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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028404/00299
 Material Information
Title: The Mayo free press
Uniform Title: Mayo free press (Mayo, Fla. : 1958)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Mayo free press
Publisher: Bernard Guthrie
Place of Publication: Mayo, Fla
Creation Date: August 27, 2009
Publication Date: 1958-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Mayo (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lafayette County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Lafayette -- Mayo
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 70, no. 27 (June 20, 1958)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN0339
oclc - 33286672
alephbibnum - 002042475
lccn - sn 95047189
System ID: UF00028404:00299
 Related Items
Preceded by: Mayo free press and Lafayette County news

Full Text







nflaonline.com




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Murder investigation continues at 'rigorous' pace


Day man shot
dead in July
By Stephenie Livingston
stephenie.livingston@gaflnews.com
Lafayette County Sheriff Brian
Lamb on Tuesday called the investi-


gation into the murder of Thomas E.
Horton "rigorous."
"Leads and persons of interest are
currently being pursued," Lamb told
the Free Press.
The Lafayette County Sheriff's Of-
fice, Florida Department of Law En-
forcement, and Third Circuit State
Attorney's Office are working to-


gether on the case, said Lamb.
No suspects lave been named,
but Lamb made it clear that the in-
vestigators believe the motive in the
murder appears to be robbery. Hor-
ton was reportedly carrying several
thousand dollars in his jeans pocket
when he left for work the morning
of July 17. He was shot to death in


the front yard of his ;ay home at
about 6 a.m.
Lamb asks that anyone who may
have seen anything suspicious near
the victim's home the day of the
shooting, or with any information
on the crime, contact the Lafayette
County Sheriff's Office at 386-294-
1301 or 386-294-1222.


Lafayette's speed is sure to be
a major factor this season.
-Photos: Stephenie Livingston


"We hope to go to state."


Meet



the



Hornets

A sit-down with
Coach Pearson 'l
and three of this
year's starters
B3 Sttppe:'Pwe Livingston
slephenle. hiringstOn@gaflnews.com
Senior starting wide receiver
Brooks Laminack shared the
attitude of the entire team
Tuesday during practice.
"We're gonna come out and play
as hard as we can each week," he
said.
Head coach Joey Pearson says his
team has a lot of new faces this year,
but he's confident that although this
team is young, the district champs
will hold their own.
' "We had a very exciting preseason
camp. It will be an interesting sea-
son," said Pearson Tuesday during,
practice.
Among the 16
seniors who .
graduated last
year, key losses


FOOTS
FOOBAL POSTER INSIDE

included Jamal Reid (who went on,
to play for the University of Miami),
defensive back Sergio Perez (Troy),
lineman Joey Mroczkowski, run-
ning back Shyler Morgan (Bethune-
Cookman), and linebacker Casey
Brewer (West Point).
The few returning stars will be
tested to the max and there will be
plenty of room for the young guns
to make a name for themselves. Re-
turning offensive starters are senior
QB Nick Bracewell, senior WR
SEE MEET, PAGE 8A


LEFT: Coach Joey Pearson giving instruction to players during
Tuesday's practice. ABOVE: Players practice blocking drills.


New policy to take effect

on Mayo utility payments
By Stephenie Livingston these regulations. However, the
The town of Mayo has estab- Town Council will have the au-
lished a new policy concerning thority to issue operating in-
utility billing, late payments on structions as may be required to
accounts and disconnection of carry out the new policy. The
services. The new policy will policy is meant to establish pro-
take effect in October 2009. The cedures that will indicate the


Town Clerk will be responsible
for properly administering


SEE NEW, PAGE 8A


COUNTY COURT

Trial set on weapons,
assault charges


By Stephenie Livingston
Judge Darren Jackson
presided over a num-
ber of misdemeanor
cases during county
court on August 19.
A non-jury trial was
set for 2 p.m. on Sept.


19 in the case of Kurt S.
Snyder who was arrest-
ed on charges of reck-
less display of a
weapon and assault.
Christopher Allen
SEE TRIAL, PAGE 8A


The rise

and fall of

Lafayette

land values
What goes up
must come
down - and did
By Stephenie Livingston
Who - or what - is to
blame for the current
economic problems fac-
ing Lafayette County?
There are, of course,
many factors. However,
County Clerk Ricky
Lyons and Property Ap-
praiser Tim Walker both
say the rise and fall in
property values in re-
cent years is a prime fac-
tor.
From late 2004
through 2006 property
value in Lafayette Coun-
ty, and throughout most
of the state, doubled and
tripled in value. Since
2007, however, property
values have continued
to fall. According to
Walker, this rise and
eventual fall in value
was brought on by in-
vestors buying vacant
land and "flipping" it to

SSEE THE RISE, PAGE 8A

Lafayette County
i total taxable value
2004- $155,647,751
2005. $171,797,608
(9.4% increase over 2004)
2006- $213,687,155
(19.6 % increase over 2005)
2007' $246,009,036
,(13.1% increase over 2006)
2008. $231,903, 547
(.'5.7% decrease over 2008)
(Preliminary)

Property
taxes levied by
Lafayette County
2004- $1.556.478
2005- $1,717,976 (9.4%)
2006- $2,136,872 (19.6%)
2007- $2,131,668 (-.24%)
2008- $1,970,809 (,7.5%)
2009- $1,982,282.(.58 %)
r----------I



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I Lafaytteoun.vs nws surcesince1881. Were poud o seve!










PAGE. 2A....THE.A.F . T


Annual Homecoming


at Hatch Bend


Baptist Church

Hatch Bend Baptist Church will celebrate their
annual Homecoming Services on September 13.
Sunday School will begin at 9:45 a.m. and end
at 10:20. After a short break, worship services
will begin at 10:30 a.m. with special singing, fol-
lowed by a message by Dr. E.V. Coons.
This year will be a little different in that we '
will not host a special singing group, but will
feature some of our "own local talent."
Dr. E.V. Coons (Bro. Gene) will be the guest
speaker. He has 35 years preaching experience,
23 years as a pastor and 9 years as an evangelist.
, A covered dish luncheon will be served fol-
lowing the service. Everyone is invited to bring
a covered dish and stay and enjoy lunch.
Nursery will be provided during the services.
Pastor Paul Coleman and congregation would
like to invite everyone to come and share this
Homecoming service with us. Hope to see you
there.
For more information you may call Bro. Paul
at the church office, 386-935-0943.


Heart Matters


Ready or not, the back-
to-school bells are begin-
ning to ring! The slower
pace of summer comes to
a close, and as parents,
we face the task of
preparing our children
for the challenges of the
upcoming year: buying
new supplies, getting
bedtimes back into prac-
tice and meeting the new
teacher.
Thinking back to our
own school days may re-
mind us of something
important that we often
tend to overlook as par-
ents, our kids may begin
school with some real
anxiety about what the
year will hold. As
adults, it can be easy to
get caught up in "adult"
problems such as work,
paying bills, etc. and
tend to brush off any


SOME PLANTS ARE JUST MORE FUN TO GROW
A few that come to mind are tomatoesfor that vine ripe taste, Sunflowers for the
tall stalks and huge flowers and citrus. There's something about growing your #1 Meyers
own lemons and oranges that's just way cool. It might be because we are Lemo
outsmarting the weather with cold tolerant varieties. Maybe it's the thrill of Lemon
picking and eating them right off the tree. What ever your reason, now is a great $15.99
time to plant. Stop in and let us help you pick out just the right tree for you.
Choose from Satsuma, Kumquat, Grapefruit and Lemon.
9248 129th Road * Live Oak HWY 90
(386) 362-2333
Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 11
Saturday 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 11T STREET
Closed Sunday z
"For over 30 Years"
WWW.NOBLESGREENHOUSE.COM
541936-F


fears our kids may have
as unimportant or even
silly. To your children,
these issues are as real as
any you may be facing.
If your children seem
less than thrilled about
going back to school, ask
some. questions: Are
you looking forward to
seeirg your friends?
Are'you nervous about
how hard the work will
be? What do you think
about your new teacher?
What do you hope will
(or will not) happen this
year?
Listen to how your
children answer these
and other questions, and
respond with encour-
agement. Proverbs
12:25 gives great insight:
"An anxious heart
weighs a man down, but
a kind word cheers him
up." Helping your child
bring their fears out into
the open will not only
make them less, fearful,
it will also help them un-


derstand how to deal
with their feelings in a
positive way. Com-
mit to "checking in" with
your children on a regu-
lar basis, asking ques-
tions to draw out their
feelings.
A great daily practice
is intentional goodbyes
and hellos. It works like
this: every morning be-
fore your child heads off
to school, encourage
them about the day, no
matter how stressful the
morning has been or
how hard it was to wake
them up, make sure that
you part ways on a posi-
tive note: "I lqve you,
have a great day!" or "I
know you will do great
on your test!" It works
the same way when you
reunite at the end of the
day, make sure to take a
few moments to ask
about the day, especially
if their heart looks
"weighed down". Don't
get discouraged if they


MAYO FREE PRESS
Published weekly every Thursday, USPS #334-600
Phone: (386) 362-1734 * Fax: (386) 362-6827






Myra Regan, Robert Bridges, Linda Smith,
Publisher Group Editor Manager

Annual subscription rate:
$17 in county / $25 out of county,
Periodicals postage paid at Live Oak, Florida
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
The Mayo Free Press
P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, Florida 32064
Office located at 211 Howard St. East, Live Oak, FL
Editorial Policy: The Mayo Free Press encourages readers to write letters to the
editor expressing their opinion. All letters should be brief and to the point and those
selected for publication (we reserved the right to accept or reject all letters) may be
edited for space reasons. Letters must be signed and include the writer's address and
phone number to be considered for publication. All letters become the property of
The Mayo Free Press.


don't open right up .and
talk, give it time and
practice. Keep asking
and keep encouraging,
our children have their
own giants to face, and
we want to make sure
they know we are in their
corner, because their
hearts matter!
Blessings, Angie
Heart Matters is a
weekly column written by
Angie Land, Director of the
Family Life Ministries of
the Lafayette Baptist
Association, where she
teaches Bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences and offers
Biblical counseling to indi-
viduals, couples and
families. Contact Angie
with questions or
comments at ang-
ieland3@windstream.net



Baseball team

supper Sept. 4
The LHS varsity and
JV baseball teams,will
host a supper Friday
Sept. 4 at Lafayette High
School. They will serve
pork steaks, mashed
potatoes, green beans,
rolls, tea and dessert.
Tickets are $6 and can be
picked up at the office or
bought from the players.


AIRLINE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC)......294-2676
Pastor..................................................................... Chip Parker
Youth Pastor.............................................................Orry Agner
Sunday
Sunday School ................................................................ 9:30 a.m .
Morning Worship....................................... .....10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship................................. ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Fellowship Supper.................... ............................... 6:00 p.m.
AWANA & Bible Study............................ .............6:30 p.m.
Located Four Miles East of Mayo on Higway 27
"O Come Let us Worship The Lord" Ps. 95:6

ALTON CHURCH OF GOD................294-3133
Pastor.. .........................................................Rev. Tim Hamm
Youth Pastor ............................................................... Chad M orrin
M usic Director...........................................................Blanche Perry
Children's Pastor.............. .................... Ryan & Tiffany Perry
Sunday School.......................................... ....9:30-10:30a.m.
Worship Service/K.I.D.S. Church..............10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Evening W orship........................................................... 6:00 p.m .
Family Night Youth Club Church.............7:00 p.m. Wednesday
State Road 27 50983.F

BETHEL HOLY CHURCH......................294-1932
"Affiliated with Mt. Sinai Holy Churches of America Inc."
Pastor........................................ .....Elder Carolyn Demps
Sunday School..............................................11:00 a.m.
Worship Service............................................12:00 p.m.
Thursday Bible Study.............. ............. .............7:00 p.m.
357 Pine Street
"Membership means Discipleship" 500MF5

HATCHBEND APOSTOLIC CHURCH..935-2806
Pastor............................... ............... Rev. Steve Boyd
Sunday Sch ool.................................................................. 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service.............................................. 7:30 p.m.
Located 4 miles South on Hwy. 349,,
then left on CR 138, follow signs.
50097-F


FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD...................294-1811
Sunday School.............................................. 10:00 a.m .
Snd a Worship Service................................... 0:45 a.m.
S Kid's Church...................................................11:00 a.m .
Evening Worship.......................................... 6:00 p.m.
. ,,nYouth Imnpact ................. 0 p.m.
f net-t Adult Bible Study............................................7:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Kenny Sullivan
Youth Pastor: Daryl Fletcher
Located at 294 SE Mill Street, Mayo "Renewing Hope and Building Lives"


Methodist Church
Phone: 386-294-1661
MAYO FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Located SE corner of Hwy. 27 & FL 51 Mayo
Pastor: Rev. Connie Steele


Sunday School........................................................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship.........................................................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship................................................ .. 6:00 p.m.


"The Friendly Mayo Methodist"


sMI-MU.F


MAYO BAPTIST CHURCH...........(386)294-1020
916 N. Fletcher Ave.
Pastor Brother Jimmy Legg
Interim Music ........ ..............................................Kathy Palamino
Sunday Schedule
Bible Study ............................................................... 9:45 A.M .
W orship Service... ............................................................11:00 A.M .
Sunday Night Service...........................................6:00 P.M.
Wednesday Night Schedule
Supper .................. ....................... 6:00 P.M.
Prayer Service & Youth & Children Meeting..........................7:00 P.M.
maPvbantistchurch@allitel.neI

MIDWAY BAPTIST CHURCH.....................935-4993
Pastor: Danny Rogers
Sunday School. ... .............................................................. 45 a.m .
W worship Service........................... ................ ..:....11:00 a.m.
Discipleship Training..............................5:00 p.m.
Evening W orship..... ............................ ................6:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting - Wednesday............................................7:00 p.m.
S , Located on County Road 354
"For If Ye Forgive Men Their Tresspasses Your Heavenly
Father Will Also Forgive You" Matt 6:14 s 5 F

ST. MATTHEW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Contact Number in Mayo (386) 294-1839
Sr. W arden........................................................Eva Bolton
Celebration of Holy Eucharist at 7:00 PM
each Wednesday to be followed by light
refreshment and Christian Education.
Located One Block North of the Courthouse in Mayo.


Brewer Lake .Baptist Church
Off Hwy. 53 In Day, FL 386-294-1578
"We're Going, Growing and Glowing for God"
Sunday School...................... .............................. .10 a.m.
Morning Worship............... ..................................11 a.m.
Training U nion................... ............................ ............ 6 p. .
Evening Bible Study ................ ....................................7 p.m .
* Wednesday
Children, Youth & Adult......................... ............... 7
Matt Swain, Pastor William Sircy, Youth
Visit us on the web at www.brewerlakebaatistchurch.co
"Come To Day...Come Todayl" 501001-F


PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC),294-1306
Pastor .. ............................................................ Todd Babione
Sunday School.............. ................................9:45 a.m.
W worship Service................................................................ 1:00 a.m .
Wednesday Discipleship Training................................7:00 p.m.
Evening Training................... ...................... 600 p.m.
Seven miles West of Mayo,
left on CR 534 then right on 350A
-Jesus Saves - '5o99-F

NEW HARMONY UNrIED MEIHODIST CHURCH
160th St.
(Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right)
Pastor: Stan Posey
Phone (386) 776-1806
SUNDAY
Sunday W orship................................................................9:30 am
Bible Study.............. ................................... .....................10:30 am
WEDNESDAY
Women's Bible Study............................................. .......10:00 am
S42084-F

Hatch Bend Baptist Church
Pastor Paul A. Coleman
935-0943
Sunday School........................................................9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship...........................................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening... ...............................................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening....................................................7:00 p.m.
'. 3029 S.E. CR 500 .F

LIGHTHOUSE CHRISTIAN CENTER
"Freedom is Here"
PO Box 458, Mayo, FL 32066 * 386-294-3089
www.lccmayo.com

Morning Worshiop.........................................Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Kids of the King..............................................Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Prayer Meeting...... .............................Monday 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study.................................................Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Army of Fire Youth..................................Wednesday 7:00 p.m.


m..ammmmmm
New Beginnings Church
a place for you
Pastor............Wayne Hudson
Phone Number.....386-294-1244
newbeginninpschurh@alltelnet

Nea Bnings aists tofmoid an enlmrt
A Pme cadisanme dandeplopapassimfor
GodAdih is Re P dek agamdrein
S New Location:
163.W. Main Street, Suite 500
Smi SdiSdu-
Sun. Moning Worshi............. a.m.
www.newbegnimngschurchmayo.com

Ephesus Advent
Christian Church
Pastor Bill Talley
963-5600 ~ 208-9626
Sunday School Service....9:45 a.m.
Worship Service..............11:00 a.m.
Prayer Meeting................7:00 p.m.
541318-F

To Place

Your Church

In Our

Church

Directory,

Call Nancy

at 386-362-

1734


To Place Your Church In Our Church



Directory, Call Nancy at 386-362-1734


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor ..........................................................Rev. Charlie Walker
Sunday Early Service..............................................8:30 a.m.
Sunday Schol.............................................................. 10:00a.m.
Morning Worship............................................................11:00 a.m.
Discipleship Traming.......... .................... ....... 6:00p.m.
Even g orship......................................... .............7:00 p.m.
Wed. Visitation............. ............... ......5:00 p.m.
Bible Study. ................................................................7:00 p.m.
Mission Classes................................................................. 7:00 p.m.
Located Two Miles North of Mayo Off Highway 51
"Come And Hear, All Ye That Fear God" Ps. 6616 500995-F


I


- - r


MI L


THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009


AP GE 2A ~ THE MAYO FREE FL









I ,RufAY AI 0 H Y FE P M F


You're invited to the

annual Fletcher Reunion
When: August 29, 2009
Where: Fanning Springs
Come and bring a covered dish.
Lunch will be served at 12:30 p.m. in the same cab-
in as last year, located to the left of the entrance - a.c.
and porch swing.
All friends and family welcome.

L.H.S. Class of

1999 Reunion


LHS class of 1999 will hold their 10 year reunion
on October 16-17, in Mayo.
Please send mailing address to www.fdoacs.hot-
mail.com Darica Land, 386-288-4028. Invitation to
follow.


Lafayette Schools
closed for Labor
Day Holiday
Lafayette Distnct Schools will be
closed on Monday, September .
2009 in observance ot Labor Day



Seeds from the Sower
Michael A. Guido
Not far from my home was a covered bridge.
When I was a child, my uncle took me to see it.
We stopped before we entered. I said, "Look out,
Uncle. You may drive in, but you won't drive out
of that little, dark hole at the other end."
But I was wrong. It was bigger and brighter than
I thought.
Are you frightened about tomorrow?
That "little hole" of tomorrow may seem dark
and doubtful today, but as you come to it, with the
Lord, you'll find it's bigger, brighter, and better
than today.
The Living Bible says, "The good man walks
along in the ever-brightening light of God's favor;
the dawn gives way to morning splendor."

Important information for our readers
For your convenience when submitting articles
and photos for printing in the Mayo Free Press
please send to: Mayo Free Press, PO Box 370,
Live Oak, Florida 32060, or email to mayofreep-
ress@windstream.net. All photos should be sent
as jpeg attachments, via email.
If you choose to fax something to the Mayo
Free Piessithe direct fax number is 386-362-6827.
If you want to reach Linda directly, call 386-362-
1734 ext. 150.


