Group Title: Mayo free press
Title: The Mayo free press
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028404/00181
 Material Information
Title: The Mayo free press
Uniform Title: Mayo free press (Mayo, Fla. : 1958)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Mayo free press
Publisher: Bernard Guthrie
Place of Publication: Mayo Fla
Publication Date: June 19, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Mayo (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lafayette County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Lafayette -- Mayo
Coordinates: 30.051944 x -83.175556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 70, no. 27 (June 20, 1958)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028404
Volume ID: VID00181
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN0339
oclc - 33286672
alephbibnum - 002042475
lccn - sn 95047189
 Related Items
Preceded by: Mayo free press and Lafayette County news

Full Text




10-foot
alligator
sp o o k s .. ,'' .o ,
Bell "
resident A large alligator tried to take up residence in a Bell family's yard. See story below. Photo submitted.

nflaonline.com r







3' ,


Siurival Guide


Lafayette County schools make the grade


FCAT scores are slightly improved


IRA MIKELL
Free Press Reporter
mayofreepressl@alltel.net
The Florida Department of Educa-
tion recently made available more re-
sults from the Florida Comprehen-


sive Achievement Test on its website.
These test scores reveal how well
each school did in comparison to the
statewide scores. It also provides test
scores from previous years.
FCAT, a vital part of FDOE since
1998, was signed into law by former


Florida governor Jeb Bush. During
his tenure, Bush worked with the de-
partment and his administration to
improve test scores and make
schools and school districts more ac-
countable for student learning and
achievement.
As a result of this cooperative ef-
fort, test scores, according to the
FDOE website, have improved across


the state, especially in schools that
were once classified as "D" or "F"
schools. FDOE also credits this suc-
cess to teachers using the Sunshine
State Standards in the classroom.
These standards are also used to help
students prepare for the FCAT.
Earlier this year, on May 15, fourth:
SEE LAFAYETTE, PAGE 8A


Florida
tomatoes
safe to eat,
says Bronson
IRA MIKELL
Free Press Reporter
mayofreepressl@alltel.net
Since April, the Food
and Drug Administra-
tion has been investigat-
ing numerous cases sal-
monella poisoning in-
volving red plum, red
Roma, round red toma-
toes and any product
'that contains these toma-
toes.
In response, many gro-
cery stores, restaurants,

SEE FLORIDA, PAGE 8A

10-foot
alligator

spooks
Bell
resident
IRA MIKELL
Free Press Reporter
mayofreepressl@alltel.net
Several weeks ago, as
Valerie Thomas of Bell
was getting ready to
leave for work with her
children, she noticed a
large alligator had tak-
en up residence in her
yard. Her husband,
John, quickly notified
the Florida Fish and
SEE 10-FOOT, PAGE 9A


Hatch Bend man badly hurt in crash

..J ,Free Press Reporter
mayOfreepressl@alltel.net
.Hatch Bend resi-
dent Brian Butler, 30,
sustained serious but
non-life threatening
injuries in a single-car
Accident off CR 500
Tuesday, June 10, at 9
p.m., according to
Fiorida h6hwa I- a-
trol reports.
Butler's vehicle, a
.white, four-door 2004
.Daewoo, veered off
CR 500, slammed
-mmthrough a gated area,
and hit a tree, said
SFHP. The vehicle enid-
ed up about 200 feet
east of SE Leopard
S Road.
-. .-.. ..,The impactof the
Hatch Bend resident Brian Butler was seriously injured in a single-car accident June 10. His condition is said to SEE HATCH BEND,
be improving. Photo: Ira Mikell. PAGE 8A


First graders at Lafayette Elementary learn about trees and how to properly care for them.
tion of the Free Press.


for story and more photos in an upcoming edi-


I, Drew Bell, Jr., would like to declare my I 1 l. I i )
intent to run for County Commissioner, Dis- I-t Publix / I
trict One. I plan to qualify at the appropriate
time.

Mustit PI r tU 1 KW 1 o n
,) l llltj I i P1114 lllM U I No Purchase Necessary
.1.' i J il t-. i~ti S w I Must Present Coupon ,
f ) 111f W u I iH lTPJI in -M Limit I Pr Persof


Lafaytte ount 's ew Iouc sn e 18.Wrepodtosre


5,5000 REBATE


It '; *"'


e-I I /


0


trees








THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


O ,f-COA- Li= LA A'J F", l=PP= Z-Z nAvn Fl


PA E2 H ALYt Ii I lt rsa.. -Htw.~j, iviayo,M


Picture a two-year old
on the floor kicking and
screaming, wanting their
own way and having a
temper tantrum to get it.
If you haven't heard one
lately, walk near the toy
aisle at Wal-Mart, and
chances are good you
will. To be sure, a two-
year old doesn't leave
home planning to throw a
fit, it results when the de-
sire for something arises
and there is no under-
standing of how to deal
with those desires if they
aren't satisfied. While
these scenarios are far
from pleasant, they are
necessary life lessons in
maturing. The real prob-
lem comes when the tem-
per tantrum produces


positive results, we all
continue behavior that
gets us what we want.
Therefore, we never de-
velop the ability to control
our desires and feelings
no matter what our age.
To be immature is to be
incomplete or ufderde-
veloped, and unfortu-
nately two year olds
arefi't the only ones suf-
fering from this condition.
The Bible addresses
maturity in .what is com-
monly referred to as the
"love chapter," of all
places! I Corinthians
13:11 has this to say:
"When I was a child, I
talked like a child, I
thought like a child, I rea-
soned like a child. When I
became a man, I put


childish ways behind
me."
While hopefully you
haven't witnessed any
"down-on-the-floor fits"
by any adults lately, im-
maturity .affects many
over the age of 18, espe-
cially in the arena of rela-
tionships. Temper
tantrums may look a bit
different at an older age,
but call them what they
are, throwing a fit to get
your way. Yelling,
screaming, slamming
doors, throwing things,
using intimidation, or
giving the cold shoulder,
refusing to talk, withhold-
ing affection, using ma-
nipulation. Either way,
the real issue is immaturi-
ty: talking, thinking and


** BRANFORD RIVER REUNION *
* 30th ANNIVERSARY *
JULY 4th CELEBRATION *
, 10:00 A.M. OPENING CEREMONY
*L AT HATCH PARK ENTERTAINMENT, ARTS AND CRAFTS
AND FAMILY GAMES ALL DAY, *
PATRIOTIC PET CONTEST
ENTERTAINMENT BY WILLOW CREEK BAND
* 2:00 P.M. BRANFORD ROTARY CLUB RIVER DUCK RACE *
1ST PLACE WINNER $500 *
2ND PLACE WINNER $500
3RD PLACE WINNER $3100 *
*L 4TH PRIZE $300 *
5TH PRIZE $300
LAST DUCK- $100
& MANY OTHER PRIZES! ,
5:00 P.M. PARADE
FIREWORKS IN THE PARK AT DUSK *
* COME JOIN US!!
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CALL 935-1427 *
* TOWN O
f BRANFORD
ON THE BANKS OF &....S
THE SUWANNEE RIVER


reasoning like a child, not
putting childish ways be-
hind us.
According to Christian
authors Henry Cloud and
John Townsend, "The
good thing about imma-
turity is that it is not an in-
curable disease. The right
treatment will get rid of
it." What do they recom-
mend? Confronting our
own immaturity and rec-
ognizing the impact it is
having on our relation-
ships. Imagine that same
two-year old we first
mentioned, standing up,
brushing himself off and
saying, "You know Mom,
you're right. I don't need
that toy today. I'll just
look forward to getting it
for my birthday." .
That level of maturity in
a child would make our
jaws drop, facing our im-
maturity may have the
same affect on our loved
ones! Not easy, but right
and the first step toward
maturity. Having great re-
lationships are worth the
effort, because their hearts
and yours really do mat-
tert!
Blessings, Angie
Heat Matters is a week ctmn wrifen by
Ade Lnid, Diredor of the Fanmy *V Miistries
of the Lafayett Bpt Baptist s an wher e se
teaches sWe shdies, leas domm e aid family
conferences and offers hibd cfanstfig to ina-
divid s, couples and fariaes Contact Ange
with Questionsor smaien s at


AIRLINE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC)......294-2676
Pastor................................................................. Rev. Chip Parker
Sunday
Sunday School...................................................................9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship ......................... .............. 11:00 a.m.
PrayerMeetin CHURCH OF GOD............................... ..................... 4-5:30 p.m
DisPaleshiporTraining..................................................... Charles E. Hod6:e, Jr.
Evening WP orship..............................................................ha7:00 p.m
Wednesday
Fellowship SuDirect...................................................Blanche6:00-6:30 p.m
Awanas, Fait, Bible Study .............................................936:30 p.m.
Located FoService/KIDes East of Mayo on HigChurch. 10:30hway 27
S Come Let us Worship The Lord" Ps.956 424455-F

ALTON CHURCH OF GOD...................... 294-3133
Pastor.............Rev.l Charles E. Hodge, Jr.
Youth Pastor ..................................... ....................... 11:00Chan m Perry
M music Director...........................................................Blanch e Perry

Worship Service/K.I.D.S. Church..............0:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Evening W orshiptudy....................................... ....................6:00 p.m .
Family Night Youth Club Church ............. 7:00 p.m. Wednesday
State Road 27means Discipleship" 4163-F

ETHEL HOLY CHURCH..............RCH....... 294-1932
"Affiliated with Mt. Sinai Holy Churches of America Inc."
Pastor ..........................................................Elder Carolyn Demps
Sunday School........ ............................................1....11:00 a.m.
W ors dayp Service...................................................:...... 00 p.m .
Thursday Bible Study 4 miles South on Hwy............................49..................7:00 p.m.
357 Pine Street
"MNembership means Discipleship" 416373-F

HATCHBEND APOSTOLIC CHURCH..935-2806
Pastor ...................................................................... Rev. Steve Boyd
Sunday School.................................................... ........... 10:00 a.m .
W wednesday Service...........:.............................................. 7:30 p.m .
Located 4 miles South on Hwy. 349,
then left on CR 138, follow signs.
416377-F


Methodist Church
Phone: 386-294-1661
MAYO FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Located SE comer of Hwy, 27 & FL 51 Mayo
Pastor Jim Gamble
Sunday School......................................................... 1..... 0:00 a.m .
M morning W orship.........................................................11:00 a.m.
Evening W orship.......................................................... 6:00 p.m .


"The Friendly Mayo Methodist"


416385-F


MAYO BAPTIST CHURCH...........(386)294-1020
916 N. Fletcher Ave.
Pastor: Brother Jimmy Legg
Interim M music ................................................................. Kathy Palamino
Sunday Schedule
Bible Study. .................................................... ........................ 9:45 A.M .
W worship Service.......................................................................... 11:00A .M .
Sunday Night Service.......................................... ........ 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday Night Schedule
Supper .......................................................................................... 6:00 P.M .
Prayer Service & Youth & Children Meeting....................... 7:00 P.M.
mavobalisltchurch@alllel.ne 41 1BF


MIDWAY BAPTIST CHURCH................ 935-4993
I Pastor: Danny Rogers
Sunday School......................................................... 9:45 a.m .
Worship Service....... .............................. ...... 11:00 a.m.
Discipleshp Training........ ...... ................ 5:00 p.m.
Evening W orship..... .......................... ..... 6:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Wednesday............................. ......7:00 p.m.
Located on County Road 354
"For If Ye Forgive Men Their Tresspasses Your Heavenly
Father Will Also Forgive You" Matt. 6:14 4390F

ST. MATTHEW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH"
Contact Number in Mayo (386) 294-1839
Sr. W arden.................................................. ......... .Eva Bolton
Celebration of Holy Eucharist at 7:00 PM
each Wednesday to be followed by light
refreshments and Christian Education. N
Located One Block North of the Courthouse in Mayo. .


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor.................................................... Rev. Charlie Walker
Sunday Early Service........................... ...... 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School...... ...................... ........................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship.............................................. ......... 11:00 a.m.
Discipleship Training ..................................... ..... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship..............................................................7:00 p.m.
W ed. Visitation.............................'.................................... 5:00 p.m .
Bible Study ..........................................................7:00 p.m.
M mission Classes.................................................................7:00 p.m .
Located Two Miles North of Mayo Off Highway 51
"Come And Hear, All Ye That'Fear God" Ps. 66:16 416391-F


PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC).294-1306
Interim Pastor........................................................ Todd Babione
Sunday School.........................9:45 a.m.
W worship Service............................. ......................... ...e11:00 a.m .
Wednesday Discipleship Traiingn......................,......6:30 p.m.
Evening Training............. ........... 6:00 p.m.
Seven miles West of Mayo,
left on CR 534 then right on 350A
Jesus Saves 416392.F


NEW HARMONY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
160th St.
(Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right)
Pastor: Stan Posey .
Phone (386) 776-1806
SUNDAY
Sunday Worship........................... ..... ......................... 9:30 am
Bible Study.......................................................................... 10:30 am
WEDNESDAY
W omen's Bible Study.......... ........................................1...10:00 am
418394-F

Hatch Bend Baptist Church
Pastor George Dunn
935-0943

Sunday School.......................................................... 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship............................... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ......................................................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening..................................................7:00 p.m.


FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD.............2...294-1811 BreWer Lake Baptist Church
Sunday School .................................................9:45 a.m. Off Hwy. 53 in Day, FL 386-294-1578
Sunday "W..............................................e're Going, Growing and Glowing for God"
nd Worship Service...........................................10:30 a.m. SundaK
S n Kid's Church...................................................11:00 a.m Sunday Sch ool............................................................ .....10 a.m .
Evening Worship.............................................6:00 p.m. Morning Worship.................................. ......11 a.m,
Training Union....... .................................................. 6 p:m .
a Youth Im pact................................................. 7:00 p.m Evening Bible Study ......................................... ...................7 p.m .
4dne Adult Bible Study..... ........................... 7:00 p.m. Wed adany.
Pastor: Rev. Kenny Sullivan Children, Youth & Adult................... .................... 7pm
YuhPastor: Rev.KennySullvan Matt Swain, Pastor Willisam Sircy, outh
Youth Pastor: Daryl Fletcher oi Visit us on the web at www.brewerlakebaptistchurch.com
Located at 294 SE Mill Street, Mayo "Renewing Hope and Building Lives" "Come To Day...Come Todayl" 416402-F


New Beginnings Church
a place for you
Pastor...............Wayne Hudson
Phone Number........386-294-1244
newbeginningschurchallUtel.net
PurpsetStatent:
New Beginninpgs ts to provide menvironmet
here People cm discover and deeopa pssmionfor
God that isRel, deant and relational
New Location:
163 W. Main Street, Suite 500
Senrve Scheduk.
Sun. Morning Worship.....................10:00 a.m.
www.newbeginingschurchmayo.com

Ephesus Advent
Christian Church
Pastor Bill Talley
963-5600 208-9626
Sunday School Service....945 a.m.
Worship Service.............11:00 a.m.
Prayer Meeting...........,...7:00 p.m.
S 444933-F

To Place

Your Church

In Our

Church

Directory,

Call Nancy

at 386-362-

1734
Ly


To Place Your Church In Our Church


Directory, Call Nancy at 386-362-1734


*B *U~ t


CHRHNW


m


Fifth Sunday night


service at New Hope

Baptist Church

The Lafayette Ministerial Association will be
holding its fifth Sunday night service at New Hope
Baptist Church on Sunday, June 29. Services will be-
gin at 6 p.m.




