Group Title: Mayo free press
Title: The Mayo free press
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028404/00251
 Material Information
Title: The Mayo free press
Uniform Title: Mayo free press (Mayo, Fla. : 1958)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Mayo free press
Publisher: Bernard Guthrie
Place of Publication: Mayo Fla
Publication Date: November 19, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Mayo (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lafayette County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Lafayette -- Mayo
Coordinates: 30.051944 x -83.175556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 70, no. 27 (June 20, 1958)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028404
Volume ID: VID00251
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN0339
oclc - 33286672
alephbibnum - 002042475
lccn - sn 95047189
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Preceded by: Mayo free press and Lafayette County news

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Closed for Thanksgiving holiday!
The Mayo Free Press office will be closed on
Thursday, Nov. 26, and Friday, Nov. 27, in observance
of Thanksgiving. Our office will reopen Monday,
Nov. 30, at 8 a.m. Have a safe and happy holiday.


Local girl is "Little Miss
Perfect Charity," Page 7A


Fi. 3


nflaonline.com






SiC4 NL ILI


~ZJ] VZ11


Man brutally beaten



by teens, say police


3 juvenile suspects in custody


By Stephenie Livingston
stephenie.Iivingston@gaflnews.com
A Mayo man was brutally
beaten by three Live Oak
teenagers in his home Friday
morning, according to a press re-


lease from the Lafayette County
Sheriff's Office.
Police say the victim was
struck first in the face with a
large metal wrench by Kelyn
Loston, 17, of 504 Webb Drive.
After the man fell to the floor,


Dylan Beam, 17, of SW 2nd St.,
and Tyler Carter, 15, of Liberty
Street, allegedly kicked him re-
peatedly.
After beating the man, the
three juveniles reportedly
searched him and his home for
cash.
SEE MAN, PAGE 7A


ABOVE: Disappointed Hornets leave the field
after Friday's loss to rival Branford. RIGHT: A
hard-fought battle, by any measure.
- Photos: Paula Livingston

"In a close game it comes
down to a few plays and we just
didn't get it done. We now have
to rebound and get ready for a
very good Jefferson County team


6 97113 07521 8


in the first
round of
the play-
offs."
Lafayette
Coach Joey
Pearson


Water woes

won't go away
200 gather in Branford
to address dwindling aquifer,
threat from South Florida
By Stephenie Livingston
stephenie.Iivingston@gaflnews.com
Experts gathered at a forum hosted by
state Representative Debbie Boyd Mon-
day night in Branford to express concern
over North Florida's dwindling water
supply.
Experts outlined a new plan to save the
Floridian Aquifer, North Florida's main
source of water, while Boyd voiced her
opposition to allowing South Florida ac-
cess to our water.
"I've been a huge advocate of keeping
our water here and not being piped to
other areas," said Boyd. It is most impor-
tant to protect local sources first, as per
current state law, agreed Suwannee Riv-
er Water Management District Deputy
Executive Director Kirk Webster.
"They are looking for water, they need
SEE WATER, PAGE 7A



2 charged

in marijuana


Some of the marijuana plants confiscated at a Lafayette
County residence. Two arrests were made in connection
with the operation. Photo: Lafayette County Sheriff's Office

Five-month investigation
culminates in arrests
By Stephenie Livingston
stephenie.livingston@gaflnews.com
After nearly five months of investigation, Abel
Tellechea, 42, and Alberto Rodriguez, 42, have
been arrested by the Lafayette County Sheriffs Of-
fice and charged with cultivation of cannabis and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
The two were arrested in Live Oak in June and
charged with possession of more than 20 grams of
marijuana with intent to sell. Shortly thereafter,
police reportedly discovered an indoor marijuana
grow house in a resi-
dence at 1525 SE Ea-
gle Road in Mayo. -
The house contained
65 marijuana plants
along with various k i
items used to grow Publix / I
and process the mari- I / I
juana, say police. The I
plants recovered I
from inside the house I
had an estimated For Kids 12 & Under I
I No Purchase Necessary -
street value of about I Must Present Coupon M
$227,500. L Limit 1 Per Person


I afytt'Cutysnes orc ince 188.,W'repodItoIrve


d.


/






PAGE 2A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2009


Heart Matters


"Am I my brother's
keeper?" Apparently
Michael Monsoor thinks
so, while serving in Iraq
in 2006, this Navy SEAL
was killed during opera-
tions in enemy-held ter-
ritory, when he threw
himself on top of a
grenade in order to save
the lives of his fellow
SEALS. According to
the Summary of Action
regarding the circum-
stances of his death,
"Petty Officer Monsoor's
actions could not have
been more selfless or
clearly intentional, while
he could have easily es-
caped, instead Monsoor
chose to protect his com-
rades by the sacrifice of
his own life."
In his book "Facing
Your Giants," Max Luca-
do tells of a similar story
that happened in a
Japanese prisoner-of-
war camp during World
War II. It seems that af-
ter the evening work de-
tail, a shovel was miss-


ing, so a Japanese officer
kept the Allied prisoners
in formation. Insisting
the shovel had been
stolen, the officer de-
manded that unless the
guilty man stepped for-
ward, he would kill one
prisoner at a time until a
confession was made.
At that moment, a Scot-
tish soldier stepped for-
ward and said, "I did it."
After the man was beat-
en to death and the pris-
oners returned to camp,
the shovels were re-
counted. Turns out the
Japanese soldier had
miscounted, no shovel
was missing after all.
Who does that, what
kind of person sacrifices
their life to protect an-
other? While these are
obviously extraordinary
people in extraordinary
circumstances, the Bible
records Jesus words in
John 15:12-13: "Love
each other as I have
loved you. Greater love
has no one than this, that


the latest news and stories that touch home.
We want to give it to you.
1 Year In County
Subscription

1 $2 5 1CYear
25 ut of County

Mail or bring payment to:

Mlayo 3sreer i e
P.O. Box 370 211 Howard St. East
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1734 1-800-525-4182 ext. 152
557908-F


he lay down his life for
his friends." No doubt
Jesus loved us that way,
He gave His life for us in
the most sacrificial way,
so that we could be for-
given of our sin against
God. But how do we
love like that? Thankful-
ly, most of us won't ever
be in a situation to save
others from a live
grenade or being beaten
to death, so in what way
can we live out sacrificial
love?
In Psalm 15:3 we find
quite the opportunity to
practice this kind of love
on a regular basis: "and
(He) has no slander on
his tongue, does his
neighbor no wrong and
casts no slur on his fel-
lowman." In our culture,
controlling our tongue is
as unusual as risking
one's life to save another.
Matthew Henry's "Com-
mentary of the Bible"
gives the following ex-
planation of this verse:
"(He) is one that con-
trives to do all the good
he can to his neighbors,
and is tender of his
neighbor's reputation,
especially careful not to
injure his neighbor in his
good name." If we really
understood the worth of
reputation, and the pain
of losing it, we would
not make other's faults
the subject of our idle
talk, much less intention-
ally repeating them in
ridicule. We show sacri-
ficial love for others
when we control our
tongue and become our
brother's keeper, of their
good name. Henry goes
on to say that a man who
would protect his neigh-
bor's reputation "does
not take up a reproach


(gossip), that is, he nei-
ther brings it up, nor re-
ceives it from another, if
an ill-natured character
of his neighbor be given
him, he will disprove it if
he can; if not, it shall die
with him and go no fur-
ther. His love will cover a
multitude of sins."
Love like that will also
minimize damage, like a
man throwing his body
over a grenade to spare
the lives of others. It is
interesting that the origi-
nal Hebrew word for
neighbor simply trans-
lates, another person.
This includes any and
every other person! We
have the opportunity to
show sacrificial love by
not only refusing to be a
source, but "selflessly
and intentionally"
throwing ourselves over
slander and gossip to
protect the reputation of
another person, simply
because their hearts mat-
ter!
El /i.,--S Angie
We would love to hear from
you, contact us with questions
or comments at ang-
ieland3@windstream.net
Heart Matters is a weekly col-
umn written by Angie Land,
Director of the Family Life
Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where
she teaches Bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences and offers Bibli-
cal counseling to individuals,
couples and families.


Revival services at

Midway Baptist Church
Midway Baptist Church will hold revival services
beginning Nov. 29, through Dec. 2. Services begin
each evening at 7 p.m.
Bro. Rodney Baker from Hopeful Baptist Church
in Lake City, will be the guest speaker.
There will be special music each evening. Every-
one is invited to attend.


Thanksgiving


Bake Sale

Who: Lafayette County Volunteer Fire Department
When: Wednesday, November 25, 2009
Where: Thriftway, Mayo,
Time: 9 a.m. until.....

The Lafayette County Volunteer Fire Department
will be having a Thanksgiving bake sale on Wednes-
day, November 25, 2009 at Thriftway in Mayo, from
9 a.m. until..... We will have many kinds of cakes and
pies available for sale, If you have a SPECIAL kind
of cake that you would like baked (ie. Thin layer
chocolate cake, Italian cream cake, red velvet cake,
carrot cake, coconut cake or specialty pound cakes)
orders need to be placed one week in advance to ei-
ther Leta Hawkins at 294-1697 or to Bobbie Rives at
294-2477. The Lafayette County Fire Department
would again like to thank each and every one who
has so graciously donated in the past to our depart-
ment. Let us help you with your holiday baking and
in turn your donation will help to purchase much
needed items for your volunteer fire department.
All proceeds will go to fund purchases for equip-
ment for the Lafayette County Volunteer Fire De-
partment. On behalf of the Lafayette County Volun-
teer Fire Department we wish each of you and every-
one a safe, happy and healthy Thanksgiving.
Chief William Robinson
Lafayette County Volunteer Fire Department


Important information

for our readers!
For your convenience when submitting arti-
cles and photos for printing in the Mayo Free
Press please send to: Mayo Free Press, PO Box
370, Live Oak, Florida 32060, or e-mail to may-
ofreepress@windstream.net. All photos
should be sent as jpeg attachments, via email.
You may fax to: 362-6827or call 362-1734.


AIRLINE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC)......294-2676 Methodist Church
Pastor........................................................ ........... Chip Parker Phone: 386-294-1661
Youth Pastor............................................ ........... Orry Agner MAYO FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday Located SE corner of Hwy. 27 & FL 51 Mayo
Sunday School ... .................................................... 9:30 a.m Pastor: Rev. Connie Steele
M morning W worship ............................................................10:30 a.m .
Evening W worship .................... .... ..... .........................6:30 p.m Sunday School.................................. .....................10:00 a.m .
Wednesday ,, .... I I)a.m.
Fellow ship Supper ............................................................ 6:00 p.m "a.m .
A W AN A & Bible Study ...................................................6:30 p.m ...... ... l P .m .
Located Four Miles East of Mayo on Highway 27
"O Come Let us Worship The Lord" Ps. 95:6 500981-F "The Friendly Mayo Methodist" 500991-F

ALTON CHURCH OF GOD...................294-3133 MAYO BAPTIST CHURCH...........(386)294-1020
Pastor.................. ..................... ...................... Rev. Tim H am m 916 N. Fletcher Ave.
Youth Pastor ........................ ............................ Chad Morrin Pastor: Brother Jimmy Legg
M music D irector...................................... .....................Blanche Perry Interim M music ................................................................. Kathy Palam ino
Children's Pastor.........................................Ryan & Tiffany Perry Bible Stud .........................Su ..Sc .. ........................9:45 A.M .
Sunday School................................. ... ............. 9:30-10:30 a.m W orship Service......................................................................... 11:00A .M .
Worship Service/K.I.D.S. Church ........0...10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. s,,, ,.., . P...IP.M.
Evening W orship............. ..... ................... ....... 6:00 p.m .... .,
Family Night Youth Club Church...........7:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Service& Youth &Children Meeting ........................... 7:00 P.M.
State Road 27 500983-F mavobaptlstchuch@alltel.net s00o99,-F