You are what you eat:


Brain-friendly foods for kids


A child who is well
nourished is better able
to perform in school and
in everyday activities.
Adults have long heard
that breakfast is the most
important meal of the
day - and it continues to
be so. However, some
foods are better options
than others.
The human brain is an
amazing organ. It re-
quires a large number of
nutrients, including vita-
mins, minerals and
amino acids, to produce
,neuro-transmitters and
other important brain
compounds. A lack of
nutrients can result in
chemical abnormalities
and missed connections.
It only takes a small
deficit in nutrition to po-
tentially cause an entire
host of health and behav-
ioral issues.
Poor nutrition can af-
fect the behavior of chil-
dren, their attendance at
school, performance in
the classroom, and over-
all development, say ex-
perts. That is why it is es-
sential that children con-
sume healthy, regular
meals throughout the
day. It is also why so
many schools have im-
plemented government
or private-funded nutri-
tion programs to ensure
kids get the foods they
need.
Breakfast Bonanza
Ideal meals offer a bal-
ance of complex carbohy-
drates and protein. When
preparing breakfast, it's
easy to make sure kids
get what they need if you
follow a simple rules:
dairy + grains + fruit,
and vary the combina-
tions. The following ar�
some healthy breakfasts
to consider.
* cream cheese on a


whole grain bagel,
served with orange juice.
* a vegetarian omelet
with whole wheat toast
spread with fresh fruit
preserves.
* sweet potato pan-
cakes topped with blue-
berries and served with
low-fat chocolate milk
* scrambled eggs, an
English muffin and ap-
ple juice
* whole grain cereal
with yogurt and sliced
strawberries
* an on the go smooth-
ie, made from yogurt,
fruit and juice
Carbs are Key
The brain requires a lot
of energy (by way of
sugars) to run, making
healthy carbohydrates
the key to improved
brain performance. Brain
friendly foods are those
with beneficial sugars
that are low on the
glycemic index. Foods
with a low glycemic in-
dex do not push the pan-
creas to secrete so much
insulin, so the blood sug-
ar tends to be steadier,
and a child will not have


the highs and lows asso-
ciated with a sugar rush.
Here are some foods to
consider.
* Choose fruits such as
grapefruit, apples, cher-
ries, oranges and grapes.
When selecting between
fruits and fruit juices,
keep in mind that the
fiber in whole fruit slows
down the absorption of
fruit sugars. So whole
fruits are better for the
brain than simply juice.
* Bran and oatmeal ce-
reals are healthy for the
body and the brain. Not
only does their high fiber
content promote diges-
tive regularity and possi-
bly reduce cholesterol
levels, but the low
glycemic index of these
foods make them brain
friendly..Plus, they help
promote a feeling of full-
ness.
* Legumes have some
of the lowest glycemic
indexes of any foods.
Soybeans, kidney beans,
chick peas, and lentils
are some considerations.
While not exactly break-
fast foods, they can be in-


corporate into lunches
and dinners to promote
brain function through-
out the day.
* Low-fat dairy prod-
ucts, such as milk and
yogurt, are very healthy
for the brain and body.
* DHA (Docosa-
hetaenoic acid) is an es-
sential fatty acid that is
linked to brain develop-
ment and health. It is
now included in prenatal
vitamins and infant for-
mulas to help develop-
ing baby brains. It is also
an important component
for the brain develop-
ment of older children.
DHA can be found in
fish such as tuna, salmon
and mackerel. DHA sup-
plements can also be
.found in the vitamin
aisle.
Dietary experts also
encourage children to
"graze" throughout, the
day on the healthy foods
mentioned so they keep
their food fuel levels at
an optimal level. Other-
wise they may crash and
start to feel sluggish or
tired.


Labor Day in the United States is cel-
ebrated on the first Monday of Septem-
ber every year. It is a creation of the la-
bor movement and is dedicated to the
social and economic achievements of
American workers. Labor Day com-
memorates the strengths and achieve-
ments of workers and what they have
done to propel the country to success.
There is speculation that Peter J.
McGuire, general secretary of the
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners
and a cofounder of the America Feder-
ation of Labor, was the first to propose


a day to honor laborers. However, oth-
ers stand behind Matthew Maguire as
the creator. He was the secretary of Lo-
cal 344 of the International Association
of Machinists i Paterson, NJ and may
believe he proposed the holiday in 1882
while serving as secretary of the Cen-
tral Labor Union in New York.
The first official Labor Day was held
on September 5,1882 in New York City,
under the guidance of the Central La-
bor Union. Two years later the first
Monday of September was chosen as
the day Labor Day would be held.


Labor Day Origins


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL - PAGE 3A


THURSDAYAUGUST 272 9












UF nursing school receives more than


$900,000 to expand doctoral education


The U.S. Health Re-
sources and Services
Administration Depart-
ment of Health and Hu-
man Services has
awarded more than-
$900,000 to the Univer-
sity of Florida College
of Nursing to facilitate
transition of its ad-
vanced practice nursing
education program
from the master's to the
doctoral level. This
strategic move will in-
crease availability of
primary health-care
providers in under-
served areas and help
address the critical
nursing faculty short-
age.,
The Doctor of Nurs-
ing Practice degree, or
DNP, is a national ini-
tiative led by the Amer-
ican Association of Col-
leges of Nursing and re-
flects a significant
change in nursing edu-
cation. Universities
have traditionally of-
fered master's degrees
to prepare nurses for
advanced practice.
"The DNP prepares
advanced practice nurs-
es with the knowledge,
skills and abilities need-
ed in today's and to-
morrow's complex
health-care environ-
ment, and provides ad-
vanced practice nurses
with educational back*
grounds comparable to
health-care practitioners
in other fields," said Su-
san Schaffer, Ph.D.,
A.R.N.P., a clinical as- *
sociate professor and
department chair who
serves as the grant's
program director.
The college admitted
pt4~itrster's students
to th) DNP program in
2006 and will become


one of the first schools
in Florida and national-
ly to enable students
with a bachelor's de-
gree in nursing to earn
their DNP degree.
The three-year grant
will support nurses
with bachelor of science
or master's degrees in
nursing for admission
to UF to enter adult
acute care, adult, family
and pediatric DNP
nurse practitioner spe-
cialty tracks.
A major emphasis of
the program will be the
education of culturally
diverse and culturally
competent nurse practi-
tioners who will help
address the nation's
shortage of primary
care providers, especial-
ly in rural and urban
medically underserved
areas.
The need for primary
care providers in Flori-
da is severe. In 2008, 65
out of 67 counties were
designated as primary
health-care professional
shortage areas.
"The College of Nurs-
ing has always been
committed to providing
clinical experiences for
students in rural and
urban underserved ar-
eas and this grant will
allow us to further ex-
pand that reach," Schaf-
fer said. "By exposing
our students to more
diverse clinical experi-
ences, we will be en-
.couraging them to con-
tinue work in these ar-
eas after they gradu-
ate."
From 2005 to 2007,
between 27 percent and
49 percent of UF mas-
Ster's degree nursing
students in their last se ,
mesters of study indi-


cated they intended to
work in medically un-
derserved areas. In fall
2008, 63 percent of the
college's post-master's
DNP students reported
that they intended to
work with underserved
clients after graduation.
The grant will allow
the college to place
greater emphasis on
cultural diversity and
competence throughout
the DNP curriculum,
increase clinical place-
ment of students in
public health units and
in rural or urban un-
derserved areas, and
continue classroom dis-
cussion of ways in
which nurse practition-
ers can address unmet
health-care needs. Stu-
dents also will explore
employment opportu-
nities in underserved
areas.
The grant also will
address the critical
nursing faculty short-
age that is restricting
enrollment in under-
graduate and graduate
nursing programs na-
tionwide.. Faculty retire-
ments expected in the
next decade will further
fuel the serious nursing
faculty shortage. *
DNP graduates will
be qualified for acade-
mic faculty positions
and can serve as clinical
preceptors for under-
graduate and graduate
nursing students.
"I am very apprecia-
tive of the hard work of
our faculty in obtaining
this grant and grateful
to the U.S. Health Re-
sources and Services
Administration for rec-
ognizing that advanced
; practiceonurses play in
our health-care system


and how the expansion
of education for these
nurses can improve
care for patients," said
Kathleen Ann Long,
Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N.,


dean of the UF College
of Nursing. "Nursing is
a vital part of our grow-
ing and changing
health-care system, and
highly educated ad-


vanced practice nurses,
at the doctoral level,
will be prepared to im-
prove practice, educate
new clinicians and ele-
vate our profession."


What is your dominant


geometric shape?


Linda Smith
At the August 5, meeting of the
Rotary Club of Mayo, Jana Hart
presented a very different type of
program concerning '"learning
more about yourself." Before be-
ginning her presentation, she gave
each member and guest a "test" to
take, so that at the conclusion of
the program, Rotarians were able
to find out interesting things about
their own personalities.
The object of the exercise was to
see if you were a box, a triangle, a
squiggle, a circle or a rectangle, or
perhaps a combination of several.
In order to figure this out the test
included questions in each of the
five groups. After answering the
questions in each group and tally-
ing up your scores, you could de-


Jana Hart presented a program on "Domina
Shapes"


termine which group you were in.
Hart then showed a power point
presentation that explained the per-
sonality tracts of each particular
group.
As an example, if you proved to
be a "Circle" then this was the defi-
nition given for persons in this cat-
egory, "The Giver and Performer:
These people are process oriented.
Relationships tount. They do not
like to say "no." They are accom-
modators and are nurturing. They
like to get multiple opinions. Their
greatest fear is poor performance,
which would mean a loss of identi-
ty to them. Under stress they lock
down. Process must go well for
them to be effective at work.
The positive traits listed for a
"Circle" are: positive, friendly,
nurturing, persua-
sive, and empha-
thetic. The negatives
of a "Circle" are:
overly personal, ma-
nipulative, gossipy,
and indecisive. It
was decided
amongst the group
that not all traits ap-
ply, and you may
have some traits of
another group. But,
it proved to be an
interesting and fun
thing to do.
Just as a note of in-
terest, the majority
of the group that
ant Geometric took the test were
"Circles."


Paf*Sickupyoursct ofa ayul


s,�


The 5 to 50% savings Is not to be combined with any other offer. Discounts
may only be used on regular retail merchandise - cannot be used with
any clearance merchandise, "more Value"or other specially advertised
Items indicating savings. Check your local Badcock store for holiday
hours. Prices good through Monday, Sept. 7, 2009


SALEM CREEK COLLECTION o03,3
5-Piece Dinette: Leg Table &
4 Side Chairs $55 $659.75
Also available: Buffet & Hutch $799.95, Server $379.95


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Rails, Slat Kit, Stairchest Unit .$44995 $398
Also available: 3-Drawer Under Bed Storaae $99.95


PAGE 4A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009












Great turn-out for annual teacher's luncheon


This group of teachers and staff are awaiting the delicious meal prepared for them by the
Rotary Club of Mayo.


Linda Smith
Lawyer, humorist and
author, Luther
Beauchamp, entertained
teachers, guests and Ro-
tarians at the annual
Teachers Appreciation
Luncheon held on Au-
gust 19, in the Lafayette
High school cafeteria.
This annual event is
sponsored by the Rotary
Club of Mayo. Club
members helped pre-
pare and serve the deli-
cious meal to show ap-
preciation for the hard
work and dedication of
our Lafayette County
teachers.
A large crowd lis-
tened as Luther
Beauchamp of Chiefland
gave a lighthearted, and
uplifting presentation in
honor of our teachers.
He held the crowd's at-
tention and brought a
continuous roar of
laughter from his very


humorous, yet inspiring
presentation.
Beauchamp, through his
lighted-hearted fun, still
sent a message of hope
to the teachers as they
begin a new year. Ad-
dressing the teachers he
said "you will have to
be a cheerleaders, face
challenges, and there
will always be changes."
Beauchamp said that
teachers have a tough
job. Often they will have
to try to cheer the stu-
dents on, help them
achieve their goals, and
face many challenges,
such as communication
with students. As he
said "hearing, is not al-
ways communicating."
Often times, according
to Beauchamp, it will be
the teachers themselves
that will need to be
"cheered up." He said
teachers often are able
to help students visual-


ize where they are and
where they want to be
and then work towards
that goal. As an example
he mentioned that
"small schools can pro-
duce people who have a
big impacts." This is es-
pecially true in
Lafayette County, as
many of these students
have gone on to bigger
and better things.
One interesting item
of information that he
shared was that he tries
to find something fun-
ny, everywhere he goes.
He challenged those lis-
tening to look for angles
to bring out humor in
whatever you do.... in
other words, enjoy
yourselves, no matter
what you may be doing.
Beauchamp said that
"teachers have an awe-
some responsibility and
a wonderful opportuni-
ty."


I
Rotarian Deris Ceraso heads for her table as others are gathering their food and tea.
Rotarian Deloris Ceraso, heads for her table as others are gathering their food and tea.


L-R Ricky Lyons and Skip Jarvis along with oth-
ers, visit while waiting for "meal time."


w. - . ;..-.- .. : - ;, .. . ..


These ladies are helping themselves to
some of the delicious desserts.


Rotary president Steve Land visits with guest speak- Guest speaker, Luther
er, Luther Beauchamp. Beauchamp entertains the crowd.



ifrJ.�


i"';l" ...



Superintendent Tom Lashley along with many of his teachers and staff-are we
turn to get some of the delicious food prepared in their honor.


More teachers have their plates loaded with great food.


-PRIMARY


tARE CENTER


of Live Oak

an affiliate of Lake City Medical Center


Rotarians Lana Morgan and Judge Darren Jackson are serving up plates loaded with good
food.


SDaniel J. Messcher, M.D.
Board id n Pimiay MediciBn
PROVIDpNG :
Pr61twy Huawt Coo '$0M0n0 ,IecimoAli
a easpF adryH * ' Mlndt sMsnin
.' ' *U1mrgnt CM of "on griact Worelw Treamobt. of mil

;' . PhysIwl bk o tobheoo. @pool, ,M owtO1fi4
1n soeuparcio nd lois - . elh CoiMrw$useI
. 1500 North Ohio Aveoue

' 386-330-0100'

/h}^^i0 ,


ng,4
' 1
* ' , , , , * * ,.. :w


r ?'


Teachers receive plates filled with yummy chicken and rice, green beans, cole slaw,
bread.


ig ineir


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL - PAGE 5A


THURSDAYAUGUST 27 2009


I








r/A( ~r - I- F MY I FREE PRF ML.v- , T SA AGS 2


All aboard for the


"Land Down Under"


Linda Smithi
Hatch Bend Baptist
church offered a grand
tour of the "Land Down
Under" during their
week of vacation Bible
School held the week of
June 15.
During this week, the
"kidaroos" were able to
enjoy music at the
Opera House, study at
Missions Harbor, make
things at Crafts Cross-
ing, play and have fun
at Recreation Rock and
the eat each evening at
G'Day Cafe.
While touring Aus-
tralia the children also
discovered the amazing
truth that Jesus Christ
desires to have a unique
and personal relation-
ship with them.
No matter which area
of learning and fun the
kids visited during the
week, they learned that
"It all comes back to Je-
sus.
VBS at Hatch Bend
was very successful


again this year, There
were 51 children attend-
ing, 39 faculty members
for a total of 90 partici-
pating in the fun filled,'
Bible learning week.
The most important
thing that happened
during the entire week
was four decisions
were made to accept
Christ, which is what
it's all about..... It's all
about Jesus!"
The mission offering
collected during the
week, $290, was given
to Mayo Manna House
in Mayo.
This was a week of
great fun, and learning
more about Jesus,.or
learning about Jesus for
the first time, but either
way, the important
thing was to discover
how important it is to
have a relationship with
God's Son. All the teach-
ers and helpers, as well
as pastor Paul Coleman,
worked hard towards.
this goal.


This large group of "kidaroos" are enjoying a train ride.


L;.


Outback Guides: L-R Michele Brooks, Erin Deadwyler. Ki-
daroos: front-Delaney Deadwyler, Emily Coleman, back-
Wyatt Vansickle, and one month old baby Dallas Dead-
wyler.


Ceo Hl.'
- Clerical Staff: L-R Mary Newell, VBS Director Ruth Vogel, Betty Lawhon and Ada Hill.


t:�

~~j1


r Ap i:k


.No ll


Train Conductor Greg Hill and son Parker, on the Boomerang Express, with Courtney Dees
waiting for a ride.


Kidaroos enjoying the Boomerang Express train ride... L-R Courtney Dees, Zack Coleman,
Katherine Cope, Joe Coleman and Charlie Robarts.


.FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
WITH COGONGRASS MANAGEMENT"


S A Pilot Cost-Share program for
Treatment of Cogongrass
2009 Sign-up Period:
Extended through September 1st
Apply for the cost-share assistance with
spraying herbicide to control this non-native
grass, called one of the world's worst weeds.

* Increase land management options

SProtect your property value

* Decrease fire hazard

For guidelines and application materials,
contact your local Florida Division of Forestry Office
or visit our website at:
AI cauGDiCEG GojC mom-_ I


I
'95
3'


Front-Delaney Deadwyler, Emily Coleman, Back-Darlene Baldy, Sheriff Brian Lamb, Pastor
Coleman, Gary Hurst and grandson Wyatt Vansickle.




I lb...
.. ,#'


" i : b". �
. R - ^' . :" ..: , '.
.nflm, _..."'. . .:.. ".
r' .t, �!":. - "


L-R. Betty Lawhon,


wel o-it


Beverly Hurst and grandson of Betty, Aaron Lawhon.


MAYO


Walk-ins
Welcome


BIIARIBEIR SHOP
Licensed Master Barber & Hairstyle's
Nit wimapu nut mehundtd
Shop Hours
Monday - Thinday 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p m.


Owner
Jessica Broughton


122 SW Monroe Ave., Shop Numbers
o, FL 3 Ce Work 386-294-2647
Mayo, FL 32066 ceil 706-825-0418


~~.:.


i. r-''


(.)


r


0 W -; -- -=.==-�- -- - 1-9- - - -ZW*AV


THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009


AP GE 6A ~ THE MAYO FRE L


t ";'-^ ..**


r


'. linl i.e1c h Ilill ii.,' I I...1. I, . l I . ' nl'.h1,11 .I l l u ' l ll lll llllli -(.I.1 . . l.rIIII sl 1.1 I UII1.I.. 1. .1 i, .in l) ( l h I .I ," � l .'
' Bi~ 5 -_ _ _________________________ < ^










.... A. UT2. 20 E Y E P S M F


� . ..k,..: "::. .,.+.,,+ -- +. -.^ r --'. y* .'.3 ' **','[ _ -. . ...'. -------








William Walker, Jr. is among the many students enrolled in the NFCC Law Enforcement program who benefit from the quality instruction and state-of-the-art training facilities available
at NFCC's Public Safety Academy.



NFCC Public Safety Academy



announces open enrollment

Law Enforcement and Corrections programs accepting new students


NFCC students Megan Touchton and Troy Wren are amo
the many students enrolled in the NFCC Corrections Baz
Recruit program. Touchton and Wren are pictured at t
NFCC Public Safety Academy's firearms training area.


