Group Title: Mayo free press
Title: The Mayo free press
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028404/00264
 Material Information
Title: The Mayo free press
Uniform Title: Mayo free press (Mayo, Fla. 1958)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Mayo free press
Publisher: Bernard Guthrie
Place of Publication: Mayo Fla
Publication Date: February 18, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Mayo (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lafayette County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Lafayette -- Mayo
Coordinates: 30.051944 x -83.175556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 70, no. 27 (June 20, 1958)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028404
Volume ID: VID00264
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN0339
oclc - 33286672
alephbibnum - 002042475
lccn - sn 95047189
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Preceded by: Mayo free press and Lafayette County news

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February is

WOMEN'S
HEART DISEASE

AWARENESS

nflaonline.





I 4Ia


SLocal young lady
competes for The
Miss Jr. Pre-Teen
Miami Title
PAGE9A STORY PAGE 6A


Atlanta man wins regional Elvis tribute artist
competition at the Spirit. INSIDE FOCUS


Among Elvi,

he's the best


IVl12,N. 50e 334600 THRSAY FBRARe1, 01, aaytt- CunyFlria.. SCTOS 2 PG


TEACHER OF THE YEAR


Simply put,


Ruby McCray


is in love with


her job


Garrett, Ruby and Miley McCray.
Courtesy photos


Getting the kids involved in the lesson.
Getting the kids involved in the lesson.


By Joyce Marie Taylor
Correspondent
"I love what I do and
it shows." That is how
Ruby McCray describes
her career as a teacher
with the Lafayette
County school system.
It might also explain
why she was recently
chosen as Teacher of the


By any
measure
used,
Lafayette
Elementary
and High
Schools
rank
among the
best in the
state
of Florida
Tom Lashley
Superintendent
of Schools





6 97113 C75


Year in her county.
Ruby is in her fifth
year of teaching, and
when she found out she
was nominated for the
prestigious title of
Teacher of the Year she
felt, in her own words,
"honored, super-excit-
ed, great and wonder-
ful." She also said that


Lafayette

County

Schools

Happenings
By Tom Lashley
Superintendent of Schools
Greetings, Lafayette
County! This is the first in-
stallment of a weekly col-
umn that I will be doing for
the Free Press, so that we
can let you know more in-
formation about what is go-
ing on at the schools, what
is up-coming, and also to
publicize good things that
are going on in our system.
It is my opinion that the
state of informational media
in our country is much
more attuned to the bad
things that go on, rather


SEE LAFAYETTE, PAGE 7A
YOUR LOCAL
WEATHER


59/31


"everybody at the
school does a wonder-
ful job."
She started out teach-
ing fourth grade at
Lafayette Elementary
School and did that for
four years. Last year the
fourth grade students
placed first in Math
FCAT scores statewide.


Safe Sc

Healthy S
By Marisha Murphy, LES
Prevention Specialist
Having Safe Schools and
Healthy Students is what
our school system is all
about. As teachers we
work hard to ensure that
our students are healthy
and safe. We teach them
ways to stay healthy and
be safe not only at school,
but at home, in the com-
munity or wherever they
may be. The skills that are


Aside from
being a wife to
husband,
S Garrett, a
mother to her
daughter,
Miley, as well
as a full-time
teacher, she
also trains
other teachers
in a special
"hands-on"
math program
called SUMS.

"For a small town like
Mayo, we are extremely
proud that we scored so
highly," McCray said.
When she was asked
in her fifth year to
switch gears and begin
teaching fifth graders,
she did so willingly and
SEE SIMPLY, PAGE 7A



hools,

students
taught to our students at
Lafayette Elementary
School are skills that will
help them throughout their
lives, so they can grow
from safe and healthy stu-
dents to safe and healthy
adults.
With the combined ef-
forts of Project Save,
Lafayette District School
Board and Lafayette Ele-
mentary School there is a


SEE SAFE, PAGE 7A


Ann Land:


Exceptional


dedication


to her work


By Joyce Marie Taylor
Correspondent
Proud recipient of
the School-Related
Employee of the
Year award, Ann
Land has one thing
to say about her
nomination, and that
is, "I feel very hon-
ored."
Ann is an ESE
paraprofessional at
Lafayette Elemen-
tary School. To carry
the title of an ESE


paraprofessional -
ESE stands for Ex-
ceptional Student
Education one
must be highly qual-
ified and meet a vari-
ety of state require-
ments.
Ann has always
loved working with
young children and
Lafayette Elemen-
tary School provides
the perfect environ-
SEE ANN, PAGE 7A


Pam Uornell, Ann Land nnd Angie Iicray
Photos: Joyce Marie Taylor, Correspondent


IN HONOR OF BLACK
HISTORY MONTH
Third Annual African
American Soul Festival
"A People poised to lead and succeed"
Alms of Bethel Community Development,
Inc. (ABCD) will be celebrating African Ameri-
can History month by sponsoring the Third
Annual African American Soul Festival on Feb-
ruary 27, 2010 at 12 noon in the Mayo Town
Park.
This event will feature contests in Art, Ora-


torical and Poetry.
Contests will be
judged by "age"
divisions (pre-k -
adults) and prizes
will be awarded in
each division.
Contests rules and
regulations are
available at
Lafayette Elemen-
SEE THIRD, PAGE 7A


Mrs. Israel's first grade class. Courtesy photo


--I


I Publix/ I


For Kids 12 & Under A
No Purchase Necessary
Must Present Coupon |
Limit 1 Per Person 1
L --.-- -


I Lfaete'outys ewssorc snc 188 W'repodItoIrve


SCHOOL-RELATED
EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR


Ann Land






PAGE 2A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010


Heart Matters


A box of candy, a
beautiful card, dinner
out, or a heartfelt gift?
How did you celebrate
Valentine's Day with
that special someone?
The National Retail Fed-
eration estimates that
Americans spent ap-
proximately 17 billion
dollars on the Valentine
holiday. Why all the
fuss? According to Dr.
Gary Chapman's book
"The Five Love Lan-
guages," love is an emo-
tional need, and what
we must learn about
love is how to express it
in a language that the
other person under-
stands. According to
Chapman, there are five
basic love languages:

Words of Affirma-
tion: this can mean
words of sincere praise
for results and efforts as
well as words of affec-
tion that express positive
thoughts toward some-


one as a person. "You
are such a great friend,"
"Your eyes are beauti-
ful," or "I know that did-
n't turn out like you
hoped, but I am proud of
how hard you tried."
Quality Time: giv-
ing a portion of time and
your undivided atten-
tion is a powerful com-
municator of love to an-
other person because
our lives are so busy.
This doesn't mean sim-
ply being in the same
room at the same time,
but has everything to do
with togetherness, mak-
ing sure the other person
feels like they are the fo-
cus of your attention.
Receiving Gifts:
gifts are visible evidence
of emotional love. Per-
haps this explains the
billions spent on Valen-
tine's Day. The Greek
word from which we get
our English word gift is
"charis" which means
grace or undeserved.


aI
the latest news and stories that touch home.
We want to give it to you.
1 Year In County
Subscription

1 1 $25 1 Year
Out of County

Mail or bring payment to:

Mayno rrre 1rrss
P.O. Box 370 211 Howard St. East
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1734 1-800-525-4182 ext. 152
571512-F


The beauty of gifts is that
they don't have to be
fancy or expensive to be
valuable. A gift says "I
care about you" and "I
think you are impor-
tant." That is the real
treasure.
Acts of Service: Lov-
ing service is an internal-
ly motivated desire to
give your energy for an-
other. Just doing some-
thing for someone, espe-
cially something they
want or need accom-
plished is a powerful
way to communicate
love. Like quality time,
it requires a portion of
our life set aside and do-
nated for another, but
acts of service also al-
lows them to be free of a
task or chore.
Physical Touch:
Touching is an emotion-
ally powerful way to
communicate love, this is
why we love to give and
receive hugs and why a
shoulder massage relax-
es us, touch makes us
feel loved and accepted.
Although all of the five
love languages listed
above are enjoyable and
pleasant, every person
has one or two of these
that makes them feel
more loved than the oth-
ers, and by nature we
speak that language to
others. If we enjoy gifts,
we will probably buy
gifts for others. If we
need words of affirma-
tion, we will probably
leave love notes and be
very encouraging verbal-
ly. The problem comes
when the other person
doesn't speak our lan-
guage. We may be
speaking gifts, but they
want quality time. Or
they may be doing acts


of service for us and we
just want them to say, "I
love you."
We can learn to speak
the language of the other
person if we want them
to feel loved by us. We
can usually determine
our own language by
what we most often do
for another when we
want to show love to
them, and to determine
other's language, we can
ask their preference and
watch what they do for
others. This principle
can be applied in friend-
ships and parent-
child/teenager as well as
romantic relationships.
Learn to speak the lan-
guage of those you love,
because their heart mat-
ters!

El. --i',S- Angie

Heart Matters is a
weekly column written
by Angie Land, Director
of the Family Life Min-
istries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association,
where she teaches bible
studies, leads marriage
and family conferences
and offers biblical coun-
seling to individuals,
couples and families.
Contact Angie with
questions or comments
at angieland3@wind-
stream.net


Airline Baptist Church
B.L.A.S.T. Sunday School class
beginning a new book study
The B.L.A.S.T. Sunday School Class at Airline Bap-
tist Church is beginning a new book study on Sun-
day, February 21, at 9:30. The title of the book is "The
Principle of the Path" by Andy Stanley. This book
shows that once you embrace this Principle, you will
be empowered to identify and follow the path that
leads to your desired destination.
It will enable you to avoid life-wasting detours
along the way. This class is an open class with no age
limits and we welcome you to come and visit and
participate in this exciting book study.
If you have questions, call Pastor Chip Parker at
294-2676.