BETHEL HOLY CHURCH.................... 294-1932 MIDWAY BAPTIST CHURCH................... 935-4993
"Affiliated with Mt. Sinai Holy Churches of America Inc." Pastor: Danny Rogers
Sunday School .....................................................................9:45 a.m .
Pastor..................................................... Elder Carolyn D em ps W worship Service................................................................11:00 a.m .
Sunday School.............................. ......................... 11:00 a.m Discipleshi i ........ : "
W orship Service........... ....................................... 12:00 p.m Evening W ... ,1 ...
Thursday Bible Study........ ................... .............. 7:00 p.m Prayer M eeting- W ednesday...........................................7:00 p.m .
Located on County Road 354
357 Pine Street "For If Ye Forgive Men Their Tresspasses Your Heavenly
"Membership means Discipleship" 500985F Father Will Also Forgive You" Matt. 6:14 500994-F


HATCHBEND APOSTOLIC CHURCH..935-2806
Pastor................... .......................................... Rev. Steve Boyd
Sunday School ....................................................... 10:00 a.m .
Wednesday Service..............................................7:30 p.m.
Located 4 miles South on Hwy. 349,
then left on CR 138, follow signs.
500987-F
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD.................294-1811
Sunday School ................................................10:00 a.m .
,,, W orship Service..............................................10:45 a.m .
S K id's C church ................................................... 11:00 a.m .

i,,Youth Im pact................................ ........ 7:00 p.m .
WedCeS Adult Bible Study......................... ...... 7:00 p.m .
Pastor: Rev. Kenny Sullivan
Youth Pastor: Daryl Fletcher
Located at 294 SE Mill Street, Mayo "Renewing Hope and Building Lives"


ST. MATTHEW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Contact Number in Mayo (386) 294-1839
Sr. W arden............................................................Eva Bolton
Celebration of Holy Eucharist at 7:00 PM
each Wednesday to be followed by light
refreshments and Christian Education.
Located One Block North of the Courthouse in Mayo.

Brewer Lake Baptist Church
Off Hwy. 53 in Day, FL 386-294-1578
"We're Going, Growing and Glowing for God"
Sunday
Sunday School .................................................. ...........10 a.m .
S.... 1 Wenesa a.m.
Children, Youth & A dult..................... ........................7....... p.m .
Matt Swain, Pastor William Sircy, Youth
Visit us on the web at www.brewerlakebaptistchurch.com
"Come To Day...Come Today!" 501001-F


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor........................................................... Rev. Charlie W alker
Sunday Early Service........................................................8:30 a.m .
Su nday School..................................................................10:00 a.m .


B ible Stud ......................................................................./7:00 p.m .
M mission C lasses ................................................................. 7:00 p.m .
Located Two Miles North of Mayo Off Highway 51
"Come And Hear, All Ye That Fear God" Ps. 66:16 500995-F

PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC).294-1306
Pastor.............................Todd Babione
Sunday School ...............................................9:45 a.m.
W orsh ip Service................................................................11:00 a.m .
Wednesday Discipleship II ........ 7:00 p.m.
Evening Training ............................................................... 6:00 p.m .
Seven miles West of Mayo,
left on CR 534 then right on 350A
-- Jesus Saves -- 500996-F

NEW HARMONY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
160th St.
(Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right)
Pastor: Stan Posey
Phone (386) 776-1806


SUNDAY
Sunday Worship..........
Bible Study..................
WEDNESDAY
Women's Bible Study


...9:30 am
.10:30 am


.10:00 am8078-
558078-F


New Beginnings Church
a place for you
Pastor...............Wayne Hudson
Phone Number........386-294-1244
newbeginningschurch@alltel.net
Purpose Statement:
where People can discover and develop a passion for
God that is Rea relevant, and relations.
New Location:
163 W. Main Street, Suite 500
Service Schedule:
I .... I,, hI IiiiI.
www.newbeginningschurchmayo.com
500992-F
Ephesus Advent
Christian Church
Pastor Bill Talley
963-5600 ~ 208-9626
Sunday School Service.... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service.............. 11:00 a.m.
Prayer Meeting................. 7:00 p.m.
558070-F

To Place

Your Church

In Our

Church


Wednesday Evening........................................... 7:00 p.m.
3029 S.E. CR 500 558065- Directory,

SCall Nancy

uat 386-362-


Ii-~I Ca JJ


To Place Your Church In

Our Church Directory, Call

Nancy at 386-362-1734


Hatch Bend Baptist Church
Pastor Paul A. Coleman
935-0943
Sunday School............................................................ 9:45 a.m .
Sunday Morning Worship..........................................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening............................................................ 6:00 p.m.


Call Junk Joe


For Junk Vehicles
Will Remove any kind
of scrap metal
Free Pickup

Call 386-867-139655804_-F


I - . .


PAGE 2A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2009








YOU'D BETTER LISTEN II -I


uavia 1- matter, doctor of
Pastoral Counseling
dmatier@windstream.net

What made the ancient
Jews stand out to their
neighbors wasn't their
own strength and mili-
tary prowess but God's
movement in their
midst. Early on in their
history when they ap-
proached Jericho, while
they were faithful to the
Lord, Rahab the harlot
told the spies Joshua
sent to spy out the land,
"I know that the Lord
hath given you the land,
and that your terror is
fallen upon us, and that
all the inhabitants of the
land faint because of
you. For we have heard
how the Lord dried up
the water of the Red sea
for you, when ye came
out of Egypt; and what
ye did unto the two
kings of the Amorites,
that were on the other
side Jordan,..." (Joshua
2:9, 10). When Israel
walked with God, He
fought their battles be-
cause they were His cho-
sen people!
It is obvious that God
has chosen to bless our
nation. It doesn't appear
to be any accident that a
little nation started by
renegade soldiers fight-
ing one of the greatest
armies in the world at
that time the British


Army; the Red Coats,
would ever have been
accomplished without
the hand of God in the
mix. Great men of God
sacrificed their lives to
write the Constitution of
the United States Most
of whom were Preachers
of the Word of God.
They believed that the
Bible you and I have the
privilege of reading, is
the Word of God and did
their best to obey;
obeyed the Word of God
like the early Israelites
did and as long as they
listened to God, God
blessed.
Do you think it is any
accident that our coun-
try has been blessed to
have automobiles
massed produced,
thanks to Henry Ford
and FREE ENTERPRISE,
to be the first in flight,
commercial aviation. It
is because God blessed
our nation because, at
least until the last 30 or
40 years America has
had churches that have
taken a stand on the
teachings of the Bible.
Pastors didn't act like
anything goes. At one
time a preacher didn't
have to be told that life
starts in the womb that
it is a child not a fetus.
He didn't have to be told
that homosexuality is
wrong because the Bible
makes it very clear (Soon
if your pastor preaches
the Word of God it is
possible he could be ar-
rested for a hate crime
because he opposes
"same sex" marriage,
etc.). Some churches
have even succumbed to
homosexual pastors!
These churches definite-
ly are not listening to


God's Word! God com-
municates with you
through His word! You
are not listening!
In Jeremiah chapter 13,
the prophet Jeremiah is
told to hide a "girdle"
and after many days the
Lord tells him to go back
and get the "girdle."
And then Jeremiah dis-
covers, "...behold, the
girdle was marred, it
was profitable for noth-
ing. Then the word of
the Lord came unto me
saying, Thus said the
Lord, After this manner
will I mar the pride of Ju-
dah, and the great pride
of Jerusalem. This evil
people, which refuse to
hear my words, which
walk in the imagination
of their heart, and walk
after other gods, to serve
them and to worship
them, shall even be as
this girdle, which is
good for nothing," (Jere-
miah 13:7-10). Will
America's "Pride" soon
be marred? Is there an
upcoming, coming? We
must listen to God or ex-
pect the consequences.
Look around. Quit
blaming the situation
America is in on the
politicians (of course
they are as responsible
as anyone else when it
regards whether or not
they are willing to listen
to God), But America lis-
ten to God! You'll keep
the blessing the way you
got it even if it is too
late for II Chronicles 7:14
because what you are
witnessing is what men
of old told you would
see as the end ap-
proached (Romans 1:18-
32)
David H Matier, DPC
dmatier@windstream. net


Talking with children about their loss.


Kamp Time at your school


Jan Greene, LCSW (center), Hospice
of the Nature Coast Children's Grief
Specialist and Branford Elementary
School offer Kamp Time at Your School,
a program for children who have expe-
rienced a loss.
Kamp Time at Your School is a pro-
gram of the Herry's Kids Division of
Hospice of the Nature Coast that teach-
es children about loss and the process
of healing. Recognizing the negative
impact that grief can have on a child's
life, professional counselors teach chil-
dren to work through their loss in a
positive manner. The children partici-
pate in various group sessions in order
to better understand their loss and be-
gin the process of healing. Therapies
include art therapy, play therapy, mu-
sic therapy, drama, and one-on-one dis-
cussion.
Children are often faced with difficult
grief issues. For instance, the death of a
grandparent, considered to an adult as
a "normal" culmination of a fruitful life,


can have a major negative impact on a
child. The death of a parent, sibling,
other family member or friend can cre-
ate anxiety and fear in children. When
death is a result of abuse, murder, sui-
cide, drug use or accident, children may
develop inappropriate social behaviors
if they do not receive help for their
grief.
Hospice of the Nature Coast Kamp
Time at Your School is supported sole-
ly by community donations, corporate
sponsorships and grants. The Wings
Grief Support Division of Hospice of
Citrus County/Hospice of the Nature
Coast provides educational programs
and support to anyone who has experi-
enced a loss. Support is provided on an
individual basis or as part of a group.
Educational programs are offered to
community groups and organizations,
schools, and businesses. For more infor-
mation about grief support programs
contact David Green at 866-463-1385 or
www.hospiceofthenaturecoast.org.


In memory of


Ronny

SNewbern


* Nov. 7, 1949 Nov. 15, 2007
2 years ago God saw fit to come and take
you home. Our lives have been forever
changed. Life goes on, but you will always
beapart of. .,-i-i i ..we thinkand do.
You are.., i,' missed.


Love you,
Daddy & Mama,
Rhonda, Aaron & Alyssa,
Danny, Larry, Lana, Susan
P.S. We love You


561557-F


FARM-CITY Week
Nov. 20 26 with Lafayette County Farm Bureau


Keith and Stephanie Shiver, a Lafayette County Farm Bureau family, pose
with their children, Kole, Christian, Faith and Emma, at their dairy farm.

What does Farm-City Week

mean to Lafayette County?
Lafayette County Farm Bureau is pleased to recognize
Nov. 20- 26 as Farm-City Week.
FAM.ff Y On the seven days leading to and including Thanksgiving
Day, Farm-City Week is celebrated nationwide. What are we
celebrating? The American economy perseveres thanks to the
interdependence of farms and cities.
Neither the farm nor the city can exist in isolation. Instead, the interdepend-
ence of the two creates jobs, products, markets and relationships that make our econ-
omy and nation strong. Join with us in recognizing Lafayette County agricultural
producers and allied industries and the contributions they make to the economy.
As we celebrate Thanksgiving, let's remember the vital farm-city partner-
ships that have done so much to improve the quality of our lives. Rural and urban
communities working together have made the most of our rich agricul-
tural resources, and have made significant contributions to
our health and well-being and to the strength of our
nation's economy. For this, we can give thanks.
A* In honor of Farm-City Week, Lafayette County
Farm Bureau is hosting a luncheon on
Food For Thought... Nov. 25 in conjunction with the Rotary Club. Lafayette -
From Florida's Farmers County c


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2009


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 3A






PAGE 4A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2009


Forestry Team Members

The Lafayette FFA Ju-
nior and Senior Chapters
competed in the district
forestry contest October
8, 2009 at Lake City
Community College.
Team members were
tested on their knowl-
edge of dendrology, in-
sect, disease, and tool
identification, map inter-
pretation, tree measure-
ment, and a written test.
Fort White again won
the senior contest and
Cedar Key Middle won
the middle school con-
test. Team members in-
cluded: Darren Brantley,
Jared Sampson, Elliot
Solano, Jackson Koon,
Cole Lawson, Christo-
pher Keen, Cody Walk-
er, Ashlin Morgan, Au-
dra Shiver, Laruen
Solano, Kaley Koon,
Robin Shiver, Mason
Byrd, Conner Buchanan,
Garret Dekle, Ryan
Fredriksson, Myles
Byrd, and Micah Byrd.
Jared Sampson was the


Ashlin Morgan identifies a tool.


senior team high indi-
vidual and Ashlin Mor-
gan was the junior team
high individual. The


We're right around
the next turn.
(Look for us on Victory Lane and Pit Road too.)
You don't have to look far to find one of the leaders in Auto,
Home and Life coverage. Your local Farm Bureau Insurance
agency provides the proven protection, prompt service and
competitive rates you want. Plus, our fast, fair claims service
makes any pit crew look like they're standing still
Call today for a free, no-obligation review.



