U.S. 27, Branford, FL 32008
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-5 p.m. (386) 935-1544
Saturday 7 a.m. - Noon 642318-
642318-F


& Excavating
* Front End Loader Limerock *
* CAT Back Hoe Top Soil*
* Gradall Clearing *
* Earthmoving Site Prep *
* Pond Digging Fill Dirt *
Kenny Hart Jr., Owner 386-294-2621 642356




UWOLFE PLUMBING, INC.
Repair * Remodeling * Drain Cleaning
New Construction
7 Days * 24 Hours
386-935-0616
State Certified #CFC051621
Serving All North Central Florida 6423.19 F


644204-


Advertise your YARD SALE, VEHICLES OR UNWANTED ITEMS IN THE
CLASSIFIEDS. Call (386) 362-1734 or 1-800-525-4182 to place your ad today


Lafayette Apartments
Rental Assistance. 1, 2, & 3
BR HC & non-HC accessible
apartments. Laundry facility
& playground. We pay water,
sewer & garbage. 176 SE
Land Avenue, Mayo, FL. Ph:
386-294-2720, TDD/TTY
711. "This institution is an
equal opportunity provider,
and employer." 642296-F


- 4)


.r


118 E. Park St. Perry, FL 32348
Toll-Free 1-866-Perry Movies (737-7966)
Visit our website at www.perrytheatre.com
Movies starting Friday, July 8, 2011
Friday/Saturday........$5.00 all seats
Sunday.......................$5.00 all seats
1 Free Refill On Any Size Drink & All Popcorn
(Located behind Foodland Shopping Center)


Ma' ig mi
16in. ia eem P 13


Fri. & Sat.................7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat.................7:30 p.m.
Sunday.........................4:00 p.m Sunday..................... 4:00 p.m
I .I Coming Attractions:
Fri Harry P. & Sat...................otter - Starts July 15th
Sunday.........................4:00p.m * Mr. Poppers Penguins
@ Zookeeper
-- * First Avenger: Capt. America
Starts July 22nd
S" We do not accept $50 or $100 bills

: BUY 1 GET 1 FREE COUPON :
S (Limit one per visit) Certain restrictions may apply. Expires 7-31-11 g
-6m mmm mmm mmm mmmmem eR Mim


Cas


"L "" ,
" -- ..._::


. A


W- F",mk - -- Ogl IMA-


Yea! Exercise can be fun.










PAGE 6A -~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011










6 Lafayette County's news source since 1888. We're proud to serve!


Lafayette and Madison County collided in a game here recently at the District 4 Babe Ruth All-Star tournament at First Federal Sportsplex. Photo: Paul Buchanan (SuwanneeSports.com)


10-under state tourney coming to Jasper


By Corey Davis
corey.davis@gaflnews.com

JASPER-Hamilton County Parks
and Recreation will host the 10-un-
der Babe Ruth North State tourna-
ment this week.
With so many teams across the
state, Babe Ruth divided the state
into North and South and has two
separate state tournaments, with the
South tournament being held in
Sarasota.
As the host of the tournament,
Hamilton received an automatic
berth into the tournament. The other
nine teams competing this week, had


to finish first or second in their dis-
trict tournaments last week.
The tournament consists of ten
teams placed into two pools: Ameri-
can and National. The top two finish-
ers in each pool advance to the semi-
final round on Sunday.
The American pool is Whitehouse
(Jacksonville), Mandarin (Jack-
sonville), Santa Fe (Alachua), Wakul-
la (Crawfordville) and host Hamilton
County, while the National pool is
Chiefland, Orange Park (Jack-
sonville), Murray Hill (Jacksonville),
Ponte Vedra (Jacksonville) and Madi-
son County.
Wakulla won the District 4 title


with a 12-2 win over Madison Coun-
ty in Live Oak recently and will like-
ly be one of the favorites.
Action begins Thursday at 9 a.m.
on Field 1 with Whitehouse facing
Mandarin and on Field 2 with
Chiefland taking on Orange Park.
At 11 a.m., on Field 1 Santa Fe
takes on Hamilton Conuty, while on
Field 2 Murray Hill faces Ponte Ve-
dra.
At 1 p.m., on Field 1 Wakulla faces
Whitehouse, while on Field 2 Madi-
son County plays Chiefland.
Opening day ends at 3 p.m. on
Field 1 with Santa Fe facing Man-
darin and on Field 2 with Murray


