Group Title: Mayo free press
Title: The Mayo free press
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028404/00261
 Material Information
Title: The Mayo free press
Uniform Title: Mayo free press (Mayo, Fla. : 1958)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Mayo free press
Publisher: Bernard Guthrie
Place of Publication: Mayo Fla
Publication Date: January 28, 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Mayo (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lafayette County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Lafayette -- Mayo
Coordinates: 30.051944 x -83.175556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 70, no. 27 (June 20, 1958)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028404
Volume ID: VID00261
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN0339
oclc - 33286672
alephbibnum - 002042475
lccn - sn 95047189
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Preceded by: Mayo free press and Lafayette County news

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Sree


Elaine Williams
grew up in
Lafayette
County. Now
she's back -
or close to it.
By Joyce Marie Taylor
Correspondent

For Elaine Williams it was all
about coming back home when it
was time for her and her hus-
band to make that all-important
retirement decision. Although
Elaine was born in Taylor Coun-
ty, she always felt like Lafayette
County was her home, since the
majority of her relatives lived
there and it is where she spent
her childhood. Her father was
born and raised in a place that
the locals refer to as Fish Creek,
just over the Lafayette Bridge,
where his old house still stands.
As a young girl, she worked
on a tobacco farm in Lafayette to
fund her love of clothes shop-
ping and many days were spent
picking grapes. Friday nights,
however, were for hopping onto
a mule fueled wagon cart to
head into downtown Branford
for movie night. Back then, since
there was no theater, the movies
were shown on the side of a
wall.
She later settled in Perry for 42
years, where she met and then
married her best friend, David,
who, it's been said, strongly re-
sembles Robin Leach, the host of
the television series, "Lifestyles

SEE COMING HOME, PAGE 13A


TOP:
David and
Elaine
Williams.

RIGHT:
Elaine's
father's
former
home.

Photos:
Joyce
Marie
Taylor,
Correspon-
dent


The Lafayette County delegation with state Rep. Debbie Boyd (third from left). Courtesy photo


Local ladies get legislative briefing


Several ladies from
Lafayette County at-
tended the annual Dis-
trict Women's Confer-
ence held in Stein-
hatchee last week,
sponsored by the Flori-
da Farm Bureau Feder-
ation.






6 97[113 07521 8


Nearly 35 women
from surrounding
counties heard Rep.
Debbie Boyd speak on
a number of key leg-
islative issues which
will be discussed dur-
ing the coming session
in March. One of the
biggest issues will be
Amendment 4, the
Hometown Democra-
cy issue, which, they
were told, could be
devastating to small
rural counties. If
Amendment 4 passes,


voters would have to
approve all changes to
an area's comprehen-
sive land use plan, ef-
fectively halting
growth.
Women attending
from Lafayette County
were Kelly Lyons, Dis-
trict Women's Chair-
man; Brenda Land, lo-
cal County Women's
Chairman; Nikki
Shaw, Sue Kerby and
Julie Koon.
In addition to Boyd,
the ladies also heard


from Senate aide Lynn
Bannister, from Sen.
Bill Nelson's office,
and Congressional
aide Jackie Smith from
Congressman Ander
Crenshaw's office.
Farm Bureau
Women have many
projects that are done
during the year, one of
which is Celebration of
Food Check Out
Week. The ladies from
Lafayette and sur-
rounding counties will
be going to the Ronald


McDonald House in
February to host a lun-
cheon celebrating this
day. Also, the county
will be donating food
to this great charity.
The aides from Con-
gressman Crenshaw
and Senator Nelson's
office spoke on the is-
sue of healthcare that
is being debated in
Washington. They
noted this issue is per-
haps the most hotly
debated issue ever in
Washington.


Coming home


SEE SUWANNEE, PAGE 13A





Publix /

-I
For Kids 12 & Under
No Purchase Necessary
Must Present Coupon |
Limit 1 Per Person 1


I Lfaete'outys ewssorc snc 188 W'repodItoIrve


THE



B_.-_





her debut
Florida


Focus



Jobless

rate in

Lafayette

rises

Suwannee
remains the
same, Hamilton
goes up
By Jeff Waters
Unemployment in
Lafayette County rose to
8.7 percent in December
2009, according to figures
released Friday by the
state. November's adjust-
ed figure was 8.3 per-
cent, compared to 5.6
percent for December
2008.
The jobless rate in
Suwannee County re-
mained the same at 10.9
percent for December.
November's adjusted fig-
ure was also 10.9 per-
cent, compared to 7.2
percent for December
2008.
Hamilton County rose
to 12.5 from an adjusted
figure of 12.4 in Novem-
ber. The December 2008
rate was 10.1 percent.
The jobless rate in De-
cember 2009 for the state
was 11.8 percent, up
from November of 11.5
percent. The December
2008 rate was 7.6 percent.
Lafayette County is
still under the national
unemployment rate of 10
percent.


Suwannee

River Stock

Dog Trials
The Suwannee River
Stock Dog Trails will be
held locally at the 'Cul-
leymont in Dixie' Farm
on Highway 349 in the
northeast corner of Dixie
County on Feb. 5, 6, and
7. This will be the third
annual stock dog trials to
be held at the farm in
Dixie County.
"For hundreds of
years, stock dog trials
have been held in Scot-
land and England where
sheep dogs, primarily
Border Collies and their
handlers exhibit their
skills in handling sheep
through an assigned ob-
stacle course. A trial is
designed to test all of the
skills a good ranch or
farm dog needs to per-
form its daily work. To
reach the level of training
and skill required to suc-
cessfully compete in a tri-
al, takes years of work on
the part of the dog and
the handler.






PAGE 2A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


I lost something this
week, and I wonder if
you have ever noticed
that no matter how small
or large your loss, it im-
mediately becomes the
center of your attention.
Lost your car keys?
Everything else stops
and a massive hunt be-
gins. Lose your job? All
the frustrations that
went along with it seem
minor in comparison to
trying to find a new one.
However, as frustrating
as losing keys and jobs
can be, they can be re-
placed. Lose your health
and every other issue be-
comes secondary. Lose a
loved one and you won-
der, "How on earth did I
ever take one moment
for granted?"
In Luke 15, the Bible
records three of Jesus,
parables dealing with
something lost, a sheep,
a coin, and a son. The
shepherd has one hun-
dred sheep and loses
one, so he secures the


ninety-nine and goes in
search of the one. A cer-
tain woman with ten
coins, loses one and
lights the lamp to search
carefully until she finds
it. The father, whose
youngest son chooses to
leave home, waits and
watches for his return.
In all three examples,
what was lost became
the concentrated focus,
what was taken for
granted, immediately
became urgently impor-
tant.
Perhaps then, experi-
encing loss is the cure for
a more tragic problem,
the agent of familiarity.
In his book, God Came
Near, author Max Luca-
do writes,
"(Familiarity's) goal is
nothing less than to take
what is most precious to
us and make it appear
most common. To say
that this agent of famil-
iarity breeds contempt is
to let him off easy. Con-
tempt is just one of his


the latest news and stories that touch home.
We want to give it to you.
1 Year In County
Subscription

1 1Year
$ I 2 Out of County

Mail or bring payment to:

iMapu ffrrr 100
P.O. Box 370 211 Howard St. East
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1734 1-800-525-4182 ext. 152
571512-F


offspring. He also sires
broken hearts, wasted
hours, and an insatiable
desire for more. He's an
expert in robbing the
sparkle and replacing it
with the drab, and his
strategy is deceptive."
By definition the word
"familiar" means "fre-
quently seen or experi-
enced; of everyday oc-
currence." No surprises
there, but the next de-
scription should shake
us out of our business as
usual routines. Familiar-
ity indicates an absence
of ceremony, life with
nothing to celebrate be-
cause everything be-
comes, ordinary. That
girl who used to make
your heart race, barely
gets a second glance
from the comfort of your
recliner, and that guy
you used to dress up for
on Saturday nights now
gets only the left-over
energy from your day.
What about the child
who brought tears to
your eyes in the delivery
room, but now spends
more time in front of the
television than with you.
With our spouse, chil-
dren, family and friends,
every day of life is cause
for a celebration by the
sheer fact that we aren't
promised even one
more, and each one
could be the last.
What I lost this week
was a friend, and while I
have joy and peace


knowing that he is in
heaven, I am sad that I
let his friendship grow
ordinary to me. I saw
him every week, with no
thought that this week
would be any different.
While the opportunity to
tell him just what a great
guy I thought he was is
gone, I have been re-
minded of the extraordi-
nary reasons to celebrate
life, it is precious and it is
short, and nothing about
it is ordinary.

Because Every Heart
Matters, Angie

Heart Matters is a week-
ly column written by Angie
Land, Director of the Fam-
ily Life Ministries of the
Lafayette Baptist Associa-
tion, where she teaches
Bible studies, leads mar-
riage and family confer-
ences and offers Biblical
counseling to individuals,
couples and families.
Contact Angie with ques-
tions or comments at ang-
ieland3@windstream.net


Minister Willie Lee
Jones

Minister Willie Lee
Jones was born March
18, 1930 in Jasper, Flori-
da to the late Henry and
Katie Jones. He was edu-
cated in Jasper, Florida.
There he met and mar-
ried Mary Lee Crockett.
They were united for
twenty-two years. From
this union nine children
were born.
A beautiful life came
to an end on Friday, Jan-
uary 22, 2010. Two
brothers Willie George
Cambell and Earle Jones,
a sister, Rosa Mae Norris
and a daughter, Mary
Louise Perry preceded
him in death.
Willie always believed
in God and served his
life as a Christian. He ac-
cepted Christ as His Sav-
ior at an early age. He
enjoyed hunting and
fishing throughout his
life. Willie was a mem-
ber of Little Galilee
where he faithfully
served as a Minister. He
was well known and
well liked in the commu-
nity. Willie was very
proud of his family
whom he loved dearly.
They will continue to
live and love in his hon-
or.
He leaves to cherish
his memory eight chil-
dren: Freddie
Jones(Sharon), Earnest
Jones, Jimmie Jones(La-
zoni) all of Mayo, Fla.,
Wilbert Jones (Joanne),
and Raymond Jones
(Lewanda) both of Live
Oak, Fla., Geraldine
Owens and Jacqueline
White (Dessie) of Lake
City, Fla. and Barbara
Jones (Live Oak, Fla.).
He also leaves two


brothers Walter Jones
and Samuel Jones of
Mayo, Fla., and two sis-
ters Irene Jones and
Zadie Mae Cook (Bill)
Mayo, Fla., forty-one
grandchildren and forty-
two great grandchildren.
A host of nieces,
nephews, and devoted
friends, Brother-in-law
Willie Norris, special
friend, Oliver Jackson.
Homegoing celebra-
tion is to be held Satur-
day, January 30, 2010, 12
noon at the Little Galilee
Holiness Church, Mayo,
Fla. Evangelist Annie
Sellars is the Pastor and
will officiate. Burial will
follow in the Garden of
Rest Cemetery. The fam-
ily will receive other rel-
atives and friends from 6
to 8 p.m., Friday, Janu-
ary 29, also at the Little
Galilee Church, Mayo,
Fla.
Eric A. Brown & Son
Funeral Home, Inc. is in
charge of all of the final
arrangements.