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Freddy Pitts, Agent
105 W. Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-2213 Auto Home Life
Freddy Pitts, Agent
Ryan Perry, Agent 111
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371 J ,iDE
Lance Braswell, Agent RACING
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thank Mr. Lucas Mor-
gan, Mr. Chris Vann, and


Mr. Barry Tye for taking
time to assist in training
the teams.


Garrett Dekle measures a tree


MAY CA 4 1[s


Lafayette Apartments
Hurry in and apply at "The
Best Place to Live!" Rental
Assistance, 1, 2, & 3 BR. HC
& Non-HC accessible
apartments. Laundry facility
& playground. We pay water,
sewer & garbage. Mayo, FL.
Ph: 386-294-2720, TDD/TTY
711. Equal Housing
Opportunity 499138-F


Advertise your YARD SALE,
VEHICLES OR UNWANTED
ITEMS IN THE CLASSIFIED.
Call (386) 362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182 to place
your ad today
-" w.-


Nov. 23.27, 2009
Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri.
________ 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th


IIt il i i

I Itim. II
"I. Il .i.


.KljI.
ll.ulld
tilikli
I*ia I*


Fall Break

No School for

students or staff!


Breakfast will now be provided at LHS each morning beginning at 7:45 a.m.
Sponsored By: Mayo Tritway

'- Hwy 27*294-1165 557583-F


Chapter Competes in


District Forestry Contest



R? t;:^ rc ^At a^ C 2L^ ^i ^-:


Mrs. Heather Croft
Jackson, National and
State Board Certified
Occupational Therapist,
from Mayo, Florida, at-
tended the National
Association for Gifted
Children: 56th Annual
Convention & Exhibi-
tion in St. Louis, Mis-
souri on November 5-8,
2009 at the America's
Center and the Renais-
sance St. Louis Grand
Hotel. The NAGC is an
organization founded
"to address the unique
needs of children and
youth with demonstrat-
ed gifts and talents as
well as those children
who may be able to de-
velop their talent po-
tential with appropriate
educational experi-
ences", according to the
organization's website
org/index.aspx?id 661
> There were several
keynote speakers in-
cluding: Dr. Howard
Gardner, the Hobbs
Professor of Cognition
and Education at the
Harvard Graduate
School of Education,
who discussed his theo-
ry of Multiple Intelli-
gences; eight time Na-
tional Chess Champion,
Josh Waitzkin who was
the focus of the book
and movie Searching
for Bobby Fischer; and
Polly Draper and
Michael Wolff, parents
of the stars of the syn-
dicated TV show "The
Naked Brothers Band".
While attending,
Heather presented a
poster presentation ses-
sion on the topic: "Can
A Child Be Gifted and
Have Sensory Process-
ing Disorder (SPD)?"
There were over 950
proposals submitted for
presentations for ap-
proximately 250 pro-
gram slots. Heather's
presentation proposal
was one of those 250
program slots chosen to
present to over 2,500
convention attendees.
Heather's presentation
track was "Special Pop-
ulations" and a de-
scription of her presen-
tation was printed in
the convention pro-
gram as follows: "Can a
child be gifted and
have sensory process-
ing disorder (SPD)?:
The answer is yes! SPD
(formerly known as
Sensory Integration
Dysfunction) is a real
condition, but often
hidden and unrecog-
nized. In this session,
learn various sensory
processing challenges
and their effects on
learning and behavior.
Learn to identify and
provide interventions
for normalizing sensory
information from sen-
sory receptors (audito-
ry, visual, olfactory,
vestibular, propriocep-
tive, tactile, and oral
motor) through "senso-
ry diet" techniques to
improve academic per-
formance, transitions,
social interactions, as
well as decrease temper
tantrums, emotional
outbreaks/ meltdowns,
and fear-based or risk-
taking behavioral ac-
tions." For more infor-
mation on the topic of
Sensory Processing Dis-
order, go to the follow-
ing internet websites:
www.spdfoundation.ne


t www.sensory-process-
ing-disorder.com
Heather commented


that she "was humbled
at the opportunity to at-
tend the convention
and present her topic
on Sensory Processing
Disorder." Heather
stated, "Being a child
advocate is what it is all
about... if I can reach
one child, one parent,
one teacher, then I am
making a difference. I
ask all of you to make a
difference too! Children
need advocates, espe-
cially those with learn-
ing difficulties. We
need to help those chal-
lenged learners by
helping them find ways
to learn and preserve
their self-confidence.
We need to help chil-
dren feel competent
and not 'dumb' or 'stu-
pid'. Also, I want to
thank Dr. Deborah Har-
ris, school psychologist
from Gainesville, Flori-
da, who introduced me
to the field of gifted
learners and twice ex-
ceptional. She has been
instrumental in the gift-
ed field of education
advocating for gifted
children who have
learning disabilities. It
was after discussions
with her that I decided
to submit my propos-
al."
Heather graduated
from Lafayette High
School in 1993 and re-
ceived her Bachelor of
Health Science in Occu-
pational Therapy de-
gree from the Universi-
ty of Florida in 1997
where she graduated
Summa Cum Laude
(with Highest Honors).
Currently, Heather is
pursuing her Master's
degree in Teaching and
Learning from South-
eastern University's
College of Education.
She is a contracted Oc-
cupational Therapist
with the Lafayette
County School System
and owns a private Oc-
cupational Therapy
Practice called POSS-
Abilities: A Therapy
and Consulting Compa-
ny. She provides thera-
py services for children
with developmental de-
lays, learning disabili-
ties, neurological syn-
dromes like Attention
Deficit, Autism, As-
perger's, and Develop-
mental Coordination
Disorder diagnoses. She
also works with gifted
children who are con-
sidered twice excep-
tional-that is, children
who have developmen-
tal / learning and / or
neurological delays
along with qualifying
as gifted learners by
psychological testing.
Heather is the wife of
Dr. Lindsey Duane
Jackson and the mother
of three energetic boys.
Her parents are Thomas
and Carlene Croft of
Mayo, Florida.


Jackson attends

National Association

for Gifted Children,

56th Annual Convention

and Exhibition


MAYO FREE PRESS
Published weekly every Thursday, USPS #334-600
Phone: (386) 362-1734 Fax: (386) 362-6827





Myra Regan, Robert Bridges, Linda Smith,
Publisher Group Editor Manager
Annual subscription rate:
$17 in county / $25 out of county
Periodicals postage paid at Live Oak, Forida
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
The Mayo Free Press
P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, Forida 32064
Office located at 211 Howard St. East, Live Oak, FL
Editorial Policy: The Mayo Free Press encourages readers to write letters to the
editor expressing their opinion. All letters should be brief and to the point and those
selected for publication (we reserved the right to accept or reject all letters) may be
edited for space reasons. Letters must be signed and include the writer's address and
phone number to be considered for publication. All letters become the property of
The Mayo Free Press.


PAGE 4A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2009








Lafayette County Schools Safe Schools Healthy


Students
Lafayette County Schools, Safe
Schools Healthy Students Project,
along with Lafayette High School,
Lafayette Elementary School, Light-
house Christian Academy and SWAT
celebrated Red Ribbon Week October
24 31. During this week, students in
Lafayette County joined students all
across the United States in a pledge to
live drug and alcohol free.
Red Ribbon Week is the most far-
reaching and well-known drug pre-
vention event in America with 80 mil-
lion people participating in Red Rib-
bon events. The first event was orga-
nized in 1985 by a group of parents
concerned about the destruction
caused by alcohol and drug abuse. The
red ribbon was adopted as a symbol of
the movement in honor of Enrique
"Kiki" Camarena, one of the U.S. Drug
Enforcement Administration's bravest
agents who made the ultimate sacrifice
fighting drugs. Kiki Camarena was
kidnapped, tortured and brutally mur-
dered by drug traffickers in Mexico in
March 1985.
The National Red Ribbon Week
campaign is dedicated to helping pre-
serve Special Agent Camerena's mem-
ory and further the cause for which he
gave his life, the fight against the vio-
lence of drug crime and the misery of
addiction. By participating in Red Rib-
bon Week activities and wearing the
Red Ribbon, Americans from all walks
of life demonstrate their opposition to
drugs and drug use in their communi-
ty. DEA Acting Administrator Michele
Leonhart stated in a recent press re-
lease, "DEA will continue doing all we
can to take drug traffickers out of our
communities, and we are so proud
when we see millions of young people
across America join us in taking a
stand against drugs."
The Lafayette County Schools Safe
Schools Healthy Students Project and
Lafayette County SWAT invited each
and every member of Lafayette Coun-
ty to be involved in Red Ribbon Week
by displaying a Red Ribbon on the
door of their business. Kim Rice of
Kim's Enchanted Florist graciously
made each Red Ribbon displayed at
the following businesses:

Lafayette Elementary School
Lafayette High School
Lafayette County School Board
Kim's Enchanted Florist
Mayo Post Office
Lafayette County Courthouse
Sandy's Country Curl
Le Chateau Bed & Breakfast
Jiffy Food Store
Drummond Community Bank
Family Dollar


Project observe Red Ribbon Week
Mayo Auto Parts
Subway -
Subs & More 0
Koon's Smokehouse & Grill _r
Farm Bureau InsuranceY
Mayo Town & Country Animal Hos-


I


pital
Hair Designs by Michelle
Mayo Fertilizer, Inc.
Cindy's Hair Styling
First Federal
Lafayette County Library
Jimmy Barrington Agricultural
Complex
Suwannee River Economic Council
Lafayette County Health Depart-
ment
Lafayette State Bank
Two Sisters BBQ
Mayo Cafe
Dollar General
Mayo Food Mart
Thriftway
J & J Gas Service
North Florida Pharmacy
Old Florida Company
Main Street Restaurant & Coffee
B. J.' s Consignment Shop
Lillie's Fashion
Jannie's Shop
Lafayette County Jail
Lafayette County Sheriff's Office
Revels Auto Supply
Lafayette EMS
Mayo Hardware
Lafayette County Chamber of
Commerce

Students at all schools participated
in a variety of activities to promote
Red Ribbon Week. The activities in-
cluded: Drug Free Pledge at LHS and
distribution of theme related materials
such as pencils, book marks, bracelets,
backpacks, flashlights and stickers at
Lafayette High School, Lafayette Ele-
mentary School and Lighthouse Chris-
tian Academy. Lafayette High School
students who pledged last year to re-
main drug free and displayed their
pledge card this year received a special
prize on the day of the pledge. Stu-
dents at Lafayette Elementary School
also participated in a Poster Contest
and enjoyed a "Gateway Drug" pre-
sentation from the National Guard
Drug Demand Reduction Program.
Please contact Becky Sharpe, Safe
School Healthy Students Project Direc-
tor, (386-294-1417 or
bsharpe@lafayette.kl2.fl.us) if you
would like more information on the
Project SAVE Initiative or the Project
SAVE Partnership. Partnership Meet-
ings are held in the SSHS Building at
9:30 a.m. on the second Tuesday of
each month. Parents and community
members are encouraged to attend.


Deputy Tysall talks with Middle School student Ryan Fredriksson as he pledges to be Drug
Free.


Captain Kicklighter shows students a "Smoker's Lung"


and Lindsey Hamlin.


