Group Title: Mayo free press
Title: The Mayo free press
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028404/00237
 Material Information
Title: The Mayo free press
Uniform Title: Mayo free press (Mayo, Fla. : 1958)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Mayo free press
Publisher: Bernard Guthrie
Place of Publication: Mayo, Fla
Publication Date: July 16, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Mayo (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lafayette County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Lafayette -- Mayo
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 70, no. 27 (June 20, 1958)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028404
Volume ID: VID00237
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN0339
oclc - 33286672
alephbibnum - 002042475
lccn - sn 95047189
 Related Items
Preceded by: Mayo free press and Lafayette County news

Full Text



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SUBSCRIBER UNI VERSITY OF 13-51
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S;ol. 1 N 1 pA 346 THURSDAY, JL 16,-009,Laf y 0tte County F r 2 S I 2 PA E,


Burglar a copycat,



say authorities


Dixie County man allegedly copied
style of recently busted ring
By Stephenie Livingston rash of burglaries, ace
stephenie.livingston@gaflnews.com to the Lafayette Coun


Since the Fourth of July
weekend, Lafayette, Levy,
Alachua, Gilchrist, and Dixie
counties have seen a new


:ording
ty


Sheriff's Office. Donald
Bernier, of Dixie County,
was arrested last Thursday
and is being held in the Levy
County jail. According to


When Lacquey got back from Nepal, her
children gave her a book of quotes.
"My favorite was by Albert Pike. He says
'What we have done for ourselves alone
dies with us; what we have done for others
and the world remains and is immortal',"
said Lacquey. "Isnt that just wonderful?"


Lafayette County Sheriff
Lamb, Bernier is "not speak-
ing to authorities" and all
charges have not been filed
as of yet.
LCSO ip investigating the
case, along with Levy,
Alachua, Gilchrist, and Dixie
county agencies.
"This arrest was a team ef-


Donald Bernier


fort," said Lamb. Law en-
forcement from Lafayette
County made contact with
Levy County after "intense
investigations" of a rash of
burglaries in Lafayette
County and it was learned
that Levy County had simi-
SEE BURGLAR, PAGE 4A


cts of love



kindness

1 Mayo native Trannie
Lacquey is helping children
from North Florida to the
L jungles of Nepal


Rotary Club of Branford members John and Trannie Lacquey.


By Stephenie Livingston
stephenie.livingston@gaflnews.com
A grandmother of six crosses a
swollen river while hiking through
a tension-filled corer of Nepal. Be-
fore reaching their destination, she
and a group of disaster relief vol-
unteers encounter Maoist guerril-
las. A 19-year-old Maoist guerrilla
soldier approaches her. She takes
off her hat and begins turning it
nervously in her hand, as if turning
the whole world around. But she
isn't afraid, just frustrated. There
are children waiting for shelter.
Trannie Lacquey, raised in Mayo,
a mother of six daughters and six
grandchildren, grew up in a small
town, graduated from Florida
State's College of Education and
manages her own pine straw busi-
ness with her husband. In her free
time, however, she travels to dan-
gerous foreign countries caught in
the grips of disaster to deliver aid,
SEE ACTS, PAGE 8A
Lacquey noted the refugees
in Nepal took little for granted.
She spoke of'"seeing p;) ple!
so poor it's almost
incomprehensible and yet
seeing n';Itiful,
happy children and
incredible smiles on the
women. And when these
people have nothing
but the tent you've given to
them, it cli~'1inI'" you."


Lafayette FFA: 2 big wins at State
Local chapter claims a pair .
of state championships - *
By Stephenie Livingston .
stephenie.livingston@gaflnews.com
The Lafa' ette FFA Cha ter attended


Trial


Coming


in death


of infant
Jeffery Daniel Ray
is accused of murder
By Stephenie Livingston
Jeffery Daniel Ray will
go on trial July 27 in the
March 2006 death of an
infant.
Ray was indicted by a
Lafayette County grand
jury for murder in Au-
gust 2006. According to
the indictment, Ray
killed the infant "by
striking, beating, shak-
ing or otherwise trauma-
tizing" the child.
Details of the alleged
crime are hazy.
In count two of the in-
dictment, Ray was
charged with aggravat-
ed battery on a child.
The Mayo Free Press
will cover the trial,
which is expected to run
from July 27-31.


Disaster aid
continues for
North Florida
residents,
counties
Page 5A









Middle
X_
Si!hooI

Aw ards
*Page 8A

Volleyball
tryout


0 Page 5A

IMMPT



*Page 9A


IIM: Ld-dyt:LU: FJUM k-IdFLM aUCHUCU
the 81st Florida FFA State Convention
during the week of June 8-12 in Orlan-
do and came away with two state
championships. The middle school par-
liamentary team were state champions
as did Cecelia Koon, who won a state
championship in the creed competition.
Mary-Thomas Hart and Courtney
Reinbott were also recognized as state
champions in their Ornamental Horti-
SEE LAFAYETTE, PAGE 4A


The Lafayette FFA Chapter picked up a pair of state championships at the recent state convention. See
a future edition for more photos. Photo: Submitted


Iauye Couty's dnews ourcesince1888.a V Ips


^ -\


rr00








DI ',,L, L,. M/A II PR.... Mao FL THURSDI .Y..ULY--16


Heart atter


"But Mom, everyone
else is!" What parent
hasn't heard this plea?
In fact, according to our
teens, no other kid they
know even has a curfew,
any restrictions, or par-
ents who are out to ruin
their life! As adults, we
may vaguely recall us-
ing this line on our folks
and our parent's stan-
dard response: "So, if
everyone else jumped
off the bridge, I guess
you would want to do
that too!" Case dosed, it
was pointless to contin-
ue the discussion.
Since we all have the
desire for a certain qual-
ity or a unique talent to
render us valuable, it
seems odd that during
the years those talents
and qualities could be
discovered and nur-.


tured, we fight hard to
be like everyone else.
Why? The word "identi-
ty" is defined as "the set
of behavioral or person-
al characteristics by
which an individual is
recognizable as a mem-
ber of a group." In other
words, our children, es-
pecially during the teen
years, are searching to
find out who they are
and where they belong,
desperately seeking to
fit in with their own
generation.
The early generations
of God's children as a
nation struggled with
the same identity crisis.
In 1 Samuel 8:5, the
Bible records their peti-
tion to the prophet
Samuel: "now appoint a
king to lead us, such as
all the other nations


have." In verses 10-18,
Samuel gave the people
a host of reasons why
being like everyone else
was not a good thing,
but according to verses
19-20: "the people re-
fused to listen to
Samuel," "No!" they
said. "We want a king
over us. Then we will
be like all the other na-
tions, with a king to lead
us and to go out before
us and fight our battles."
(italics mine)
Was their desire for a
king wrong? I don't be-
lieve so, God indeed had
a plan for Israel to have
a king, a man after his
own heart, but that's a
later story. It was their
motive that missed the
mark. According to
Leviticus 20:26, God had
called Israel to be a holy


FLOWERS
FOR
BUTTERFLIES
Flowers and butterflies
go together We can
help you plan your
flower garden to attract
butterflies and grow a
magical bunerflh habitat
in your ou n back% ard.
Plant it and the, wvill
come!
SIDEWALK
SALE!
Come on in and brow se
our sale area. Includes
close out, left over and
NQP (Not Quite Perfect)
items at bargain basement'
prices. Stop in toda\ they
won't last long!


nation, separate from
and unique among all
other people. In search-
ing for their identity by
trying to be like every-
one else, they missed the
distinctive purpose that
was intended for them!
As parents, part of our
job is to help our chil-
dren understand this,
concept. Too often we
say yes to our kids be-
cause we are tired of
struggling with them, or
maybe we don't want
them to be left out. Or,
perhaps we don't have
the strength to say no,
but we don't finish our
task by helping them see
the options they can say
yes to, leaving them
frustrated and angry.
Our children have not
traveled the road of life
as we have and they
need our wisdom, matu-
rity and courage to make


good decisions today
and for their future. It is
our responsibility to en-
courage and convince
them of their special and
unique identity, so that
the reality of being like
"everyone else" is made
clear, because their
hearts matter!
Blessings, Angie


of .
is teaches Bible
and of-
Sand fari-
as cowarnts at assng-


Mayo Bait & Tackle Box

July Speclal!!

Exchange of a 201b. $1 95
Propane Cylinder .1T
Located on Main Street, Mayo, FL
For more information call 294-1788
**Present coupon for discount at time of purchase
**Cylinder must be equipped with OPD valve Expires 7/31/09 saaF


es ef~r~ship


AIRLINE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC)......294-2676 Methodist Church NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH New Beginnings Church
Pastor.............................................................Rev, Chip Parker Phone: 386-294-1661 Pastor..................................................... Rev. Charliu Walker a place for you
Sunday MAYO FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday Early Service...:........................................8:30 a..
Sunday School ......................................................... 9:45 a.m. Located SE corner of Hwy. 27 & FL 51 Mayo Sunday School................................................................0.:00 a.m. Pastor...............Wayne Hudson
M morning W orship ............................................ : ............... 11:00 a.m.
Prayer M meeting ...................................... .m. Pastor Jim Gamble Morning Worship.........................................................11:0 am Phone Number...,.,386-294-1244
Di les r I hip rain ng n.................. ..................................... 6:00 p.m. Discipleship Training.... ....................... d1':00 p .m
:Eve ung ................. 7:00 p.m. Sunday School...................... ...........................10:00a.m. Evening W rship....................................... 7:00 nebeginni chur ltl.ne
Wednesday Morning Worship....................................................... :00 a.m. Wed. Visitation.......................................................... 0 p.m.
Fellowship Suppe .. ......................6:00-6:30 p.m. Evening W worship .... .................................... ... 6:00 p.m. Bible Study...................................... ........7:00 pm. Pr S :
Awanas, Faith le Study .. ... 6:30 p.m. Mission Crasses ............................ ............................. 7:00 p.m. *tr i-Biinnalgs c ts to prmoidan miroinmott
Located Four Miles East of Mayo on Highway 27 Located Two Miles North of Mayo Off Highway 51 iwhmrtRplccan ismeramnddeidopapassionfor
I "0 Come Let us Worship The Lord" Ps. 95:6 5081-F I"The Friendly Mayo Methodist" 5oIa. "Come And Hear, All Ye That Fear God" Ps. 66:16 500995F GlCAthat isRal Rl rt, arlireltionrl

ALTON CHURCH OF GOD.................... 294-3133 MAYO BAPTIST CHURCH...........(386)294-1020 PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC).294-1306 16 ai Strew suitesOO
Pastor........'............. ............................. Rev. Tim Hamm 916 N. Fletcher Ave. &nmice Sdic uk
Youth Pastor.............................................................. Chad Morrin Pastor: Brother Jimmy Legg Pastor ....................................................................Todd Baione Sun. in Worship ................. a.m
Music Director.............................................Blanche Perry Intrim Music .......................... ..............Kathy Palamino Sunday School........ ..................... .............................. 9:45 a.m. ,,
Children's Pastor........................Ryan & Tiffany Perry BibletudSunday Schedule9:45 AM. Worship Service..............................................11:00 a.m. w .newbegmningschurchmayo.com
Sunday School........................... .................9:30-10:30 a.m. WorshipService.... ................... 0 A.M. Wednesday Discipleship Training...........................7:00 p.m-F
Worship Service/K.I.D.S. Church..............10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Sunday Night Service....... ......................6:00P.M. Evening Training.......................... ............6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship............................................. ............ 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Night Schedule Seven miles West of Mayo, Ephesus Advent
Family Night Youth Club Church.............7:00 p.m. Wednesday upper ..... .&Youh&..Ch..dren.Mee....................:00P.M. left on CR 534 then right on 350A Christian Church
] State Road 27 s Prayer Service & Youth & Children Meeting ........................... 7:00 P.M. Jesus Saves -
State Road 27 50983-F mavobantischurch@allte.net Jesus Saves 5 Pastor Bill Talle
963-5600 ~- 208-9626
BETHEL HOLY CHURCH.....................294-1932 MIDWAY BAPTIST CHURCH.....................935-4993 NEW HARMONY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
"Affiliated with Mt. Sinai Holy Churches of America Inc." Pastor: Danny Rogers 60th St Sunda School Seice....9:45 am.
Pastor..................................Elder Carolyn Demps Sunday School.....................................................................9:45 a.m. (Go south onl 51 to 160th. tun right) Sunday School Serv ice..... ....9:4500 a.m.
Pastor ........... ....... nDm. Worship Service...................E.o... ..1:00 a.m. Pastor: Stan Posey Worship Service..............11:00 a.m.
Sunday School............................................................11:00 a.m Disciplship Training......................................................... :00 .m. Phone (386) 776-osey06 Prrayer M eeting.................7:00 p.m .
Discipleship Training. .....................5:00 p.m. Phone (386) 776-1806 PrayerMeeting.7:0 p.m.
Worship Service...........................................12:00 p.m. Evening orship........:.. ....................... 6:00 p.m. SUNDAY S34756-F
Thursday Bible Study........................ ................. 7:00 p.m. Prayer Meeting W ednesday..........................................7:00 p.m. Sunday Woship...........................9:30
357 Pine Street Located on County Road 354 To P lace
357 PneStreet For If Ye Forgive Men Their Treaspasses Your Heavenly WEDNESDAY
I"Membership means Discipleship" For If Ye Forgive Men Their Tresspasses Your" M att. 6:14venly Women's Bible Study.......... ...................... ... 10:00 .i7
"Membership means Discipleship" 5 Father Will Also Forgive You" Matt. 6:14 Your53475 C church

HATCHBEND APOSTOLIC CHURCH..935-2806 ST. MATTHEW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH Hatch Bend Baptist Church
Contact Number in Mayo (386) 294-1839 Pastor Paul A. oemn In O u
Pastor........................................................... ...... Rev. Steve Boyd Sr. W arden.................................................. ..... EvaBolton935- 943 u
Wednesday Service.................. ..... 0 .m. Celebration of Holy Eucharist at 700 PM Sunday School.............................................................9:45 a.m.
Wednesday Loervce..........d 4 miles South on ....Hwy................... p.349,m. Sunday Eveorning Wo.. ip........................................................ :0 C.
Located 4 miles South on Hwy.349, refreshments and Christian Education. Wednesday Evening................... ............ 7:00 p.m.
then left on CR 138, follow signs. E ngT.. 70p
506918F Located One Block North of the Courthouse in Mayo. 3029 S.E. CR 500 534757-F D director,

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD................294-1811 Brewer Lake Baptist Church LIGHTHOUSE CHRISTIAN CENTER
Sunday School ............................................... 10:00 .m. ff Hwy. 53 n Day, FL 386-294-1578 "Freedom is Here"
Worshi Service .. .. 10:45 a.m. "We're Going, Growing and Glowing for God" PO Box 458, Mayo, FL 32066 386-294-3089
S' Kid's C urch................................. ............... :00a.m. Sunday chool.......... a.m. www.lccmnyo.com
S11:00 Sunday School.........................10 a.m.
Evening W worship ............................................ 6:00p.m M morning W orship...............................................................11 a.m .
Training Union................................... p.m. Morning W orshiop..................... ................ Sunday 10:30 a. m.33
ine:Youth I .. 7:00 pm7m. Evening Bible Stu ....................... .....7pm 1734m.
e Adult BibleStudy ............................................7:00 p.m. ChideYouth &A ednesdayultKidsofteKng0
Pastor: Rev. Kenny Sullivan Chidren, Youth & Adult ..... ....................... Srcy Prayec Meeting ................................ ,Monday p7 n,3
astor: Dy FechMatt Swain,s oPastor William Sircy, out Bible Study......................................Wednesday 7:00 p.
Youth Pastor: Daryl Fletcher Visit us on the web at iw t.breweraapttchurch.com
Located at 294 SE Mill Street, Mayo "Renewing Hope and Building lives" "Come To Day...Come Today" Army of Fire Yout..................................Wednesd 70 p.


To Place Your Church In Our Church


Directory, Call Nancy at 386-362-1734 y


I11rf.-- I

LO 1 000


MAYO FREE PRESS
Published weekly every Thursday, USPS #334-600
Phone: (386) 362-1734 Fax: (386) 362-6827





Myra Regan, Robert Bridges, Linda Smith,
Publisher Group Editor Manager
Annual subscription rate:
$17 in county / $25 out of county
Periodicals postage paid at Live Oak, Florida
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
The Mayo Free Press
P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, Florida 32064
Office located at 211 Howard St. East, Live Oak, FL
Editorial Policy: The Mayo Free Press encourages readers to write letters to the
editor expressing their opinion. All letters should be brief and to the point and those
selected for publication (we reserved the right to accept or reject all letters) may be
edited for space, reasons. Letters must be signed and include the writer's address and
phone number to be considered for publication. All letters become the property of
The Mayo Free Press.


THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009


PAGE 2A ~ THE MAYO FRE L









SI I ,11 -I IV TEvvU


Lending a helping hand!


Linda Smith
Everyone needs a help-
ing hand sometimes and
Dale Croft shared with
the Rotary Club of Mayo
just how much 'help is
needed in our county.
Unfortunately, there are
many needs that we as a
community may not even
be aware of.
Croft is working this
summer as the Migrant
Advocate, McKinney-
Vento Liaison at
Lafayette High School.
He enlightened Rotarians
about some of the aspects
of his new job. Croft has
only beer working in this
capacity for about three
weeks. But, he said he
has found out he is very
passionate and compas-
sionate about it. Accord-
ing to Croft he sees this
job not as a job, but as a
ministry.
He works with the mi-
grant workers and the
homeless families in the
county. Croft explained
that homeless doesn't
necessarily mean, no
home, but it can mean a
home with no heat or
A/C or running water, or
lights, etc. Croft ex-
plained that the term "mi-
grant worker" is anyone
who moves to this county
to work in agriculture,
which is a seasonal job.
When the work runs out,
they move on to another
location'to find work.
"Through the grant
monies provided for this
program," stated Croft,
"we are able to help these
children and families in a
number of ways." Cur-
rently there are 120 chil-
dren receiving benefits
according to Croft.
The children must
qualify for this program,
which is an educational
program designed for
ages 3-21. But, there are
stipulations to qualify.
First of all the child must
be enrolled in school. The


main purpose of this pro-
gram is to get the child
enrolled in school and
help them get an educa-
tion.
Croft said a major part
of his job is to locate these
children and families that
need help, so he has spent
a lot of time the past few
weeks riding around in
the county, talking to
folks, etc. to find where
these folks are located
that may be in need.
Croft shared some of
the levels of poverty that
he has encountered and
as he put it, "it breaks my
heart" to see some of the
living conditions of these
folks."
This program offers as-
sistance with such things
as brand new back packs
for the children that are
filled with school sup-
plies the children will
need, but are unable to af-
ford. Other needs that
may be met might be a
fan in the summer for the
family or a heater and/or
coat in the winter. Oten-
times, according to Croft,
several families live to-
gether in a small, inade-
quate dwelling, only
meant for one family.
Other services offered
through this program are
to give them assistance
where needed in things
such as making doctor or
dentist appointments,
giving referrals for addi-
tional help options, Plan-
ning and conducting par-
ent involvement meet-
ings, making home visits,
etc.
Croft said it isn't as if
these folks aren't trying,
they are out there work-
ing, but it just isn't
enough sometimes to
jneet the needs of the
family.
In an effort to meet the
needs in the county, Croft
asked Rotarians to help in
any way they felt led, ei-
ther through the club, or


Dale Croft, Migrant Advo-
cate, McKinney-Vento Lia-
son in Lafayette County.

personally. Members
were given a chance to
sign up to be called when
a need arises, or to donate
money, etc.
If you are interested in
helping in' any way or
would like more informa-
tion you may call Dale
Croft at (386) 294-4145 or
email him at
dcroft@lafayette.kl2.fl.us
Croft is also currently the
band director at Lafayette
High School.

Questions About
Medicare?
Do you have ques-
tions about Medicare or
.Medicare / Medicaid,
Supplemental Insur-
ance, Part D Prescrip-
tion Drug Plans, or
Medicare Billings?
If you do, come see
SHINE, a volunteer
program with the Flori-
da Department of Elder
Affairs for one-on-one
counseling. SHINE
provides free, unbiased
and confidential assis-
tance. If you cannot
come to a site or want
to know a site close to
you, call the Elder
Helpline at 1-800-262-
2243.
SHINE's next site is
on:
Friday; July 17,
10-Noon Branford
Library
Wed, July 22, 10-
Noon Trenton Pub-
lic Library
Wed, July 22, 2-
4 p.m. Cross City
Public Library


Ask a Lawyer....