Dinner Theater at

McCall's Chapel
The annual dinner theater will be held at McCall's
Chapel United Methodist Church on February 20,
with the meal beginning at 5, and the theater begin-
ning at 7, as with our custom the dinner will be
based around pasta, drink and desert.
The tickets are $6 for adults and $3 for children
ages 5 10, and under 5 are free. Carry outs are avail-
able. Tickets can be purchased from any church
member. If you desire to purchase your ticket at the
door please call 386-935-0595 for reservations, as
seating arrangements are limited. But as always we
allow for a few who decide at the last moment.
Come, enjoy an evening of good food and Christ-
ian fun. The church is located at 7755 South State
Road 349, a mile North of the Dixie County line, at
the Southern Gate way to Hatch Bend, in Lafayette
County.
Got questions? Need directions? Call 386-935-0595
and ask for Pastor Taylor.


The Bowmans in Concert at Alton

Church of God Family Life Center
The Bowmans will be in Concert on Sunday, Feb-
ruary 21, 2010 at Alton Church of God Family Life
Center, beginning at 6 p.m.
Blaine Bowman was saved in 1971 during the Jesus
Movement at a FGBMFI meeting in Denver, Col-
orado.
He has since filled nearly 7,000 engagements all
over the USA and other countries as a preacher,
teacher, singer, songwriter, musician and entertain-
er.
You may laugh or you may cry, but it is certain
you will be touched by his ministry as he shares his
testimony in Word and Song!


AIRLINE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC)......294-2676 Methodist Church
Pastor Chip Parker Phone: 386-294-1661
Youth Pastor Orry Agner MAYO FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday Located SE corner of Hwy. 27 & FL 51 Mayo
Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Pastor: Rev. Connie Steele
Morning Worship 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m. Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
W wednesday ,, .... I, I I ,,)a.m .
Fellowship Supper 6:00 p.m. .. '
AWANA & Bible Study 6:30 p.m. I .. p.m.
Located Four Miles East of Mayo on Highway 27
"0 Come Let us Worship The Lord" Ps. 95:6 571532-F "The Friendly Mayo Methodist" 571550-F

ALTON CHURCH OF GOD...................294-3133 MAYO BAPTIST CHURCH...........(386)294-1020
Pastor Rev. Tim Hamm 916 N. Fletcher Ave.
Youth Pastor Chad Morrin Pastor: Brother Jimmy Legg
Music Director Blanche Perry Music Director Kathy Palamino
Children's Pastor Ryan & Tiffany Perry Sunday Schedule
Sunday School 9:30-10:30 a.m. Bible Study 9:45 A.M.
Worship Service/K.I.D.S. Church ...........10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Sunday NightService 11:00.M.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Night Schedule
Family Night Youth Club Church.. ....7:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Service & Youth & Children Meeting ...........................7:00 P.M.
State Road 27 571536-F mavobaptistchurch@alltelnet 571558-F

BETHEL HOLY CHURCH....................294-1932 MIDWAY BAPTIST CHURCH...................935-4993
"Affiliated with Mt. Sinai Holy Churches of America Inc." Sunday School Pastor:Danny Rogers9:45 a.m.
Pastor Elder Carolyn Demps Worship Service 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Discipleshii i ......... :
Worship Service 12:00 p.m. Evening W... I,1 ...
Thursday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Prayer Meeting Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Located on County Road 354
357 Pine Street "For If Ye Forgive Men Their Tresspasses Your Heavenly
"Membership means Discipleship" 571541 F Father Will Also Forgive You" Matt. 6:14 571563-F


HATCHBEND APOSTOLIC CHURCH..935-2806
Pastor Rev. Steve Boyd
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service 7:30 p.m.
Located 4 miles South on Hwy. 349,
then left on CR 138, follow signs.
571547-F
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD.................294-1811
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
hiday Worship Service 10:45 a.m.
Kid's Church 11:00 a.m.
I. 1- ... I1. .I III lp .m .
,,,Youth Impact 7:00 p.m.
Wehesd Adult Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Kenny Sullivan
Youth Pastor: Daryl Fletcher
Located at 294 SE Mill Street, Mayo "Renewing Hope and Building Lives"


ST. MATTHEW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Contact Number in Mayo (386) 294-1839
Sr. Warden Eva Bolton
Celebration of Holy Eucharist at 7:00 PM
each Wednesday to be followed by light
refreshments and Christian Education.
Located One Block North of the Courthouse in Mayo.

Brewer Lake Baptist Church
Off Hwy. 53 in Day, FL 386-294-1578
"We're Going, Growing and Glowing for God"
Sunday School 10 a.m.
I .. .. i a.m .
Wednesday_
Children, Youth & Adult 7 p.m.
Matt Swain, Pastor William Sircy, Youth
Visit us on the web at www.brewerlakebaptistchurch corn
"Come To Day...Come Today!" 571571-F


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Rev. Charlie Walker
Sunday Early Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
I ,,,n ,_ I I II i

Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
Mission Classes 7:00 p.m.
Located Two Miles North of Mayo Off Highway 51
"Come And Hear, All Ye That Fear God" Ps. 66:16 571574-F

PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC).294-1306
Pastor Todd Babione
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Discipleship ii ........ 7:00 p.m.
Evening Training 6:00 p.m.
Seven miles West of Mayo,
left on CR 534 then right on 350A
-Jesus Saves- 571580F

NEW HARMONY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
160th St.
(Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right)
Pastor: Stan Posey
Phone (386) 776-1806


SUNDAY
Sunday Worship
Bible Study
WEDNESDAY
Women's Bible Study


9:30 am
10:30 am


10:00 am
571581-F


Hatch Bend Baptist Church
Pastor Paul A. Coleman
935-0943
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening 7:00 p.m.


3029 S.E. CR 500


571582-F


LIGHTHOUSE CHRISTIAN CENTER
"Freedom is Here"
PO Box 458, Mayo, FL 32066 386-294-3089
www.lccmayo.com
S .... . I -,,,, I 10:30 a.m .
Kids of the ... -,,, I, 10:30 a.m.
I . . .I 7:00 p.m .
Bible Study Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Army of Fire Youth Wednesday 7:00 p.m.


Call Junk Joe


For Junk Vehicles
Will Remove any kind
of scrap metal
Free Pickup

Call 386-867-1396574553-F


To Place Your Church In

Our Church Directory, Call

Nancy at 386-362-1734


New Beginnings Church
a place for you
Pastor...............Wayne Hudson
Phone Number........386-294-1244
newbeginningschurch@alltel.net
Purpose Statement:
where People can discover and develop a passion for
God hat is Rea relevant, and relational.
New Location:
163 W. Main Street, Suite 500
Service Schedule:
I ,,, -' ,, I iI. ,.,
www.newbeginningschurchmayo.com
571584-F
Ephesus Advent
Christian Church
Pastor Bill Talley
963-5600 ~ 208-9626
Sunday School Service.... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service.............. 11:00 a.m.
Prayer Meeting................. 7:00 p.m.
571599-F

To Place

Your Church

In Our

Church

Directory,

Call Nancy

at 386-

362-1734


PAGE 2A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18,2010






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 3A


Baseball and Softball

is underway at

Lafayette High School!
Linda Smith
Both the LHS Softball
Coach, Derek Garland, as well
as the Varsity Baseball coach,
Jamie Fike, gave updates on
the upcoming season.
Both coaches shared their
optimism for the outcome of
this year's teams, as well as Softball Coach,
asking for the support of local Derek Garland
fans.
Coach Garland said he has 3
seniors, 2 juniors and 4 sopho-
mores on the team this year.
He also shared that they have
plenty of "pitching" to go
around this year as well, hav-
ing four pitchers that will be
available for play.
Another highlight of this
coming season is that the dis-
trict tournament will be held Baseball Coach,
right here in Mayo, which Jamie Fike
hasn't been the case in several
years.
Coach Garland expressed his appreciation for
Sonja Land, and Tori Lyons, (former LHS student)
who are doing a great job assisting with the
coaching duties of the softball team.
Coach Fike who is in his fourth year teaching in
Lafayette County, said that he is greatly im-
pressed with Lafayette County schools, as well as
the community of Lafayette County. Fike said he
is looking forward to coaching the varsity base-
ball team, assisted by Herbert Perry. He ex-
pressed his appreciation for being given the op-
portunity to be the varsity coach. He too, urged
the community to come out and support the base-
ball and softball teams.


Starting your day right!


Abound in Grace
February 18

And God is able to
make all grace abound to
you, so that in all things
at all times, having all
that you need, you will
abound in every good
work.

My definition of "get"
is to obtain by struggle
and effort, and "receive"
is to act like a receptacle
and simply take in what
is offered. We can re-
ceive mercy, grace,


strength, forgiveness,
and love from the Lord.
It is a new day -- and
God's mercy is new
every morning (see
Lamentations 3:22-23).
You can have a brand
new start today. Allow
God's mercy to strength-
en and heal you before
starting your routine ac-
tivities. Receive His
healing power, and let
its grace work in you.
Today can be effortless
as you depend on God's
grace to do what He has
called you to do.