Hill taking on Orange Park.
Play resumes Friday and Saturday
with more pool games at 9 a.m., 11
a.m. and 1 p.m.
Both winners of the North and
South state tournaments advance to
the Southeast Regional beginning
July 27 in New Bern, NC and will
compete against teams from Alaba-
ma, West Tennessee, East Tennessee,
East North Carolina, West North
Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, South
Carolina and the Bahamas.
The winner of the Southeast Re-
gional will then advance to the Babe
Ruth World Series beginning August
13 in Winchester, Virginia.


10-UNDER TOURNEY


American
Whitehouse (0-0)
Mandarin (0-0)
Santa Fe (0-0)
Hamilton (0-0)
Wakulla (0-0)

Thursday
Game 1: Whitehouse vs. Mandarin, 9 a.m.
Game 2: Santa Fe vs. Hamilton, 11 a.m.
Game 3: Wakulla vs. Whitehouse, 1 p.m.
Game 4: Santa Fe vs. Mandarin, 3 p.m.
Friday
Game 5: Hamilton vs. Wakulla, 9 a.m.
Game 6: Whitehouse vs. Santa Fe, 11 a.m.
Game 7: Mandarin vs. Wakulla, 1 p.m.
Saturday
Game 8: Hamilton vs. Whitehouse, 9 a.m.
Game 9: Wakulla vs. Santa Fe, 11 a.m.
Game 10: Mandarin vs. Hamilton, 1 p.m.
Sunday
Game 11: American #1 vs. National #2, 9 a.m.
Game 12: National #1 vs. American #2, 11 a.m.
Game 13: Winner GM 1 vs. Winner GM 2, TBA


National
Chiefland (0-0)
Orange Park (0-0)
Murray Hill (0-0)
Ponte Vedra (0-0)
Madison (0-0)


Thursday
.-- Game 1: Chiefland vs. Orange Park, 9 a.m.
., .. . .... . Game 2: Murray Hill vs. Ponte Vedra, 11a.m.
Game 3: Madison vs. Chiefland, 1 p.m.
Game 4: Murray Hill vs. Orange Park, 3 p.m.
jj1 .Friday
Game 5: Ponte Vedra vs. Madison, 9 a.m.
' A-- .......- ,, Game 6: Chiefland vs. Murray Hill, 11 a.m.
Game 7: Orange Park vs. Madison, 1 p.m.
Saturday
Game 8: Ponte Vedra vs. Chiefland, 9 a.m.
Game 9: Madison vs. Murray Hill, 11 a.m.
Game 10: Orange Park vs. Ponte Vedra, 1 p.m.
Sunday
Game 11: American #1 vs. National #2, 9 a.m.
Although Lafayette isn't participating, fans should come out to Jasper and watch some of the best teams in North Florida com- Game 12: National #1 vs. American #2, 11 a.m.
pete in the 10-under state tournament. Photo: Paul Buchanan (SuwanneeSports.com) Game 13: Winner GM 1 vs. Winner GM 2, TBA


6m--Iod


A wo

Pik^-
















VANISHING WATER


Continued From Page 1A

river and spring flows
in Suwannee County
have not reached the
dire conditions of the
upper Suwannee, he
said they could if
drought conditions per-
sist.
Recently, drought has
caused groundwater
levels to fall in 92 per-
cent of the District's
monitored wells. Levels
in the Suwannee River
Basin fell to the 22nd
percentile for the period
of record, meaning that
almost 77 percent of the
time they have been
higher than they are
now, painting a critical
picture.
Groundwater sup-
plies will not meet fu-
ture demands within
the District's jurisdic-
tion, a study formally
accepted by the District
last December showed.
The study said that
groundwater levels
have dropped by 6 feet
in some areas since the
early 80s.
"It's ankle deep just a
little bit below my
property," said Deb