HYSSONGS IN
CONCERT AT
BETHEL CREEK
BAPTIST
CHURCH
Everyone is invited to
come to Bethel Creek
Baptist Church on Sun-
day, February 7, at 6 p.m.
for a blessing in song by
the Hyssong family from
Maine.
This group brings a
rich blend of gospel mu-
sic and inspirational
thoughts.
A love offering will be
taken up for the family.
A time of fellowship with
light refreshments will
follow the concert.


AIRLINE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC)......294-2676 Methodist Church
Pastor........................................................ ........... Chip Parker Phone: 386-294-1661
Youth Pastor............................................ ........... Orry Agner MAYO FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday Located SE corner of Hwy. 27 & FL 51 Mayo
Sunday School ... .................................................... 9:30 a.m Pastor: Rev. Connie Steele
M morning W worship ............................................................10:30 a.m .
Evening W worship .................... .... ..... .........................6:30 p.m Sunday School........................................ .......................10:00 a.m .
Wednesday ,, ...., II ,,,)a.m.
Fellow sh ip Supper ............................................................ 6:00 p.m "a.m .
A W AN A & Bible Study ...................................................6:30 p.m ...... ...' l P .m .
Located Four Miles East of Mayo on Highway 27
"O Come Let us Worship The Lord" Ps. 95:6 571532-F "The Friendly Mayo Methodist" 571550-F

ALTON CHURCH OF GOD...................294-3133 MAYO BAPTIST CHURCH...........(386)294-1020
Pastor.................. ..................... ...................... Rev. Tim H am m 916 N. Fletcher Ave.
Youth Pastor ........................ ............................ Chad Morrin Pastor: Brother Jimmy Legg
M music D irector...................................... .....................Blanche Perry Interim M music ................................................................. Kathy Palam ino
Children's Pastor.........................................Ryan & Tiffany Perry Bible Study .........................Su .. .. ........................9:45 A .M .
Sunday School................................. ... ............. 9:30-10:30 a.m W orship Service......................................................................... 11:00A .M .
Worship Service/K.I.D.S. Church ............10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. s ,,.1 ... . ...I P.M.
Evening W orship............. ..... ................... ....... 6:00 p.m ,. .... .. .,
Family Night Youth Club Church.............7:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Service& Youth & Children Meeting ........................... 7:00 P.M.
State Road 27 571536-F mavobaptlstchuch@alltel.net 571558-F

BETHEL HOLY CHURCH.................... 294-1932 MIDWAY BAPTIST CHURCH................... 935-4993
"Affiliated with Mt. Sinai Holy Churches of America Inc." Pastor: Danny Rogers
Sdr r o n Sunday School .....................................................................9:45 a.m .
Pastor.................................................. Elder Carolyn D em ps W worship Service ................................................................11:00 a.m .
Sunday School.............................. ......................... 11:00 a.m Discipleshii i ........ : "
W orship Service........... ....................................... 12:00 p.m Evening W 1 .1... '
Thursday Bible Study........ ................... .............. 7:00 p.m Prayer M eeting- W ednesday...........................................7:00 p.m .
Located on County Road 354
357 Pine Street "For If Ye Forgive Men Their Tresspasses Your Heavenly
"Membership means Discipleship" 571541 F Father Will Also Forgive You" Matt. 6:14 571563-F


HATCHBEND APOSTOLIC CHURCH..935-2806
Pastor.................. .......................................... Rev. Steve Boyd
Sunday School..................... ................................... 10:00 a.m .
Wednesday Service...............................................7:30 p.m.
Located 4 miles South on Hwy. 349,
then left on CR 138, follow signs.
571547-F
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD................. 294-1811
Sunday School ................................................10:00 a.m .
,,, W orship Service..............................................10:45 a.m .
S K id's C church ................................................... 11:00 a.m .

,,,Youth Im pact................................ ........ 7:00 p.m .
vWed1es Adult Bible Study......................... ...... 7:00 p.m .
Pastor: Rev. Kenny Sullivan
Youth Pastor: Daryl Fletcher g,
Located at 294 SE Mill Street, Mayo "Renewing Hope and Building Lives"


ST. MATTHEW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Contact Number in Mayo (386) 294-1839
Sr. W arden............................................................Eva Bolton
Celebration of Holy Eucharist at 7:00 PM
each Wednesday to be followed by light
refreshments and Christian Education.
Located One Block North of the Courthouse in Mayo.

Brewer Lake Baptist Church
Off Hwy. 53 in Day, FL 386-294-1578
"We're Going, Growing and Glowing for God"
Sunday Sunday
Sunday School.................................................................... 10 a.m .
I .. .. ii a.m .
..... _Wednesda p.m.
-
Children, Youth & A dult..................... ........................7....... p.m .
Matt Swain, Pastor William Sircy, Youth
Visit us on the web at www.brewerlakebaotistchurch.com
"Come To Day...Come Today!" 571571-F


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor........................................................... Rev. Charlie W alker
Sunday Early Service...................................................... 8:30 a.m .
Sunday School............................................................... 10:00 a.m .
I ,,,' I,, ii .


B ible Stu dy .......................................................................e7:00 p.m .
M mission C lasses................................................................. 7:00 p.m .
Located Two Miles North of Mayo Off Highway 51
"Come And Hear, All Ye That Fear God" Ps. 66:16 571574-F

PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC).294-1306
Pastor ............................................ ......................... Todd Babione
Sunday School ....................................... ....................... 9:45 a.m .
W orship Service.................................. ......................... 11:00 a.m .
Wednesday Discipleship I ........- 7:00 p.m.
Evening Training............................................................ 6:00 p.m .
Seven miles West of Mayo,
left on CR 534 then right on 350A
-- Jesus Saves --571580-F

NEW HARMONY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
160th St.
(Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right)
Pastor: Stan Posey
Phone (386) 776-1806


SUNDAY
Sunday Worship..........
Bible Study..................
WEDNESDAY
Women's Bible Study


...9:30 am
.10:30 am


.10:00 am
571581-F


New Beginnings Church
a place for you
Pastor...............Wayne Hudson
Phone Number........386-294-1244
newbeginningschurch@alltel.net
Purpose Statement:
where People can discover and develop a passion for
God that is Rea relevant, and relations.
New Location:
163 W. Main Street, Suite 500
Service Schedule:
I .... .. ,, hI IIIi'
www.newbeginningschurchmayo.com
571584-F

Ephesus Advent
Christian Church
Pastor Bill Talley
963-5600 ~ 208-9626
Sunday School Service.... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service.............. 11:00 a.m.
Prayer Meeting................. 7:00 p.m.
571599-F

To Place

Your Church

In Our

Church


Wednesday Evening............................................ 7:00 p.m.
3029 S.E. CR 500 571582-F Directoly,

l Call Nancy
MEat 386-


S362-1734


Call Junk Joe


For Junk Vehicles
Will Remove any kind
of scrap metal
Free Pickup

Call 386-867-139657455,-F


To Place Your Church In

Our Church Directory, Call

Nancy at 386-362-1734


Heart Matters


IOITUARY


Starting your day right!
Confess God's Provision
In conclusion, be strong in the Lord (be em-
powered through your union with Him): draw
your strength from Him (that strength which His
boundless might provides). Ephesians 6:10


Hatch Bend Baptist Church
Pastor Paul A. Coleman
935-0943
Sunday School............................................................ 9:45 a.m .
Sunday Morning Worship..........................................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening............................................................ 6:00 p.m.


I - . .


PAGE 2A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28,2010






THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 3A


David H. Matier,
Doctor of Pastoral
Counseling
dmatier@windstream.net

There are those that
would like to claim that
men have existed before
they were born; that they
hobnobbed with some in
the heavens before com-
ing into this world. But
there is only One that
can make that claim. Je-
sus prayed in John sev-
enteen, "And now, 0 Fa-
ther, glorify thou me
with thine own self with
the glory which I had
with thee before the
world was," (John 17:5).
At other times he got in
trouble with the Jews be-
cause he made what
they considered to be
outlandish claims.
For instance in John
8:56-58 He said, "Your
father Abraham rejoiced
to see my day: and he
saw it, and was glad.
Then said the Jews unto
him, Thou art not yet
fifty years old, and hast
thou seen Abraham? Je-
sus said unto them, Ver-
ily verily, I say unto you,
BEFORE ABRAHAM
WAS, I AM." Jesus
who's personal ministry
began at about age 30
and lasted for about
three and one half years
made the claim that He
had known Abraham
who had lived a couple
thousand years before
Him; before the incar-
nated Jesus "the Jesus


that came down from
heaven in human form
so He could pay for the
sin debt of all mankind;
But God commendeth
his love toward us, in
that, while we were yet
sinners, Christ died for
us," (Romans 5:8).
Now this Jesus has al-
ways existed because He
is God He is the "I
AM" (John 5:58). He
was there in the begin-
ning as creator "In the
beginning was the Word
and the Word was with
God, and the Word was
God. The same was in
the beginning with God.
All things were made by
him; and without him
was not anything made
that was made...And the
Word was made flesh,
and dwelt among us,
(and we beheld his glo-
ry, the glory as of the
only begotten of the Fa-
ther,) full of grace and
truth," (John 1:1-3, 14).
Here you see that the
Word was active in cre-
ation and (v 14) that the
Word was the "begotten
of the Father" Jesus is
the only begotten of the
Father! Jesus was active
in creation! He is God!
He preexisted before all
time; before creation.
This is substantiated
by the Hebrew word
used for God in Genesis
1:1. The word is Elohim;
in the Hebrew a plural
word. In the Hebrew
you have singular, dual
and plural. Singular, of
course, means one, dual
means two and plural
means at least three. The
word for God in Genesis
1:1, actually in most all
of the verses in the Pen-
tateuch, is Elohim veri-
fying the Trinity; God
the Father, God the Son
and God the Holy Ghost
for the very beginning of
the Bible. When you
compare Genesis 1:1 to
John 1:1 it makes very


good sense.
Did you ever wonder
why Genesis 1:26 reads,
"And God said, "Let US
make man in our image,
after our likeness:...?" It
is because there were
three identities involved
THE FATHER, THE
SON, and THE HOLY
GHOST.
There have been all
sorts of cults that have
rejected the Trinity. True
Christians whether part
of the Catholic Church or
those who came out of
the Catholic Church dur-
ing the Reformation or
those who never were a
part of the Catholic
Church and can trace
their history back to pre-
Catholic times, such as
Baptist, for the most part
have had one thing in
common: the doctrine of
the Trinity because it is
taught in the Bible.