Ramblings from the past......

Mayo Merchants, continued from Dec. 30, 2009


By: O.A. Winburn, Jr.
Scrubhammock@aol. corn

The "pressing Club" as
it was known was Demp
Gainey's dry cleaning
and tailor shop. Mr.
Gainey was the tailor
and he could mend a
pair of trousers or make
you a suit of clothes. He
had help with the clean-
ing and pressing but had
been seen doing it all if
need be. He'd been at
this for a long time be-
fore I ever got old
enough to know. The
Gainey's lived over on
the next corner west of
the Presbyterian Church
and there were mostly
girls in that family, about
five as I recall: Hattie,
Claudia. Leona, Ruby
and Dorothy and one
son, Edsel. It was Edsel's
and Ruby's stint at the
Pressing Club when I
came along. When Ed-
sel, or Buddy as we
knew him got a little old-
er, he would deliver the
cleaned and pressed arti-
cles that had been
brought in.
All these new Fangled
fabrics, the no iron, wrin-
kle free ones hadn't
come along yet and their
appearance on the scene
eventually spelled the
demise of the once thriv-
ing "Pressing Club."
That business was an-
other of those spots that
served as a hang out for
many of the youths
around Mayo during
those days. Buddy and


Ruby were quite popular
and their friends were in
and out of that place
quite frequently, espe-
cially during the sum-
mer months while school
was out. If you looked
closely enough you
could sometimes see
that look of consterna-
tion on the elder Mr.
Gainey's face because of
the crowd of young folks
in there, likely interfer-
ing with the normal rou-
tine of doing business,
keeping Buddy and
Ruby from their chores.
He just plodded on, nev-
er saying anything, at
least not audible.
Sometime in the early
40's the everlasting pop-
ular board game, "Mo-
nopoly" came upon the
scene and the only one I
knew of in Mayo was at
the Gainey home and it
was always sorta crowd-
ed around there, kids
watching as they waited
for a chance to play.
Delivery was always
done on Thursday after-
noon. That was the time
when all the merchants
closed their doors at
noon. Those were the
days when our elected
officials were consider-
ate of the needs of the
people and closed their
doors on Thursday after-
noon also so that they
could remain open a half
day on Saturday which
gave working folks a
chance to tend to official
business without having
to take off time from
work.
The items delivered
were neatly done up on
hangars with a cover
over them and the cost
noted on a slip of paper


was pinned to that cov-
er. Most folks were
home and paid upon de-
livery but those who
were missed, the clothes
were left and paid for
later at the "Club".
During the war, those
metal hangars were in
short supply due to the
war effort and Mr.
Gainey eagerly paid a
penny for each one re-
turned. Just more easy
money for some of us
youngsters.
Those Thursday after-
noons were a time for
the merchants to spend
as they chose, working
in their vegetable gar-
den, visiting or maybe
just resting. Some of
them were avid fisher-
men and would take to
the river. Fishing was
good in the Suwannee
back then and mercury
wasn't a known prob-
lem. Mr. Guess Croft
was one such fisherman
and it was interesting to
hear some of the yarns
he would spin about his
adventures on the river.
Jabo, Leb Taylor's
huge bull dog would
sometimes take to the


road out of boredom
when his master closed
for the afternoon. He
could be seen riding on
the running board of a
car heading over to
Branford and that ani-
mal knew when to get
off and after his visit, he
would hop a ride back to
Mayo. Talk about a
smart dog but old Jabo
could hitch a ride merely
by playing possum be-
side the road and as cu-
riosity would cause an
approaching motorist to
slow, Jabo merely
walked over and
flopped down on the
running board. Someone
wrote an article in the
Times Union about Jabo
many years ago. Inter-
esting reading.
So when Saturday
rolled around, the court
house was open until
noon and folks could
tend to the affairs there.
And the merchants
stayed open into the
night, well after the free
show was over if there
were potential cus-
tomers still to be seen on
the streets. To me those
were the good old days.


Michelle Townsend
Murray Benefit
Pulled Pork Dinner
February 27, 2010, 11 a.m. until at the 4th Dis-
trict Community Center.
Dinners served with baked beans, potato salad,
dessert, bread and tea. Price is $8.
An account is also set up at Lafayette State Bank
for anyone who would like to donate with
Michelle's medical expenses.
You can contact Mary Beth Hamlin or Stephanie
Ogden at LSB, 294-1901 or 935-6363.
Diagnosis: 3rd stage cancer, going through
chemo/radiation at North Florida Regional Can-
cer Center.


PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTIONS

March 1st is the deadline for application of
Property Tax Exemptions

Anytime there is a change in ownership of property, a new exemption
application must be completed in order to receive an exemption.

Homestead Exemption Widow or Widower Exemption Total and
Permanent Disability Exemptions Service Connected Disability Exemptions
- Agricultural Classification of Lands. These exemptions must be applied
for.

Senior Citizens 65 or Older $10,000.00 Exemption. {must meet Income
Requirements and apply for this exemption}. Only applies to County portion of
taxes.

Portability If you had a homestead tax exemption for 2008 or 2009 in another
county or within the county and have moved and you plan to apply for the
Homestead Tax Exemption on your new location in Lafayette County you may
have some assessed value savings created by Save Our Homes that you can
transfer from your prior location to your new location that could save you tax
dollars. Portability is only retroactive back to you having a prior homestead in
2008 or 2009.
TO RECEIVE PORTABILITY THERE IS AN APPLICATION THAT
MUST BE COMPLETED. Portability does NOT automatically happen.

$25,000.00 Tangible Personal Property Tax Exemption For 2010, if your
equipment value is less than $25,000.00 then you will not need to complete a
return, but will rather simply sign a form stating that your equipment value total is
less than $25,000.00. If you add equipment and the total value again exceeds
$25,000.00 then you will again need to file a return. All New Businesses must file
a return the first year even though the eqiupment total may be less than
$25,000.00.

10% Cap on Non-Homestead Property This cap took effect in 2009 and does
NOT have to be applied for. Agricultural assessed properties are not protected by
this cap.

Lands Classified as Agricultural On the last day of the 2008 Florida
legislative session a bill was passed to remove the minimum acreage requirement
for property owners to be eligible for the agricultural classification. Having your
property assessed as agriculture can provide some tax savings. The agricultural
classification can only be granted if you are using your property for bona fide
commercial agriculture purposes. You must be able to prove this practice before
this classification can be granted. An agricultural product must be produced and
income or future generated income by this product for it to be considered a
commercial agricultural practice.

Please come by the Property Appraiser's Office to make application or call us if
you have any questions at 386-294-1991.
Thank You
Tim Walker
Lafayette County Property Appraiser
577540-F


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18,2010


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 3A









Hatch Bend Baptist Youth fundraiser held


at the Suwannee River Stock Dog Trials
Ja Smith The weekend was a worked each of the three
he third annual mixture of rainy, windy, days including Sunday,


Suwannee River Stock
Dog trials were held this
past weekend, Feb. 5, 6,
and 7 at 'Culleymont in
Dixie' farm on Highway
349.
A "stock dog trial" is
designed to teach all of
the skills a good ranch or
farm dog needs to per-
form their daily work.
The idea is for the dog,
with the assistance of the
handler controlling with
voice or whistle, to flank
right, left, stop, walk up
or make whatever move
needed to move the
three sheep through the
course, while the judges
watch and award or take
away points for each
handler and his dog dur-
ing the ten minute time
slot.


chilly weather, but in
spite of mother nature,
the dog handlers and
their dogs, worked the
course set up for the tri-
als, as spectators enjoyed
watching these amazing
dogs.
Also at the dog trials,
all three days, the youth
of Hatch Bend Baptist
Church and adult vol-
unteers, were set up to
serve a variety of foods
such as breakfast sand-
wiches, coffee, as well as
chili, hamburgers, hot
dogs, drinks, baked
goods and more. All the
proceeds that were
made from the food
sales are going towards
a mission trip that the
youth are planning.
Some of the youth
miENAOWu ME~


but their Sunday School
teacher was there to
make sure that they got
their lesson, just as if
they were in the Sunday
School class at church.
The youth raised
$1329 before expenses,
giving them around
$800-$900, all of which
will go towards their
mission trip planned for
this summer.
Lots of the food and
drink products were do-
nated. A special thanks
goes out to all who orga-
nized, donated food,
worked at the trials, at-
tended and bought food,
made cash donations, or
helped out in any way to
make the fundraiser for
Hatch Bend Baptist
Youth, a great success.


Hatch Bend Baptist Youth, and volunteers prepare and sell stood at their tundraiser.


Terry Dees, Social Director at Hatch Bend Baptist Church stands ready and waiting under
the food tent at the dog trials.


Volunteers, and youth ready to serve.


Parker Hill is exhausted
from working at the youth
fund-raiser.