During a time like this we realize how much
our friends and relatives mean to us. The family
of James E.(Jim) Johnson would like to express
our gratitude to the members of Mayo Baptist
Church, Pastor Jimmy Legg, the staff at Lafayette
County Healthcare and to the Emergency Med-
ical Technicians for their assistance and kindness
shown to us during the recent loss of our father.
Your thoughtfulness will always be remembered.



Florida Museum offers

butterfly-friendly plants

for sale each weekend
Add butterflies to any home or business land-
scape with the help of butterfly-friendly plants on
sale from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. to
5 p.m. Sunday at the Florida Museum of Natural
History.
Learn from the experts at the Florida Museum's
Butterfly Rainforest which plants will grow best in
different soils and the butterflies they are likely to
attract. Nectar, native,.host and accent plants will be
available and marked with butterfly information.
The Museum will feature 10 plants for sale in-
cluding at least one unannounced species each
week. A monthly schedule of plants for sale can be
accessed on the Museum's web site at
www.flmnh.ufl.edu/butterfliesLplant_sales.htm


. -- - -Ir-- -.- ..


I


III ----------- I "


I









THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 3A


SOIALEW


7.
Ethel McCall and Jeremy Burns


Burns graduates

from FSU

Jeremy Burns of Tallahassee recently graduated
from Florida State University with a Bachelor's of
Arts degree in history. He has accepted a teaching
position at an American School in Dubai, United
Arab Emirates.
Burns is 24, is the grandson of Mrs. Ethel McCall of
Mayo and the late Audie T.-McCall..


Questions about Medicare?
SHINE, a volunteer Branford Library Fri-
program with the FL De- day, June 20, 10 a.m. 12
apartment of Elder Af- noon
fairs, will be conducting Trenton Library Wed.,
free and confidential June 25, 10 a.m. noon
counseling on Medicare, Dixie County Library
Medicaid, Supplemental Wed., June 25, 2-4 p.m.
Insurance, Part D Drug Or call 1-800-262-2243
Plans, and Prescription for assistance if you can-
Assistance Programs at: not come to the site.


Get smart in yo

family dinner
Getting more fruits and
vegetables in at the dinner
table doesn't have to be a -.
struggle. Hey, why not .
add fruits and vegetables
to the meals you are al-
ready making? How
Smart! Or make a meal
starring just fruits and
vegetables. Try these tips
for convenient ways to
add MORE!
Double the delicious- Pippy Cashman
ness: Add a can of veg-
gies, such as corn or green daily intake-so add
beans, to a can of soup-or to canned, and fi
onions, peppers and/or frozen-mix and ma
mushrooms to the jar of For more infor
spaghetti sauce. on healthy eating
Create yummy rain- contact Priscilla Ca
bow lasagna: Tuck shred- Program Assistant,
ded carrots, sliced yellow Nutrition Program
peppers and chopped versity of I
spinach into each layer for Lafayette County (
a rainbow of flavors. For ative Extension Set
pickier palates, add 294-1279 or go
pureed vegetables to the "http:/ /www.frui
sauce. veggiesmorematter
Create a Picasso pizza
or a colorful fiesta:
"Paint" your pizza with
peppers, broccoli, spinach
and pineapple or dress up
your taco dinner with
sweet peppers, cucum-
bers and avocado.
Try a favorite dish in a
new way: Serve spaghetti
squash instead of pasta,
topped with your favorite
sauce and diced vegeta-
bles. 233 V
Sumptuous soups:
Whip up homemade
soups from pureed 105 W
cooked veggies, livened
up with a handful of
herbs and thinned with a
little canned vegetable or
chicken broth.
Get Smart, all forms 813 S.
count: All fruits and veg-
gies count towards your
Lafaye

2
"Heli


t frozen
resh to
tch!
mation
habits
sshman,
Family
n, Uni-
Florida,
Cooper-
rvice @
to
itsand-
s.org"


Birth Announcement


McKenna and Maci Shauna Thomas

McKenna Thomas is proud to announce the arrival
of her little sister Maci Shauna Thomas. Maci was
born on May 22, 2008, at the Woman's Center in
Gainesville. She weighed 9 pounds and 13 ounces
and measured 21 inches long.
The proud parents are Breck and Tonya Thomas.
Maternal grandparents are Annie Laura Hall of
Mayo and the late Charles E. Hall, Sr.
Paternal grandparents are Charles and Sandra
Thomas of Mayo.


glalystop


mailing Z


bill l

and give you one month FREE
H- ,"- Pa* y t ou
1. Monthly billing doesn't tie up large amounts of money in
advance.
2. Never receive another renewal notice no more checks to
write or stamps to find.
3. Switch at any time prefer to go back to paying another way
after trying EZ Pay? Just call us!
4. Sign up and receive one free month of home delivery service.
Choose From Two Convenient Payment Options


D Credit Card Payment
I want to take advantage of EZ Pay, and I authorize you
to bill my credit/ATM/debit card for the applicable
O10001 teach month until 1 instruct you otherwise.
Please bill mIy: 01 1n .
IF.*- JBmfCI-.r J I


1 Month
D0 81.34 in county
3 Month
0$4.00 in county


08 1.92 out of county

0$5.75 out of county


1 Direct Debit from
Checking/Savings Acount
I want to take atdvItagc of EZ lay, nid I
anthorilze you to process a payment for the
appilienille aioulnt on ily checkin}Vg/slintgs
necoutnt calh month until I listruct tyou otherwise.
Please debit my cheekling/saviigs account on the:
1 5th of eacIh month
i $ 1.134 In county
, 8,.00 In coillty
D 20th of each month,
13 81.92 out of nonilty
O 85.75 out of county


Credit card account number Enclosed is a blank check/deposit slip marked
Exp. Date "VOIl)" across the front.
Signature Signature
Required for validation Requircd for validation
I- -------- *..- *- -.--
CLIP AND MAIL TO:



I PO Box 248, Mayo, FL 32066 I
I


I Name


Address


I
City-

I Phone


State Zip I
I


ltt Yr i ssPO Box 248, Mayo, FL 32066
386-294-1210 45 .


Serving Madison, Jefferson,

Taylor & Lafayette Counties

Auto, Life, Health, Home


Freddy Pitts, Agency Manager


Jimmy King, Agent
V. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071

Freddy Pitts
J. Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-
2213

Freddy Pitts
Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371

Lance Braswell, Agent ......,
tte County Mayo, FL* (386) 294-,1 ,99


14/7 Claim Service: 1-866-275-7322
)ing You Is What We Do Best."


452870-F


45204U-F I


Im

ku


1"HE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 3A


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


W=









PA~~F 4A THF MAYO FREE PRESS. Mayo. FL THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


Community helpers in April


n April, the
kindergarten
classes at
Lafayette Ele-
mentary School studied a
unit on community
helpers, careers, and
transportation.
As part of this unit, we
invited many profession-
als from our community
to come and share what
their jobs were. The
kindergarten classes
were able to see the jobs
that are represented by
our community.
We also visited our lo-
cal library, post office,
courthouse, Drummond
Bank, and Lafayette State
Bank.
The kindergarten stu-
dents enjoyed receiving
the goodies provided by
the community helpers
and they enjoyed going
out in the community.
The kindergarten classes
would like to express
their thanks to the
thoughtful people and
businesses who partici-
pated in this unit:
Russell Walker (Lawn
Service); Travis Sullivan
(Mobile Home Sales);
Michele Walker (Hair De-
signs); Melissa Pearson
(Nurse); Matt Buchanan
(Central FL Lands and
Timber Nursery); Maggie
Evans (School Nurse);
Lori Sadler (Teacher,
Yearbook Coordinator);
Scotty Lents (Gustafason
Milk); Matt Pearson
(Suwannee River Eco-
nomic Council); Tabby
Fain (Carnival Conces-
sions); Chuck and Bran-
don Hewett (J and J Gas);
Wyman Clark (Suwan-
nee Valley Electric); Jana
Hart and Chris Vann
(Lafayette County Exten-
sion Office); Stephanie
Barrington (The Learning
Corner); Connie Pearson
(Middle School Teacher);


Lafayette Apartments
Hurry in and apply at "The
Best Place to Live!" Rental
Assistance, 1, 2, & 3 BR HC
& non-HC accessible
apartments. Laundry facility
& playground. We pay water,
sewer & garbage. Mayo, FL.
Ph: 386-294-2720, TDD/TTY
711. Equal Housing
Opportunity 416965-F


Courthouse: Judge Dar-
ren Jackson, Lana Mor-
gan, Marilyn Wimberley,
Tim Walker, Ricky Lyons,
Bobby Johnson,
Leighanne Fowler, Matt
Swain (Brewer Lake
Preacher); Jason Single-
tary and Julie Koon (Sin-
gletary Trucking); Lind-
sey Jackson (Mayo Town
and Country Animal
Hospital); Carson McCall
(Sheriff), Officer Hamlin,
Officer Hempstead, Offi-
cer Condy; Heather Jack-
son (Interior Designs);
W.C. Hart (Volunteer Fire
Department); Trevor
Hicks and Debra Lang-
ford (EMT and Jaws of
Life); Sidney and Julie
Koon (Farming); Troy
Hamlin, Lance Lamb,
Ashley Taylor, Chris Jor-
dan (Mayo Correctional
Institute and search dog);
Janis Johnson, Kay
Green, Meki Pearson (Li-
brary); Patti Ferriea (Post
Office); Mary Beth Ham-
lin (Lafayette State Bank);
Cassie Phelps, Yvonna
Sullan, Chan Perry
(Drummond Bank); Paul
and Forrest Byrd (Byrd's
Logging); Steven Hall


~. N~


Advertise your YARD SALE, VEHICLES OR
UNWANTED ITEMS IN THE CLASSIFIED.
Call (386) 294-1210 or
1-800-525-4182 to place your ad today
416600.F


118 E. Park St. Perry, FL 32348
(Behind Foodland Shopping Center)
Toll-Free 1-866-Perry Movies (737-7966)
Visit our website at www.perrytheatre.com
Bargain/NIatinee's.....$4.00 all seats
All Other Shows...........$5.00 all seats
1 Free Refill On Med/Lg Drink & All Popcorn
Starting Friday 6/20/08


Ge ,I.


Fri. & Sat................ 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat............... 7:30 p.m
Sunday........................ 4:00 p.m. Sunday......................... 4:00 p.m
Coming Attractions:
* The Incredible Hulk
Hancock
Wall-E, starts 6/27

BUY 1CIET 1 FREE COUPON
(Limit one per visit) Certain restrictions nmay apply. Expires 06/29/08
n y i y memmmm mpmm m:mFH:


(Division of Forestry);
Mr. Ira and Mrs. Linda
(Mayo Free Press); Tina
Singletary (CPA); Lance
Bracewell (Farm Bureau
Insurance); Tracey Hen-
derson (Dental Clinic);
Brian Lamb (Florida


Highway Patrol); Frank
Gerrard (Train Conduc-
tor); Kelly Jackson
(Speech Therapist); Jar-
rette Linton (Bass Assas-
sin); Winslow Frdriksson
(Farming); & Mrs. Wanda
(Publix Bakery).


Cars for Boys and

Girls Clubs in Florida
Boys and Girls Clubs throughout the country are
pleased to call their clubs, "THE POSITIVE PLACE
FOR KIDS." Helping to keep clubs a "positive place"
is the income from donated cars.
Boys and Girls Clubs are accepting car donations.
The money received from the sale of the cars is a big
influence in making a club "positive."
To donate a car just call 1-800-246-0493. No restric-
tions apply and the car will be picked up within a
few days.



MAYO FREE PRESS
Published weekly every Thursday, USPS #334-600
Phone: (386) 294-1210 Fax: (386) 294-2666


i-

Myra Regan,
Publisher


Linda Smith,
Manager


- ^

Ira Mikell
Reporter


Annual subscription rate:
$17 in county / $24 out of county
Periodicals postage paid at Mayo, Florida
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
The Mayo Free Press
P.O. Box 248
Mayo, Florida 32066
Office located at 705 NW Suwannmiee Ave. Branford, FL
Editorial Policy: The Mayo Free Press encourages readers to write let-
ters to the editor expressing their opinion. All letters should be brief and to
the point and those selected for publication (we reserved the right to accept
or reject all letters) may be edited for space reasons. Letters must be signed
and include the writer's address and phone number to be considered for
publication. All letters become the property of The Mayo Free Press.


EARNHARDT & SONS
UPHOLSTERY

JUNE

SPECIAL!

Sofa & Chair
Upholstered
r/ t min any fabric T
we stock!


$48900
Price includes fabric & labor.
More than 300 fabrics to select from!
Price also includes spring & frame repairs, new padding
added to entire piece. New cushion foam is extra if needed.
NO Seconds NO Close-Outs
All First Quality Material.
"I personally guarantee all work to suit you"


1 901? Q! I t- I_ o 1' I S 1(, i -]I
g [ ;s *o I2;f3. ;


Kun F Pnd


LHS Supplies needed

for school year


6th Grade supplies
i2 'Pencils
Blue/Black pens
Notebook paper
Small covered pencil
sharpener
Markers, crayons, or
colored pencids
Small cheap calculator
Colored grading pens
Ino gel pens
1 spiral bound note-
book (Language arts.)
Scissors
Cap erasers

Students will be re-
quired to have a folder
for each class. We have
2 different options be-
low:
1. 2 pocket/3 prong
folders 6 total (1 for
each class)
2. 1 large binder with 6
dividing folders (1 sec-
tion for each class)

The following items
will be collected and
used in class when
needed:
Graphing paper
4 packs lined index
cards
Expo markers
Hand samtizer
Kleenex tissue


7th Grade Supplies
Notebook paper (all
teachers)
#2 pencils (all teachers)
Graphing paper (1/4
inch) Mrs. Driver and
Mrs. Swain
Colored pencils (all
teachers)
Calculator (add, sub-
tract, positive/ negative
+/-, multiply, divide,
square root, percent -
Mrs. Driver and Mrs
Swain
No scientific or graph-
ing calculators will be
allowed for math
Index cards (all teach-
ers)
Blue or Black pens
(Mrs. Hart
Composition book
(Mrs. Swain)
Pens, Paper, composi-
tion book (Mr. Clark)

8th grade supplies
Loose leaf notebook pa-
per
composition book
pencils
pens
folder with pocket and
prongs
There will be items that
the different teachers
require for their indi-
vidual classrooms.
Teachers should give
you a list of these items
the first week of school.