Winter: Waistline Wrecker?


Winter weight gain
doesn't have to be a fact
of life-even with the
body's chemical changes
that can compel you to
binge on carbs and
"comfort foods."
"There's quite a bit of
science that shows levels
of serotonin, which reg-
ulates appetite and
mood, dip in the winter
time," says Dr. J. Adam
Rindfleisch, associate
professor of family med-
icine at the University of
Wisconsin School of
Medicine and Public
Health (SMPH).
"When the brain sens-
es a serotonin level drop,
it signals a craving for
carbohydrates. Carbs
can provide a quick
burst of serotonin," ex-
plains Rindfleisch.
A drop in serotonin
levels, in addition to less
activity in cold-weather


months, can be a recipe
for significant weight
gain. Two studies pub-
lished in 2000 show holi-
day weight gain alone
can range from just un-
der a pound to five
pounds. And the really
bad news is that most of
us do not take off those
extra pounds. Also, the
weight gain appears to
be on the higher end of
the range for people
who are already over-
weight.
"It is possible to satisfy
your cravings for carbs
and comfort foods, with-
out weight gain," says
Donna Weihofen, clini-
cal nutritionist at Uni-
versity of Wisconsin
Hospital and Clinics.
Weihofen points out
that not only are we
physiologically inclined
to pack on pounds in the
winter, we're socialized


Happy New Year It's Wildfire Season
Our area has received rainy days can be gone ing the Suwannee
a lot of rain recently. Al- within one day of high Forestry Center at 386
though the drought in- wind and low humidity. 758-5700.
dex in the Suwannee Before you burn for any The Suwannee
Forestry Center's six- reason, please call our Forestry Center, located
county district currently office to learn about re- in Lake City, is responsi-
is low, we can't drop our strictions and safety re- ble for fire suppression
guard when it comes to quirements you'll need and landowner assis-
wildfire preparedness. to follow to get autho- tance in Baker, Bradford,
The cold temperatures rization to burn." Columbia, Hamilton,
we have experienced re- Now that the grass has Suwannee and Union
cently and which will begun to turn brown, in- counties in North Cen-
continue off and on for creased wildfire condi- tral Florida.
the foreseeable future, tions will continue until
will freeze-dry our grass- the fire fuels get a chance
es and other fine vegeta- to green up again. Al- CJBAT tests
tion. Add to this the though wildfire can oc- Monday-Thursday
gusty winds and low hu- cur at any time of year, Monday Thursday at
midity a cold front the primary wildfire sea- CJBAT (Criminal Justice
brings and we have the son in North Central NFCC Testing Center (B
potential for increased Florida runs from Janu- is required for acceptance
spotting and rapidly ary through May. Enforcement programs.
spreading wildfires. Current burn informa- istration & scheduling tin
According to Glenn tion and authorizations To register please call 85
Davis, Operations Ad- can be obtained by call-
ministrator of the
Suwannee Forestry Cen-
ter, "People need to be
aware how quickly these
fuels dry out. The mois-
ture brought by several


to crave warm, sweet,
creamy and hearty
foods.
"If it's cold outside, the
last thing we want is a
salad! We want warm
apple pie, pot roast and
mashed potatoes and
other foods with extra
calories," says Weihofen.
She says with a little cre-
ative thinking, and good
recipes, it is possible to
satisfy cravings without
high-calorie foods.
"Things like chili and
soup with rice or pasta
and a fresh roll can be
very satisfying and fill-
ing. French onion soup
with a little cheese sprin-
kled on top can be as lit-
tle as 200 calories," says
Weihofen.
What about the in-
evitable sugar cravings?
"You have to have
sweets or you'll binge,"
says Weihofen. Her ad-
vice is to pick a few
treats every once in
awhile and eat them
without guilt.
Rindfleisch agrees that
the key to cracking the
craving conundrum is
balance.
"If you make mostly
healthy food choices, en-
joy an occasional treat
and get as much activity
as possible, you can sur-
vive the winter and
maintain your weight,"
he says.


t 5 p.m. (by appointment):
Basic Abilities Test) at
ldg. #16), Madison. CJBAT
e into Corrections & Law
Photo ID required. Pre-reg-
ne and date are required.
50-973-9451.


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 28,2010


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 3A


K, A







Portraits of Literacy: The ig

Florida Literacy Coalition How to combat cold weather-related bills


The Florida Literacy
Coalition wants you to
capture the love of read-
ing through photogra-
phy. Join in FLC's first
photo contest, capturing
how words and literacy
are experienced in our
everyday lives through
photography.
The photos entered
into the contest will be
used to promote literacy
throughout Florida.
Submissions will be
posted online and
everyone will be en-
couraged to vote for
their favorites. Select
photos will also be fea-
tured at the 26th Annual
Florida Literacy Confer-
ence.
The contest will ac-
cept submissions until
Feb. 12, 2010 and is
open to everyone.
For submission guide-
lines, go to
www.flordaliteracy.org
The grand prize in-
cludes a Pentax Optio


60 Digital Camera, a $50
gift certificate, award
recognition, and more.

About the Florida
Literacy Coalition
Established in 1985,
The Florida Literacy
Coalition (FLC) promotes,
supports and advocates for
the effective delivery of
quality adult and family
literacy services in the
state of Florida.
As a statewide umbrella
literacy organization and
the host of Florida's State
Literacy Resource Center,
FLC provides a
range of services
to support more than
300 adult education,
literacy and
family literacy providers
throughout Florida.
Special emphasis is
placed on assisting
community based
literacy organizations
with their training
and program
development needs.


announces pnoto contest


Heating systems in
Floridians' homes and
businesses worked over-
time to keep up with ten
days extreme cold weath-
er in early January. The
unprecedented cold spell
caused record-breaking
electric use and will be
reflected in higher than
normal bills for many
Progress Energy Florida
customers in the coming
weeks.
For example, when the
average temperature is
20 degrees lower than
what is typical, as Florida
customers experienced
during the recent cold
spell, maintaining a
home's internal tempera-
ture at 68 degrees may
cost an average residen-
tial customer with an
1850-square-foot, single
family home about $10
more per day. Individual
customers' bills may be
higher or lower depend-
ing on a number of fac-
tors including: home and
family size, heating sys-
tem efficiency, insulation
level and temperature
setting.
Here in Florida the cost
to heat during extreme
cold weather is more
than the cost to cool dur-
ing a heat wave. When it
is 35 degrees outside,
heating a home to 68-70
degrees pushes the heat-
ing system to overcome a
temperature differential
of more than 30 degrees.
On a 95-degree day, cool-
ing a home to 78 degrees
requires the air-condi-
tioning system to over-
come a much smaller
temperature differential-
less than 20 degrees.
In addition, many
Florida homes have heat
pumps with heat strips
that function when the
system is set to the


"Emergency Heat" or
"Auxiliary Heat" set-
tings. Heat strips require
a great deal of electricity,
making these systems
more expensive to run
than a heat pump alone.
The strips activate when
the outside air stays very
cold or when the thermo-
stat setting is increased
more than one or two de-
grees at a time.
Customers concerned
about paying an extreme-
ly high bill due to the re-
cent extreme cold can
contact Progress Energy
at 800-700-8744 for infor-
mation on payment pro-
grams. Representatives
are available to help cus-
tomers with payment op-
tions to keep their ac-
counts in good standing
and avoid disconnection.
Progress Energy also
offers a number of pro-
grams and efficiency tips
to help take the sting out
of high power bills and to
help customers strug-
gling financially:
Energy Neighbor Fund
The Energy Neighbor
Fund helps provide assis-
tance to Progress Energy
customers in need. The
fund helps customers
pay home energy bills.
Contributions to the fund
come from employees,
customers and organiza-
tions, and are matched,
up to $1 million annually
by contributions from the
Progress Energy Founda-
tion. Funds are distrib-
uted through local social
service agencies. Founda-
tion contributions come
from shareholder funds
and do not affect cus-
tomer rates.
Budget Billing
Under the Budget
Billing program, a cus-
tomer's annual cost for
electricity is spread into


12 equal monthly pay-
ments. While there is no
cost savings with this op-
tion, the Budget Billing
provides predictable
payments to help cus-
tomers better budget
their energy dollars.
Using energy wisely
The best way to identi-
fy opportunities for ener-
gy savings in your home
is to sign up for a free
Home Energy Check.
Through this service -
which can be performed
in person, online, over
the phone or by mail a
Progress Energy Florida
energy advisor will pro-
vide customized, energy-
saving advice specific to
a customer's home and
determine the customer's
eligibility for valuable
company rebates toward
energy-efficient home
improvements. Cus-
tomers wanting to learn
more about energy effi-
ciency can also visit
www.savethewatts.com
for more than 100 tips.
Flexible ways
to manage your bill
Progress Energy pro-
vides a variety of ways
for customers to manage
their energy bill. Cus-
tomers can view their bill
and make payments
at www.progress-ener-
gy.com, and can make
payments at a number of
conveniently located
paystations available


Hamlins to celebrate
50th Wedding Anniversary
The children and grandchildren of Alvin and
Edith Hamlin, would like to invite you for the
celebration of their 50th wedding anniversary.
This special occasion will be held Saturday,
Feb. 6, 2010 at "A Perfect Setting" building in
Branford, from 2-5 p.m.
For more information call 935-0382, 294-1918 or
294-3277, ask for Shanna or Teresa.


gj CO o With easy
... . I I ( II K credit options,
"Badcoc k" ""' I |1 know there's

HOME FURNITURE something here

Sfor me!


MAYO FREE PRESS
Published weekly every Thursday, USPS #334-600
Phone: (386) 362-1734 Fax: (386) 362-6827


ipii


Myra Regan, Robert Bridges, Linda Smith,
Publisher Group Editor Manager
Annual subscription rate:
$17 in county / $25 out of county
Periodicals postage paid at Live Oak, Forida
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
The Mayo Free Press
P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, Forida 32064
Office located at 211 Howard St. East, Live Oak, FL
Editorial Policy: The Mayo Free Press encourages readers to write letters to the
editor expressing their opinion. All letters should be brief and to the point and those
selected for publication (we reserved the right to accept or reject all letters) may be
edited for space reasons. Letters must be signed and include the writer's address and
phone number to be considered for publication. All letters become the property of
The Mayo Free Press.