LIBRARY
DIRECTOR
Starting Salary:
$40,000-44,000 plus 1, ... .'
Job Description: Three Rivers
Regional Library System
(TRRLS), located on Florida's
Nature Coast, seeks a Director
to plan, organize, direct, and
coordinate activities of a rural
three county public library
cooperative. Prepare and
maintain library budget, submit
Annual and Long Range plans
to TRRLS Library Board,
administer online catalog and
library webpage, supervise
staff of three, coordinate State
Aid to Libraries grant for all
members, and evaluate grant
opportunities to establish,
sustain, or enhance library
services. Technology skills
essential EOE/DFWP
Education/Qualifications: This
position requires an ALA
accredited MLS or MLIS
degree, and at least 2 years of
full-time, paid professional
experience post degree.
Location: Three Rivers
Regional Library System, 262
West Main St., Mayo, FL
32066
Contact: Stephen J. Hurd,
shurd@neflin.org, Phone:
386-294-3858, Fax: 386-294-
3861
www.3rivers.lib.fl.us
Instructions for Applying:
Send letter of application,
resume, and 3 references by
April 15, 2010 to:
Stephen J. Hurd
Three Rivers
Regional Library System
P.O. Box 1340
Mayo, FL 32066 5777o2rd


The dog handler gives voice commands to his dog as the dog maneuvers the sheep
through the course.


Handler and dog working those sheep.







february Special

f Sofa & Chair
No Up bolstered in
TRICK any
fabric we stock!
$489.00
Price includes fabric & labor.
More than 300 fabrics to select from!

Price also includes spring & frame repairs,
new padding added to entire piece.
New cushion foam is extra if needed.
NO Seconds NO Close-Outs ALL First Quality Material.
"I personally guarantee all work to suit you"


EARNHARDT & SONS UPHOLSTERY O
MADISON, FLORIDA ICs

1-850-973-6006 OR 1-850-973-4667


Spectators enjoy watching tne amazing Doraer collies ana tneir nanalers at worK.


118 E. Park St. Perry, FL 32348
Toll-Free 1-866-Perry Movies (737-7966)
Visit our website at www.perrytheatre.com
Friday/Saturday ........ $5.00 all seats
Sunday $5.00 all seats
1 Free Refill On Med/Lg Drink & All Popcorn
Starting Friday 2/19/10


(Located behind
Foodland
Shopping Center)
Tot airy
10 min (PG)


Fri.& Sat............ :0 p.m.
ISunday.............400 pm.


Fri. & Sat................... 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat................... 7:30 p.m.
Sunday..................... 4:00 p.m. Sunday.................... 4:00 p.m.
Coming Attractions: We donot accept 50 or $100 bills
Avatar DearJohn -.A nW ia
* Percy Jackson and the Olympians f i l Tit
WoValentines Day Alice In
Wonderland (starts Mar. 5)

BUY I GET I FREE COUPONS.
* (Limit one per visit) Certain restrictions may apply. Expires 2/28/10 .'


Feb. 22426, 2010
Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri.
22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th
Breakfast Cereal, Cereal Cereal, Cereal, Cereal,
Elem. Crackers, Crackers, Crackers Crackers Crackers,
Elem. Yogurt, Pop Tarts, "'' -... .. ... :: i 1
School Juice, Milk .. .. .
Lunch Hot Dog, Vegetable Soup, Macaroni & Chicken & Rice, Pizza,
Cole Slaw, Salad, Cheese, Sweet Green Corn,
Elem. French Fries, Dressing, Green Beans, Peas, Pineapple
School Applesauce, Crackers, Rolls, Cornbread, Tidbits,
Milk Peaches, Fruit Cocktail, Diced Pears, Sweet Potato
Milk Milk Chocolate Chip Pudding,
Cookies, Milk Milk
Breakfast Sausage Biscuit, French Toast, Breakfast Pizza, Waffles, Breakfast
S Yogurt, Cereal, Sausage Patty, Cereal, .. i ,1 Burrito,
nigh Crackers, Cereal, Crrackers, .i Cereal,
School Juice, Banana, i Juice, ...i Crackers,
Milk ,, i i, Milk .,, .1 Juice, Milk
Lunch Hamburgers Spaghetti (Little Chili Hot Dogs), Chicken & Pepperoni Pizza
Lunch (Turkey Sandwich), r. Toss Saad Noodles (Chef Salad),
High French Fries, Carrot Sticks, (Little Caesar Baked Potato,
School Lettuce, Tomato, Carrot & Celery Peanut Butter Pizza), Corn, Brocccoli/Cheese
Dill Chips, Sticks, Sandwich, Turnip Greens, Sauce,
Carrots Sicks Sliced, alaes Apple Juice, Apples, Apple
irangeWedges, O e neapple Fruit Cup Shced Peaches, Orange Pineapple
0u re Saltines, Cornbread, Cowbo oes,
Cooie M Sweet Potato Milk
Cookies, Milk Milk Pudding, Milk
Breakfast will now be provided at LHS each morning beginning at 7:45 a.m.
Sponsored: Mayo Th tway

4Hwy 27 294-1165 575543-F


L-R Caroline Hill and Terry Dees, making sure the coffee is
good and hot for this cold windy day at the dog trials.


Lafayette Apartments
Hurry in and apply at "The
Best Place to Live!" Rental
Assistance, 1, 2, & 3 BR. HC
& Non-HC accessible
apartments. Laundry facility
& playground. We pay water,
sewer & garbage. Mayo, FL.
Ph: 386-294-2720, TDD/TTY
711. Equal Housing
Opportunity 571522-F


Advertise your YARD SALE,
VEHICLES OR UNWANTED
ITEMS IN THE CLASSIFIED.
Call (386) 362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182 to place
your ad today
-. A


Lind
T]


PAGE 4A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18,2010






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL -~ PAGE 5A


With appreciation for your sympathy....
Words just don't seem sufficient to express our
thanks for all that you have done to make our
grief bearable.
The family of Minister Willie Lee Jones would
like to send our expression of gratitude and ap-
preciation for the outpouring of love, support,
and comfort.
We appreciate all your acts of kindness during
this most difficult time. May God continue to
bless you as you have been a blessing to us.
The Jones Family


Government officials

DIRECTORY


Allen Boyd,
Congressman
Washington office:
1227 Longworth House
Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: 202-225-5235
Fax: 202-225-5615

Bill Nelson, Senator
716 Senate Hart Bldg.
Washington, DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-5274
Fax: 202-228-2183

George Lemieux Senator
356 Russell Senate
Office Building


Washington, DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3041
Fax: 202-228-5171

Rep. Ander Crenshaw
440 Cannon House
Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: 202-225-5744
Fax: 202-225-3973

Rep. Cliff Stearns
2370 Rayburn House
Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: 202-225-5744
Fax: 202-225-3973


THE ANNUAL To Tax Or Not To Tax:

OLD TIMERS, A Social Security Question


REUNION


If you remember the
Buckville Juke, you're
an oldtimer.

Here is another ex-
cerpt from AS WE RE-
MEMBER, a book by
the LHS 1943 graduat-
ing class, which is this
year's door prize.
Knute Brumley wrote
his memory about
the......
"Saturday night
dance at Buckville. At
the time it was against
the law for an automo-
bile to be parked near
a place of entertain-
ment, so Mr. John Fol-
som would leave his
horse barn gate open
and we would park in
his horse lot out of
sight of any passers-
by. State Trooper Sim-
mie Moore was a
source of info about
when his Big Boss was
to be in the area check-
ing on people parked
around places that
was against the law."

Please Join Us and
Bring a Covered Dish

When:
February 27, 2010

Where:
Mayo Community Center

Time:
Start Arriving
About 11 A.M.


wr iOWENS


PROPANE, INC.
"Service With A Smile"


WE ARE BACK ONCE AGAIN
SERVING NORTH FLORIDA!!!
Now HAMILTON, SUWANNEE & LAFAYETTE COUNTIES
No Price Discrimination *
Same Low Price For All Customers *
(Call For Quote)
Call To Ask About No Tank Rental
24 Hour Service
208 West Screven Street Quitman, Georgia 31643
1-(229)263-5004 Toll Free 1-(866)382-2484

. I. l. .l. .l. .. 1 -1 I .*.:...i....


By Donna Maitland
Social Security District
Manager, Gainesville, FIl
When it comes to Social
Security benefits, you
may be wondering who
must pay taxes on them
and who does not. Let's
look at the numbers.
If you file a federal tax
return as an "individual"
and your total income is
more than $25,000, then
the answer for you is yes:
you'll have to pay federal
taxes on your benefits. If
you file a joint return and
you and your spouse
have a total income more
than $32,000, you'll be ex-
pected to pay federal tax-
es as well. If your taxable
income is below those
thresholds, there is no
need to pay taxes on your
Social Security benefits.
If you need to pay taxes
on a portion of your ben-
efits, you will need your
SSA-1099. This form
shows the total amount
of benefits received in the
previous year and is used
to find out whether any
benefits are subject to tax.
You will need to submit it
when you complete your
federal income tax re-
turn.
You already should
have received your SSA-
1099 for tax year 2009 in
the mail they were auto-
matically mailed to all


MAYO FREE PRESS
Published weekly every Thursday, USPS #334-600
Phone: (386) 362-1734 Fax: (386) 362-6827





Myra Regan, Robert Bridges, Linda Smith,
Publisher Group Editor Manager
Annual subscription rate:
$17 in county / $25 out of county
Periodicals postage paid at Live Oak, Florida
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
The Mayo Free Press
P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, Florida 32064
Office located at 211 Howard St. East, Live Oak, FL
Editorial Policy: The Mayo Free Press encourages readers to write letters to the
editor expressing their opinion. All letters should be brief and to the point and those
selected for publication (we reserved the right to accept or reject all letters) may be
edited for space reasons. Letters must be signed and include the writer's address and
phone number to be considered for publication. All letters become the property of
The Mayo Free Press.


at..