The annual fall
Suwannee River Jubilee-
Southern Gospel-will be
held Oct. 2-4 at the Spir-
it of the Suwannee Mu-
sic Park (SOSMP) in
Live Oak. Featured
groups will be the Dove
Brothers, Dixie Melody
Boys, Blackwood Broth-
ers and the Dixie
Echoes. Take a break at
the SOSMP canoe,
horseback ride, bike,
hike, play mini golf,
shop, enjoy the SOS


Cafe, the arts and crafts
village or just -relax and
enjoy some good South-
ern gospel music.
Advance tickets and
reservations at the
SOSMP are available
now. To learn more
about the event, go to
musicliveshere.com and
click on Full Calendar of
Events. For tickets and
reservations, go to ju-
bilee@dixieechoes.com
or call the SOSMP at
386-364-1683.


Branford Camera Club
meeting set for June 18
The Branford-Camera Club will meet Thursday,
June 19, 7:30 PM, at the Branford Public Library.
This month's meeting will be an open forum... we'll
discuss whatever photography-related topic you'd
like to bring to the forum. As always, bring any of
your recent pictures you'd like to share.
The Branford Camera Club meets at the Branford
Public Library on the 3rd Thursday of each month,
with two exceptions. We have no meeting in August,
and our December meeting is held on the 2nd Thurs-
day to accommodate the busy Holiday season.
For more information, please call one of the fol-
lowing:
Carolyn Hogue, Program Chair, 386-935-2044
Dick Bryant, Technical Consultant, 386-935-1977
Dick Madden, Technical Consultant, 386-935-0296
Skip Weigel, Technical Consultant, 386-935-1382


Trees and Trails

REALTY
S F Brack Jackson
Licensed Real Estate Broker
www.treesandtrailsrealty.com Office: (386) 294-1366







Land and Home. 6 81 acres arid a doublewide mobile home with
well, power and septic. Close to town and priced right. Additional
adjoining acreage also available. MLS# 66507 $90,000
10 acre tracts. Private drive and close to town. MLS# 66506 and
MLS# 66505 $58,000 each.
Lot in Old Town with highway frontage. MLS# 66241 $14,500
Home sitting on 1/2 city block. Large shade trees surround home.
Property would also make a nice business location. MLS# 66075
$165,000

3 Bed/ 2 Bath mobile home sitting on 26,83 acres. MLS# 66503
$187,000 430245.F


Plan now to attend

fall Suwannee River

Jubilee Oct. 2-4

Gospel music at its best on
the famous Suwannee River


CIASSIFIEPS


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


PAGE 4A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


r










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Scenes of Lafayette County at the Suwannee Invitational All-Star Tournament Major and
Senior Leagues. Photos by Paul Buchanan, suwanneesports@gmail.com


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A SOWaAL IiTHANKS
FROM THE MAE ROTARY at B AM MAYO QUARTERBACK CLUB

YO RY S0aosrTY BL4SWDTHF MAYO RTARY A T4 O FU$ Nb E
SAUNA iLA& PEAAsaY MNMU4 sOatS A WA nrErTamwrsca SQARnSHfi
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EXTRA! EXTRA
Do you know where to purchase
the Mayo Free Press?
HERE'S WHERE!!
Store locations
Jiffy 302, Hwy. 27 Fast Track, Hwy. 27
L&R, SR 51 Thriftway, Hwy. 27
Foodmart, Hwy. 27 Jiffy 324, Buckville
Hwy. 27 Taylor Store, SR 51
Luraville Store, SR 51
Jiffy 310, Dowling Park on CR 250
Village Grocery, Dowling Park
*Time Saver, Hwy. 27 Branford
C-Square, Hwy. 27 Branford
Scaff's Grocery, Hwy. 129 Branford

Coin Rack locations
Mayo Cafe Sub Shop
2 Sisters BBQ Mayo Post Office


9 \


IF you're ready to put in a new pool, remodel your kitchen, or install
new windows, come see First Federal For your Financing.


Giue us a call or stop by today For more details.

Amelia Island 904.321.2337 Jasper 386.792.2400 Lake City 386.755.0600
Liue Oak/Dowling Park 386.362.3433 macclenny 904.653.5400 mayo 386.294.1940
uwww.rfsb.com


BI \ N K ] of 0 RI i A


Member

LENDER FDIC


HELOC To receive introductory rate, must have monthly payment automatically deducted from o FFBF checking account. 2.99% variable Annual Porcoetlago Rate (APR) will be in effect for the first twelve (12)
billing cycles, then a variable intorost rate based on the Prime Rate as published in the Wall Stroeet Journal. On 5/22/2008 the Primo Rate was 5.00%. Rate is subject to change. Maximum interest rate not to
xceed 18%. This offer is available only on single family residences. First Federal must be in a valid first or second lion position on the collateral. HELOC fees may range from $300 to $2,565. Exclusions and
limitations apply. $47 annual plan tfo may apply. Property insurance is required, including flood insurance where applicable. Consult your tax advisor regarding tlihe deductibility of interest. Loan pricing subject
to credit underwriting and approval.
S41008-F


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THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 5A


THI jp.qnAV .11 INF 19 2008


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P-/~tlF- rA HA YO FREEI PRESS. MIyw IFL THURSDAY, JUNE.19,,2008


Lafayette County
Library Summer
Program

The Lafayette County Library will again host a
summer library program. The theme this year is
"Catch the Reading Bug."
Programs begin June 17 at 10 a.m.
Other dates are:
June 24, July 1, and July 8
Time: 10 a.m.
June 17, will be Anna Moo www.annamoo.com
June 24 and July 1 (to be announced)
July 8 Mad Science "Fire and Ice" www.mad-
science.com


Water Awareness Science Institute for gifted students


North Florida Community College (NFCC) is ac-
cepting applications for 40 gifted eighth through
12th grade students from the surrounding counties
to participate in a three week Water Awareness Sci-
ence Institute on the Madison campus from June
23-July 15. The Water Awareness Project is a part of
the Governor's Summer Program for Gifted and
High Achieving Students. There is no fee for select-
ed students. Students will be selected based on
outstanding achievements, grade point average
(GPA), recommendations from school personnel
and a written essay. A preference will be given to
students who are in a gifted program. The project
is inviting the participation of one science teacher
from each of the six counties. A stipend will be
available for selected teachers. The Institute will


run Monday through Friday for three weeks 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. daily. Info/application: Terry Zimmer-
man, 850-973-1646 or zimmermant@nfcc.edu or
Nancy Lillis, 850-973-1661 or lillisn@nfcc.edu.


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THURSDAY, JUNE 19,2008


PAGE 6A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL









THURSDAY. JUNE 19. 2008 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 7A


Young women roll up their


sleeves to give blood


That "We can do it"
attitude of World War
all's Rosie the Riveter
has been passed on to a
ne\\ generation of
blood donors who are
both young and a ma-
jority are female.
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers operates
in Florida, Georgia and
Alabama, collecting -
more than 800 units of
blood daily to support
more than 130 medical
facilities. When it
crunched the numbers
of its active donors over
the past two years, the
results contradicted sev-
eral popularly held
stereotypes over who is
most likely to give
blood.
The largest single
group was donors 20 to
24, followed closely by
donors ages 17 to 19,
while those 25 to 29
were the third largest.
"I'm not surprised,
I've seen this for years,"
said Galen Unold, Di-
rector of Donor Recruit-
ment and Retention for
LifeSouth.
Today's teens and
twenty somethings are
willing to help, Unold
says, and they're not the
generation of slackers
as they are frequently
portrayed.
"Without this age
group helping us, we
eould not operate as an
organization," Unold
said.
Unold says LifeSouth
holds blood drives on
every college, commu-
nity college and high
school campus in the
areas it serves, and
some schools will host
three or four drives per


year.
"This is a group that
is healthy, they have the
time and it's a way they
can make a difference,"
Unold says. "It's truly
an altruistic act."
And while the
younger donors are the
most active, they are
also the group that is
the hardest to connect
with during the sum-
mer.
"The 17-25 age group
account for 27 percent
of our donor base and
' during the summer we
struggle to connect with
them. We try to sched-
ule more blood drives
with business, civic
groups, and other com-
munity minded organi-
zations so they can pick
up the slack of our
youth. It's one of the
reasons that each sum-
mer we face a blood
shortage and it's why it
is so important that
donors make the extra
effort to give during
this time of the year,".
Unold said.
Christine Evans, a
donor services manager
for LifeSouth, has
worked many drives on
the University of Flori-
da campus. She says
frequently on those dri-
ves she'll have to turn
donors away, because
they're too eager to
help. They're unable to
give because they
haven't had enough
time pass since their
previous donation.
"That happens every
day on campus, and I
don't think it's because
of our T-shirts," Evans
said.
She said many of


these donors got their
start in high school,
when donating did of-
fer a nice bonus a
chance to legally cut
class. But it then be-
came a habit they took
to college and beyond.
"It makes them feel
good to do it," she said.
"They make themselves
part of our community
by donating."
Over the past two
years female donors
have accounted for. 56
percent of all donors. In
fact, only in the plus-65
age groups do men
overtake women as
donors.
"I don't think women
are as intimidated by
the whole medical at-
mosphere," Evans said.
Unold speculates that
guys may also fear em-
barrassment of passing
out fi something that
rarely ever occurs fi so
they nix even that re-
mote possibility and
don't try it.
"They won't ever ad-
mit it, but I think that's
a reason," Unold said.
Evans said she never
hears the words "fear"
or "afraid" coming from
guys, instead she hears,
"I don't do needles."
And she's heard it from
men with pierced eye-
brows, pierced tongues
and from those covered
in tattoos.
"If I can just get them
to try it, they learn just
how simple and pain-
less it can be to save a
life," Evans said.
4039 Newberry Road
Gainesville, Florida
32607
(352) 224-1660
www.lifesouth.org


Spotlighting past Lafayette High

School athletes continues.......


Submitted by
Donald Hurst
It has been a joy to
"spotlight on past
Lafayette High ath-
letes." A number of
people have con-
tributed to the story of
Clayette Dees and Wy-
atte O'steen. Wyatte
must have been a real
athlete as he lettered in
college football before
Lafayette High even
played football; and
also lettered in basket-
ball and baseball.
And now we will
take a look at the next
Lafayette High athlete
to play in college.
(Hopefully, if someone
knows of earlier players
from LHS playing in
college they will call
The Mayo Free Press at *
294-1210.
The picture enclosed
shows Ray Graves,
head football coach at


the University of Flori-
da signing the number
one recruit, Kenny Fol-
som from Lafayette
High School, on Dec.
15, 1968.
Graves was in
Alachua General Hospi-
tal with a "severe case
on Bronchitis." Since
Graves couldn't come
to Mayo to sign they
arranged for Kenny, his
mother Nadine and dad
A.F. Folsom to come to
the hospital and sign
where the news media
statewide could have
photo ops and see that
the head coach was on
the job.
Back in those days
freshmen could only
play on the freshman
team and all players on
Freshman and varsity.
teams played both of-
fense and defense.
The freshman team
played a four game


:... '. *

This old photo was reproduced from the December 15,
1968 edition of the Gainesville Sun. ,


schedule and the varsi-
ty a nine game sched-
. ule. Kenny was starting
fullback for the fresh-
man team that first
year. He was hailed by
the media as being the
starting fullback on the
varsity next year.
On the last freshman
team game of the sea-
son Kenny got banged
up pretty badly. After
the game his head hurt
very badly. He was car-
ried to the hospital
where x-rays and care-
ful examination re-
vealed no damage, his
headaches lessened and
he was discharged from
the hospital.
The following spring
he had a good practice
and was put in as the
varsity team's number
one fullback.
During the Orange
and Blue Spring game
his headaches returned
very serverly. He was
rushed to the hospital
where x-rays now re-
vealed old fracture lines
of his neck vertebrae.
He remained on schol-
arship but was never to
play football again.
He now lives in the
Orlando area where he
is a successful business
man in the construction
industry. He and his
wife have three chil-
dren, one of which was
an outstanding high
school baseball player.
The Cleveland Indians
signed him directly out
of high school with a
signing bonus of more
than a half million dol-
lars.
Upcoming articles
will feature one ,of
Lafayette High School's
most productive college
player.


Two eye-popping,

world-class golf courses.


One new luxurious hotel and spa

overlooking the Tennessee River.

All of this adds up to one more reason to

visit Alabama's Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail.

Take on the Fighting Joe and the new
Schoolmaster courses at The Robert Trent

Jones Gulf Trail at The Shoals. Then spend
your evening relaxing at the Marriott Shoals

Hotel and Spa, part of thdie Resort Division of
the Trail.

Make The Shoals your choice for world-
class golf and luxury. Call 800 949 4444 today

for golf and hotel reservations. Call the hotel at
800 593 6450.


ALABAMA'S

ROBERT RENTJONES
GOLF IAIL






www.rtjgolf.com


CHOOSE FROM 432 CHAMPIONSHIP HOLES
ON OUR TEN WORLD-CLASS SITES STATEWIDE


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THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 7A


THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008








.fDA('IP RA -TUW UAVO R FPFl DD Q q Ar ZTH R A ,JU E1,20 t IOf ** 1.,vn'. a n aa vo- FL,


The Lady of the Mayo Rotary News
Lake Quilting 7

Guild meeting
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild will hold
its monthly meeting on
SWednesday, June 25, at.
the Suwannee River Re-
gional Library on US 129,
south of Live Oak. Social
time starts at 9:30 AM, the
business meeting begins at
10 AM.
The program for June
will feature local artist
Carolyn Spilatore who willF,
speak on one stroke paint-
ing. i.
The Guild will also have .
a "show and tell" session Travis Hart, an aide to Florida Congressman Allen
where quilters showcase Boyd (Dem), offers a brief update on several is-
their recent projects. sues being debated in Washington, D.C., to the
The Guild is:an organi- Mayo Rotary Club on Wednesday, June 11. Sever-
zation for anyone interest- al of the issues discussed were the rising cost of
ed in quilts and the art of fuel, possible drilling of oil in new locations, and
quilting. The public is in- the farm bill. Photo: Ira Mikell.
vited.