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PAGE 4A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28,2010


across Florida. In addi-
tion, the online "Lower
My Bill Toolkit" offers
tips and steps to help you
determine where you
may find savings on your
utility bills with just a
few small changes in
your household routine
and includes energy use
analysis graphs to com-
pare individual electric
usage this year and last
year to the average tem-
perature by month.
Progress Energy Flori-
da, a subsidiary of
Progress Energy (NYSE:
PGN), provides electrici-
ty and related services to
more than 1.6 million
customers in Florida. The
company is headquar-
tered in St. Petersburg,
Fla., and serves a territo-
ry encompassing more
than 20,000 square miles,
including the cities of St.
Petersburg and Clearwa-
ter, as well as the Central
Florida area surrounding
Orlando. Progress Ener-
gy Florida is pursuing a
balanced approach to
meeting the future ener-
gy needs of the region.
That balance includes in-
creased energy-efficiency
programs, investments in
renewable energy tech-
nologies and a state-of-
the-art electricity system.
For more information
about Progress Energy,
visit www.progress-en-
ergy.com.






THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 5A


Margaret Willis Clark celebrated her 90th birthday, surrounded by her family.


Margaret Willis Clark celebrates 90th birthday


O.A. Winburn, Jr.

Dowling Park
January 9, 2010

I visited The Advent Christian Vil-
lage in Dowling Park, January 9,
which was the first such visit in 30
years. I was here in 1980 at the invita-
tion of Pomeroy Carter, Jr., and given
the "grand tour" of what he and his fa-
ther, Pomeroy Sr., had accomplished
as administrators of this lovely facility,
over the span of three or four decades.
That father and his successor son had
transformed what had originally be-
gun as an "orphans home" in a bygone
era, into a marvelous and expansive
facility that included accommodations
for those retiring elderly folks in
search of a home where all their needs
could be met as they made the transi-
tion into those "golden years."
This visit was by invitation also, that
of a relative residing there... Margaret
Willis Clark was celebrating her 90th
birthday, hosted by children and the
newly constructed Phillips Center
there at the Advent Christian Village
was the setting for this gala occasion
and what a lovely and appropriately
decorated facility it is.
As usual, I'm a few minutes early at
such times and it gave me a few min-
utes to spend renewing some old ac-
quaintances. The first person that I rec-
ognized upon entering that magnifi-
cent edifice was Wyman Clark. His
mother, Abbie was Margaret's sister
and Abbie had raised her family in
Mayo, so I was acquainted with them.
It's hard to miss those Clark boys in
any crowd as they stand a little larger
and broader than most folks and of
course they usually sport those shiny
heads so typical of their heritage. I
learned that Wyman had retired after
forty years with Suwannee Valley
Electric and brother Wyatt was there,
having retired from the Florida High-
way Patrol. Ronald showed up later
and the only one missing was Donald
who had passed away several years


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ago. And there was lovely Marlene
whom I had last seen 30 years ago at
the "Potentates Ball" at the Osborn
Center in Downtown Jacksonville.
Glancing around I could see that the
"honoree" cousin (once removed)
Margaret Willis Clark, seated there in
the foyer of that lovely Phillips Center
was quite busy greeting guests as they
arrived. I must say that this bright-
eyed and enthusiastic little lady shows
none of the signs often associated with
folks her age and as I noticed when she
arose from that chair, she is quite spry
for her 90 years.
I had the pleasure of meeting her
children and what a gracious group
they are. One daughter was absent
due to an accident when her husband
broke his leg only moments before
they were to prepare for the day's
events.
A little background detail is appro-
priate here and it entails the days back
when this lady and her sister, Abbie
were growing up. Abbie, the older of
the two was also a beautiful girl and
she had caught the eye of a young man
by the name of Frank Clark. Frank and
Abbie went through the courting
process and were married. Well, Frank
had a brother, J. D. Clark, a few years
younger and he noticed that there was
another beautiful young girl in that
Willis family, named Margaret and he
set out on the courting trail also. J.D.
and Margaret were married and so
there you have it, two brothers marry-
ing two sisters. Two handsome young
men with their eyes open latching onto
two beautiful young ladies. Frank and
Abbie had 6 children, four boys and
two girls. J.D. and Margaret had five
children, four girls and a boy. As you
will notice from the accompanying
photo, most of them were there to help
Margaret celebrate her birthday.
A delightful buffet dinner with all
the trimmings, appealing to those with
even the most discriminating taste was
prepared for the large crowd gathered
there in honor of this little lady on her
birthday. I failed to get the name of the


Margaret Willis Clark and U.A. Winburn, Jr.

folks that catered that affair but intend
to do so for future reference.
I can't remember spending a more
enjoyable afternoon than what I expe-
rienced there, mingling with kin folks,
renewing old friendships, and remi-
niscing about bygone days, that I had
there on that day.


Shortly after that delightful meal, I
made ready to begin the trek back to
Marion County as the sun had already
begun it's journey towards the western
horizon and I don't particularly like
driving after dark.
And so, after a brief offering of part-
ing words, I was gone.


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 28,2010


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 5A








NFCC art exhibit "The Local Show" now open


NFCC invites public to exhibit


The North Florida
Community College
Art Department invites
the public to a recep-
tion on Thursday, Jan.
28 from 12 Noon-1:30
p.m. to help celebrate
its newest exhibit enti-
tled "The Local Show"
at the NFCC Hardee
Center for the Arts
(NFCC Bldg. 11).
"We invite commu-
nity members to stop
by, spend their lunch
hour with us on Jan. 28
and to enjoy works by
two local artists -
Deanna Wheeler of
Pinetta and Marshall
Norris of Greenville."
said Lisa Barden,
NFCC Art Instructor.
"We encourage the
public to attend and
show their support for
the arts."
The college's Sen-
tinel Cafe (Student
Center, Bldg. 9) is of-
fering chili and a side
salad as a special menu
item to help celebrate
and the Hardee Center
for the Arts, just steps
away from the Student
Center, is offering
dessert items to visi-
tors at its artists' re-
ception on Thursday.
Artists Marshall Norris


and Deanna Wheeler
will both be on hand at
the reception to dis-
cuss their work.
Artist Marshall Nor-
ris, a native of
Greenville, Fla., regu-
larly tours his metal
sculptures and often
builds pieces to fit spe-
cific themes for shows,
exhibits or customers.
His art is located in
every state in the U.S.
and in over 20 foreign
countries. Norris and
wife Barbara operate
the Artistic Things by
Marshall Gallery just a
few miles from where
Norris grew up in
Greenville. Norris has
a creative knack for
turning old metal
pieces into art and he
says that almost any-
thing, from metal gears
to springs, can be recy-
cled. Norris not only
creates sculptures, he
also does paintings
and drawings. Accord-
ing to Norris, he was
influenced at an early
age to be an artist
through school and
church. He became a
professional artist in
1990 and opened his
business in 1998.
Artist Deanna


Wheeler of Pinetta is a
self taught artist "I
was gifted with my
natural ability to draw
and paint, said Wheel-
er." She is a member of
the Southern Artist
League and has partici-
pated in several ex-
hibits at the Turner
Center for the Arts in
Valdosta, Ga. A few
years ago the City of
Madison commissioned
Wheeler to create a
portrait of James Madi-
son. The portrait is
now on permanent dis-
play at the west en-
trance of the Madison
County Courthouse.
"I paint in a very re-
alistic style, using both
oils and acrylics, said
Wheeler. "My subject
matter generally tends
to be of horses, dogs,
cats and all manner of
animals."
Wheeler and her
husband have been res-
idents of Madison
County for fifteen
years; their home and
studio is located in
Pinetta. More informa-
tion about Wheeler's
art is available at
www.Persimmon-
RidgeArt.com.
"The Local Show"


reception Jan. 28, 12-1:30 p.m.
exhibit, open now Hardee Center for the instructor,
through Feb. 26, and Arts are Monday 1642, email
the artists' reception through Thursday, 10 BardenL@n
Jan. 28 are both open a.m.-4 p.m. For more visit www.
to the public. Regular information, contact hours for the NFCC Lisa Barden. NFCC art > (search V


at (850) 973-

ifcc.edu or
nfcc.edu
ww.nfcc.edu
Visual Arts).


THE ANNUAL OLD


TIMERS'REUNION


LHS 1943 graduating
class, which is this
year's door prize. W.G.
Croft, Jr. writes:
"I was about eight
years old when my dad


Sdoodt ZeI4

Feb. 1.5, 2010 W
Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri.
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
Breakfast Cereal, Cereal, Cereal, Cereal, Cereal,
Elem Crackers, Crackers, Crackers, Crackers, Crackers,
Elem- YogL.- i: : -. Donut, Juice, 1 1 :: Yogurt, PopTarts,
School J i." , i." Milk ... I, Juice, Milk
Lunch Hot Dog, Taco, Macaroni & Spaghetti, Pizza,
Cole Slaw, Lettuce, Ham, Bread Sticks, Corn,
Elem. French Fries, Cheese, Sweet Green Green Beans, Diced Pears,
School Fruit Cocktail, Salsa, Peas, Applesauce, Milk
Milk Peaches, Rolls, Milk
Milk Pineapple
I Chunks, Milk
Breakfast Sausage Biscuit, Pancakes, French Toast, Breakfast Pizza, Breakfast
Yogurt, Sausage Patty, Yogurt, Cereal Burrito,
_gh C r:C-.-.- Cereal, Biscuit, Cracker, Cereal,
School '* i: J" Crackers, Cereal, Juice, Crackers
U Milk Juice, Milk Juice, Milk Milk Juice, Milk
Chicken Sandwich Corndogs (Little Pepperoni Pizza Macaroni & Beef Tacos
Lunch (Turkey Sandwich), Caesar Pizza), (Turkey Casserole (Little i. i ...F.,
igh FirenchFnries, Baked Beans, ...1 Caesar Pizza), ..,, T ..,i
School Lettuce, Tomato, Corn, : -1: Corn, Cheese,
Pickle, Carrot Sticks, Broccoli/Cheese Toss Salad, Corn
Carrot Sticks, Sliced Peach, Sauce, Carrot & Celery Sliced Peaches,
Orange Wedges, Orange Wedges, Applesauce, Sticks, Orange Wedges,
Sliced Apples, Sweet Potato Apples, Sliced Apples, Blonde Brownies
Snicker Doodles, Spice Bar, Chocolate Orange-Pineapple Milk
Milk Milk Pudding, Milk Jue, Milk
Breakfast will now be provided at LHS each morning beginning at 7:45 am,
SponsoredBy: Mayo Thriftway

4 Hwy 27 294-1165 570872-F


[among others] brought
a load of cows from
Tennessee. The whole
country was open
range. Our cow was
milked by me, W.G., be-
fore daylight and then
turned loose. Our cow
and others then went
through town and to the
south where there was
plenty of range. If the
cow failed to come in I
had to walk the area,
find the cow, drive her
home and milk her. I
look back and find it
amazing that my broth-
ers tried but could not
milk the cow. I became
the only milker in the
family."

Please Join Us and
Bring a Covered Dish
When: February 27,
2010
Where: Mayo Com-
munity Center
Time: Start Arriving
About 11 A.M.