The Public Safety
Academy at North Flori-
Sda Community College
is now accepting stu-
dents for its Law En-
forcement and Correc-
tions Basic Recruit pro-.
grams. Both programs
are open entry *with
Classes beginning every
few weeks. Classes are,
held Monday through
Thursday front 6-11 p.m.
at the NFCC Public Safe-
ty Academy complex.
Students' can com-
plete training in one year
or less and be ready to
begin a career in public
safety, corrections or law
ng enforcement. "My in-
sic structors at the Public
he Safety Academy work
hard to assure my suc-


cess," said Megan
Touchton, a current stu-
dent in the NFCC Cor-
rections program. -"I
have learned so much
about Corrections at
NFCC."
NFCC students train
in one of the newest fa-
cilities in the state of
Florida. The NFCC Pub-
lic Safety Academy of-
fers a state-of-the-art dri-
ver training facility, an
indoor firearms training
area and NFCC works
with all public safety
agencies and personnel
from across NFCC's six-
county service area.
NFCC is one of the 42
approved Public Safety
Training Centers certi-
fied by the Criminal Jus-


tice Standards and
Training Commission
(CJSTC) to teach Law
Enforcement and Cor-
rections Basic Recruit
programs which prepare
students for the certifica-
tion exams required for
all Florida officers.
Those interested in
training at NFCC are en-
couraged to begin the
enrollment process now.
Students must be at least
18-years-old to enter ei-
ther program. Admis-
siori requirements' in-
clude completing an
NFCC admission appli-
cation, passing the Flori-
da Criminal Justice Basic
Abilities Test, submit-
ting official high school
or GED diploma and


transcripts; and passing
background checks. Fi-
nancial assistance may
be available for qualified
students.
"NFCC has provided
me with the opportunity
-to fulfill a life time
dream of becoming the
third generation in my
family to work as a po-
lice officer," said NFCC
student William Walker,
Jr.
For more information
or to enroll in the NFCC
Public Safety Academy,
contact John Ulm, In-
structional Coordinator,
at (850) 973-9492 or
ulmj@nfcc.edu. Informa-
tion is also available at
http:/ /www.nfcc.edu/p
ublic-safety.


Fall sniffles?


It could be allergies


There are many people who
look forward to the cooler,
crisp days of autumn. They're
interested in seeing the foliage
change color to those bright
blazes of crimson and orange.
However, for the millions of
allergy sufferers out there, au-
tumn may be as tricky to navi-
gate as the spring season.
That's because pollen, mold
and ragweed are common of-
fenders come this time of year.
Heading outdoors to rake
leaves or enjoy the scenery can
cause itchy eyes, the sniffles
and more. The trouble is, many
people fail to realize allergies
can occur in the autumn, and
chalk their sniffles and sneezes
up to the common cold.
If you suffer from seasonal
allergies, don't wait until symp-
toms are in full.force before
taking action. Autumn comes
around every year and you can
be proactive about keeping al-
lergies at bay.


* Monitor the air. Get pollen
and ragweed counts from any
number of sources that keep
track of this information. Many
times you can receive the air
quality information when
you're checking up on the
weather.
* Avoid the outdoors as
much as possible during peak
levels. While you can't hermeti-
cally seal yourself inside, limit-
ing exposure to high levels of
allergens can help you feel
fuller.
* Pay attention to clues. If
you find you're
the only person
sneezing and
suffering in your J
home, or your


symptoms are
not going away
after a week,
chances are it's
allergies and not
a cold.


College Placement Tests
Monday -Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): Col-
lege Placement Test (CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg.
#16), 5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC Student Ser-
vices 24 hours before test. For information please call
850-973-945 I.


Did you Know?


According to a report from the United
States Department of Labor, the average
SAmerican consumer spends slightly
more than 34 percent of their paycheck
on housing. The average U.S. consumer
makes $63,091 before taxes, with average
annual expenditures of $49,638. That
translates to nearly $17.000 per year
,pent on housing. This includes utilities,
fuels and public services (which combine
for 7 percent of expenditures for hous-
ing), shelter (20.2 percent), household
operations (2 percent). housekeeping
supplies (1.3 percent), and household
furnishings and equipment (3.6 percent).
What might come as mo-.t urpnsing,
particularly to homeowners, is their an-


nual expenditures on transportation.
Transportation expenditures account
for more than half of what the average
American spends on housing. Home-
owners looking to save money and im-
prove their home, therefore, should con-
sider the possibility of spending less on
transportation, the costs of which in-
clude gasoline, interestingly enough,
spending on transportation significantly
outweigh what's spent on food. Again,
however, homeowners hoping to save
tor their next big home improvement
project might want to consider eating in
more, as the average U.S. consumer
spends nearly $2,700 per year on food
purchased away from home.


GRACE MANOR


RESTAURANT

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CLOSED SUNDAY & MONDAY
ALL U CAN EAT 5 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
TuesdayLs Wednesdays. Thursday's Friday's Saturdal's
ALL U CAN EAT ALL U CAN EAT ALL U CAN EAT ALL U CAN EAT ALL U CAN EAT SIRLOIN
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I -- Mmm.71"


V


---- �


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL - PAGE 7A


THURSDAYAUGUST 272 9


I,


~


~QI













Meet the Hornets


Continued From Page 1A

Brooks Laminack, se-
nior C Jared Sampson
and junior OL David
Carson.
Returning defensive
starters are senior DL
Troy Folds (6'1", 250
lbs.), senior DE Aaron
Goyette (6'3", 220), se-
nior LB Alan Driver
(5'9", 175) and junior DB
Antwan Brown (6'2",
180).
There are also several
key reserves to keep an


Continued From Page 1A

turn a profit. Walker
says eventually the cost
of land got too high and
fierce competition,
along with an increas-
ingly troubled econo-
my, led to a decline in
value; Vacant land val-
ue since 2007 has now
lost half its value and
the housing market is
beginning to drop, said
Walker.
From 20b4 through
2006 county officials
continued to keep the
millage rate at 10, as it
had been for several
years before (10 is the
highest the rate can go).
Although property val-
ue went up, the millage
rate did not go down. A
decrease in village
keeps taxes the same or
lowers them. Because
the millage rate re-
mained the same, prop-
erty taxes went up and
the county brought in
more money, according
to Walker.
However, Lyons says
the increase in revenue
was needed.
"It is like running a
small business," said
Lyons of managing a
small town's budget.
The rising price of in-
surance and workman's
compensation, plus


eye out for.
Sophomore OL/DL
Mel Jones (6'1", 255), ju-
nior LB/RB Tyler
Chancey (5'8", 170), ju-
nior LB / WR Jose Rubio,
(5'10", 170), senior
WR/DB Austin Ander-
son (6'5", 160), sopho-
more RB /LB. Treston
Whidden 5'10 185, ju-
nior OL/DL Josh Lira
(5'10" 220), junior
RB/DB Arthur Sellers
(5'9" 165) and junior DB
Andre Hall (6'1" 175).
The Hornets' All-State


high fuel prices and
other economic factors
gave county officials no
choice but to keep the
millage the same from
2004-2006, according to
Lyons.
"The board didn't re-
ally have a choice,"
Lyons said of decisions
made by county com-
missioners.
In 2007, the state in-
troduced the "rollback".
rate. The tax rollback
rate is the tax rate that
would bring in the
same amount of dollars
from the previous year.
Whenever officials do
not reduce the millage
rate to an amount that
would bring in the
same dollars they are
generating increased
revenue. Whenever rev-
enue increases, it is a
tax increase.
Amendment 1 put in
place additional exemp-
tions, meaning less rev-
enue for the town.
Lyons says between
caps put in place last
year and the forced cut
back of the millage rate,
the lacking general fund
is to be expected. Ac-
cording to Lyons, sever-
al small towns in Flori-
da are in the same situa-
tion and so the state has
agreed to pay the
deficit.


first team quarterback,
Nick Bracewell, says he's
excited to return for his
last year. Senior Lami-
nack will also be return-
ing to help out the de-
fense, playing defensive
back as well as wide re-
ceiver. Laminack, with
24 catches for 274 yards
and three touchdowns
last year, will act as
Bracewell's go-to guy
down the field.
"I can hold my own,"
said Laminack.
Jared Sampson, the
Hornets' starting center,
says he's ready for a
challenge.
"I expect we're gonna
go through district pretty
easily. The deeper we get
into playoffs, the harder
it will get," said Samp-
son. "We hope to go to
state."
This season, the team'
will also face new oppo-
nents.
"We recently moved
up from a B1 team to an
Al team, so we're look-
ing forward to playing a
lot of new teams," said
Pearson.
Bracewell, who has
been scouted by schools
such as Tulane and Mis-
sissippi State, says he is
optimistic this will be
one of his best seasons.
However, with many
new players and new op-
ponents, he says the sea-
son remains uncertain.
"We don't really know


what to expect," he said.
Despite the challenges
that await them, all
three players are excited
about the season.
"I love it," responded
Bracewell, Laminack
and Sampson when ask
what it's like playing
football for the Hornets.
The boys say the aspect
they enjoy most about
this year's team is the


Date
8/28/09
9/04/09
9/11/09
9/18/09
9/25/09
10/2/09
10/9/09
10/16/09
10/23/09
10/30/09
11/6/09
11/13/09


tight camaraderie.
"Everybody's real tight,"
said Laminack, who also
says he's a little indeci-
sive about what he'll do
after graduation. "We've
all grown up together,
ya khow? You're out
there with your friends."
Sampson, who plans
to attend the University
of Florida next year and
work towards a master's


Opponent
Taylor Conmty (Kickoff Classic)
Dixie County
Oak Hall'
St Francis Catholic*
Aucilla Christian"
Open
Mandarin Christian*
Cedar Creek Christian*(Homecomning)
Hawthorne"
Arlington Country Day School*
St Johns Country Day School*
Branford


in horticulture, said the
best part of playing for
Coach Pearson is that he
cares about his players
being well-rounded and
realizes football isn't
their only responsibility.
"He's a great coach. If
you have anything aca-
demic or extra-curricu-
lar to do, he'll work
around it," said Samp-
son.


Site
Home
Home
Away
Away
Home

Home
Home
Away
Home
Away
Away
Away


Time
7:30
7:30
7:30
7:30
.7:30

7:30
7:30
7:30
7:30
7:30
7:30


'Denotes district game

2009 JV Football Schedule


Date ; Opponent
9/3/09 Trenton
9/10/09 Bronsn (7-8)
9/17/09 Branford
9/24/09 Open
10/1/09 Bell.
10/8/09 Trenton
10/15/09 Open
10/20/09(Tues) Branford (7-8)


Site
Home
.Away
Home

Home
Away


Time
7:00.
7:00
7:00

7:00
7:00


Away 7:00


Trial set on weapons, New DOliCV to take effect


assault charges
Continued From Page 1A

Dixon, charged with a DUI, was given a fine of
$135, one-year probation, DUI school, 50 hours of
community service and suspended drivers li-
icense.
Ronald Lee-Durrance was given credit for time
served after being arrested for transportation of
uninspected produce.
Allen J. Hall, charged with criminal mischief
under $200, was ordered to pay $171.20 in resti-
tution and given six months' probation.
Victor M. Gonzales, Juan G Mendez, Odilon
Juorez, and Octovio Gonzales were each given
six months' probation plus court costs for driving
without a valid drivers license.


I


Continued From Page 1A

most reasonable
method whereby these
terms can be carried
out. Amendments,
changes or revisions
must be approved by
the Town Council.

The new policy is as
follows:
Water meters are read
beginning on the 10th of
each month. All meters
are read by the 15th of
each month.


Utility bills are mailed
to customers on the last
working day of the
month. Payments of
utility bills are due by 4
p.m. on the 15th of each
month.

Disconnected services
require a reconnect fee
of $40 to be turned back
on.

All bills, including re-
connect fee, must be
paid in full prior to be-
ing reconnected.


GREENVILLE TIMBER

CORPORATION
Post Office Box 540
Madison, FL 32341

"We Buy Pine and
Hardwood Timber"

Toll Free Phone:
.800-533-4902

Office Phone:
850-973-4107

Fax:
850-973-3563

Timber Buyers
Matthew Webb, President, Cell 850-973-7311
Jimmy Chamblin, Vice-President, Cell 850-454-0889
Wally Ellis, Cell 850-973-7319
Todd Witt, Cell 850-973-7317 53202-F








SAugust Special



Sofa & Chair
Upholstered in any
fabric we stock! $489.00

Price includes fabric & labor.
More than 300 fabrics to select from!

Price also includes spring & frame repairs,
new padding added to entire piece.
New cushion foam is extra if needed.
NO Seconds * NO Close-Outs ALL First Quality Material.
"Ipersonally guarantee all work to suit you"


EARNHARDT & SONS UPHOLSTERY
MADISON, FLORIDA
6s.�,� 1-850-973-6006 OR 1-850-973-4667


Aug. 31!Sept. 4, 2009
Mon. Tues. Wed.
31st 1st 2nd


Breakfast Cereal, Pancake Wrap, Sausage Breakfast Pizza, Blueberry
. Crackers, Cereal, Biscuit, Cereal, Cereal, Muffin.
Honey Bun, Crackers. Crackers, Crackers, Juice, Yogurt. Juice.
School Juice, Milk Juice, Milk Juice, Milk Milk Milk
Lunch Chicken Spaghetti, Corn Dog, Chicken Fajitas, Stuff Crust
Sandwich, Green Beans, French Fries, Lettuce, Pizza,
Elem, French Fries, Breadsticks, Applesauce, Cheese, Corn,
School Lettuce, Pineapple Milk - Salsa. Orange
Tomato, Pickle, Tidbits, Fruit Cocktail, Halves, Milk
Diced Peaches, Milk Milk
Milk _____
Breakf Pancake on a Breakfast Sausage Blueberry French Toast,
Stick, Sausage, Pizza, Biscuit, Cereal, Muffin, Turkey Ham,
Hih Cereal, Cereal Orange Sausage Peaches,
eel Banana, Juice, Crackar Wedges, Paty, Cereal, Juice,
Milk Juice, Milk Juice, Milk Juice, Milk Milk
ChickeanSandwich Pepei Pizza Harmburers Chicken& Chicken
LAun (Turkey Sandwich), (Chef Salad), (TrkeyHam Noodles Nuggetls
High French Fries, asked Poato, Sandwich), (Litle Caesar (Hamurger
LettuceTma, Broccoli& French Fries, Pizza), Steak),
ickleShool Cheese Suce, Lettuce Tomato, lp Greens, Macaroni &
trSicks, ' Dill Ch s, Corn, Fruit Cup, Cheese. Green
CarrotSte , oh. Applesauce, Carrote elry Fresh Apples Bans, Carrt &
SlicedPeaches OrangeWedes, Sticks, Orange Sweet Potato Celery Sicks,
Ors Wedges, Conboy Wedges or Apple Pudding, Pineapole
SnierDoodle Cookies, Juice, Chocolate Cornbred, Chunks, Grape
Cookies. Milk Milk Pudding, Milk Milk Juice, Rolls, Milk
Breakfast will now be provided at LHS each morning beginning at 7:45 a.m.

Mayo Thriftway
Hwy 27* 294-1165


In Loving Memory of


Barney Cyril Hart

(B.C., Cyril)
1915-1959



i .















50 years & we still love and miss you!
Your Family & Friends 4-F


MAY C itF


Lafayette Apartments
Hurry in and apply at "The
Best Place to Live!" Rental
Assistance, 1, 2, & 3 BR. HC
& Non-HC accessible
apartments. Laundry tacilily
& playground. We pay water.
sewer & garbage Mayo, FL.
Ph: 386-294-2720, TDD/TTY
711 Equal Housing
Opportunity ,,, ,


Advertise yourYARD SALE,
VEHICLES OR UNWANTED
ITEMS IN THE CLASSIFIED.
Call (386) 362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182 to place
your ad today



-t.. ..-.


F� e , .


We're right around
the next turn.
(Look for us on Victory Lane and Pit Road too.)
You don't have to look far to find one of the leaders in Auto,
Home and Life coverage. Your local Farm Bureau Insurance
agency provides the proven protection, prompt service and
competitive rates you want. Plus, our fist, tair claims service
makes any pit crew look like they're standing still.
Call today for a free, no-obligation review.



Glen King & Jimmy King, Agents
233 W. Base St. * Madison * (850) 973-4071
Freddy Pitts, Agent
105 W. Anderson St.. Monticello* (850) 997-2213 Auto Home Life
Freddy Pitts, Agent
Ryan Perry, Agent ,fc( ?
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371 )IDE
Lance Braswell, Agent PACING
Lafayette County * Mayo, FL* (386) 294-1399
L oirtar Bla , iu(nl .ea eal Inliia e o lonl l Bwe a ,uatII y Insu, (o ier Srtl ai! ,ir R ,at I lnr ew Ilf l'nik n, C n h =tl o
-s-_tt n l H xl.


The rise and fall of

Lafayette land values


Lafayette High School
2009 Varsity Football Schedule
Last season: 10-1


Thurs. Fri
3rd 4th


THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009


AP GE 8A ~ THE MAYO FREE FL


I









I ,ll 0 TE MY FE P S Mo FL P


Overcoming learning disabilities a team effort


Though kids might
initially dread their an-
nual autumn return to
the classroom, once they
arrive on school
grounds and start
clowning around with
friends, that dread
quickly transforms into
excitement for another
school year. Parents,
too, might want to keep
the kids around the
house longer, but also
enjoy seeing their kids
dive back into school
work.
Some students, how-


ever, fear the return to
school. For students
with a learning disabili-
ty, going back to school
is often difficult. Cou-
pled with the typical
fears of fitting in social-
ly, students with learn-
ing disabilities have the
additional fear of han-
dling their coursework
and excelling in the
classroom in spite of
their learning disability.
What's more, in such
cases, students might be
silently battling an undi-
agnosed learning dis-


ability. According
Learning Disabil
sociation of AmE
(LDAA), many s
with learning di.
are of average or
average intellige
While learning d
ties have no cur
support and inte
tion, many peop
learning disabili
have gone on to
their full potenti
Of course, the
step in overcome
learning disabili
ognizing its press


1%


A.


A part of many students' lives, learning disabilities can be overcome with the he
ents and teachers.


g to the Certain learning disabil-
lities As- ities, such as dyslexia,
erica are widely known to
studentss parents and educators
sabilities alike and can be easier
r above to detect. However, oth-
nce. ers, such as Central Au-
lisabili- ditory Processing Disor-
e, with ders (CAPD), can prove
erven- to be more of a mystery.
le with Often part of another
ties learning disability,
realize CAPD is a physical
al., hearing impairment, one
first that affects a person's
ing a ability to separate a spo-
ty is rec- ken message from back-
;ence. ground information. In
certain instances, a per-
son with CAPD might
be asked one question
but answer another.
Such confusion can
make communication,
be it with teachers or
fellow students, very
difficult, and negatively
influence a student's ed-
ucation. That places a
greater responsibility on
the parents and educa-
tors to recognize possi-
ble symptoms of CAPD.
Those symptoms can in-
dude:
* processing thoughts
Sand ideas slowly and
difficulty explaining
them
* confused by figura-
tive language, such as
alp of par- similes and metaphors,
or misunderstanding


puns and jokes because
words are taken too lit-
erally
* misspelling or mis-
pronouncing similar
sounding words, or con-
fusing like-sounding
words, such as
celery/salary, belt/built,
.etc.
* easily and frequently
distracted by back-
ground noises
* difficulty focusing or
remembering presenta-
tions or lectures
It's important for par-
ents, teachers and, per-
haps most importantly,
students to recognize
that people with diag-
nosed learning disabili-
ties often excel in the
classroom with a few
adjustments. For people
with CAPD, parents and
educators are integral in
ensuring they make the
most of their talents and
intellect.
* Show rather than ex-
plain: Because students
with a CAPD can expe-
rience difficulty process-
ing language, it is often
easier for them to grasp
a concept if they see it
unfold rather than have
that concept simply ex-
plained to them.
* Reduce directions:
The longer a spoken di-
rection is, the more like-


Maze Craze

Can you find your way through the maze?


I


*1862: THE SECOND
BATTLE OF BULL RUN
OF THE CIVIL WAR TOOK
PLACE.

S1905: TY COBB MADE
HIS MAJOR LEAGUE DE-
BUT, PLAYING FOR THE
DETROITTIGERS.

* 1967: THURGOOD
MARSHALL BECAME THE
FIRST AFRICAN AMERIC-
AN SUPREME COURT
JUSTICE.


THIS EXTREMELY POPULAR
BOOK SERIES FOLLOWED THE
LIVES OF WIZARDS AT SCHOOL.