NATIONAL FARM-CITY WEEK

November 20-26, 2009

November 19, 2009


This Thanksgiving Day, as we gather with family
and friends to count our blessings, let's give thanks
for the bounty we enjoy not just on this holiday, but
every day. The safe, plentiful food that is available
to us, and the products we use on a daily basis, did-
n't just appear in a store. They got there, thanks to a
tremendous partnership of farmers and ranchers,
processors, brokers, truckers, shippers, advertisers,
wholesalers and retailers.
In appreciation of this farm-city partnership, the
President of the United States annually proclaims
the week leading up to and including Thanksgiving
Day as National Farm-City Week.
Rural and urban residents are "Partners in
Progress" who produce the products, consume the
products, and make them readily available through
an efficient production and marketing chain. Farm-


ers and ranchers are just the beginning of that
chain. Farm workers, researchers, processors, ship-
pers, truck drivers, inspectors, wholesalers,
agribusinesses, marketers, advertisers, retailers and
consumers all play important roles in the incredible
productivity that has made our nation's food and
fiber system the envy of the world.
This week, as we celebrate Thanksgiving, let's re-
member the vital farm-city partnerships that have
done so much to improve the quality of our lives.
Rural and urban communities working together
have made the most of our rich agricultural re-
sources, and have made significant contributions to
our health and well-being and to our nation's econ-
omy. For this, we can give thanks.
Lafayette County Farm Bureau, 874 East Main St.
Mayo, Florida


In order to allow our employees time off to spend with their
families the following deadlines will be in effect:
Thursday, November 26 edition
North Florida Focus Retail Advertising................ 3 p.m.Thursday, Nov. 19
Classified Line Ads.................................... ......... 4 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 19
Legal Advertising................... ............... ..4 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 19
Mayo Free Press Retail Advertising..................... 1 p.m.Thursday, Nov. 19
Have a safe and happy holiday






211 Howard St. East PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1734 Fax 386-362-6827


I


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2009


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 5A


Captain Chad Kicklighter shows students a healthy lung






PAGE 6A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2009


NFCC Studen


North Florida Com-
munity College held its
annual Club Expo Sept.
29 through Sept. 30 from
11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the
NFCC Student Center.
The Club Expo is a two-
day event providing stu-
dents with information
on student clubs, organi-
zations, and how to get
involved in campus ac-
tivities.
Each year NFCC's
campus clubs and orga-
nizations turn out to
compete for best in
booth at the Expo, and
this year was no excep-
tion. Each booth was
judged by the NFCC
Student Government
Association and was


scored for its creativity,
information and enthu-
siasm. Winning first
place for its glitz and
glitter was NFCC's the-
atrical organization the
Sentinel Upstage Play-
ers. Second place went
to NFCC's ecological
group Save Our Animal
Resources (SOAR), who
brought a display that
included live butterfly
chrysalis. The NFCC Art
Club received third
place for its clever create
a T-shirt booth, while
fourth place went to the
Trailblazer who passed
out the newest edition of
the campus newspaper.
Other clubs that par-
ticipated included the


ts get i
Astronomy Club, Busi-
ness Club, Brain Bowl,
Diversity Student Union
(DSU), Phi-Theta Kappa,
Sentinel Rocketeers, and
Student Government
Association (SGA).
"This year's Club
Expo was very success-
ful and well attended,"
said NFCC Director of
Student Services Bobbie
O'Hara. The sign up
for students interested in
joining an NFCC club
was exceptional."
For more information
about joining a campus
club or organization at
NFCC contact Bobbie
O'Hara at 850.973.1623
or email
oharar@nfcc.edu.


involved at Club Expo


Denise Bell advisor for the Sentinel Upstage players takes first for the best booth at the
Expo.


NFCC Soar Advisor Bonnie Littlefield displays butterfly chrysalis while club members hold
up second place trophy.


NFCC Art Club snags third place with creative "Create a T-Shirt" idea.


NFCC Phi Theta Kappa honor society set up to welcome its newest members.


Trailblazer students Jeremy Weatherspoon and Veronica Bruton show off fourth place tro-
phy, while handing out the latest edition.


NFCC Business Club advisor Marie Guest talks business with potential new member.


Sentinel Rocketeers get ready to make the Club Expo a real "blast" with live rocket
launches


PAGE 6A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2009






THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2009 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL -~ PAGE 7A


Local girl is


"Little Miss


Perfect Charity"
























Delayna Lentz Bearden

Submitted
T he Little Mr. and Miss Perfect
Pageant was held recently at the
Van H. Priest Auditorium in Madi-
son, to benefit the Florida State
Employees Charitable Campaign. Delayna
Lentz Bearden, daughter of Mike and Shelley
Bearden of Mayo, made it her goal to collect
the most money for charity. She approached
many people and businesses in Mayo. With
everyone's help, she collected $180 for charity
and won "Little Miss Perfect Charity" since
she collected more money than any of the oth-
er participants.
Delayna could not have done this without
help from local folks. Local businesses such as
A3 Graphics, Hair Designs by Michele, Mayo
Fertilizer and Mayo Hardware gave donations
to be auctioned of to benefit this special chari-
ty campaign. Delayna thanks everyone for
helping her achieve her goal. All money col-
lected will benefit the Florida State Employees
Charitable Campaign.



Hornets come up


short against Bucs


Water woes won't go away


Continued From Page 1A

water," Webster told a crowd of
about 200 at Branford Elementary
School. However, Webster noted,
"we do not have endless sup-
plies" of the resource.
Lauren Davis, a Future Farmers
of America member and student
at Cedar Key Middle School,
compared North Florida to the
ant in Aesop's fable, working
hard to protect its resources,
while a wasteful South Florida -
the grasshopper foolishly refus-
es to conserve, then turns to us
for help.
In some versions of the story
the ant takes pity on the
grasshopper and shares his food
him. In real life we may not have
a choice.
"We do not have the political
clout to stop it if someone wants
to take our water," said Webster.
Still, North Florida citizens are
going to try. Before the forum
was over a group action meeting
had already been set up for Tues-
day morning at the Ft. White


community center.
"The era of cheap water is
gone," said Webster. "The state is
going to have to pay more. You
cannot take water without harm-
ing resources."
Webster sited desalination and
better conservation practices as
alternative solutions to Tampa's
water shortage.
As for our own dwindling
aquifer, the Suwannee River Wa-
ter Management District along
with the St. Johns River Water
Management District are work-
ing towards a plan that will even-
tually put Florida's aquifers
"back on track." Already, SR-
WMD has been in the process of a
district wide water supply assess-
ment. "We have determined
there will not be sufficient water
to meet future needs in the Upper
Santa Fe Basin," said Webster.
"This is the red flag, this is the
warning."
The new plan will mean a new
permitting strategy for munici-
palities, as well as stricter conser-
vation measures for homeowners


and business. The increasing
population in northeastern Flori-
da and advancing industry and
other economic development has
led to a rapid increase in water
demand.
In a previously published arti-
cle, SRWMD Executive Director
David Still stated that North
Florida must improve the design
and management of water re-
source technologies, find alterna-
tive water supplies, and adopt
stricter water conservation tech-
nologies. "Hopefully once imple-
mented things will get back on
track," he said.
However, with Tampa's eye on
the Floridian aquifer, the future
of the Suwannee River Basin's
water supply remains hazy, ex-
pressed water management offi-
cials.

Part 2, which will appear in next
week's Free Press, concerns the other
topic addressed at Monday night's
forum: new EPA guidelines govern-
ing nutrient levels in runoff from
lawns, ranches and farms.


Man brutally beaten by teens, say police


Continued From Page 1A

The three were unable to locate
anything of value except the vic-
tim's cellular telephone, police
say. They took the phone and
fled the scene, according to re-
ports.
Afterward the victim gave
physical descriptions of the juve-


niles to Lafayette County
Deputy Randy Henderson.
Through a combined effort be-
tween Deputy Henderson and
assisting deputies, Robert Law-
son and Jacquelyn Tysall, a pos-
sible location was narrowed
down to an apartment at the
Lafayette Apartments. Beam and
Carter fled from a window at the


back of the apartment as the
deputies approached. They were
quickly apprehended. Loston
was also taken into custody at
the apartment a short time later.
All three juveniles were
charged with home invasion rob-
bery and aggravated battery af-
ter the victim reportedly identi-
fied them in a photo lineup.


Continued From Page 1A

top with a 32-20 win
over the Hornets.
With the Hornet de-
fense getting off to a
rocky start Friday night,
the Bucs scored quickly
in the first quarter on a
39-yard run by Trent
Thomson. The Hornets
came back with a 23-
yard touchdown pass
from Nick Bracewell to
Brooks Laminack with
less than two minutes
left in the first.
The Bucs came back
early in the second quar-
ter with a five-yard run
for a touchdown by Kyle
Certain. The kick was
blocked. The Hornets
picked up a touchdown
by Antwan Brown with
less than a minute left in
the first half.
However, Kyle Cer-
tain's pass to Josh Kirby
in the third quarter
quickly broke the half-
time 13-13 tie, while Per-
ry sat on the sidelines
with a sprained ankle.
Brown then made the
crowd go wild with an
82-yard kickoff return
for a score. The Hornets
failed to produce after
they got the ball back on
a missed 42-yard field
goal attempt by Carlos
Negrete.
Branford responded
with a touchdown by
Certain against a Hornet
defense that had previ-
ously given up an aver-
age of less than two
touchdowns per game.
The Hornets intercepted
the ball just before
Lafayette sophomore
lineman Tyler Brown
went down after a hit.
The crowd was quiet as
Brown lay immobilized
for 20 minutes. Brown
was alert as he was
loaded into an ambu-
lance while his team


prayed in a huddle on
the field.
After Tyler Brown's
injury, an on-target pass
from Bracewell to
Antwan Brown, gained
20-plus yards. The Hor-
nets' chances to score
looked hopeful. Howev-
er, after several incom-
plete passes, the Hornets
failed to score.
Perry sealed the deal
with a huge 70-yard
sprint for a touchdown.
"I didn't feel like I did
what I was capable of,"
said Nick Bracewell.
"We played good, al-
though I don't think we
came in ready to play.
We were thinking about
playoffs, we didn't focus
on Branford."
Lafayette Coach Joey
Pearson gave the Bucs
credit for the win.
"Branford played a
great game and de-
served to win," said
Pearson. "We had some
opportunities to win the
game, but we could not
get them off the field on
third downs and didn't
score when we got
down in the red zone."
"In a close game it
comes down to a few
plays and we just didn't
get it done. We now
have to rebound and get
ready for a very good
Jefferson County team
in the first round of the
playoffs," said Pearson.
Branford Coach Bill
Wiles was proud of his
team's hard-fought win
against what he called a
"well coached and
classy outfit."
"I have a lot of respect
for coach Pearson and
his program," he said.
"We felt like we would
get their best effort, so
our challenge was to
fight back. We did. We
battled the whole
game."


Krista Lyons


Lyons wins Blue Ribbon

at 68th Annual Florida Farm Bureau Convention
Krista Lyons, 9 years old, and a student at Lafayette Elementary School, was a representative for the
Lafayette 4-H Art Club at the 68th Annual Florida Farm Bureau Convention.
The convention was held Oct. 28-30 in Daytona Beach.
Krista won a Blue Ribbon as well as $100 cash for her artwork. The theme of the artwork was "Strong
Family Farms, Strong Florida."



Medicare 2010 Annual Enrollment Period


For Part D Drug Plans Begins Soon!


Do you know how much your current Part D
Drug Plan is going to cost you next year?
Do you know the cost of your drugs in the De-
ductible and in the Gap?
Do you know when you will hit the Gap?
Do you know if there is a less expensive plan
out there that covers your drugs?
Medicare Part D's Annual Enrollment Period
runs Nov. 15, to Dec 31.
SHINE, a volunteer Program with the FL Dept
of Elder Affairs, is here to help answer your ques-
tions.