Mayo Legals
AGENDA
TOWN COUNCIL,
TOWN OF MAYO, FLORIDA
REGULAR MEETING
MONDAY, JULY 11, 2011
7:00 P.M.
TOWN HALL, COUNCIL MEETING
ROOM, 276 WEST MAIN STREET
REGULAR MEETING
1. Adopt Agenda
2. Approve Minutes
3. Citizen Input
4. Ordinance 11-01 (First Reading)
5. Set Budget Workshop Dates
6. Appoint Zoning Board Member
7. Department Reports
a. Sampson Edwards
b. Aaron Lawson
c. Bobby Johnson
d. MVFD
e. Sheriff Brian Lamb
8. Miscellaneous Items
9. Pay Bills
10. Adjourn
7/7
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Lafayette County Commission will
hold a regular meeting on Monday, July
11, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. The meeting will be
held in the County Commissioner's Meet-
ing Room at the Lafayette County Court-
house in Mayo, Florida. Listed below is an
agenda for the meeting.
By Order of:
Earnest L. Jones
Chairman
Lafayette County Commission
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS:
1. Open the Meeting.
2. Invocation and pledge to the flag
3. Approve the minutes.
4. Special needs from the community.
5. David Still - Suwannee River Water
Management District
6. Department Heads:
A) Marcus Calhoun-Maintenance
B) Scott Sadler-Public Works
C) Donnie Land - Public Safety/Industrial
Park.
D) Bobby Johnson-Building/Zoning.
7. Florida League of Cities Insurance
Representative to discuss the recent fire
at the Industrial Park.
8. Leenette McMillan-Fredriksson-various
items
9. Approve the bills
10. Discuss the following projects:
A) E911 remodeling at the jail
B) EOC construction project
C) Old Dental Clinic rehab
D) ARRA Energy Conservation SEP
Grant
E) CDBG Housing Grant
11. New Business
12. Adjourn
ALL MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC ARE
WELCOME TO ATTEND. NOTICE IS
FURTHER HEREBY GIVEN, PUR-
SUANT TO FLORIDA STATUTE
286.0105, THATANY PERSON OR PER-
SONS DECIDING TO APPEAL ANY
MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS PUB-
LIC HEARING WILL NEED A RECORD
OF THE HEARING AND MAY NEED TO
ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD
OF THE PROCEEDING IS MADE
WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TES-
TIMONYAND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH
THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES RE-
QUESTING REASONABLE ACCOMMO-
DATIONS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS
PROCEEDING SHOULD CONTACT
(386) 294-1600 OR VIA FLORIDA RELAY
SERVICE AT (800) 955-8771.
See www.lafavetteclerk.com for updates
and amendments to the agenda.
7/7

Public Notice
To Whom It May Concern
Please take notice that the Interim Library
Director of Three Rivers Regional Library
System, library staff, and two or more
members of the Three Rivers Regional
Library Board will hold a meeting on
Friday, July 8, 2011 at 10a.m., at the
Headquarters office in Mayo, Florida.
All interested persons are invited to
attend and be heard. Please be advised,
that if a person decides to appeal any
decision made by the Board with respect


to any matter considered at such hearing,
that person will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose,
he/she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
"Person with disabilities requesting
reasonable accommodations to
participate in this proceeding should
contact (386) 294-1600 (Voice & TDD) or
via Florida Relay Service at (800) 955-
8771."
7/7


Odem who lives on 25A
in Hamilton County. "If
you walk upstream
from the Highway 41
bridge in White Springs,
you'll see the entire riv-
er flow in about a three
foot wide channel. Mind
boggling."