If you have a product orcraftad

are interested in booth space,

please e-mail Chris:

chrs.white@gflnews.co


, orcall

229-226-2400


P OWENS


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(If you remember clay
basketball courts, you're
an old timer.)
Here is another ex-
cerpt from AS WE RE-
MEMBER, a book by the


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I


PAGE 6A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28,2010


,


X






THURSDAYJANUARY 28, 2010 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL -~ PAGE 7A


SWAT.


Students of our community
have recognized there is a need
for action and are standing up
against tobacco. SWAT known
as Students Working Against
Tobacco is one of the newest
youth groups in our communi-
ty. Scores of students attend
meetings on a regular basis
where they are educated on to-
bacco use, its effect on their
health and how to compete
against the tobacco industry to
gain back their community. The
students are focusing their
goals on enforcing seemingly
non enforced policy such as No
Tobacco on school grounds that
seems to be overlooked at every
after school sporting event.
Outside of the school the stu-
dents are furthering their ef-
forts by focusing on policy
change in the community to
keep the temptation of tobacco
far out of reach of children and
underage youth. The group
along with groups around the
state are involved in events
such as the "Great American
Spit Out" week Feb. 14 20, and
"Through with Chew" day be-
ing on Feb 18. They will also be
involved in "Tobacco Free
Florida Week" beginning
March 21-28, with "Kick Butts
Day" being on March 24.
As the students continue to
progress against tobacco we ask
for your support. Tobacco can
be related to 88 Floridian deaths
every day. With your support
we can make a difference.
Join us for a Tobacco Free
Lafayette partnership meeting
February 8, at the Lafayette
County Health Department at
5:15. Please join us in support-
ing our students. For more in-
formation you can contact Ali-
cia Worley 294-1321x238. If you
are trying to quit smoking con-
tact the Quitline at 1-877-U
-CAN- NOW.


. 0


Students Making a Difference


SWAT students are making a difference
SWAT students are making a difference


Girl Scout Cookie season is underway


It is that time of year
again! Girl Scout Cookie
pre-orders start January
1, 2010. Girl Scouts from
across the 19 counties of
the Florida Panhandle
will take preorders for
cookies from January 1
through January 25,
2010. Cookies will be de-
livered to customers
starting February 13,
2010. The price is $3.50
per box. The preorder
period guarantees cus-
tomers the availability
and the receiving of their
favorite cookies. Girl
Scout Cookie Booths be-
gin February 20, 2010.


This year's theme In-
spired By U will contin-
ue the tradition of pro-
viding a quality cookie
while teaching effective
skills to girls.
"The cookie product
program provides the
girls with an opportuni-
ty to learn business skills
including customer ser-
vice, budgeting and
planning," said Raslean
M. Allen, CEO of the
Girl Scout Council of the
Florida Panhandle.
"Through the Gifts of
Caring program, girls
take action through ser-
vice projects that directly


MAO 4 1ID


Lafayette Apartments
Hurry in and apply at "The
Best Place to Live!" Rental
Assistance, 1, 2, & 3 BR. HC
& Non-HC accessible
apartments. Laundry facility
& playground. We pay water,
sewer & garbage. Mayo, FL.
Ph: 386-294-2720, TDD/TTY
711. Equal Housing
Opportunity 571522-F


Advertise your YARD SALE,
VEHICLES OR UNWANTED
ITEMS IN THE CLASSIFIED.
Call (386) 362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182 to place
your ad today


118 E. Park St. Perry, FL 32348
Toll-Free 1-866-Perry Movies (737-7966)
Visit our website at www.perrytheatre.com
Friday/Saturday........ $5.00 all seats
Sunday........................$5.00 all seats
1 Free Refill On Med/Lg Drink & All Popcorn
Starting Friday 1/29/10


(Located behind
Foodland
Shopping Center)


90 min. (R
Fri.& Sat....................7:30p.m.
Suda ................4:00 p.m*.


Fri. & Sat.................... 7:30p.m. Fri. & Sat................. 7:30 p.m.
Sunday........................4:00 p.m Sunday........................4:00 p.m .
Coming Attractions: Wedonot accept 50 or $100 bills
Avatar Tooth Fairy
When In Rome
* Percy Jackson and the Olympians

BUY I GET I FREE COUPON s
* (Limit one per visit) Certain restrictions may apply. Expires 1/31/10


benefit others, giving
customers the option to
purchase cookies to do-
nate to an identified or-
ganization."
The Gifts of Caring
program especially as-
sists the Military Troops
overseas.
This year's cookie line
includes the all-time fa-
vorites: Thin Mints,
Samoas, and Tagalongs;
Do-Si-Dos, Trefoils, and
Lemon Chalet cremes
are also available.
New to the cookie line
up this year is the Thank
U Berry Munch cookie.
This new cookie has pre-


mium cranberries that
provide a sweet tartness
which nicely accompa-
nies the creamy white
fudge chips. With zero
transfat and no hydro-
genated oils, this cookie
is sure to be a fast seller.
The Girl Scout Cookie
Sale is the number one
literacy program for
girls. By selling cookies,
girls are able to realize
their full potential and
become strong, confi-
dent, and resourceful cit-
izens. Many successful
business women today
say that they got their
start in the business


Building
Construction
Open
Enrollment
Call
386-647-4210
for more
information.

SUWA ,I I -
HAMILTON
TECHNICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 647-4210


world by selling Girl
Scout Cookies.
The Girl Scout Council
of the Florida Panhandle
invites girls from
kindergarten to twelfth
grade, to join the adven-
ture and empower
themselves through
courage, confidence and
character, to make the


world a better place.
Currently, the council
serves 7,150 girls and
2,400 volunteers across
19 counties of the Flori-
da Panhandle. To volun-
teer or join Girl Scouts,
contact the local council
office at 1-888-271-8778
or visit HYPERLINK
"http:/ /www.gscfp.o


Culinary Arts and
Commercial Foods Program
Classes starting January 21st
TABE testing must be completed prior to enrollment

SUWANNEE-
HAMILTONJ
TECHNICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 647-4210
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING T
BENEFITS. ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.

Serving Madison, Jefferson,

Taylor & Lafayette Counties

Auto, Life, Health, Home







Freddy Pitts, Agency Manager

Jimmy King, Agent
Glen King, Agent
233 W. Base St. Madison
(850) 973-4071
Freddy Pitts Glen King, Agent
105 W. Anderson St. Monticello
(850) 997-2213
Freddy Pitts Ryan Perry, Agent
813 S. Washington St. Perry
(850) 584-2371
Freddy Pitts Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL
(386) 294-1399
24/7 Claim Service: 1-866-275-7322
'N i sI 'w o e I I I:t'


In Loving Memory Of



Glennie


Ceraso

February 11, 1911 January 15, 2010

S Milton & Dolores Ceraso
573882-F


Masonry
Classes
Open
Enrollment
Call
386-647-4210
for more
information.

SUWA -li E- l
HAMILTON ,
TECHNICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 647-4210


THURSDAYJANUARY 28, 2010


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 7A






PAGE 8A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


Ask a


J.Z. of Cedar Key asks,
"I live in this country as
a LEGAL immigrant. I
have my Green Card
and I also have a Certifi-
cate of Domicile show-
ing that I live and work
in Florida. I hope to be-
come a citizen soon. I
just bought a house. Can
I get a Homestead Ex-
emption even though
I'm not a U.S. citizen?"

Dear J.Z.;

The short answer is
YES, you can. The law
reads as follows:

Every person who
owns and resides on real
property in Florida as of
January 1 and makes the
property their perma-
nent residence is eligible
to receive a Homestead
Exemption up to
$50,000.

Even though you are
not a citizen of the Unit-
ed States, you and every-
one else in the world, are
allowed to buy land in
Florida and in the Unit-
ed States. Therefore, the
only question is whether
or not you are eligible to
get the benefit of a re-
duction in taxes because
the property where you
live is your DOMICILE,
which means it is your
principal residence. The
answer to that question,
again, is YES. Pursuant
to Florida Statute
196.015, entitled "per-
manent residency" you
qualify and you are al-
lowed to claim the ex-
emption. The first
$25,000 of the exemption
applies to all property
taxes and up to an addi-
tional $25,000 may be
available if the assessed
value of the property is
over $50,000.

Upon receiving your
inquiry, I called Oz
Barker, the Property Ap-


praiser for Levy County,
and asked him to con-
firm that the above an-
swer is correct. I asked
specifically about
whether or not a person
had to be a citizen of the
U.S. and reside in Flori-
da for six months, as is
required for some
things. He told me that
there is no six month re-
quirement and no citi-
zenship requirement,
though you must be
legally in the U.S.

One thing people must
know, he explained, is
that a person can have
only ONE homestead.
He told me of a situation
that occurred just last
year when he found out
that one person was
claiming an exemption
in two states. Once he
found out about it the
exemption was immedi-
ately removed and the
tax bill increased dra-
matically. The best
proof, as far as he is con-
cerned, is a Florida Dri-
ver's License or Identifi-
cation Card. He also in-
vited people to call his
office at 352-486-5222 or
visit the Property Ap-
praiser's website of
www.levypa.com for
further information.

Furthermore, though I
don't have any informa-
tion about your medical
condition or age, there
are several ADDITION-
AL property tax exemp-
tions you may be enti-
tled to, such as:
Every person over the
age of 65 as of January 1
is eligible for an addi-
tional $50,000 exemp-
tion;
If the annual house-
hold income does not ex-
ceed $26,500 the $50,000
exemption referred to
above is available;
A $500 exemption is
available to a widow or
widower;


REGISTER NOW!

Early Childhood Education Program
Earn Your CDA Today!
Day & Evening Clasess
Classes starting January 21st
TABE testing must be completed prior to enrollment

SUWANNEE-

TECHNICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064 (386) 647-4210
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING
BENEFITS. ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.


JOE P. BURNS
FUNERAL HOME and CREMATORY
OF MAYO
386-294-2658
Locally owned & operated since 1953

Located 7 blocks South of the Courthouse
at the corner of Lake St. and Monroe Ave.
571089-F


Byrd's Power Equipment
Sales & Service All Makes & Models
-= Husqvama- HUSTLER
Dealer TurfEquipment
,,MA ....S % '1 TRIUCKA(CESSORIES
CLOSED SATURDAYS UNTIL SPRING
11860 E. U.S. 27, Branford, FL 32008
Hours: Mon.-Fri.7 a.m.-5 p.m. (386) 935-1544
CLOSED SATURDAYS 570869-F


Lawye

A $500 exemption is
available to every Flori-
da resident who is total-
ly and permanently dis-
abled (20/200 vision);
Any ex-service mem-
ber who is a permanent
resident of Florida and is
disabled lr.. or more in
war or by a service-con-
nected misfortune is en-
titled to a $5,000 exemp-
tion;
Every Florida resident
who is blind qualifies for
a $500 exemption;
A person who is a
quadriplegic is exempt
from taxation;
A person who is a
paraplegic, hemiplegic
or other totally and per-
manently disabled per-
son who must use a
wheelchair for mobility
or who is legally blind is
exempt from taxation,
too, though there is an
income qualification for
this exemption.
The foregoing list is
not intended to list every
exemption and you
should, as Oz Barker
suggested, call the
County Property Ap-
praiser's Office for fur-
ther information and de-
tails. There are more ex-
emptions for Veterans,
but those would not, I
assume, apply to you.
When applying, go to
the Property Appraiser's
Office in the county
where the land is situat-
ed.
I hope I have an-
swered your question,
J.Z., and I hope that you
obtain that full $50,000
tax exemption. Be sure
to apply before March 1
as the time for claiming
the exemption is be-
tween January 1 and
March 1 of every year.
Also, since this will be
the first time you will be
filing, you will need to
bring with you the fol-
lowing:


Pierce Kelley

1. Social Security
card; or
2. Voter's Regis-
tration; or
3. Florida vehicle
registration; or
4. Florida State
identification card, and
5. Your "Green"
card; and
6. Your Certificate
of Domicile.