Lighthouse Christian Center

Sunday, February 21, 2010 6 p.m.
772 SR 51 Mayo, FL 386-294-3089 www.lccmayo.com
Barry McGee has been awarded ICM's "Christian Comedian of the
Year" for the past three years! Barry ministers through comedy,
music and drama. Come and enjoy Jhii special service with us!
f Admission is Free. Donations will be accepted. -
ILA-JB 578006-F5_



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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18,2010


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 5A


beneficiaries by January
31, 2010. If you receive
Social Security and have
not yet received a Form
SSA-1099 for 2009, you
can request a replace-
ment online at
"http:/ /www.socialse-
curity.gov / onlineser-
vices."
Or you can call Social
Security's toll-free num-
ber, 1-800-772-1213 (TTY,
1-800-325-0778) and ask
for a replacement SSA-
1099 to be mailed to you.
If you would like more
information about pay-


ing taxes on your Social
Security benefits, visit
"http:/ /www.irs.gov"
and read Publication
Number 915, Social Secu-
rity and Equivalent Rail-
road Retirement Benefits.
You also can call the In-
ternal Revenue Service
toll-free at 1-800-829-3676
(TTY, 1-800-829-4059).
So if you've been won-
dering whether or not
you'll need to pay taxes
on your Social Security
benefits and what forms
you may need, now you
know the simple facts.






PAGE 6A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010


Mayo Legals
PUBLIC HEARING
The Lafayette County Commission will
hold a Public Hearing to consider the fol-
lowing proposed ordinance that will CON-
TINUE the 6 cent local option gas tax for
a five year period.
The ordinance has to be adopted every
five years. The hearing will be at a regular
scheduled meeting on Monday February
22, 2010 at 6:00 p.m. and will be held in
the County Commissioner's Meeting
Room on the Second Floor of the
Lafayette County Courthouse in Mayo,
Florida.


2/11, 18


By Order Of:
Curtis 0. Hamlin, Chairman
Lafayette County Commission


BID SOLICITATION
Re-Advertisement
BID NO. 2009-15
The Suwannee County Board of County
Commissioners, Suwannee County, Flori-
da will receive sealed bids, at the Clerk of
Court CashierWindow at the Courthouse,
Attention: Clerk to the Board, 200 South
Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, FL 32064 until
Friday, February 26, 2010 at 4:00 P.M. at
4:00 PM. Bids will be publicly opened
and read aloud at the Live Oak City Hall
Meeting Room, 101 S.W. White Avenue,
Live Oak, Florida 32064 on Tuesday,
March 2, 2010 at 9:00 A.M. or thereafter,
for the following:
REPLACEMENT OR REPAIR OF FOUR
PIPE A/C SYSTEM LOCATED AT THE
SUWANNEE COUNTY JAIL
The Board of County Commissioners may
accept all or part of any bid. Any bid re-
ceived after Friday, February 26, 2010 at
4:00 P.M., will be retained at the Clerk of
Court Office unopened and will not be
considered. The Board of County Com-
missioners reserves the right to reject any
and all bids, waive formalities and read-
vertise and award the bid in the best in-
terest of Suwannee County.
The Board of County Commissioners
does not discriminate because of race,
creed, color, national origin or handicap
status.
The Board of County Commissioners re-
quires a Sworn Statement under section
287.133(3)(a), FS., on Public Entity
Crimes.
Anyone wishing to obtain bid documents
may contact the Administrative Services
Department, at 386/364-3410. Any ques-
tions concerning the bid specifications
should be directed to Steve Sharpless,
Maintenance Director at (386)364-6524.
All bids must be submitted in triplicate
and labeled on the outside of the enve-
lope as "ATTENTION: CLERK TO THE
BOARD, SEALED FOR RE-ADVER-
TISEMENT BID NO. 2009-15 FOR RE-
PLACEMENT OR REPAIR OF FOUR
PIPE A/C SYSTEM LOCATED AT THE
SUWANNEE COUNTY JAIL."
WESLEY WAINWRIGHT, CHAIRMAN
SUWANNEE COUNTY BOARD
OF COMMISSIONERS
2/18, 25

BID SOLICITATION
BID NO. 2010-01
The Suwannee County Board of County
Commissioners, Suwannee County, Flori-
da will receive sealed bids, at the Clerk of
Court CashierWindow at the Courthouse,
Attention: Clerk to the Board, 200 South
Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, FL 32064 until
Friday, February 26, 2010 at 4:00 P.M.
Bids will be publicly opened and read
aloud at the Live Oak City Hall Meeting
Room, 101 S.W. White Avenue, Live Oak,
Florida 32064 on Tuesday, March, 2010
at 9:00 A.M. or thereafter, for the follow-
ing:

HAULING OF LIMEROCK
FOR THE SUWANNEE COUNTY
PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT
The Board of County Commissioners may
accept all or part of any bid. Any bid re-
ceived after Friday, February 26, 2010 at
4:00 P.M., will be retained at the Clerk of
Court Office unopened and will not be
considered. The Board of County Com-
missioners reserves the right to reject any
and all bids, waive formalities and read-
vertise and award the bid in the best in-
terest of Suwannee County
The Board of County Commissioners
does not discriminate because of race,
creed, color, national origin or handicap
status.
The Board of County Commissioners re-
quires a Sworn Statement under section
287.133(3)(a), FS., on Public Entity
Crimes.
Anyone wishing to obtain bid documents
may contact the Administrative Services
Department, at 386/364-3410. Any ques-
tions concerning the bid specifications
should be directed to Jerry Sikes, Public


Works Director at (386)362-3992.
All bids must be submitted in triplicate and
labeled on the outside of the envelope as
"ATTENTION: CLERK TO THE BOARD,
SEALED BID NO. 2010-01 FOR HAUL-
ING OF LIMEROCK FOR THE SUWAN-
NEE COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS DE-
PARTMENT."
WESLEY WAINWRIGHT, CHAIRMAN
SUWANNEE COUNTY BOARD
OF COMMISSIONERS
2/18, 25

PUBLIC NOTICE
The Lafayette County Commission will be
accepting sealed bids for a Commercial
Grade Zero Turn Radius Riding Lawn-
mower at a regular scheduled meeting on
Monday, the 22nd day of February 2010
at 6:00 p.m. The meeting will be held in
the County Commissioner's Meeting
Room at the Lafayette County Court-
house in Mayo, Florida. Bids must be
turned in by 12:00 p.m. on Monday, Feb-
ruary 22, 2010 to the Lafayette County
Clerk of Court, PO. Box 88, Mayo, Florida
32066. Specifications for the Lawnmower
may alin ho nhtained from the Clirk nf


Court.
Terms of payment: cas
delivery
Delivery date: within 4
The Board of County
Lafayette County rese
ject any and all bids,
to re-advertise and a
best interest of Lafaye
and to accept the low.
By Order Of t
Lafay


2/11, 18


PUBLIC N


The Lafayette Count
hold a public hearing
assessment exempt
scheduled meeting on
22, 2010 at 5:45 p.m.
will be held in the C
meeting room on the
Courthouse in Mayo, F

Curtis O
Lafayette C
2/11, 18

PUBLIC M
TO WHOM IT MP
Please take notice th.
Regional Library Boar
Meeting on Thursday,
7:00 p.m., at the Lafa
Library, in Mayo, Florid
All interested persons
tend and be heard. F
that if a person decide
cision made by the Bo
any matter consider
that person will need


upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office notified of your current
address. (You may file Notice of Cur-
rent Address, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form 12.915.)
Future papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record at the
clerks office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family
Law Rules of Procedure, requires cer-
tain automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and information. Failure to com-
ply can result in sanctions, including
dismissal or striking of pleadings.
Dated: 2/1/10
Ricky Lyons
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Hannah Owens
Deputy Clerk
2/11, 18, 25, 3/4


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS


For Notice of Intent to Provide Wireless
Middle Mile Internet Access and Data
sh within 30 days of Transport Services
The North Florida Broadband Authority
45 days. ("NFBA") announces two public hearings
to which all interested persons are invit-
Commissioners of ed. The NFBA is a legal entity and public
serve the right to re- body created pursuant to the provisions
to waive formalities, of provisions of Section 163.01, Florida
ward the bid in the Statutes, and an Interlocal Agreement
ette County Florida, among: Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Dixie,
est and best bid. Gilchrist, Hamilton, Jefferson, Lafayette,
Levy Madison, Putnam, Suwannee, Tay-
he Board of County Ior and Union Counties and municipalities
Commissioners of of Cedar Key, Cross City, Lake City, Live
ette County, Florida Oak, Monticello, Perry White Springs and
Worthington Springs, Florida. The first
Ricky Lyons public hearing will be held at 10:00 AM
Clerk to the Board ET on March 16, 2010 at the Suwannee
River Water Management District Of-
fice, 9225 County Road 49, Live Oak,
Florida 32060. The Public Hearing will
NOTICE be continued to March 17, 2010 at 2:00
pm ET at the Suwannee River Water
y Commission will Management District Office, 9225
to consider special County Road 49, Live Oak, Florida
ions at a regular 32060. The second public hearing will
n Monday, February be held at 2:00 PM ET on April 16,2010
The public hearing at the Suwannee River Water Manage-
:ounty Commission ment District Office, 9225 County Road
second floor of the 49, Live Oak, Florida 32060. The Public
Florida. Hearing will be continued to April 21,
2010 at 2:00 pm ET at the Suwannee
By Order Of: River Water Management District Of-
Hamlin, Chairman fice, 9225 County Road 49, Live Oak,
County Commission Florida 32060. The public hearings are
being held to accept comments from the
public and dealers of communications
EETING services prior to the NFBA Board of Di-
AY CONCERN rectors making a determination to provide
broadband middle mile and data transport
at the Three Rivers communications services within the 14
rd will hold a Board county NFBA service area as required by
March 11, 2010, at Section 350.81, Florida Statutes. All in-
yette County public terested persons shall have an opportuni-
da. ty to be heard and to file written com-
ments with the NFBA. In accordance with
s are invited to at- the Americans with Disabilities Act, per-
Please be advised, sons needing a special accommodation
as to appeal any de- or an interpreter to participate in this pro-
card with respect to ceeding should contact the NFBA Board
d at such hearing, Clerk at (877) 552-3482, at least seven
a record of the pro- (7) days prior to the date of the hearing.