Florida tomatoes
A . .


sate to eat, says


Continued From Page 1A
and other establish-
ments removed the
'juicy red vegetables
from their shelves, and
refused to sell them un-
* til the investigation was
over.
As of June 10, the
;FDA concluded that all
tomatoes grown in
Florida are safe to eat.
"It is critical that con-
sumers know that our
tomatoes are safe and
delicious. Our growers
have worked hard to
ensure the utmost safety
"of their product," Flori-
da Department of Agri-
::culture and Consumer
*Services Commissioner
Charles-Bronson said in'
,- a press release dated
'Ju El 10. '. : ':
* In order to help con-
:sumers know the prod-


uct they are purchasing
is safe to eat, Bronson is
implementing the
"Fresh From Florida
Program." Every tomato
farmer in Florida in who
signs up will receive free
"Fresh From Florida" la-
bels to put on every
tomato that will enter

Hatch Be

badly hum
Continued From Page 1A
collision destroyed the
vehicle, trapping Buitler
inside. Hatch Bend Vol-
unteer Fire Department
and Lafayette Emer-
gency Services.-person-,.
nel used the Ja *. of
Life to e\tritate ButJir. ''
Butler was transport-
ed by Lafayette EMS to


Lafayette County schools

make the grade


decreased from last year.
Fourth graders
recorded an average
score of 332, the highest
in reading for Lafayette
County Schools, while
sixth graders scored
292. In math, seventh
graders scored 336,
while ninth graders
scored the lowest, 309.
Scores were based on a
range between 100 and
500, according to
FDOE.
In an email interview,
Fred Ward, Lafayette
County School Superin-
tendent, said he was dis-


appointed and deeply
concerned about the re-
sults. "The scores are not
as good as we expected
like in years past, but
our students and teach-
ers are working very
hard. We have a plan for
improvement for next
year," Ward said. Plans
include summer training
in reading, progress
monitoring, and data
analysis, just to name a
few.
For more information
about test scores, visit
the FDOE website at
fcat.fldoe.org.


4-H Residential Gator Adventures Camp
4-H Residential Gator or $215 per week for swimming, recreational
Adventures Camp will non 4-H members. The games, campfires, fish-
be held Monday-Friday, camp will provide ing and more. Registra-
July 28-Aug. 1 at Camp youth the opportunity tion deadline is Tues-
Cloverleaf in Lake to learn about and par- day, July 1. Info/regis-
Placid. Cost: $200 per ticipate in fun activities tration: Brian Estevez,
week for 4-H members such as canoeing, 386-362-2771.


Bronson
the market. "When they
see the Fresh from Flori-
da logo, they will know
exactly where the toma- S m m m p
toes were grown," Bron- merBatOn Ca
son said. Saturday,
For more information, Saturay, une282008
visit www.fda.gov, and 9:00 a.rl.,-4:00 p.m.
http://www.doacs.state.
fl.us/index.html. SDA Dance Studio in Branford
Camp will include:
nd man 1 Baton, 2 Baton, 3 Baton, Rolls, Tricks, etc. *
rt in crash $65 per student (Includes Camp, T-Shirt and Lunch)
Hands of Lake Shore, Call 386-935-1000 to register!
then transferred to Summer Tumbling Class *
Shands UF. FHP Troop ng Cl
er Jesse Moore, who in- Summer tumbling offered by *
vestigated the accident,
said Butler's condition Cheek's Gymnastics from Live Oak.
is slowly improving Weekly Class @ SDA's Studio *
while-be is being treat- -* T
ed for his injujreI.
Estimated f rmage of '* .. "
the vehicle is $3,000, Call 86-935-1000 for more information. 6F*
according to FHP.


S uS*s S S* 'S S a U Y

Fo oeifom to botavriin norBuiesDrctr alLoieLtCleMHr !rIa 941 0o 863--131 x.1


* JORDAN AGENCY, INC.




Joe Jordan .
405 SW Highway 27 -... ,. 1416 N. Ohio Ave.
Branford. FL 32064 Live Oak. FL 32060
935-638'5 362-4724


FUNERAL HOME
1400 Johnson Stripling Road, Perry Florida 32347
Ioll Free 800-343-3151
Leila F. Allen
Family Services Counselor
Advance Funeral Planning


Mayo Chapel
386-294-2658


Perry Chapel
850-584-4149
41B851-F


- U- ------------ II-------------~ ~ -


JoLee Quilt Shop
Quilting and Supplies
Long Arm Quilting


587 S. Fletcher Ave., Mayo, FL
386-294-1694
email: joleeqs@windstream.net
Hours: Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m. 5 p.m.


&LExcavadg


* Front I
* CAT B
* Grada]
* Earthn
* Pond D


End Loader Limerock *
ack Hoe Top Soil *
11 Clearing
moving Site Prep
)igging Fill Dirt *
Kenn\ Hart Jr., Owner 386-294-2621


A-.f


ir11


Lambert Computer Service, Inc.
"Computers that work for YOU..."
Victor Lambert
Phone: 386-294-3444
Email: vlctor@lambertcs.com
www. www.Ilambertcs.com


Computer Repair
Virus/Malware
Network Installation
WAN


Custom Computer Systems
Software Installation
Broadband Setup
Upgrades


On-site Home Service in the North Florida Area


Byrd's Power Equipment
Sales & Service
A AII Makes & Models

HUSQVARNA.
11860 E. U.S. 27, Branford, FL 32008
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-5 p.m. (386) 935-1544
Open Saturdays 7 a.m.-12 p.m. I
416847-F


WOLFE PLUMBING, INC.
Repair Remodeling Drain Cleaning
New Construction
7 Days '24 Hours
386-935-0616


S~iaveCurfied #CF0t51(621
Ser fng AU North Central florida


416M-FI


Daniels Funeral Homes
& Crematory, Inc.

Branford 935-1124
Live Oak 362-4333
James (Jim) B. Daniels, III, L.F.D.
Keith Daniels, L.F.D.
J.B. Daniels, Jr.
(Local) Family Owned & Operated
416848F

Call Junk Joe!
$200 $400 for junk vehicles
Will remove ANY KIND
of scrap metal


Mon Sat 386-867-1396
After 5pm 386-755-9183
452863-F


For more information about advertising on our

Business Directory call Louise at Ie it4Maao nr t Press

at 294-1210 or 386-362-1734 ext. 141 416598F
1II 169-


'HAUt bA I Mr- rVIATU I-Mr-r- ividyu, rL


Continued From Page 1A
graders were treated to a
banana split and ice
cream party for being in
second place in the state
in FCAT writing. They
tied for second with
fourth graders at Tren-
ton Elementary School.
The additional test
scores revealed a slight
improvement from last
year in reading and
math for several grade
levels. Some of these
scores surpassed the
state average. For others,
some of the scores had


I I I r-


TH U RS DAY, J UN E 19, 2008











THURSDAY. JUNE 19. 2008


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL- PAGE 9A


Mayo Legals
ATTENTION COMCAST CABLE
CUSTOMERS IN MAYO, FL
AND JENNINGS, FL
Effective July 17, 2008 the late payment
fee charged for past due payments will
change from $5.00 to $7.00. If you are In-
terested in information about this change
and want information about availability,
service, equipment details and restric-
tions, please contact Comcast at 1-888-
COMCAST (1-888-266-2278).
6/19 g__
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2008CA000510001XX
DANIEL CRAPPS, as Trustee of the
McCRAY LAND TRUST,
Plaintiff,


AGUILLARD EUSTACHE; and other
unknown parties In possession, In-
cluding the unknown spouse of any
person In possession of the property,
and if a named Defendant is deceased,
the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, and all other par-
ties claiming by, through, under or
against that Defendant, and all
claimants, persons or parties, natural
or corporate, or whose exact legal sta-
tus is unknown, claiming under any of
the named or described Defendants,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pur-
suant to a Default Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated May 30, 2008, in the
above referenced case in which DANIEL
CRAPPS, as Trustee of the McCRAY
LAND TRUST is Plaintiff, and
AGUILLARD EUSTACHE; unknown ten-
ants; and other unknown parties in pos-
session, including the unknown spouse of
any person in possession of the property,
and if a named Defendant Is deceased,
the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, and all other parties
clainring by, through, under or against
that Defendant, and all claimants, per-
sons or parties, natural or corporate, or
whose exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under any of the named or de-
scribed Defendants, are Defendants, I,
RICKY LYONS, Clerk of the Court, will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash in the Lafayette County Courthouse
in Mayo, Florida, at 11:00 o'clock A.M. (or
as soon thereafter as Plaintiff's counsel
may direct provided that said sale must
be commenced prior to 2:00 o'clock
P.M.), on the 3rd day of July 2008, the fol-
lowing described property set forth In the
Default Final Judgment of Foreclosure:
Part of the Southeast 1/4 of the South-
west 1/4 of Section 36, Township 4 South,
Range 10 East, Lafayette County, Florida
being more particularly described as fol-
lows:
For Point of reference commence at the
Northeast Comer of the Southeast 1/4 of
the Southwest 1/4; thence run North
8954'59" West along the North line of
said Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4,
a distance of 602.39 feet to the. point of
Beginning; thence run South 026'43"
East, a distance of 1304.80 feet to the
North right-of-way line of County Road
No. 53; thence run South 8952'15" West
along said North right-of-way line, a dis-
tance of 200.00 feet; thence run North
026'43" West a distance of 660.00 feet;
thence run South 8952'15" West, a dis-
tance of 330.00 feet; thence run North
026'43" West, a distance of 646.77 feet
to the North line of said Southeast 1/4 of
the Southwest 1/4; thence run South
89054'59" East along said North line, a
distance of 530.02 feet to the Point of
Beginning.
Subject to an easement for utilities over
and across the South 20.00 feet and the
East 10.00 feet thereof.
Any and all bidders, parties or other inter-
ested persons shall contact the informa-
tion desk of the Clerk of the Court prior to
the scheduled foreclosure sale who will
advise of the bxact location in the
Lafayette County Courthouse for the fore-
closure sale.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST
IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE. IF
ANY. OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN
60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
[NOTE: If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommodation in or-
der to participate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance. Please con-
tact Court Administrator, Post Office
Box 1569, Lake City, Florida 32056-1569,
Telephone: 386-758-2163, within two (2)
working days of your receipt of this Notice
or pleading. If you are hearing or voice
impaired, please call: 1-800-955-8771.]
WITNESS my hand and the official seal of
said Court, this 4th day of June, 2008 at
Mayo, Lafayette County, Florida
(COURT SEAL)
HONORABLE RICKY LYONS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Hannah Owens
As Deputy Clerk
THE DECKER LAW FIRM P.A.
320 White Avenue
Post Office Box 1288
Live Oak, Florida 32064
Telephone: 386-364-4440
Telecopier: 386-364-4508
Email: decklaw@alltel.net
Attorney for Plaintiff
6/.12,19


LEGAL NOTICE
The Suwannee River Economic Council,
Inc. Board of Directors will hold a meeting
of the Board of Directors on Monday,
June 30, 2008, 7:00 P.M. at the Suwan-
nee Rive Economic Council, Inc., Senior
Center In Live Oak, Florida.
6/19

PUBLIC NOTICE
The Lafayette County Commission will
hold a regular meeting on Monday, June
23, 2008 at 5:30 p.m. The meeting will be
held In the Commissioners Meeting
Room at the Courthouse in Mayo, Florida.
Listed below Is an agenda for the meet-
ing.
By Order of:
T. Jack Byrd
Chairman
Lafayette County Commission
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENTS:
1. Approve Resolution SE 08-05
2. Consider a special exception to permit
an RV campsite for Charles Wilson.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS:
1. Call the regular meeting to order
2. Approve the minutes
3. Special needs from the community
4. Department Heads:
A) Marcus Calhoun Maintenance
B) Edward Dodd Public Works
C) Donnie Land Public Safety
D) Bobby Johnson Building/Zoning
5. Planning and zoning issues.
6. Nancy McCullers-Lafayette County
Hesialth Department fees.
7. Leenette McMillan-various items.
8. Approve the bills.
S9. New Business.
10. Adjourn.


Mayo Legals


ALL MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC ARE
WELCOME TO ATTEND. NOTICE IS
FURTHER HEREBY GIVEN,
PURSUANT FLORIDA STATUTE
286.0105, THAT ANY PERSON OR
PERSONS DECIDING TO APPEAL ANY
MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS
PUBLIC HEARING WILL NEED A
RECORD OF THE HEARING AND MAY
NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM
RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS
MADE WHICH RECORD INCLUDES
THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE
UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE
BASED.
PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
REQUESTING REASONABLE
ACCOMMODATIONS TO PARTICIPATE
IN THIS PROCEEDING SHOULD
CONTACT (386) 294-1600 OR VIA
FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE AT (800)
955-8771.
6/19-1-D


10-foot alligator spooks Bell resident


Continued From Page 1A

Wildlife Commission to send
someone out to remove the in-
truder. FWC officials destroyed
the animal, according to re-
ports.
Thomas said FWC reported
the gator was 10 feet long and
weighed about 300 lbs.
According to Karen Parker,
spokesperson for the FWC Lake
City office, the Thomas family
handled the situation properly.
"If someone does encounter a
gator in their backyard or in


their pool or under their car,
don't attempt to catch the
gator," she said in an email in-
terview. "Call the hotline and
let the experts deal with it. Our
alligator trappers have the ex-
perience and the equipment to
deal with a gator. We don't
want anyone getting hurt."
Last year, FWC logged more
than 13,000 complaints of alli-
gators creating a nuisance.
More than 10,000 of those nui-
sance alligators were disposed
of by trained professionals.
P.arker also reminds residents


that it is against state law to kill
any alligator, unless a permit
has been granted by FWC.
Trained alligator trappers are
the only ones authorized to re-
move and relocate or dispose of
the animal. Harassing alligators
as well as keeping them as a pet
are also illegal, says Parker.
Another suggestion Parker
gives is to be aware of your sur-
roundings, especially near bod-
ies of water. According to the
FWC website, alligators are
mostly active between sunrise
and sunset.