I'VE BEEN SUED ON A CREDIT CARD
DEBT AND I CAN'T PAY. NOW WHAT?
TM of Branford asks: have and make a determi-
I lost my job and got be- nation as to what assets
hind on my payments. they can get. You will be
Now I've been sued over required to fill out a fact
a credit card debt and I information sheet and tell
can't pay it. What should I the creditor what assets
do? you have. Creditors
T.M., since almost 10% sometimes take deposi-
of the country is out of tions of debtors to aid
work at the present time, them in their efforts to
you are not alone. There satisfy their judgments.
are millions of people in Now, if you do show
the same predicament up in Court, the Judge
you are. Until you find a will ask you if you admit
job and have a source of to owing the money or
income, it's likely that you not. If you say you don't
can't make any payments think you owe ALL of the
until you do. Here's the money demanded, he or
best advice I can give you: she will send you to meet
The first thing you need with the creditor and a
to know is that by filing mediator to try to come to
suit the creditor has de- an agreement regarding
cided that it wants to get a what is owed. If you have
judgment against you, some money, you can en-
which will include the ter into a new payment
costs of filing suit, and at- plan, at the reduced rate
torneys fees, most likely, of interest, and avoid a
in addition to the princi- judgment. If you have
pal amount due and ow- enough money, you can
ing, plus late fees, over- sometimes negotiate a full
the-limit charges and all settlement for much less
the rest. Sometimes credi- than the amount demand-
tors will delay filing suit ed as creditors are happy
against debtors because to get cash instead of a
the interest rate they are promise to pay in the fu-
getting, which can be as ture. If you can't reach
high as 28% or more on agreement, the Judge will
the credit card agreement set the case for trial for a
is MUCH higher than the later date, maybe a month
interest allowed on a or so later, thereby giving
judgment. In Florida, per you an additional month
Statute 55.03, the rate is to find work and a source
8% for this year, 2009. of income so that you can
If you don't show up in enter into some kind of
Court on the designated agreement.
day, the Judge will un- In my next column,
doubtedly enter a judg- which will come out in
ment against you for the August, I'll tell you about
full amount of money de- what. creditors can get
manded. Once a judg- and what they can't get,
ment is entered, the credi- but for now, T.M., my ad-
tor will then seek to EXE- vice is that you should
CUTE on its judgment, show up in court and do
which means it will look what you can to avoid
to see what assets you having a judgment en-


Pierce Kelley


tered against you. If you
have enough money, the
services of an attorney can
help to negotiate a favor-
able settlement, but if you
had the money, you'd pay
the debt, right? While
money is said to be the
root of all evil, it is also the
cure for many problems,
especially the ones you
are having. There is no
easy answer to your ques-
tion, T.M, but I hope I
have helped you some.
Any readers with spe-
cific legal questions for
this "Ask a Lawyer" col-
umn are invited to submit
those questions to the Ed-
itor of this newspaper,
who will pass it along to
the attorney. If you need
assistance with probating
a will or probating an es-
tate where there is no will,
and you cannot afford an
attorney, you can call the
closest Legal Services of-
fice, which provides free
legal assistance to quali-
fied individuals, or call
the Florida Bar Referral
service at 1-800-342-8011.
I wish you good luck in
obtaining access to our le-
gal system, no matter
what your income and as-
set level might be.
The foregoing was written
by attorney Pierce Kelley,
who is a member of the Flori-
da Bar Association. The con-
tents reflect his personal
opinions and beliefs.


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 3A


THURSDAYJULY 16 2 9


I












Burglar a copycat, say authorities Lafayette FFA:


-c: - JL / a


Continued From Page I A

lar burglaries with a
white male driving a
white Ford Explorer, ac-
cording to sheriff's re-
ports.
Lafayette County .
formed a task force with
Levy County to investi-
gate the burglaries. The
investigation revealed
that the suspect is re-
sponsible not only for
burglaries in Levy and
Lafayette County but
also in Alachua,
Gilchrist.and possibly
Dixie County.
A "Be on the lookout"
call (BOLO) was given
to the region. On July 9
an officer with the
Chiefland Police De-
partment received a
shoplifting call at Wal-
Mart. Bernier was ar-
rested. He allegedly re-
sisted a merchant dur-
ing the arrest. The CPD
officer reportedly locat-


ed prescription pills in
Bernier's pocket, but
lernier said he had a
prescription for the nar-
cotics inside his truck.
The officer recognized
the white Ford Explorer
and called the Levy
Sheriff's Department.
Authorities quickly
did a photo line up and
burglary victims in
Alachua
County positively
identified Bernier as the
suspect, reports show.
Bemier has been
charged with occupied
burglary, since the vic-
tim was at home during
the burglary, and grand
theft. Alachua and
Lafayette counties both
have a warrant for
Bernier for multiple bur-
glaries.
Authorities believe
Bernier may have been
trying to copy the style
of Michael Christopher
Hackle and Cody Eu-


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gene Pridgeon, who al-
legedly committed a
rash of burglaries in
Lafayette County and
across northern and cen-
tral Florida by breaking
into seemingly,empty
houses across several
counties with no vehi-
cles present and stealing
untraceable items, ac-
cording to police.
Lamb says the rate of
burglaries in Lafayette
County and surrounding
counties has risen dra-
matically of late. Small
crimes have increased
lately in Lafayette. "We
had a few young women
vandalize the laundry
mat in town and try to
steal the money out of
the machine," said


L.amnb.
The Lafayette County
Sheriff's Office asks that
anyone with information
on these burglaries, or
anyone who has had
contact with Bernier con-
tact police. Bernier was
driving a white Ford
Explorer with no tag.
If you have seen this
truck in your neighbor-
hood, call the Lafayette
County Sheriff's Office.
As the investigation
continues, it is expected
that Bernier will be
charged for other resi-
dential burglaries, au-
thorities say.
Bernier was convicted
of burglary in 1998 and
of burglary and aggra-
vated assault in 2001.


NOTICE
CHANGE OF DATE &TIME FOR
SCHOOL BOARD MEETING
The Lafayette County School Board will hold
their regular monthly meeting on Friday,
July 17, 2009 beginning at 9:00 a.m. Meetings
are held in the School Board Administration
Building. The public is invited to attend.
537189-F







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Call (386) 362-1734 or
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Continued From Page 1A

cultural Demonstration
category. The chapter re-
ceived the Premier
Chapter Award and the
Supervised Agricultural
Experience Award. More
than 50 Lafayette mem-
.bers, parents, school ad-
ministrators, and alumni
attended the convention.
The chapter competed in
state finals contests, at-
tended nine of ten ses-
sions, and was recog-
nized for their 2008-09
achievements.
The middle school
parliamentary procedure
team competed in the
Florida FFA Middle
School State Contest.
The team took a written
test June 8 and was the
highest scoring team.
Tuesday, June 9 the
team competed in pre-
liminaries against Tom-
lin Middle, Desoto Mid-
dle, Beulah Middle and
Bartow Middle.
Lafayette and Beulah ad-
vanced to the parliamen-
tary procedure finals
against Lake Butler and
Buddy Taylor. The re-
sults were announced
during the Wednesday
night, June 10 session.
The Lafayette FFA mid-
dle school parliamentary
procedure team was an-
nounced as state cham-
pions for the first time
since 2000. Team mem-
bers included: Trevor
Swafford, Emily
Fredriksson, Ellen Lash-
ley, Kelsey Barrington,
Taylor Newbern, Garret
Hart, Blair Marzloff (al-
ternate), James Clark (al-
ternate), and Dustin
Hart (alternate). Unfor-
tunately there is not a
national middle school
contest to advance to.
Cecelia Koon compet-
ed in the Florida,FFA
Creed State Contest June
9. This career develop-
ment event required


I


OR'TheStreet.com




vws*,.he vatur

Aptl3, 2009

Keth C Lefbfrkd
Firt Federal Bank of Florida
4705 W US Hwy 90
Lake Cy, FL 32055

Dear Mr. eibln.d:
Congy ea i s' Firg r a f Flnrid h ',o agiin reLcited a tinai:mni aIrengih rarin
of"A'" ,or -r: inrn "iSr. Cn Rarings. Ite 11ar, 1i.n' l r ad in.kJ arnn p r,
ratings anrdanalsSi of i rti or .xanpns t, mur a uL n.1 and s.c~ ke r e
This r3ringa ,is First Fd.raIl B3tnk ofFlrl d
This ranc.I ri b.,,.ij ,Os c d.rr Lendcof Florida 1 an OuStandiig bank offering ex"eJ,'rer
Iqnanc,:fl bili x ri: rcl ilrr,r, tenders nd mplh11".? Plrau kno th l t han rwrr
irslr A of the nri s haks an.d rhriris ment IhcSrm lo Rl kin o;t r h. r en erethaiorl ,
fifahrk ,.*Iren.g h. jL i J ,"1rin ,i9,n rrf, :,ne ,t, be p e pioud

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insr nil"ln, i ,wluItng h e. if .e' nt il, aMnh i l wn t hOf ranre n 5.0
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a'liue Co,, lriee Shll'a p!~l,, btks~, and a5 ,rln X and JI idilin,, e rj) Inlure rs.,k-
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n a ~,c. placi'.g 'lrI a. r or t4.hia s nrean- r A m Er n r rIr. ti l o hur r Iii r
rn l a Irlli erne tr.girc" I tlf rn .,1 n. c fR oCC i -.urI n $'! li a.' i2iu
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f w o fro Trjic.Sroom ., ,, i ,
financial strrenpiwh' a i pt rn e io e c n ec .
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Sin, cieFy,


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uals and groups donated
meals during the conven-
tion: Lafayette FFA
Alumni, Sheriff Brian
Lamb, Attorney Lenette
McMillan, Mr. and Mrs.
Angle Ceraso, and Mrs.
Debbie Land. Also, Mary
Koon, in charge of meals,
and assistant Dottie Clark
did another exceptional
job planning and provid-
ing meals for all chapter
attendees.


THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009


PAGE 4A ~ THE MAYO FRE L


each contestant to recite
the FFA Creed verbatim
and then respond to
three questions regarding
the FFA Creed in five
minutes. Cecelia was
named a top four finalist
along side members from
the JF St. Martin FFA
Chapter, Blountstown
FFA Chapter, East Ridge
FFA Chapter andthe
South Dade FFA Chap-
ter. Cecelia Was nained
the state champion dur-
ing the night session of
Wednesday, June 10. Ce-
celia is the first creed
state winner from our
chapter. Cecelia will ad-
vance to national compe-
tition at the National FFA
Convention in Indi-
anapolis in October.
The Lafayette FFA
chapter also had many
proficiency finalists who
were recognized at con-
vention. The finalists
were: Blake Hendrick
(Swine), Blake Hendrick
(Diversified Livestock),
Quinn Frier (Sales & Ser-
vice), Brandon Adams
(Fiber & Oil Crop), Jack-
son Koon (Specialty
Crop), Jared Sampson
(Ag Mechanics), Kali
Sharpe (Dairy), Jacob
Jones (Swine), Evan Bar-
rington (Landscape),
John Levi Vann (Beef),
and John Levi Vann
(Small Animal). Out of
these 11 finalists, four
were announced as state
champions in their re-
spected categories. Blake
Hendrick won the state
swine proficiency area.
Quinn Frier won the state
sales and service profi-
ciency area. Brandon
Adams won the state
fiber and oil crop profi-
ciency area. Jared Samp-
son won the Agricultural
Mechanics proficiency
area. All four proficiency
winners earned two hun-
dred dollars and'their ap-'
plications will be submit-
ted to national competi-
tion later this month.
Other convention
highlights included Kali
Sharpe placing fourth in
the Job Interview Career
Development Event,
both the middle school
dairy and meats judging
teams being recognized
as top-five teams on
stage, and Mary-Thomas
Hart and Courtney
Reinbott being recog-
nized as state champi-
ons in their Ornamental
Horticultural Demon-
stration category. The
chapter also received the
Premier Chapter Award
and the Supervised
Agricultural Experience
Award. Mary-Thomas
Hart and Karley Bar-,
rington also competed
in the talent show and
performed during one of
the 10 sessions.
According to Chad
Lyons, Lafayette High
School's Agri-Science in-
structor, the FFA makes a
positive difference in the
lives of students by de-
veloping their potential
for premiere leadership,
personal growth, and ca-
reer success through agri-
' cultural education.
Lyons and the entire
FFA chapter would like
to thank Mr. Hancock,
LHS principal, and Mr.
Lashley, Superintendent
of Schools, for attending
the state convention and
showing their continued
support for our chapter.
The following individ-










THRSA JUY1,20 H AOFE RSMyF AE5


Disaster aid continues for


North Florida residents, counties


Although the dead-
line for north Florida's
individuals and busi-
ness owners to apply
for federal disaster aid
has passed, applicants
continue to be ap-
proved for grants and
disaster loans to help
them recover from the
damages and losses
they suffered due to
storms between March
26 and May 5. The Fed-
eral Emergency Man-
agement Agency
(FEMA) has also grant-
ed additional Public
Assistance funds to
help local governments
and certain private non-
profits recover.
To date, FEMA has
approved nearly $3 mil-
lion to help homeown-
ers.and renters and al-
most $7.3 million to
help repair and rebuild
public infrastructure.
Additionally, the U.S.
Small Business Admin-
istration has approved
nearly $1.5 million in
low-interest disaster
loans for storm sur-
vivors.
Disaster Aid for
Homeowners, Renters
and Businesses
During the applica-
tion period, 1,339 storm
survivors living in the
17 counties designated
as eligible for FEMA
aid registered for assis-
tance.
As of July 9, 2009,
FEMA has approved
$2,985,531 in assistance
to individuals.
The bulk of that mon-
ey $2,685,507- was
approved for housing


Flag Salute
Changes for
Veterans and
off duty military
personnel
People should not be
surprised, or dis-
turbed, when they ob-
serve someone in civil-
ian clothes render the
military salute, rather
than the usual cap and
hand over the left
breast, during the play-
.ing of the national an-
them or other cere-
monies when the flag is
displayed.
Traditionally, in the
past, members of the
nation's veteran's ser-
vice organizations
have rendered the
hand-salute at events
involving the national
flag only while wear-
ing their .organizations
official head gear.
Due to changes in the
FY08 and FY09 Nation-
al Defense Authoriza-
tion Act, veterans and
off-duty military per-
sonriel not in uniform
can now render the
military-style hand
salute during the rais-
ing, lowering or pass-
ing of the flag and dur-
ing the playing of the
national anthem.
"The military salute
is a unique gesture of
respect that. marks
those who have served
in our nation's armed
forces," said Secretary
of Veteran Affairs Dr.
James B. Peake. "This
provision allows the
application of that hon-
or in all events involv-


ing our nation's flag."
Hopefully, all veter-
ans and not-in-uniform
active duty military
personnel, will adopt
this practice, and oth-
ers will proudly recog-
nize them for doing so.
Compiled from several
sources by Angie Ceraso,
member American Legion
Post 105, Mayo.


expenses, including
temporary rental assis-
tance, home repair
costs and assistance to-
ward replacing de-
stroyed homes.
Another $300,024 was
approved for other dis-
aster-related needs
such as medical expens-
es and lost personal
possessions not covered
by other resources or
programs.
Federal and state offi-
cials overseeing north
Florida's disaster recov-
ery from the severe
storms urge all regis-
tered applicants to stay
in touch throughout the
recovery process. Stay-
ing in touch is as easy
as using FEMA's toll-
free Helpline telephone
number or Web site to:
update personal infor-
mation like changes of
address or phone num-
ber, reschedule inspec-
tion appointments, no-
tify FEMA about insur-
ance settlements, initi-
ate appeals, or ask
questions about the sta-
tus of a FEMA applica-
tion. Go online to
www.disasterassis-
tance.gov or call the
Helpline toll-free at
800-621-FEMA (3362) or
(TTY) 800-462-7585.
Representatives are
available seven days a
week from 7 a.m. to 7
p.m. EDT. Multilingual
specialists are available.
The deadline to apply
for federal disaster was
June 29, 2009.
The SBA has ap-
proved $1,481,700 in
low-interest loans to
households and busi-
nesses in the affected
counties through July 9.
Information about
SBA programs is avail-
able by calling toll-free
800-659-2955 from 8


a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday
through Friday or on-
line at
www.sba.gov / ser-
vices / disasterassis-
tance.
Federal Emergency
Management Agency
disaster assistance was
approved for eligible
homeowners, renters
and businesses in the
following counties: Cal-
houn, Dixie, Gilchrist,
Hamilton, Holmes,
Jackson, Lafayette,
Leon, Levy, Liberty,
Madison, Okaloosa,
Santa Rosa, Suwannee,
Wakulla, Walton, and
Washington.
Public Assistance
Funds Continue to be
Approved
To date, FEMA has
approved $7,261,687 to
pay for debris removal,
emergency services re-
lated to the disaster,
and for repairing or re-
placing storm-damaged
public facilities and in-
frastructure in the 22
north Florida counties
eligible for Public As-
sistance funds. Of that,
the federal share,
$5,446,265, or
75 percent, has been ob-
ligated to the state to
disburse to local gov-
ernments and certain
private non-profits for
specifically approved
projects. The remaining
25 percent of the costs
will be shared by the'
state and other appli-
cants.
Obligated Public As-
sistance funds will go
to help communities in
the following counties:
Bay, Calhoun, Dixie, Es-
cambia, Franklin, Gads-
den, Gilchrist, Gulf,
Hamilton, Holmes,
Jackson, Jefferson,
Lafayette, Leon, Liber-
ty, Madison, Okaloosa,


Santa Rosa, Suwannee,
Wakulla, Walton, and
Washington.
FEMA's mission is to
support our citizens
and first responders to
ensure that as a nation
we work together to
build, sustain, and im-
prove our capability to
prepare for, protect
against, respond to, re-.
cover from, and miti-
gate all hazards.
Disaster recovery as-
sistance is available
without regard to race,
color, religion, national-
ity, sex, age, disability,
English proficiency or
economic status. If you
or someone you know
has been discriminated
against, call FEMA toll-
free at 800-621-FEMA
(3362)..For TTY call 800-
462-7585.
FEMA's temporary
housing assistance and
grants for public trans-
portation expenses,
medical and dental ex-
penses, and funeral and
burial expenses do not
require individuals to
apply for an SBA loan.
However, applicants
who receive SBA loan
applications must sub-
mit them to SBA loan
officers to be eligible for
assistance that covers
personal property, vehi-
cle repair or replace-
ment, and moving and
storage expenses.
The Florida Division
of Emergency Manage-
ment and State Emer-
gency Response Team
(SERT),coordinates dis-
aster preparedness, re-
sponse, recovery and
mitigation programs
with all 67 counties and
the federal government.
For more information
and to GET A PLAN!
please visit www.Flori-
daDisaster.org.


I iwti" oj 4, k1 7


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slanuO-F


Mayo Legals


AGENDA
LAFAYETTE COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD
REGULAR MEETING,
JULY 17, 2009
Regular School Board moolling, July 17,
2009 in the School Board Administration
Building beginning at 9 a.m
I. CALL TO ORDER
II. APPROVAL OF MINUTES
Ill. RECOGNITIONS/PRESENTATIONS
A. Resolutions
IV. CITIZEN INPUT
V. CONSENT ITEMS
A. Personnel: (1) Recommendations-
Instructional
Substitute Workers
Volunteer Coaches/Assistants
(2) Approve request for
family medical leave
B. Approve personnel to transport stu-
dents for the 2009-2010 school year
C. Approve fundraising requests for
2009-2010 school year
D. Approve Title X ARRA Project Applica-
tion for 2009-2010 school year
E. Adopt 2008-009 salary schedule for
the 2009-2010 school year
F. Approve requests for the following stu-
dents to attend school in Lafayette Coun-
ty for the 2009-2010 school year. Nicholas
Bracewell, Bryson Bracewell, Joshua
Martinez, Jessica Martinez, John Perry,
Billy McClelland, Stacy McClelland, Mar-
cus Durham III, Amanda Raber
G. Approve request for Lauren Smith to
attend school In Suwannee County for the
2009-2010 school year
VI. ACTION ITEMS
A. Approve Contract with O'Neal Roofing-
LES Media Center Re-roof Project
B. Approve Letter of Agreement with Ac-
celify, LLC
C. Approve Becky Sharpe to attend Safe
Schools Healthy Students Project Direc-
tor Consortia in Washington, D.C.. August
4-7, 2009 (expenses pd. by SS/HS pro-
ject)
D. Approve SSHS Partnership Contracts
for 2009-2010 school year
E. Approve Florida Virtual School to pro-


vide virtual instruction (contract)
FI Approve 2009-2010 eight grade trip to
Washington, DC.
G. Approve payment of cell phone sup-
ploneInt
FH. Discuss pay rates for substitute em-
ployeos
I. Approve pizza provider for the 2009-
2010 school year
J Approve bills for payment
K Approve budget amendments
L. Approve for advertising: Revisions to
Student Progression Plan
M. Approve 2009-2010 Tentative Budget
for advertising
VII. ITEMS FOR INFORMATION
A. Transportation Report
B. Principal's Monthly Financial Report on
Internal Funds
C. Purchase Orders
D. Financial Statement
E. New School Board Policy on Bullying
and training to be held during the up-
coming school year.
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO AP-
PEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE
BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MAT-
TER CONSIDERED AT SUCH MEETING
WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PRO-
CEEDINGS, AND THAT, FOR SUCH
PURPOSE, HE OR SHE MAY NEED TO
INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD
OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE,
WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TES-
TIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH
THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
7/16
THE LAFAYETTE COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD WILL
RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
FOR THE FOLLOWING:
SURPLUS USED TIRES
Bids must be returned by 2:00 PM, Mon-
day, July 27, 2009 at which time bids will
be opened. The School Board will award.
bid on Monday, July 27, 2009 at 5:30 PM.
Bid packets may be picked up at Lafayette
County School Board, 363 NE Crawford
St., between the hours of 8:00 AM and
3:00 PM. For more Information, please
contact Tammi Maund, Purchasing Clerk
at (386) 294-1351.
7/16,23


Volleyball tryouts!

Volleyball tryouts will be held August 10, 11 at
4 p.m. at the LHS gym.
Be sure you have had your physical ard bring
your consent forms.