Any readers with spe-
cific legal questions for
this "Ask a Lawyer" col-
umn are invited to sub-
mit those questions to
the Editor of this news-
paper who will pass it
along to the attorney. If
you need assistance with
a consumer matter, such
as an unfair and decep-
tive collection practice,
or garnishment of
wages, a mortgage fore-
closure or other such
things, and you cannot
afford an attorney, call
the Legal Services office
closest to you, which
provides free legal assis-
tance to qualified indi-
viduals, or call the Flori-
da Bar Referral service at
1-800-342-8011. I wish
you good luck in obtain-
ing access to our legal
system, no matter what
your income and asset
level might be.
The foregoing was writ-
ten by attorney Pierce Kel-
ley, who is a member of the
Florida Bar Association.
The contents reflect his
personal opinions and be-
liefs.


Seeds from the Sower
A big sale was in progress, and the department
store was swarming with bargain hunters.
In the confusion a little boy ran over to the Lost
and Found Department, sobbing, "My mom's lost!"
But he, not his mother, was lost.
How many others are lost, and don't know it?
Something's lost when it's in the wrong place.
And you're lost because you've wandered away
from God.
But you don't have to find Him. He has come to
seek and to save you.
You're just a step from Him. That step is turning
around.
Turn around, and you'll find yourself in the arms
of the seeking, loving God.


& Excavating
Front End Loader Limerock *
CAT Back Hoe Top Soil *
Gradall Clearing
Earthmoving Site Prep
Pond Digging Fill Dirt *
Kenny Hart Jr., Owner 386-294-2621 570868-F

Come by & see Helen & Beverly at

Zt4e Attic

3113 US Hwy. 27, Branford
386-935-0926
Open Tues.-Sun. 2-6 (Winter Hours)
SI .... o*: .,' in Antiques & Collectibles,
Gifts & Thrifts
Glassware Crystal
Knives Stoneware (Hull) Furniture
572... Call about Retal Space for your c~ *l -en ics


Public meeting on Jan. 28
to discuss planning for
future water supplies


The Suwannee River
and St. Johns River water
management districts
will hold a joint public
meeting on Jan. 28 to en-
courage public participa-
tion in the development
of the Suwannee Dis-
trict's Upper Santa Fe
River Basin Water Sup-
ply Plan and the St. Johns
District's Water Supply
Plan 2010.
The informational
meeting with senior tech-
nical staff from both
agencies will be held
from 6:30-8 p.m. at the
Alachua County Health
Department Auditorium,
224 S.E. 24th St.,
Gainesville.
The agenda includes an
overview of the water
supply planning process,
discussion led by each of
the water management
districts on the water
supply assessment in
northeast Florida, and
opportunity for public
comment.
The Suwannee Dis-
trict's Upper Santa Fe


River Basin Water Sup-
ply Plan and the St. Johns
District's Water Supply
Plan 2010 are designed to
meet the requirements of
the water supply plan-
ning provisions of Chap-
ter 373, Florida Statutes.
Through meetings of
the Northeast Florida
Water Supply Planning
Area Work Group, the
planning process concen-
trates on a 10-county area
including the eight St.
Johns District counties in
northeast Florida, as well
as portions of Columbia
and Union counties in the
Suwannee District.
Alachua, Bradford and
Baker counties span both
water management dis-
tricts.
Both districts are coor-
dinating on the water
supply planning process.
The process is open to the
public and involves local
governments, water sup-
ply utilities, self suppli-
ers, other governments
and other interested par-
ties.


AAA OFFERS SAFETY ADVICE

FOR DRIVING IN FOG
When combined, fog, wet weather and traffic can re-
sult in a disastrous situation for many motorists, espe-
cially at this time of year.
Extreme caution is imperative on the roadways, es-
pecially during early morning commutes when visibil-
ity from fog is lowest. Most fog-related crashes occur
during the morning rush hour (6-9 a.m.) and involve
motorists who do not take appropriate safety measures
to maneuver through the fog.
According to Dr. Greg Forbes, Severe Weather Ex-
pert at The Weather Channel, Florida is generally
prone to fog at times because of the prevalence of mois-
ture both from the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic and
from local streams, lakes, and the Everglades. This
moisture can result in fog after cooling of the air on
nights that begin clear and calm.
When driving in fog, motorists should slow down,
anticipate slow traffic and allow themselves ample
time to arrive safely.
"Fog greatly reduces visibility and can quickly put
motorists in a dangerous predicament," said Leticia
Messam, manager of traffic safety for AAA Auto Club
South. "It creates an unpredictable driving environ-
ment that may require special maneuvers and a great
deal of patience."
"We saw the severe consequences of fog related
crashes in January 2008 from the 70-vehicle pile-up
along 1-4 in Polk County. 5 people died and 38 were in-
jured," said Messam.
AAA suggests motorists abide by the following safe-
ty measures in foggy conditions:
Reduce your speed in order to have a safe stopping
distance between vehicles.
Use low-beam headlights, not just parking or emer-
gency lights when the vehicle is in motion.
Avoid using high-beams, as the fog's moisture will
reflect the light back into your eyes.
In dense fog, leave the highway as soon as it is safe
to do so and wait for the fog to lift.
Use windshield wipers and the windshield de-
froster to clear moisture from the car windows.




163 W. Main St.
VARIETY Suite 100
SAR 1Mayo, FL 32066
Baby Clothes 0-24 months VERY Cookbooks
Toddler All Sizes AFFORDABLE
Kids 8-20 PRICES!!!
Plus Sizes '
Shoes
Dresses
Wedding Dresses
Jackets & Coats
Bring Ad in & Receive
*10 off *50 Purchase
$5 Off *25 Purchse 574686-F





WJOLFE PLUMBING, INC.
Repair Remodel*. Drain Cleaning
New Construction
7 Days 24 Hours
386-935-0616


570861-F


Daniels Funeral Homes

& Crematory, Inc.

Branford 935-1124
Live Oak 362-4333
'K S James (Jim) B. Daniels, III, L.F.D.
Keith Daniels, L.F.D.
J.B. Daniels, Jr.
(Local) Family Owned & Operated
571087-F
570874-F


Fo oeinformation abotavriig hr all
Rhnd tA8-32-74 x.A4


State Certified #CFC051621
Serving All North Central Florida


PAGE 8A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28,2010




THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL -~ PAGE 9A


kbFeb. 2010



Cupid Shuff


This is the story of a man who found love after
changing his smile. We will call him Mr. X for the
sake of his privacy.


e


'


Mr. X was a hard-working, professional salesman /
whose job paid him well. He had a nice home, two
cars, and all the other material things that indicated,
"This guy is doing well for himself." The sad fact was,
Mr. X was alone and becoming an expert in the field of loneliness. Success was easy
over the phone as a high-stakes salesman. It was being around a person face-to-face
that was holding Mr. X in failure.
Mr. X was embarrassed and afraid to smile because he felt so ugly and self-conscious
about his teeth. It had started around middle school and gotten worse as time went
on. Now in his early thirties, Mr. X was depressed and feeling like things would
never change.
It was a toothache that finally got Mr. X into Smile Designs. After talking to Dr.
Gerry, Mr. X took advantage of our high quality "One Price Smile Makeover" and
received what he called a "Dental Miracle". He was not just proud of his amazing
smile; he was a self-described "new man"!
Mr. X started to take advantage of this new lease on
life. He was opening up to people like never before.
Within two months, it happened--LOVE! Mr. X met
the girl of his dreams.
Improving your smile can bring Cupid's arrows right
to your heart. We have helped so many people like
S Mr. X and we can help you, too. Come on in to Smile
j Designs by Dr. Charlotte Gerry. We are waiting for
you!
-----------------------~1-------------------------------- n
I CUPID'S PICKS IICUPID'S PICKS
!New Patient Exam: $20 25% off any
I Full Mouth X-Rays: $20
I Dental
Dental Polishing: $40 | e
STreatment
I ADA Codes: 0150, 0210, 1110, 1120
Expires 2/17/10 i Expires 2/17/10
L------------------------J L------------------------J
r-------------------------------------------------- i
CUPID'S PICKS

Free Exam with the "Fix My Smile
at One Great Price" Special
I(Does not include to o Implants) Expies 2/17/10
I ---------------(Does not include Or---------------tho o Implants) Expies 2/17/10----------------
L-------------------------------------


S


I LE


530 E. Howard St., Live Oak
386-362-6800


DESIGNS
DR. CHARLOTTE GERRY
857 SW Main Blvd., Suite 105, Lake City
386-755-7010


WWW.SMILEDESIGNSBYDRCHARLOTTEGERRY.COM
574165-F


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28,2010


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 9A





::::::::lE:........ O O K IN G


[ART
for the
Heart
11bl %Cu
Ihatbrgn* el


B


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available From Commercial News Providers"

ii."m.
1'..=..


PAGE 1 OA THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28,2010






























































Making Oral Care Fun


Children's oral care is something many parents
are concerned about year-round, but there are
also several times during the year when oral care
is especially important. For example, Halloween,
the winter holidays, Valentine's Day and Easter
are all large candy-eating times in the year, mak-
ing it essential to take the time now to teach chil-
dren the importance of maintaining good oral
health.
"Tooth decay is the most common chronic
childhood disease, so it's important to teach chil-
dren effective tooth brushing habits, especially
around the holidays, when children are typically
consuming more sweets than usual," says dentist
and mom Dr. Jennifer Salzer.
Oral care isn't usually a top priority for chil-
dren and teeth cleaning may even be considered


Year-Round


a chore to kids, which is why it is so important
for parents to get involved and teach children the
importance of proper oral care early on in their
children's lives. To make oral care more fun for
children, Dr. Salzer offers some of her best tips:
Parents should brush their teeth with their
child to set a good example. It also helps children
to learn by watching and imitating their parent.
Sing your child's favorite song, like "Twinkle
Twinkle Little Star," or play a song from their fa-
vorite singer for the two minutes while they are
brushing their teeth.
Give your child a toothbrush that is designed
to appeal to a toddler who is learning to brush
and whose baby teeth are growing in, like Oral-B
Stages 2, which is designed to effectively reach
all teeth, with its narrow head, simple bristle pat-


tern and Power Tip.
For younger children, when their first teeth
begin to appear, parents should brush teeth us-
ing a child-sized, soft-bristled toothbrush with a
cushioned head to help protect babies' tender
gums, like Oral-B Stage 1 toothbrush.
It's important that children two and older use
fluoridated toothpaste to help prevent decay as
their teeth continue to develop. One such tooth-
paste, Oral-B Stages, provides effective cavity
protection in a kid-tested, mild formula gel that
comes in fun flavors that kids love, like "Fruit
Burst" or "Princess Bubblegum."
For additional information about children's
oral care and to get more of Dr. Salzer's expert
oral health tips, visit
www.oralb.com/ smilestages.