F3IlOd AHHVH :Id3MSNV


MATRICULATE


to be enrolled in a
college or university


ENGLISH: Education


SPANISH: Educaci6n


ITALIAN: Formazione


FRENCH: Education


GERMAN: Ausbildung


SGET THE

PICTURE?
L -i J.


Can you guess what
the bigger picture is?


iOJ.LV7n7oV:' :IM NV


STUDENTS WHO RIDE A SCHOOL BUS
TO SCHOOL EACH DAY ARE LESS
LIKELY TO SUFFER AN
INJURY FROM AN
ACCIDENTTHAN
THOSE IN
PRIVATE CARS.


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 9A


THURSDAYAUGUST 272 9


ly a student with CAPD
is to have those direc-
tions drowned out by
background noises.
Keep directions short, or
space them out to lessen
the amount the student
has to process all at
once. In addition, con-
sider rewording direc-
tions that could poten-
tially prove confusing.
* Allow more time for
a response: A student
with CAPD might take
longer to process a ques-
tion and decipher'what
was asked. Allow such
students more time to
give their response.
* Use supplementary
materials: Educators can
use things such as hand-
outs to supplement a
lecture that a student
with CAPD might have
trouble focusing on or
remembering.
* Vary pitch and tone
of voice: Place a greater
emphasis on key words
in an effort to aid a stu-
dent's memory of im-
portant points.
Learning disabilities
are a part of.many stu-
dents' lives. However,
as students across the
nation continue to prove
each day, with proper
support and interven-
tion learning disabilities
can be overcome.


.e


jII/b











PAGE 1O .-. TH MAY FREPES aoLTURDY UUT2,20


Mayo Legals
PUBLIC NOTICE
There will be a meeting of the Lafayette
County Property Appraisal Adjustment
Board on Friday, August 28. 2009 at
11:30 a.m. The meeting will be held in the
Commissioner's Meeting Room on the
second floor of the Lafayette County
Courthouse in Mayo, Florida.
Ricky Lyons
Clerk to tie Board
ALL MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC ARE
WELCOME TO ATTEND. NOTICE IS
FURTHER HEREBY GIVEN. PUR-
SUANT TO FLORIDA STATUTE
286.0105, THAT ANY PERSON OR PER-
SONS DECIDING TO APPEAL ANY
MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS PUB-
LIC HEARING WILL NEED A RECORD
OF-THE HEARING AND MAY NEED TO
ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD
OF THE PROCEEDING IS MJDE
WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TES-
TIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH
THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES RE-
QUESTING REASONABLE ACCOMMO-
DATIONS'TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS
PROCEEDING SHOULD CONTACT'
(386) 294-1600 OR VIA FLORIDA RELAY
SERVICE AT (800) 955-8771.
8/27
IN CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE THIRD JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR LAFAYETTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09-52CA
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
AS TRUSTEE FOR OPTION
ONE MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2005-3 ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-3,
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
MELOIN F. ADAMS AKA
MELVIN ADAMS AKA
MELFIN F. ADAMS, ET AL.
Defendants.
.NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to
the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
August 13, 2009 in the above action, I will
sell to the highest bidder for cash at
Lafayette, Florida, on October 15, 2009,
at 11:00 a.m., at North Door of court-
house (back door) - 120 West Main St.,
Mayo, FL 32066 for the following de-
scribed property;
BEGINNING AT THE SW CORNER OF
THE NW 1/4 OF SECTION 9,TOWNSHIP
6 SOUTH, RANGE 13 EAST AND RUN
EAST 264 YARDS TO A POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH 440
YARDS, THENCE RUN EAST 264
YARDS; THENCE RUN SOUTH 440
YARDS; THENCE RUN WEST 264
YARDS TO HE POINT OF BEGINNING,
BEING IN THE NORTH 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHWEST '1/4 OF SECTION 9,
TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 13
EAST. (PARCEL A) AND; THE WEST
264 FT. OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF
THE SOUTHWEST 1/4, SECTION 9,
TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 13
EAST, (PARCEL "B") SUBJECT TO
EASEMENTS AS SHOWN IN O.R.
BOOK 126, PAGE 3 AND O.R. BOOK
1ZO, PAGE 315. ALL IN LAFAYETTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of the date of the lis
'pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale. The Court, in its dis-
cretion, may enlarge the time of the sale.
Notice of the changed time of sale shall
be published as provided herein.
DATED: August 18, 2009
Ricky Lyons
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Hannah Owens
Deputy Clerk of the Court
Gladstone Law Group, PA.
101 Plaza Real South, Suite 219
Boca Raton, FL 33432
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DIS-
ABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMO-
DATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN
THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTI-
TLEO, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.
PLEASE CONTACT ADA COORDINA-
TOR, MS. BARBARA DAWICKE AT P.O.
BOX 1569, 173 N.E.'HERNANDO ST.,
ROOM 408, LAKE CITY, FL 32056;
TELEPHONE NUMBER 386-758-2163
TWO (2) WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RE-
CEIPT OF THIS NOTICE; IF YOU ARE
HEARING IMPAIRED, CALL THE FLORI-
DA RELAY SERVICES AT 1-800-955-
8771 (TTY); IF YOU ARE VOICE IM-
PAIRED, CALL THE FLORIDA RELAY
SERVICES AT 1-800-955-8770.
8/27 9/3


Lafayette County ARREST LOG


Editor's note: The Mayo
FreP Press prints ithe arrest
record as received fronm thlt'
Sheriffs office. If your name
appears here Land /you are
later found not igilty or
the charges are dropped, we
will be happy to make note
of this in the newspaper
when judicial proof is pre-
sented to us by you or the
authorities.
The following abbrevi-
ations are used below:

ATF-Department of
Alcohol, Tobacco and
Firearms
DOC-Department of
Corrections
DOT-Department of
Transportation,
FDLE-Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforce-
ment
FHP-Florida Highway
Patrol
FWC-Florida Wildlife
Commission


LCSO-Lafayette Coun-
ty Sheriff's Office
OALE-Office of Agri-
cultural Law Enforce-
ment
P&P Probation and
Parole
USMS-US Marshall's
Service
VOP-Violation of Pro-
bation

August 8, 2009
Brandy Lawson
213 Palm Leaf
Lake Wales, Fl
Age - 32
Charge - Vop (Poss Of
Meth / Dwlsr/Poss
Drug Para/Use Of Con-
cealed Weapon
Arresting Officer - C.
Keen

August 10, 2009
Linda Bass
125 SE Maltese Road
Mayo, Fl
Age - 45


,Charge - Insurance
Fraud
Arresting Officer - A.
Ellis / Insurance Investi-
gator Manza

August 11, 2009
Ronald Durrance
312 Wisconsin Avenue
Bonifay, Florida
Age - 32.
Charge - Fta (Trans-
porting Uninspected
Produce)
Arresting Officer - A.
Ellis

August 13, 2009
Michael Hackle
309 NE 259th Street
Cross City, Florida
Age - 27
Charge - Racketering
Violation / 36 Cts Bur-
glary Of Dwelling /.26
Cts Grand Theft III/ 5
Cts Grand Theft III With
Firearm / 3 Cts Of
Grand Theft II / Con-


spiracy To Committ
Arresting Officer
Cranford


SAugust 13, 2009
Cody Pridgeon
P.O. Box 1092
Cross City, Florida
Age- 24
Charge - Racketering
Violation /36 Cts Bur-
glary Of Dwelling / 26
Cts Grand Theft Iii / 5
Cts Grand Theft lii With
Firearm / 3 Cts Of
Grand Theft II / Con-
spiracy To Committ
Arresting Officer - R.
Cranford

August 14, 2009
Kenneth Padgett
Holmes Ci
Age - 32
Charge - Vop (Dwls)
Arresting Officer - R.
Henderson

August 14, 2009


Launa Prine
316 Ne Cr 425
Branford, Fl
Age - 32
Charge Vop (Obtain-
ing Substance By Fraud)
Arresting Officer - A.
Ellis

Brian N. Lamb
Sheriff, Lafayette
County
P.O. Box 227, Mayo,
Florida 32066
Phone: (386) 294-
1222/1301
Fax: (386) 294-1190

Under Florida law, e-
mail addresses are pub-
lic records. If you do
not want your e-mail ad-
dress released in re-
sponse to . a public
records request, do not
send electronic mail to
this entity. Instead,
contact this office by
phone or in writing.


Vanaver Caravan performs dances and


music from around the world


The North Florida
Community College
Artist Series begins its
2009-2010 season with
Vanaver Caravan's
"Earth Beat" - an
evening of traditional -
and original dances from
around the world - on
Saturday, Sept. 12 at 7
p.m. at Van H. Priest
Auditorium (NFCC
campus, Madison, Flori-





h-I


da). This high
performance,
dance, live mi
culture,,is a se
opener that yo
want to miss.
"You'll ha'
The Vanaver C
believe the hig
sional skills th
developed to
the old folk tr
and then to se


)


Above and below: Vanaver Caravan presents
featuring dances from around the world Sept.
(photos by Lois Greenfield)


-spirited they make the audience
full of feel part of the show. In
music and . the end, everyone is on
eason their feet cheering!" said
ou don't Pete Seeger.
The show features the
ve to see rhythms, energy and
Caravan to beauty of Romanian
gh profes- stick dances, the English
ley have "Rapper Sword" dance,
bring out French Canadian and
editions - Cape Breton step danc-
*e how ing, Appalachian Clog-
ging, the South African
Gumboot Dance, the,
Philippine Igorot Sun
Dance, original stick
dances, body percussion,
stomp dances as well as
dances from Bulgaria,
"" India; Brazil and Spain.
"These highly versa-
tile performers all eager-
ly explore every cranny
of their art and create an
evening alight with the
joy of discovery!" said
Doris Hering, Dance
"Earth Beat" Magazine. "A polished
12 at NFCC. and vivacious group of
dancers and musicians


held the audience capti-
vated...ingeniously con-
ceived!" said The Miami
Herald.
The community will
also have the opportuni-
ty to meet some of the
Vanaver Caravan per-
formers during the
NFCC Festival of Arts
being held on Saturday,
Sept. 12 from 10 a.m.-3
p.m. at NFCC. Members
of the group will be
leading the following
workshops and presen-
tations during the festi-
.val: African Drumming,
Swing Dance, Interna-
tional Songs for Children
and World Instrument
Demonstrations. Each
workshop / demonstra-
tion will be offered from
10-10:25 a.m., 10:40-11:06
a.m. and 11:20-11:45 a.m.
The festival is free and
open to the public. The
performance and educa-
tional activities are fund-
ed in part by a grant


from the Southern Arts
Federation in partner-
ship with the National
Endowment for the Arts
and the Florida Depart-
ment of Cultural Affairs.
Tickets for the Sept..
12, "Earth Beat" perfor-
mance are on sale now.
Season passes, which in-
cude all seven perfor-
mances of the 2009-2010
season, are also avail-
able. Call (850) 973-1653,
email ArtistSeries
@nfcc.edu or stop by the
College Advancement
Office at NFCC Monday
through Friday, 8 a.m.-
4:30 p.m. More informa-
tion about the NFCC
Artist Series and the
NFCC Festival of Arts is
available at
www.nfcc.edu

(search: Artist Series) or
visit
http:/ /www.nfcc.edu/ c
ommunity-
programs/ artist-series-.


Government officials Directory


Keep up with what goes on in
*our government and voice
your opinion!:

Allen Boyd, Congressman
Washington office:
202-225-5235
Tallahassee office:
f


p


850-561-3979
www.house.gov/boyd

Bill Nelson, Senator
Washington office;
202-224-5274
Tallahassee office:
850-942-8415


www.nelson.senate.gov

Mel Martinez, Senator
Washington office:
202-224-3041
-Orlando office:
407-254-2573
www.martinez.senate.gov


0


*


JOE P. BURNS
FUNERAL SERVICES and CREAMTORY

SAdvanced Funeral Planning
Locally owned &
operated since 1953 e
440 S.W. Monroe Ave., Mayo, FL 32066
Mayo Chapel Perry Chapel
386-294-2658 850-584-4149
499136-F


Byrd's Power Equipment

SSales & Service
All Makes & Models

HUSQVARNA.

Open Saturday 7 a.m. - 12 Noon

11860 E. U.S. 27, Branford, FL 32008
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-5 p.m. (386) 935-1544
Saturday 7 a.m. - Noon '499122F


& Excavating


For more

information about

advertising here call

Nancy at

386-362-1734

ext. 103


Daniels Funeral Homes

& Crematory, Inc.


' ~


Branford 935-1124
Live Oak 362-4333
James (Jim) B. Daniels, 1ll, L..D.
Keith Daniels, L.F.D.
J.B. Daniels, Jr.
(Local) Family Owned & Operated
499127.C


WOLFE PLUMBING, INC
Da * DnRAamn*lu * Flrain Cloanino


* Front End Loader Linerock KCpI iRCwlllliUUIi II. L 1
* CAT Back Hoe Top oil. New Construcdon
* Gradall Clearing 7 Days * 24 Hours
* Earthmoving Site Prep * 386-935-0616
* Pond Digging Fill Dirt s* n. ,c firwIcrcrU w
keinnv Hart Ji. Owner 386-294-2621 Serving All North Central Forida ,.,1:


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009


PAGE 10A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


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THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL - PAGE 11A


THURSDAY AUGUST 27 2 9


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PAGE 12A - THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


Irv

















.O Learn how to dial 9-1-1.

0 Know how to give directions to your home, in case of an emergency.

0 Never talk to strangers or accept rides or gifts from strangers.

0 Don't answer the door when your parents aren't home, and never let anyone
into your home without asking for permission from your parents.

0 Don't tell anyone over the phone that your parents aren't home.
Say they're busy and they can't come to the phone.

0 Keep doors and windows locked when you're at home.

0 Check in with your parents or a neighbor when you come home from school.

SMayo Barber Old 7/orida Coffee louse B&B Auto &
h"Specializing in Cuban Press Sandwich" Truck Spec
o p Hours: 8 a.m .m. Mon. -Fi. on
Downtown Mayo. For complete care care
Hours: Tues.-Fri. 9-6; Sat. 8:30-1 386-294-3906 920 Main St. Ma
Across from Mayo Fitness (formerly Badcock) , Breakfast L Lunch Main .* ayo
122 SW Monroe St. Mayo, FL 32066 specialty Coffee A 386-294-2761
386-294 1955 Brose n our antique Owned and operated by Samnu Buchanan
0 >386-294--~a1955,,, -, S& jewlery store MVR-MV51173
Mayo Drummond Complete LP GasService
Mayo DrummondJ J G SEI
Thriftway Bank P.O.'Box 308
YOUr HometoWlR Super market FDi 130 NE Clyde Ave. * Mayo Mayo, Florida 32066
Main Street, Mayo, FL 386-294-2000 Phone JOHN C. HEWETT,
Store Hours: Mon.-Sat. 7 a.m. - 7 p.m. ,o www.drummondbank.com 386-294-1801 Owner
8:30 am-6:00 pm
Byrd's Power SAF A '-
"* u m " U OF BRANFORD Sunday-Closed
Now accepting Blue Cross Blue Shield Health Options
Equipment Fromn your Everything For Your Home Recover)'
elected officials at the From Prescriptions to Medical Supplies
.** \'ll, if "1T" t\ ,4n v m / �


116U 8 ( U~LUS , 36 3515 Ij Lafayette County Courthouse & the 101 O.. US Highway 27
Branford iu"l84 " I54 Lafayette County Sheriffs Office Cherry Lumbert Branford, Florida 32008
Pharmacist (386) 935-6905,


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009









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An eco-friendly weedkiller, such as the Telescoping Multi-Weeder from Fiskars (inset), can easily and effectively eliminate unsightly weeds, but do so in a V~ay that doesn't harm the
environment.


n the last few decades, landscaping
evolved from a quiet, relaxing task into
one where an arsenal of heavy equipment
and potent chemicals keeps lawns and,
shrubs neat and tidy.
Chemical, mechanical and gas-powered tools
certainly can be effective around the yard and gar-
den. But in addition to being poor friends to the
environment, many of these items are dangerous
to users.
According to recent Consumer Product Safety
Commission statistics, accidents with lawn and
garden tools cause over 400,000 trips per year to
the emergency room. Lawn mowers (both the rid-
ing and walking kind), chain saws and weed-.
eaters cause the most injuries, indicate the num-
bers. Pesticides and chemical weed prevention ap-
plications may produce effects that are more sub-
tle, but no less dangerous to homeowners. When
these products are factored into the mix they tend
to make gardening a dangerous hobby.
Many homeowners are getting back to their gar-
dening and landscaping roots by gravitating to-
ward tools that are safer for people and pets ...
and the environment. It's common to see compost
piles in yards for feeding plants and rainwater'
collection systems to put rainwater to good use ir-
rigating plants.
Additionally, manual, hand-powered tools can
be some of the more effective items to use, and
new innovations in design and materials utilized
to craft these tools make them even more efficient
and comfortable for avid landscapers. Consider
these options and advice from garden-tool leader
Fiskars.
Old Way: Chemical weedkillers applied to


cracks and other hard-to-reach areas to eradicate
weeds.
Green Way:Wouldn't it be nice to have a goat or
another grazing animal to keep errant weeds and
grasses in check? That would certainly be good
for the environment, put poor for neighbor rela-
tions in suburbia. Easier than pulling out weeds
by hand is using a Telescoping Multi-Weeder.
This versatile tool weeds, edges and scrapes. It's
effective at removing weeds in hard-to-reach
places, cleaning walkways and driveways, and
edging. For tough weeds, Fiskar's Weeder grasps
upstart plants and plucks them neatly from the
soil -- roots and all -- with a simple "step down,
pull back" movement.
Old Way: Over-treating soil with chemical fer-
tilizers to ensure that plants receive the right
amount of nutrients and water for proper
growth and healthy roots.
Green Way:Loosened, aerated soil is a
boon to most plants. Earthworms are na-
ture's soil aeration team, but it would
take a large colony of worms to main-
tain your entire landscape. Use a
Coring Aerator to loosen com-
pacted soil and ensure air, nu-
trients and water move effec-
tively throughout. The result
will be more vivacious
plants and lawns.
Old Way:Wheeling out
the gas-powered goliath to
mow the lawn and then spend-
ing an hour or more going over
each and every blade tends to be the
norm. And let's not forget those weekend warriors


who must fire-up a riding mower despite having
less than an acre of property to tend.
Green Way:A manual push-
reel mower is very effective at
keeping lawns neat and
trimmed without the need for -
gas, smoke and noise. Today's
models are very easy to push,
so don't let the idea of a back-
breaking task steer you fr9m jn-
'vestigatihig this tried aarid tuie.-- a
and green -- method of mowing
Plus, you get some beneficial exercise
'in the process.
Old Way: Risking life and limb.with
weed-eaters and powered edgers, and po-
tentially knocking an unsuspecting neigh-'
bor unconscious with a flying projectile.
Green Way: Powered edgers and string
trimmers can make fast work of cleaning up
areas where the mower just can't reach..But
who hasn't had some dangerous encounter with
one of these gadgets? They throw rocks, in-
evitably decapitate plants (and possibly hidden
wildlife), and spew enough smoke and noise to
wonder what's the point. A manual edger can do
just as good a job at tidying up the perimeter of
your property, walkways and garden beds with-
out the downside of those noisy contraptions.
Gardening doesn't have to be loud, com-
plicated and peppered with bodily haz-
ards. It can be enjoyable and safe for the
environment if you choose the right
Gardening tools. For more informa-
tion on gardening green, visit
www.fiskars.com.