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(Behind Foodland Shopping Center)
Toll-Free 1-866-Perry Movies (737-7966)
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Timber Buyers
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THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 5A


THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009


j









THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009


EE PRESS M o FL


PAGE 6A ~ THE MAYO FR ay ,


A HONOR ROLL

2nd grade

Beauboef, Austin
Buchanan, Carriagan
Cobb, Chyanne
Dyal, Corbin
Garcia, Elissa
Gay, James
Jackson, Case
Jackson, Grace
Jackson, Graham
Johnson, Julya
Lewis, Jasmine
Lowman, Felicity
Martinez, Gabriela
Maund, Truett
Perry, Caroline
Perry. Gabrielle
Peterson, Ainsley
Poole, Christian
Poole, Micah
Revels, Taylor
Rogers, Trent
Russ, Harley
Severance, Austin
Shiver, Christian
Tollman. Frances

3rd. grade

Byrd, Tara
Calhoun, Kendall
Cedillo, Salvador
Celedon, Brianna
Coverson, Kymeisha
Ellis, Comeron
Ferrell, BreiLan
Jackson, Sarah
Lyons, Krista
Medlin, Savannah.
Morgan, Kaylin
Price, Leesa
Pruitt, Graceman
Purcell, Illich
Rehberg, Ashley
Richardson, Holden
Russell, Mac
Smith, Autumn
Taylor, Lindsey
Taylor, Macy

4th grade

Blackburn, Sabrina
Boligan, Melanie
Bulnes, Jordan
Fletcher, Katie
Garland, Trevor
Guyton, Lang
Harris, Shane
.Hernandez, Diana
Hill, Ciana.
Hingson, Coley
Lake,. Rachel
Land, Adam
Lashley, Madelyn
Lawson, Harli
Lents, Kaylah
Massey, Nathan
Mata, Kevin
Perry, Drew
Poole, Hannah

5th grade

Fredricksson, Ryan
Jackson, Clay
Morris, Devin
Pearson, Kelbey
Randolph, Dixie
Swafford, Lacey
Sanchez, Jorge
Wimberley, Alana


A/B HONOR ROLL,

2nd grade

Cobb, Shawnee
Cooley, Sarah
Crum, Julie
Driver, Landry
Edwards, Garris
Espinoza, Pablo
Fillyaw, Lauren
Garacia, Aileen Morales
Hamlin, Sarah
Hayes, Bethany
Hewitt, Shade
Hill, Hannah
Hurst, Lee
Jeffries, Trinity
Lancaster, Alyssa
Pruitt, Samantha
Ruff, Ashtin
Shepherd, Joseph
Shows, Haley
Sullivan, Hanna
Sutton, Joe
Thompson, Brooke
Tovar, T. J.
Trejo, Micaela'
Vences, Blanca
Walden, Austin

3rd grade

Adams, Morgan
Bash, Celsi
Buchanan, Chase
Clay, Anthony
Dekle, Katie
Devore, Alex
Douglas, Zoey
Edwards, Megan
Edwards, Perston
Elleson, Haley
Escamilla, Gustavo
Folsom Kassity
Gonzalez, Keishmary
Laemmle, Tyler
Lamb, Brayden
Lancaster, Kali
Lanphar, Hailey
Molina, Johanna
Pressley, Danielle
Robinson, Matthew
Simpson, Oshean
Singletary, Josh
Spikes, Garrett
Ward, Autumn
Wardrep, Ryan
Webster, Alexis
Williamson, Landon

4th grade

Adams, Melba
Amerson, Craig
Bennett, Stormy
Croft, Dalton
Ducksworth, Dalton
Fletcher, Austin
Humphries, Brian
Koon, Ryan
Lawson, Peyton
Leon, Christopher
Luna, Guillermo
Moreno, Osiel
Murray, Jeremy
OfSteen, John Riley
Powe, Monica
Revels, Nicholas
Tovar, Alexia
Vences, Juan
Watson, Shaylene


5th grade

Braritley, Ashleigh
Buchanan, Connor
Byrd, Mich
Christian, Dana
Dean, Hailey
Dekle, Garrett
Dekle, Hannah
Fowler, Haley
Herring, Marlenia
Lawson, Lauren
Lawson, Logan
Lira, Jewelyana Newberry'
Murray, Danielle
Pearson, Darby
Perry, Ashlyn
Perry, Grace
Schreck, Luke
Shaw, Michaela
Shiver, Kole
Smith, Breanne
Walker, Anna

Lafayette High School

6th grade
A honor roll

Karley Barrington
Myles Byrd
Mason Byrd
Sunni Cobb
Keely Dyjak
Zachary Ellis
Ashley Freeman
Logan Hewett
Katelyn Law
Brycen Lee
Elisha Molina


7th grade
A honor roll

Jade Buchanan
Dalton Elliott
Emily Fredriksson
Darby Guyton
Haley Koon
Lydia Land
Ashlin Morgan
Stephanie Ramirez
Cody Walker
Courtney Walker

8th grade
A honor roll,

Kiera Blakely
Dylan Green
Chase Hart
Garrett Hart
Hunter' Hewitt
Kole Hurst
Jennifer McDonald
Taylor Newbern
Savannah Pruitt
Nicholas Singletary
Trevor Swafford

9th grade
A honor roll

Elizabeth Anderson
Stephen Dees
Dillon Ellis
Ivonne Flores
Katie Jackson
Brody Longley
Kaci Palomino
Courtney Reynolds
Kali Sharpe
Nathanlee Tice


10th grade
A honor roll

Timothy Atwell
Ashley Black
Mary-Thomas Hart
Joshua Lira
Alicia Marzloff
Jose Rubio

11th grade
A honor roll
Joseph Demarais
Eileen Givens
Brooks Laminack
Kelsey Land
Courtney Reinbott

12th grade
A honor roll

James Handson
Alma Huerta
Brittany Lindblade
Brandon Sapp

A/B honor roll

6th grade
A/B honor roll

Timothy Bell
Kasey Edwards
Mariah Edwards
Kassidy Ellis
Jacob Henderson
Skyler Hewitt
Benjamin Lake
Cinthia Posada
Brianna Powe
Leesandra Quinones
Taylor Rackley
Sydney Shows
Breanna Singletary
Kayla Sparks
Madisyn Trawick
Miguel Trejo
Victoria Walker
Hannah Williams

7th grade
A/B honor roll

Caitlyn Creamer
Jason Degroff
John Demarais
Savanna Hamlin
Dustin Hart
Cassidy Livingston
Corben Murray
Exalin Resendiz
Edward Rhoden
Audra Shiver
Cameron Thomas

8th grade
A/B honor roll

Kelsey Barrington
Samantha Calhoun
Juan Cedillo
Cary Cooley
Bailey Edwards
Danielle Ezell
Buddy Filsell
Tori Fluriach
Austin Gilliam
Ellen Lashley
Kaleigh Law
Blair Marzloff
Jakalah Massey
Laura Miles
Andrea Nonnemacher


Lindsay OfSteen
Kimberly Powe
Steven Ray
Joshua Revels
Leonel Rosalio
Michaela Smith
Brianna Snider
Katelyn Sullivan
Malachi Watson
Robbin Youngblood

9th grade
A/B honor roll

Kevin Amerson
Julia Barnes
Darren Brantley
Daniel Demarais
Alyssa Dyal
Octavio Escamilla
Michael Harrison
Daniel Johnson
Cecelia Koon
Jackson Koon
Stacy Mcclelland
Chad Morris
Rhoda Reid
Kayla Russ
Colby Smith
Danielle Templin

10th grade
A/B honor roll

Mechal Blakely
Olivia Celedon
Ande Diaz
Katrina Handson
Shelby Hart
Krista Hein
Emily Koon
Jimmy Macias
Nicolle Marlenee
Sam Medlin
Uriel Posada
'Bridgett Powe
Amanda Raber
Dustin Reinbott
Elliott Solano

1ith grade
A/B honor roll

Austin Anderson
Christina Bailey
Brandi Bethea
Megan Brantley
Austin Henderson
Ryan Horn
Jenna Hundley
Jacob Jones
Tyler Keast
Connor Lashley
Brad McGraw
Tiffany Peacock
Ethan Perry
Emily Selleck
Courtney Smith
Jessica Williams
Sheila Wimberley


12th grade
A/B honor roll

Rhett Coleman
Gabriela Goodison
Taquelia Macklin
Krysten Millard
Kandy Nielsen
Andrew Smith
Harley Thornberg
John-Levi Vann


'-1' 7r'^I- "^







THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 7A





"A look back at scenes around Lafayette County"


.I-


f : .- ,


A true razor-back taken near Mayo in 1940-41.


Downtown Mayo, the county seat for Lalayene County.

*Li .


4


IV


Picket Lake Elementary School around 1949.


2-wheel log cart used to snake logs out of the woods around the 1920s.


Mayo street scene with courthouse, and several churches. Date unknown.


Sawmill at Day, Florida about 1910.


An average Lafayette County tobacco barn, around 1949.


Turpentining in Lafayette County, 1949.


Sponsored by: Tommy Murrow and Steve Green. "'--


4ne P


amuru


FUNERAL HOME
440 SW Monroe Ave., Mayo, FL
386-294-2658
Locally owned & operated.
Serving, Ltaveite County' siiroumlin areas since 1953


34 1ws r


". *


655~,c~C~S


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P% A F TF OMY- FREE P S Mao% FI THURSDAY,1 JULY,6I 20


Middle School Awards -


June 2, 2009


Woodmen of the World
Chase Hart

Students of the Month
Taylor Sullivan
Katie Jackson
Keely Dyjak
Garrett Hart
Savanna Pruitt
Jujuan Camacho
Hannah Williams
Kiera Blakely
Erica Flores

American Legion
Garrett Hart
Kiera Blakely

Perfect Attendance
Bernabe Arreguin

Language Arts
6th Grade
Kayla Nielsen
Brittany Walker
Sunni Cobb
Ashley Freeman
Zachery Ellis
Breanna Singletary
Timothy Bell
Samantha Lawson
Hannah Williams
Mason Byrd
Myles Byrd
Katleyn Law
Elisha Molina

7th Grade
Forrest Jackson
Joan Pedro Negrete
Laura Paz
Emily Fredriksson
Darby Guyton
Haley Koon
Lydia Land
Audra Shiver
Cody Walker
Ashlin Morgan

8th Grade
Garrett Hart
Hunter Hewitt
Ellen Lashley
Laura Miles
Leonel Rosalio
Michaela Smith
Kiera Blakely
Dylan Green
Jennifer McDonald
Taylor Newbern
Lindsay O'Steen
Savannah Pruitt
Nicholas Singletary
Katie Sullivan
Trevor Swafford
Robbin Youngblood

8th Grade FCAT
Writes Awards
Lindsay O'Steen
Andrea Nonnemacher
Leonel Rosalio

Math
6th Grade
Zachery Ellis
Ashley Freeman
Breanna Singletary
Karley Barrington
Mason Byrd
Myles Byrd
Katelyn Law
Manuel Arreguin
Joshua Thomas

7th Grade
Dalton Elliott
Emily Frediksson
Darby Guyton
Audra Shiver


Cody Walker
Alyssa Clay
Laura Paz
Jade Buchanan
Caitlyn Creamer
Jason Degroff
Lydia Land
Haley Koon
Ashlin Morgan
Cory Murray
Joan Pedro Negrete
Brooke Walker

8th Grade,
Garrett Hart
Laura Miles
Trevor Swafford
Taylor Newbern
Savannah Pruitt
Nick Singletary

Science
6th Grade
Sunni Cobb
Zachery Ellis
Timothy Bell
Hannah Williams
Karley Barrington
Mason Byrd
Myles Byrd

7th Grade
Dalton Elliott
Emily Fredricksson
Darby Guyton
Lydia Land
Audra Shiver
Cody Walker
Jade Buchanan
Caitlyn Creamer
Ashlin Morgan
Brooke Walker

8th Grade
Laura Miles.
Taylor Newbern
Savannah Pruitt
Nick Singletary
Trevor Swafford

Social Studies
& Geography
6th Grade
Social Studies
Mason Byrd
Myles Byrd
Sunni Cobb
Zachary Ellis
Ashley Freeman
Logan Hewett
Breanna Singletary
Timothy Bell

7tl Grade Geography
SJade Buchanan
Caitlyn Creamer
Dalton Elliott
Emily Fredriksson
Darby Guyton
Lydia Land
Ashlin Morgan
Audra Shiver
Brooke Walker
Cody Walker

8th Grade History
Laura Miles
Taylor Newbern
Savannah Pruitt
Trevor Swafford

Citizenship
6th Grade
Kayla Nielsen
Lionel Snider
Brittany Walker
Sunni Cobb
Kasey Edwards
Zachary Ellis
Ashley Freeman


Logan Hewett
Jazmin Luna
Cinthia Posada
Anesha Robinson
Sydney Shows
Breanna Singletary
Taylor Sullivan
Madisyn Trawick
Ryan Weaver
Taylor Adkins
Timothy Bell
Keely Dyjak
Skyler Hewitt
Sam Lawson
Michaela Murray
Demecio Robles
Robin Shiver
Brittany Smith
Dalton Turner
Hannah Williams
Rocio Zarate
Karley Barrington
Kassidi Brady
Wyatt Driver
Mariah Edwards
Timothy Fleming
Katelyn Law
Elisha Molina
Brianna Powe
Alyssa Revels
Kayla Sparks

7th Grade
Dalton Elliott
Darby Guyton
Savanna Hamlin
Audra Shiver
Cameron Thomas
Cody Walker
Brian Archer
Holly Lents
Laura Paz
Charles Scott
Jade Buchanan
Tyler Cornell
Caitlyn Creamer
Jason Degroff
Taylor Fain
Cassidy Livingston
Ashlin Morgan
Exalin Resendiz
Brooke Walker

8th Grade
Kiera Blakley
Brianna Snider
Kelsey Barrington
Danielle Ezell
Kaleigh Law
Michaela Smith
Jennifer McDonald
Taylor Newbern
Andrea Nonnemacher
Lindsay OiSteen
Amairani Paz
Leonel Rosalio
Savannah Pruitt
Joshua Revels
Nick Singletary
Katelyn Sullivan
Trevor Swafford
Laura Miles
Chase Hart
Garrett hart
Hunter Hewitt
Ellen Lashley
Blair Marzloff

Honor Roll
6th Grade

"A"
Zachery Ellis

"A-B"
Breanna Singletary
Myles Byrd
Sunni Cobb
Katelyn Law
Karley Barrington


FREE Oil Painting

classes at the Library


There will be FREE Oil Painting
classes at the Library in Mayo on
July 21, from 9-3 and Aug. 4 from 6-
9 p.m. given by a local artist. Both
classes will be of a landscape scene
and completed in just this one ses-
sion! Yes, you can do it and we will
show you how.
The July 21, class will be on a
16X20" canvas. The evening class
on Aug. 4, will be a smaller 9X12
canvas but all elements of sky, wa-
ter, mountains and trees will be in
both.
All materials are brought and pro-


vided for each student but he/she
will be responsible for their cost of
$25 for the larger painting and $20
for the smaller one.
To view what we are painting,
please go by the Three Rivers Re-
gional Library in Mayo. Regular
classes are also available in the sur-
rounding communities on July 14,
28 and Aug 8.
To sign up and for more informa-
tion:please contact Pamela at 386-
294-2981. Classes are popular and
fill rapidly so reserve your spot to-
day.


Social Security Alert


During a hurricane or other emer-
gency you should not have to worry
about your Social Security or SSI
checks arriving safely and on time. Be
prepared by having your check set up
for direct deposit. Your money goes
directly into your bank account and is
immediately available. Whether


you're at home or away from home on
the day of payment, you know your
money is safe in your bank account in-
stead of sitting unsecured in your
mailbox. Go to
www.socialsecurity.gov/deposit or
cajl 1-800-772-1213 to sign-up or learn
more about direct deposit.


Ashley Freeman
Kasey Edwards
Logan Hewett
Brianna Powe
Timothy Bell
Mason Byrd

7th Grade

"A"
Emily Fredriksson
Darby Guyton
Lydia Land
Ashlin Morgan
Audra Shiver
Cody Walker
Courtney Walker

"A-B"
Jason Degroff
Jade Buchanan
Caitlyn Creamer
Haley Koon
Corben Murray
Dalton Elliott
Savanna Hamlin
Dustin Hart
Laura Paz
Cameron Thomas

8th Grade

"A"
Taylor Newbern
Savannah Pruitt
Trevor Swafford

"A-B"
Garrett Hart
Lindsay O'Steen
Nicholas Singletary
Kelsey Barrington
Kiera Blakely
Samantha Calhoun
Danielle Ezell
Dylan Green
Chase Hart
Hunter Hewitt
Kole Hurst
Ellen Lashley

Class Officers/
Student Council
6th Grade
Taylor Rackley -
President
Taylor Sullivan -
Vice President
Kasey Edwards -
Secretary


Brittany Walker -
Historian
Skyler Hewitt Student
Council Representative
Madisyn Trawick -
Student Council
Representative

7th Grade
Dustin Hart President
Bryce Pendez Vice
President
Emily Fredriksson -
Secretary
Darby Guyton -
Treasurer
Lydia Land Treasurer
Cassidy Livington -
Historian
Dalton Wimberly -
Student Council
Representative
Haley Koon Student
Council Representative

8th Grade
Chase Hart-President
Rodney Brown -
Vice-President
Danielle Ezell -Secretary
Jennifer McDonald -
Treasurer
Andrea Nonnemacher -
Treasurer
Michaela Smith -
Historian
Hunter Hewitt Student
Council Representative
Lindsay O'Steen Stu-
dent Council Represen-
tative

Jr. Beta Club New
Members
Leonel Rosalio
Sydney Shows
Breanna Singletary
Taylor Sullivan
Hannah Williams
Sydney Barry
Dustin Bethea
Dylan Clingan
Austin Moody
Laura Paz
Stephanine Ramirez
Exalin Resendiz
Kiera Blakely
Jennifer McDonald
Savanna Pruitt
Joshua Revels


Karley Barrington
Timothy Bell
Kassidi Brady
Mason Byrd
Myles Byrd
Keely Dyjak
Zachary Ellis
Ashley Freeman
Logan Hewett
Katelyn Law
Brycen Lee
Brianna Powe
Taylor Rackley

Jr. Beta Club
Officers:
President Emily
Fredriksson
Vice President Brooke
Walker
Secretary Cody Walker
Treasurer -Haley Koon
Reporter-Lydia Land,
Kaley Koon

Physical Education
6th Grade
Bre Singletary
Ashley Freeman
Katelyn Law
Karley Barrington
Cinthia Posada
Kasey Edwards
Sydney Shows
Taylor Sullivar
Breanna Powe
Lianna Hickman
Mariah Edwards

7th Grade
Alyssa Clay
Darby Guyton
Savannah Hamlin
Kaley Koon
Lydia Land
Ashlin Morgan
Melissa Stone
Exalin Resendiz
Brooke Walker
Laura Paz

8th Grade
Danielle Ezell
Lindsay O'Steen
Bailey Edwards
Ellen Lashley
Kaleigh Law
Bre Massey
Kim Powe


Acts of love and kindness


Continued From Page 1A

or teaches children to
read who have never
held a book.
In 2007, she and her
husband traveled to
Nepal as volunteers
with a ShelterBox re-
sponse team. ShelterBox
is a project started by
the Rotary Club of Hel-
ston-Lizard, England in
2001. The purpose of
ShelterBox is to deliver
custom made shelters to
people in disaster situa-
tions. The shelter con-
tains supplies that in-
clude a large tent, blan-
kets, water purification
and cooking equipment,
basic tools, and a multi-
fuel stove.
"Those people were
completely wiped out,"
said Lacquey. "I can re-
member being stunned
by so many displaced
children. Nepal was the
first time I'd ever been
to a third-world coun-
try."
Her efforts to improve
the lives of children are
part of the reason Flori-
da State University
chose Lacquey as the
College of Education's
2009 Distinguished
Alumna, Business and
Industry category. Lac-
quey was nominated for
this award by her
daughter, Jennifer Win-
net. You'll never hear
Trannie Lacquey say,
"Do you need help?" 'but
instead, "Tell me what I -
can do to help," said
Winnet in her nomina-
tion essay. To quality
for the award the nomi-
nee had to currently be
employed in business
and industry and
should have demon-
strated exejiplary con-
tributions toward im-


proving the educational
quality within their
community through
various activities.
Branford's Lacquey
was more than quali-
fied. During 20 years of
living in this communi-
ty, she has volunteered
countless hours in the
classroom, served on the
SAC committee for sev-
eral years, and continu-
ally gives both time and
money for programs
that benefit students
and teachers. Lacquey
has also volunteered as
a track coach and a bas-
ketball coach among
many other roles.
In recent years, Lat-
quey and her husband
have gotten involved
with organizations that
help children overseas
with not only disaster
relief, but also educa-
tional needs.
"Kids, oh my gosh,
they're so beautiful,"
said Lacquey. "I just
love children. However,
I've seen that the differ-
ence in children here
and children abroad is
that for children over-
seas, education is usual-
ly the only way out of
their situation."
She spoke in melan-
choly tones as she
thought back on scenes
of refugee camps in
Nepal and the appalling
slums of Belize.
"Education is very im-
portant wherever you
are, but for them it's es-
sential," said Lacquey.
"Owning our own
business has given my
husband and I the op-
portunity to do these
things," said Lacquey.
"Volunteering is what I
like to do. After raising
my family I decided this
is how I want to spend


my time."
Lacquey has traveled
all over the Caribbean
and to other countries,
in South America and
elsewhere, promoting
literacy and delivering
books.
As this article went to
press, Lacquey and her
husband were en route
to Costa Rica for the sec-
ond time on a literacy
campaign.
"We're just getting
started," Lacquey said
excitedly. "We'll go any-
where an opportunity
comes up."
When Lacquey got
back from Nepal, her
children gave her a
book of quotes. "My fa-
vorite was by Albert
Pike. He says 'What we
have done for ourselves
alone dies with us; what
we have done for others
and the world remains
and,is immortal'," said
Lacquey. "Isn't that just
wonderful?"
These qualities of
charity, kindness and
love are expressions too
rarely seen. Lacquey,
however, speaks of love
and kindness like one
speaks of common
sense. "People here
sometimes take for
granted all the things
they have," said Lac-
quey. In a previous in-
terview for this news-
paper, Lacquey noted
the refugees in Nepal
took little for granted.
She spoke of "seeing
people so poor it's al-
most incomprehensible
and yet seeing beauti-
ful, happy children and
incredible smiles on the
women. And when
these people have noth-
ing but the tent you've
given t9 them, it
.changes you."


THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009


AP GE 8A THE MAYO FREE L









Lighthouse Christian Center sponsors


IMPACT CHEERLEADING CAMP


ii i


17, for more information
call Kelli Whittington at
294-3940.


Impact cheerleading


group on crazy hair day.


Working hard at cheer camp.


Bommerang Express
VBS at Bethel
Creek Baptist church
Hop on board the Boomerang Express!
Travel to the Land Down Under for a week
of nonstop action as you learn how it all
comes back to Jesus. Each day's Bible study
will help kids discover how to have a rela-.
tionship with'Jesus. By the end of the week
you will have learned what it means to live
through Him.
It's Vacation Bible School at Bethel Creek
Baptist Church like you've never experi-
enced before! The church is located on
Hwy 53 North of Day, and just two miles
West of Dowling Park. Children age 4
through grade 6 are admitted free from
JULY 19, through JULY 23, 6 to 9 pm.
In this one-week adventure, you will
hear Bible stories, participate in cool crafts,
motivating music, eat snacks at the G' Day
Cafe, and play games at Recreation Rock.
Boomerang Express: It All Comes Back
to Jesus will be an event to remember!
Come join us!
For more information or if you need
transportation, please call 386-294-1937 or
386-208-3054.


p
1D


p


1


JOE P. BURNS
FUNERAL SERVICES and CREAMTORY
Advanced Funeral Planning
Locally owned &
operated since 1953
440 S.W. Monroe Ave., Mayo, FL 32066
Mayo Chapel Perry Chapel
386-294-2658 850-584-4149
499136-F

Byrd's Power Equipment
SSales & Service
All Makes & Models
HUSQVARNA.
Open Saturday 7 a.m. 12 Noon
11860 E. U.S. 27, Branford, FL 32008
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-5 p.m. (386) 935-1544
Saturday 7 a.m. Noon 499122-F


S & Excavating
* Front End Loader Limerock *
* CAT Back Hoe Top Soil *
* Gradall Clearing
* Earthmoving Site Prep *
* Pond Digging Fill Dirt
Kenny Hart Jr.. Owner 386-294-2621


WOLFE PLUMBING, INC.
Repair Remodelhng Drain Cleaning
New Construction
7 Days 24 Hours
386&935-0616


Sic Ctnltlfid #CFCaiS 162
Serving AU North Central Florida


For more Daniels Funeral Homes
information about & Crematory, Inc.
advertising here call Branford 935-1124

Nancy at Live Oak 362-4333
38 O6-362-173 4 3 James (Jiln) B. Daniels, Ill, LEF.D.
6-62- 34Keith Daniels, L.F.D.
J.B. Daniels, Jr.
ex. 103 (Local) Family Owned & Operated
ext. 103 499127-F
499137-F


9124 i


0


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 9A


THURSDAYJULY 16 2009


Lighthouse Christian
Center held a summer
cheerleading camp June
15 19 sponsored by IM-
PACT Cheerleading. IM-
PACT is a Christian or-
ganization founded by
the Fellowship of Christ-
ian Cheerleaders (FCC).
FCC provided two in-
structors for the camp
and they did an out-
standing job leading the'
28 girls in devotions and
prayer followed by
Cheer/Form Class,
Jump Class, Stunt Class,
Creation Station and
games.
Lighthouse Christian
Center will sponsor the
2009-2010 IMPACT
cheerleading team be-
ginning in the fall. Regis-
tration begins August






PA("F iA TH MYOFRE RES.Ma.FLTHRSAY, J, 12


"I never thought spending

$150 per month could help

me get my life back!"
Let me share with you a sad story with a happy ending. I had just lost my job and was
quickly sinking into a deep depression. I went home that night and was so embarrassed to
tell my family what had happened at work that dreadful day. After spending time with them,
I went to the bathroom and broke down. I admit it, I cried. What was I going to tell my
wife? How was I going to break the news that the man of the house had lost his job? I took
a good, long look at myself in the mirror.
Thoughts of the conversation with my boss went racing through my head. "Your sales are
down. We can't keep you on when you consistently fail to meet production goals," he had
said. With a sad and uncomfortable look, he had proceeded to tell me, "You have customers
that are interested, but several have called back to say they felt uncomfortable buying their
appliances from you. They said you seemed cold, unfriendly and that you refused to look
them in the eye."
I had tried to defend myself and had given every lame excuse I could think of. I had
reminded him that I knew the product better than anybody else on staff. "What's going on
in your life?" he had asked me. "What has caused you to become so unenthusiastic about
your job?" I stood there with a blank look. I knew the answer, but was-too embarrassed to
tell him the truth. Instead, I packed my desk in shame as colleagues came.by to say
farewell.
I refocused on my reflection. Broken and hurting, I began to pray. All of a sudden, I
remembered seeing an ad in the paper, "Smile Designs By Dr. Charlotte Gerry." I also
remembered reading that they offered easy financing. The very next day, I made an
Appointment with Dr. Gerry.
I was nervous on so many different levels: scared to be at the dentist, lack of finances and my
awkward smile, but Dr. Gerry and her wonderful staff put me at ease. No one embarrassed me
about my missing and broken teeth. In fact, they were very positive and encouraging to me.
^The office staff and assistants were very professional; I was greeted and take care of fast.
Dr. Gerry did a thorough and comprehensive exam; she spent more time with me than I thought she would and answered all my
questions. Next, the office manager came in to go over prices for my treatment plan. After the quote, I felt nervous, once again, believing
it impossible to fix my smile. After losing my job, how could I afford this? I started pacing the floor, wondering, "How could I do this?"
Sensing my discomfort, the office manager talked to me about dental financing. This financing was not based on my credit score, but on
my ability to pay back the debt. It was a small, one page application which took only a minute to complete. The next thing I knew, I was
approved for a new smile at only $150 per month.


I was so excited that I drove to my old company and explained to my boss the actual reason my sales
had gone down. My smile, lack of confidence, and embarrassment had been the real problem with my
sales. You see, my teeth are in poor condition and I had been embarrassed to talk with the customers in
a confident and personal manner. Customers had started backing away from my awful breath. As you
can imagine it, was very hard to be confident. Over the years, my wife has had some medical issues that
forced me to neglect the problems in my mouth. I didn't realize that it could get so bad this quickly, and
it didn't affect just my mouth. I have been depressed about who I am when I looked at my ugly teeth.
I was so excited about what was happening that my boss could see it. He actually suggested that I go
forward with my new smile and report back to work asap! He gave me three months to bring my sales
back up with my new smile.
Dr. Gerry at Smile Designs promised to make my smile as close to perfect as possible, and she
delivered! Not only do my teeth look great, but my wife says I look 10 years younger. I went back to
my sales job and became regional sales leader for the last quarter. Did I mention that regional sales
leader came with a bonus? I still can't believe that $150 a month got my life back!


r --------------F- -- ir --------------------,
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For a FREE
"Denture Relief Report"


DR. CHARLOTTE


Live Oak
386-362-6800


Lake City
386-755-7010


GERRY

Jacksonville
904-725-4444,
636760-F


IMILE


THURSDAY, JULY 16, 2009


AP GE 10A ~ THE MAYO FRE L


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DESIGNS














lle iHan uo rre Press

LT 1r Aasprr Wrua


Deadlines for
Line Ads
Publication Deadline
Wednesday ......Fri. @ 10 a.m.
Friday..............Wed. @ 10 a.m.


JIa~fw 5*51B E .j


HOURS: MONDAY FRIDAY 8 A.M. 5 P.M.
Contact Us!

Online... Email... Fax... Phone...
When you place your Classified Ad it automatically classads@gaflnews.com (386) 364-5578 (386) 362-1734
appears on our website, www.nflaonline.com. Your ad is 1-800-525-4182
live on the internet 24 hours a day (free ads excluded). Don't forget your name, address & phone number we can reach all us Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Don't forget your namce, address & phone number we can reach you.


BEST OF THE BEST REAL ESTATE COMPANY 2008
386-755-6600
UX Toll Free 1-877-755-6600
540 W. Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida 32055
email:
hallmark01 @comcast.net
www.hallmarklakecity.com
O G\VTW \ qC Hallrrark w'elome
OE F HOVD,4 DYKES, Realtor.
to their offie.
FEATURED LISTING:
f : -! I BANK OWNED Log home on


12 ACRES Hugh 5/3 home with 3652 sq.
ft.. 10 foot ceilings, crown molding,
formal dining, large master suite. Great
family home with lots of room inside and
outside. MLS 71411 $345.(1X) Call Janet
Creel 386-719-0382
$8,000 Stimulus will help first time buyer
get this renovated home in Lake City! All
re-done with new microwave, stove,
refrigerator with ice maker. Solid wood
cabinets, new carpet, new roof, new A/C,
give Kay Priest a call at 386-365-8888.
Asking only S99.900 NILS 71462


4 acres. Open living room soars
to loft above. 3/2 with stone
fireplace, beautiful oak foors.
stainless kitchen with granite
contertops and tiled
backsplash. Rolling land, just
West of Lake City. $225,500
Call Betsy Tyler 386-365-4434

T PROPERTIES
15.61 ACRES in McAlpin area. Old
homesite with huge pecan trees! Beautiful
country setting! Asking $135,000
Additional adjacent 37 acres also
available. Call Paula Lawrence 386-623-
1973
.91 ACRE with river access to park and
'boat ramps along the Ichetucknee and
Santa Fe Rivers. Summer is here! Enjoy
our rivers! $19,500 Call Rhonda Dykes
386-965-1995 -
U0887-.F


Announcements























You can Reach
'Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Nancy at

386-362-1734
499651.-F


Help Wanted
FirstDay
OFFICE HELP. Must be
computer literate & have
knowledge of Microsoft Office &
Quick Books. Good customer
service & phone skills a must.
Call 386-294-1360
FirstDay
FIRE FIGHTER/
PARAMEDICS
Taylor County Fire Rescue
Service, Perry, Florida, has one
full time vacancy and some part
time vacancies for Fire Fighter/
Paramedics. If interested,
please go to
www.taylorcountygov.com for job
description and application or
you can obtain from
WORKFORCE in your area.













Dial's Inspection

Services
For All Your Home
Inspection Needs!
386-364-4434 or
386-590-6534
Please visit our website:
www.suwanneevalleyinspections.com$


FirstDay
ALTERNATE COLLECTION
SITE ATTENDANT
Suwannee County is currently
accepting applications for
Alternate Collection Site
Attendant position. This
position will work on an as
needed basis. An employee
allocated in this position
ensures that refuse entering
the collection center is
acceptable and that sufficient
area for disposal is
continuously available.
Ensures that proper
procedures are followed in
disposal. Performs routine
cleaning of the site. Minimum
qualifications include high
school education or G.E.D.
preferred and one year
experience in customer
service work; or an equivalent
combination of training and
experience. Must possess a
valid Florida Drivers License.
Position will remain open until
filled. For an application
contact the Administrative
Services Department, 224
Pine Avenue, Live Oak, FL
32064. (386) 362-6869 The
Suwannee County Board of
County Commissioners is an
equal employment opportunity
employer that does not
discriminate against any
qualified employee a or
applicant because of race,
color, national origin, sex,
Including pregnancy, age,
disability, or marital status.
Spanish speaking individuals
are encouraged to apply. All
applicants subject to a pre-
employment physical.
Successful completion of a
drug test is a condition of
employment.


FirstDay


COTTAGE PARENTS
The Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch is looking for couples to
be full-time Cottage Parents.
Responsibilities include the
direct care and development
of 10 boys, ages 8-18.
Professional skill based
training & support provided.
Help children develop social,
academic, and independent
living skills. Salary $47,000.00
per couple with housing,
utilities, board, and benefits
provided. High school
diploma or GED required. For
more information contact
Linda Mather at (386) 842-
5555
Imather@youthranches.org
Fax resume to (386) 842-1029
(EOE/DRUG FREE
WORKPLACE)

FirstDay
NORTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Two fulltime positions
available:
Grants Coordinator
& Institutional
Effectiveness Coordinator.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.


127 Howard Street E., Live Oak, FL

*. ... Phone: 386-362-4539
Toll Free: 1-800-557-7478

SSe Habla Espanol


I -FOR RENT- I


I


www.poolerealtv.com


-.ls-

GREAT RATES FOR RENTALS SINGLE AND
DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOMES STARTING
AT $375 PER MONTH. WATER, SEWER,
AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS.
386-330-2567


I REALTOR*
529 S. Ohio Ave., Live ak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 FaLx (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389,
Evening 362-2990


(1) Hamilton Co: 4 acres on CR
143 with well, septic & service
pole, 10x12 storage, nice grass &
trees. Reduced to $40,000.
(2) Off CR 49 10 acres in grass
with scattered trees, surveyed
into two 5 acre tracts, 3 sides
fenced. Priced to sell at $4,900
per acre.
(3) Near City 133rd Road:
3BR/2-1/2BA CH/AC brick
home with approx. 3,200 sq. ft.
under roof, fireplace, kitchen
furnished, shop, storage one acre
homesite with large trees. Priced
to sell @ $207,500.
(4) Off CR136: 5 acre partially
wooded some grass. Will work
for land hope package. Reduced
to $39,900.
(5) Near City: 3.13 acre tract
with large trees on county road.
Priced to sell @ $20,500.
(6) Off CR 349: 10 acre
wooded tract with a two
bedroom CH/AC log home i4
excellent condition cont. approx.
1200 sq. ft. under roof, 30'x40'
pole barn. Reduced to $175,000.
(7) Suwannee River: 1.6 acre
wooded tract with 100 ft. on the
water, together with a 3
bedroom, 2 1/2 bath CH&AC
DWMH cont. approx. 1700 sq.
ft. with detached storage. Priced
to sell @ $145,000.
(8) Branford area: 15 acres in
good cropland, with county
roads and fence on three sides.
Excellent location near US 27 &
US 129. Bring all offers.
(9) Live Oak Area: New 3
bedroom, 2 bath CH/AC home,
kitchen furnished, parking pad,
sewer & water, will work for
S.H.1.1. 100% financing.
Reduced to $99,900.
(10) 01f CR 132: 1.47 ac. with a
3/2 CH/AC 2008 DWMH with
fireplace, kitchen furnished,
20'x20' sh op, fenced,
REDUCED TO $65,000
(11) Industrial Park: 1.13 acre
corner tract good exposure.
Reduced to $34,500.
(12) 40 acres with 835 ft. on
paved road in 13 year old
planted pines. Priced to sell at
Reduced to $189,600.


______________________________________________ &


(13) Near City: 2 ac. with 3/2
home cont. approx. 1280 sq. ft.
under roof, kitchen furnished,
carport. $83,250.
(14) Luraville Area: Fly-in
Community 15 acre wooded
large trees, good county road.
Priced to sell reduced to $74,900.
(15) Suwannee River: Two acres
wooded river lot off CR 349 near
Royal Springs and Boat Ramp.
100 sq. ft. on the water.
(Buildable) good buy @ $55,000.
(16) Off Mitchell Rd.: 20 acres
wooded with survey on 199th
Rd. $89,900.
(17) Off CR 136 East: 40 acre
tract partially wooded, some
grass small pond, fenced. Good
area. Reduced to $4,500 per acre.
(18) Hamilton Co.: 10 acres on
CR751 and the river approx.
1300 ft. on the water and approx.
1300 ft. on paved road. Priced to
sell at $85,000.
(19) Madison Co.: 40 acres In 16
year old slash planted pines off
CR 255 good elevation. Good
buy at $175,000.
(20) Helvenston St.: 4 lots with a
4/3 CH/AC 1-1/2 story
brick/frame home cont. approx
3,200 sq. ft. under roof. Kitchen
furnished, fireplace, corner lots,
plus 1 bedroom, guest house
cont. approx. 550 sq. ft. Priced to
sell @ $170,000.
(21) Suwannee River home: nice
two bedroom two story CH&AC
home South of Branford, kitchen
furnished, beautiful view of river
from rear, screen porch. Good
area priced to sell @ $215,000.
(22) Farms of 10 Mill Hollow: 4
acres in grass/cropland with
scattered trees. $32,500.
(24) Near City: OffUS 90 East 5.
acres wooded near golf course.
Good buy @ $44,900.
(25) Suwannee River: Nice river
lot with a one bedroom cabin
needs some work, well, septic,
etc. 82 ft on the water. Good
location with survey. $75,000.
(26) 208 Houston: 3/5 BR, 1-1/2
BA frame home cont. approx.
2,000 sq. ft. under roof. Zoned
R/D, has potential. Priced to sell
@ $59,500.
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FirstDay
MANAGERS
Are You highly motivated? Are
you a self starter? Do you
posses a strong desire to
succeed?
If you answered yes to any of
the above questions we are


( FOOD STORE)
looking for you.
We are currently accepting
applications for Manager and
Assistant Mgr in the Jennings
area. Competitive Salary,
Bonus, Weekly Pay, Holidays,
Vacation & 401K plan
Interested applicants please
call Kim @ 352-494-4551 or
Laurie @ 386-792-2334


FirstDay
Medical
Primary Care Center in Jasper,
FL is currently seeking the
following positions:
MEDICAL OFFICE
SPECIALIST
Responsibilities include
scheduling, telephones, and
other front desk functions. Must
have at least 1 year of medical
office experience. Knowledge
and experience in billing,
scheduling and posting is
required.. Excellent customer
service and computer skills are
necessary. Must be able to mult-
task.
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
Responsible for directing patient
care & assisting physician with
clinical and clerical duties. Must
have at least 1 year of medical
office experience and be
computer literate.
LPN
Must have at least 2 years of
experience and be able to multi-


task, perform patient scheduling,
referrals and other tasks, as
necessary.
Please fax your resume to:
1-866-896-5764 or email to:
robert.fischer@hcahealthcare.com
Must be able to pass a
background investigation and
pre-employment drug screen.
EOE


Suwannee
Valley
Humane
Society
Critter Corner
Page 10
ffmimm.


Contact
us at the
paper.

Classified
Advertising
386-362-1734 ext 102
ax: 386-364-5578
e-mail:
- www.swanneedemocratcom
Mon,-Fri,:
8 or.m.-b p.m
We'd'love to hear from you.
Classified
Marketplace
P.O. Box 370
ULive Oak, FL 32064


Bwn


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STRACTOR WORK d-ams Auto Upholstery


COMPLETE LAWN SERVICE





I t LIVE OAK MC'S
CELL 386-590-1096
Iraclorwork('winlsifream.nel


Metal Roofing
I Qi $g $ $SAVEs At D t
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Cut to your desired lengths!
*Delivery Service Available*
Ask about steel buildings


Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg. Inc.
CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-393-0335


) LIVE OAK

MINI STORA GE
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CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE
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Units located on Gold Kist Road
Rental Office: 121 Vam Ituren St., L e Oak 364-6626


TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 386-362-1734

DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M.


FirstDay
PART-TIME LIBRARY AIDE II
GREENVILLE PUBLIC
LIBRARY
Suwannee River Regional
Library is currently seeking
applicants for the position of
regular part-time Library Aide
II at the Greenville Public
Library. The applicant will work
approximately 8 hours per
week regularly and also be
used as a substitute during
other days of the week when
needed. Minimum
qualifications include
graduation from a standard
high school, ability to type and
experience with Internet and
computer software. Library
experience is desired, Salary
is $7.21 to $10.24 per hour
depending on qualifications
and experience. Interested
applicants may obtain an
application at the Lee,
Greenville or Madison Public
Libraries, or at the Suwannee
County Administrative
Services Department, 224
Pine Ave., Live Oak, FL
32064, telephone (386) 362-
6869. Applicants are
encouraged to submit
resumes, letters of reference
and other biographical
information with their
applications. All applications
must be returned to the
Administrative Services
Department in Live Oak.
Position will remain open until
filled. The Suwannee County
Board of County
Commissioners is an equal
employment opportunity
employer that does not
discriminate against any
qualified employee or
applicant because of race,
color, national origin, sex,
including pregnancy, age,
disability, or marital status.
Spanish speaking individuals
are encouraged to apply. All
applicants subject to a pre-
employment physical.
"Successful completion of a
drug test is a condition of
employment."


From the
Suwannee/
Lafayette
health
department


Advent Christian
Village
Current JOBS Line
Advertisement
call 386-658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net
24 hrs/day, 7 days/week
Be your BEST, Among
the BEST
CNA
FT/PT/ long-term care setting:
Florida unrestricted
certification required;
experience with geriatric
population strongly desired.
MARKETING
SPECIALIST
PT position to assist in
marketing housing, services,
and venues of Advent
Christian Village; Bachelor's
degree in Marketing,
Advertising, or relevant field
plus two to five years proven,
relevant experience required.
Must possess strong customer
service and communication
skills; PC proficiency required
with experience in MS Office
(including Access); experience
with REPS a strong plus.
FT positions include health,
dental, life, disability,
supplemental insurance; 403b
retirement account; paid time
off, access to onsite daycare
and fitness facilities. Apply in
person at Personnel Office
Monday through Friday from
9:00am until 4:00pm, or fax
resume/credentials to 386-
658-5160 EOE/ Drug-Free
Workplace/Criminal
background checks required.

Job List
ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE
needed for Maynard Holding &
Co (An Artwork Venture).
Interested persons should send
a cover letter with his/her
resume available to
frankmaynard4 @gmail.com
DRIVERS Miles & Freight;
Positions available ASAPI CDL-
A with tanker required. Top pay,
premium benefits and Much
orel Call or visit us online,
877-484-3042
www.oakleytransport.com
WAREHOUSE NOW HIRING
All Departments.
Assembly/Shipping/Receiving &
Forklift Immediate Hire.
Management/Office Help
Available. NO experience/Will
Train. 1st & 2nd Shifts.
Benefits. $13 $22/hr. 1-800-
823-3830 Fee Req.
Jobs Wanted
CAREGIVER, HOUSEKEEPER
& COMPANION w/ 15 years
experience. Call 386-362-3365
Ask for Brenda.