Simple Means to Making a Home Healthier


wnile candles mignt add some aesthetic appeal to a
home's interior, combustion also produces several po-
tentially harmful side effects.


With the spring season finally
upon us, the annual rite of pas-
sage that is spring cleaning has ar-
rived as well. For homeowners
that means it's time to stop resting
on their laurels and start cleaning
house.
But cleaning house doesn't only
involve throwing away a season's
worth of magazines and donating
clothing that no longer fits. Spring
cleaning also involves improving
a home's overall environment.
That's especially true for the
health- and environmentally-con-
scious homeowner.
One way to clean a home while
making it healthier and benefit-
ting the environment is to rid the
home of chemical contaminants
that can be harmful to both your
personal health and the air you're
breathing. Many of these contami-
nants are not associated with tra-
ditional spring cleaning but can
have as big an impact as anything
you do around the house this sea-
son.
Don't allow smoking indoors.
Nearly everyone knows of the po-
tentially harmful physical side ef-
fects of smoking cigarettes. Ciga-
rette smoke contains more than
4,000 chemicals, including several
dozen that are known carcino-
gens, including formaldehyde,
ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, and


arsenic, among others. While it's
ideal to avoid smoking entirely, a
good place to start is to stop al-
lowing both guests of the home
and residents to smoke indoors.
This will also make a home more
enjoyable for those who don't
smoke, as they likely have an
aversion to the smell of cigarettes
and will welcome that smell's
banishment to the home's exterior.
Stop burning candles inside
the home. While aromatic candles
have grown in popularity thanks
in large part to the benefits they
provide to a home's ambience, it's
also important to remember the
harmful byproducts of combus-
tion. Those include carbon
monoxide, hydrocarbons, soot,
and VOCs (volatile organic com-
pounds), which can be toxic. So
the next time you consider the aes-
thetic appeal of a candle, don't for-
get its potential to release harmful
emissions every time you light it
up.
Pay closer attention to what
you're doing in the home. Often-
times, our homes are our havens.
What we do in our homes is cer-
tainly our business, but it can also
be problematic. Something as in-
nocent as wearing slippers or go-
ing shoeless when taking out the
trash can track dust and other con-
taminants into a home. When at-


tempting to clear a home of poten-
tially harmful chemical contami-
nants, something as simple as
what's on your feet can have a
meaningful impact.
Avoid overdoing it with
household supplies. While buying
in bulk can help save money, it
can also be harmful depending on
what you're buying. For instance,
storing excess paint, solvents and
other hazardous chemicals can
lead to harmful emissions if not
sealed properly or if they leak. To
avoid such risks, simply purchase
what you need when you need it
and avoid storing too many chem-
ical products in the home, be it in-
side or in the garage.
Open the windows when
cleaning. There likely is not a sin-
gle person who enjoys the smell of
household cleaning products.
However, many people often for-
get to open the windows or turn
fans on when using chemically-
based household cleaners. While
these products no doubt do a fan-
tastic job cleaning a home, they
might also be emitting harmful
toxins into the air. If you must use
chemically-based cleaners, open
the windows and use fans when
cleaning to avoid that familiar
odor from overtaking the home
and potentially emitting harmful
chemicals into the air.


for


Kids





PAGE 12A -~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2010


* *


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* *


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What's the Difference?
There are five things different between Picture A
and Picture B. Can you find them all?


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commercial News Providers"


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*1880: THOMAS
EDISON RECEIVED A
PATENT FOR HIS
INCANDESCENT LIGHT.
* 1945: THE RUSSIANS
LIBERATED AUSCHWITZ
CONCENTRATION
CAMP.
* 1951: THE U.S. AIR
FORCE BEGAN ATOMIC
TESTING IN THE
NEVADA DESERT.


HOW MANY PLAYERS CAN BE ON
A FOOTBALL FIELD PLAYING AT
A GIVEN TIME FOR A PARTICULAR
TEAM IN AMERICAN FOOTBALL?


L L :3MSNV


PUNT

kick a football


ENGLISH: Kick

SPANISH: Retroceso

ITALIAN: Scossa

FRENCH: Coup-de-pied


Pr ET THE N
PICTURE?'


Can you guess what
the bigger picture is?


AMERICAN FOOTBALL EVOLVED
FROM SEVERAL CHANGES TO WHAT
WAS KNOWN AS RUGBY FOOTBALL.


I


I


I


PAGE 12A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28,2010


9 0


D:









Coming home '


Continued From Page 1A
of the Rich and Famous."
Since David insisted he wanted to
retire to a home on the Suwannee
River, Elaine complied on one condi-
tion. It had to be in the community
of Hatch Bend, on the outskirts of
Branford, because that was where she
felt the strongest family ties. With a
Branford address and phone number,
they consider themselves residents of
that town and it is where they do
their shopping and errands.
With the help of Brae Construction,
Elaine and David built a magnificent
two-level home, complete with an el-
evator, and you guessed it, it is right
smack dab on the Suwannee River.
Speaking of romantic, these retire-
ment years for David and Elaine are
actually their honeymoon, since they
never got to experience one after
they got married. Coming into a
ready-made family with two chil-
dren, then having another child to-
gether, and finally caring for David's
mother years later, there was never
any time for them to just enjoy each


other.
Together they did all the finish
work on the house, even laying tile,
which was something they learned
how to do together. David proudly
says that Elaine is "a great carpen-
ter's helper," along with being a fab-
ulous cook and a wonderful mother
to their children.
Her talent doesn't end in the
kitchen, though. In fact, there proba-
bly isn't anything she hasn't tried.
She was urged by a friend to try pot-
tery making and the final pieces look
as professional and beautiful as
you'd find in any store. One of her
passions was volunteering at Big
Bend Hospice, where she was a Pa-
tient/Family Volunteer. She also
served on the Advisory Counsel for
fourteen years. To quote Elaine,
"Working for hospice has been the
most rewarding thing I've ever done,
besides being a wife and mother."
From humble beginnings to an ex-
citing, comfortable, and yes, roman-
tic time of life with the Suwannee
River as a backdrop, she and her
husband both feel truly blessed.


ABOVE: The balcony of the Williams home. BELOW: Elaine with her pottery.
Photos: Joyce Marie Taylor, Correspondent


Suwannee River Stock Dog Trials


Continued From Page 1A
The team effort is demonstrated as
the partners (handlers and dogs) not
only understand each other perfectly
but outguess and outwit unfamiliar
sheep as they entice them through the
obstacle course."
Spectators always enjoy watching
these fascinating dogs compete while
under total control at distances of 260
to 500 yards through obstacle after ob-
stacle. The idea is for the dog, with the
assistance of the handler controlling it
by voice or whistle, to flank right, left,
stop, walk up or make whatever move
needed to move these three sheep
through the course.
The handler stays at the post to com-
mand the dog through the ten minutes
allotted until he reaches the pen when
he can leave the post to help the dog.
The ultimate result is to put the sheep
through the course in a quiet and con-
trolled manner causing the sheep very
little anxiety. Gripping or biting the
sheep in any way results in immediate
disqualification.
These trials are qualifying trials for
the United States Border Collie Han-
dlers Association National Finals and
the Georgia Stock Dog Association Fi-
nals. The Open or highest level of class-
es is held on Saturday and Sunday.
Younger dogs will compete in the low-
er level classes on Friday. A United
States Border Collie Association Nurs-
ery class will also be held on each of
the three days of competition. The
judges for these will be Jim Murphy
from Portland, Ontario, Canada, and
Carol Campion from Hammond, Conn.
Competitors are expected from sev-
eral states with many of the competi-
tors coming from Florida and Georgia.


Fred Moses, a local dairyman from
Branford will be one of the competi-
tors. Some of the dogs competing were
imported from Scotland, Wales, Ire-
land, and/or England.
Among the competitors are Richard
and Cheryl Jagger Williams from 'Cul-
leymont at Dixie' farm where they raise
and train their own Border Collies.
Cheryl and Richard are presently na-
tionally ranked in the top ten in the
U.S. Border Collie Handlers Associa-
tion. One of the dogs Cheryl will be
running in the open competition is
named Spot. Spot was imported from
Ireland and was ranked eighth in the
country last year. Spot also won the
Northeast Border Collie Association Fi-
nals. Richard will be running Lass, who
won the Northeast Border Collie Han-
dler's Association's High Points award
for 2007.
Sheep dog trialing and herding in
general is one of the fastest growing
sports in the dog world today. Trials
are springing up all over the county
with more and more people compet-
ing. The sport can be equally enjoyed
by the old or young, man or woman,
from any walk of life whatever their
profession.
The Border Collie is a thoroughbred
of the herding dogs and the dog most
often seen competing at the large herd-
ing trials though the trials are open to
any breed of dog. The Border Collie is
entirely bred for its intelligence and
their herding ability. The fact that
many of these dogs are also pretty is
purely incidental. They truly are a mar-
vel to watch and will be enjoyed by the
whole family.
Bring your lawn chairs and enjoy the
day! Call 352-542-0347 for more infor-
mation.


welcomes

Board Certified General Surgeon

Michael J. Stumpf, D.O.