In the midst of these
concerns, last month,
the St. Johns River Wa-
ter Management District
approved a 20-year per-
mit for Jacksonville's
utility (JEA) -the
largest to date. The per-
mit, which could mean
groundwater pumping
in an excess of 160 mil-
lion gallons a day
(mgd), has ignited dis-
cussion and controver-
sy.
Described by Live
Oak's mayor Sonny No-
bles as "crusaders" for
local rivers and springs,
Miller and White
Springs Vice-Mayor
Walter Mckenzie were
present at the St. John's
District Governing
Board meeting last
month when the permit
was issued. Miller
spoke before the board,
asking that they freeze
JEA's water use at the
current level for a peri-
od of five years and de-
velop a wide-ranging
technical and financial
plan that would fully
restore the historic po-
tentiometric surface to
all areas of the Floridan
Aquifer, returning
springs and surface wa-
ters to their pre-devel-
opment levels, and pro-
vide adequate water
from alternative
sources, such as desali-
nation, to meet JEA
needs-in addition to
other suggestions.
"I believe we made
rational and realistic
recommendations that
would benefit all of us
in both water manage-
ment districts, but it
was clear that the Gov-
erning Board was going
to grant JEA's permit,
no matter what data
were presented," said
Miller.
During the meeting, a
JEA representative at-
tributed low levels, in
the case of White Sul-
phur Spring, to the local
PCS phosphate mine,
Miller said.
In recent years, the


mine has been striving
to cut its water use in
half.
Alleging "gross mis-
representations" in
JEA's presentation to
the St. John's District
Governing Board, Still
sent a letter to the exec-
utive director of St.
John's District. He stat-
ed that Suwannee Dis-
trict officials attended
the meeting with their
"conviction that the wa-
ter resources and future
economic well being of
the SRWMD have been
impacted and are under
continued threat from
withdrawals from the
Floridian aquifer system
in northeast Florida."
Still argued that the
utility "manipulated in-
formation" and "mis-
represented" data
found in the Suwannee
District's 2010 Water
Supply Assessment. He
said statements and
conclusions regarding
the District's WSA was
misleading by indicat-
ing that deficit rainfall
along with withdrawals
from Georgia, St. John's
District and Suwannee
District were potential
causes of impacts. Still
said the assessment, in
fact, did not conclude
rainfall was a reason
for declining water lev-
els.
The WSA states, "This
decrease is apparently a
result of groundwater
withdrawals originating
in the District, the St.
John's River Water
Management District,
and the State of Geor-
gia."
Still also wrote that
the presentation did not
mention a U.S. Geologi-
cal Survey report on a
study which found that
flow reduction in White
Sulphur Spring was due
to groundwater with-
drawals east of the site.
Statements made by
JEA that the utility's
"withdrawals do not
adversely impact the
SRWMD" and that PCS
is responsible for the
cessation of flow in
White Sulphur Spring,
Still called "unfound-
ed".
Miller agrees that St.
John's District was mis-
led.
"I believe JEA's con-
sultant misrepresented


data he presented at the
meeting, and it is this
questionable data on
which the governing
board based its decision
to grant the permit for
increased water use,"
she said. "The meeting
was a mockery of the
public process."
Local city officials are
concerned they will not
be able to achieve eco-
nomic development
goals, since they feel it
is clear that the endan-
gered water supply
could come into play,
not only when it comes
to growth, but the con-
tinued viability of their
communities, according
to Miller.
"I think it's really a
travesty," said Nobles.
"While they siphon off
our water, we're the
ones who will have to
suffer."
Miller echoed, "We
need water for house-
hold and personal use,
for our businesses, for
agriculture, and for eco-
tourism."
Mckenzie said he un-
derstands the current
drought-condition is the
principal reason for the
low flow levels on the
upper Suwannee. How-
ever, he is skeptical that
the problem will be
solved once the drought
is over.
"When we get out of
this drought, we're still
going to have a prob-
lem," he said. "I've seen
the river low before, but
I've never seen it and
the spring this low at
the same time."
Though not as severe
as the upper Suwannee,
levels further 'down
upon the Suwannee
River' are also lower
than average. Some of
Suwannee and
Lafayette's springs are
disappearing.
"This spring is done,"
said Dan Saether, who
operates River Ren-
dezvous in Lafayette
County, home of the
once popular diving site
Convict Spring. "We'll
need lots of rain to
bring this one up
again."