S"Promoting Safety
Through Educatwn"
FIREARM TRAINING
c un .hallsrfirearmlrnining.conii
Classes fulfill the training requirement lfor the
Florida Concealed Weapon or Firearm License
Les Hall. Lke O.ak. FL L
NR .Ha .i.r ., 4 Hours S60
.,,.; ,,, E;...... ', ri ...i, 386-364-6400
n .m ..... a-I


tall Junk Joe


For Junk Vehicles
Will Remove any kind
of scrap metal
Free Pickup '.
Call 386-867-1396


For all your upholstery needs
* Convertible Tops Marine
* Headliners Cushions
" Seats Motorcycle
seats
Complete Interiors
501 Goldkist Blvd. Live Oak, FL
John Adams 386-362-1525


.tump Grinding

I ^A^ %


Jim Sellers 386-776-2522
Cell 386-647-5978


Advertising Sales Rep
needed
Job Description:
Are you ready to join a growing sales team? Do you
have a proven track record in sales? Thrive in a
fast-paced environment? Do you want to be part of
a newspaper company that offers a creative and
challenging workplace?
The Suwannee Democrat is looking for an
Advertising Sales Rep that can consistently
generate new business and build on the momentum
of an existing sales team to grow established
relationships within the community and surrounding
counties.
The Suwannee Democrat is headquartered in Live
Oak, Florida and is owned by Community
Newspaper Holdings Inc. (CNHI). Live Oak is a
north central Florida town located in Suwannee
County (pop. 39,800) and is on the historic
Suwannee River offering plenty of outdoor
recreation opportunities. The newspaper group
consists of three weekly newspapers and a bi-
weekly Shopper;
The Suwannee Democrat- a twice weekly publication
servicing, Live Oak, Branford, McAlpin, O'Bnen and
Wellborn in Suwannee County (pop. 39,800).
The Mayo Free Press-Weekly publication servicing
Lafayette County (pop. 8,000).
The Jasper News- Weekly publication servicing
Hamilton County (pop. 14,300).
Suwannee Valley Shopper Bi-weekly publication
servicing, Suwannee, Hamilton and Lafayette counties.
Responsibilities include: print and online sales,
growing and creating. new revenue streams and
sales planning.
Qualified candidates should possess a successful
history of increasing ad revenue, excellent
presentation, communication and decision making
skills. Effective newspaper advertising sales skills
are desirable.
We offer a positive work environment with a base
salary and incentive program including a benefits
package with 401K and insurance.
If interested please send resume to
Monja Slater, advertising director,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Email resume to monJa.slater@gaflnews.com
Our Web site: www.suwanneedemocrat.com
Job closing date: not set
EEOC notice: CNHI is an Equal Opportunity
Employer.
We are a Drug Free Workplace.


M CLASSIFIED MARKETPL E WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


PAGE 2 JULY 15 16 2009


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JULY 15 16, 2009 PAGE 3


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


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DO YOU NEED YOUR HOME
CLEANED or Pressure Washed,
or your yard cleaned up? Done
at a very reasonable rate. Call
Christine or Gary 386-792-1655
SURVEY PARTY CHIEF:
Instrument Man 20 yrs exp.
Land/Construction. Clean Driving
Record, Willing to learn any field
for work.
386-364-7702 or 386-208-8750
Lost & Found
FOUND MIX BREED FEMALE
PUPPY. Owner can claim by
identifying & pay Vet. bill. 386-
362-2832
REWARD LOST BLACK LAB,
Male, Neutered, Black Nylon
Collar NO Tags. Lost from 169th,
Rocky Sink Rd. REWARD. 386-
965-5236
Special Notices













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Finance Almost Everyone
Reroof, Repairs, Shingle, Tile,
Flat, Mobile Homes Home
Improvement Services 1-877-
845-6660, 727-530-0412 State
Certified (Lic.#CCC058227)


Legal
NOTICE TO M/WBE FIRMS
WRScompass is looking for
M/WBE Compaines/firms
licensed in the City of Live Oak
in the following areas: Paving;
Landscaping; Concrete Flatwork;
Plumbers; Electricians;
Mechanical Contractors. Andy
Hooper 813-684-4400
Business
Opportunities
ALL CASH VENDING!! DoYou
Earn $800 in a Day? 25 Local
Machines and Candy, All For
$9,995. Call 1-888-753-3430
AIN#BO2000033 Call Us: We
Will Not Be Undersoldl
Business For Sale
CONVENIENT STORE FOR
LEASE Immokalee. Please Call
The Following Voicemail
Number. 1-800-828-6979 ext
2236. Please Leave Your Name
& Number. No Duplicate Calls.
Vocational
ADULT HIGH SCHOOL
DIPLOMA at home Fast!
Nationally accredited $399.
Easy payment plan. Free
brochure. 800-470-4723
www.diplomaathome.com
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical,
'Business, *Paralegal,
'Accounting, 'Criminal Justice.
Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call 800-443-
5186 www.CenturaOnline.com
AVIATION MAINTENANCE /
AVIONICSGraduate in '14
Months. FAA Approived;
financial aid if qualified. Job
placement assistance. Call
National Aviation Academy
Today! 1-800-659-2080 or
NAA.edu
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA!
Fast Affordable & Accredited
Free Brochure. Call Now! 1-
800-532-6546 ext. 16
www.continentalacademy.com
FirstDay
Want to be a CNA?
Don't want to wait?
Express Training
is now offering our quality
Exam-Prep Classes in Lake
City. Class sizes limited.
Next class 03/16/2009.
Call 386-755-4401
expresstralning
services.cor
LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072.
M-F from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Pets for Sale
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES FOR
SALE: CKC, Health Certs,
Shots, 3-Males, 1-Female. 1-
Long Hair 3-Smooth Coat $300
negotiable. 386-364-5858
Pets for Free
FREE BEAGLE MIXED
PUPPIES
TO A GOOD HOME.
850-971-2757
FREE PUPPIES: Born May 5th,
Very Cute. Please Call 386-362-
1749 O'Brien Area.


FREE KITTENS: Adorable &
Friendly, 3-Males, 3-Females. 2-
Orange, 1-White, 1-Grey Tabby,
1-Calico, 1-Siamese. 386-330-
4940

Feed & Seed
FirstDay
HAY FOR SALE Round Bales
Pensacola/Bahia Mix. Fertilized,
no weeds, barn kept. $30 & $35
Call 386-209-0399
Livestock
MINI DONKEY'S 3-Females, 2-
Breed, 1-Young. 2-Brown, 1-
Spotted. $400 Ea OBO 386-
935-9530


ADVENT CHRISTIAN VILLAGE
--- Al~ Alnull. PAih -
Coed Sucarlanu Ce`lter
t ir.. ~ ...IL..- ...





161-bed Mcdicati'/Mcdicaid
skilled nursing facility
Alzheimer's Unit specialized
care by loving staff who provide
hands-on carc
Individualized Care through
stimulating physical and social
environment, physical,
occupaLional, nd speech therapy,
short-lerm rehabilitation, well-
balanced meals and family support
and involvement
Physician services provided
through our on-site Copeland
Medical Center
Admission Standards resident
must be (A) years of age and mect
the State nursing home admission
guidlines, as ordered by a
physician.
For nmgre
information call = r
386-658-5550 or 1-800-647-3353
TDD# 800-955-8771
536082-F


Go to suwn.,~n .imocrat.com and look under
Loc~:. Happenings for the Calendar of Events


BUSINESSES


I, 2 & I 3 R 11( & N.Nion i
AL-ccssible A|)H Innoils

705 NW Drive, live Oak,. I'
386-364-7936
TI)I) TTY/71 i
Iqudl I t" lhltlngOpp wl 1fl y


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living
2 bedroom duplex.
Call 362-3110.
501033-F


SERVICES


I FOR
Rental Assistance
I, 2, 3, & 4 BR HC & Non-
HC AessbleAnartments

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/ITY 711
Equal Housing Opportunity


Shands HomeCare

Rehab Candidates
Needed for HomeCare!!

Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants,
Occupational Therapists, and Speech Therapists
needed for Lake City, Live Oak and surrounding areas.
Flexible Scheduling always available for.
Days, Evenings and Week-End work
Work available immediately!
Qualified candidates apply on-line at
www.shands.org
OR contact
Mary Lynn Williams, Human Resources
Phone 800-325-0367, ext. 85387
Email: mlwill@shands.ufl.edu
Shands supports a drug-free workplace
EOE/M/F/Q/V
537242irv


Bw]]


1 Bush Hogging Landclearing Hauling
SStump Removal* Discing Fencing


BILL'S BACKHOE
& LAND CLEARING
FREE Estimates

i 12150 196th Terrace
(386) 364-1418 O'Brien, FL 32071


SUWANNEE
IRONWORKS

We do Aluminum Steel, Stainless,
Welding & Fabricating
We also do Metal Sales
386-935-3466
Cell 386-984-5112
22618 CR 49
O'Brien, FL 32071


aj ~-----------

LAKEWOOD

APARTMENTS

IN LIVE OAK

Quiet country living 2 bedroom duplex

Call 362-3110


I


OH LORD.Please
Don't let my
ROOF LEAK.


S386-497-1419
LEWIS WALKER
ROOFING, INC.
LIC. & INSURED
RC 0067442


TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 386-362-1734

DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M.

.RldAiiL8C


ROOFING

FREE ESTIMATES
WIND TECH 386-755-8699
CONTRACTING CORP. CBC05882
www.windtechcontracting.com |


STATE OF FLORIDA APPROVED-
ReSidential* Commercial* Agricultural

AGRI-METAL SUPPLY, INC.
Phone: 38-294-1720 Fax: 386-294-1724
232 SE Industrial Park Cir. Mayo,' FL
---MENl


ABBEY MINI STORAGE
All New Units
*5X15 *5X20 *10X15 *10X20 *15X20
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd.
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak


364-5300


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Copyrighted Material



SSyndicated Content


- Available from Commercial News Providers



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* l


Building Materials
LUMBER LIQUIDATORS
Hardwood Flooring, from $
.99/Sq.Ft. Exotics, Oak,
Bamboo, Prefinished &
Unfinished. Bellawood w/50
y ear prefinish, plus A Lot Morel
e Deliver Anywhere, 5 'Florida
Locations, 1-800-FLOORING (1-
800-356-6746)
FirstDay
STEEL BUILDINGS
Big Disc Avail, 30x40- 105x105.
Call for Deal! Erection Avail.
www.scg-grp.com Source #OES
PHONE: 386-506-8740
Furniture
CHURCH FURNITURE, Does
your church need pews, pulpit
set, baptistry, steeple, windows?
Big sale. New cushioned pews
and upholstery for hard pews.
800-231-8360 www.pewsl.com
MEMORY FOAM ALL VISCO
New Thera-Peutic Mattresses
Member BBB 60 Night Trial As
Seen on TV High Density 25
Year Warranty T/F $348; Q -
$398; K $498. Free Florida
Delivery. Thera-Pedic, Dormia, #
Beds, Craftmatic Adjustables.
Best Price Guaranteedll
Wholesale Showrooms Tampa
813-889-9020 7924 W
Hillsborough Pinellas 727-525-
6500 7101 US 19N Miami
305-651-0506 21307 WW 2nd
Ave Polk 863-299-4811
Hernando 352-688-3464 3021
Commercial Spr Hill
www.mattressdr.com 1-800-AT
SLEEP 1-800-287-5337


Miscellaneous
DIRECT FREE 4 Room
System 265+ Channelsl
Starts $29.991 Free HBO,
Showtime, Starzl 130 HD
Channels Free DVR/HDI No
Start Up Costsl DirectStarTV
Local Installersl 1-800-973-
9044
DIRECTV Satellite Television,
Free Equipment, Free 4 Room
Installation, Free HD or DVR
Receiver Upgrade. Packages
from $29.99/mo. Call DIRECT
Sat TV for Details 1-888-420-
9482
DISH NETWORK'S BEST
OFFER EVER Free HD/DVR
$9.99/mo For Over 100 All-digital
Channels. Call Now And
Receive $600 Signup Bonusl 1-
866-573-3640
NEW ADT CUSTOMERS Free
Home Security Systeml ADT
24/7 Monitoring starting at just
$35.99/mo. $99 Install Fee. Call
Nowl 866-265-4139 ADT Auth
Co
SWIM SPAS SWIM SPAS
Four Fantastic models to choose
from, factory direct, wholesale
pricing! Warranty, financing.
HOTTUBS @ 50% Discounts,
Can Deliver. Call 1-800-304-
9943
Wanted to Buy
BOAT TRAILER For A 12 Foot,
Flat Bottom Boat. Must Be
Road Worthy. Please Call 386-
330-6606 Leave Message If No
Answer.
FirstDay
TRAVEL TRAILER 8X25' or
longer. Responable. 386-963-
4720 or 386-266-8411


Announcements

Advertise in Over 100 Papers!
One Call One Order One
Payment The Advertising
Networks of Florida Put Us to
work for You! (866)742-1373
www.national-classifieds.com,
info@national-classifieds.com

Auctions

AUCTION- COMMERCIAL &
DEVELOPMENT REAL
ESTATE: 1,091 Acres offered in
36 tracts, located in Kingsland
and St. Mary's Georgia near
Interstate 95, Exit 3. Auction on
July 30 at 5:00pm at the Western
Motel in Kingsland, Georgia.
Auction staff will "be available
July 22, and 29 from 3- 6 pm at
the Western Motel, Kingsland.
Call (800)551-3588 for
information or go to
www.woltz.com. Jim Woltz
#AUNR002906. Woltz &
Associates, Inc., Real Estate
Brokers & Auctioneers. Roanoke,
VA

Auto Donations

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE
RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY
COUPON UNITED BREAST
CANCER FOUNDATION Free
Mammograms, Breast Cancer
Info www.ubcf.info FREE
Towing, Tax Deductible, Non-
Runners Accepted, (888)468-
5964.

Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING. 40 yr
Warranty-Buy direct from
manufacturer 30/colors in stock,
w/all accessories. Quick turn
around. Delivery available. Gulf
Coast Supply & Mfg, (888)393-
0335 www.GulfCoastSupply.com

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING! Do you
earn $800 in a day? 25 Local
Machines and Candy $9,995.
(888)629-9968 BO2000033
CALL US: We will not be
undersold!


CASH FOR YOUR COINSI
Private collector seeking US
coins and currency. Older
varieties, copper, silver, nickel
and gold. I pay more than
dealers or pawn.
Call 352-949-1450
FirstDay
TRAVEL TRAILER 8X40' OR
LONGER GOOD CONDITION.
386-963-4720 or 386-266-8411
Boats/Supplies
BOATS; 1000's of boats for sale
www.floridamariner.com
reaching 6 million homes weekly
throughout Florida. 800-388-
9307, tide charts, broker profiles,
fishing captains, dockside dining
and more.
Campers/Motor Homes
FOREST RIVER WILDCAT
2006:
- 28' 5th Wheel, Exc. Cond, Living
Room Slide, Custom Canopy,
$15,900, www.gofindrv.com
pic's. Weekdays 9-5 386-963-
3456
Guns/Ammunition
FirstDay
,GUN SALE DUE TO HEALTH
CONCERNS: 3-Side-By-Side
12, 16 & 20 Ga. 2- Pump Guns
12 Ga 2-22 Riffles, 1-303
Enfleld, 1-308 Mauser, 1-S&W
Model,27, 2-Winchester 30/30's,
2-Black Powder, Guns are in
very good to like new condition,
some never fired. $150-$595.
Trades welcome Tom in Mayo
386-294-3187 Also lots of fly
fishing equipment.


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY IN
THE CHRISTIAN MARKET
Concessions available for only
ONE person per city. Keep 100%
of the revenue. Go to
www.ChristianLeadersWanted.co
m

Cars for Sale

Acura Integra 95 $500!! Honda
Civic 97 $400! Toyota Camry 98
$850! Ford Taurus 00 $900!
Police Impounds! For listings call
(800)366-9813 ext 9275.

Help Wanted

Help Wanted. No Truck Driver
Experience-No Problem. Wil-
Trans Will Teach You How to
Drive. Company Sponsored CDL
Training. Must be 23. (888)368-
1205

$600 Weekly Poten'tial$$$
Helping the government PT. No
Experience. No Selling. Call:
(888)213-5225 Ad Code: M

RV delivery drivers needed.
Deliver RVs, boats and trucks for
PAY! Deliver to all 48 states and
CN. For details log on to
www.RVdeliveryjobs.com

OTR Drivers for PTL! Earn up to
46 cpm. No forced Northeast. 12
months experience Required. No
felony or DUI past 5 Years.
(877)740-6262 www.ptl-inc.com

Legal Services

$$$$ LAWSUIT ADVANCE
$$$$ No credit check,, MONEY
when you need it FASTI Car
Accidents, Slip and Fall. If you
don't win, you keep the CASH!
Need a Lawyer, Doctor or CASH
Today? Call NOW (813)270-
9874, (877)275-8299 ext 4 or,
(813)699-2157.

Miscellaneous


Apartments for Rent
LAFAYETTE APTS.
Hurry in and apply at the best
place to live. Rental assistance.
1, 2 & 3bdrm. HC & NonHC
accessible apartments. Laundry
facility & playground. We pay
water, sewer & garbage. Mayo,
FL. PH: 386-294-2720, TDD/'TY
711. Equal Housing Opportunity.
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in
this newspaper is subject to the
Fair Housing Act which makes it
illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability,
familial status or national origin,
or an intention, to make any
such preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age
of 18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women
and people securing custody of
children under 18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in
violation of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimination call
HUD toll-free 1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free number for the



hearing impaired is 1-800-927-
9275.


www.CenturaOnline.com.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train
for high paying Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if
qualified Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (888)349-5387.

Real Estate

Coastal Georgia BANK
ORDERED SALE 1+ Acre Ocean
Access $29,900 (888)982-8952 x
5192 www.oceanaccess299.com

ALABAMA WATERFRONT
BLOW-OUT! ESTATE-SIZE
LAKEFRONT NOW ONLY
$39,900. One day, Saturday, July
25th (adjoining lakefront parcel
sold for $92,300 on 4/12/09-others
available at similar savings.)
Sensible owner & bank financing.
Owner on-site to ensure ALL
LAKEFRONTS SELL!!! Best
prices ever-GUARANTEED! Call
now (866)952-5343, x 106

Lake Lot Deal Fell Thru! 2.6 AC-
$19,300 FREE BOAT SLIPS! (was
$39,900) Secluded wooded lot w/
deeded access to private stocked
bass lake in Tenn. Quiet rd
frontage, utilities, warranty deed.
Excellent financing. Must see, call
now (888)792-5253, x3087

LAKE BARGAIN! 3+ AC just
$49,900 (was $89,900) Nicely
wooded, private lake access.
Ready to build. Owner will
finance. Only one -save big. Call
now (866)352-2249





ANF
A-N

ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA

Classified I Display | Metro Dally


ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home. *Medical, *Business,
*Paralegal, *Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement
assistance. Computer available.
FinancialAid if qualified. Call Week of July 13, 2009
(866)858-2121,


499626-


Houses for Rent
FirstDay
FOR RENT OR SALE 3bd/lba
$675 1st, last, & security
deposit. $119,000 over finance.
Approx. 2 miles E. of Live Oak,
Fl. Call 386-590-2756
FirstDay
HOUSE 2Bd/2Ba on 1/2 acrer
lot, In White Springs behind City
Hall. Back Yd fenced in, w/FI
SRoom on Back.$750 mo, 1st,
last, $500 Security. 904-263-
0152
HOUSE FOR RENT 2Bd/1Ba
Brick Home on 1 'acre. Paved
Road, CHA, Fireplace. $650, 1st
& Last. Call 386-362-5617
FirstDay
HOUSE IN LIVE OAK 3Bd/1Ba.
CHA, Garage, Fenced Yard.
References Required. $650 &
$650 Security. 386-688-0841
IN LIVE OAK NEW 3Bd/2Ba
CHA Range/Refrig/DW.WD
hook-up For Sale, Lease W/Opt
to buy, or Rent. $750 mo 386-
208-2384
IN LIVE OAK NEWLY
REFURBISHED 2Bd/1Ba CHA
Gas Range/Refrig/DW/Disposal,
WO hook-up. For Sale, Lease
w/opt to buy, or Rent $650 386-
208-2384
NEWER 3Bd/2Ba Brick House
on 5 acres in Wellborn.
Stainless Steal Appl. W/D, 8'
front porch, 10X12 back patio.
$850 mo, 1st, last, sec 352-528-
4748
Mobile Homes for Rent
FirstDay
AVAILABLE NOW 3Bd/2Ba
SWMH $575 mo. Avail. 7/15
2Bd/1Ba SWMH $525 mo. Both
Renovated on 5 ac, 2 mi E. of
Live Oak. Pets OK 386-697-
9326
Vacation Rentals
FLORIDA KEYS Marathon.
Luxurious Oceanfront vacation
homes. 1-6 Bedrooms. Private
Pool, hot tub, docks & morel
Weekly & long weekend rates.
Last minute summer specials 1-
888-564-5800
Office Space for Rent
OFFICES FOR RENT
2,100 sq.ft. office setup for
medical use with 8 exam rooms,
$1,500 per month MLS#69818.
Also office with 1,200 sq.ft. for
rent, $1,000 per month,
MLS#69817. Both are located in
Live Oak. Call Ronnie Poole,
386-208-3175.
Homes for Sale
MACON GEORGIA 2, 3 & 4BR
HOMES. Near 1-75. Move-In-
Readyl Remodeled. New
Carpet/Paint, Cabinets. Safe
Communities, Low taxes.
Starting at $54,900 Owner
Financing Low Down No
Credit Chetk. 706-364-4200




Mobile

Homes

and

Land for

sale.

Finmanced

by owner.