Come see us for free, unbiased, and confidential
assistance. Bring your Medicare Card, your cur-
rent Part D Plan card, and your prescription drug
bottles. There will be a worksheet to complete. To
find a SHINE site near you or to be referred to a
volunteer, call the Elder Helpline at 1-800-262-
2243.

Next site dates are:
Friday, Nov 20, 9 a.m.-Noon, Branford Library
Wed, Nov 25, 9 a,m, -Noon Trenton Library
Wed, Nov 25, 2 p.m.-5 p.m. Cross City Library.


Cloed orhansgiinghoiday
Th .MyoFre res ffce lcaedinie heSuaneeDeocatwil 6e.loedo
ThrdyIo. 26,S nd*Fida, o. 2,i bsrac o hnsgiving. Our office*wiroe
I ona,.o. 30 8i m.Hav* a af a app hoida.


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2009


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 7A












"Looking back at 2001"


Teford Pert, local Day Fireman, "always on call."


With 1 second left on the clock, Chandra Shine makes the winning shot.


-q


Donnie Severance, Field Appraiser and GIS Mapping, takes
a break from putting property information into the comput-


*. r' E' ~
4
4 -~
4
t
U,
~..


Marvin Buchanan (standing) is honored on his birthday,
with a neighborhood fish fry. Others in picture are John
Henry Bell, Elbert Buchanan, and Travis Howard.


L-R Brittany Walker, Victoria Walker, Zachary Hutchins, Kayne Hurst, (back) Vickie Ducksworth holding Savanna Hamlin.
With childlike faith these children learn to make a "PHONE CALL" to God.


L-R Lafayette County Property Appraiser Tim Walker stops
for a photo with Joyce Buchanan, Deputy Appraiser and
Donnie Severance, Field Appraiser.


The installing officer, Bernard Prunier, (L) greets Ron
McMillan as Worshipful Master of Day Lodge. McMillan is
wearing a hat, which is the symbol of his office.


Hatch Bend Youth are more than willing to "WORK" toward raising money for a ski trip
planned for February.


Mary Koon, eighth grade
teacher is encouraging her
students to raise money for
St. Jude Hospital while
learning math.


Sponsored by:


S4n1


SIurnj'


Funeral Home & Crematory
of Mayo
386-294-2658
Locally owned & operated.
Located 7 blocks South of the courthouse at the comer
of Lake St. and Monroe Ave.


of Lake St. and Monroe Ave. 557~~ F


PAGE 8A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2009


4w-G


557686-F






THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2009 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL -~ PAGE 9A


Editor's note: The Mayo
Free Press prints the arrest
record as received from the
Sheriff's office. If your name
appears here and you are
later found not guilty or the
charges are dropped, we
will be happy to make note
of this in the newspaper
when judicial proof is pre-
sented to us by you or the
authorities.
The following abbrevi-
ations are used below:

ATF-Department of
Alcohol, Tobacco and
Firearms
DOC-Department of
Corrections
DOT-Department of
Transportation
FDLE-Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforce-
ment
FHP-Florida Highway
Patrol
FWC-Florida Wildlife
Commission
LCSO-Lafayette Coun-
ty Sheriff's Office
OALE-Office of Agri-
cultural Law Enforce-
ment
P&P Probation and Pa-
role
USMS-US Marshall's
Service
VOP-Violation of Pro-
bation

October 2, 2009
Miner Brown
1070 Jordon Road
Fort White, Florida
Age 46
Charge Vop (Grand
Theft)
Arresting Officer B.
Lawson

October 2, 2009
Jody Sullivan
4153 Se Cr 500
Mayo, Florida
Age 35
Charge Vop (Aggra-
vated Assault)

October 2, 2009
Mitchell Joiner
217 Ne Kalmia Lane
Branford, Florida
Age 27
Charge Fta (Petit Lar-
ceny) Alachua County


ARREST LOG


Arresting Officer B.
Lawson

October 5, 2009
Robert Piccolo
133 Ne Clyde Avenue
Mayo, Florida
Age 41
Charge Aggravated
Battery
Arresting Officer B.
Lawson

October 5, 2009
Richard Guthrie
133 Ne Clyde Avenue
Mayo, Florida
Age 41
Charge Aggravated
Battery
Arresting Officer B.
Lawson

October 6, 2009
William Watkins
105 So Indian River
Fort Pierce, Florida
Age 61
Charge Aggravated
Battery Domestic
Arresting Officer R.
Cranford

October 9, 2009
Kurt Snyder
843 Sw Koon Lake
Mayo, Florida


Age 44
Charge Theft Of Util-
ity Service / Burglary Of
Conveyance / False In-
prisonment
Arresting Officer R.
Henderson


October 10, 2009
Carol Ryan
1220 Main Street
Dunedin, Florida
Age 47
Arresting Officer A.
Ellis
Charge Vop (Intro-
duction Of Contraband
Into A State Facility)

10-16-2009
Jeffery Wolverton
175 Plaza Lane
Lake City, Florida
Age 30
Charge Dwls X3 /
Felony Dui
Arresting Officer Fhp
Trooper Hughes

10-16-2009
James Laster
3967 Ne Cr 354
Mayo, Florida
Age 75
Charge Sexual Bat-
tery Under 12 / Lewd


118 E. Park St. Perry, FL 32348
(Behind Foodland Shopping Center)
Toll-Free 1-866-Perry Movies (737-7966)
Visit our website at www.perrytheatre.com
Friday/Saturday........ $6.00 all seats
Sunday......................$5.00 all seats
1 Free Refill On Med/Lg Drink & All Popcorn
Starting Friday 11/20/09
ADMISSION
ROLLBACK Fri.& Sat....................7:30 p.m.
All Seats $5.00 Sunday ........................4:00p.m.


Whee Te ildThns*r
10 n ia Weed JG


Fri. & Sat...................7:30p.m. Fri. & Sat.................... 7:30 p.m.
Sunday ........................4:00 p.m. Sunday................... 4:00 p.m.
Coming Attractions: Wedonotaccept 50or$100bills
* Old Dogs The Blind Side
Christmas Carol
*Alvin & Chipmunks

BUY e CIT 1PREE CO UPON ,
(Limit one per visit) Certain restrictions may apply. Expires 11/30/09


Twiliht Saa: Ne Moo


And Lascivious
Arresting Officer -
Deputy R. Henderson

10-26-2009
Robert Daniels
967 Sw Seven Springs
Road
Greenville, Florida
Age 38
Charge Vop (Con-
trolled Substance Within
1000ft Of Convey)
Arresting Officer -
Deputy J. Harris

11-6-2009
Abel Tellechea
1525 Se Cr 405
Mayo, Fl
Age 40
Charge Drug Para
Use Or Possession /
Manufactoring Marijua-
na
Arresting Officer L.
Hempstead

11-6-2009
Alberto Rodriquez
1525 Se Cr 405
Mayo, Fl
Age 41
Charge Drug Para
Use Or Possession /
Manufactoring Marijua-
na
Arresting Officer L.
Hempstead

11-11-2009
Jeffery Wheeler
2919 230th Street
Lake City, Fl


Age 40
Charge Aggravated
Battery With Deadly
Weapon
Arresting Officer C.
Keen

11-12-2009
Ray Wilson
200 Se Land Avenue
Mayo, Florida
Age 24
Charge Simple As-
sault
Arresting Officer C.
Keen
Released 11-13-2009
Ror By Judge Jackson

11-13-2009
Dylan Beam
Sw 2nd Street
Live Oak, Florida
Age 17
Charge Home Inva-
sion Robbery / Aggra-
vated Battery
Arresting Officer R.
Henderson
Released To Djj

11-13-2009
Tyler Carter
Liberty Street
Live Oak, Florida
Age 15
Charge Home Inva-
sion Robbery / Aggra-
vated Battery
Arresting Officer R.
Henderson
Released To Djj

11-13-2009


Kelyn Loston
504 Ne Webb Drive
Live Oak, Florida
Age 17
Charge Home Inva-
sion Robbery / Aggra-
vated Battery
Arresting Officer R.
Henderson

11-13-2009
Shyler Morgan
433 Sw Laurel Street
Mayo, FI
Age 19
Charge Sexual Bat-
tery
Arresting Officer J.
Harris

11-13-2009
Filemon Cruz
112 Se Malone Avenue
Mayo, FI
Age 19
Charge Dwls / At-
taching Tag Not As-
signed / Driving With-
out Headlights
Arresting Officer J.
Harris

11-16-2009
Louis Ramirez
322 Cr 400
Mayo, FI
Age 33
Charge No Valid Dl
Arresting Officer C.
Keen
Brian N. Lamb
Sbi. t iLafayette County
P.O. Box 227, Mayo,
Florida 32066
Phone: (386) 294-
1222/1301
Fax: (386) 294-1190


Because .e


Meant to be


Enjoyed

When faced

with a

life-threatening

injury

or illness,

you need

Fast Service

Quality Care

Caring Hands


For ER waiting times, text ER to 23000
or visit
lakecitymedical.com


LAKE CITY

MEDICAL CENTER

386-719-9000

Consult-A-Nurse 800-525-3248
560987-F


Ginger's Smokehouse


& Catering Etc.



'A _M


~g~4rn~
~TFrI


~''


uLA "t .


Thanksgiving
Specials Available
Order yours by4
Nov. 22nd


Smoked Turkey
& Hams
10-12 Ibs.
20-22 Ibs.
Pickup Wed., Nov. 25
Special Hours

Homemade Pies


Relax and let Gin ',cr ,, k
your turkey f r v, ,
We have a variety of
meals to choose from!
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. 6:30 p.m.
Wed. 11 a.m. 2 p.m.; Closed Sat. & Sun.

Ginger 386-854-0722

Dwayne 386-854-0799


O PlagIest 2009

0ED

Dec. 14 & 15 Testing $70.00

You must attend a registration session.
Wed., Dec. 9th 9 a.m. or 6 p.m.

Call Lynn Lee at 386-647-4201
to sign up for registration

SUL WAiNNLEE- 415 S.W. Pinewood Dr
HAN-]LTDCN Live Oak, FL 32064
iE: Hill: L riJTEp p b-b386-647-47200


- I ~


I


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2009


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 9A


A51


: iqw IV W,
Callfor
deta]i[Is! 3,








Mom, Dad I Have Mental Illness.....

from the Safe Schools Healthy Students Behavioral Therapist


Kimberly Shattuck MA
Behavioral Therapist
Children have a hard
time talking with their
parents about mental ill-
ness. It is not that they
don't want to talk to the
parents but many do not
know where to start.
Some children think if
they tell their parent how
they are feeling or what
is happening to them
they won't be loved any-
more or will be sent
away. Being open with
your child is the best way
for both parents and chil-
dren to learn about what
type of mental illness the


child may be experienc-
ing. Within this process
the parent can learn what
to do next to help their
child.
Children get angry
when something unfair
happens to them. Chil-
dren will ask questions
like, "why is this happen-
ing to me or what did I
do wrong." Talk to your
child and convey to them
there are no guarantees
in life and sometimes
things may seem unfair.
However, it does not
mean they deserve what
is happening to them.
Making sure that your


child knows they are not
bad or sick is a very im-
portant piece of the
process as well. Through
the process your child
may have feelings of fear,
sadness, embarrassment,
and anger. These are all
normal and come and go
depending on the child.
It is important that your
child have someone they
trust to speak with so
they can release these
feeling when needed.
Some guidelines for
communicating with
your child are as follows:
Talk to your child
when they are in a state


of comfort and feel safe.
Don't try to talk to
them when they are
stressed and irritated.
Communicate with
your child in a straight
forward manner because
this works best for chil-
dren and they won't
think you are trying to
hide something from
them.
Make sure you com-
municate in a way that is
age appropriate for the
child.
Giving them more in-
formation that they can-
not comprehend due to
their age will just confuse


them.
If your child becomes
confused back up and
ask the child what it is
they don't understand.
Within this process
they may have some
more questions they did
not ask before and they
need the answers.
Mental illness comes in
many forms. When chil-
dren have issues it is
hard on a parent as well
as the child. It is impor-
tant that parents get the
help they need to learn
and help their child.
With this a parent can be
a better advocate for


their child and will be
able to adjust within
themselves as well. Men-
tal illness is not an end. It
is a new way of life. With
support children can live
very productive lives.
Mental health services
are available to all stu-
dents enrolled in
Lafayette County Schools
through the Safe Schools
Healthy Students Initia-
tive. Please contact Becky
Sharpe, Safe School
Healthy Students Project
Director, (386-294-1417 or
bsharpe@lafayette.kl2.fl.
us) if you would like
more information on the
counseling services avail-
able, SSHS Project SAVE
Initiative or the Project
SAVE Partnership. Part-
nership Meetings are held
in the SSHS Building at
9:30 a.m. on the second
Tuesday of each month.
Parents and community
members are encouraged
to attend.