2008 Chevy HHR LT #3486 30 MPG
*0nstar *chrome appearance package
*LT package



2008 '11,995. 0%60

2008 Chevy Cobalt LT #3526 32 MPG
*Onstar *automatic transmission .
9 *LT package *spoiler






2008 Impala LT#3685 30 MPG
s *Onstar *heated leather seats '
LT package *luxury package.




9 22,995.0460k

2008 Chevy Equinox ,36i9.
*Onstar automatic *power windows
Power locks scd player






2008 Chevy Trailblazer LT33s
Onstar automatic *power windows
*power locks *cd player


I en9fta"






PAGE 1 OA THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2008


IL. ja


LET'S


REFUEL
iri ......'j ,
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' M V .-- r ....
....


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2005
D DODG
US &k3 NE


gl-T

201CEVRLE9S10:j, A


*Certain terms and conditions apply. See dealer for details,.
mWi'sa11 a1101a 10 111: I hf 0ll li guil IElMI


rm.. I m.275 permo. 2 22O P.o.. s32 2 0r mo.


S Jep If the
Sunbelt
tag's not
SL on your
car you


,~


fJidlEu /V


CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE much!


WAC, APR from 7.5-8.5, 36-72 month terms
Hours: M-F 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.,
Sat. 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
1307 W. Howard Street (US Hwy. 90)
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1042
Email: usedcarsales@windstream.net 455901.,


200 CEVYIMALA


THURSDAY, JUNE 19,2008


PAGE 1 OA -THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


^











North Florida 4


June 18 19, 2008
Live Oak Publications, Inc.


Submitted
Kidzpalooza's "Ocean Adventures" fascinates kids
of all ages with thrilling shows and interactive
activities, bringing guests closer than ever to animals
not seen at the park previously. Delight in shows such
as "Sea Lion Splash," "Shark Encounter" and "North
American Predators" and dive into the hands-on fun
of the "Sting Ray Experience" or "Wild About
Babies." Kidzpalooza runs through August 3 and is
included in park admission.
"We're bringing a whole new level of guest and
animal interaction to Wild Adventures during
Kidzpalooza," explains Bob Montgomery, Wild
Adventures general manager. "We can't wait to see
the faces of children and parents alike as they pet
sting rays for the first time, laugh at the sea lions or
get closer to a shark than ever before."
"Ocean Adventures" gives Kidzpalooza a new
maritime flavor, as salt-water creatures make the park
their home for the summer. "Sea Lion Splash"
features the comedic antics of one of the sea's most,
loveable animals, as they perform daring acrobatic
feats, play games and even try. to trick their trainers.
In the "Shark Encounter" guests will learn just what is
fact and what is fiction about the fearsome shark and
then watch as a diver enters the tank to try and put one
to sleep.
"Sting Ray Experience" is a hands-on activity for
all ages, as petting and even feeding of the graceful
stingray is encouraged. And don't miss another
hands-on experience-a visit to "Hermit Castle," a
kingdom of scurrying hermit crabs.
Back on dry land, the fun continues with "North ,
American Predators," a new show highlighting fierce
creatures found right in our own backyard. Wolves,
bears and cougars star in this show where guests will
learn about their habits and habitats.
The cast might be little, but the action is big in
"Baby Tigers 'n Toys," an inside look at how trainers
use play time to teach baby tigers how to act like big
ones. More baby fun can be found at "Wild About
Babies," a baby petting zoo featuring dozens of the
park's youngest and most adorable residents.
Even vegetables are fun this summer at Wild
Adventures. The VeggieTales "Silly Song Sing-
Along" features Bob, Larry and the whole VeggieTale
crew and encourages plenty of audience interaction.
Kidzpalooza returns to the park for its fourth and
biggest year yet. The festival runs through August 3
and is included in park admission.
Kidzpalooza's "Ocean Adventures" tops off a day
of fun at Wild Adventures with more than 50 rides,
including nine coasters; Splash Island Water Park,
hundreds of wild animals and daily shows. Regular
admission is just $45 and Junior/Senio'r
admission is $40. Both include a Second- .
Day Free.
Revisit
the fun
the rest of
the year
with the
Passport
2008 or Gold
Passport. Both 0
Passports include
unlimited
admission to
the park .
through
December
31, 2008, as
well as
Passholder
specials, sneak pre% iewks and
discounts to other Herschend Family h,
Entertainment parks such as Dolly wood,
Dollywood's Splash Countrn, Stone
Mountain Park, Sil\ er Dollar City,
Celebration City and White Water in Branson,
Missouri. Gold Passports also include free parking,
free go-karts, free Adventure Golf and 10% discounts
on food and merchandise at Wild Adventures.
For more information on.any of the park's activities,
go to www.wildadventures.net or call 229-219-7080.



HIBISCUS CREATES
THE TROPICAL TOUCH
IN ANY GARDEN!
If you like the beaut> of tropical
hibiscus blooms and want a plant that
returns \ear aftter \ear. the Mkallo
dinner-plate sized hibiscus is for you!
Available in colors from while to pink
to red these nati\ es of the southeast
will br ghten \our .ard all summer!
PUT BLOOMING BEAUTY ,
WHERE YOU WANT IT! '
By placing beaunitul flowering ,
hanging baskets around \ our ard ou
can have instant beauty where ever ,
you like' Flower up tfor that cookout -
or dress up the pool or porch. Hanging
baskets make it simple and fun!
1O" Hanging Basket
Purslane $12.99
(Sun loving in lots of colors)


9248 129th Road Live Oak
(386) 362-2333
Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Closed Sunday
"For over 30 Years"
WWW.NOBLESGREENHOUSE.COM
452436-F


Kidzpalooza


at Wild Adventures


Four-week-old tiger cubs at Wild Adventures. -Photo: Submitted


An all-new summer of fun, featuring

sea lions, sharks and stingrays


mThe
VeggieTales
"Silly Song
Sing-Along" features
Bob, Larry and the whole
VeggieTale crew and
encourages plenty of
audience interaction..


CRITTER CORNER

From the Suwannee Valley Humane Society


Diamonds in the RuffAdoption
Program*
Suwannee Valley Humane Society,
,1156 SE Bisbee Loop, Madison, FL
32340. Directions: Two miles south of
Lee off CR 255; from 1-10 take Exit
262; take CR 255 north 1/2 mile, then
follow the signs. ,
Suwannee Valley Humane Society is
a limited space (no kill) shelter and
depends on adoptions to free up
available space. A drop-off donation is
required for any animal brought to the
shelter. You must check with us prior
to bringing a drop-off animal to the
shelter. Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10
a.m. to 2 p.m., or by appointment.
Visit our website and see the homeless
animals who need a really, good home


at ww'\.geocities.com./Suwanneehs, or
e-mail us.at
suwanneevalley@embarq.com.
Adoption fee of $65 includes
spay/neuter, deworming,
heartworm/feline (leukemia) testing
and babies shot. Please visit the
shelter, the animals would love to
meet you. The shelter also offers
optional microchipping when you
adopt for $10 more.
Diamonds in the Rtuffadoption fee:.
$30.*
If you have lost a pet or found one,
the Humane Society will help you find
your pet. Call 850-971-9904 or toll-
free at 866-236-7812. Leave a
message if they are closed, your call
will be returned. Remember to always
call your local animal
lodden berry control or shelters if you
Io eclalnst have a lost or found
animal.
The Suwannee Valley
Humane Society really
appreciates donations; it
couldn't operate without
them. Donations are the
heart and soul of its thrift
shop income. Please

SEE CRITTER, PAGE 3C


1 11,11 ties'








PAGE 2C, JUNE 18- 19, 2008 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Free breakfast and lunch
for youth 1-18
Thru Aug. 7
Summer Meals Program
Suwannee County Schools Food Service invites youth
ages 1-18 to participate in the Summer Meals Program
Monday-Thursday, thru Aug. 7. Meal schedule: Break-
fast from 7:30-8:15 a.m.; Lunch from 11 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
Note: Sites: Branford High School; Suwannee Intermedi-
ate School; Boys and Girls Club of North Central Flori-
da; John Hale Park Community Center; Greater New
Bethel AME Church; Triumph the Church and Kingdom
of God in Christ (June 16-July 31). Other sites are limit-
ed to participants in the program. Some sites will end be-
fore Aug. 7. Info: 386-362-2618.

Apply now!
Water Awareness Science Institute
for gifted students in grades 8-12
North Florida Community College (NFCC) is accept-
ing applications for 40 gifted eighth through 12th grade
students from the surrounding counties to participate in a
three week Water Awareness Science Institute on the
Madison campus from June 23-July 15. The Water
Awareness Project is a part of the Governor's Summer
Program for Gifted and High Achieving Students. There
is no fee for selected students. Students will be selected
based on outstanding achievements, grade point average
(GPA), recommendations from school personnel and a
written essay. A preference will be given to students who
are in a gifted program. The project is inviting the partic-
ipation of one science teacher from each of the six coun-
ties. A stipend will be available for selected teachers. The
Institute will run Monday through Friday for three weeks
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Info/application: Terry Zimmer-
man, 850-973-1646 or zimmermant@nfcc.edu or Nancy
Lillis, 850-973-1661 or lillisn@nfcc.edu.

Attention to graduates
of SHS class of 1998!
Members of the Suwannee High School class of 1998
are planning a 10 year class reunion. Contact information
is needed for all classmates. (Name, address, phone num-
ber and email address.) If anyone knows someone who
graduated with this class, please let them know their in-
formation is needed in order for them to receive an invi-
tation. Info: Prell Gwinn, glachrisha@hotmail.com or
386-209-2340.

Register now!
Deadline June 18
4-H Environmental Day Camp
4-H Environmental Day Camp will be held from 9
a.m.-noon, Monday-Wednesday, June 23-27 at Suwannee
County Extension Office, Live Oak. Cost: $10 per week.
The camp will provide youth the opportunity to learn
about environmental issues, such as water quality and
quantity and is sponsored by Suwannee River Partner-
ship. The registration deadline is Wednesday, June 18.
Info/registration: Carolyn Saft or Brian Estevez at 386-
362-2771.

Register now!
June 19-20
EMS offers ICS400 training
Suwannee County Emergency Management Services
will host ICS400 training from 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Thursday-
Friday, June 19-20 at its new location, Douglass Center
Complex, 617 Ontario Avenue SW, Suite 200, Live Oak..
These classes are for upper management and those who


Name:
Address:


Phone:.


Do you subscribe:

Register for your chance to win 2 tickets
to Wild Adventures Theme Park.
One winner will be drawn at random.
Deadline for entry is June 19 at 5 p.m.

Mail entry to:
uniannee eIEnmocrat/Wild Adventures
P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32060
4fl3246-F


may play a role in a supervisory position. Prerequisite:
completion of ICS 100, 200, 300; IS700 and recom-
mended IS800/801. Info/registration: 386-364-3405.

Apply now!
Deadline June 19'
Summer Tutorial/Recreational
Program
Suwannee County Police Athletic League will offer
Summer Tutorial/Recreational Program from 8 a.m.-
noon, Monday-Thursday, June 23 July 31 at Douglass
Center Gym, Live Oak. The program is for ages 7-14
and limited to the 40 participants. Pick up application at
Douglass Center Gym. Cost: $5 membership fee plus ac-
tivities expenses. Application deadline, Thursday, June
19, Info: 386-364-2906.

Donations needed now!
June 21
St. Luke's Busy Hands
for Babies yard sale, bake sale
and handmade table
St. Luke's Busy Hands for Babies will hold a yard
sale and bake sale from 7 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday, June 21
at St. Luke's Episcopal Church, 1391 SW Eleventh St.,
Live Oak, across from the Garden Club. The sale will be
inside and there will be clothing, books and lots more.
Come and see our new handmade gift table. Call if you
have donations. Info/donations: Sister Maria Ann, 386-
362-6926.

Register now!
Deadline June 25
4-H RoboDogs Day Camp
4-H RoboDogs Day Camp will be held from 9 a.m.-
noon, Monday-Wednesday, June 30-July 1 at Suwannee
County Extension Office, Live Oak. The camp will pro-
vide youth the opportunity to learn about robotics and
technology. Cost: $5 per day. Registration deadline is
Wednesday, June 25. Space is limited. Info/registration:
Brian Estevez or Carolyn Williams, 386-362-2771.

Register now!
June 30-July 3
Harmony in the Streets Day
Camp Branford
The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc. and the
Suwann.ee County Sheriff's Office Police Athletic
League will present "Harmony in the Streets," an action-
packed, fun-filled five-day camp for ages 6-12 from 9
a.m.-4 p.m., Monday-Friday, June 30-July 3 at Branford
High School. Activities include: group building, water
activities, workshops, environmental education, law en-
forcement demonstrations, snacks, lunch, arts and crafts
and team sports. Open to the first 60 kids that register:
Info/registration: Mary Maxwell, 386-208-8693, SuWan-
nee County Sheriff's Office.

Register now!
Deadline July 1
4-H Residential Gator Adventures
Camp
4-H Residential Gator Adventures Camp will be held
Monday-Friday, July 28-Aug. 1 at Camp Cloverleaf in
Lake Placid. Cost: $200 per week for 4-H members or
$215 per.week for non 4-H members. The
camp will provide youth the opportunity to
learn about and participate in fun activities ,
such as canoeing, swimming, recreational


games, campfires, fishing and more. Registra-
tion deadline is Tuesday,
July 1. Info/registration:
Brian Estevez, 386-362-
2771.


I~i


Register now!
Deadline July 1
4-H Dairy Day
Camp
4-H Dairy Day Camp
will be held from 8:30
a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-
Wednesday, July 7-9 at


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Suwannee County Extension Office, Live Oak. Cost: $25
for all three days. Limited to 25 youth maximum. Mini-
mum age: 10 years old. Registration deadline is Wednes-
day, July 1. The camp will provide youth the opportunity
to visit a dairy, learn about dairy cow nutrition and feed-
ing, make ice cream and cheese and participate in a dairy
quiz bowl. Lunch will NOT be provided on July 7 and 8,
but will be provided on July 9. Info/registration: Brian
Estevez or Carolyn Williams, 386-362-2771.

Register now!
Deadline July 1
4-H Residential
Shooting Sports
and Sportsfishing
Camp
4-H Residential Shoot-
ing Sports and Sportsfish-
ing Camp will be held
& .... Monday-Friday, July 21-25
Si at Camp Cloverleaf in
Lake Placid. Cost: $200
Super week for 4-H members
or $215 per week for non
4-H members. Minimum
V age: 10 years old. Registra-
tion deadline is Tuesday,
July 1. The camp will pro-
vide youth the opportunity
to learn life skills through fun, noncompetitive activities
in shooting sports, sport fishing, and natural resources.
Info/registration: Brian Estevez, 386-362-2771 for regis-
tration form or Bill Hill, 863-519-8677, ext. 105, for
more camp details.