386-362-2720


FirstDay
NEAR LAKE CITY, NICE
3Bd/2Ba. On 4 acres, storage
buildings, fenced in, quiet. $79K
Firm. 386-362-5530

Mobile Homes for Sale
BY OWNER 16X76 SWMH
3Bd/2Ba 1997, 1208 sq ft, 4.06
Acres. Utility Bldg, Frt & Back
Porch. Peacock Lake Addition.
$75,000 386-209-0893
OWNER FINANCE/LEASE
OPT 3bd/2ba, 24X52 Fiesta on
approx. 6 acres. Needs some
work Rent applied to down
payment. $725/mo, corner of
Duval and 80th Terr. Call 386-
867-0048
OWNER FINANCE/HANDYMAN
SP. 14X70 3Bd/2Ba .45 acres,
needs clean-up. Rent applied to
down pmt. $550 mo, 1st & last.
1634 177th Rd 386-867-0048
THIS 16X60-$300 Above
Factory Inv.- 2Bd/2Ba SWMH,
Save Thousands. Call Rick 386-
752-1452
BANK REPO 2005 24X48
3Bd/2Ba "Like Brand New" "With
a Used Price:' Call Mr Mott 386-
752-8196
"Mossy Oak" 2010 Model
4Bd/2Ba MH $39,995. Includes
Delivery, Set-Up, AC, Skirting &
Steps. You Pick all Colors. Call
Mr. Mott 386-752-8196
Vacation Property
NC MOUNTAINS Cool
Summers / Mild Winters. New!
E-Z to finish log cabin shell,
w/loft & basement, includes
acreage $99,900. Mountain &
waterfront homesites $39,000 -
,$99000. Local Firtacing
Available!! 828-247-9966 (Code
41)
NC MOUNTAINS 2.5 ACRE
HOMESITE. Spectacular view.
High altitude. Easily accessible.
Paved road. Secluded. Bryson
City. $39,950. Owner
financing. Call Owner 1-800-
810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com
NORTH CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS Lake Lure
Developer clearance sale. Only
23 lots remain in gated
community. Shown by appt only,
Owner financing from $29,900.
864-909-1035
www.RowelLand.com
S.E. TENN MTNS LAND
DISCOUNTED 5+ acre Tracts
from $24,900 w/ utilities. Must
Sell! Ocoee/Hiwassee River
Area. Large MTN Tracts from
$2250/acre. 1-800-531-1665 or
1-931-260-9435.
TENNESSEE. Head for the
Smokey Mountains Vacation
Tours 2 night / 3 day stay only
$49 Home sites @ $29,900
Paved roads, water, sewer &
clubhouse


Double and

single wide
mobile

homes
for rent on

their own

lots in the
Live Oak

area.

386.362.2720
499680-F
singewd


PAGE 4, JULY 15 16, 2009


_asemeF /


E CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


4962- A







JULY 15 16, 2009 PAGE 5


0 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


CLASSIFIED Medical Network


www.ocoeemountainclub.com
888-821-2006
THE INN ON FIFTH NAPLES,
FLORIDA1-888-403-8778
www.lnnonFifth.com Luxurious
boutique hotel with prime
shopping, dining, entertainment,
just blocks from Gulf beaches.
Spa, rooftop pool, restaurants.
Acreage
ALABAMA WATERFRONT
BLOW-OUTI ESTATE-SIZED
LAKEFRONT NOW ONLY
$39,900. One day, Saturday,
July 25th (adjoining lakefront
parcel sold for $92,300 on
4/12/09 others available at
similar savings.) Sensible
owner & bank financing. Owner
on-site to ensure All Lakefronts
Sell!I! Best prices ever -
Guaranteed! Call now 866-952-
5343, x108


FL LAKE BARGAIN! 3+ AC -
just $49,900 (was $89,900)
icely wooded, private lake
access. Ready to build. Owner
will finance. Only one save
big. Call now 1-866-352-2249.
GEORGIA: UPSON COUNTY,
155 AC $3,250/ac., Great
timberland investment tract,
excellent hunting, gently rolling,
near Flint River. 478-987-9700
St. Regis Paper Co.
LAND SALE NOTICE:
VIRGINIA MTNS Closeout Sale!
- 2.5 acres with pond near
stocked trout stream, near state
park, $29,500, must sell. Bank
financing. 1-866-789-8535
LAND SALE 10 Acres
Steinhatchee, FL Starting @
$49,000. $995 Down, $399/Mo.
Great Hunting/Fishing. Near
Gulf and River. Call 352-542-
7835 cell: 352-356-1099
LAND, 7.7 ACRES- No Flood,
Paved Road, North of Live Oak.
$37K, Owner Finance Possible.
386-935-2953


PRICE REDUCED
Lafayette County
10ac, Hwy 51 N. of Mayo,
near river, $64,900
1 ac RV/Mobile home lots,
Branford area, $15,000
Suwannee County
5 ac, Park like,
near airport, $49,900
Easy Financing
1-941-7980/7565
www.landcallnow.com
TENNESSEE LAND OUR
LOSS YOUR GAIN Beautiful
acre tracts for $24,995.
Breathtaking views, bluffs,
waterfalls, creeks. Great
schools. Smaller/larger tracts.
Others available with owner
financing $250 down / $99
month. JDL Realty 800-330-
3390 or 931-946-2484
Autos for Sale
MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE RS
1998. Must seel Well maintained.
$3,000 or best offer. 386-466-
0863 or 321-696-1798.


),@ o, 1(W@toL


Pink Ladies Needed!
Are you looking for a place to share
your talents? Do you enjoy meaningful
conversation with a good friend? How
'bout a good book?
Then We Want You!! Suwannee Health
Care and Rehab Center is looking for
volunteers to start a Ladies Auxiliary.
Call Lynn Brannon, Activities Director
at 386-362-7860 or 386-590-2961.

Talent Search
Do you sing or play and instrument?
Do you act or dance? Do you like to read
or spend time with a friend in wonderful
conversation?
WE WANT YOU! Suwannee Health
Care & Rehab Center is looking for your
talent for our residents. Dinner for two -
$45; One night at the Beach $125; One
hour volunteering to make memories that
last forever PRICELESS!
Call: Lynn Brannon, Activities Direc-
tor 386-362-7860 or 386-590-2961.

Head Start/Early
Head Start
early enrollment
Suwannee Valley 4Cs Head Start/Early
Head Start is accepting applications for
children from birth to age 5 for the 2009-
20 school year beginning Monday Feb.
23. Head Start/Early Head Start is a
FREE comprehensive early childhood ed-
ucation program that includes health, den-
tal, nutrition and VPK services to eligible
children/families.
Centers are located in Suwannee,
Hamilton, Lafayette and Columbia coun-
ties. Parents bring proof of income and
child's age to register.
For more information call 386-754-
2222.

Community asked to
help animal shelter


win $1 million
makeover
Suwannee County Animal Shelter could
be the recipient of a.$l million shelter
makeover. All that is required is registra-
tion at www.zootoo.com/makeover. Please
use zip code of 32062 for the shelter
when registering. Participation by all area
residents is crucial, as we have about
three weeks to accumulate enough points
to be in the top 20. Fifty points are imme-
diately accumulated just by registering,
and additional participation in various ac-
tivities on site will add more points.
There are no requirements by the public
other than just registering and your sup-
port. We can't stress enough the impor-
tance of the community's support. A shel-
ter makeover could mean saving the lives
of many stray animals here in Suwannee
County.

Flyball racing classes
Too Hot to Handle Flyball Racing Team
will be holding flyball classes in O'Brien
and Live Oak. The classes will teach you
and your dog how to compete as a team.
Flyball is a relay race in which four dogs
race against another team of four dogs
over four hurdles to a box that they leap
upon to release a tennis ball, they catch
the ball and bring it back to their handler
so that the next dog on their team may
then run the course. There are two leagues
that teams can compete in to win titles
and awards.
For more information call Cathy at 386-
362-4956 or visit the website at
http://toohottohandle-flyball.com/.

Customers needed!
Dairy Queen of Live Oak will host
Dairy Queen Benefit Night the second
Tuesday of every month from 6-8 p.m. to
help buy books for Suwannee Middle


CONTINUED ON PAGE 6


, 1, ... $
41





Gregory D. Snodgrass, M.D. The
522 South Ohio Ave., Live Oak AdVI
386-330-6260
1-800-435-3937

Heartland Rehabilitation
Services Lv
405 11th St., Live Oak Lak
386-364-5051 Ja
Bra
North Florida Pharmacy M
101 SW. US Hwy. 27, Branford
386-935-6905 Hel
229 W. Main St., Mayo
386-294-3777 602 F

Eye Center of North Florida
876 SW. State Road 247,
Lake City St
386-755-7595 110
1-866-755-0040


Ophthalmology
Eduardo M. Bedoya, M.D.
Now at Shands In Live Oak
386-755-7595
Toll Free 866-755-0040
Se habla espaiol 5,3,F


Fimnly Denistry
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH,
D.D.S, P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-6556
1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County) soms-F



VI I-faoZ^20, nT.

* Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy
* Specializing In Arthritis Fibromyalgia Geriatrics Spinal &
Joint Pain Sports Injuries Work Injuries Pediatrics
Manual Therapy Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare. Protegrity
Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross. Av Mcd
Jasper 792-2426 Medicaid-pediatrics
Branford 935-1449 Workers Comp
Mayo 294-1407 Most Other Insurance Plans
A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info @healthcorerehab.com 9
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore


Ophthalmology

GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
522 South Ohio Avenue
(386) 330-6260 or 1-800-435-3937
___________________-___


Cope
1082


Village Pharmacy at
ent Christian Village
Dowling Park, FL
386-658-5860
1-800-647-3353

Healthcore, Inc.
e Oak 386-208-1414
;e City 386-755-8680
asper 386-792-2426
inford 386-935-1449
layo 386-294-1407

rbert C. Mantooth,
DD..S., P.A.
Railroad Ave., Live Oak
386-362-6556
1-800-829-6506

:eele Chiropractic
SIrvin Ave., Live Oak
386-362-4112

land Medical Center
0 Marvin Jones Blvd.,
Dowling Park, FL
386-658-5300


Pharmacy

S* Medical
Equipment
Oxygen


"Everything For Your
Home Recovery"

Locally Owned & Operated
101 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL 32008
(386) 935-6905
229 W. Main St., Mayo, FL 32066
(386) 294-3777


To place an ad on this page, please call
lkLT -- .- "1'0C 11C"% 1i A Ir-__-_ A L '


-------ry O iNancy at 38O-3J6 -17i/34 lxt. 103

SlIZZATlorr | (: Oral Health Maintenance Important
2888 W.US Hwy90
,I rExp.: -3 -2009 for Patients With Osteoporosis.
41"0i----i-.i- -- It has long been known that oral health and other ailments may 9gO
:20 aREEp N hand-in-hand. That is why routine- oral health screenings are so j
TokensT > important. Take for example, osteoporosis. Physicians and dentists"
81o W.Us vHsy90 HI d should collaborate to improve early detection and treatment- of.
Please call or vis it L Exp. Date:7-31-2009 lu. u alm patients who have or may develop osteoporosis, said researchers in
s online for ore details 'imitioi:rprLic,2,2 zl_ ;,1 (38o9 3 52
0.l,ai, 0A. A, Athe cover story of the May 2008 issue of The Journal of the
American Dental Association.


Each Kit Includes:
* 2 All-Weather Fluorescent "For Sale" Signs
* Successful Tips
"Get Top Dollar for Your Used Car"
Pre-Sale Checklist
Vehicle Options Window Display
E-Z Closing Forms
Including Deposit Form & Bill of Sale


Run your Car For Sale classified in the Wednesday
North Florida Focus & Friday Suwannee Democrat
Classifieds and get the Car Kit for FREE.*
Deadline for placing your ad is Friday at 11:00 a.m.
*Not valid with the $18.95 special 499524.~


The authors of the article, "Osteoporosis and Its Implications for
Dental Patients:' reviewed the medical and dental literature to"
examine osteoporosis' effect on public health in the United States.':
They also assessed Ihe implications of providing dental care to
people who have or are at risk of developing osteoporosis, :

According to the authors, the literature indicated that osteoporlsis.
and related fractures are more common than coronary disease,
stroke and breast cancer. Fractures resulting from osteoporosis can
affect a patient's quality of life, as well as result in functional,:
impairment and increased health care cost and mortality.

Their literature search also revealed that medical management of
osteoporosis includes diet control, weight-bearing exercise,
discontinuation of tobacco and alcohol intake, and use of
medications -- including selective estrogen receptor modulators.
calcitonin, anabolic agents and bisphosphonates -- that.have been.
associated with the development of osteonecrosis of the jaw.

The authors determined that oral health maintenance is important ,
.patients with osteoporosis, and that changes to bisph6sphgti
therapy or other medical treatment should be made onlyy',f '
consultation with the patient's physician. "Dentists need t',
understand osteoporosis, its treatments and its complicatior1' o ~t
provide adequate care:' wrote the authors.

All health care professionals involved in the care of all dental-
patients, particularly patients who are taking oral bisphosphonate','S
should discuss patient care decisions with the patient's physician,
the authors concluded.


Heardand
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA
Mandy McCray, PTA
Carolyn McCook, Office Manager,
Patient Care Coordinator
AQUATIC THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports
Medicine, Pediatrics Providers
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS Providers
405 11th St., Live Oak, FL 32060
(386)364-5051 sMo105


M A


Sell Your Car for"Top Dollar" '


"'""


F1


I







PAG ,6.JUL 15- 1 200 C- SER TH I N H G


Continued From Page 5
School.

Donations needed!
Suwannee County Environmental Watchdogs, a non-
profit organization, seeks donations for yard sale mer-
chandise. Info: Sandy, 386-364-8020.

Register now!
Descendants of Calhoun family plan
reunion in 2009
Descendants of the late Sarah Calhoun, Eva Calhoun
and Thomas Calhoun are invited to a family reunion to
be held in 2009. Info: misstheresamartin@yahoo.com or
predop@aol.com.

Coffee with your councilman
Beginning Jan. 13, 2009 City Councilman for District
4 Mark Stewart invites his constituents to "Coffee with
your Councilman" at JAVA JAX located in the Publix
shopping center.
Come and meet with him on the second Tuesday of
each month from 7 a.m. till 8:30 a.m. This will be a
time to get to know each other and discuss current is-
sues and citizen concerns.

CJBAT tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): CJ-
BAT (Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test) at NFCC
Testing Center (Bldg. #16), Madison. CJBAT is required
for acceptance into Corrections & Law Enforcement pro-
grams. Photo ID required. Pre-registration & scheduling
time and date are required. To register please call 850-
973-9451.

College Placement Tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday.at 5 p.m. (by appointment): Col-
lege Placement Test (CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg.
#16), 5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC Student Ser-
vices 24 hours before test. For-information please call
850-973-9451.

TABE tests
Monday Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education) at NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison. TABE is required for acceptance
into vocational/technical programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration & scheduling time & date are required.
To register please call 850-973-9451.

Artist Guild to hold craft
camp


Ask a



Lawyer....


I'VE BEEN SUED ON A CREDIT
CARD DEBT AND I CAN'T PAY.
NOW WHAT?
TM of Branford asks: I lost my job and got behind on
my payments. Now I've been sued over a credit card debt
and I can't pay it. What should I do?
T.M., since almost 10% of the country is out of work at
the present time, you are not alone. There are millions of
people in the same predicament you are. Until you find a
job and have a source of income, it's likely that you can't
make any payments until you do. Here's the best advice I


The Artist Guild
will start classes June 19th
featuring Stained Glass or Mosaic.
Classes will be held every Friday
night Cost is $65.00 per project.
For more information call
Barbara Law 362-5099 or
Kathy Romano 776-2172 03F
I-531023F


July 13-15
The Live Oak Artist Guild will be holding a craft camp
for children ages 6-13 July 13-15, at the Gallery and
Cultural Center. Classes will include decorative painting,
collage, making t-shirts, and calligraphy. Classes will be
$20 each and include all supplies for a finished project.
Live Oak Artist Guild and Cultural Center is located
at 213 2nd Street, NW, just north of Duval Street and
US 129. The gallery and gift shop is open Wednesday .
and Saturday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Thursday and Friday
11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information and class regis-
tration call the gallery at 386-364-5099.

Melody Christian car wash
July 18
Please come out and support Melody Christian boys bas-
ketball team. They will be having a car wash Saturday,
July 18, from 9 a.m. 3 p.m. at cheek and Scott Pharma-
cy, US 129, Publix Shopping Center.
For further information and or donation, to cover camp
fees and traveling expenses, call Coach Mike Raines at
386-965-2877.

Miss, Junior Miss and Little
Miss Suwannee Valley 2009
Pageant
The Suwannee River Woman's Club is seeking con-
testants for the Miss, Junior Miss and Little Miss
Suwannee Valley Pageant on September 12. Miss
Suwannee Valley contestants must be 16 to 23 years old
and/or going into their senior year of high school. The
winner of "Miss" Suwannee Valley will receive an aca-
demic scholarship. Junior Miss Suwannee Valley con-
testants must be 12 to 14 years old and/or in the 6th
grade. Little Miss Suwannee Valley contestants must be
4 to 6 years old. All contestants must be from the
Suwannee Valley area, which consists of Suwannee,
Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison and Columbia Counties.
Information session

When: July 20

Where: Java Jax

Time: 6 p.m.

Hosted by: Suwannee River Woman's Club
Contestant packets will be handed out and any questions
regarding the pageant and/or procedures will be an-
swered. If you need additional information, please call
Tennille Cantella at 386-688-1437.


Suwannee Primary School
kindergarten registration
July 21


can give you:
The first thing you need to know is that by filing suit
'the creditor has decided that it wants to get a judgment
against you, which will include the costs of filing suit,
and attorneys fees, most likely, in addition to the princi-
pal amount due and owing, plus late fees, over-the-limit
charges and all the rest. Sometimes creditors will delay
filing suit against debtors because the interest rate they
are getting, which can be as high as 28% or more on the
credit card agreement is MUCH higher than the interest
allowed on a judgment. In Florida, per Statute 55.03, the
rate is 8% for this year, 2009.
If you don't show up in Court on the designated day,
the Judge will undoubtedly enter a judgment against you
for the full amount of money demanded. Once a judg-
ment is entered, the creditor will then seek to EXECUTE
on its'judgment, which means it will look to see what as-
sets you have and make a determination as to what assets
they can get. You will be required to fill out a fact infor-
mation sheet and tell the creditor what assets you have.
Creditors sometimes take depositions of debtors to aid
them in their efforts to satisfy their judgments.
Now, if yoi do show up in Court, the Judge will ask
you if you admit to owing the money or not. If you say
you don't think you owe ALL of the money demanded,


Register your child for kindergarten and receive free
learning materials to help your child get ready for
kindergarten.
Date: Tuesday, July 21
Time: 8 a.m. 3:15 p.m.
Place: Suwannee Primary School
Please bring the following documents with you:
* Birth certificate
* Copy of a physical dated within one year of school
(starting date: August 24, 2009)
Immunization record
Social Security card
Please bring your child with you when you come for the
registration even if you d6n't have all of the documents.
All parents will have an opportunity to discuss their
child's screening results with a Kindergarten teacher.
Please set aside at least one hour to complete the screen-
ing/registration.

American Legion turkey shoot
July 25
Harry C. Gray 11 Memorial American Legion Post #107
turkey shoot is set for July 25.
Twelve-gauge shotgun only. Post will provide shells.
Post is located south of Live Oak in McAlpin. Take US
129 to 142nd Street, go east one mile. Post is on right.
All welcome, food and sodas available.


Suwannee County
Schools Summer
Food Service Program
Breakfast meals will be available for 7:30 to 8:30 a.m.
and lunch from noon to 1 p.m., Monday through Thurs-
day at both sites. All children one year old to 18 years of
age are eligible for meals no charge. Parents of children
must pay $3.00 per meal. Suwannee High School Cafete-
ria will be in operation from June 1, 2009 to August 13,
2009. Branford High School Cafeteria will be open from
June 8, 2009 to July 30, 2009.


SHS class of 1994
to hold reunion
Aug. 1
Attention SHS class of 1994! We are planning our 15
year class reunion for Aug. 1. Please contact the commit-
tee at classofl994shs@yahoo.com or call Sheri Riggins-
Sanders at 352-348-3998 for more information.


Suwannee River Challenge
and Marathon
Oct 10
The 8th Annual Suwannee River Challenge and
Marathon date has been set for Saturday, Oct 10, on
Columbus Day Weekend.


he or she will send you to meet with the creditor and a
mediator to try to come to an agreement regarding what
is owed. If you have some money, you can enter into a
new payment plan, at the reduced rate of interest, and
avoid a judgment. If you have enough money, you can
sometimes negotiate a full settlement for much less than
the amount demanded as creditors are happy to get cash
instead of a promise to pay in the future. If you can't
reach agreement, the Judge will set the case for trial for a
later date, maybe a month or so later, thereby giving you
an additional month to find work and a source of.income
so that you can enter into some kind of agreement.
In my next column, which will come out in August, I'l
tell you about what creditors can get and what they can't
get, but for now, T.M., my advice is that you should
show up in court and do what you can to avoid having a
judgment entered against you. If you have enough mon-
ey, the services of an attorney can help to negotiate a fa-
vorable settlement, but if you had the money, you'd pay
the debt, right? While money is said to be the root of all
evil, it is.also the cure for many problems, especially the
ones you are having. There is no easy answer to your
question, T.M, but I hope I have helped you some.
Any readers with specific legal questions, for this "Ask
a Lawyer" column are invited to submit those questions
to the Editor of this newspaper, who will pass it along to
the attorney. If you need assistance with probating a will
or probating an estate where there is no will, and you
cannot afford an attorney, you can call the closest Legal
Services office, which provides free legal assistance to
qualified individuals, or call the Florida Bar Referral ser-
vice at 1-800-342-8011. I wish you good luck in obtain-
ing access to our legal system, no matter what your in-
come and asset level might be.
The foregoing was writtdi by attorney Pierce' Kelley,
who is a member of the Florida Bar Association. The
contents reflect his personal opinions and beliefs.