Lights out! Green tips for comfort ir


Is your home set up to handle an emergency?
Whether a natural disaster like a hurricane or ice
storm, or a man-made one like a rolling black out,
steps can be taken to keep your family reasonably
comfortable during an extended power outage. Here
are some green tips to ensure that your family can
stay warm, cook food, communicate, and keep clean
until the lights come on.
Perishable Foods
Perishable food can be stored temporarily in cool-
ers until used -- the quicker the better.
Heat and Light
Homes that are equipped with wood stoves have
heat for comfort and cooking, while candles,
lanterns, and flashlights can provide light. Your
emergency preparedness kit should include plenty
of batteries, matches, a manual can opener, bottled
drinks, andpackaged foods that can be cooked on an
outdoor grill or not cooked at all.
Communication
If your cell phone doesn't work well at home, keep
a standard -- non-cordless -- phone that will work
without electricity, as your landline can stay in ser-
vice without electricity.
Essential Water
One of the most important requirements for com-
fort in a home is a ready supply of water to cook,
drink, clean and maintain sanitary conditions. Keep-
ing a supply of bottled water or filling a bathtub
with water can work for a short time, but these sup-
plies can be expensive and depleted quickly with a
busy family. Many homes have a private well to
supply water to their homes, powered by a sub-
mersible electric water pump. But when the power is


out, the water has. no way to reach the surface or
your house.
Hand Pumps Are a Green Solution
If you have a private well, consider investing in a
modem hand pump to keep your water at hand and
accessible at any time. Houlton, Maine-based Bison
Pumps manufacture an environmentally friendly
solution to bringing water to the home.'One unique
feature that makes Bison Pumps great in an emer-
gency is the spout designed with threads to accept a
standard garden hose. When the power fails, just at-
tach a garden ho$e between the Bison Pump and
your outdoor faucet, and you can pump water back
into your domestic system to flush toilets and ruri
tap water.
The stainless steel Bison Pump delivers up to 4.5




Staying . .
comfortable and -
safe during an
extended power
outage takes some . p,... ,.
safety precautions
on the part of a
homeowner. One
thing to consider -
is the installation .
of a modern hand ". ". -.
pump for families .
relying on well "
water. .."


i an emergency

gallons per minute, depending on the cylinder size.
The pump is easy to install in just a few hours with
.a helper using the complete and concise installation
manual, or it can be installed by your plumber.
Protection from Floodwaters
If your emergency involves flooding, your Bison
Pump can also protect your well from contamina-
tion when submerged. Most wells are covered with
a simple three-bolt cap, which can allow contami-
nants to seep into your well. Bison's wellhead seal
truly protects your well from surface contamination,
with a tight fitting gasket and stainless steel bolts.
And because it's built in Maine to last, once it's in-
stalled it is virtually maintenance free. For more in-
formation, visit their Web site,
www.bisonpumps.com or call 800-339-2601.


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THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 13A


I MUMOUAT, MUUUO I I , �VVZ



Out with the old, in with the new

Toss gas-guzzling tools aside and garden green


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O. A. Winburn

If you went a few
blocks further south on
the Old Salt Road, be-
yond Dr. Green's office
you would find the
L.O.P. & G. depot where
Mr. L. B. Dees, the depot
agent was busy at his
chores of handling the
freight or sending and re-
ceiving messages over
the telegraph line. Again,
as with Mr. Williams, I
expect Mr. Dees rejoiced
when one day I failed to
show up at his elbow
with those incessant
questions. Across the
track was Mr. Elliot's
store and there was no
other business out that
way.
Mr. Elliot had some
candy there that he sold
by the scoop. A penny
scoop was a pretty good
mouthful and that's
about what I usually
bought. If you had a
nickel you could buy a
cinnamon bun that was
more than you could eat
at one time.
There was a filling sta-
tion on the comer of the
Land's property that had
been closed before my
time. That building was
used as a day care facility
during the Roosevelt ad-
ministration for the ladies
S employed at the sewing
center located in a tin
building on the corer
across the 'street on the
Chandler Land property
as well as others who
could muster up the 25
cents and bring a mat for
their child to take a nap
on.
Mr. Elliot was a wid-
ower by the time I came
along and he owned a
city block there and, he
lived in a stately home
facing the "salt road" with
his daughter and son-in-
law, Alton Hughes and
their two daughters,
Frankie Jean and Loraine.
I saw Loraine only once
after she married and
moved away from Mayo.
That was in 1958 when
she came for a visit.
Frankie Jean married
O'Neal Johnson over in
Suwannee County and I
believe that she still re-
sides there, but that
O'Neal, a mighty fine
man in my opinion, has
passed away a few years
ago. Like most other folks
that had been around in
the era immediately pre-


ceding that time, Mr..El-
liot had a barn, stable and
room for his horse and
buggy on the back comer
of that lot next to the rail-
road track. I may have
mentioned that my
granddaddy who lived
across the vacant lot from
the Elliqt place kept his
buggy stored in a barn
there next to his home
even. though he had not
used it in many years and
that Babe Green had
bought it and let it go to
ruin. Fifteen dollars was-
n't much to lose but that's
all it cost him as my
granddaddy wasn't one
to try to "gouge" folks.
Alton Hughes, Mr. El-
liot's son-in-law, was a
jack of all trades sort of
person and was kept
busy around town doing
such things as building
sidewalks, steps and
house repairs and.so on. I
made a few nickels mix-
ing mortar for him on
some of those jobs. He
didn't cooperate much
with answering my ques-
tions so it was pretty qui-
et around those jobs. He
did have a bit of humor
about him though and
once told me of his trek
from Alabama where he
was raised. They loaded
up everything they
owned on a mule drawn
wagon and headed for
Florida. The only mishap
on that journey happened
when the fence post holes
he had loaded on the
wagon rolled off and
broke into small pieces,
no longer usable.
Back on Main street, US
27, the rest of that block
fronting on the south side
of main street going west
was occupied by Blacks-
Shear's Barbershop, Parker
Chevrolet, the Suwannee
Store and lastly, another
restaurant, operated by
Mrs. Land. The barber-
shop building had previ-
ously been occupied for a
short while by a Mr. June
who ran what was
known as a "Dime Store."
That sobriquet originated
from the earlier designa-
tion of "Five and Ten
Cent Stores" which were
quite popular and seen in
every business communi-
ty.
There were several gas,
or filling stations around
at that time. A joke some-
times heard was that
there were so few auto-
mobiles that there was a
station for each auto
owner. On the next block
was a neW Sinclair station
operated by "Little Sam,"
S. J. Buchanan. It was the
only business on that
block at that time. Later
D. Pridgeon built a drive
in restaurant next to the


station and a Gulf Oil Sta-
tion was built on the rest
of that block.
Mr. Robinson's fish
market and Alburtus
Morgan's Waco Pep and
the Cities Service station
in that order were on the
next block. Mr. Morgan
may have passed away
about the time of WWII
and Mr. Weaver who had
served as postmaster in
the absence of J.O. Parker
while the latter served in
the military for the dura-
tion of the war, operated
that station for a while.
The Cities Service Station
upon my first recollection
had been operated by Mr.
Lamb. Mr. Lamb had pre-
viously operated his shoe
shop from his residence
across the street from Dr.
Green's office but had
sold that business to Otis
McCullers who ran it for
a- while in the building
previously occupied by
Mrs. Radford's restau-
rant.
At the Cities Service


Station Mr. Lamb also
served as ticket agent for
the Florida Motor Lines
and later, Greyhound.
Somewhere along there
Mr. Claude Shiver oper-
ated a business there and
as an aficionado of differ-
ent modes of transporta-
tion owned the only
.Austin automobile I have
ever seen. It was not
much larger that a toy but
there was room for two
and he drove it around
on occasion. He also had
what I suspect was an an-
tique motorcycle that he
would sometimes ride.
Mechanics were his pas-
sion and being an expert
in that field he used his
expertise to maintain his
vehicles in good order.
There was a large, two
story home on the west
corer of that block, fac-
ing the highway that was
owned by a Mr.
Chauncey. Mr. Chauncey
and a brother had report-
edly been involved in an
unhappy incident that


was reported to have
caused the failure of the
little bank in Mayo. Ap-
parently, according to.lo-
cal accounts, two broth-
ers who were dealers in
livestock had borrowed
much of the capital at the
bank and later defaulted
when the neither the cat-
tle nor money could be
located. Bank auditors
declared it in default and
appointed Mr. Gornto, a
local attorney as trustee.
It was not until many
years later, that another
bank was established in
Mayo, chartered in 1945
as Lafayette County State
Bank..
A son, Bill Chauncey
lived there with his wife
and son for a while but
eventually moved to
Shamrock and sold tlat
place. At one time, Bill's
sister, Linnie and her hus-
band Claude Ainge had
also lived there. Claude,
one time garage owner
had served one term in
the House of Representa-


tives. Lennie taught
school, seventh grade I
believe, in that little
wooden building that sat
a ways back between the
high school building and
the elementary school
building. Incidentally,
that building is where the
first effort to organize a
band in the school had it's
short lived beginning,
meeting on Saturday
mornings. The Ainges
later moved to Cross City
where Lennie continued
in her chosen profession
of teaching school. Bill
Chauncey and his family
also moved and I believe
they operated the "Put-
nam Lodge" there in
Shamrock for a good
while. Ihad the good for-
tune while doing some
research to stumble
across a publication au-
thored by Mrs. Ainge
with reference to infor-
mation of historical value
pertaining to Dixie Coun-
ty.
To be continued........


Suwannee River Area Health Education Center

Nicotine Reoh iamm1mit ,t


TO Pto gite r call:
S Shary Humphey'386-88-4289 '

Alicia Worley 386-294-1321 Ext 229

or Toll Free: 866-341-2730


SQuitline
lQu ~tlinel


REAt


DO YOU SMOKET


DO YOU DIPT


DO YOU SPIT?


00 maWr To, 4weM�


-Free Group Sessions-

Thursdays 5:30 - 7:30 pm

Sept. 17th thru October 22nd

Lafayette County Library

Corner of SR 51 and Crawford St.

Mayo,

wwmsrahec.org/qsn.php8'



, |Dirtons in Community Heal~ F
544687-F


--


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 15A


UGUST 27 2009


I









PAGE 16A - THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009


In the past two years, the newspaper business has faced unprecedented challenges, but make no mistake:
newspaper media - print and digital - remains strong and will emerge from the current environment an even stronger multi-platform force.


104Million
Number of adults who read a print
newspaper every day, more than
115 million on Sunday. That's more
than the Super Bowl (94 million),
American Idol (23 million) or the
average late local news (65 million.)


61%
18-24 year olds
and 25-34 year
olds who read
a newspaper'
in an average
week. 65%. of
everyone in those
age groups read
a newspaper
or visited a
newspaper
website
that week.


40%
Households with
unique visitors
to newspaper
vebsites in an
average month.


56%
According
to Google,
percentage of
consumers that
have researched
or purchased
products
they saw in a
newspaper.


52%
Percentage of
people who are
more likely to buy
a product if it is
seen in the paper.


TONS
Number of
creative options
for advertisers
choosing to utilize
the newspaper.
From belly bands,
polybags, post-it
notes, scented
ads, taste-it ads,
glow-in-the-dark
Sand temporary
tattoos, as
well as event
and database
marketing,
behavioral
targeting,
e-mail blasts,
e-newsletters
and more.


MOST
Newspapers make a'
larger investment in
journalism than an
other medium.
Most.of the
information you
already read from
"aggregators"
and other media
originated with
newspapers.
No amount of
effort from local
bloggers, non-profit
news entities or
TV news sources
could match the
depth and breadth
of newspaper-
produced content.


This is not a portrait of a dying industry. It's illustrative of transformation. Newspapers are reinventing themselves to focus on serving distinct audiences
with a variety of products, and delivering those audiences effectively to advertisers across media channels.

For more on the power of newspaper media, visit newspapermedia.com.


CONCEPT AND DESIGN BY ALLIED ADVERTISING PUBLICITY PROMOTIONS ALLIED-CREATIVE.COM
Sources: Scarborough Research, Google, Nielsen Online


Newspaper Associatlon of America
4401 Wilson Blvd., Suite 900, Arlington, VA 22203 571.366.1000
newspapermedla.com


546340-F


$ (


THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 2009


PAGE 16A ~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL













'eIe umanwne Bmonrrat


*l.uft qd 4I~F


Deadlines for
Line Ads
Publication Deadline
Wednesday......Fri. @ 10 a.m.
Friday...............Wed. @ 10 a.m.


HOURS: MONDAY - FRIDAY 8 A.M. - 5 P.M.
Contact Us!

Online... Email... Fax... Phone...
When you place your Classified Ad it automatically classads@gaflnews.com (386) 364-5578 (386) 362-1734
appears on our website, www.nflaonline.com. Your ad is 1-800-525-4182
live on the internet 24 hours a day (free ad excluded). Dont foret your name, address & hone number we can reach Call us MondayFriday 8 am.-5 p.m.
live on the internet 24 hours a day (free ad excluded). Don't forget your name, address & phone number we can reach you.


BEST OF THE BEST REAL ESTATE COMPANY 2008
-386-755-6600
Toll Free 1-877-755-6600
540 W. Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida 32055
email:
hallmark0l @comcast.net
S wwv h lrnarKlaecily corn
S RHONDA * eekor,
s-j to hr .�e,
FEATURED PROPERTY:
CLEAN, CLEAN, CLEAN. Owners
ha e rrce,'tlh addedd new skirting,
blhnm , dihwaheor, lighting, carpet,
S Hunler ciilng fans, metal roof, and
nt ,, /c More ,n ready, you will be
. .pr.ud to, ,n this Doublewide that
flerure, covered carport, concrete-
drik.%.ar,nd beautiful landscaping.
MLS 71745 Only $92,000. Call
Snaron Selder 30b-365-1203
MORE GREAT BUYS!


RIVERFRONT Unique home with covered
decking joining 2 separate dwellings. Access by
elevator. Floating dock, many out buildings,
gorgeous river views. Janet Creel 386-719-0382
OFFICE OR HOME Want a great new
business location? Centrally located home or
office near bank and shopping for residential or
office. Would be suitable for service business as
barber/beauty salon, accounting, tanning etc.
Only $74,000 Call Vic Lantroop 386-623-6401
1/2 ACRE sold "as is". Well and septic, plus an
older mobile home. Value priced $32,000. Call
Sharon Selder 386-365-1203


10 ACRES with great barn for your horses or
cows - 40 X 60 with stalls inside and out. 3/2
Doublewide with addition plus a 4 car
carport. Call Paula Lawrence. 386-623-1973
COMMERCIAL LOT Corner Branford
Highway and Real Rd. 1.03 Acres, prime
location! Zoned Commercial Intensive. Call
Myrtle Wall, 386-752-2655
AIRPARK LOT Right on the paved
runway! Pilot or not, you'll enjoy this close
location to town and amenities. Bring your
building plans! .688 acres for$65,900 Call
Payla Lawrence 386-623-1973 500887-F


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You can Reach
Over 4 Million


for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Nancy at

386-362-1734
4996S1-F


Help Wanted
BOOKKEEPER/SECRETARY
Computer skills required. Apply
in person at BRC Performance
615 Industrial Avenue Live Oak,
Fl or fax to 386-362-7960
INSIDE SALES /
SERVICING AGENT
Seeking energetic, friendly
individual for fast-paced
working environment. Position
is Inside Sales/ Servicing
Agent for Health and Life
Agency. Current License and
Experience preferred. Please
fax resume to Parks Johnson
Agency at 386-362-7594.
SKIDDER OPERATOR
Experienced. Good pay & good
benefits. apply in person at
25755 Northwest 130th Ave.
High Springs. 386-454-1511







a U

A 0 ki


Diars Inspection

Services
For All Your Home
Inspection Needs!
386-364-4434 or
386-590-6534
Please visit our website: M
www.suwanneevalleyinspections.como


.. 127 Howard Street E., Live Oak, FL


FirstDay.
LPN NEEDED
, Looking for a change from
hospital hours and shifts?
Tired of working in an
office/nursing home? Our
growing outpatient dialysis
clinic needs youl No
Experience Necessary. We will
train F/T with excellent
benefits and great hours. No
Sunday!
Apply In person:
FMC Live Oak
10543 Suwannee Plaze Blvd,
Live Oak Fl 32060 (Beside
Subway at Walmart Plaza)
386-364-6604 EOE

Job List
DRIVERS - Miles & Freight;
Positions available ASAPI CDL-
A with tanker required. Top, pay,
premium benefits and Much
More! Call or visit us online,
877-484-3042
www.oakleytransport.com
HEAT & AIR. TECHS have
Recession Poof Careersl 3WK
Training Accreditation.
EPA/OSHA Certified. Local Job
Placement Assistance. Financing
Available. May Qualify For
GINA Benefits. 1-877-994-9904


JobsWanted
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR
SOMEONE to take care of an
elderly person for you, in your
home? REF IF NEEDED. Call
after 6:00 pm 386-364-7779
.DO YOU NEED YOUR HOME
CLEANED or Pressure Washed,
or your yard cleaned up? .Done
at a very reasonable rate. Call
Christine or Gary 386-792-1655
EXPERIENCED CARE GIVER
W/Refers., Looking for elderly, or
disabled person to take care of.
I'll take you to the Dr, help with
your mpds, or just
companionship. 386-638-1603 or
386-984-0123
NEED YOUR HOME OR
OFFICE Cleaned or Carpets
Shampooed Professionally
without the Professional Price?
Selena 386-855-6042 386-362-
5254
RESPITE CARE FOR YOUR
LOVED ONE. Bathing, Dressing,
Light Housekeeping, Meals, Drs
Appt & Companionship.
References 386-466-5514
SURVEY PARTY CHIEF:
Instrument Man 20 yrs exp.
Land/Construction. Clean Driving
Record, Willing to learn any field
for work.
386-364-7702 or 386-208-8750
Lost & Found
$$REWARD$$
LOST BLACK & WHITE D.O.G.
FAMILY MISSES HIM
TERRIBLY
PLEASE CALL 352-538-7747


Hunting Lease Available Web site to help
458 ac., Suwannee Co.
near McAlpin - $2000/yr improve physical
plus liability insurance, fitness in kids
Call 850-997-6254 for more
information. 54.-F- Page 10


-FOR RENT-


,. . .