TOBACCO FREE FLORIDA
PARTICIPATES IN THE

34th GREAT

AMERICAN

SMOKEOUT
The Florida Depart-
ment of Health and To-
bacco Free Florida are
celebrating the 34th
Great American Smoke
out on Thursday, No-
vember 19, sponsored by
the American Cancer So-
ciety, by encouraging
Floridians to commit to
being tobacco free for 24
hours. This event chal-
lenges people to stop us-
ing tobacco and helps
raise awareness about
the dangers of smoking
and the many effective
ways available to quit
smoking permanently.
Tobacco Free Florida is
the statewide youth pre-
vention and adult cessa-
tion campaign launched
in February 2008, created
to educate the public
about the dangers of all
tobacco use and to help
those who use tobacco to
"Be Free" and break the
cycle of addiction.
During the Smoke out,
Floridians are challenged
to "Be Free" of all tobac-
co use for 24 hours or
commit to a plan of be-
coming smoke-free and
beating their addiction
for good. E-cards that
promote the holiday and
create awareness about
cessation services such
as counseling will be
available on
"http:/ /www.tobacky-
ou.com"
The e-cards will be
available for distribution
beginning November 12.
Lafayette County High
School and Middle
School students will be
participating in this
event to bring awareness
in the community. Many
students are participat-
ing in an essay contest.
Students will be writing
letters to smokers to try
and convince them to
quit. The most convinc-
ing essay will be chosen
and submitted to the pa-
per for the community to
read.
According to the Cen-
ters for Disease Control,
approximately 28,700
adult deaths in Florida
can be attributed to


smoking annually. For
those who are interested
in quitting, the Florida
Quitline offers free coun-
seling and nicotine re-
placement therapies for
those who qualify (while
supplies last). Please
visit www.floridaquit-
line.com or call
1.877.U.CAN.NOW for
more information.


PAGE 1 OA THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2009





THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2009


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL h




Community


"Mrs. Hart carries a cool radio"


LES Principal welcomes




First Grade Scientists


Submitted by:
First Grade Scientists

As the new school
year began, and first
graders were getting
back into their new
school routine, they had
a surprise visitor. Mrs.
Gina Hart, our school
principal, visited their
Science/Social studies
class to welcome each
student back to school.
As she visited in the
science room, she heard
the students learning


about different science
tools they would be us-
ing throughout the year.
She shared about the dif-
ferent tools she uses
everyday at school. First
graders were amazed at
the long list of tools she
uses daily. She ex-
plained why she carries
a radio and how she can
call someone to come
and quickly fix things at
school that needs to be
repaired.
The principal is al-
ways concerned with
R -


student safety! She uses
a computer to do a lot of
her work, like communi-
cating through emails
with teachers and par-
ents. She shared with
the students that she
uses a lot of paper and
pencils (just like first
graders). She must sign
a lot of papers each day,
which means she must
do a lot of reading (stu-
dents were amazed that
the school principal had
to read more than 20
minutes each day!)
| ** *-


Mrs. Hart explained
that the telephone is a
tool that helps her talk
with other people about
what's happening at our
school. The students
were shocked that she
uses so many tools
everyday on her job.
Everyone agreed that
she is a very busy princi-
pal.
She discussed the im-
portance of being kind
to others and always us-
ing good manners. She
reminded them that


coming to school was
their job and they should
listen carefully to their
teachers and follow di-
rections. If students
make good decisions
and follow the rules,
then they will not have
to come see her for disci-
pline reasons (maybe
they are a teacher's
helper delivering some-
thing to her from the
teacher a good visit).
She said she would like
those kinds of visits
from all of the students


at LES. She talked to the
boys and girls about
how everyone at school
helps children learn and
helps to keep them safe,
even the principal!
Before she left the
classroom, she encour-
aged them to do their
best each day and she
would visit again soon.
The students are looking
forward to her next visit
and share with her about
some more new exciting
things they are learning.
Thanks Mrs. Hart!


"She reads more than twenty minutes each day." See more photos, Page 3B.


B SECTION








Koon participates in 2009 '

National FFA Creed Speaking

Career Development Event


Cecelia Koon of the Lafayette Sr. HS
- FFA Chapter was one of 49 individu-
als participating in the 2009 National
FFA Creed Speaking Career Develop-
ment Event (CDE). The competition
was held Oct. 21-24, during the 82nd
National FFA Convention.
Team members pictured are: Cecelia
Koon along with her FFA Advisor,
Emily Land
The Creed Speaking CDE is de-
signed to recognize outstanding FFA
members for their ability to present the
FFA Creed and respond to a series of
questions related to the Creed. The
CDE is just one way FFA members can
develop their ability to communicate
in an organized and professional man-
ner.
The National FFA Creed Speaking
CDE is sponsored by CHS and Nation-
al FFA Foundation. It is one of 23 dif-
ferent national events that use the fun
of competition to connect classroom
learning and careers.
The National FFA Organization, for-
merly known as the Future Farmers of


America, is a national youth organiza-
tion of 506,199 student members all
preparing for leadership and careers in
the science, business and technology
of agriculture as part of 7,429 local
FFA chapters in all 50 states, Puerto
Rico and the Virgin Islands. The Na-
tional FFA Organization changed to its
present name in 1988, in recognition of
the growth and diversity of agricul-
ture and agricultural education. The
FFA mission is to make a positive dif-
ference in the lives of students by de-
veloping their potential for premier
leadership, personal growth and ca-
reer success through agricultural edu-
cation. The National FFA Organiza-
tion operates under a Federal Charter
granted by the 81st Congress of the
United States, and is an integral part of
public instruction in agriculture. The
U.S. Department of Education pro-
vides leadership and helps set direc-
tion for FFA as a service to state and
local agricultural education programs.
Visit www.ffa.org for more informa-
tion.


HARDEE'S CORP TO REENACT

"THE RAID ON THE SUWANNEE"

NOVEMBER 21 & 22
Event at the Spirit of the Suwannee brings
Civil War History to the Suwannee Valley


During the Civil War years of the
1860s, Florida was a major participant
in many ways. Not only did they field
troops for every aspect of the conflict
that led to a truly united America, but
they were the most productive part of
the South as the war continued into
the closing years.
The Pioneer Families of our State
were enterprising, producing farm
product, cattle, goods and services of
all types. The Union fully recognized
this, leading to a series of skirmishes
all over Florida. One of the goals was
their continued attempts to control
shipping, and more importantly, the
well established rail lines. This led to
the well know Battle of Olustee. Less
well known were the numerous
"probes" all along the coastal accessi-
ble area or the State.
There are earthworks reminding us
of the encampments and hastily erect-
ed fortification at the nearby Suwan-
nee River State Park. A "spur line"
that served a river landing with mule
drawn cargo cars still borders the Spir-
it of the Suwannee Music Park, with
roots into the 19th. Century.
Hardee's Corps is a 501(3)C non
profit organization that accurately
portrays the events of this time, in an

^ WT


atmosphere of "Folks and Family".
They have coordinated events all over
the Southeast for decades, including
the Brooksville and Crystal River
events that draw thousands of Reenac-
tors and those interested in this unique
experience. Expect authentic 1860s en-
campments, period goods and wares
from the Suttlers, hundreds of soldiers
and officers anxious to share their his-
tory, and 19th. century food--as well
as the comforts and facilities offered
by this Venue.
This year's events will feature full
battles, afternoon, on both Saturday
the 21st. and Sunday the 22nd. Prior to
that the event will start at 9 A.M. each
day, and include a Ladies Tea, Grand
Ball, and authentic Church Service on
Sunday Morning. For a full schedule,
please see the SOSMP web site at
"http://www.musicliveshere.com."
Links include the full event plan. Ad-
mission is only $6 per adult with chil-
dren under 12 free. Come meet your
past! SOS Music Park, Live Oak.
www.floridareenactorsonline.com/
SuwanneeGenInfo.htm
For additional information, please
contact Mr. Bob "General" Goodrich,
352-493-0625, or T. F. Smoak, event
planning, at 386-935-2662.


Raid on the Suwannee Reenactment


Lafayette High School's Romeo Balingcongan, Connie Pearson and Linda Driver were
among area educators attending the Math Summit at NFCC.


Area educators attend

NFCC Math Summit


North Florida Community College
hosted it 9th Regional Math Summit in
October. A total of 28 middle and high
school math teachers from NFCC's six-
county service area attended the sum-
mit. Participants enjoyed networking,
sharing ideas and various presenta-


NFCC math instructor Daniel


tions. Vince Verges, FCAT Mathemat-
ics Coordinator for the Florida Depart-
ment of Education and Melinda Milles
from the Florida Division of Colleges
were among the guest speakers. "It
was a very successful day," said
Daniel Harris, NFCC math instructor.


Harris welcomes guests to the NFCC Math Summit.


Area educators attend

NFCC English Summit


North Florida Community College
hosted it 7th annual English Summit
recently. A total of 14 Reading and
Language Arts teachers attended the
summit representing six middle and
high schools from NFCC's six-county
service area. Participants enjoyed pre-
sentations by NFCC instructors Dr.
Barbara McCauley, Jhan Reichert, and
Rose Knox, as well as a teacher work-
shop presented by Poetry Alive!, a
professional poetry company that
memorizes and theatrically performs
poetry and conducts more than 2,000


performances each year across the
United States and beyond. A lively af-
ternoon presentation regarding pla-
giarism, brain-compatible classrooms,
and College Success courses in high
schools (SB 1908) rounded out the day.
"In all, participants reported that they
enjoyed this day of professional devel-
opment and collegiality and look for-
ward to participating again next year,
said Dr. Rosie Leparulo, NFCC in-
structor and NFCC Department Chair
of English, Communications, Humani-
ties, Fine Arts and Foreign Languages.


Jocelyn Cook of Lafayette High School participates in the NFCC English Summit recently
at NFCC. Courtesy photo


PAGE 2B THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2009








LES Principal welcomes First Grade Scientists


"Our principal reminds us to follow school rules"


"She wants everyone to do their best"
"She wants everyone to do their best"


Maze Craze


Can you find your way through the maze?


A PERSON WHO DOESN'T EAT ANY
MEAT OR USE ANY ANIMAL
PRODUCTS IS CALLED WHAT?




NVD3A V :H3MSNV








ENGLISH: Vegetable

SPANISH: Verdura

ITALIAN: Verdura

FRENCH: Legume


GERMAN: Gemose


H3IOH.9LLNV :?3MGNV


THIS DAY IN...





HISTORY


- 1924: COMPOSER
GIACOMO PUCCINI DIED
BEFORE HE COULD
COMPLETE HIS OPERA
"TU RAN DOT."
* 1963: THE BEATLES'
"I WANT TO HOLD YOUR
HAND" WAS RELEASED
IN GREAT BRITAIN.
* 2001: BEATLE GREAT
GEORGE HARRISON
LOST HIS BATTLE WITH
CANCER.


TOFU

curd made from
mashed soybeans


C GET THE -

PICTURE?,


Can you guess what
the bigger picture is?


A DIET OF ONLY VEGETABLES
WILL NEED TO BE SUPPLEMENTED BY
SOME SORT OF PROTEIN, SUCH AS
FROM NUTS OR SOY PRODUCTS.