I t.,,k4*-~


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Wheels?


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PAGE 6 JULY 15 16 2009








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Anna Julia Cooper immortalized on stamp


32nd Inductee into

Black Heritage Series

Educator, scholar, feminist and activist Anna Julia
Cooper (c. 1858-1964), who gave voice to the African-
American community during the 19th and 20th centuries -
from the end of slavery to the beginning of the Civil Rights
movement was immortalized on postage today.
Cooper, best known for her groundbreaking collection of
essays and speeches,
A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South,
also exhibited educational leadership, most notably
challenging the racist notion that African Americans were
naturally inferior.
The U.S. Postal Service dedicated the stamp today at
Washington, DC's Paul Laurence Dunbar High School
(previously M Street High School and the Preparatory High
School for Colored Youth), where Cooper taught math and
science and ultimately served as principal.
"Anna Julia Cooper once said, 'The cause of freedom is
not the cause of a race or a sect, a party or a class it is the
cause of humankind, the very birthright of humanity.' Her
actions to support these memorable words during her life are
the reason the Postal Service has chosen Ms. Cooper as the
subject of the 32nd stamp in the Black Heritage series," said
Delores Killette, vice president and Consumer Advocate.
"Cooper wasn't subdued by the color of her skin, her
gender, her lack of opportunity, or lack of wealth," Killette
added. "She held an instinctive awareness that by virtue of
being human, she was entitled to freely know the world and
participate in everything it had to offer. This is what ignited
the cause of freedom in Anna Julia Cooper."
Joining Killette in dedicating the stamp were Rep. Eleanor
Holmes Norton, (D) District of Columbia, University of
Maryland English Professor Carla L. Peterson, 2009 Dunbar
High School graduate Malik Shabaazz, Dunbar High School
Principal Gerald Austin and Washington, DC, Postmaster
Yverne "Pat" Moore.

The 44-cent First-Class
Anna Julia Cooper
commemorative stamp features a portrait of her created
by Kadir Nelson of San Diego, CA, who based his painting
on an undated photograph. Nelson worked under the
direction of Art Director Ethel Kessler of Bethesda, MD. All
125 million stamps, available in sheets of 20, are available
nationwide today.
Anna Julia Cooper Background
Cooper who once described her vocation as "the
education of neglected people" viewed learning as a
means of true liberation.
Anna Julia Haywood was born into slavery around 1858
in Raleigh, NC. As a child, she developed a love of learning
and wanted to become a teacher. In 1868, she received a
scholarship to enter the inaugural class at St. Augustine's
Normal School and Collegiate Institute (now St. Augustine's
College), a local school for African Americans created by the
Episcopal Church and the Freedmen's Bureau, where she
earned part of her tuition by tutoring fellow students. She
continued to teach at St. Augustine's after completing her
studies in 1877. That year she married George A.C. Cooper,
who was studying for the ministry at St. Augustine's.
Two years after her husband's unexpected death in 1879,
Cooper enrolled at Oberlin College in Ohio. In 1884 she
graduated with a degree in mathematics, becoming one of
the first African American women to graduate from the
school. Cooper returned to Raleigh and taught math, Greek
and Latin at St. Augustine's until
1887, when she was invited to teach math and science at the
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (later known as
M Street and today as Dunbar High School) in Washington,
DC, the largest and most prestigious public high school for
African Americans in the nation.
In 1892, Cooper published
A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South,
the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the
United States. Cooper explored a variety of topics including
race relations, poverty, and gender inequality. Across the
contexts of religion, education, and literature, she examined
the place of African Americans, especially women, in
American society. "The time is ripe for action," she wrote,
urging all readers to assume an active role in liberating
themselves and others from both racism and sexism in order
to realize their fullest potential. She encouraged the African
American community to take advantage of education and to
develop and promote its own folklore, literature, and artistic
culture. Well received by black and white critics alike, the
collection was regarded as "one of the most readable books
on the race question of the South" by the

Kingsley Times
of Iowa.
Because white women routinely excluded them from the
growing feminist movement, Cooper and other black
women across the nation began to create clubs and
associations in the late 19th century that were dedicated to
the interests and well-being of the African American
community. In Washington, DC, Cooper helped establish
local organizations for women, young people, and the poor
that addressed a range of issues including education,
housing, and unemployment. Cooper also.used public
speaking as a platform for change. In 1893, she spoke about
the needs of African American women at the Chicago
World's Fair, and she was one of only two African American
women to address the first Pan-African Conference in
London in 1900.
In 1902, Cooper became principal of the M Street High
School and immediately worked to strengthen the
curriculum, which stressed both liberal arts and vocational


School to teach Latin.
Nolcd for the breadth of her education, Cooper studied
French literature alnd history for several years before
enrolling as a doctoral student at Columbia University in
1914 while also remaiining a full-time teacher. As part of
her graduate work, she translated
Le Pclerinage de Charlemagne
(The Pilgrimage of Charlemagne), a medieval epic poem,
from Old French into modern French. However, because of
her race, the translation which was published in Paris in
1925 was never published in the U.S. despite the
professional recognition it garnered. In 1924, Cooper
transferred to the University of Paris, Sorbonne, in France
and, in 1925, successfully defended her doctoral
dissertation, which explored the attitudes of the French
toward slavery during the late-18th-century revolutions in
France and Haiti. She was only the fourth African American
woman in the U.S. to earn a Ph.D. and the first black woman
from any country to do so at the Sorbonne.
Cooper retired from teaching at Dunbar High School in
1930 but continued to give lectues, publish essays, and be
active in community affairs. During this time, she also
served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which
offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for
working African Americans in Washington, DC. She
retired from her role as president in 1940 but continued to
serve Frelinghuysen, which was partly located in Cooper's
own home for several years. She privately published her


memoir,

The Third Step, around 1945.
Cooper died in her home at 201 T Street in Washington,
DC, on Feb. 27, 1964. She is buried next to her husband in
Raleigh, NC.
Ordering the First-Day-of-Issue Postmark
Customers have 60 days to obtain the first-day-of-issue
postmark by mail. They may purchase new stamps at their
local Post Office, at the Postal Store website at
www.usps.com/shop or by calling 800-STAMP-24. They
should affix the stamps to envelopes of their choice, address
the envelopes to themselves or others, and place them in a
larger envelope addressed to:
Anna Julia Cooper Stamp
Special Cancellations
PO Box 92282
Washington, DC 20090-2282
After applying the first day of issue postmark, the Postal
Service will return the envelopes through the mail. There is
no charge for the postmark. All orders must be postmarked
by Aug. 13, 2009.
Ordering First-Day Covers
Stamp Fulfillment Services also offers first-day covers for
new stamp issues and Postal Service stationery items
postmarked with the official first-day-of-issue cancellation.
Each item has an individual catalog number and is offered in
the quarterly.


AWI announces additional unemployment

benefits to 250, 000 Floridians

-New law infuses estimated $418 million in recovery funds
into Florida's economy-


The Agency for Workforce Innova-
tion announced today that an estimated
250,000 unemployed Floridians will
be eligible for Extended Benefits as a
result of legislation signed by Gover-
nor Charlie Crist. Senate Bill 810,
sponsored by Senator Rudy Garcia (R-
Hialeah) and Representative Dave
Murzin (R-Pensacola), allows eligible
Floridians to receive additional tempo-
rary unemployment compensation
made available through the American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of
2009.
"In conjunction with this law taking
effect, we have launched an online ap-
plication for Extended Benefits at
www.floridajobs.org to begin process-
ing these critical payments to eligible
Floridians as quickly as possible," said
Agency Interim Director Cynthia
Lorenzo. "This new law will provide
a financial lifeline to an estimated
250,000 Floridians who have exhaust-


training. "We are not just educating heads and hands," she
stated, "we are educating the men and women of a race."
Refusing to use inferior textbooks, Cooper sought to better
prepare students for admission to some of the nation's top
colleges and universities, including the Ivy League. Four
years later, she was removed from her position under
allegations of incompetence and misconduct, but more likely
because of her steadfast resistance to the racist notion of
African Americans' intellectual inferiority. Cooper then
taught languages at Lincoln University in Missouri until
1910, when she was invited to return to the M Street High


ed their unemployment benefits and
boost our state's economy with the in-
fusion of an estimated $418 million in
federal recovery funds through the end
of the year."
Payments will begin in early July
and will be made retroactive to Febru-
ary 22 for eligible claimants. The ini-
tial retroactive payments may be as
high as $5,100 for some claimants,
with additional payments of as much
as $300 a week for up to a total of 20
weeks.
"During these historic economic
times, Florida's families are hurting
and this legislation is a powerful tool
in helping them get back on their feet,"
said Senator Garcia. "By allowing for
individuals looking for work to contin-
ue collecting unemployment benefits,
it assures their families are taken care
of as they look toward better times."


individuals must:

Be totally or partially unem-
ployed.
Exhaust all entitlement to regular
and Emergency Unemployment com-
pensation benefits prior to February
22, 2009, and the claim benefit year
ends after February 22, 2009 or
Exhaust all entitlement to regular
and Emergency Unemployment com-
pensation after February 22, 2009.
Not be eligible for unemployment
compensation benefits in any other
state (including the District of Colum-
bia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Is-
lands) or Canada.
Be actively seeking work and pro-
vide work search documentation for
each week claimed.
Not refuse an offer of suitable
work or fail to apply for suitable work.


To receive Extended Benefits SEE AWI ANNOUNCES, PAGE 13


JULY 15 16, 2009, PAGE 7






* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


PAGE 8, JULY 15 16, 2009


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Cool


Creamy


Summer Desserts.


Summertime evokes charming images of long,
peaceful days relaxing in sun-dappled shade, but the
reality is that summer usually has more crazy days than
lazy ones. All we can hope to do is carve out a few
periods of calm and tranquility to enjoy with family and
friends. A casual dinner party with a few close friends
or a special family supper can be a brief summer retreat.

"To make a meal stress free, think cool during the
summer. The refrigerator and freezer can be your best
friend for summer entertaining," advises Martha
White(r) baking expert Linda Caritan. "Start collecting
recipes that can be made in advance, refrigerated and
served cold, as well as recipes that can be prepared and
frozen for later use. Cooking early in the day before it
gets too hot and cooking dishes for freezing not only
makes entertaining easier, but can also save energy."

Cool Cooking

Hot summer days are the perfect time to serve chilled
dishes and it also keeps the host calm, cool and
collected. By serving cool food, you can prepare dishes
in advance so that you don't have to heat up the kitchen
at the last minute.

SBuild your meal around a hearty main dish salad.
Cornbread and pasta salads make ideal summer dishes
when they contain meat, cheese and/or beans, along
with vegetables. Chicken, tuna and pimento cheese
salads are classic summer fare that are always in style.
Cook meat outside on the grill so you don't heat up
the kitchen and serve refrigerated side dishes prepared
earlier in the day. Potato, bean and fruit salads or crisp
green salads are always welcome, but don't forget that
roasted vegetables are delicious served cold or at room
temperature. And hardly any summer meal is complete
without a plate of sliced homegrown tomatoes.
SWhen you do have to use the oven, plan ahead and
bake extra muffins, cakes, cookies or other baked
products to freeze for later use.

Cool Desserts

The grand finale to any summer get-together is a
cool, creamy dessert that you can pull right out of the
refrigerator and serve. Refrigerated desserts often need
several hours to chill, so they are perfect to make in
advance with no worries about last minute preparation.
The classic pairing of peanut butter and chocolate -
combined in a cool creamy pie will get rave reviews
from kids and adults alike. Chocolate Chip Peanut
Butter Pie has a press-in crust with only three
ingredients chocolate chip muffin mix, butter and
chopped peanuts. Equally easy to make, the filling is
delightfully light and fluffy. Simply beat cream cheese,
peanut butter, sugar and milk together and fold in
whipped topping. Pile into the cooled pie shell, drizzle
with chocolate sauce and chill.
If you love strawberries dipped in chocolate, the
White Chocolate Ganache Brownies with Fresh
Strawberries recipe is for you. It's a simple
combination of fudgy brownies made from a mix
topped with creamy white chocolate ganache and fresh
strawberries. Ganache sounds impressive, but all you
do is melt white chocolate chips in hot cream.
Or dazzle your guests with this Fresh Fruit Tart with
Shortbread Crust. The easy-to-make crust is filled with
a sweetened cream cheese mixture. And the crowning
touch is a variety of colorful seasonal fruits arranged
over the top. Brush with a little apple jelly glaze, and
you have a sparkling dessert that is beautiful and
delicious.
Remember to think cool while planning meals and
get-togethers and you will enjoy entertaining as much
as being entertained. For more delectable summer
desserts, go to www.marthawhite.com and click on the
Recipes link.


Chocolate Chip Peanut Butter Pie


Crisco(r)
Original No-
Stick Cooking
Spray


Crust
1 (7.4 oz.) "
pkg. Martha .A
White Chocolate i o .,
Chip Muffin
Mix
4 tablespoons butter, softened
1/3 cup salted peanuts, chopped

Filling
1/2 cup Jif(r) Creamy Peanut Butter
3 oz. cream cheese
1/3 cup sugar
3 tablespoons milk
2 cups frozen whipped topping, thawed

Topping
2 tablespoons Smucker's(r) Hot Fudge Topping,
warmed


.Heat oven to 3500 F. Spray 9-inch pie plate with no-
stick cooking spray. Combine muffin mix, butter and
peanuts in large bowl. Blend with fork just until
crumbly. Press evenly into bottom and up sides of


prepared pie plate. Bake 12 to 15 minutes or until light
golden brown. If crust is slightly puffy, press down
gently with back of a wooden spoon. Cool.
Beat peanut butter, cream cheese, and sugar in large
bowl with electric mixer at medium high speed until
smooth. Beat in milk. Gently fold in whipped topping.
Spoon into cooled crust. Drizzle warm fudge topping
over pie. Chill 3 to 4 hours or until serving time. Store
covered in refrigerator.

8 servings

Tip: Pie may be served frozen, if preferred.

White Chocolate Ganache Brownies with Fresh
Strawberries

Crisco Original No-Stick Cooking Spray

Brownies
1 (22.5 oz.) pkg. Martha White Chewy Fudge
Brownie Mix
1/2 cup Crisco Pure Vegetable Oil
1/2 cup water
1 egg

Ganache
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 cups white chocolate chips

Topping
6 cups sliced fresh strawberries, sweetened to taste


1. Heat oven to 350 F. (3250 for glass pan. Dark
coated pans are not recommended.) Line 13x9x2-inch
pan with foil, making sure to leave the ends long
enough to lift brownies from pan. Spray with no-stick
cooking spray. Prepare brownies according to package
directions using oil, water and egg. Bake and cool
completely.
2. Place cream in medium microwave safe bowl.
Microwave on high until cream comes to a boil. Add
white chocolate chips. Stir until melted and smooth.
Spread over cooled brownies. Refrigerate 1 hour or
until serving time.
3. For easy cutting, place brownies in freezer for
about 1 hour. Remove brownies from pan and remove
foil. Place on cutting board. Cut into 24 squares.
Place brownie on serving plate. Top with fresh
strawberries. Store in refrigerator.


while the steaks are cooking," advises Martha White(r)
baking expert Linda Carman. "But, be sure to bake
plenty because you'll want to keep them coming to
serve with dinner, too."
SCheesy Chile Corn Muffins are made with a sweet
yellow cornbread mix and have a nice sweet and spicy
flavor. Sure to become a year-round favorite to serve
with soups and stews, these muffins offer a nice change
when served with ribs, chicken, brisket and even steak
right off the grill at your summer cookouts.
For more cornbread recipes to serve with fresh
summer vegetables, go to www.marthawhite.com and
click on the Recipes link.


Cheesy Chile Corn Muffins


Crisco(r) Original No-Stick Cooking Spray

2 large eggs
1 cup milk
1/4 cup butter, melted
2 (7 oz.) pkgs. Martha White Sweet Yellow
Cornbread and Muffin Mix
1 cup fresh or frozen corn kernels (if frozen, thawed)
1/4 cup sliced green onion
1 (4 oz.) can chopped green chiles
2 to 4 tablespoons chopped pickled jalapeno chiles
1 cup (4 oz.) coarsely shredded Cheddar cheese
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese + 2 tablespoons for
topping


SHeat oven to 4000 F. Spray 18 standard (3-inch)
muffin cups or 48 miniature (2-inch) muffin cups with
no-stick cooking spray. Beat eggs in large bowl. Stir in
milk, butter and cornbread mix until smooth. Add corn,
onion, green chiles, jalapenos, Cheddar cheese and 1/2
cup Parmesan cheese. Stir until blended.
Fill muffin cups 3/4 full. Sprinkle batter with
remaining Parmesan cheese. Bake 17 to 20 minutes for
standard muffins or 10 to 12 minutes for miniature
muffins, or until golden brown. Cool in pan 5 minutes.
Serve warm or at room temperature.

Makes 18 standard or 48 miniature muffins

Crisco is a registered trademark of The J.M. Smucker
Company.


24 servings


Fresh Fruit Tart with Shortbread Crust

Crisco Original No-Stick Cooking Spray

Crust
1 1/4 cups Martha White All-Purpose Flour
3 tablespoons powdered sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1 egg yolk, beaten

Filling
8 oz. cream cheese, softened
1/4 cup granulated sugar
2 teaspoons lemon juice
1/2 cup heavy cream

Topping
Assorted fruit such as sliced strawberries, peaches,
nectarines, kiwi, seedless grapes, blueberries and/or
raspberries
2 tablespoons Smucker's Apple Jelly
1 teaspoon water

.Heat oven to 3500 F. Spray 9-inch pie plate with no-
stick cooking-spray. Combine flour, poWdered sugar,
salt, butter and egg yolk in large bowl. Blend with fork.
Form dough into ball. Dust fingertips with flour. Press
evenly into bottom and up sides of pie plate. Cover and
chill 30 minutes. Prick crust with fork. Bake 12 to 15
minutes or until light golden brown. Cool.
.Beat cream cheese, granulated sugar, lemon juice
and cream in large bowl, with electric mixer at medium
high speed until smooth. Spread into cool pie shell.
Arrange fruit on top of filling in a decorative pattern
up to 12 hours before serving. Stir together jelly and
water. Brush over fruit. Cover and refrigerate until
serving time.

8 servings

Crisco, Smucker's and Jif are registered trademarks
of The J.M. Smucker Company.




Cheesy Chile Corn Muffins Spice Up Summer
Cookout

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Summer 2009)-Does your
summer cookout menu need a flavor boost? Cheesy
Chile Corn Muffins may be just the touch you need.
With two kinds of cheese, corn, jalapeno and green
chiles, these muffins will add a spicy punch to your
summer get-together.
"You might even want to bake some of the batter in
miniature muffin cups to pass around as an appetizer


Blackberry Cobbler A Southern Summer Classic

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Summer 2009)-In the rural
South, picking wild blackberries is a rite of summer but
it isn't always easy. Getting to the thorny blackberry
bushes often involves making your way through briars,
brambles and a hoard of chiggers. Sometimes it hardly
seems worth the trouble until you see the delectable
blackberry cobbler coming out of the oven or a row of
jars filled with blackberry preserves cooling on the
counter. Thankfully, cultivated varieties now make
blackberries easily available in the summer and frozen
ones are available year round.
A traditional dessert, like blackberry cobbler, is the
perfect thing to take to a family reunion or summer
gathering because it is not only delicious, but will also
generate lots of memories and conversation about good
family cooks and favorite recipes. "There are almost as
many ways to make blackberry cobbler as there are
cooks who add their personal touches to them," says
Martha White(r) baking expert Linda Carman. "The
most traditional versions of this iconic dessert are made
with a sweet biscuit topping or with pie crust. But there
are many delicious quick and easy versions, too," she
added.
Lazy Days Blackberry Cobbler is made with a self-
rising flour batter poured over melted butter and layered
with berries and sugar. The batter rises to the top and
bakes up crisp and golden brown. All you need is a
scoop of ice cream, whipped cream or a splash of heavy
cream to complete the revered summer blackberry
cobbler experience.
For more summer cobbler recipes, go to.
www.marthawhite.com and click on the Recipes link.


Lazy Days Blackberry Cobbler

1/2 cup butter
1 cup Martha White Self-Rising Flour
1 1/3 cup sugar, divided
3/4 cup milk
3 cups fresh blackberries
1/2 cup water
Ice cream, whipped cream or heavy cream

.Heat oven to 3500 F. Melt butter in oven in a 2 1/2
to 3-quart baking dish.
SStir together flour, 1 cup sugar and milk in medium
bowl. Pour over butter in baking dish. Sprinkle berries
over batter. Sprinkle 1/3 cup sugar over berries. Pour
water over sugar. Do not stir.
Bake for 40 to 45 minutes or until golden brown and
crisp. Serve warm or cool with ice cream, whipped
cream or heavy cream, if desired.

Makes 8 servings










wannee Valley Humane Society Critter Corner

Suwannee Valley Humane Society Critter Corner


Suwannet' Valle'v Huinane
Society
1156 SE Bisbee Loop
Madison, Florida 32340

Two milh's south of Lee off C. R.
255
Fivm 10 Exit 262. Take
C.R.2555 north 1/2 miles

We are a limited space shelter
(no kill). You must check with us
prior to bringing a drop-off
animal to the shelter. Hours;
Tues. to Sat. 10:00 to 2:00, or by
appointment. Visit our website
and see the animals that need a
really good home at
www.geocities.com/suwanneehs
or at our e-mail address
suwanneevalley@embarqmail.co
m.

We service the surrounding
counties of Madison, Suwannee,
Hamilton, Lafayette, Columbia
and Taylor.