While phosphate min-
ing, farming and other
local contributors are
factors, one local geolo-
gist believes water us-


age in the Suwannee
District is minor com-
pared to south Georgia
and JEA's impacts on
water levels in the re-
gion.
"Water we use in the
Suwannee River Water
Management District
does not exceed the
recharge (of the
aquifer)," said Dennis
Price who, as a geolo-
gist for over 35 years,
has worked with the
Florida Department of
Environmental Protec-
tion and the Suwannee
District. "It's not us
that's causing the prob-
lem."
Price said he under-
stands and does not ob-
ject to St. John's making
sure the utility can con-
tinue to provide water
to it's population.
"Obviously people
need to drink water," he
said. "What I object to is
the board dismissing all
of our concerns."
Price believes ground-
water pumping along
the Atlantic coast of
Florida, pulling from lo-
cal sources, is a major
contributor to the dry
condition of some area
springs. He also theo-
rizes that drainage of
flat-woods and wet-
lands in order to harvest
timber for the last 50-
100 years in south Geor-
gia and locally is anoth-
er major contributing
factor. He believes if
there were more water
in the swamps, there
would be more recharge
of the aquifer.
A solution?
Price believes the only
remedy would be to
further address ground-
water pumping along
the coast and for scien-
tists to work towards
designing a plan to
recharge the aquifer.
However, he is not
hopeful that north Flori-
da's springs and rivers
will be saved in time.
"Someone from twen-
ty years ago might look
at this and say not
much has changed.
Someone from one hun-
dred years ago would
look and say, 'Boy, what
happened, this is aw-
ful'," he said. "Old-
timers recognize the dif-
ference."
Miller believes a solu-
tion lies in an organized


effort to save the water
supply by officials and
Florida residents alike.
"Nature does not pay
attention to artificial
boundaries created by
man, irrespective of po-
litical affiliation or the
largesse of a consulting
contract," she said.
"We've got to get our
collective heads out of
the sand and get orga-
nized to save the future
of our communities."

Still said while the
District has not had any
issues with wells going
dry, it has taken steps to
warn residents of severe
drought conditions
threatening groundwa-
ter, and urges them to
cut back on water us-
age. The District has is-
sued a water shortage
advisory, first declared
by the District's Gov-
erning Board in Decem-
ber. The advisory asks
all users to voluntarily
reduce water consump-
tion indoors and out-
doors until further no-
tice.
"The advisory simply
calls upon all of us to
take voluntary steps to
reduce both indoor and
outdoor water use dur-
ing times of drought
and until conditions re-
cover," Jon Dinges, Dis-
trict director of water
supply and resource
management said in a
press release.
Once drought condi-
tions improve and
groundwater and sur-
face water levels re-
bound, the governing
board may cancel the
advisory. Should condi-
tions worsen, however,
the District's board may
impose mandatory wa-
ter-use restrictions.
As for our children,
and our children's chil-
dren-will they photo-
graph the Big Shoals
and dive into the chill-
ing waters of Suwannee
Springs? Kayak on the
upper Suwannee? Will
they know these rivers
and springs as we did?
"I don't think they
will, this thing is on a
downward spiral," Price
said. "For them, it will
be nothing like what
we're familiar with."
The JEA was not im-
mediately available for
comment.


Public safety director on back-up crews


Continued From Page 1A

weather, the same
statutes apply.
At the present time
EMS relies on volunteer
personnel to respond to
back up calls received in
the county when the pri-
mary unit is responding
to another call, at which
time these personnel are
paid to respond to these
calls. Unfortunately the
majority of the back up
personnel in the county
work full-time day jobs
and are not available for


back up calls until after 5
p.m. Because of this is-
sue other sources from
outside of the county
such as Century Ambu-
lance, Suwannee County
EMS, or Taylor County
EMS have to be called
which creates a time de-
lay which could prove to
be detrimental in a life-
threatening situation.
There have been many
occurrences of back to
back critical calls in the
county with one on ei-
ther end of the county,
only one crew on duty to