ceedings, and that, for such purpose,
he/she may need to ensure that a verba-
tim record of the proceedings is made,
which record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
"Person with disabilities requesting rea-
sonable accommodations to participate in
this proceeding should contact (386)294-
1600 (Voice & TDD) or via Florida Relay
Service at (800)955-8771."
2/18

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR LAFAYETTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-20-DR
JESSICA COLLINS,
PETITIONER
and
STEPHEN COLLINS,
RESPONDENT.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: Stephen Collins
1436 Nocoseka Trail Apt A2
Aniston, AL 36207

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has
been filed against you and that you are
required to serve a copy of you written de-
fenses, if any, to it on Jessica Collins,
whose address is 545 SW Ford Road,
Mayo, FL 32066 on or before 3/5/2010,
and file the original with the clerk of the
Court at PO. Box 88, Mayo, FL 32066 be-
fore service on Petitioner or immediately
thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default
may be entered against you for the re-
lief demanded in the petition.

Copies of all court documents in this
case, including orders, are available at
the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office.
You may review these documents


Pursuant to Section 350.81, Florida
Statutes, the North Florida Broadband
Authority, a single purpose government
entity by and through its Board of Direc-
tors, proposes to offer for compensation
and provide wireless Middle Mile Internet
Access and Data Transport Services in a
14 county region inclusive of the following
Counties: Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Dix-
ie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Jefferson,
Lafayette, Levy, Madison, Putnam,
Suwannee, Taylor, and Union, beginning
May 1, 2010.
2/18

PUBLIC NOTICE
The Lafayette County Commission will
hold a regular meeting on Monday, Febru-
ary 22, 2010 at 5:30 p.m. The meeting will
be held in the County Commissioner's
Meeting Room at the Lafayette County
Courthouse in Mayo, Florida. Listed below
is an agenda for the meeting.
By Order of:
Curtis 0. Hamlin
Chairman
Lafayette County Commission
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS:
1. Call the meeting to order at 5:30 p.m.
2. Invocation and pledge to the flag.
3. Approve the minutes.
4. Special needs from the community.
5. Department Heads:
A) Marcus Calhoun-Maintenance
B) Edward Dodd-Public Works
C) Donnie Land-Public Safety
D) Bobby Johnson-Building/Zoning
6. Pam Blackman-Administrator Lafayette
County Health Department, Presentation
to the Board.
7. Public Hearing-Consider Special As-
sessment exemption requests.
8. Public Hearing-Consider a proposed or-
dinance and interlocal agreement to con-
tinue the 6 cent local option gas tax for a
five year period.
9. Open bids-new pick-up truck for the
Road Department.
10. Open bids-commercial grade zero turn


mower.
11. Leenette McMillan-various items
12. Approve the bills
13. New Business
14. Adjourn


Granddaughter of
W.L. and Ruth Folsom of
Mayo, Kelly Folsom, of
Pembroke Pines, was re-
cently selected to partici-
pate in Nationals' 2010
Miss Jr. Pre-Teen Miami
pageant competition
that will take place Feb-
ruary 28, 2010. Kelly
learned of her accep-
tance into this year's
competition as Nation-
als, Inc. announced their
selections recently. Kelly
submitted an application
and took part in an inter-
view session that was
conducted by Natalie
Michelle, this year's Mi-
ami Pageant Coordina-
tor.
Kelly will be compet-
ing for her share of thou-
sands of dollars in prizes
and specialty gifts that
will be distributed to
contestants. Kelly will be
competing in the Miss Jr.
Pre-Teen division, one of
four divisions that will


SONS DECIDING TO APPEAL ANY
MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS PUB-
LIC HEARING WILL NEED A RECORD
OF THE HEARING AND MAY NEED TO
ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD
OF THE PROCEEDING IS MADE


ALL MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC ARE WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TES-
WELCOME TO ATTEND. NOTICE IS TIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH
FURTHER HEREBY GIVEN, PUR- THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
SUANT TO FLORIDA STATUTE
286.0105, THAT ANY PERSON OR PER- PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES RE-


have young ladies be-
tween the ages of 7 and
19 competing in model-
ing routines which in-
clude casual wear and
formal wear. Most im-
portant, Kelly will dis-
play her personality and
interviewing skills while
interviewing with this
year's Miami judging
panel. Personality is the
number one aspect that
each contestant is judged
on during all phases of
competition.
If Kelly were to win
the title of Miss Jr. Pre-
Teen Miami, she would
represent Miami and the
surrounding communi-
ties at the Cities of
America National Com-
petition that will take
place in Orlando, Fla.
Over $60,000 in prizes
and awards will be pre-
sented at the National
Competition while each
winner enjoys this ex-
pense paid trip of five


QUESTING REASONABLE ACCOMMO-
DATIONS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS
PROCEEDING SHOULD CONTACT
(386) 294-1600 OR VIA FLORIDA RELAY
SERVICE AT (800) 955-8771.
See www.lafayetteclerk com for updates
and amendments to the aaenda
2/18


nights and six days in
Orlando.
There is no cost to Kel-
ly for participating in the
pageant competition.
Community businesses,
organizations, and pri-
vate individuals will as-
sist Kelly in participat-
ing in this year's compe-
tition by becoming an of-
ficial sponsor to her.
Through sponsorship,
each contestant receives
all the necessary train-
ing, rehearsals, and fi-
nancial support which
will allow Kelly to be-
come a very confident
and well-prepared con-
testant in this year's Mi-
ami Pageant.
Any business, organi-
zation, or private indi-
vidual who may be in-
terested in becoming a
sponsor to Kelly may
contact her pageant co-
ordinator, Natalie
Michelle at 1-800-569-
2487.


Funding announced to help Florida

Farmers extend their growing season


3-Year Pilot Project to verify

effectiveness of high tunnels

The U.S. Department of Agriculturefs
Natural Resources Conservation Ser-
vice (NRCS) has announced a new pilot
project under the 'Know Your Farmer,
Know Your Food' initiative for farmers
to establish high tunnels also known
as hoop houses to increase the avail-
ability of locally grown produce in a
conservation-friendly way. NRCS will
provide financial assistance to qualified
producers for the project through the
Environmental Quality Incentives Pro-
gram (EQIP) and the EQIP Organic Ini-
tiative.
"This pilot project is going to give us
real-world information that farmers all
over the country can use to decide if
they want to add high tunnels to their
operations. We know that these fixtures
can help producers extend their grow-
ing season and hopefully add to their
bottom line," said USDA Deputy Secre-
tary Kathleen Merrigan.
A high tunnel is a greenhouse-like
structure made of ribs of plastic or met-
al pipe covered with a layer of plastic
sheeting, at least six feet in height,
which modifies the climate inside to
create more favorable growing condi-
tions for vegetables and other specialty
crops grown in the natural soil beneath
it.


High tunnels are easy to build, main-
tain and move and may be used year-
round in Florida, providing steady in-
comes to farmers a significant advan-
tage to owners of small farms, limited-
resource farmers and organic produc-
ers. There may also be advantages to
Floridafs natural resources with high
tunnel production. "There is a lot less
fertilizer use under the tunnels than
what we would use in an open field sit-
uation," says Skeeter Bethea, farm man-
ager for Utopia Farms in Florida.
Qualified participants can receive
funding for one high tunnel that can
cover as much as five percent of one
acre; or approximately a 30 by 72 foot
structure.
Farmers who would like to sign-up
for the high tunnel pilot should call or
visit their local NRCS office before the
March 12, 2010, application deadline.
USDA service center locations are listed
on-line at "http://offices.usda.gov/"
\o "http://offices.usda.gov/" or in the
phone book under Federal Govern-
ment, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
General program information is avail-
able on the NRCS Florida website at
"outbind:/ /115 / www.fl.nrcs.usda.gov
" www.fl.nrcs.usda.gov.
The NRCS is an agency of the U.S.
Department of Agriculture that helps
people conserve, maintain, and im-
prove our natural resources and the en-
vironment.