GREAT RATES FOR RENTALS - SINGLE AND
DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOMES - STARTING
AT $375 PER MONTH. WATER, SEWER,
AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS.
586-30-2567 ,





529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389,
Evening 362-2990


www.poolerealty.com


(1) Hamilton Co: 4 acres on CR
143 with well, septic & service pole,
10x12 storage, nice grass & trees.
Reduced to $40,000.
(2) Off CR 49 10 acres in grass
with scattered. trees, surveyed into
two 5 acre tracts, 3 sides fenced.
Priced to sell at $4,900 per acre.
(3) Near City 133rd Road: 3BR/2-
1/2BA CH/AC brick home with
approx. 3,200 sq. ft. under roof,
fireplace, kitchen furnished, shop,
storage one acre homesite with
large trees. Priced to sell @
$207,500.
(4) Off CR136: 5 acre partially
wooded some grass. Will work for
land home package. Reduced to
$39,900.
(5) Off CR 132: 9+ acres on 103rd
Rd. partially wooded, old homesite,
well, septic, etc. $49,900.
(6) Off CR 349: 10 acre wooded
tract with a two bedroom CH/AC
log home in excellent condition
count. approx. 1200 sq. ft. under
roof, 30'x40' pole barn. Reduced to
$175,000.
(7) 410 Dexter: Corner lot with
CH/AC brick home with 2050 +-
sq. ft. under roof, large inground
pool, kitchen furnished. Good buy
@ $149,500,
(8) Branford area: 15 acres in good
cropland, with county roads and
fence on three sides. Excellent
location near US 27 & US 129.
Bring all offers.
(9) Suwannee River: 2.34 acres
with 150 ft on the river below
Branford. Well, septic, service pole,
camper canopy, storage bldg. etc.
Priced to sell @ $79,900.
(10) Off CR 132: 1.47 ac. with a 3/2
CH/AC 2008 DWMH with
fireplace, kitchen furnished,
20'x20' shop, fenced. REDUCED
TO $65,000
(11) Industrial Park: 1.13 acre
corner tract good exposure.
Reduced to $34,500.
(12) 40 acres with 835 ft. on paved
road in 13 year old planted pines.
Priced to sell at Reduced to
$189,600.
(13) Near City: 2 ac. with 3/2 home
cont. approx. 1280 sq. ft. under
roof, kitchen furnished, carport.
$83,250.
(14) Luraville Area: Fly-in
Community 15 acre wooded large
I _________________________________


trees, good county road. Priced to
sell reduced to $74,900.
(15) Suwannee River: Two acres
wooded river lot off CR 349 near
Royal Springs and Boat Ramp. 100
sq. ft. on the water. (Buildable)
good buy @ $55,000.
(16) Off Mitchell Rd.: 20 acres
wooded with survey on 199th Rd.
$89,900.
(17) Off CR 136 East: 40 acre tract
partially wooded, some grass small
pond, fenced. Good area.
REDUCED TO $149,000.
(18) Hamilton Co.: 10 acres on
CR751 and the river approx. 1300
ft. on the water and approx. 1300
ft. on paved road. Priced to sell at
$85,000.
(19) Madison Co.: 40 acres in 16
year old slash planted pines off CR
255 good elevation. Good buy at
$175,000.
(20) Helvenston St.: 4 lots with a
4/3 CH/AC 1-1/2 story brick/frame
home cont. approx 3,200 sq. ft.
under roof. Kitchen furnished,
fireplace, corner lots, plus 1
bedroom, guest house cont approx.
550 sq. ft. Priced to sell @
$170,000.
(21) Suwannee River home: nice
two bedroom two story CH&AC
home South of Branford, kitchen
furnished, beautiful view of river
from rear, screen porch. Good area.
REDUCED TO $179,900.
(22) Farms of 10 Mill Hollow: 4
acres in grass/cropland with
scattered trees. $32,500.
(24) Near City: Off US 90 East 5
acres wooded near golf course.
Good buy @ $44,900.
(25) Suwannee River: Nice river lot
with a one bedroom cabin needs
some work, well, septic, etc. 82 ft on
the Water. Good location with
survey. $75,000.
(26) 208 Houston: 3/5 BR, 1-1/2 BA
frame home cont. approx. 2,000 sq.
ft. under roof. Zoned R/D, has
potential. Priced to sell @ $59,500.
(27) 16th St.: 3 ac. with a 3BR/2BA
CH&AC brick home with fireplace,
cont. approx. 2,780 sq. ft. under
roof. Kitchen furnished, survey.
Good Buy @ $172,500.
(28) Keaton Beach: Canal lot near
public boat ramp, sewer & water.
Good buy @ $125,000. 53541-F


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Special Notices















Business, h


ALL CASHVENDINGII DoYou
Earn $800 in a mDay? 25 Local
Machines and Candy All For
$9,995. Call 1-888-753-3430
AIN#BO2000 03 Call Us: We
Will Not Be Undersold!
Child Care
CHILDCARE AVAILABLE
Want to keep your little ones in
my home. 6 weeks to 4yrs old.
Email onlyddg@yahoo.com
Call 386-776-2182
Computer
DONNA'S COMPUTER
SERVICE We Will Find A
Solution! Please contact Donna
386-559-7311 for more
information
Vocational
Want to be a CNA?
Don't want to wait?
Express Training
Is now offering our quality
Exam Prep Classes in Lake
City. Class sizes limited.
Next class 03/16/2009.
Call 386-755-4401
expresstraining
services.com


ADULT HIGH SCHOOL
DIPLOMA at home Fast!
Nationally accredited $399. Easy
payment plan. Free brochure.
800-470-4723
www.diplomaathome.com
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Accounting, *Criminal Justice.
Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call 800-443-
5186 www.CenturaOnline.com
AVIATION MAINTENANCE /
AVIONICSGraduate in 14
Months. FAA Approved;
financial aid if qualified. Job
placement assistance. Call
National Aviation Academy
Today 1-800-659-2080 or
NAA.edu
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMAT Fast
Affordable & Accredited Free
Brochure. Call Nowl 1-800-532-
6546 ext. 16
www.continentalacademy.com
LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072.
M-F from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Building Materials
LUMBER LIQUIDATORS
Hardwood Flooring, from $
.99/Sq.Ft. Exotics, Oak,
Bamboo, Prefinished &
Unfinished. Bellawood w/50
year prefinish, plus A Lot Morel
We Deliver Anywhere, 5 Florida
Locations, 1-800-FLOORING (1-
800-356-6746)
METAL ROOFING TAX'
CREDIT! 40 yr Warranty.
Direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock Quick
turnaround. Delivery available.
Gulf Coast Supply &
Manufacturing, 1-888-393-0335
www.gulfcoastsupply.com


SWIM SPA-FACTORY
CLEARANCE Four Fantastic
models to choose from,
wholesale pricing! Warranty,
financing. HOTTUBS @ 50%
Discounts, Can deliver. Call 1-
800-304-9943
MOBILE HOME ROOF
EXPERTS 100% Financing,
Free Estimates We Finance
Almost Everyone Reroof,
Repairs, 30yrs Experience
Home Improvement Services
Toll-FREE 1-877-845-6660 State
Certified (Lic.#CCC058227)
ROOF REPAIRS CALL 24/7
Flat Roof & Mobile Home
Specialist. Free Certified
Inspections. Lic/Ins
CCC1327406. All Florida
Weatherproofing & Construction
1-877-572-1019
ROOFING EXPERTS 100%
Financing, Free Estimates We
Finance Almost Everyone
Reroof, Repairs, Shingle, Tile,
Flat, Mobile Homes Home
improvement Services 1-877-
845-6660, 727-530-0412 State
Certified (Lic.#CCC058227)

Electronics
FREE GPSI FREE PRINTER
FREE MP31 With Purchase of
New computer. Payments
Starting at Only $29.99/week.
No Credit Checkl Call GCF
Today. 1-877-212-9978
NEW ADT CUSTOMERS - Free
Home Security System! ADT
24/7 Monitoring starting at just
$35.99/mo. $99 Install Fee.
Call Nowl 866-265-4139 ADT
Auth Co
NEW COMPUTER - Bad Credit?
No Credit? No ProblemI
Guaranteed approval. No credit
check. Name brands. Checking
account required. 1-800-376-
0431. www.BlueHippo.com
Free bonus with paid purchase.


Furniture
QUEEN SIZE SOFA BED:
Beautiful Material, Perfect
Condition.JVlust sell $99.00 386-
364-1247
Miscellaneous
DIRECT FREE 5 Months
Includes All 265+ Digital
Channels + Movies with NFL
Sunday Ticket! Ask How Todayl
Free DVR/HD Receiverl
Packages from $29.99
DirectStarTV 1-800-973-0161
DIRECTV Satellite Television,
Free Equipment, Free 4 Room
Installation, Free HD or DVR
Receiver Upgrade. Packages
from $29.99/mo. Call DIRECT
Sat TV for Details 1-888-420-
9482
DISH NETWORK'S BEST
OFFER EVER! Free HD/DVR
$9.99/mo For Over 100 All-digital
Channels. Call Now And
Receive $600 Signup Bonusl * 1-
866-573-3640
FREE : DIRECT 5 Months
Includes All 265+ Digital
Channels + Movies with NFL
Sunday Ticket! Ask How Today!
Free DVR/HD Receiver!
Packages from $29.99
DirectStarTV 1-800-216-7149
Wanted to Buy
CASH FOR YOUR COINS!
Private collector seeking US'
coins and currency. Older
varieties, copper, silver, nickel
and. gold. I pay more than
dealers or pawn.
Call 352-949-1450
Garage/Yard Sales
YARD SALE MON-SAT 8/24-
8/29 9-3. 11595 74th Trace, Live
Oak. Infant to Adult Clothes,
Toys-More. Moved, Need Room.


FALL
COMMUNITY
YARD SALE

Saturday, Oct. 10th
7 am -1 pm

Lowndes Co.
Civic Center
(Fairgrounds, Hwy. 84.E.)
Clean out your closets!
Empty your cabinets
Reclaim your garage
Join us for a great day
of yard sale funl
VENDOR SPACES
AVAILABLE!
Inside spaces - $35 ea.
Outside spaces - $25 ea.
Spaces are limited,
so act quickly!
Call the
Classified Marketplace
229-244-1880
229-244-3400
1-800-600-4838
'or come by
THE
S TALDOSTA
A/DAILY
TIMES

201 N.Troup St.
Valdosta, GA

Boats/Supplies
BOATS; 1000's of boats for sale
www.floridamariner.com
reaching 6 million homes weekly
throughout Florida. 800-388-
9307, tide charts, broker profiles,
fishing captains, dockside dining
and more.
Campers/Motor Homes
AIR LIGHT 2005 SLIDE-IN
POP-UP CAMPER. For small
pick-up. Air, Stove, 3-Way Refig,
Sleeps 4.
386-294-2384 or 386-688-3656
Guns/Ammunition
FOR SALE Russian 223 AK
type New in Box w/extra clips
$495,, Ithica, Feather Weight ,12
ga pump $375. Winchester 30/30
Like New $395.' Thompon
Center Hawkins never fired
$295. Will trade 386-294-3187.
Apartments for Rent
APARTMENTS FOR RENT IN
LIVE OAK 1,2,3,4 Bd.. 1st
Month FREE $375.00 + up.
HUD Certified. 386-365-0697
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in
this newspaper is subject to the
Fair Housing Act which makes it
illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability,
familial status or national origin,
or an intention, to make any
such preference, limitation and
discrimination:' Familial status
includes children under the age
of 18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women
and people securing' custody of
children under 18.
This -newspaper will, not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in
violation of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To
complain of, discrimination call
HUD toll-free 1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free number for the
hearing impaired is 1-800-927-
9275.


I
OPPORTUNITY

Houses for Rent
FirstDay.
HOUSE 2Bd/1Ba on Lowe
Lake in Wellborn. No Pets.
$450.00 month + $150 Security.
386-963-3356
Mobile Homes for Rent
FirstDay.
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba on 2.5 acres,
w/ Shed, Like New
w/landscapingnear Live Oak off
hwy 129. $550/mo $450 Deposit.
386-288-3081
DWMH FOR RENT/ OWN
3Bd/2Ba ON 1 ACRER: 1 1/2
mile from new Prison. $750 mo,
1st & Security. Available NOW
386-294-2384 or 386-688-3656
FirstDay.
FREE ELECTRIC & ALL
UTILITIES: 2Bd/1Ba Branford,
$400 Sec, $550 Mo, 386-590-
0642 or 386-867-1833
Homes for Sale
FirstDay.
RECENTLY" FORECLOSED,
Special Financing Available,
Any Credit, Any Income
3Bd/2Ba, 1344 Sq Ft, located at,
13933 24th, Live Oak, $89,000.
Visit
www.roselandco.com/842,
Drive by then call (866)769-4495
Mobile Homes for Sale
OWNER FINANCE/HANDYMAN
SP. 14X70 3Bd/2Ba .45 acres,
needs clean-up. Rent applied to
down pmt. $550 mo, 1st & last.
1634 177th Rd 386-867-0048
THIS 16X60-$300 Above
Factory Inv.- 2Bd/2Ba SWMH,
Save Thousands. Call Rick 386-
752-1452
BANK REPO 2005 24X48
3Bd/2Ba "Like Brand New" "With
a Used Price." Call Mr Mott 386-
752-8196
"Mossy Oak" 2010 Model
4Bd/2Ba MH $39,995. Includes
Delivery, Set-Up, AC, Skirting &
Steps. You Pick all Colors. Call
Mr. Mott 386-752-8196
Vacation Property-
BEST BUY IN.THE NORTH
CAROLINA MOUNTAINS!
2.5acre parcel. Gated
development. Spectacular view.
High altitude. Brysfi' City
$39,500. Owner ' financing.
Owner 1-800-810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com
S.E. Tenn Mtns LAND
DISCOUNTED ' 5+ acre Tracts
from $24,900 w/ utilities. Must
SSelll Ocoee~Hiwassee River
Area. Large MTN Tracts 'from
$2250/acre. 1-800-531-1665 or
1-931-260-9435.
STUART, FLORIDA Waterfront
Condo 2/2 ground floor end
unit. Deep water dock, North
Fork, St. Lucie River, heated
pool, covered parking, quiet
neighborhood, close to
downtown. Estate sale, price just
reduced $259,000 772-692-
9017
TENNESSEE LAND 5 acre
tracts for .$24,995. Great
schools. Owner financing as
little as $250 down and $99
month. JDL Realty, 800-330-
3390 or 931-946-2484, ask for
Darin.
NC MOUNTAINS CLOSEOUT
SALE! Cabin Shell, 2+ acres
Switch reat view, very private, big
trees, waterfalls & large public
lake nearby, $99,500. Bank
financing Call 1-866-789-8535


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E-LIMB-INATORS, INC. fordable Seamless Gutters




. Complete Tree Service "Satisfaction Guaranteed"
" Licensed & Insured Specalizing In:
- Seamless Gutters Carl Kirk
Owners: * Soffit & Fasia 386-776-1835
Keith & Glenda Hudson * Gulter Guard Cell
9351 220th Stree E�Scres and Repair \386-209-2740
O'Brien. FL32071 Encl s
Phone 386-935-1993 y Residential & Commercial * Licensed & Insured
Fax 386-935-3321 FREE ESTIMATES * FAMILY O, NED & OPERATED



Trees, Trinmued or Removed * Firewood

Licensed & Insured * Free Estimates lump Grindin



.TREE WORK
Bucket Truck and Climbing

963 - 5026 Jim Sellers 386-776-2522
963 5026 !Cell 386-647-5978





> LIVE OAK

MINI STORAGE

*5x15 * 5x20 * 10x15 * 10x20

CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE
5x5 *5x10*10x10*10x20
Unils located on Gold Kist Road
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St.. Live Oak 364-6626



TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 386-362-1734

DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M.
TO PACE N AD CAL 38-3~ Wit3


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M CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


PAGE 2AUGUST 26 - 27 2009


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D IFISALCeii MARKEITPi AC W ~ fN NCM-SRIGNRHFOA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Iye juaiuranfee Democrat
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LAKEFRONT SALE 3+ ACRE
WATERFRONT only $34,900
Dockable! 8/29/09 Save
$10,000! Wooded park-like
setting on one of Alabama's top
recreational lakes. All amenities
complete. Boat to Gulf of
Mexico. Excellent Financing
Call now 1-866-952-5339
www.grandviewharbor.cbm
NC MOUNTAIN LAND
CLOSEOUT SALE! 5+ acres
with 10ft waterfall, great views,
lots of options, only $99,500.
Must sell. Call owner 1-866-
275-0442
NC MOUNTAINS Alarka
Highlands, Premier Gated
Community, 40 Mile Views, 4300'
Elevation, Clubhouse, Tennis,
Fitness Center, Waterfalls,
Bryson City, 90% Owner Finance
1-877-504-0005
AlarkaHighlands.com
NC MOUNTAINS Cool
Summers/Mild Winters. Newl E-
Z to finish log cabin shell, w/loft
& basement, includes acreage
$99,900. Mountain & waterfront
homesites $39,000-$99,000.
Local Financing Available!! 828-
247-9966 (Code 41)
Acreage
GEORGIA - CRAWFORD
COUNTY. 49 AC - $2,125/AC.
Excellent personal hunting tract
near Flint River, adjoining other
timberland & farms. 478-987-
9700 St. Regis Paper Co.
OWNER MUST SELL 4+ acres -
$57,300 Nice oak trees, private
access to lake. All utilities in.
Ready to build when you are!
Financing available. Call now
866-352-2249.
www.fllandbargains.com
FirstDay.
PRICE REDUCED
Lafayette County
10ac, Hwy 51 N. of Mayo,
near river, $64,900
1 ac RV/Mobile home lots,
Branford area, $15,000
Suwannee County
5 ac, Park like,
near airport, $49,900
Easy Financing
1-941-778/7980or7565
www.landcallnow.com

Cemetery Lots
FirstDay.
LIVE 9AK, FL, 2 city cemetery
plots valued at $1500. Will sell
for $1200. Call 912-638-6458.















Contact

us at the

paper.:


Classified
Advertising
386-362-1734 ext, 102
fa 386-364-5578
, m.,]
www suwaonnleedemocL rit Cori


We'd love to hear from you.
Classified
Marketplace
RO. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064



Gi.d Suanamii Coe
. .I .. t... p .





* 161-bed Mcdicarc/Medicaid
skilled nursing facility
* Alzheimer's Unit - specialized
care by loving staff who provide
hands-on care
* Individualized Care through
stimulating physical and social
environment, physical,
occupational, and speech therapy,
short-term rehabilitation, well-
balanced meals and family support
and involvement
* Physician services provided
through our on-site Copeland
Medical Center
* Admission Standards - resident
must be 60 years of age and meet
the State nursing home admission
guidelines, as ordered by a
physician.
"--- For more
TDD information call ,: Ko^
386-658-5550 or 1-800-647-3353
TDI)If 800- 955-8771


I6542007-FI


Pink Ladies Needed!
Are you looking for a place to share your talents? Do you enjoy
meaningful conversation with a good friend? How 'bout a good book?
Then We Want You!! Suwannee Health Care and Rehab Center is
looking for volunteers to start a Ladies Auxiliary.
Call Lynn Brannon, Activities Director at 386-362-7860 or 386-590-
2961.

Talent Search
Do you sing or play and instrument? Do you act or dance? Do you
like to read or spend time with a friend in wonderful conversation?
WE WANT YOU! Suwannee Health Care & Rehab Center is looking
for your talent for our residents. Dinner for two - $45; One night at the.
Beach - $125; One hour volunteering to make memories that last forev-
er - PRICELESS!
Call: Lynn Brannon, Activities Director 386-362-7860 or 386-590-
2961.

Head Start/Early Head Start
early enrollment
Suwannee Valley 4Cs Head Start/Early Head Start is accepting appli-
cations for children from birth to age 5 for the 2009-20
school year beginning Monday Feb. 23. Head Start/Early
Head Start is a FREE comprehensive early childhood ed-
ucation program that includes health, dental, nutrition and 4
VPK services to eligible children/families.
Centers are located'in Suwannee, Hamilton, Lafayette L
and Columbia counties. Parents bring proof of income
and child's age to register. Rent,
For more information call 386-754-2222. 1. 2.3. &
HC Acces
Flyball racing classes Too Hot to Handle Flyball Racing Team will be hold- 705 NW
ing flyball classes in O'Brien and Live Oak. The classes TD
Equal Hot


will teach you and your
dog how to compete as a
team. Flyball is a relay
race in which four dogs
race against another team
of four dogs over four hur-
dles to a box that they leap
upon to release a tennis
ball, they catch the ball and
bring it back to their han-
dler so that the next dog on
their team may then run
the course. There are two
leagues that teams can
compete in to win titles
and awards.
For more information
call Cathy at 386-362-4956
or visit the website at
http://toohottohandle-fly-
ball.com/.

Customers
needed!
Dairy Queen .of Live
Oak will host Dairy Queen
Benefit Night the second
Tuesday of every month
from 6-8 p.m. to help buy
books for Suwannee Mid-
dle School.

Donations
needed!
Suwannee County Envi-
ronmental Watchdogs, a
non-profit organization,
seeks donations for yard
sale merchandise. Info:
Sandy, 386-364-8020.


"If you can't live at home,
this is the next best place
to live! Everyone here
is so good to the residents."