I


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2009


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 3B









Cranberries Make Holiday Baking Shine


Only a few years ago, cranberries
were seldom seen outside the holiday
season and even then they were pri-
marily served as sauce with the
turkey. Now, sweetened, dried cran-
berries, along with cranberry juice and
sauce, are enjoyed throughout the
year. Fresh cranberries are generally
available only from September to De-
cember, but you can find frozen
berries all year round.
"The popularity of baked goods like
cranberry muffins, scones and breads
has helped us appreciate the unique,
tart and tangy flavor of these little
berries. Since dried and frozen prod-
ucts are easily accessible, we can in-
clude cranberries in our favorite
recipes any time," observed Martha
White baking expert Linda Carman.
"However, since the harvesting season
for fresh cranberries so perfectly corre-
sponds with our holidays and the tra-
dition is so strong, cranberries will al-
ways be a part of holiday celebra-
tions."

Native American Fruit
Native to North America, cranber-
ries (one of only three native fruits
along with blueberries and concord
grapes) were used by Native Ameri-
cans for food, medicinal purposes and
dye for blankets, rugs and clothing.
Having shared their know-how with
the Pilgrims, cranberries were proba-
bly served at that very first
Thanksgiving feast. And
the berries were tak-
en aboard ships and
eaten by sailors to
prevent scurvy on
long sea voyages.
As a result, cranber-
ries were the first
American fruit to ar-
rive in Europe.
Although cranber-
ries grow wild, they
are hard to find since
they grow only in low-
land bogs. The Cape
Cod region was the first to
successfully cultivate cran-
berries which thrived because
of the climate, soil and local low-
lands. Cranberries are actually
grown in dry beds although we often
see pictures of cranberries floating in a
field of water. Flooding aids in har-
vesting and protecting the plants from
freezing.

Cranberries for the Holidays
Cranberry sauce is certainly a holi-
day tradition for most families. Many
folks have a sentimental attachment to
the wiggly, jellied cranberry sauce of
their childhood, while others use fresh
berries to make a sauce, relish or a con-
gealed salad. But when it comes to
holiday baking, cranberries really
shine. Added to cornbread dressing,
baked in a pie, cake or muffin, cran-
berries add a tang and explosion of
color that make any recipe special.
Winter Cranberry Tart with Cinna-
mon Whipped Cream is easy to make
in a 9 x 13-inch baking pan. The
brown sugar crust is simply pressed
into the pan. Just bake a few minutes,
pour on fresh cranberry filling, bake a
few more minutes and you'll have a
memorable dessert to serve through-
out the holiday season. Top off a hol-
iday brunch with Cranberry Sour
Cream Coffeecake topped with canned
whole berry cranberry sauce. Cran-
berry and almond flavors pair beauti-
fully to create this delectable festive
coffee cake. And Cranberry Pecan
Corn Muffins create a taste sensation
equally delicious for breakfast or as a
surprise accompaniment to holiday
dinners. Made with a convenient
sweet corn muffin mix and dried cran-
berries, these muffins are so moist and
flavorful you'll be making them all
year round.

For more holiday recipes, visit us at
www.marthawhite.com.

Winter Cranberry Tart
With Cinnamon Whipped Cream

Crisco Original No-Stick Cooking
Spray
Crust
2 1/2 cups Martha White All-Pur-
pose Flour


1/3 cup brown sugar, firmly packed
1/2 teaspoon salt
10 tablespoons cold butter

Filling
3 large eggs
2/3 cup brown sugar, firmly packed
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup light corn syrup
1/4 cup butter, melted
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/4 cups coarsely chopped,


drained cranberries
1 cup coarsely chopped walnuts

Cinnamon Whipped Cream
1 cup whipping cream
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1. Heat oven to 350 F. Spray
13 x 9-inch pan with no-stick cooking
spray. Combine flour, 1/3 cup brown
sugar and 1/2 teaspoon salt in medi-
um bowl; mix well. Cut in 10 table-
spoons butter with pastry blender or
fork until mixture resembles coarse
crumbs. Press mixture firmly in bot-
tom and about 1 inch up sides of pre-
pared pan. Bake 20 minutes and pre-
pare filling while crust is baking.
2. Beat eggs in large bowl. Add
all remaining filling ingredients except
cranberries and walnuts; mix until
smooth. Stir in cranberries and wal-
nuts.
3. Pour filling into partially
baked crust. Return to oven; bake an
additional 25 minutes or until filling is
set. Cool on wire rack 1 hour or until
completely cooled. Store in refrigera-
tor.
4. Whip cream with granulated
sugar and cinnamon. Cut tart into
squares. Top with whipped cream.
12 servings


Cranberry Sour Cream Coffee Cake

Crisco Original No-Stick Cooking
Spray
Coffee Cake
1 cup butter, softened
1 cup granulated sugar
2 large eggs
1/2 teaspoon almond extract
2 cups Martha White Self-Rising
Flour
1 cup sour cream
1 cup whole berry cranberry sauce
1/2 cup chopped blanched almonds,
toasted*

Glaze
1 cup powdered sugar
2 tablespoons milk
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

1. Heat oven to 350 F. Spray
13 x 9-inch pan with no-stick cooking
spray. Beat butter and granulated
sugar in large bowl, with electric mix-
er at medium speed, until light and
fluffy. Add eggs and almond extract.
Beat well. Add flour alternately with
sour cream, beginning and ending
with flour. Mix well after each addi-
tion. Pour batter into prepared pan.
2. Spoon cranberry sauce evenly
over batter. Spread lightly but do not
try to cover batter. Sprinkle evenly
with almonds.
3. Bake 35 to 40 minutes or until
cake begins to pull away from sides of
pan. Cool in pan on oven rack 5 min-
utes.
4. Stir together glaze ingredients
in small bowl. Drizzle over warm cof-
fee cake.
12 servings

TIP:* To toast almonds: Place al-
monds in baking pan. Bake at 350 F.
for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring after 3 min-
utes, until lightly browned.

Cranberry Pecan
Corn Muffins
Crisco Original No-Stick Cooking
Spray
2 large eggs
1/2 cup milk


1 cup sour cream
1/4 cup butter, melted
2 (7 oz.) pkg. Martha White Sweet
Yellow Cornbread Mix
3/4 cup sweetened dried cranberries
1/2 cup chopped toasted pecans*

1. Heat oven to 400 F. Spray
12 muffin cups with no-stick cooking
spray. Beat eggs in large bowl. Add
milk, sour cream, butter and corn-
bread mix. Stir just until smooth. Stir
in cranberries and pecans. Fill muffin
cups 3/4 full.
2. Bake 18 to 22 minutes or until
lightly browned. Cool in pan 2 min-
utes. Remove from pan.
12 servings
TIP: *To toast pecans: Place pecans
in dry nonstick skillet; cook over medi-
um heat, shaking pan until nuts are
lightly browned. Or place pecans in a
baking pan. Bake at 350 F. for 10 to
15 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes,
until lightly browned.

Crisco is a registered trademark of
The J.M. Smucker Company.

Bake a Gift from the Heart
The possibilities for a special gift
from your kitchen are endless a great
pound cake, a loaf of banana bread,
special cinnamon rolls or even a home-
made pecan pie. "Anything you bake
from a treasured family recipe will
have special meaning as a gift to


a friend," said the Martha White bak-
ing expert Linda Carman. "However,
practically speaking, cookies are one
of the best choices for gift giving."
Cookies are a universal favorite.
They can be packed in a beautiful tin
or other festive container, are easy to
make, and many varieties will main-
tain their quality for several days with-
out refrigeration. A wide variety of
cookies will look beautiful on a platter,
but cookies retain their flavor and
characteristic textures better if stored
separately.
Rather than go for a decadent cook-
ie, consider reviving a simpler child-
hood favorite this year. Fun-to-make
Thumbprints are a perfect example.
Adorned with jewel-toned jam centers,
they will make a beautiful gift and
bring back cherished holiday memo-
ries.
If you feel the need to embellish
them a little more for the holidays,
consider different variations which
feature the addition of nuts to the
cookie dough and topped with com-
plementary jam flavors like almond
cookies with cherry jam.
For other holiday recipes that
would be perfect for gifts, visit
www.marthawhite.com.

Thumbprints
1 cup butter, softened
1/2 cup sugar
1 large egg
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
2 1/2 cups Martha White All-Pur-
pose Flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/3 cup Smucker's Jam or Pre-
serves, such as strawberry, raspberry
or apricot

1. Beat butter and sugar in large
bowl, with electric mixer at medium
speed, until light and fluffy. Add egg
and vanilla. Beat well. Whisk flour
and baking powder in large bowl.
Beat into butter mixture on low speed
until well blended. Cover and refrig-
erate 1 hour.
2. Heat oven to 375 F. Shape
dough into 1-inch balls. Place 2 inch-


es apart on ungreased baking sheet.
Make a deep indentation in center of
each ball with finger or tip of wooden
spoon. (Center will spread open as
cookies bake.)
3. Bake 10 minutes. Remove
from oven. Fill center of each cookie
1/4 teaspoon jam. Return to oven.
Bake 5 minutes or until golden brown,
being careful not to burn jam. Cool on
wire racks. 3 1/2 dozen cookies

Delicious Thumbprint Variations
Cherry Almond Thumbprints: Pre-
pare cookie dough as directed, except
stir 1/2 cup finely chopped almonds in
with flour mixture. Fill cookies with
cherry preserves.
Peach Pecan Thumbprints: Prepare
cookie dough as directed above, ex-
cept stir 1/2 cup finely chopped
pecans in with flour mixture. Fill
cookies with peach preserves.
Apricot Walnut Thumbprints: Pre-
pare cookie dough as directed, except
stir 1/2 cup finely chopped walnuts in
with flour mixture. Fill cookies with
apricot preserves.
Smucker's is a registered trade-
mark of The J.M. Smucker Company.
Is it Dressing or Stuffing?
No matter what you call it, dressing
or stuffing is a revered holiday tradi-
tion all over the country. "What you
call it and whether it's made with
bread or cornbread is probably dictat-
ed by family tradition and where you
grew up," said the Martha White
baking expert Linda Carman.
"Southerners generally call the fa-
mous accompaniment dressing, not
stuffing, and prefer to make it with
cornbread and bake it in a pan along-
side the turkey."
Historically, this tradition makes
perfect sense because many of the
deepest traditions are born by folks
making do with what's on hand. In
the rural South, that meant leftover
cornbread softened with a few
leftover biscuits, seasoned
with celery, onions, sage
and broth. Why
Southerners prefer to
bake it in a pan instead
of in the bird remains
a mystery, but it
may have some-
thing to do with the
buttery crisp texture
of the baked corn-
bread dressing.
Sausage Corn-
bread Dressing with
Apples and Pecans em-
braces traditional cornbread
dressing, but combines the wonder-
fully complementary additions of
sausage, apples and pecans. The
cornbread for this recipe is made with
a quick and easy cornbread mix, which
will be delicious in any of your corn-
bread dressing recipes.

Sausage Cornbread Dressing with
Apples and Pecans
Crisco Original No-Stick Cooking
Spray
2 (6 oz.) pkg. Martha White Cot-
ton Country Cornbread Mix or But-
termilk Cornbread Mix, prepared ac-
cording to package directions
2 cups crumbled biscuits or toasted
bread cubes
1/2 lb. pork sausage
1 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup chopped onions
1 1/2 cups chopped, unpeeled
Granny Smith apples
3/4 cup coarsely chopped toasted
pecans*
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
1 1/2 teaspoon dried sage leaves
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 (14 1/2 oz.) can chicken broth

1. Heat oven to 3750 F. Spray a
shallow 2 1/2-quart baking dish or
pan with no-stick cooking spray.
Coarsely crumble prepared cornbread.
Place in large bowl. Add crumbled
biscuits.
2. Cook sausage, celery and
onions in large skillet over medium-
high heat until sausage is browned
and vegetables are tender, stirring oc-
casionally.
3. Add sausage mixture and all
remaining ingredients to cornbread
and biscuits. Mix well, stirring gently
so cornbread does not crumble com-


pletely. Spoon into prepared baking
dish.
4. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until
golden brown.
TIP: *To toast pecans: Place pecans
in dry nonstick skillet; cook over medi-
um heat, shaking pan until nuts are
lightly browned. Or place pecans in a
baking pan. Bake at 350 F. for 10 to
15 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes,
until lightly browned.
8 to 10 servings


PAGE 4B THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2009




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Karst Environmental Services Operations Manager Pete Butt, second from left, assists college students in collecting trash in and around a sinkhole at Otter Springs Park & Campground
during a cleanup Oct. 24.