respond to these calls,
and no local back up
personnel available for
various reasons.
At this time the
Lafayette County Board
of County Commission-
ers are investigating the
possibility of having
paid back up personnel
to guarantee that extra
personnel are available
during these situations.
The hours between 7
a.m. and 7 p.m. appear
to be the most critical
with other personnel be-
ing available after these


hours. The two possibili-
ties presented to the
board would be to: 1)
Have a paid back up
crew available 24/7 on
each shift at a small
amount per hour unless
they responded to a call,
at which time they
would be paid the regu-
lar amount) or 2) Have a
third paramedic avail-
able for each shift from 7
a.m. to 7 p.m. who could
respond to a second call,
rotating other calls dur-
ing the day with the oth-
er on-duty personnel. If


this paramedic would
need to respond to a
back up call by them-
selves they could then
request a driver or addi-
tional personnel for
help.
The board is investi-
gating any and all possi-
bilities to try to correct
this situation in hopes of
assuring quick and ef-
fective medical care to
all citizens of the county.

By Donnie Land
Lafayette County Public
Safety Director


RYLA teaches leadership and trust


Continued From Page 1A

which he and Kolvinsky partici-
pated. "Also, we went out in
small groups and did little tasks
on the ground, like you have to
get through a lava pit."
The simulated lava pit, Luse
explained, was five stumps with
two boards across them and the
purpose was to get 11 people
across it without touching the
ground.
Kolvinsky said one of the
things her group had to do was a
"trust fall" where you stand on a
pole and fall backward. The ex-


ercise, of course, was to learn to
trust your partners enough to
know they wouldn't let you hit
the ground.
"At the beginning you don't
know these five people in your
group," Luse said. "By the end
you trust them so much that
when you do the high ropes,
they'll actually hold your ropes,
so that if you fall you won't hit
the ground."
The high ropes, he said, were
about 50 feet up in the air and
when asked if anyone hit the
ground, Luse said no.
Kolvinsky explained another


exercise where the kids were di-
vided into eight-person groups
with one leader. All of the groups
represented a different country,
like Italy, Germany, Ireland and
the USA. This was done so that
there would be a diverse group
of kids from other areas in the
groups, rather than all from one
place who knew each other.
One task the groups had to do
was make hats for each of them
to symbolize which country they
were from.
Luse said he was in the Ireland
group and Kolvinsky said she
was in Italy.


Another group task to build
teamwork and communication
was to fashion something
around an egg, Luse said, so that
when it hit the ground it would-
n't break.
When asked what was the
most important thing they
learned during the RYLA camp,
Luse said he learned about lead-
ership.
"It is a life changing experi-
ence for most who participate,
building lifelong friendships,"
McMillan stated. "It's amazing
how they bond with those folks
that they don't know."


THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 7A











PAGE 8A -~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


p


p


NATIONAL CAMPAIGN PROMOTES POOL SAFETY


FAMILY FEATURES

hen the Taylor family's new
swimming pool was com-
pleted, the builder was about
to fill it with water. But Erin,
a New Jersey mother of three
children - two of whom were nonswimmers
- stopped him: "Not one drop of water goes
into that pool until the fence is installed," she
insisted.
Erin and her husband, Jay, are painfully
aware of how dangerous swimming pools can
be. Jay's young cousin, Alicea, had drowned in
a neighbor's unfenced aboveground swimming
pool, and the preschooler's funeral was seared
into their memories.
Drowning is the second leading cause of
unintentional injury death to children ages
1 to 14, according to the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.
* In many Sunbelt states, it's the leading
cause of death.
* Children ages 5 and younger are at the
highest risk, accounting for 76 percent of
all reported drowning-related fatalities.
* The U. S. Consumer Products Safety
Commission (CPSC)) found that the
majority of all drownings in the 1-5 age
group were associated with pools, and
nearly half of those victims were last
seen in the house.