Register now!
Deadline July 7
4-H Residential State Marine Camp
4-H Residential State Marine Camp will be held
Monday-Friday, July 21-25 at Camp Timpoochee in
Niceville. Cost: $210 per week for 4-H members or $220
per week for non 4-H members. Registration deadline is
Monday, July 7. The camp will allow youth to explore
local marine environments and participate in the follow-
ing activities: snorkeling, swimming, canoeing, recre-
ational games and campfires. Info/registration: Brian Es-
tevez, 386-362-2771 for registration form or Karen
Blyler, 352-846-0996 for more camp details.

Register now!
Deadline July 11
4-H Life 101 Day Camp
4-H Life 101 Day Camp will be held from 9 a.m.-
noon, Wednesday-Friday, July 16-18 at Suwannee Coun-
ty Extension Office, Live Oak. Cost: $15 for all 3 days.
Registration deadline is Friday, JUly [l4 The campwi l
provide youth the opportunity to learn hife management
skills such as hand washing, etiquette, sewing and rou-
tine automobile maintenance. Snacks will be provided.
Info/ registration: Contact Brian Estevez or Carolyn
Williams, 386-362-2771.

Register now!
WORKFORCE plus to host
"Our Community Forum"
WORKFORCE plus will host "Our Community Fo-
rum" from 7:30-9 a.m., Wednesday,
July 16 at Ramada Inn North,.2900
North Monroe Street, Tallahassee. The
/" fofum will address the evolution of
A t I workforce development and discuss
solutions to remain competitive local-
I :ly and abroad. Key business leaders
will be provided an opportunity to
connect with other leaders and deci-
A ,. sion makers who shape our economy,
and share astake in designing our
S. economic future and mobilizing our
community. Keynote speaker: Edward
E. Gordon, an internationally recog-
nized writer, researcher, speaker and
consultant on the future of America's and the world's
workforce. Register today by visiting www.OurCommu-
nityForum.org or calling 850-414-6085 to secure your
seat.


CONTINUED ON PAGE 3C


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PAGE 2C, JUNE 18 19, 2008 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


. '-








NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JUNE 18 19, 2008, PAGE 3C


Continued From Page 2C

Register now!
July 14-18
Autism Summer Camp
and fundraiser
Suwannee Station Baptist Church will
host its first Autism Summer Camp from
9 a.m.-2 p.m., Monday-Friday, July 14-18
at the church located at 3289 101st Lane,
Live Oak. The camp is designed especial-
ly for children with Autism.. Camp lead-
ers: Gina Marler, Laura Mincks and
Tiffany Amerson. A colorful magnetic rib-
bon is available for a donation of $10. All
proceeds go to fund the summer camp.
Info: Gina Marler, 386-362-8580.

Register now!
Deadline Aug. 1
4-H Who Wants to be a
Millionaire Day Camp
4-H Who Wants to be a Millionaire
Day Camp will be held from 9 a.m.-noon,
Wednesday-Friday, Aug. 6-8, Suwannee
County Extension Office, Live Oak. Cost:
$15 for all three days. Registration dead-
line is Aug. 1. The 4-H Who Wants to be
a Millionaire Day Camp will give youth
the opportunity to learn about financial
management, budgeting, and other money
issues. Info/registration: Cathy Rogers or
Brian Estevez, 386-362-2771.

Order tickets now!
Oct. 2-4
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park to host
Suwannee River Jubilee
The annual fall Suwannee River Jubilee
- Southern Gospel will be held Thurs-
day-Saturday, Oct. 2-4 at Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak. Fea-
tured groups: Dove Brothers, Dixie
Melody Boys, Blackwood Brothers and
the Dixie Echoes. Info: Tickets atju-
bilee@dixieechoes.com; camping reserva-
tions at 386-364-1683, music lives
here.com.


Today!
June 18
NFCC will conduct
GED tests
North Florida Community College
(NFCC) will conduct GED tests at 5:30
p.m., Wednesday, June 18 at NFCC Tech-
nical Center on the Madison campus.
Photo ID required, preparation courses
are free. There is a fee for test. Pre-regis-
tration. required. Info/pre-registration:
850-973-1629.

Today!
June 18
Benefit blood drive
for Junior Hingson
On June 18 there will be a blood drive
at the Suwannee County Courthouse, Live
Oak between the hours of 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
If you have not given blood recently,
please give on this day and let them know
that you are donating for Goodley Allen
"Junior" Hingson Jr. If you can't give on
that day, please go by any LifeSouth cen-
ter and give in his name. Junior Hingson
is a life long resident of Suwannee Coun-
ty and truly appreciates your prayers and
support during this difficult time in his
life. He is married to Patricia Hingson
and has four children, Sharon (John)
Hale, Bruce (Linda) Hingson, Clarke
(Pam) Hingson & Matt Hingson. Please.
continue to pray for his recovery and give
as you can.

Today!
June 18
NFCC will conduct CJBAT
(Criminal Justice
Basic Abilities Test)
North Florida Community College will
conduct CJBAT (Criminal Justice Basic
Abilities Test) on computer at 8:30 a.m.,
1:30 p.m. and 5 p.m., Wednesday, June 18
at NFCC Testing Center, Building 16, on
the Madison campus. CJBAT is required
for acceptance into Corrections & Law
Enforcement programs. Photo ID re-


CRITTER CORNER


From the Suwannee Valley Humane Society


Continued From Page 1C

consider taking them donations of
clothes, household goods, furniture and
toys. All donations should be in good
condition; otherwise, they cannot sell
them. Thank you!
Volunteers are wanted and needed four
hours a week on the day of your choice.
Call to learn more. People are always
needed to hold, pet, love and walk the
homeless animals at the shelter, so if yotu
can't adopt you can always come help in
many other ways.
RECYCLING BINS:
Live Oak: There is a newspaper-
recycling bin at 305 Pinewood Drive,
Live Oak, just west of Johnson's
Appliance/Radio Shack.
Lee: Recycling bins are located at the
shelter at 1156 SE Bisbee Loop,
Madison (just South of Lee) for
newspapers, catalogs, paper, magazines
and broken down cardboard. All the
money goes to help the homeless
animals.
SPAYING AND NEUTERING:
Experts say the most important thing
people can do to help their pets is to get
them spayed or neutered. This means the
animals get an operation, to be sure they
can't have kittens or puppies. They are
asleep during the operation, so they
aren't scared or in pain.
Spaying and neutering are so
important because there are so many
animals needing care and not enough
homes or shelters for them.
One cat or dog can have many litters
in its life. Its kittens or puppies can have
many litters, too. This can end up
creating thousands of new cats and dogs.
Featured animals for adoption:
Remember, do not leave pets in
vehicles for any length of time due to the
heat and humidity or cold weather.
FEATURED ANIMALS
FOR ADOPTION:
DOGS:
3335 Bailey 1 year, 2 months old,
Australian Shepard/mix,
female and black and
white. She is good with
kids and other animals and If we
would love to have a.
home. N F
3332 Denny 10
months old, Retriever/mix,
male and tan color. He is a
very sweet dog. Since 1995,
3331 Damien -8
months old, Lab/mix,
male, and black and white.


He is a nice puppy.
3277 Blake 1 year, 2 weeks old,
Hound/mix, male and brown. He is a
really nice dog.
3265 Drake 1 year, 2 weeks old,
Hound/mix, male, and white and brown.
He is lovable.
CATS:
3390 Aria 4 months old, Calico
with an orange face. Just loves to play
and be made of.
3361 Valentino 4 1/2 months old
and gray and male. His name says it all,
he loves everyone.
3353 -Bubba 1 year and 3 months
old, orange kitty, male and declawed. He
likes a bath and is a inside cat.
3344 Honey 11 1/2 months old,
dark tabby and female. She is a very
sweet kitty.
3341 Precious 10 months old,
kitten, female and black with a white
spot on her belly. She is a very loving
kitty.
LOST AND FOUND ANIMALS:
DOGS LOST:
Lost from Barnett Farm on US 129 in
O'Brien, "Samson," a Great Pyrenees.
He is a big, big, white,dog, weighing 80-
plus pounds and has arthritis in his hips,.
so he limps a little. Sampson has been
shaved down for the summer and on his
left shoulder he has a bare spot. He is
very friendly. If you have found him,
please, call Barbara Barnett, 386-209-
1480 (cell).
DOGS FOUND:
Found right off CR 255, a small male
Boxer, brown/tan with a black face and a
little white on his chest, floppy ears,
long tail, a new black collar and about a
year old. He is a real nice dog and he
followed her home. If this is your dog,
please call R6xanne, 850-973-2600
(Citizens Bank) or 850-971-2777.

*Part of Diamonds in the Ruff
Program. Dogs or cats in residence at
the shelter over 10 months are offered
for a $30 adoption fee.



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Info/registration: 850-973-9451.

Thursday
June 19
NFCC will conduct College
Placement Tests (CPT)
North Florida Community College will
conduct College Placement Tests (CPT)
on computer on at 8:30 a.m. and 1:30
p.m., Thursday, June 19 at NFCC Testing
Center, Building 16, on the Madison cam-
pus. Persons taking the tests will be re-
quired to register in NFCC Student Ser-
vices 24 hours before testing. Info/regis-
tration: 850-973-9451.

Thursday
June 19
Branford Camera Club
will meet
Branford Camera Club will meet at
7:30 p.m., Thursday, June 19 at Branford
Public Library. Featured program: Open
forum,
we'll dis-
cuss
whatever
photogra-
phy-relat-
ed topic
you'd like
to bring to
the forum.
As al-
ways,
bring any of your recent pictures you'd
like to share. Membership not required.
The Branford Camera Club meets at the
Branford Public Library on the third
Thursday of each month, with two excep-
tions. No meeting in August, and the De-
cember meeting is held on the second
Thursday to accommodate the busy Holi-
day season. Info: Carolyn Hogue, pro-
gram chair, 386-935-2044 or technical
consultants: Dick Bryant, 386-935-1977,
Dick Madden, 386-935-0296 or Skip
Weigel, 386-935-1382.

Friday
June 20
Artwalk End of the Season
Celebration
Artwalk End of the Season Celebra-
tion will be held from 7-9 p.m., Friday,
June 20 beginning at Live Oak Artist
Guild, 213 NW Second Street, Live
Oak, followed by a drawing at the Art
Guild for artwork provided by local
artist Jimmy Carter. Call Jimmy Carter
at 386-688-2805 to get information on
how. to qualify for the drawing. The
purpose of the Artwalk is: 1. Introduce
the public to local artists. 2. Bring at-
tention to local business establishments.
3. Bring the arts into the forefront of
the community. 4. Provide an avenue
for young artists to display and sell
their work. 5. Educate the public about
the value of art. Artwalk will resume
again Friday, Oct. 17, the third Friday
of the month. Info: Live Oak Artist's
Guild, 386-364-5099 or Linda Ruwe,
386-362-0985.

Friday
June 20
Pet First Aid class
in Lake City
American Red Cross will conduct a
Pet First Aid class beginning at 6 p.m.,
Friday, June 20 at 264 NE Hernando
Ave., Suite 102, Lake City. Fees apply.
Pre-payment and pre-registration re-
quired. No refunds. Info/registration:
386-752-0650,
http://alachua.redcross.org.


Friday
June 20
Millennium Nights
Millennium Nights will be held from 7-
10 p.m., Friday, June 20 at Millennium
Park, downtown Live Oak. Featuring
country/western, gospel, bluegrass and
karaoke. Bring your lawn chair and enjoy
the fun. Food and drink available. No ad-
mission charge. To be on the program call
Herold White, 386-362-3263 or 386-590-
0129.

Friday
June 20
Free All-Star Kids
Football/Cheerleader Clinic


Free All-Star Kids Football clinic will
be held from 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Friday,
June 20 at Langford Stadium, Live Oak.
Enrollment: Day of camp or go to Davis-
marketingroup.net. Eligibility: Youth,
boys and girls ages 7-16. As pait of the
4th Annual Charity Weekend, Andra
Davis of the Cleveland Browns and Kel-
ley Jennings of the Seattle Seahawks have
teamed up, along with other professional
athletes and coaches, to host a free All-
Star Kid's Football Clinic for boys and a
Cheerleader Camp for girls.

Friday
June 20
Celebrity Charity Bowling
Touranment


donnell-
davi.s@aol.com.
Info: Donnell
Davis, 850-673-6333,
or donnelldavis@aol.com.