More than 250 turn out


for Otter Springs cleanup


High school and col-
lege students, Boy
Scout troops and others
helped make Otter
Springs Park & Camp-
ground a better place
to swim, fish and
camp. On Oct. 24,
about 254 volunteers
participated in a
cleanup effort at the
park. The event was or-
ganized by Current
Problems in partner-
ship with Gilchrist
County, Karst Environ-
mental Services/Karst
Productions, WUFT
and Suwannee River
Water Management
District (SRWMD).
A dive crew and sev-
eral Boy Scout mem-
bers worked to retrieve
35 large rocks from the
bottom of Otter Spring.
A group of college stu-
dents helped clean out
trash and other debris
in and around a sink-
hole on the property.
Other volunteers pad-
dled in kayaks and ca-
noes to help clean the
spring run. In all, an
estimated 8,215 pounds
of garbage including


concrete, tires and a
dumpster filled with
trash bags was col-
lected.
"We are thrilled with
the job all the volun-
teers did. They pitched
in and made a tremen-
dous difference at the
park," said Nancy Nie-
man, park manager for
Otter Springs Park &
Campground.
Nieman said while
staff at the park keeps
the campground and
hiking trails litter-free,
volunteers at the
cleanup took care of ar-
eas less noticeable.
"They were going
back in the woods, the
bushes, the rough
stuff," she said.
Current Problems,
which headed up the
event, is an environ-
mental group that con-
ducts cleanup efforts
for Northeast Florida's
rivers, lakes, springs
and creeks.
Fritzi Olson, Current
Problems executive di-
rector, said cleaning up
waterways is important
to protect the aquifer


and ocean.
"What goes into them
(waterways), goes into
our drinking water.
What doesn't, will
eventually float into
the ocean," she said.
Olson said cleanup
events serve as a teach-
ing tool that demon-
strates the effects of
stormwater runoff and
illegal dumping.
"What we do on land
affects our surface and
ground waters," she
said.
Otter Springs Park &
Campground, in Tren-
ton, is owned by SR-
WMD and managed by
Gilchrist County.
For more information
about Current Prob-
lems visit www.cur-
rentproblems.org. For
more information
about the park visit
www.ottersprings.com
springs.com> .
For more Information
about SRWMD public
lands visit www.my-
suwanneeriver.com
suwanneeriver.com>.


Boys Scout members and a scuba diver retrieve a large rock from the bottom of Otter
Spring at the Otter Springs Park & Campground cleanup Oct. 24.


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2009


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 7B










Cook up Thanksgiving energy savings



with the help of Progress Energy


Thoughts of Thanksgiving often
conjure up sights, smells and tastes
reminiscent of a holiday meal like no
other. While you're working up a
sweat in the kitchen this November,
take a few simple steps to make sure
the only thing that's sizzling is your
roasting turkey.
Consider these energy-saving tips:
Shut the door: Admit it. You like
to watch food cook. This Thanksgiv-
ing, resist the urge to open the oven
door, as doing so will decrease the
temperature inside by 25 to 30 degrees.
Use your oven light instead to keep the


oven hot and the kitchen comfortable.
Share the space: The turkey may
be the star of the show, but don't for-
get about the supporting cast. Insist
your turkey shares space in the oven
with the sides and pies and you'll re-
duce the overall amount of time your
oven is on saving energy and money
in the process.
Zap it: Even on Thanksgiving,
your microwave can be a valuable
tool. By using microwaves and toaster
ovens to cook or warm smaller items
like veggies and rolls, you could save
up to 30 percent of the energy required


to cook in a conventional oven.
Place pots properly: Play an ener-
gy-saving matching game by pairing
your pots with equivalent-sized burn-
ers. Heat is lost when small pots are
used on large burners. Increase your
savings while shortening your cook-
ing time by using tight-fitting covers
on pots and pans.
Coast to the finish: Food keeps
cooking even after you turn off the
burner. When food is almost ready,
turn off the oven or burners and let ex-
isting heat finish the cooking for you.
Ensure big (screen) savings: Want
the family to gather around a new TV
to watch this year's Thanksgiving
football matchup? Look for an ENER-
GY STAR model it will be up to 30
percent more energy efficient than
non-qualified models.
Try a cooler: Allow yourself room
in the kitchen while keeping refriger-
ated goodies cold by putting your
guests' drinks on ice. Using a cooler
can reduce trips to the fridge, cutting
down on the number of "cooks" in the
kitchen while giving your largest
kitchen appliance a break.
For more than 100 energy-saving
tips or to sign up for a free Progress
Energy Florida Home Energy Check,
visit www.SaveTheWatts.com.
Progress Energy Florida, a sub-
sidiary of Progress Energy (NYSE:
PGN), provides electricity and related
services to more than 1.6 million cus-


tomers in Florida. The company is
headquartered in St. Petersburg, Fla.,
and serves a territory encompassing
more than 20,000 square miles includ-
ing the cities of St. Petersburg and
Clearwater, as well as the Central
Florida area surrounding Orlando.
Progress Energy Florida is pursuing a
balanced approach to meeting the fu-
ture energy needs of the region. That
balance includes increased energy-ef-
ficiency programs, investments in re-
newable energy technologies and a
state-of-the-art electricity system. For
more information about Progress En-
ergy, visit progress-energy.com.


CJBAT tests
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by ap-
pointment): CJBAT (Criminal Justice
Basic Abilities Test) at NFCC Testing
Center (Bldg. #16), Madison. CJBAT is
required for acceptance into Correc-
tions & Law Enforcement programs.
Photo ID required. Pre-registration &
scheduling time and date are required.
To register please call 850-973-9451.

College Placement Tests
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by ap-
pointment): College Placement Test
(CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg.
#16), 5 p.m., Madison. Register in
NFCC Student Services 24 hours be-
fore test. For information please call
850-973-9451.


Mayo Legals


PUBLIC NOTICE
Please be advised that the trash pick-up
for Town of Mayo residents will be on Fri-
day, November 27, 2009 instead of Thurs-
aay 09 ovem H''. fu.


aay, NovemDer 26, 200uu9
Thanksgiving Holidays.


It's your right to know.


Read the public notices in this newspaper and be informed.





School District Budgets



Property Auctions



Public Hearings



Local Tax Changes



Adoptions




























Search Florida's notices online at:



www.floridapublicnotices.com


551284-F


Curtis 0. Ham
Lafayette County


dress, Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers
in this lawsuit will be mailed to the ad-
dress on record at the clerk's office.


aue 10to me WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family
Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents and
By order Of: information, failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or striking
lin, Chairman of pleadings.
' Commission


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 09-166-DR
ERIN HEALY


SEAL
Dated: November 5, 2009
Ricky Lyons
Clerk Of The Circuit Court


11/19, 26, 12/3, 10


By: Hannah Owens
Deputy Clerk


Petitioner


SEAN HEALY,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: SEAN HEALY
1612 SW MEDLEY LN
PORT ST LUCIE, FL
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has
been filed against you and that you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on ERIN HEALY
whose address is PO. Box 42 Day, FL
32013, on or before December 11, 2009,
and file the original with the clerk of this
Court at PO. Box 88 Mayo, FL 32066 be-
fore service on Petitioner or immediately
thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default
may be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this
case, including orders, are available at
the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office. You
may review these documents upon re-
quest.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office notified of your current ad-
dress. (You may file Notice of Current Ad-


PUBLIC NOTICE
The Lafayette County Commission will
hold a regular meeting on Monday, No-
vember 23, 2009 at 5:30 p.m. The meet-
ing will be held in the County Commis-
sioner's Meeting Room at the Lafayette
County Courthouse in Mayo, Florida. List-
ed below is an agenda for the meeting.
By Order of:
Curtis 0. Hamlin
Chairman
Lafayette County Commission
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS:
1. Call the meeting to order at 5:30 p.m.
2. Invocation and pledge to the flag.
3. Approve the minutes
4. Special needs from the community
5. Department Heads:
A) Marcus Calhoun-Maintenance
B) Edward Dodd-Public Works
C) Donnie Land-Public Safety
D) Bobby Johnson-Building/Zoning
6. Consider application CPA 09-2 (Rev-
els) amending the future land use plan
map of the Comprehensive Plan.
7. Consider proposed resolution 09-11-
02-01 concerning requirements for new
equipment for voting.
8. Road closing petition public hearing for
SW Dimaggio Road by Iris Townsend.


9. Leenette McMillan-varlous items
10. Approve the bills
11. New Business
12. Adjourn
ALL MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC ARE
WELCOME TO ATTEND. NOTICE IS
FURTHER HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT
TO FLORIDA STATUTE 286.0105, THAT
ANY PERSON OR PERSONS DECID-
ING TO APPEAL ANY MATTER CONSID-
ERED AT THIS PUBLIC HEARING WILL
NEED A RECORD OF THE HEARING
AND MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A
VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PRO-
CEEDING IS MADE WHICH RECORD
INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVI-
DENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS
TO BE BASED.
PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES RE-
QUESTING REASONABLE ACCOMMO-
DATIONS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS
PROCEEDING SHOULD CONTACT
(386) 294-1600 OR VIA FLORIDA RELAY
SERVICE AT (800) 955-8771.
11/19

PUBLIC MEETING
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
Please take notice that the Three Rivers
Regional Library Board will hold a Board
Meeting on Thursday, December 10,
2009, at 7:00 p.m., at the Dixie County
Public Library, in Cross City, Florida.
All interested persons are invited to at-
tend and be heard. Please be advised,
that if a person decides to appeal any de-
cision made by the Board with respect to
any matter considered at such hearing,
that person will need a record of proceed-
ings, and that, for such purpose, he/she
may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which
record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
"Person with disabilities requesting rea-
sonable accommodations to participate in
this proceeding should contact (352) 498-
1200 (Voice & TDD) or via Florida Relay
Service at (800) 955-8771."
11/19


JOE P. BURNS
FUNERAL HOME and CREMATORY
OF MAYO

^Lo 386-294-2658
Locally owned & operated since 1953

Located 7 blocks South of the Courthouse
at the corner of Lake St. and Monroe Ave.
499136-F


Byrd's Power Equipment
Sales & Service All Makes & Models
---Husqvama-- HUSTLIER
Dealer Turf Equipment

N.%... 'WI TRUCK ACCESSORIES

CLOSED SATURDAYS UNTIL SPRING
11860 E. U.S. 27, Branford, FL 32008
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7a.m.-5 p.m. (386) 935-1544
CLOSED SATURDAYS 499122 F


& Excavating
Front End Loader Limerock *
CAT Back Hoe Top Soil *
Gradall Clearing *
Earthmoving Site Prep *
Pond Digging Fill Dirt *
Kenny Hart Jr., Owner 386-294-2621 499130-F


For more

information about

advertising here call

Rhonda Cheney at

386-362-1734

ext. 141


WJOLFE PLUMBING, INC.
Repair Remodel Drain Cleaning
New Construction
7 Days 24 Hours
386-935-0616


State Certified #CFC051621
Serving All North Central Florida


499124-F


Daniels Funeral Homes

& Crematory, Inc.

Branford 935-1124

Live Oak 362-4333
< S James (Jim) B. Daniels, III, L.F.D.
9 fKeith Daniels, L.F.D.
J.B. Daniels, Jr.
S(Local) Family Owned & Operated
499127-F
499137-F


11/12, 19


PAGE 8B THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19,2009




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