Lost and Found Pets:
If you have lost a pet or found
one, the humane society will
help you find your pet. Call us at
(850) 971- 9904 or toll free at 1-
866-236-7812. Leave a message
if we are closed, we will return
your call. Remember to always
call your local animal controls or
shelters if you have found a lost
or found pet.


'THRIFT STORE:
You must come see our thrift
stores, if you have not been here
before. We have three stores, a
boutique, clothing and furniture.
We are always looking for
donations for the stores. Please
keep us in mind if you have
items in good condition you
would like to donate to us.

RECYCLING:
We have a recycling bin on our
property newspapers, magazines,
and catalogs. The bin will take
all kinds of paper. We also have a
bin in Live Oak at 305 Pinewood
Drive, just west Of Johnson's
Appliance/Radio Shack. We also
collect aluminum cans to recycle.
Just bring them to the shelter. All
the money goes to help the
homeless animals.

The Suwannee Valley Humane
Society depends on adoptions for
$65.00 which INCLUDES,
spay/neuter, de-worm,
heartworm/feline leukemia tested
and rabies shot (if old enough).
Please come and visit us, our
animals would love to meet you.
REMEMBER; DO NOT
LEAVE PETS IN VEHICLES
FOR ANY LENGTH.OF TIME
DUE TO THE HEAT AND
HUMIDITY.


FEATURED ANIMALS
FOR ADOPTIONS
DOGS:
3516 Beast is a Lab Mix, he
is 10 months old. He is black and
is a very friendly pup.

3511 Snickers is a 2 year 8
month old dog. She is brindle
and is a Mixed Breed. She'likes
woman and children, with a little
time she like men. She is very
good for protection.

3502 George is a Hound
Mix, he is tri color. He is 1 year
6 month old. He is housebroken,
good with kids and good with
other dogs and cats.

3486 Molly is 1 year 1
month old. She is all white
except for 2 brown spots on her
nose. She is a Bull/ Terrier Mix.

3484 August is a Bull/
Terrier Mix. She is 1 year 1
month old apd she is all white.
She is very friendly.

CATS:

3568 Baby Cat is a black
female kitty. She is 2 years 6
months old. She is very likeable.

3555 Bandie is a 2 year old
kitty. She is a white and black
kitty. She likes to be made of.


3543 Abby is a grey and
white kitty. She is 2 years
Smooth old. She is a long haired
kitty. She is not scared of dogs.

3540 Angel is a fluffy
tabby, she is 1 year 7 months old
and is very loveable.

3500 Nadira is a 1 year 2
month old cat. She is a short
haired black cat. She loves to be
held.

LOST AND FOUND

FOUND:
A female Pit Bull, young
and brindle color. If this is your
dog, please call @ 386 -362 -
2403.

LOST:
2 dogs: 1. a male brown
Lab, named "Phoenix" has been
fixed. Was wearing a collar, and
is very friendly. 2. is a male
Beagle, named "Charlie". He is
tri- color and has not been
neutered. He is wearing a collar
and one of the collars is green.
He is also very friendly. They
were lost from S.E. Bench Mark
in Madison. If you have found
them, please call Rich Lane @
850 -971 -7212.


LOST:
A male Chihuahua, He is
white with brown spots. He has
not been neutered and weight 4
lbs. He is 9 months old and
answers to any name. He is very
friendly. Was lost from Three
River Estates area. If you have
found him, please call Joi De
Deo @ 386 935 4688.

LOST:
From Three Rivers Estates
area, a 8 year old female
Shepard. Her name is "Chole",
she is tan and has a little bit of
white. She has been spayed and
weight 80 plus pounds. She takes
Thyroid Medicine. She is very
sweet. If you have seen or found
she, please call Elena @ 386 -
497 3065.

If you have lost or found an
animal, you would like to report.
Please feel free to call us and I
will put your report in the
newspaper free.

We have a new web site
available to view www.
petango. com
Get shelter animal information
and pictures of all our animals.
Go check it out. When you get to
web suite be sure to put in the zip
code for this area (32340).


From the Suwannee/Lafayette health department

The importance of men's health


By Mary Ward
Research shows that, compared to
women, men are more likely to smoke and
drink alcohol and generally lead less
healthy lifestyles. In addition, men are
more likely to put off routine checkups
and also delay seeing a healthcare
provider for symptoms of a health
problem. Compared to working-aged
women, working-aged men are less likely
to have a regular doctor and health
insurance.
Fortunately, many of the health
conditions'and diseases that men face can
be prevented or treated if found early. In
order to start taking better care of their
health, it is important for men to
understand their risk factors and how they
can improve their overall health. The most
common conditions affecting men heart
disease, prostate, testicular, and colon
cancer, and osteoporosis later in life have
important nutritional implications.
Heart Disease


Risk factors for heart disease include:
High blood cholesterol levels
High blood pressure
Diabetes
Obesity
Cigarette srdoking
Physical inactivity
Increasing age
Family history of early onset of heart
disease
Dietary implications for reducing your
risk:
Reduce the amounts of saturated fat
(found in animal products such as meat
and high-fat dairy products) and avoid all
trans fat (found in products such as
margarine, baked goods, and some snack
foods). Check the food labels to determine
the fat amounts in foods.
Increase high fiber foods (whole
grains, fruits and vegetables, legumes,
nuts and seeds).
Limit alcohol intake. Dietary
recommendations define moderate


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Sales Record Form


Run your Yard Sale in the

Wednesday North Florida Focus &

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and get the Yard Sale Kit for FREE.
Deadline for placing your yard sale is Friday at 11:00 a.m.
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drinking as no more than 2 drinks per day
for men.
Increase intake of omega 3 fatty acids.
Research has shown that they are
associated with keeping blood vessels
healthy and keeping blood pressure down.
Avoid tobacco use.
Cancer
Risk factors for cancer can include:
Overweight/obesity
High-fat diet
Low fiber diet
Excessive alcohol intake
Physical inactivity
Tobacco Use
Some dietary implications for reducing
your risk:
Lycopene is a caretenoid found in
fruits and vegetables. It gives tomatoes its
red coloration. Research has shown that
lycopene can help with the prevention of
prostate cancer. The best sources of
lycopene are tomatoes, guava, rosehip,
watermelon, and pink grapefruit.
Although research is still somewhat
inconclusive, selenium is thought to be a
mineral and antioxidant associated with
cancer prevention. Good sources of
selenium are nuts (especially Brazil nuts)
and fish (especially orange roughy and
tuna).
While a high-fiber diet is important
for heart health, it is just as important for
reducing the risk of colon cancer.
Osteoporosis
Many people think of osteoporosis as a
disease associated with women. However,
men are at risk too.
Risk factors for osteoporosis:
Increasing age


Theresa A. Flury,
Executive Director of the
Statewide Guardian ad
Litem Program, marked her
first six months the end of
June 2009. Gov. Charlie
Crist appointed Flury to
head the Program -
December 22, 2008.


* .


I I I .. r'i


Family history
Tobacco use
Long-term use of corticosteroid use
Excessive soda consumption
Excessive alcohol consumption
Low calcium intake
Physical inactivity
Dietary implications for reducing your
risk:
Men should get around 1000 mg of
calcium every day, especially in their .
teens and twenties. The best sources
include milk, yogurt, cheese, and ice
cream. Be sure to look for the low-fat and
fat-free dairy products for heart heath.
*, Avoid heavy drinking. Alcohol
reduces bone formation and interferes
with your body's ability to absorb
calcium. For men, heavy drinking is one
of the most common risk factors for
osteoporosis.
Avoid tobacco use.
Be sure to talk to your doctor if you
have any concerns about your risk factors
and before taking any vitamins or
minerals in supplement form. Also,
remember to always keep safety first.
Avoid unintentional injuries by being a
cautious driver, remember to always wear
your seat belt, and make your kids buckle
up too. If you are working with tools and
machinery, always wear the proper
protective gear and make sure that tools
are in good shape before you use them.
If you have questions, please call the
Suwannee County Health Department at
386-362-2708 extension 259.
Soure: The National Center on
Physical Activity and Disability,
www.ncpad.org/index.php


For more than 29 years,
the Florida Guardian ad
Litem Program has
represented the best
interests of abused and
neglected children in court
and the community. The
Program operates with
approximately 7,000
dedicated volunteers giving
approximately 27,000
abused and neglected
children across Florida a
voice.
Within just a few weeks
of taking the helm, Flury
faced many challenges
including not only a special
legislative session, but also
news from the legislature
of a possible 23% budget
cut during the regular
session.
"In a very short time, I
learned that we cannot do
this alone; we must rely on
the support of our
volunteers and the
community. Our
volunteers and the


community rallied together
and let the legislature know
how critical our work is to
thousands of abused and
neglected children in
Florida. Their voices were
loud and clear and
thankfully the legislature
heard them. I am grateful
for the tremendous effort
our volunteers and
community made on the
Program's behalf."
Ultimately, the legislature
voted on a 7.5% cut. The
cut was less drastic, but
still resulted in the loss of
57 positions statewide.
"We lost positions, but we
are determined the cuts
will not affect the number
of children we are
serving."
During the past six
months, Flury has served
on Florida's Children &
Youth Cabinet, Child
Abuse Prevention and

SEE GUARDIAN, PAGE 13


Guardian ad Litem executive

director marks 6 months on the job


'1ilie to Upgradce.


I -I
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I


g CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


PAGE 10 JULY 15 16 2009


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CARES farmers are not just



farmers, they're natural



resource managers


Life around the farm is about more than plowing the field and
planting crops these days. Technological advances to irrigation and
fertilization help take the guess work out of crop production. And
they help save the environment, too.
Just ask Timmy and Mickey Tuten, of Madison County. Their
farm was one of 26 this year recognized for environmental
stewardship as part of the County Alliance for Responsible
Environmental Stewardship (CARES) program. The Florida Farm
Bureau and the Suwannee River Partnership created CARES to
highlight efforts by farm owners to improve natural resource
management in the Suwannee River Basin.
The Tutens are committed to improving the environment by
implementing Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs help
conserve water and reduce nitrate pollution in groundwater that can
result from animal wastes and from fertilizers that aren't applied
properly.
Whether planting potatoes, tomatoes, onions or squash, the
Tutens use low-pressure center pivots and drip irrigation. The
systems not only help conserve water but are also cost-effective for
the farmer.
Joel Love, of the Suwannee River Partnership, said low-pressure
irrigation gives a more efficient, uniform application of water.
"There are less evaporative losses because you don't get the mist
as with a high-pressure system," Love said, adding some of the new
low-pressure nozzles simulate rainfall.
Drip irrigation can also be used to apply fertilizer. It spoon feeds
the crop near the root and applies just the right amount of water and
fertilizer needed. This ensures that nitrogen from fertilizers is
efficiently used by the plant so little excess will be left to enter the
groundwater.
"I love drip irrigation because I'm targeting where I want to
water," said Timmy Tuten. "You save on fertilizer and you save on
water."
To gauge whether their crops are getting the right amount of
water, the Tutens can hook up a laptop to a soil moisture probe that
reads moisture levels for certain areas of the field. They also use
portable devices to test moisture levels anywhere on the farm.
Love said applying the right amount of water is key. Over
watering can wash fertilizers away and result in nitrate pollution to
groundwater. But not applying enough water can result in crops not
utilizing fertilizers that have been applied. Eventually those
fertilizers will also get washed into the aquifer.
The Tutens want to ensure visitors who come to their farm to pick
produce that they care about the crop and the land in which it was
grown.
"I see people face to face every day," said Timmy Tuten. "When
they ride up and you got a pretty crop, it sells itself. Participating in
the CARES program, I want people to know that I care. That I care
about them and that I'm conscientious in being a good steward of the
land."
The Coggins family of Coggins Farms, in Hamilton County, feels
the sane way. Managing natural resources is just as important to
them as tending crops. That's why, theirs, too, was designated this
year as a CARES farm.
A worker manning a machine
that fertilizes crops can be seen
driving through rows of peas at
Coggins Farms. But it is not just
any sprayer. It's fitted with GPS
equipment, which determines
which crops have already been
fertilized and which ones have
been skipped over.
"It maps the field and if you
overlap, it cuts the nozzles off,"
said Mike Coggins. "That's a big
savings."
Not only is it a savings to the '
farmer, it also saves our
waterways and the aquifer.
Love said the more fertilizer
that's put out at one time, the
greater the risk a heavy rain will "- .
come and wash it into
groundwater.
Workers at Coggins Farms also
field test for nitrate concentration.
All it takes is just clipping some of
the plants' leaves and sending
them off to a lab. After the nitrate
levels are read, workers know
whether they need to apply more
fertilizer or less.
"We get tissue samples each
week and then we prescribe that
week what we're going to put out
the next week," said Gerald
Coggins. Joel Love, of the Suwannee
The Tutens and the Coggins irrigation.


family were recognized at the 9th Annual CARES dinner
held at the Dwight Stansel farm in Suwannee Count) on
June 25. Other Suwannee and Santa Fe Ri% er Basin
farmers and ranchers that were recognized include the
following: Michael Dukes, Union; David Echer ema,
Levy; Gary Jones, Dixie; Jack Meeks, Lex ) John Parnrh.
Levy; Roland Parrish, Union; Kelly Philman. Gilchrist:
Don Spradley, Columbia; James Tallman, Bradford. Big
Trees Plantation, Inc., Alachua; Bud and Judy
O'Quinn, Columbia; Ross, James and William
Terry, Columbia; Bryan and Wendi Jennings,
Columbia; John and Donna Risoli, Madison;
Corrence Fields, Madison; Jerry and Vicki
Fletcher, Madison; Jesse and Beulah Cone,
Madison; Paul and Almera Blount,
Madison; Mike and Debra Knowles,

SEE CARES FARMERS, PAGE 13


I

/


ABOVE: Mike Coggins of
Coggins Farms cuts a fresh
tomato from his field that
was grown by using the
method of drip irrigation.


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S I I


Timmy Tuten uses a soil moisture probe that reads moisture levels on his Madison County farm. Timmy and
Mickey Tuten's farm was one of 26 recognized for environmental stewardship at the 9th Annual CARES dinner on
June 25.


Chip,

II ,, rI

River Partnership, left, an Timmy Tuten observe bell peppers that were grownon Tutens farm by ng dri
River Partnership, left, and Timmy Tuten observe bell peppers that were grownon Tuten's farm by using drip


iiLL~izC~ir~ =k


A worker at Coggins Farms fertilizes peas with a sprayer that is fitted with GPS equipment. Coggins Farms, in Hamilton County, was one of 26 recognized for environmental
stewardship at the 9th Annual CARES dinner on June 25.


JULY 15- 16, 2009, PAGE 11


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JULY 15 16, 2009 PAGE 13


M CLASSIFIED MARKET
RVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


CARES farmers are not just farmers,

they're natural resource managers


Continued From Page 11

Madison; W.H. and Emogene Fletcher,
Madison: Henry and 'Tlya Terry.
Madison; Inua and Fidenacio Tones,
Madison; Harold and Troy Platt, Madison;
and Howard Mobley, Suwannee.
Since the Suwannee River Partnership
began in 1999, 99 percent of poultry
farmers, 90 percent of dairies and 70
percent of crop farmers have agreed to
adopt BMPs for fertilization, irrigation and
waste utilization practices. Partnership
members, which include various agencies,
residents, farmers, scientists, educators and
businesses come together to protect the
natural resources in the Suwannee River
Basin.
Love said managing natural resources is


a balancing act. You don't want to over
water or under water and you don't want to
over fertilize.
Striking that balance can be challenging.
But some CARES farmers have received
between 25-85 percent cost share from
state and federal agricultural agencies for
technology and equipment needed to
implement BMPs.
Love said the CARES program benefits
both the Partnership and the farmer.
"BMPs are economical and they help
save the environment," he said.
For more information about the CARES
program, call the Suwannee River
Partnership at 386-362-0431. You may also
call ybur county Farm Bureau office or
Scot Eubanks, Florida Farm Bureau
Federation, at 352-384-2633.


Continued From Page 10

Permanency Advisory Counsel, the
Multidisciplinary Dependency Court
Improvement Panel, and the Department
of Children and Families Task Force on
Fostering Success.
Flury is intent on increasing the
number of Guardian ad Litem volunteers
and has formed a leadership team to help
accomplish this. Flury's priorities also
include providing statewide training for


Continued From Page 7

Eligible Floridians are invited to apply
online at www.floridajobs.org, which is the
most efficient way to process claims. For
those who do not have internet access,
forms will be mailed from the Florida
Agency for Workforce Innovation begin-
ning June 3.

In addition, the legislation:

Amends portions of unemployment
compensation law related to the solvency
Sof Florida's Unemployment Compensation
Trust Fund in order to replenish the fund
sooner than under current provisions.
Temporarily increases the minimum
taxable wage base from the first $7,000 an-
nually to the first $8,500 annually,of em-
ployees' wages. (This provision sunsets in
2015.)
Adjusts statutory trigger to generate ad-
ditional funds for the Unemployment
Compensation Trust Fund.
Grants authority to the Governor or his


Program staff in critical areas including
legal advocacy, educational surrogacy
and psychotropic medications. "Being
able to lead such a wonderful Program is
an honor. Our employees and volunteers
are extremely dedicated to our children.
I'm excited about moving the Program
forward."
SFor more information on how to
become a guardian ad litem, log onto our
website at www.GuardianadLitem.org or
call 1-866-341-1GAL.


designee to.request advances from the fed-
eral government to replenish Florida's Un-
employment Compensation Trust Fund.
The American Recovery and Reinvestment
Act gives the state the ability to receive
these advances interest-free through De-
cember 2010.
"These reforms will help keep premiums
low for small businesses while protecting
the unemployment compensation system in
this down-turned economy," said Repre-
sentative Murzin.
For a comprehensive list of questions
and answers about Extended Benefits,
please visit www.floridajobs.org/unem-
ployment/EB/EB_FAQ.html. For more in-
formation about AWI's unemployment
compensation programs, including Extend-
ed Benefits, please visit
www.floridajobs.org/unemployment/EB/E
Bonepager.pdf
For more information about Florida's
use of the federal recovery dollars made
available through the American Recovery
and Reinvestment Act of 2009, please visit
www.FlaRecovery.com.


UF college receives public


health accreditation


The University of
Florida College of Public
Health and Health
Professions has been
awarded five-year
accreditation as a school of
public health by the
Council on Education for
Public Health, an
independent agency
recognized by the U.S.
Department of Education.
The college joins only 40
other U.S. universities that
have received accreditation
in public health at the
college level.
"Our college has
developed a unique
educational model that.
integrates public health and
health professions
disciplines, two areas that
have traditionally operated
independently of each
other," said Michael G.
Perri, Ph.D., interim dean
of the college. 'By
combining the public
health focus on populations
and prevention with the
individual treatment
perspective of the health
professions, we have
created important synergies
in education, research and
service. Our ultimate goal
is improve people's lives
by promoting healthy
lifestyles and addressing
critical issues, such as the
health needs of a growing
population of older adults
and the prevention and
control of outbreaks of
infectious diseases."
The dual and
complementary missions
of the College of Public
Health and Health
Professions are critical to
the future of UF's entire
health-care enterprise, said
David S. Guzick, M.D.,
Ph.D., senior vice
president for health affairs
and president of the
UF&Shands Health
System.
"Research in the college
- epidemiologic,
biostatistical, behavioral
and health services is
especially pertinent to the
national focus on
improving health-care


access and quality in a
cost-effective manner, and
the training of health
professionals in key areas
of need promotes high-
quality care at Shands and
at other health-care
facilities in the state,"
Guzick said.
"Accreditation by the
national certifying body
gives well-deserved
recognition to Dean Perri
and his faculty for the
excellence of their
college."
To develop a new public
health enterprise, the
college established
departments of
epidemiology and
biostatistics; environmental
and global health; and
behavioral science and
community health. The
College of Public Health
and Health Professions
also added two Ph.D.
programs, one in
epidemiology in
conjunction with the VF
College of Medicine and
the other in biostatistics.
The college expanded the
Master of Public Health
degree and added a
distance-learning
certificate program in
public health, and an
online MPH degree is in
the works. These programs
complement the college's
existing nationally
recognized academic
programs, including Ph.D.
degree programs in clinical
and health psychology,
health services research
and rehabilitation science;
professional doctoral
programs in audiology and
physical therapy; master's
degrees in health
administration,
occupational therapy and
rehabilitation counseling;
and a bachelor's degree in
health science.
The College of Public
Health and Health
Professions has received
$15.6 million in research
funding over the past year
with specific studies
'focused on.disability and
rehabilitation; the


prevention of chronic
health problems, such as
obesity; aging; health
disparities; and the
identification and control
of emerging diseases and
environmental threats. The
college has developed
strong partnerships with
the other UF colleges and
with UF institutes and
centers, including the
Emerging Pathogens
Institute, the Institute on
Aging, the McKnight
Brain Institute and the
SCenter for Latin American
Studies, Perri said. Several
college faculty members.
are also collaborating with
researchers from the
Department of Veterans
Affairs Medical Center to
address the special health
needs of the veteran
population.


"If you can't live at home,
this is the next best place
to live! Everyone here
is so sood to the residents."


When you or your loved one need
assistance with the tasks of daily
living, consider Dacier Manor
Assisted Living Facility (ALF
#7641). Our loving, qualified staff
is on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week. And our secure, comforting
atmosphere allows our residents
to maintain the highest level of
sclf-care Our residents enjoy
a variety of activities and a
supportive environment.
Call us today for more information
or to schedule a free tour.
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To create your customized classified ad visit

www.nflaonline.com

And click on "Buy a Classified"


0LArII~


Guardian ad Litem executive

director marks 6 months on the job


AWI announces additional unemployment

benefits to 250, 000 Floridians


M ULMOO I r I E:U IVIIMI 1 1 -- - vv IN I ..... ...... .


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