Celebrity
Charity
Bo [ing
Tournament
%\ ill be held
from 9 p.m.-
unnl Friday.
June 20 at
Thunder i-\-
Ile. Live
Oak. Info:
Donnell
Davis, 850-
673-6333,
* l or





,,*>'l


Saturday
June 21
Kids Fun Day
Kids Fun Day will be held from 10
a.m.-2:30 p.m., Saturday, June 21 at John
H. Hale Community Park & Recreation
Center is located at 215 NE Duval Street,
Live Oak. Info: Donnell Davis, 850-673-
6333, or donnelldavis@aol.comi

Saturday

CONTINUED ON PAGE10OC


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Shedding some light on reading comfort


Reading is an activity that people Of all ages enjoy, and something that
is as much a part of daily life as eating or sleeping. Pouring through the
pages of the latest bestseller may be your perfect idea of relaxing on the
weekend. A favorite crossword or Sudoku puzzle book can pass the hour
during your commute home from work. A home-improvement idea
guide can help pave the way toward a kitchen remodel.
The trouble is, not all of your reading is done during the day or when
light is optimal. Many times busy schedules push leisure or required
reading into the evening or late-night hours, when leaving a bright
overhead light on can disturb others. However, reading in poor lighting
can strain eyes and prove bothersome.
A Bright Idea for Readers
Up until now, those who frequently enjoyed a book in bed or in dimly
lit situations, such as on a bus or airplane, had to use a little ingenuity to
illuminate their reading matter. A flashlight tucked on a shoulder, a pen
light balanced above an ear were some attempts to lighten up the
situation. Even clip-on booklights may have been used, but found
ineffective because they didn't provide much light and may have
featured a cord that needed to plug into a wall outlet. These options were
far from convenient. But the Periscope LED Book Light in a
Bookcover ends the frustration of reading in low-light situations.
The patented Periscope Book Light in a Bookcover eliminates all
cords, clips and clutter and lets you read what you want where you want
in all types of low-light reading environments all while protecting your
privacy. The handy lighting system is housed within a slip-on bookcover
(there are separate covers for hardcover and mass market paperback
books). Simply slip your book into the cover and pull up the telescoping
light, which automatically turns it on. The adjustable twin, wide-angle
LED light can be pivoted to focus just where you need it for maximum
reading comfort. Simply retract the lighting arm back into the book
cover spine to turn off the light and stow it away. The light is powered
by three AA batteries that deliver over 40 hours of continuous light, so
there are no cords or plugs to worry about.
The covers also come with an attached book mark and handy pockets,
so you'll never lose your place while reading and can store notes,
tickets, or other small items as well. All of these features are housed in
one convenient package that is just as portable as your favorite book.
Tips for Reading in Comfort
The makers of Periscope Book Light in a Bookcover suggest these tips
for additional comfort while reading.
Reading in low light will not severely damage the eyes, but it can
lead to eye strain. So use adequate lighting whenever possible. Eye
strain can.produce symptoms, such as headaches, aching eyeballs, fuzzy
vision, and drooping' eyelids.
If you're straining to see the print in books it may be time for an eye
examination. An eye doctor may determine you need reading glasses or


check your current prescription.
While some people have no trouble reading in situations with plenty of ambient
noise, most people prefer a quiet spot. At home, set aside a place that is a reading
nook or serene sanctuary for reading.
To learn more about Periscope products, visit www.periscopelight.com. The book
lights are readily available for paperback and hardcover books at Barnes and Noble
retailers and online at www.barnesandnoble.com. -


To place an ad on this page, please call Nancy at 386-362-1734 Ext. 103


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physical and social environment, physical,
occupational, and speech therapy, short-term
rehabilitation, well-balanced meals and
family support and involvement
Physician services provided through our
on-site Copeland Medical Center
Admission Standards resident must be 60
years of age and meet the State nursing home
admission guidelines, as ordered by a
physician. "
h For more information call
^S 386-658-5550 or 1-800-647-3353
TDD# 800-955-8771 445985-F

Hearing
SSolutions, InLc.
Dr. Debra K. Griffin, Au.D. Audiologist

HEARING EVALUATIONS AND HEARING AIDS
SERVICE AND REPAIR ALL BRANDS

Located in Copeland Medical Center
Call 386-330-2904
------------ii.u


prescription services to the
comnIunity."


At the W.B. Copeland Medical Center at Advent
Christian Village, modem facilities provide a
comfortable setting for our experienced staff to
deliver quality, full-service medical care.
Following your medical appointment, have your
prescription filled on the spot and purchase over
the counter medications at Village Pharmacy. Our
experienced Pharnmacist gives professional
consultations and personalized service.Village
Pharmacy also offers free prescription delivery
service within Dowling park, as an additional -
convenience. Most forms of insurance accepted.

ADVENT CHRISTIAN VILLAGE
--____--- AT DOWLING PARK ---
PO Box 4345 1 Dowling Park, FL 32064
386-658-5860 1-800-955-8771 TTY
1-800-647-3353
www.acvillage.net 445705-F



North

Florida

EyeCa re

Examination and Treatment of the Eye
Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses


PHONE (386) 362-5055
FAX (386) 208-8660


522 S. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak, Florida 32064
416544-F


ADVENT CHRISTIAN VILLAGE
When you"
can no .
longer .
live alone -


1When your loved one needs help with-the tasks of
daily living, Dacier Manor offers a secure and
comforting atmosphere that will help your loved
one maintain their highest level of functioning.
Seniors enjoy a variety of activities and dine in a
beautiful dining room. A, loving, caring staff is
on duty 24 hours a day to help residents maintain
their highest level of self-care.

P.O. Box 4345 DowllngPark, FL 324
S- vww.aevllage.net
TDD# 800-955-8771 445982-F


You DESERVE the BEST glaring
for LESS...
Buy 1 Hearing Aid
Get the 2nd 1/2 Price EVERYDAY




Ophthalmology
GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
522 South Ohio Avenue
(386) 330-6260 or 1-800-435-3937

f.EYE CENTER of NorthFlMda
General Eye Care & Surgery
EYE EXAMS CATARACT SURGERY
GLAUCOMA MACULAR DEGENERATION
DIABETES LASERS
Eduardo M. Bedoya, MD
Board Certified, American Board of Ophthalmology
Eye Physician & Surgeon

Medicare, Medicaid, Avmed,
Blue Cross/Blue Shield
: & other insurance accepted.
Se hablia espaiol.
876 SW. CR 247.
Lake City A
866-755-0040,..
416539-F


Physical Therapy

" Iaf cnTcaftfiolt, Ofna.

* Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy
* Specializing In Arthritis Fibromyalgia* Geriatrics Spinal &
Joint Pain Sports Injuries Work Injuries Pediatrics
Manual Therapy Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Prolegrity
Lake City 755-8680 B lue Cross, Av Med
Jasper 792-2426 Mcdicaid-pcdialrics
Branford 935-1449 Workers Comp
Mayo 294-1407 Most Other Insurance Plans
A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore


hysical Therapy

Heartland
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA
Kalie Hingson, PTA
Lisa Garrett, PTA
AQUATIC THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports
Medicine, Pediatrics Providers
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS PmrViders
405 11th St., Live Oak, FL 32060 .
(386) 364-5051
____________ --______________41fiM.1.F






PAGE 6C, JUNE 18 19, 2008 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS

2008


d %M.4 Vd


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IN
KU^


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prepare.,


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Suwannee County Lafayette County Hamnilton County
13530 NW 80th Terrace PO Box 344 1133 US 41 NW
Live Oak, FL 32060 Mayo, FL 32066 Jasper, FL 32052
Phone 386-364-3405 Office Phone 386-294-1950 Phone 386-792-6647
Fax 386-362-0584 Warning Point 386-294-1301 E-mail: hamcoem@alltel.net
E-mail: E-mail: Web Site:
SuwanneeDEM lafayem@windstream.net www.hamcoem.com
@suwcounty.org Web Site:


www.lafayettecountyflorida.org


R0 With technology in its current state, forecasters can give residents in the path of hurri-
S' N canes advanced warnings to help prevent casualties due to storm surge, strong winds, and
S'''O D D heavy rain, -- each of which claimed many lives during the first half of the century. Now,
10Z more people are caught off guard by the tornadoes found in the spiral bands, causing
. .9 m . damage similar to that seen in the Midwest.


Storm Surge a concern to coastal residents


One major cause of hurricane damage
is storm surge. Storm surge is the rising
of the sea level due to the low pressure,
high winds, and high waves associated
with a hurricane as it makes landfall.
The storm surge can c:uii-e ipnfificant
flooding and cost people theii .lie if
they're caught unexpected.
Storm surge can be understood by
looking at the video below. The strong
winds blowing towards the shore help
push water towards shore on the right
side of the hurricane's direction of mo-
tion. This piling up contributes to most


of the coastal flooding.
Also, the central pressure of a hurri-
cane is 'o Iou that the relative lack of
atmo.,phc ic weight above the eye and
eye wall causes a bulge in the ocean
surface level. Thiu- effect is similar to
using a straw. When you use a straw,
yoi deccise the air pieiiie in the
straw, and the high pressure pushing .
down on the rest of the di ink pushed. the
drink up the straw. Here it is the relative
higher pressure on the ocean around the
outside the hurricane that lifts the ocean
surface in the center.


Photo by: McGhiey
These tornadoes are also found close to or within the eye wall. Often these tornadoes oc-
cur in heavy rain storms, making them tlifficult, if not impossible, to see. Advances in radar
technology have given the public more lead time than before, but these twisters are still
very dangerous and can cause quite a bit of damage.
L.A M CL LL .LL. L2 VZ LL.ZA
L -L LUc LLL L .C ,.L@I


n'L L'LL L [ L:- L C- L L


I EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT .1


-maw%
C30L-
Ar ,
t








NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JUNE 18- 19, 2008, PAGE 7C


Heavy rain and flooding

a problem of any

tropical disturbance
Apart from the storm surge, heavy rainfall causes both
flash and long term flooding. Tropical storms and hurri-
canes are known to dump as much as a meter (about 3
feet) of rain in just a couple of days, creating big problems
for residents who believe they are safe just because they
do not live on or near the coast. In fact flooding kills more
people than the strong winds do. Here are some of the
rainfall totals which occurred in October of 1995 from the
landfall of Hurricane Opal.


Data provided by rTPC
After a hurricane has come inland, it does begin to de-
teriorate. However, it still produces a lot of rainfall. Even
when a tropical system is as weak as a depression, it is
still a very strong storm when compared to average thun-
derstorms.


Public Awareness satellites

and hurricane hunters


In the early part of this century, coastal rii-
dents may have had less than a day to'prepare or
evacuate their homes from an oncoming huiri-
cane Today. these same locations receive warn-
ings t, eC\ .iIate liom one to two days in ad- a
\ aice, let alone the extrn days they are aso w
a\ :ue ol it- existence. Before satellites and
iaId,us. people had very little knowledge of the
Seatheli just 100() kilometers offshore. ,:n
Ob\ iousl\ it i, a \a-tlIs different world today .e
Thanks to satellite-s. we know about the existence
of a uopic.d cyclone immediately. Meteorologists at the
Topical Prediction Center work to constantly monitor
these .stems a.s the\ move. issuing humcane watches
and warmnng-, definitions of %which are placed below)
\\ ith adequate time for the public to prepare.
Nleteorologists and the public also rely on hurricane
hunters to learn more about the hurricane. They do this
b. flying aircraft equipped with %weather instruments;
straight into the middle of these powerful storms. Hurri-
cane hunters are operated b. both the Air Force Reserve
based at Keesler Air Force Base in Mississippi and the


Image by: U.S. Air Force
Air force reserve hurricane hunters
use the WC-130H aircraft seen above
to make their flights, while NOAA
crews use the WP-3D and GIV-SP. As
dangerous as it seems, the hurricane
hunters have an extremely clean safety
record A normal crew consists of six' a
pilot, co-pilot, navigator, flight engineer,
aerial reconnaissance weather officer,
and dropsonde system operator.


r .


Hurricane Watch:


I hurricane or an incipient
hurricane condition poses
a possible threat, generally
Ithin36 hours.


Hunlcane Warning:


Sustained winds 64 tt (74
mph or 119 Aph) or higher
associated with a hurricane
are expected In a specified
coastal area in 24 hours or
less.


m b n3H r ,_ m e..,',7j'r.g s ., '""_e.') i. 'r '."J.:--: '.'.; .'n ri t'tl e",:'O,' lnm .
-ra 'nO .jr, '.n' -5'3. ,7, C-e '.".* i rl,, .re,-ne ,'.,.:,..

Nafiond Oceanic and \ntmosphenric Adminiuation
(.NO.L-\Ai. The two ha\e a long history. making their first
flights in 1944. Before satellites '.eie put in space. these
planes were the best and sometimes onls source of mnfor-
mation about a hurricane's position and intensity When a
hurricane hunter airplane is ,se to fl. into a tropical
storm or hurricane, it is read\ for a long mission. Most
commonly, one plane %% ill be in the air for about 11
hours. Scientists on the plane relay the data they collect
immediately to the Tropical Piedicuon Center for analy-
sis.


* ', .'~


rII


Public Action


What do you do?

If your home is on or near the coastline where the hurricane's destructive forces will
affect it, pay close attention to what the local government and/or police force is rec-
ommending. You should also pay attention to radio and TV stations for the latest in-
formation.

If evacuating your home is recommended:
/ Heed their warning!!
/ Plan ahead where you would go -- it may be beneficial to choose a few
places like an out of town friend's home or a designated shelter, etc.
/ Take the phone numbers of these places with you.
/ Take a road map in case the weather forces you onto unfamiliar roads.
/ Do not drive over standing water, as floods may have damaged the roads.
YOU DO NOT KNOW HOW DEEP THE WATER REALLY IS!!!


4 -'~.'4~


A:,


If you are in the path of a
land-falling hurricane, you should prepare
a supply kit containing:
V A first aid kit and necessary medications.
/ Canned food and an opener, as this food lasts for long periods of time
without needing refrigeration.
/ Plenty of water. (The Red Cross recommends three gallons of water per
person to last three days.)
Flashlights, a battery powered radio, and extra batteries.
/ Raingear, sleeping bags, and protective clothing.
More cofnplete information on this subject as well as how to best prepare your
house for a hurricane can be gathered by contacting your local Red Cross chapter.


Evacu on 71
When community evacuations become necessary, local officials provide information
to the public through the media. In some circumstances, other warning methods, such
as sirens or telephone calls, also are used. Additionally, there may be circumstances un-
der which you and your family feel threatened or endangered and you need to leave
your home, school, or workplace to avoid these situations.
The amount of time you have to leave will depend on the hazard. If the event is a
weather condition, such as a hurricane that can be monitored, you might have a day or
two to get ready. However, many disasters allow no time for people to. gather even the
most basic necessities, which is why planning ahead is essential.
Evacuation: More Common than You Realize
Evacuations are more common than many people realize. Hundreds of times each
year, transportation and industrial accidents release harmful substances, forcirig thou-
sands of people to leave their homes. Fires and floods cause evacuations even more
frequently. Almost every year, people along the Gulf and.Atlantic coasts evacuate in
the face of approaching hurricanes.
Ask local authorities about emergency evacuation routes and see if maps may are
available with evacuation routes marked.


Always:


Keep a full tank of gas in your car if an
evacuation seems likely. Gas stations
may be closed during emergencies and
unable to pump gas during power out-
ages. Plan to take one car per family to
reduce congestion and delay.

Make transportation arrangements with
friends or your local government if you
donot own a car.

Listen to a battery-powered radio and
follow local evacuation instructions.

Gather your family and go if you are in-,
structed to evacuate immediately.

Leave early enough to avoid being ,
trapped by severe weather.

Follow recommended evacuation routes.
Do not take shortcuts; they may be
blocked.

Be alert for washed-out roads and
bridges. Do not drive into flooded areas.

Stay away from downed power lines.


If time permits:

Gather your disaster supplies kit.


Wear sturdy shoes and clothing that
provides some protection, such as long
pants, long-sleeved shirts, and a cap.

Secure your home.*


Let others know where you are going.


When you're
securing vour home.
Close and lock doors and v% indo% s.
LUnplus elcIn icial equipment, such
as hadios and telek sions, and small
:ppilaniice.. such .is ilasters and mi-
crowa es.
Leave Iree'rs and refrigerators
plugged in unless there is
a isk of flooding.