Office Hours
Monday Thursday 8am 5pm
Friday 8am 12pm
Dr. Stumpf has experience in a full
range of General Surgery procedures
and has a special interest in the
Management of Breast Disease
Gateway Surgical Group
3140 NW Medical Center Lane
Suite 120
Lake City, Florida 32055
^ (386) 755-6682


LAKE CITY

MEDIL CENTER572761-F


Government officials directory


Keep up with what goes on in our
government and voice your opinion!
Allen Boyd, Phone: 202-224-5274 Office Bldp
Congressman Fax: 202-228-2183 Washington, DC
Washington office: Phone: 202-225
1227 Longworth House George Lemieux Senator Fax: 202-225-3
Office Bldg. 356 Russell Senate
Washington, DC 20515 Office Bldg. Rep. Cliff SteE
Phone: 202-225-5235 Washington, DC 20510 2370 Rayburn I
Fax: 202-225-5615 Phone: 202-224-3041 Office Bldp


Bill Nelson, Senator
716 Senate Hart Bldg.
Washington, DC 20510


Because


p


S


/ v


Fax: 202-228-5171
Rep. Ander Crenshaw
440 Cannon House


Washington, DC
Phone: 202-225
Fax: 202-225-3


g.
20515
5-5744
3973
arns
House
g.
S20515
5-5744
3973


time


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When faced

with a
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For ER waiting times, text ER to 23000
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lakecitymedical.com


LAKE CITY

MEDICAL CENTER

386-719-9000

Consult-A-Nurse 800-525-3248


572762-F


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28,2010


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 13A


^l


t









UF gets almost $15 million in federal funds to


build research complex to help older adults


The University of
Florida's Institute on
Aging has received
close to $15 million
from the National Insti-
tutes of Health to con-
struct an almost 40,000-
square-foot complex for
clinical and translation-
al research. The build-
ing will bring together
scientists from a range
of scientific disciplines
and enhance how aging
research is carried out
on the campus.
"This is a unique op-
portunity to have basic
science, clinical, epi-
demiology and health
services researchers
working under the
same roof on a common
goal improving the
health and indepen-
dence of older adults,"
said Marco Pahor, M.D.,
principal investigator of
the grant and director
of the UF Institute on
Aging.
The one-stop facility
will make it easier for
mobility-restricted old-
er adults to take part in
clinical trials, and
strengthen connections
among existing UF re-
search centers, includ-
ing the Claude D. Pep-
per Older Americans
Independence Center,
the Clinical and Trans-
lational Science Insti-
tute and the newly es-
tablished Cognitive Ag-
ing and Memory Clini-
cal Translational Re-
search Program.
More than one-fifth of
Florida's population is
age 60 or older, accord-
ing to 2006-08 data
from the United States
Census Bureau. Among


all states, Florida has
the largest proportion
of elderly adults.
The new building is
part of UF's commit-
ment to develop multi-
disciplinary research
programs and facilities
to help address the
needs of the Florida's
aging population. It will
provide a home on the
UF Health Science Cen-
ter campus for Institute
on Aging researchers
who are scattered
across 11 locations
throughout UF and
around the state -
some in leased spaces.
With facilities for clin-
ical research recruit-
ment and assessment,
laboratories, training,
conferences and
lifestyle intervention -
including an indoor
walking track, demon-
stration kitchen and be-
havioral counseling
suite the building
will play a key role in
advancing aging-related
research and career de-
velopment at UF and
around the region.
"Thanks to Dr. Pahor
and his team, we now
will have a centerpiece
around which we can
potentially develop
more broadly an acade-
mic home for clinical
and translational sci-
ence at UF," said David
Guzick, M.D., Ph.D., se-
nior vice president for
health affairs and presi-
dent of the UF&Shands
Health System.
Bringing researchers
from varied fields such
as genetics and biosta-
tistics under the same
roof will facilitate the


kinds of spontaneous
and informal interaction
that often lead to mean-
ingful multidisciplinary
collaborations. The
building also will allow
clinical investigators
better supervision of
field operations.
Awarded through a
highly competitive
peer-review process,
the construction grant
will be administered by
the National Center for
Research Resources, the
same agency that last
year awarded UF a
Clinical and Transla-
tional Science Award.
Funded under the
American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act of
2009, the project will
create or retain an esti-
mated 376 jobs, three
quarters of which will
be construction-related.
The others include 30
faculty positions as well
as graduate assistants
and support and ad-
ministrative staff.
The new grant comes
on the heels of a recent
$64 million NIH re-
search award to the UF
Institute on Aging to
study whether physical
activity can help pre-
vent mobility disability
and other morbidities in
older adults.
Together the insti-
tute's researchers have
more than 90 active
NIH and other grants in
basic, clinical and trans-
lational science totaling
more than $200 million,
and almost 150 pending
grant proposals that
would garner close to
$200 million if funded.
The new building helps


to pull all those scientif-
ic efforts together and
improve the possibility
for even greater impact
of the Institute on Ag-
ing.
"The Institute on Ag-
ing initiative at the Uni-
versity of Florida is
very important to the
state and the nation,"
said Win Phillips, D.Sc.,
UF's vice president for
research. "Major sup-
port from the National
Institutes of Health en-
ables the University of
Florida to take a nation-
al leadership position in
this important endeav-
or. This building will
provide critical infra-
structure to enhance
this activity."
The four-story build-
ing to be located at
the northeast corner of
Gale Lemerand Drive
and Mowry Road is
designed according to
the LEED Platinum cer-
tification standards of
the United States Green
Building Council. Plat-
inum is the highest of a
four-level rating system
aimed at responding to
environmental chal-
lenges such as responsi-
ble use of resources, re-
duction of pollution
and making indoor
spaces conducive to
good health and well
being.
The new building in-
corporates features to
improve indoor air
quality through the use
of low-emission build-
ing materials, efficient
energy production and
use through photovolta-
ic cells, and light sensor
technologies and water


savings.


Nothing in life is free. In fact, things seem to

be getting more and more expensive, don't

they? These days a little savings can go a

long way. That's why we bring you the deals

you want at a price that's just right. With

the money you could save, the newspaper

practically pays for itself.








We deliver more than just newspapers.




taln terir jr1rrss


211 Howard St. East, Live Oak 362-1734
573226-F


conservation technolo-
gies. The project also
calls for prevention of
construction activity
pollution and reduction
of light pollution from
the completed building.
"The new facility will
take the university's
LEED goals to the high-
est level and serve as
another example of the
commitment of the fac-
ulty and staff toward
sustainable design and
emphasis on energy ef-
ficiency," said Carol
Walker, assistant vice
president and director
of UF's facilities plan-
ning and construction
division.
The University of
Florida Health Science
Center the most com-
prehensive academic
health center in the
Southeast is dedicated
to high-quality pro-
grams of education, re-
search, patient care and
public service. The
Health Science Center


encompasses the col-
leges of Dentistry, Pub-
lic Health and Health
Professions, Medicine,
Nursing, Pharmacy and
Veterinary Medicine, as
well as the Veterinary
Medical Teaching Hos-
pital and an academic
campus in Jacksonville
offering graduate edu-
cation programs in den-
tistry, medicine, nurs-
ing and pharmacy. Pa-
tient care activities, un-
der the banner
UF&Shands, are pro-
vided through teaching
hospitals and a network
of clinics in Gainesville
and Jacksonville. The
Health Science Center
also has a statewide
presence through satel-
lite medical, dental and
nursing clinics staffed
by UF health profes-
sionals; and affiliations
with community-based
health-care facilities
stretching from Hialeah
and Miami to the Flori-
da Panhandle.


College Placement Tests
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): Col-
lege Placement Test (CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg.
#16), 5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC Student Ser-
vices 24 hours before test. For information please call
850-973-9451.


TABE tests
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education) at NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison. TABE is required for acceptance
into vocational/technical programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration & scheduling time & date are required.
To register please call 850-973-9451.


Mayo Legals


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
LAFAYETTE COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 34-2008-CA-000064
THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE
HOLDERS CWALT, INC, INC. ALTER-
NATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-6CB MORT-
GAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2006-6CBB
Plaintiff,
Vs.
BRANDON HENDRIX AND SCHALENE
HENDRIX, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AND
UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final
Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff en-
tered in this cause on January 14, 2010,
in the Circuit Court of Lafayette County,
Florida, I will sell the property situate in
Lafayette County, Florida, described as:
A PARCEL OF LAND IN SECTION 23,
TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 12
EAST, LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
FOR A POINT OF REFERENCE, COM-
MENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER
OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SEC-
TION 23, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE
12 EAST; THENCE S 89 DEGREES 45
MINUTES 52 SECONDS ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER OF SAID SECTION A DIS-
TANCE OF 37.19 FEET TO THE WEST
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SOUTHEAST
COUNTY ROAD 405 (FORMERLY
STATE ROAD 354), SAID POINT BEING
THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
CONTINUE S 89 DEGREES 45 MIN-
UTES 52 SECONDS WA DISTANCE OF
717.48 FEET; THENCE N 0 DEGREES
30 MINUTES 10 SECONDS W A DIS-
TANCE OF 582.00 FEET; THENCE N 89
DEGREES 45 MINUTES 42 SECONDS
E A DISTANCE OF 714.85 FEETTOTHE
WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
SOUTHEAST COUNTY ROAD 405
(FORMERLY STATE ROAD 354);
THENCE S 0 DEGREES 45 MINUTES
42 SECONDS E ALONG SAID RIGHT
OF WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF 582.02
FEET TO CLOSE ON THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH AND SUBJECT TO:


National Certified

MEDICAL


SECRETARY


A 30 FOOT EASEMENT FOR THE PUR-
POSE OF INGRESS AND EGRESS IN
THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION
23, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 12
EAST, LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
FOR A POINT OF REFERENCE, COM-
MENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER
OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SEC-
TION 23, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE
12 EAST; THENCE S 89 DEGREES 45
MINUTES 52 SECONDS W ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER OF 354, SAID POINT BEING
POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CON-
TINUE S 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 42
SECONDS W A DISTANCE OF 811.79
FEET; THENCE N 0 DEGREES 30 MIN-
UTES 10 SECONDS W PARALLEL
WITH THE WEST LINE OF SAID SEC-
TION A DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET;
THENCE N 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES
42 SECONDS E A DISTANCE OF 811.65
FEET TO THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF COUNTY ROAD 354; THENCE
S 0 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 42 SEC-
ONDS 3 ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF COUNTY ROAD 354; THENCE
S 0 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 42 SEC-
ONDS E ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY
LINE A DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET 0
CLOSE ON THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
and commonly known as: 1206 SE
COUNTY ROAD 405, MAYO, FL 32066;
including the building, appurtenances,
and fixtures located therein, at public
sale, to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, Sales are held at the North en-
trance of the Lafayette County Court-
house, on 2/11/10 at 11 am.
Any person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of the date of the lis
pendens, must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
Dated this 14th day of January, 2010.
SEAL
Ricky Lyons
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: Hannah Owens
Deputy Clerk
Edward B. Pritchard
(813) 229-0900 X1309
Kass, Shuler, Solomon,
Spector, Foyle & Singer, PA.
PO. Box 800
Tampa, FL 33601-0800
1/28 2/4


COSMETOLOGY
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1200 hours for
Hair Design


Classes start Jan. 21st Classes start Jan. 21st


Call 386-647-4210

to Schedule TABE Test



SUWANNEE-
HAMILTON
TECHNICAL CENTER 0
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064
FINANCIAL AID IS AVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED. |
APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING BENEFITS. I
ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.


PAGE 14A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28,2010




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