When you or your loved one need
assistance with the tasks of daily
living, consider Dacier Manor
Assisted Living Facility (ALF
#764I). Our loving, qualified staff
is on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week. And our secure, comforting
atmosphere allows our residents
to maintain the highest level of
self-care. Our residents enjoy
a variety of activities and a
supportive environment.
Call us today for more information
or to schedule a free tour.
(386) 658-5552

ADVENTCFrsrISTIANVILLAG
PO Box 41551 * DO)WI.ING PARK, FI. 1o064
(386) 658-5552 * 1-800-955-8771 ITY
C 1-800-647-3353
..... w w w .a cv llla g e .n e t
542005-F


Register now!
Descendants of Calhoun family plan reunion
in 2009
Descendants of the late Sarah Calhoun, Eva Calhoun and Thomas
Calhoun are invited to a family reunion to be held in 2009. Info: miss-
theresamartin@yahoo.com or predop@aol.com.


Coffee with your councilman
Beginning Jan. 13, 2009 City Councilman for District 4 Mii�k Stew-
art invites his constituents to "Coffee with your Councilman" at JAVA
JAX located in the Publix shopping center.
Come and meet with him on the second Tuesday of each month from
7 a.m. till 8:30 a.m. This will be a time to get to know each other and
discuss current issues and citizen concerns.

CJBAT tests
Monday - Thursday
Monday - Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): CJBAT (Criminal
Justice Basic Abilities Test) at NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. #16), Madi-
CONTINUED ON PAGE 4
I


SINES!



al AssIstanee
4 BR HC & Non-
sible Apartments

rive. Live Oak. FL
-364-7936
D/TTY 7T1
using Opportunity


ES SI

LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living
2 bedroom duplex.
Call 362-3110.
501033-F


SERVICES
L OO"

Rental assistance may be available!
HUD Vouchers Welcome!
1, 2 & 3 BR HC & Non-HC
Accessible Apartments

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936 5
TDD/TTY/711 ."
Equal Housing Opportunity " "


AUGUST 26 - 27, 2009, PAGE 3


JSUWANNEE
IRONWORKS
,V,... I, > T. Ru. ,', S, i l' . .
I-A
Ernie Caplrelli
We do Aluminum, Steel Slainless
Welding & Fabricating

386-935-3466
Cell 386-984-5112
22618 CR 49
O'Brien, FL 32071


Bush Hogging * Landclearing * Hauling I ,
Stump Removal Discing * Fencing LA K E W O O D


BILL'S BACKHOE APARTMENTS
& LAND CLEARING IN LIVE OAK

FREE Estimates Quiet country living 2 bedroom duplex
12150 196th Terrace Call 362-3110
(386) 364-1418 O'Brien, FL 32071 ll



ABBEY MINI STORAGE
All New Units
*5X15 * 5X20 * 10X15 * 10X20 * 15X20
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd.
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak


364-5300


TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 386-362-1734

DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M.
.I.. .. . - ... . ... .- --^- . . . . . . . ...


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PAGE 4. AUGUST 26 - 27, 2009 * CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


C
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Available from Commercial News Providers


a - -
-


www.Clas ifed :ys co


\Copyrighted Material


- Syndicated Content


Continued From Page 3
son. CJBAT is required for acceptance into Corrections
& Law Enforcement programs. Photo ID required. Pre-
registration & scheduling time and date are required. To
register please call 850-973-9451.

College Placement Tests
Monday - Thursday
Monday - Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): Col-
lege Placement Test (CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg.
#16), 5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC Student Ser-
vices 24 hours before test. For information please call
850-973-9451.

TABE tests
Monday - Thursday
Monday - Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education) at NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison. TABE is required for acceptance
into vocational/technical programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration & scheduling time & date are required.
To register please call 850-973-9451.

Lady of the Lake Quilting
Guild to meet
Aug. 26


Announcements

Advertise in Over 100 Papers!
One Call - One Order - One
Payment Advertising Networks
of Florida - Put Us to work for
You! (866)742--1373
www.national-classifieds.com,
info @national-classifieds.comn

Apartment for Rent

A 4bdr 3ba $217/mo! HUD
HOME! 3 bdrm only $199/mo!
Stop Renting! 5% dw, 15 yrs @
8% apr For Listings (800)366-
9783 ext 5669

Auto Donations

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY
,COUPON UNITED BREAST
CANCER FOUNDATION
Free Mammograms, Breast
Cancer Info www.ubcf.info
FREE Towing, Tax Deductible,
N.on-Runners Accepted,
(888)468,-5964.

Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING. 40 yr
Warranty-Buy direct from
manufacturer 30/colors in
stock, w/all accessories. Quick
turn around. Delivery
available. Gulf Coast Supply &
Mfg, (888)393-0335
www.GulfCoastSupply.com

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING! Do
you earn $800 in a day? 25
Local Machines and Candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033 CALL US: We
will not be undersold!

Cars for Sale

Acura Integra 98 $500! Honda


The Lady of the Lake Quilting Guild will hold its month
ly meeting on Wednesday, August 26, 2009 at 10 a.m. at
the teen Town 533 NW Desoto St., Lake City, (two
blocks north of Duval (US 90) on Lake Jeffery Rd.
Lorriane Miller will present a program on "Environmen-
tally Friendly Materials for Quilters."
The Guild is an organization for anyone interested in
quilts and the art of quilting. The Guild makes and dis-
tributes over 200 quilts a year to various charities and
non-profit organizations in the Suwannee Valley Region.
The Guild is co-hosting the 21st Suwannee River Quilt
Show and Sales at Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park in White Springs on October 16-18. This is a
judged quilt show with vendors and boutiques.
For more details contact President Ramona Dewees,
386-496-3876.

You're invited to the annual
Fletcher Reunion
When: August 29, 2009
Where: Fanning Springs, Fla.
Come and bring a covered dish.
Lunch will be served at 12:30 p.m. in the same cabin as
last year, located to the left of the entrance - A/C. and
porch swing.
All friends and family welcome.


Civic 01 $550! Nissan Altima
99 $500! Toyota Corolla 02
$500! Police Impounds! For
listings call (800)366-9813 ext
9275.

Help Wanted

RV delivery drivers needed.
Deliver RVs, boats and trucks
for PAY! Deliver to all 48
states and CN. For details log
on to
www.RVdeliveryjobs.com

PTL OTR Drivers. New Pay
Package! Great MileS! Up to
46cpm. 12 months experience
required. No felony or DUI
past 5 years. (877)740-6262.
www.ptl-inc.com

Homes For Rent

A Bank Repo! 5bdr 3ba
$317/mo! 3 br Foreclosure!
$199/mo!! 5% dw, 15 yrs @
8%Lapr For Listings (800)366-
9783 ext 5853

Homes For Sale

FORECLOSED HOME
AUCTION 500+ FLORIDA
Homes REDC I Free Brochure
www.Auction.com RE No.
CQ1031187


*Accounting, *Criminal Justice.
Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call (866)858-
2121,
www.CenturaOnline.com.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for high paying Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial
aid if qualified - Housing
available. CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance
(888)349-5387.

Real Estate

LAKEFRONT SALE 3+ ACRE
WATERFRONT only $34,900
DOCKABLE! 8/29/09 Save
$10,000! Wooded park- like
setting on one of Alabama's top
recreational lakes. All amenities
complete. Boat to Gulf of
Mexico. Excellent Financing
Call now (866)952-5339
www.grandviewharbor.com

Services

CRIMINAL RECORD?
MISDEMEANOR, FELONY?
Have them expunged for
$99.95, 30 to 60 days including
DUI's. Get a Fresh Start Today.
Call (800)621-4889 24/7days.


Lots & Acreage


Owner Must Sell. 4+ acres-'
$57,300 Nice oak trees, private
access to lake. All utilities in.
Ready to build when you are!
Financing avail. Call now
(866)352-2249.
www.fllandbargains.com


ANF
AuWt. llPn rIijG JNEJ'OPk OF -I i)RIDA

Classified I Dir.pF,iv M -ero Dlily


Miscellaneous


ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,


[Week of August 24, 2009]


499626-F
___ ______________weseF y


The Coach's Corner
Aug. 29
Coming August 29: The Coach's Comer with Bulldog
coach Jerry Odom, 10 a.m. to 11 on WQHL.
Sponsored by the Suwannee Quarterback Club.
(It's-not too late to become a member!)


Artist Guild presents 13th
annual Fine Art:Exhibition
Deadline to enter is August 28
Art presented September 14-25
.The 13th annual Fine Art Exhibition will be presented by
the Live Oak Artist Guild, September 14 through Sep-
tember 25, at the Suwannee River Regional Library in
Live Oak.
A call for entries has gone to local artists to enter their
recent works. Entry forms are available at the Live Oak
Artist Guild, The Frame Shop, The Rainbow's End Art
Supply, Thunder Alley or LOAG.org. Categories for en-
tries include painting, drawing, photography and sculp-
ture. The deadline to enter is August 28.
Awards will include Best of Show, First, Second, Third
place, honorable mentions and purchase awards.
An opening day reception will be held on Sunday, Sep-
tember 13 from 2 pm to 4 pm at the Suwannee River Re-
gional Library. Music will be provided by the Suwannee
Trio. All participating artists, their guests, award spon-
sors and general public are invited to attend.
Works shown will include painting, drawing, photogra-
phy and sculpture by artists from Live Oak, North Flori-
da and Georgia.
The community is encouraged to view this year's exhi-
bition; the show will be open during the library's daily
schedule. For more information, please call the Live Oak
Artist Guild Gallery at 364-5099 or go to LOAG.org.


Spaghetti dinner for CCS
Aug. 29
Comprehensive Community Services would like to invite


Double and
single wide
mobile
homes
for rent on
their own
lots in the
Live Oak
area.

386-362-2720
499680-F


2$5999-


you to a spaghetti dinner
and live auction held by
Spirit of Christ Church in
Lake City on Saturday, Au-
gust 29. The spaghetti din-
ner, $6 per plate, will start
at 5 p.m. with the live auc-
tion to start at 6:30.
SProceeds from the
spaghetti dinner will be
given to Comprehensive
Community Services, Inc.
in support of a roofing pro-
ject for a pavilion located
in the back of the Live Oak

CONTINUED ON PAGE 5



Mobile

Homes
and

Land for
sale.
Financed

by owner.

386-362-2720


Limited time offer
$9.99
Alntt melin arobt de bit aertd
With now a ya r nltlvotlan p0r pl.ono
Nova tel USB 760
SunCellul ar m a ,
380-901 1477


'Our Surchaorgos m(in i I , ,, i .. 1 .i. , .i . .... i..i ....... ,, i" hi, "i i,,h o. ' . ' I-
Adiloi ninilaivo li , re ii,. '. " ' ' ...... Ih II, I' " ''h" , ' ,' 1' ll '"'h,"I' "1'1 ,,*,i i ii **I' i i , '" 11
Aclivallon loinoe: $35, Il'UI IAI'.I IUUN rUMCol iifu'Mrti IoiN: OIUOIuI LiiiIIii t 111III mi, ,lw10 i o l llf I11, 0 II a1 w alII� 11a000 Up Il
$175 termnnion lee & other changes, S 25.MDB ater allo oance, Add'l $20 upgrade lee may appy., ReIres cmpato" EV.DO Reo, A dekce
(sold sepalrate)}. Moble Bioadband is avaICola o no m Ihan 262 nillon people in 258 nm1or mros in the US 0' o r& cA wraog varong bt
service, nul avalate evolwhare. While sulphes last, Shoplng charges may apply. LIried lime oer. In CA: Saes lax based on hl rebil petai o
phone. Rebate debllcard lakes up ino Bws A expei in 12 months. NOhek details a covege mapo at vo.onm C 009 W nlzN WIroes
53515aOF


I


Back To ..oo d,2 9,


E CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


PAGE 4, AUGUST 26 - 27, 2009


I-


m


p













ah Medical Network


Continued From Page 4
Adult Day Training center. CCS serves
adults with developmental and intellectual
disabilities in Suwannee, Hamilton,
Lafayette and Columbia counties.

Cookout, ice cream
social planned
at McAlpin
Community Club
Sept. 14
To kick off the fall season, members of
the McAlpin Community Club will
host a cookout and ice cream social on
Sept. 14 at 7 p.m.
All members are encouraged to attend.
Neighbors in the McAlpin area are wel-
come to join us; the membership
fees per year are $5 per family. The
clubhouse is located at 9981 170th Ter-
race. For more info, call Donna at 963-
3516 or Shirley at 963-5357.

Reunion plannedfor
BHS class of '63
Oct. 3
The Branford High School Class of
1963 will hold a reunion at the Jonas Mill
in Hildreth, FL (seven miles east of Bran-
ford on US Highway 27), starting at 11
a.m., Saturday, October 10. A hamburg-
er/hot dog cookout is planned. Please


share this information with other class
members you see or have contact with.
Let's make this a great reunion! For de-
tails, contact Larry Jonas at 229-559-
6922, or mail your contact information to:
Larry Jonas, PMB 122, Moody AFB, Ga.
31699. We need a head count, so let us
hear from you no later than October 3.

Class reunion
Suwannee High Class of 1989
Upcoming 20th reunion
October 9-10, 2009
For more information please contact:
Paula Gianeskis McCullers
386-590-4385.


Suwannee River
Challenge
and Marathon
Oct. 10
The 8th Annual Suwannee River Chal-
lenge and Marathon date has been set for
Saturday, Oct 10, on Columbus Day
Weekend.

L.H.S. Class of 1999
Oct. 16-17
LHS class of 1999 will hold their 10 year
reunion on October 16-17, in Mayo.
Please send mailing address to
www.fdoacs.hotmail.com Darica Land,
386-288-4028. Invitation to follow.


Suwannee Valley Humane


Society Critter Corner


Suwannee Valley
Humane Society
1156 SE Bisbee Loop
Madison, Florida 32340

Two miles south of Lee off
C.R. 255
From - 10 Exit 262. Take
C.R.2555 north 1/2 miles

We are a Limited Space
Shelter (no kill). You must
check with us prior to
bringing a drop-off animal
to the shelter. Hours; Tues.
to Sat. 10:00 to 2:00, or by
appointment. Visit our
website and see the animals
that need a really good
home at
www.geocities.com/suwann
eehs or at our e-mail address
suwanneevalley@embarqm
ail.com.

We service the
surrounding counties of
Madison, Suwannee,
Hamilton, Lafayette,
Columbia and Taylor.

Lost and Found Pets:
If you have lost a pet or
found one, the humane
society will help you find
your pet. Call us at (850)
971- 9904 or toll free at 1-
866-236-7812. Leave a
message if we are closed,
we will return your call.
Remember to always call
your local animal controls or
shelters if you have found a
lost or found pet.


THRIFT STORE:
You must come see our
thrift stores, if you have not
been here before. We have
three stores, a boutique,
clothing and furniture. We
are always looking for
donations for the stores.
Please keep us in mind if
you have items in good
condition you would like to
donate to us.

RECYCLING:
We have a recycling bin
on our property newspapers,
magazines, and catalogs.
The bin will take all kinds
of paper. We also have a bin
in Live Oak at 305
Pinewood Drive, just west
Of Johnson's
Appliance/Radio Shack. We
also collect aluminum cans
to recycle. Just bring them


to the shelter. All the money
goes to help the homeless
animals.

The Suwannee Valley
Humane Society depends on
adoptions for $65.00 which
INCLUDES, spay/neuter,
de-worm, heartworm/feline
leukemia tested and rabies
shot (if old enough). Please
come and visit us, our
animals would love to meet
you.
REMEMBER; DO NOT
LEAVE PETS IN
VEHICLES FOR ANY
LENGTH OF TIME DUE
TO THE HEAT AND
HUMIDITY.Y

FEATURED ANIMALS
FOR ADOPTIONS
'DOGS:

SEE SUWANNEE, PAGE 6


Gregory D. Snodgrass, M.D.
522 South Ohio Ave., Live Oak
386-330-6260
1-800-435-3937

Heartland Rehabilitation
Services
405 11th St., Live Oak
386-364-5051

North lorida Pharmacy
101 SW. US Hwy. 27, Branford
386-935-6905
229 W. Main St., Mayo
386-294-3777

Eye Center of North Florida
876 SW. State Road 247,
Lake City
386-755-7595
1-866-755-0040


Ophthalmology
Eduardo M. Bedoya, M.D.
Now at Shands in Live Oak
386-755-7595
Toll Free 866-755-0040
Se habla espaol 41301



HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH,
D.D.S, P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-6556
1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County) 501056-F






* Physical Therapy * Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy
SSpecializing In Arthritis * Fibromyalgia * Geriatrics * Spinal &
Joint Pain * Sports Injuries * Work Injuries * Pediatrics
* Manual Therapy Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Procegrity
Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross. Av Med
Jasper 792-2426 Medicaid-pediatrics
Branford 935-1449 Workers Conmp
Mayo 294-1407 � Most Other Insurance Plans
A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore

Ophthalmology
GREGORY D. SNODGRASS. M.D.


.2.

The Village Pharmacy at
Advent Christian Village
Dowling Park, FL
386-658-5860
1-800-647-3353

Healthcore, Inc.
Live Oak 386-208-1414
Lake City 386-755-8680
Jasper 386-792-2426
Branford 386-935-1449
Mayo 386-294-1407

Herbert C. Mantooth,
D.D.S., P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak
386-362-6556 -'
1-800-829-6506

Steele Chiropractic
110 Irvin Ave., Live Oak
386-362-4112

Copeland Medical Center
10820 Marvin Jones Blvd.,
Dowling Park, FL
386-658-5300




Heartland
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA
Mandy McCray, PTA
Carolyn McCook, Office Manager,
Patient Care Coordipator
AQUATIC THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports
Medicine, Pediatrics Providers
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS Providers
405 11th St., Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051 s01o


Pharmacy

* Medical
Equipment
* Oxygen

"Everything For Your
Home Recovery"

Locally Owned & Operated
101 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL 32008
Ri Q Q935-6905


- - - -- -I-.-I 'VT ' VqI V V awn
S(386)330-6260or1-800-435-3937 229W. Main St., Mayo, FL320663824-7
ra oi ( (386) 294-377 7 501051-

GCrab Gompany Inc. I To place an ad on this page, please call
I3) 32-7227 I Nancy at 386-362-1734 Ext. 103
0I041 i nn .l t N . Li ..I nk i 204 I


IV v IFuval 4UIO B 1i r - vlo v wini Vr Qrmv,% I

Call for our specials!
Come in and. I

great atmoi ie1
some awesome food!
SBring this ad and receive an additional 5% off
Excludes Friday Night
- - - - - --- i i - -i


Dr. Beverly Ileinking .