JOE P. BURNS

FUNERAL HOME and CREMATORY
OF MAYO

0Lo 386-294-2658 0

Locally owned & operated since 1953

Located 7 blocks South of the Courthouse
at the corner of Lake St. and Monroe Ave.
575937-F



Byrd's Power Equipment

Sales & Service All Makes & Models

---Husqvama-- HUSTLER
Dealer TurfEquipment
WSLIF lAMCNHAKMID.
,MvrE uS . l TRICK ACCESSORIES

CLOSED SATURDAYS UNTIL SPRING

11860 E. U.S. 27, Branford, FL 32008
Hours: Mon.-Fri.7 a.m.-5 p.m. (386) 935-1544
CLOSED SATURDAYS 570869-F


& Excavating

Front End Loader Limerock
CAT Back Hoe Top Soil *
Gradall Clearing
Earthmoving Site Prep *
Pond Digging Fill Dirt *

Kenny Hart Jr., Owner 386-294-2621 570868-F


Come by & see us at


Chr Attic


Helen 3113 US Hwy. 27, Beverly
935-0926 Branford 935-2920

Open Tues.-Sun. 2-6 (Winter Hours)
SI...1. ,:/ i n Antiques & Collectibles,
Gifts & Thrifts
Glassware *Crystal
S* Knives Stoneware (Hull) Furniture
S73020-F Call about Retail Space for your uIoh' ibl/c'


WJOLFE PLUMBING, INC.

Repair Remodel Drain Cleaning
New Construction
7 Days 24 Hours
386-935-0616


State Certified #CFC051621
Serving All North Central Florida


570861-F


Daniels Funeral Homes


& Crematory, Inc.


SBranford 935-1124

^Live Oak 362-4333
I S/ James (Jim) B. Daniels, III, L.F.D.
Keith Daniels, L.F.D.
t J.B. Daniels, Jr.
)i, (Local) Family Owned & Operated
575936-F
570874-F


Local young lady competes for


The Miss Jr. Pre-Teen Miami Title


3-
H








Lafayette County Schools Happenings


Continued From Page 1A

than the good. Bad news
sells, but I don't feel we
always have to accept
that.
By any measure used,
Lafayette Elementary
and High Schools rank
among the best in the
state of Florida, and be-
cause of that I feel we
should strive to do two
things, 1) illuminate and
pat on the back those
people and events that
are positive, and 2) use a
column like this to in-
form and educate par-
ents and citizens about
what is going on, so that
an already committed
community can be even
more involved in their
children's lives.
The first item I am go-
ing to mention is a re-
port that we received re-


cently about the dropout
rates and graduation
rates for disabled stu-
dents in the state. Cur-
rently, we are in 14th
place (out of 67 districts)
in dropout rates for stu-
dents with disabilities.
That means that only 13
districts have a lower
dropout rate prior to
graduation than we do,
at some point during
their academic career.
We are 5th in the state in
graduation rate for stu-
dents with disabilities
who earned a regular
diploma. That means
that they passed the
FCAT or an equivalent,
got their credits, and
met the same criteria as
other students. It also
means that a whole lot
of teachers worked hard
to help them.
A few years ago, we


Safe Schools,


Healthy Students


Continued From Page 1A

program developed for
Lafayette Elementary
students that teaches
and encourages them to
be Safe and Healthy
Students. This program
is a universal drug and
violence prevention
program. Universal
means it is taught to
every student in the
school rather than se-
lected children. The
curriculum of this pro-
gram is designed for
Kindergarten through
fifth grade students to
help promote social
competence, reduce the
children's social and
emotional problems,
and to prevent drug
use. This program helps
increase children's safe-
ty and well-being by
teaching them skills
that reduce their ag-
gression and increase
their social competence.
The children in this
program have the op-
portunity to express


themselves and what
they have learned
through activities such
as role plays, writing
songs, drawing pic-
tures, writing poems
and having group dis-
cussions on any issues
they may be facing or
could face in the future.
This program com-
bined with the contin-
ued support of parents,
teachers, and the com-
munity our students
will be and Stay Safe
and Healthy Students.
For more information
about the Safe Schools
Healthy Students
(SSHS) Initiative, please
contact Becky Sharpe,
Project Director of
SSHS at 386-294-1417 or
by email at bsharpe@
lafayette.kl2.fl.us. The
SSHS Partnership
meets at 9:30 am on the
second Tuesday of each
month in the SSHS
Conference Room. Par-
ent and community
members are encour-
aged to attend.


implemented an inclu-
sion program currently
being coordinated by
Bill Shows at LHS and
Jamie Fike at LES. At the
time, a lot of people, my-
self included, wondered
if it would work. Obvi-
ously these teachers, and
the regular classroom
teachers as well, have
worked very hard to
make sure these stu-
dents' needs are being


met. I think it comes
down to having a coor-
dinated, concerted effort
all the way from Mrs.
Land at the county office
down through the teach-
ers, and the ESE aides
and everyone else in-
volved. I think that all
parties realize in today's
world everyone needs
the best diploma possi-
ble in the job markets we
are all facing.


Spring sports season
has arrived, but we (as of
this writing) still have
one winter program
moving up through the
playoff ranks. Tonight,
the girls' varsity basket-
ball team goes to Port St.
Joe in a regional
matchup that has final
four implications. The
girls recently won their
seventh straight district
title, and ninth in the last


ten years. That's impres-
sive. Baseball, softball,
and track have all either
started playing or are
practicing for upcoming
events. Check with Mike
Harris and get a sched-
ule, so you can come out
and support these stu-
dents. Also, spring dra-
ma and musical practice
is happening, and the
FCAT is just around the
corner....


Simply put, Ruby McCray is in love with her job
Continued From Page 1A "We work together as a team," Lafayette County, is looking for-


she says, and "being consistent
has a lot to do with our success."
Ruby McCray, as well as all of


ward to the results of the state
Teacher of the Year award, which
will be announced in July.


with great anticipation.
With a 16-month-old baby girl
at home, Ruby stays quite busy.
Aside from being a wife to hus-
band, Garrett, a mother to her
daughter, Miley, as well as a full-
time teacher, she also trains oth-
er teachers in a special "hands-
on" math program called SUMS.
The idea is to let students discov-
er on their own how things
work, rather than just telling
them. It must be working out
well because Ruby says the chil-
dren love it.
Ruby has been humbled by this
prestigious award and she stress-
es that it isn't just one individual
in the school system who should
be recognized.


Ann Land: Exceptional dedication to her work


Continued From Page 1A

ment for her to fulfill her
passion. Her husband,
Donnie, is retired from
the military, who now
serves as Public Safety
Director in Lafayette
County.
Early on in their mar-
riage, Ann provided
home daycare to other


military families who
needed someone to care
for their young children.
Then, after raising three
children of her own,
who gave her three
beautiful grandchildren,
Ann's passion only grew
stronger.
"Each day is a new
day with children," she
said, smiling at the


group of young students
in her classroom.
One thing she stresses
is that she doesn't do her
job alone. Colleagues
Angie McCray, Jamie
Fike and Pam Cornell all
work together to provide
quality care and instruc-
tion for special-needs
children from kinder-
garten to second grade.


Working with special-
needs students involves
a little extra effort by
breaking down standard
teaching programs into
workable segments, as
well as melding those
children into the main-
stream of the rest of the
student body. As Ann
says, "We're a good
team."


Third Annual African

American Soul Festival
Continued From Page 1A

tary. Lafayette High School and the ABCD Center.
Entertainment will be provided throughout the
day. Food booths will be available and drawings for
prizes will be held throughout the program. THE
GRAND PRIZE GIVEAWAY WILL BE $200 CASH.
Please come out and fellowship with us. For more
information please contact the ABCD Center at 294-
1183 or Taylor McGrew 294-1701 (W) or 294-2440
(H). Hope to see you on Saturday, Feb. 27th.


Serving Madison, Jefferson,

Taylor & Lafayette Counties

Auto, Life, Health, Home







Freddy Pitts, Agency Manager

Jimmy King, Agent
Glen King, Agent
233 W. Base St. Madison
(850) 973-4071

Freddy Pitts Glen King, Agent
105 W. Anderson St. Monticello
(850) 997-2213

Freddy Pitts Ryan Perry, Agent
813 S. Washington St. Perry
(850) 584-2371

Freddy Pitts Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL
(386) 294-1399
24/7 Claim Service: 1-866-275-7322

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211 Howard St. East, Live Oak 362-1734


573230-F


-


j


'A


Illustrating a lesson. Courtesy photo


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18,2010


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 7A


-












Looking back fifteen years to "1995"


The Hornets practiced


hard Saturday. Okay boys, break time. Get a quick drink and back to the field.


uur ootDaii ouaay is Lance braswell. His number is //. He
likes football. He plays offensive line and linebacker. His
hobbies are riding horses and going out with his friends.
His favorite movie is "Forest Gump." He likes the excite-
ment and the hitting of football. He wanted to be a football
player because he thinks it is fun. Written by: Ronnie Jack-
son and Chere Ray.


The Hornet Majorettes were in beautiful form for Friday night's game against Aucilla. Pictured L-R: Lindy Kelly, Kim Dri-
ver, Aimee Byrd, Wendy Garrard and Cheryl Johnson.


Queen Lisa Kelly


Pictured rom Lett: Bunny hnodes, buwannee County As-
sistant Clerk of Court and Coordinator, Lana Arnold, Exec-
utive Director Lafayette County Teen Court, and Katie Self,
Executive Director Sarasota County Teen Court.