"Drowning is swift and silent. There is no
splashing sound or cry for help," says Kim
Burgess, executive director of the National
Drowning Prevention Alliance in Fort Lauder-
dale, Fla. "That's why parents need to be aware
of the danger and install alarms to alert them
and barriers to delay a child's unsupervised
access to a swimming pool, hot tub or other
backyard water feature."
Burgess adds: "Barriers can buy parents the
precious time needed to recover from a brief
lapse in supervision. But remember, if a child
is missing, check the pool area first."

Submersion Injuries
For every child that drowns in a pool or spa, it's
estimated another 10 are treated for submersion
injuries. The CPSC reports that between 2008
and 2010, there were, on average, 5,100 pool-
or-spa-related submersion injuries involving
children younger than 15 years of age treated in
emergency departments. Many suffer profound,
permanent brain damage, requiring life-long
skilled nursing care.
Nadina Riggsbee, of Benicia, Calif, knows
first-hand the suffering those parents endure. In
1978, a babysitter removed a bar the Riggsbees
had placed in the track of a sliding glass patio
door to let the family dog outside. While the
sitter was in the bathroom, the Riggsbee's 26-
month-old daughter, Samira, and 14-
month-old son, JJ, opened the door and
fell into the backyard swimming pool.
Samira died, but JJ survived with
profound brain damage.
"After my family's tragedy, I became
outraged whenever I heard a news
report of another child drowning. I
thought to myself, 'Someone should
do something,'" said Riggsbee.
So she did. Riggsbee founded the
Drowning Prevention Foundation to
promote public awareness and advocate
for swimming pool barrier legislation.
Thanks to her efforts, Contra Costa
County, Calif, required all newly con-
structed swimming pools to have an
isolation fence, an automatic safety cover
or alarms on house doors leading to the
pool area. The 1984 act is thought to be
the first swimming pool barrier law.

Pool Safely
While no national law requires
residential swimming pool barriers,
Congress passed the Virginia Graeme
Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act in
December 2007. The statute requires anti-
entrapment drain covers and other safety
devices in all public pools.
But the law does not require anti-entrapment
drain upgrades in private home pools and hot
tubs. Nor does it mandate swimming pool
barriers. Rather, it mandates a public safety
education program.
As a result, the CPSC created the Pool Safely
campaign, launched in May 2010. The hub of
the program is a dedicated website where
campaign partner organizations can order free
public education resources such as brochures,
posters and public service announcements.
Parents and other child educators can visit the
site to access children's stories and activities
designed to spark a conversation about safer
behavior around pools and spas.
The law also provided funding that enabled
the CPSC to contract with national safety
nonprofit organizations, such as the National
Drowning Prevention Alliance, Safe Kids USA
and the Home Safety Council to promote the
Pool Safely campaign and create their own
outreach initiatives.
Burgess says that she is very pleased by the
clear, empowering messages of the Pool Safely
campaign. "It really fits our motto: Drowning
is preventable. And simple steps really do
save lives."


Isolate the pool from the house and yard area by surrounding it with a
fence and self-closing and self-latching gate.


Photo courtesy of Getty Images


The National Drowning Prevention Alliance asks everyone to reduce risk by
following the Safer 3 program developed by the Swim for Life Foundation:


Safer Water W `3
n Isolate the pool from the house and
yard area by surrounding it with a
fence and self-closing and self-
latching gate.
n Install door, child immersion and
pool alarms and locking pool and
spa covers. Several barriers provide
backup in case one fails.
* Prevent children's unsupervised
access to any body of water,
including natural ones, bathtubs,
buckets, coolers and toilets.


Safer Kids v
* Designate a '.,ik r .ii, h r 'to
ensure constant, attentive adult
supervision during water recreation
and at bath time.
* Teach children water safety and
swimming skills. Parents and child
caregivers should also know how
to swim proficiently.
* Check the pool area or other water
features first if a child is missing.


Safer Response
* Know CPR with
rescue breathing.
n Keep a phone and
reaching and
throwing aids near
the pool.
* Develop an
emergency action
plan and make sure
everyone knows it.


Remember, simple
steps save lives. So
please, Pool Safely!
For more information,
visit:
* www.NDPA.org
* www.PoolSafely.gov
* www.Safer3.com


PAGE 8A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011




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