Effective Ways to Banish Bad Breath
One of the first things many people.notice about other people is their smile. A
beautiful smile can make a strong first impression and boost an individual's confidence
as well.
But as strong an impression as a beautiful smile can make, the breath behind that
smile is equally important. Bad breath, for example, can quickly negate a good smile,
no matter how beautiful it is. While what you eat plays a role in whether or not you
have bad breath, other factors influence how your breath smells as well.
Lifestyle Habits
Certain lifestyle habits strongly influence an individual's breath. People who do not
brush or floss daily, for instance, are far more likely to have bad breath. That's because
food particles remain in the teeth after eating, promoting the growth of bacteria
between teeth, on the tongue and arouirad the gums. That bacterial growth results in
bad breath.
Another factor that contributes to bad breath is smoking or chewing tobacco.
Tobacco-based products are very detrimental to a person's oral hygiene, causing bad
breath but potentially contributing to gum irritation, stained teeth and a reduced ability
to taste foods as well.
Individual Health
Bad breath isn't always a reflection of a person's diet or tIlestyle choices. Sometimes
bad breath mighl be indicative of a larger issue such as gum disease. As plaque builds
up on the teeth, the resulting baclena cause toxins to form in the mouth. Those toxins
irritate the gums While gum irritation is often painful enough, allowing it to go
untreated can result in worse problems, including damage to the jawbone.
Other ailments can contribute to bad breath as well. In addition to diabetes, liver or
kidney problems can contribute to bad breath, as can chronic respiratory problems
such as bronchitis or pneumonia. Acid reflux can also contribute to bad breath.
Prevention
While there's no guaranteed way to banish bad breath forever, there are ways to
reduce or prevent it.
" Stop smoking. Smokers or people who chew tobacco can greatly reduce their risk for
bad breath by quitting. While that's easier said than done, its as close to a guarantee
to reducing bad breath as smokers will find.
" Stay hydrated. Dry mouth often results In bad breath, so slaying hydrated by drinking
lots of water can reduce bad breath. Also, chewing sugarless gum can stimulate the
production of saliva, helping to keep the mouth moist in the process.
" Visit the dentist. Many people fear the dentist's chair, but visiting the dentist at least
twice a year can greatly reduce the risk of bad breath. A dentist can give a thorough
cleaning and will be able to monitor and detect the common problems that contribute
to bad breath, such as gum disease or dry mouth.
" Remember Mom and Dad's advice Mom and Dad always said to brush twice per day
and floss after meals, and that advice is as true today as it was back then. In addition
to brushing your teeth, brush your tongue as well. And be sure to replace your.
toothbrush every 2 to 3 months, or when it begins to look frayed, whichever comes
first
To learn more about oral hygiene, visit the American Dental Association Web site at
www.ada.org.


AUGUST 26 - 27, 2009, PAGE 5


M CLASSIFIED MARKET NG NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA








PAG 6. AUUS 26-2,20 LSIIOMREPAE-WWNLOLN.O EVN OT LRD N OT ERI


Daughters of


Bluegrass nominate


for IBMA Recorded


Event of the Year

Editor's note: Jeanie Stanley, daughter of the famous
Carter Stanley and niece of Ralph Stanley, is a singer in
her own right, having recorded an album called Baby
Girl: A Tribute to My Father, Carter Stanley, on CMH
Records. A member of the award-winning group, The
Daughters of Bluegrass, Jeannie Stanley grew up in Live
Oak and still lives in North Florida.
NASHVILLE-Blue Circle Records is proud to
announce the song, "Proud to be a daughter of bluegrass,"
by the award-winning group, The Daughters of Bluegrass,
has been nominated for the 2009 IBMA Recorded Event
of the Year. Winners will be announced during the 20th
Anniversary presentation of the International Bluegrass
Music Association's Award Show on Thursday, Oct. 1, at
the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville.
"Proud to be a daughter of bluegrass" is the opening
track from the group's current Blue Circle Records
album, Bluegrass Bouquet, produced by Dixie Hall, Paul
Wolak and Frances Mooney. "A whole recorded event in
one song! I feel very grateful and satisfied in knowing
that "Proud to be a daughter of bluegrass" is a nomination
truly representative of an entire project worthy of being
the true recorded event of the year. Our appreciation to all
52 Daughters and all women in bluegrass," said Dixie
Hall, who also wrote the tune.
The nominated song features the current and two-time
IBMA Female Vocalist of the Year, Dale Ann Bradley
along with some of the top female talents in bluegrass
music including: Rhonda Vincent, Jeanette Williams,
Heather Berry, Frances Mooney, Lorraine Jordan, Sonya
Isaacs, Lisa Ray, Linda Lay, Lisa Martin, Sally Jones,
Jeanie Stanley, Carol Lee Cooper, Gloria Belle, Becky
Isaacs Bowman, Michelle Nixon, Sophie Haislip, Louise
Tomberlain, Sierra Hull, Mindy Rakestraw, Lizzy Long,
Annette Kelley, Lily Lieux, Dixie Hall, Judi Marshall,
Melissa Lawrence, Beth Lawrence, Rebecca Frazier,
Donica Christensen, Lisa Manning and Jenni Lyn


Gardner.
"I want to thank each and every one who voted to
nominate the Daughters' song "Proud to be a daughter of
bluegrass" for this year's IBMA Recorded Event of the
Year. It's folks like radio hosts who play our music, our'
fans who listen and request our songs, fans that attend the
many live performances throughout the year, plus all the
people behind the scene that have made this possible,"
said Frances.
Daughters, Dale Ann Bradley, Rhonda Vincent, Sonya
Isaacs, and Alecia Nugent are nominated for this year's
IBMA Female Vocalist of the Year. Dixie Hall has
another original song nominated this year, "Leaving here
for Baker County," co-written by Tom T. Hall, performed


by Junior Sisk & Ramblers Choice, and nominated in the
2009 IBMA Song of the Year category.
The Daughters of Bluegrass are the proud winners of
the 2006 IBMA Recorded Event of the Year Award for
their previous album, Back to the Well. Individually, the
Daughters have won a multitude of awards throughout
the years along with numerous 2009 SPBGMAAWARDS
including: Blue Circle Records owners Tom T. and Dixie
Hall winning the 2009 SPBGMA Songwriter of the Year
Award, making this 8 years in a row; Rhonda Vincent, the
2009 SPBGMA Contemporary Female Vocalist of the
Year; Jeanette Williams the 2009 SPBGMA Traditional
Female Vocalist of the Year; and Kristin Scott Benson the
SPBGMA Banjo Player of the Year.


Suwannee Valley Humane Society Critter Corner


Continued From Page 5

3689 -Alex -is a 11
weeks old, Catahoula Mix.
He is silver and black. He
likes to play.

3688 - Alexis - is a
Catahoula Mix, she is
chocolate and white. She is
11 weeks old and loves
everyone.

3686 - Blinky - is a 1 year
old, Pekingese Mix. He is
black and white and is a


very friendly dog.

3683 - Cindy - is a
Mix. She is 3 months
She is Chocolate colo
has a medium stub tail
likes to be around peo

3680 - Cocoa - is a
month old, Chocolate
white toes, Lab Mix.
Who would love to
home with somebody.


CATS:
3646 - Elizabeth - is a
Lab Manx Mix, she is 5 1/2
old. months old. She is a grey,
r and tan, calico kitty. She has no
1. She tail and is a medium length
iple. hair.

3 3643 - Karen - is a short
with haired, calico kitty. She is 1
year 3 months old. She
go loves to be made of.

3637 - Mr. Sunshine - is 2
years 4 months old. He is an
Orange and white kitty and
is very loveable.
- I


3631 - Nicole - is a 6
month old, grey and tan
kitty. She is a short haired
kitty and likes to be patted.

3619 - Natasha - is a 1
year 3 month old, grey kitty.
She is very friendly and
hopes to find a home soon.


Lost or found an animal,
you would like to report.
Please feel free to call us
and I will put your report in
the newspaper free.

LOST:
From the Lee area, a
male, Pit Bull. His name is
"Coby" and he is brown and
white and has white on his
face. He has a stub tail and
he weight 30 plus pounds
and is 20 plus inches high.
He has not been fixed. He is
a friendly guy. If you have
found-him, please call Pedro
Martinez @ (386) 209 -
1273.
We have a new Web site
available to view: www.
petango.com.
Get shelter animal
information and pictures of
all our animals. Go check it
out. When you get to web
suite be sure to put in the zip
code for this area (32340).


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NFCC Artist Series presents "Earth Beat"


Vanaver Caravan performs dances and music from around the world


The North Florida Community College Artist
Series begins its 2009-2010 season with
Vanaver Caravan's "Earth Beat" --an evening of
traditional and original dances from around the
world - on Saturday, Sept. 12 at 7 p.m. at Van
H. Priest Auditorium (NFCC campus, Madison,
Florida). This high-spirited performance, full of
dance, live music and culture, is a season
opener that you don't want to miss.
"You'll have to see The Vanaver Caravan to
believe the high professional skills they have
developed to bring out the old folk traditions -
and then to see how they make the audience
feel part of the show. In the end. er er one i. on
their feet cheering!" said Pete Seegei.
The show features the rh\ thms, energ~l and
beauty of Romanian stick dances, the English
"Rapper Sword" dance, French Canadian and
Cape Breton step dancing. Appalachian
Clogging, the South African Gumboot
Dance, the Philippine Igorot Sun Dance,
original stick dances, bod percussion.
stomp dances as well as dances from
Bulgaria, India, Brazil and Spain
"These highly versatile pertfornmeis
all eagerly explore ever crann3 of
their art and'create an evening alight
with thejoy of discover!-" said
Doris Hering, Dance Magazine "A
polished and vivacious group of
dancers and musicians held the
audience captivated...ingeniousl
conceived!" said The Miami
Herald.
The community will also
have the opportunity to meet
some of the Vanaver
Caravan performers
during the NFCC lI
Festival of Arts being
held on Saturday, ,.
Sept. 12 from 10 a.m.-
3 p.m. at NFCC.
Members of the group
will be leading the
following workshops
and presentations
during the festival:
African Drumming,
Swing Dance,
International Songs for
Children and World
Instrument
Demonstrations. Each
workshop/demonstration
will be offered from 10-
10:25 a.m., 10:40-11:05
a.m. and 11:20-11:45 a.m.
The festival is free and open
to the public. The
performance and
educational activities are
funded in part by a grant
from the Southern Arts
Federation in partnership with
the National Endowment for the Arts and the
Florida Department of Cultural Affairs.
Tickets for the Sept. 12th "Earth Beat"
performance are on sale now. Season passes,
which include all seven performances of the
2009-2010 season, are also available. Call
(850) 973-1653, email ArtistSeries@nfcc.edu
or stop by the College Advancement Office at
NFCC Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30
p.m. More information about the NFCC Artist
Series and the NFCC Festival of Arts is
available at www.nfcc.edu (search: Artist
Series) or visit
http://www.nfcc.edu/community-
programs/artist-series-.


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TOP, MIDDLE, ABOVE: Vanaver
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featuring dances from around the
world Sept. 12 at NFCC.
- Photos: Lois Greenfield


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Vernacular Art from the Hill Collection opens

August 28 at the Gadsden Arts Center -pag -


N
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) '


AUGUST 26 - 27, 2009, PAGE 7


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~p









Vernacular Art from the Hill Collection opens August 28 at the Gadsden Arts Center


QUINCY-On August 28, The Gadsden Arts Center will
present one of the most culturally and historically
important art exhibitions in its history: Vernacular Art
from the Hill Collection. Vernacular art is a unique and
powerful expression of culture and community, created
by artists with no formal training, using recycled
materials, and typically including symbolism from the
artists' immediate American and distant cultural roots.
Collectors Lou and Calynne Hill (Tallahassee, FL) have
generously loaned for the exhibition 40 works of art by
14 southern American artists: Thornton Dial Sr.,
Thornton Dial, Jr., O.L. Samuels, Mary Proctor, Purvis
Young, Jimmy Lee Sudduth, Joe Light, Mary T. Smith,
Mose Tolliver, Ruby C. Williams, Edward Mumma,
Johnnie Griner, Lonnie Holley, and Alyne Harris. The
exhibition is centered around the work of Thornton Dial
Sr., who was featured in the 2007 PBS documentary


entitled "Mr. Dial Has Something to Say," and has had
solo exhibitions at the American Folk Art Museum (NY,
NY) and Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (Houston, TX).
Jane Simpson, Visual Arts Director at the Colquitt Arts
Center (Moultrie, GA) will giye a gallery talk on Friday,
August 28 at 6:30pm. The opening reception is from 6-
9pm, offered concurrently with a Quincy Main Street
Music Festival, featuring Crooked Shooz, on the
Courthouse Square from 7-10pm. The exhibition runs
through October 25.
Exhibition-related opportunities include a full-color
exhibition catalog, Docent-guided gallery tours,
Luncheon Tours, an Art Collecting Seminar on
September 18, covering topics such as "Affordable
Collecting" and "What's My Art Worth?", and a Family
Art as Recycling Workshop on October 25. For more
information or to schedule a tour please call (850) 875-


4866.
Vernacular Art from the Hill Collection is presented by
Dermatology Associates of Tallahassee, Edward Babcock
Photography, Pecan Tree Antiques, and the Toni and
Walter Robinson Family Fund, with financial assistance
from the City of Quincy, the Gadsden County Tourist
Development Council, and Visit Florida. Thank you to
The Allison House'Inn, Dr. and Mrs. Moritz Dehler, Mr.
Everitt Drew, Dr. and Mrs. Ocie Harris, Mrs. Mart Hill,
Mr. and Mrs. Mark O'Brjant, Almena and Brooks Pettit,.
and Mr. Bob Wilkinson for additional support.
The Gadsden Arts Center works to improve the quality
of life in the region through cultural, social, and
educational opportunities. Fine art exhibitions, classes
for adults and children, cultural events, summer art


SEE VERNACULAR, PAGE 9


Come to t


ie River


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Saturday September 19, 2009 * 10am - 4pm













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For more information
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~Art


PAGE 8, AUGUST 26 - 27, 2009


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I *







AUGUST 26 - 27, 2009, PAGE 9


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


UF vets treat life-threatening




vascular infection in horses


Two horses at risk for life-threatening
bleeding caused by an uncommon
infection of the internal carotid artery
were successfully treated recently by
University of Florida veterinarians who
used cutting-edge technology to resolve
the problem faster and less invasively
than traditional surgery would allow.
"The problem both of these horses had
involved a disease called guttural pouch
mycosis, or a fungal infection in the
guttural pouch," said Herb
Maisenbacher, V.M.D., an assistant
clinical professor of cardiology at UF's
Veterinary Medical Center. "The
infection can eat its way through the
tissues in the back of the throat,
potentially rupturing the arteries."
Typical symptoms include bleeding
from the nose, Maisenbacher said. UF
veterinarians treated the first horse in
October 2008, and the second in May.
"One horse's red blood cell count was
actually dropping because of the
bleeding," he said. "The other had just
one nose bleed. The owners knew they


needed to do something before it became
life-threatening."
Lynne Kimball-Davis of Wellington
recalled the late October morning when
she went to feed her horse, a Dutch
warmblood named Upper Class, and
discovered him in his stall bleeding
profusely from the nose.
"It looked like he had been
massacred," she said.
Kimball-Davis rushed her horse to
Palm Beach Equine Clinic, where
veterinarians determined a referral to UF
was necessary.
"He was stabilized for two days and
then Sunday morning, we got him up to
Dr. (David) Freeman," Kimball-Davis
said..
She added that Upper Class returned
home after about a week at UF, and has
made steady progress since then.
"I'm getting ready to show him in the
fall again," she said. "Everyone has told
me he's perfectly fine now and not to
give his problem a second thought."
Freeman, an equine surgeon,


collaborated with Maisenbacher's
cardiology team to treat both cases. In
each case, a device known as a vascular
plug was inserted to occlude the at-risk
artery. Before that, surgeons access the
carotid artery through a small incision in
the neck and use a contrast agent to find
the damaged vessels before blocking
them off.
"The affected area is difficult to
approach surgically, but it's been done
before," Maisenbacher said. "Another
approach has been to place multiple
metallic coils inside the vessel to block
the flow of blood. What made our
approach unique is that we were able to
make the procedure go more smoothly
by using newer devices to achieve the
same result."
Freeman, who has used all the various
treatments, favors the new approach.
"The minimally invasive introduction
of nitinol plugs seems the best to me,"
he said. "It's also a nice example of
teamwork between the small and large
animal hospitals that allows us to make


use of leading-edge technologies that
benefit many species."
Maisenbacher said the vascular plugs
are made for use in human medicine, and
are believed to have only been used at
Purdue University's veterinary school to
treat gutteral pouch mycosis in horses.
Because of the success UF has had in
treating dogs with the devices,
Maisenbacher felt a similar result might
be achieved in horses.
"Once the animals wake up from
anesthesia, they are almost back to their
normal selves," he said. "The other
advantage is that the devices offer the
ability to access vessels that by
traditional methods are very difficult to
get to. Plus, there really is no other
medical treatment for this condition."
The procedure takes between two and
three hours, he added.
Anyone seeking more information
about UF's Veterinary Medical Center
and treatments currently available for
pets and horses should call 352-392-
2213 or visit www.vetmed.ufl.edu.


#4F


Lynne Kimball-Davis of Wellington rides her Dutch warmblood, Upper Class. The horse was successfully treated last fall at UF's Veterinary Medical Center for a vascular infection.



Vernacular :Art ..

from the Hill

Collection opens

August 28 at

the Gadsden J





camps, a gift shop, and an
artists' co-op are housed in '' .
the Center's beautiful .
historic buildings, along
with Miss Helen's
Espresso Caf6 D'art. '
Group tours are available
free of charge - call (850)
875-4866 to make your i " "
reservation. A
The Gadsden Arts Center
is located on Quincy's A
historic Courthouse Square
at 13 N. Madison St., just
10 miles from Tallahassee
City Limits. Admission is
$1 (members and children -A
admitted free). Gallery and
gift shop hours are Tuesday
through Saturday, 10am- ' .
5pm, and Sunday, 1-5pm.
Hours for Miss Helen's
Espresso Caf6 D'art and
the Artists Guild Co-op are it Ia
Monday- Saturday 8iam-,i
5pm. Thornton Dial, Following up the Dream, 1992, mixedmedia, 60 x 48 Inches Collectionof Lou and Calynne Hill. -Photo: Submtted







MUM , I,,IIIUu 14 - IA)II M PVS I ROR


.


Aug 20


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Home page of the new site designed to help improve physical fitness in kids.



Web site to help improve physical fitness in kids


By April Frawley Birdwell
Surrounded by Gov. Charlie Crist and star athletes such
as former Tampa Bay Buccaneer Derrick Brooks and
tennis star Jennifer Capriati, state leaders recently
unveiled a UF-developed Web site aimed at increasing.
physical activity in children.
UF informatics specialists teamed with the state
pepArtment of Health, Crist and other agencies to expand
and improve the Web site for the Governor's Fitness
Challenge, an eight-week program that allows children
and schools to earn awards and recognition for their
progress and involvement in physical activities.
The interactive site made its debut at the Governor's
Council on Physical Fitness meeting in Tampa.
Complete with online tools, statistics and even healthy
recipes from star chef Emeril Lagasse, the new and
improved Governor's Fitness Challenge Web site should
'allow more children than ever to participate in the
program, says Narayan Raum, assistant informatics
manager for the UF Clinical and Translational Research
Informatics Program in the College of Medicine
department of epidemiology and health policy research.
"To actually be involved in a project that could
potentially help a lot of kids get even just an extra 10


minutes of exercise a day is very exciting," said Raum,
whose team developed the site. "With the overall positive
impact this could have on many children, there is nothing
to lose here. Even if 10 kids get healthier because they
were involved, it makes it worthwhile."
Before the new site, students and schools had to send
forms and written charts of activity to the state in order to
participate. Now, children and teachers can log in to the
Web site, where they can track their time and even view
live statistics. For example, once this year's program
starts, the top five schools with the highest levels of
participation will be listed on the site. Because schools
are competing for end-of-year monetary prizes, these
statistics could spur a little friendly competition and get
more schools involved, Raum said.
The program starts Sept. 1 for elementary schools and
Nov. 18 for middle schools. Although the challenge is
.school-based, homeschooled children and students in
schools that do not participate can take part in the
program, too.
The state received funding from the AT&T Foundation
to remodel the site. UF's Clinical and Translational
Research Informatics Program software engineering
specialists were hired to reconfigure the site and develop


a database for program statistics. The team, led by project
manager Erik Henrikson, began developing the site in
January.

For more information
and to view the site, visit
www.governorsfitnesschallenge.com.



Want to Subscribe?1


gS.


The Suwannee
Democrat,
The Jasper News
and The Mayo Free
Press is online,
so it's easier
than ever to
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