Gold Kist Annual Producers Meeting.....
Trawick Farms, owned by Paul and Barbara Trawick of
Lafayette County, were top producers as well. Their farm
produced a successful yield of 95.45% for a total of
824,740 lbs. which brought an average of 17.670 per
pound. Presenting the award was Joe Pete Cannon, their
district manager.


He Like Me!... Alex Gresham, a Pre-K student in Betty
Ray's class has decided these furry guys are OK as he
gives 'Lucky' a pat on the head. Alex learned all about
miniature ponies as part of a week-long study on land
transportation.


Sponsored by:



31o41*


.A..f .. Shatara Blake, the 14 year old daughter of Annette and An-
MTV. V thony Blake, granddaughter of Clara Oglesby, was crowned
"Pop Davis Perfect Attendance Awards" were presented to Miss Bethel of Mt. Sinai, Mayo, Florida, June 10, 1995,
(L-R) Jana Hart, Angie Ceraso, B.Z. Cashman, Logan Pastor: Min. Carolyn Demps. She will representing her
Whalen. church in Washington, D.C., July 19-23. Great Job Shatara!


Iurni


Funeral Home & Crematory
of Mayo
386-294-2658
Locally owned & operated.
Located 7 blocks South of the courthouse at the corner
of Lake St. and Monroe Ave. 576010-F


PAGE 8A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18,2010





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL -~ PAGE 9A


Februat


hei


eI


ry is



men s




irt disease




areness


Li[1HeaptII[1 I L Ii1 dies tillaingcasIo' eahi n '[woml e n,] I iIac] o IIiLn (toD4new ] Pep


Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics 2010 Update (American Heart Association,
December 17, 2009) has been issued just in time for American Heart Month, and the
news is sobering. Despite the fact that there may be broader awareness in the
population about women's heart disease, there are still disparities in how women are
diagnosed and treated, translating into more than 42 million women currently living
with or at risk for heart disease in the United States.
According to the report, one woman dies every minute from cardiovascular disease
(CVD), citing a total of 432,709 female deaths in 2006 more than the combined
deaths from all cancers, chronic lower respiratory disease, Alzheimer's disease, and
accidents. Of clear concern are the rates of overweight, obesity, diabetes, and high
blood pressure, all key contributors to heart disease. Although there was a higher
percentage 57% of awareness among women of CVD being the leading cause
of death among women than in recent surveys, the percentage of African-American
and Hispanic women was still low and unchanged. Hispanic women also reported
that there was i> ..iiin they can do to keep themselves from getting CVD."
"WomenHeart encourages all women to take charge of their heart health. It is
important for women to learn their risk for heart disease, know how to live a heart
healthy lifestyle, and recognize the signs and symptoms of heart disease in the event
she needs evaluation and treatment," said Lisa M. Tate, Chief Executive Officer of
WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease.
On the bright side, in a national survey of women of all races, the number of
women who identified CVD as the leading cause of heart disease has almost doubled
since 1997 although the rate of awareness was higher in white women than in
black and Hispanic women. Respondents to the survey also cited confusion about
"basic prevention strategies." Indications are that there is more work to do to make
sure that all women, regardless of race, have clear and current information about
heart disease, including how to take preventative measures to help avoid developing
CVD.

Myths & Truths on Women

and Heart Disease
MYTH #1: Most women in America die from cancer.
TRUTH: Heart disease is the leading cause of death of women in the U.S.
Almost every minute, a woman in the U.S. dies from heart disease. Nearly five
times as many women 12, 1 111 )) will die from heart attacks alone this year than
will die from breast cancer.[1]
MYTH #2: Heart disease is a man's problem.
TRUTH: Since 1984, more women than men have died of heart disease each
year. Women have a 28% increased risk of dying as compared to men to die
within the first year after a heart attack.[1]
MYTH #3: Only older women have heart disease.
TRUTH: Heart disease threatens all women, even those as young as 30 and
40.For example, the rate of sudden cardiac death of women in their 30s and 40s
is increasing much faster than in men their same age-rising 21 percent in the
1990s.[2]
MYTH #4: Most doctors know about women's risk of heart disease.
TRUTH: A 2005 American Heart Association study showed that only eight
percent of primary care physicians and 17 percent of cardiologists knew that
heart disease kills more women than men.[3]
MYTH #5: Women's and men's heart disease is the same and should be treated
the same.
TRUTH: In many cases, the experts don't know. The vast majority of
cardiovascular research has been performed on men and/or data have not been
separated out based on gender. Where men and women have been studied
separately, some important differences have been identified. As importantly,
however, women should be treated as aggressively as men when there is proof
of benefit, such as using stations and aspirin after a heart attack.
MYTH #6: Women and men with heart disease get the same care.
TRUTH: Far too often, women fighting heart disease are not accurately
diagnosed and do not receive the care they need when they need it. A study
published in the January, 2009 issue of the journal Heart showed that among
heart patients, women were less likely than men to receive medications called
beta blockers, stations and ACE inhibitors-which are crucial to prevent further
heart problems.[5] Women are also less likely to receive ICDs (an implantable
cardioverter defibrillator, a device that helps to control irregular heartbeats) or
even aspirin, following a diagnosis of heart disease.[5] Even newer studies
confirm the disparities in care and treatment between men and women.[4,5]
MYTH #7: If heart disease isn't in your family, it isn't your problem.
TRUTH: A family history of heart disease does increase risk of developing the
disease. But many women without a family history have heart attacks or heart
problems. High blood-pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, kidney disease, poor
dietary patterns, high sodium intake, smoking, being overweight or obese, and
physical inactivity, all factors that increase your risk of heart disease.
MYTH #8: You can't do anything to stop heart disease.
TRUTH: Yes, you can! You can significantly reduce your risk of heart disease
if you have the information you need, know the questions to ask your health
provider and have the support to make heart-smart changes in your life. Visit
our Prevention & Early Detection for more information.
*Information available at www.womenheart.org


Some key statistical updates from the report include:
Heart disease is the leading cause of death of American women, killing more than
a third of them.
More women than men die of heart disease each year.
35.3% of deaths in American women over the age of 20, or more than 432,000,
are caused by cardiovascular disease each year.
More than 200,000 women die each year from heart attacks- nearly five times as
many women as breast cancer.
Women are less likely than men to receive appropriate treatment after a heart
attack.
Women compromise only 27% of participants in all heart-related research studies.
58% of Caucasian women, 80% of African-American women, and 74% Hispanic-
American women are overweight or obese.
Women with diabetes are 2.5 times more likely to have heart attacks.
48% of adult women have total cholesterol of at least 200mg/dL.
50% of Caucasian women, 64% of African-American women, 60% of Hispanic
women, and 53% of Asian/Pacific Islander women are sedentary and get no leisure
time physical activity.
African-American women, despite their higher risk of heart disease, were 10%
less likely to receive aspirin and 27% less likely to receive cholesterol-lowering
drugs.
Some medications to treat hypertension in African-American patients work better
and some work worse compared to Caucasian patients.
Among African-American women over the age of 20, 44.8% have high blood
pressure.
Compared with Caucasian women, Hispanic women are nearly three times as
likely to be uninsured.
Prevalence for diabetes in Mexican-American women is two times higher than
Caucasian women.



Butternut Squash and Ginger Soup
Ingredients: Makes 6 servings
1 tsp mild olive oil Each serving equals 1 cup vegetables
1-1/2 cups chopped onion
3 cloves garlic, crushed
2 tsp chopped fresh ginger
1-1/2 lbs (6 cups) peeled raw butternut or other winter squash
1/2 lb (1 cup) new potatoes, peeled and chopped
1 cup unsweetened 100% apple juice '
3 cups water 1/2 cup skim milk
1/2 tsp salt garnish
1/2 cup chopped Granny Smith apple
2 Tbsp chopped parsley
Heat the oil in a high-sided skillet or large saucepan on medium high. Saut6 the
onions 3 minutes or until tender. Add the garlic and ginger and cook 1 minute
longer. Add the squash, potatoes, 100% apple juice, and water or broth. Bring to
a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer 35 to 40 minutes or until very soft. Puree in
a blender or processor, in batches, until smooth. Pour back into the pan and stir
in the milk and salt. Reheat and serve topped with chopped apple and parsley.

S8 Easy Steps
to

Get More

Physically

Active
1. Get a partner. Find a friend to join you in becoming more active. Exercising
together will provide you both with support and encouragement to stick with
exercising when you get tired or discouraged.
2. Take a walk every day. Start small with a short walk and gradually build up to
at least 30 minutes or more each day. (Or take several fifteen-minute walks).
Walking with a friend or spouse will make your walks even more enjoyable.
3. Move more often. When watching television, get up and walk around or
march in place during commercials. Try hiding your remote get up each time you
want to change the TV channel. At work hand deliver messages to colleagues
instead of using the telephone or E-mail. If you're on the phone, get up and walk
around. Dance when listening to music.
4. Take the stairs. Try taking the steps down (and several flights up) instead of
the elevator.
5. Ditch the car. Park your car several blocks away from your destination. If you
use public transportation, get off before your stop and walk the rest of the way.
6. Plan in advance. Include activities such as walking, golfing, hiking, bicycling,
skating, or swimming in your vacation plans.
7. Hydrate. Be sure to drink lots of water before, during, and after you exercise.
8. Think outside the box. Try several kinds of exercise and find ones that you
really enjoy.
Before you begin exercising, talk with your doctor to see if you should take any
precautions.


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