Rainfall from Hurricane Opal (1995)
Ellyson, FL 15.45"
Evergreen, AL 8.10"
Peach Tree City, GA 7,66"
Mobile, AL 7.48"
Pensacola, FL 7.27"
Hurlburt Field, FL 6.64"
Atlanta, GA 6.59"
Fulton Co., GA 6.22"
Anniston, AL 6.09"
Ft Benning, GA 5.25"
Dobbins AFB, GA 5.14"


...-,,..,, .. A World Clio Cement anuf'aiwu
'n m, m :Qualilty, Safely, Hltath and ED IAwW t aIi II


From the time our state-of-the-art cement manufacturing plant began operating
in March 2003, Suwannee American Cement has been proud to support Branford,
Florida and the surrounding communities. SAC is recognized internationally
for its. successful initiatives aiming at quality, the environment, the local
community, and its employees.


Suwannee American Cement, LLC

5117 US Highway 27

Branford, FL 32008


386-935-5000

www.suwanneecement.com
455532-F


Hamilton County

1133 US 41 NW;

Jasper, FL 32052

Phone 386-792-6647

E-mail:

hamcoem@alltel.net

Web Site:

www.hamcoem.com









PAGE 8C, JUNE 18 19, 2008 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Facts and falsehoods about lightning


Kerosene
Candles
Camp Stoves


EMREC ..


MANGEMNT.
LAAET CUT







MAYOS. FL


Use this handy checklist to ensure you're
ready when bad weather hits. You'll find the
Sriqht tools and products at True Value.


17 Flashlights/extra bulbs
El Battery-operated radio
E Batteries
E Lighters/matches
El Plastic garbage bags
E Fire extinguishers
E Basic hand tools
(hammer, screwdriver, etc.
El Plastic sheeting
El Tarps
E Rope


El Work/plastic gloves
El Cell phone-fully charged
El Nails & screws
0 Disinfectant
El Deodorizer
Dl Bleach
El Duct tape
D Water
0 Ice chestsicoolers
0 Bucket


For more hurricane preparedness information, visit www.noaa.gov

W.B. HOWLAND CO.
"Serving North Florida Since 1926" % .
602 11th St, Live Oak l T .
2007TruVeCo START RIGHT. START IeERE
362-1235
02007 TrueValue" Company, All rights reserved.


Jasper Hardware
"Family Owned & Operated"
202 North West Central Ave.
Jasper, FL 32052



386-792-1052


Chain Saws
Generators
Flashlights/Batteries 455541-F


A little preparation

MAKES A BIG DIFFERENCE.
Bottled water. A flashlight and radio. Fresh batteries. Having the
little things ready can make a big difference when a storm hits.
State Farm' can help before as well as after. Contact me for tips on
how to prepare or visit statefarm.com'.


Derek Loadholtz CPCU CLU ChFC, Agent
1562 South Ohio Avenue
Live Oak, FL 32064
Bus: 386-364-3535
www.derekloadholtz.com


LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR E STATE FARM IS THERE.
-H S f~t


PET PLAN
Contact your local veterinarian or animal shel-
ter for information on preparing your pets for an
emergency.
Animals brought to a pet shelter are required
Sto ha\ e: proper identification collar and rabies
tag. proper identification on all belongings, a
':.: ',,--,_, \ carner.or cage, a leash, an ample supply of
Food, water and bowls, any necessary med-
SL ications, specific care instructions and news
"1, papers or trash "
bags .oi clean

If you plan to shelter your pet work it into
your family disaster plan and evacuation route
planning.


AFTER THE DISASTER
Walk your pet on a leash until they become re-
oriented to their home often familiar scents and
landmarks may be altered and pets could easily be confused and become lost. Also
downed power lines, high water due to flooding and debris can all pose a threat
for animals after,a disaster.
If pets cannot be found after a disaster, contact the local animal control/shelter
office to find out where lost animals can be re-
covered.
The next few of days following a disaster the
P -s behavior of your pets may change. Normally qui-
et and friendly pets may become aggressive or de-
fensive. Watch animals closely. Leash dogs and -
place them in a fenced yard with access to shelter
and water.

If you evacuate your home,

DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PETS BEHIND!
Pets most likely cannot survive on their own and if by some remote chance they
do, you may not be able to find them when you return.


Mother Nature offers many wonders that are a specta-
cle to behold. Ranking among some of the more awe-in-
spiring is lightning. Lightning strikes the earth rough-
ly 1,800 times at any given moment.
While lightning is certainly a beautiful vision illumi-
nating the sky, its immense power can have a downside,
including the potential for destruction and even death.
Lightning is five times'as hot as the sun in every one-
inch diameter bolt. In the U.S., lightning kills more peo-
ple than hurricanes and tornadoes, combined. Only
floods are more deadly. According to Underwriters Lab-
oratories, lightning also accounts for more than one bil-
lion dollars annually in structural damage to buildings in
the U.S.
Considering lightning inspires awe and wonder, and
also some fear ... it is beneficial to separate fact from
fiction when it comes to lightning safety.
1. People are poor lightning conductors.
Fiction: The human body is a better conductor than in-
sulating building materials, water, and many metallic
systems. The body is over 90 percent fluid, which is why
sticking a finger in an electric socket or even experienc-
ing static electricity when touching a doorknob can
shock you.
2. If you are caught outdoors, it can be safe to seek
shelter from lightning in a car.,
Fact: A vehicle that is fully-enclosed with metal can
provide better protection against lightning than standing
outdoors in a storm.
3. Lightning rods attract lightning.
Fiction: A lightning protection system simply inter-
cepts a lightning strike and provides a safe path to
ground for discharging the dangerous electricity.
4.Surge arresters, suppressors and "whole-house pro-
tectors" can protect my home.
Fiction: Surge protection devices are important com-
ponents of a complete system to protect incoming utility
lines against infiltration, but can do nothing to protect a '
.structure against direct lightning strikes. Surge protection
must be installed in conjunction with a structural light-
ning rod system (air terminals, bonding and grounding)
to provide whole house protection.
5. Insurance covers all damages caused by lightning.
Fact & Fiction: While this is generally true for an ini-


Lightning danger

on the water
Boating, swimming and other water sports are some of
the more enjoyable recreational activities, provided safety
is intermixed with fun.
There are a variety of dangers lurking below the surface
of the water and from water itself. But many people don't
realize the dangers beyond the water, notably lightning.
According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA), an estimated 40 million light-
ning strikes account for nearly 100 deaths annually in the
United States, making lightning considerably more harm-
ful than hurricanes and sharks. Being completely exposed
on a boat or another type of craft, such as a surfboard or
water skis, makes water recreation dangerous when a
storm is predicted. Sailboats with their tall masts are more
susceptible to lightning hits than powerboats. But light-
ning can also funnel through the electronic systems on any
boat. The National Marine Electronics Association dealers
report substantial amounts of lightning damage to big-
boat. electronics every year.
According to marine experts, there are no ways to actu-
ally protect a boat from lightning, just ways to limit the
damage if a strike should occur. Actually, keeping a boat
docked during storms that have the potential for lightning
is the only surefire way to ensure passenger safety.

How Risky Is Lightning?
It's important to understand some fundamentals about
lightning to realize the danger involved. Lightning occurs
when the difference between the positive and negative
charges, the electrical potential, becomes great enough to
overcome the resistance of the insulating air and forces a
conductive path between the positive and negative
charges. Lightning will generally seek the easiest path to


Avoid boating or entering the water when strong lightning-
producing storms are predicted.

the ground. Therefore it tends to strike the highest point in
the immediate area. On the flat surface of the water, that
is generally a boat. Most smaller crafts are not made from
metal. They are made from lightweight materials such as
fiberglass. Therefore, if lightning strikes, it will search for
any path to ground and the human body may be the best
route.
Radio antennae, fishing rods and even lightning pro-
tection system rods themselves may be targets for
lightning strikes. Again, reason enough to keep off the wa-
ter if lightning is forecast.

Medical Help
CPR may be required to rescue a person who has been
struck by lightning. Prompt artificial breathing and CPR
can jump-start the heart and lungs should they fail.after a
strike. Remember, there is no danger to touching a person
who has been struck by lightning the current has al-
ready passed through to the ground or water. Keep a level
head and provide emergency care.


V:1*"


tial occurrence with lightning, many insurance compa-
nies will deny second or third lightning claims and many
will non-renew a policy after a lightning claim is en-
tered.
Since a single bolt of lightning can carry over 100 mil-
lion volts of electricity (enough power to rip through a
roof, explode walls of brick and concrete and ignite
fires), homeowners may want to consider the security
and peace of mind that a lightning protection system of-
fers. A professionally installed lightning protection sys-
tem provides a safe path to channel lightning's electrical
energy into the earth. The Lightning Protection Institute
(LPI), a not-for-profit nationwide group founded in 1955
to promote lightning safety, awareness and education,
stresses that homeowners should only use experienced
contractors to install protection systems. LPI states that
the contractor should be reputable, use UL-listed materi-
als and be LPI-certified in lightning protection.
"It is important to have an experienced professional in-
stall the lightning protection system," says Bud VanSick-
le, executive director for LPI. "Contacting a certified
professional ensures safety and expertise to save con-
sumers time and money."
The Lightning Protection Institute offers a list of cer-
tified contractors, along with information regarding the
national safety standards for lightning protection installa-
tion.. Visit the LPI Web site at www.lightning.org for
more information.








NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JUNE 18 19, 2008, PAGE 9C

Atlantic Basin Hurricane Tracking Chart
National Hurricane Center, Miami, Florida


PQ7
ht


VA


'S~4t


AtXO AK


' VVV.VA


NCO'


SW '4w N'' .


SAW 44 oMw A


This is a reduced version of the chart used to track hurricanes at the National Hurricane Center


W a -*C9. .
A hurricane is a type of tropical cyclone, the generic term for a low pressure sys-
tem that generally forms in the tropics. A typical cyclone is accompanied by thunder-
storms, and in the Northern Hemisphere, a counterclockwise circulation of winds near
the earth's surface.
All Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastal areas are subject to hurricanes or tropical
storms. Parts of the Southwest United States and the Pacific Coast experience heavy
rains and floods each year from hurricanes spawned off Mexico. The Atlantic hurri-
cane season lasts from June to November, with the peak season from mid-August to
late October.
Hurricanes can cause catastrophic damage to coastlines and several hundred miles
inland. Winds can exceed 155 miles per hour. Hurricanes and tropical storms can also
spawn tornadoes and microbursts, create storm surges along the coast, and cause ex-
tensive damage from heavy rainfall.
Hurricanes are classified into five categories based on their wind speed, central
pressure, and damage potential (see chart). Category Three and higher hurricanes are
considered major hurricanes, though Categories One and Two are still extremely dan-
gerous and warrant your full attention.
How are the F ':ane Categories Determiined?',


SAFFIR-SIMPSON HURRICANE SCALE
SCALE SUSTAINED DAMAGE STORM SURGE
NUMBER WINDS
(CATEGORY) (MPH)
1 74-95 Minimal:. Unanchored mobile homes, 4-5 feet
vegetation and signs.
2 96-110 Moderate: All mobile homes, roofs, 6-8 feet
small crafts, flooding. ______....
3 111-130 Extensive: Small buildings, 9-12 feet
low-lying roads cut off.
4 131-155 Extreme: Roofs destroyed, trees 13-18 feet
down, roads cut off, mobile homes
destroyed. Beach homes flooded.
5 More
than 155 Catastrophic: Most buildings Greater
destroyed. Vegetation destroyed. than 18 feet
Major, roads cut off.
Homes flooded.

Hurricanes can produce widespread torrential rains. Floods are the deadly and de-
structive result. Slow moving storms and tropical storms moving into mountainous re-
gions tend to produce especially heavy rain. Excessive rain can trigger landslides or
mud slides, especially in mountainous regions. Flash flooding can occur due to in-
tense rainfall. Flooding on rivers and' streams may persist for several days or more af-
ter the storm.
Between 1970 and 1999, more people lost their lives from freshwater inland flood-
ing associated with land falling tropical cyclones than from any other weather hazard
related to tropical cyclones.
How are Hurricanes Named?
Since 1953, Atlantic tropical storms have been named from lists originated by the
National Hurricane Center and now maintained and updated by an international com-
mittee of the World Meteorological Organization. The
lists featured only women's names until 1979. After that,
men's and women's names were alternated. Six lists are
used in rotation. Thus, the 2001 lists will be used again
in 2007.
The only time there is a change in the list is if a storm
is so deadly or costly that the continued use of the name
would be inappropriate for reasons of sensitivity. When
this occurs, the name is stricken from the list and anoth-
er name is selected to replace it.
Sometimes names are changed. Lorenzo replaced Luis
and Michelle replaced Marilyn.


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Phone 386-364-3405

Fax 386-362-0584

Email:

SuwanneeDEM

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iar I IrK
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MEXICO


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Arthur Ana Alex Arlene Alberto Andrea
Bertha Bill Bonnie Bret Beryl Barry
Cristobal Claudette Colin Cindy Chris Chantal
Dolly Danny Danielle Don Debby Dorian
Edouard Erika Earl Emily Emesto Erin
Fay Fred Fiona Franklin Florence Femand
Gustav Grace Gaston Gert Gordon Gabrielle
Hanna Henri Hermine Harvey Helene Humberto
Ike Ida Igor Irene Isaac Ingrid
Josephine Joaquin Julia Jose Joyce Jerry
Kyle Kate Karl Katia Kirk Karen
Laura Larry Lisa Lee Leslie Lorenzo
Marco Mindy Matthew Maria Michael Melissa
Nana Nicholas Nicole Nate' Nadine. Nestor
Omar Odette Otto Ophelia Oscar Olga
Paloma Peter Paula Philippe Patty Pablo
Rene Rose Richard Rina Rafael Rebekah
Sally Sam Shary Sean Sandy Sebastien
Teddy Teresa Tomas Tammy Tony Tanya
Vicky Victor Virginie Vince. Valerie Van
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PAGnF 10C JUNE 18- 19. 2008 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Continued From Page 3C
June 21
Celebrity Charity
Basketball Game
Celebrity Charity Basket- :
ball Game will be held at 4
p.m., Saturday, June 21 at .
Suwannee High School Gym,
Live Oak. Info: Donnell
Davis, 850-673-6333, or don- :
nelldavis @ aol.com.

Saturday
June 21
St. Luke's Busy Hands
for Babies yard sale, bake sale
and handmade table
St. Luke's Busy Hands for Babies will hold a yard sale
and bake sale from 7 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday, June 21 at
St. Luke's Episcopal Church, 1391 SW Eleventh St.,
Live Oak, across from the Garden Club. The sale will be
inside and there will be clothing, books and lots more.
Come and see our new handmade gift table. Call if you
have donations. Info/donations: Sister Maria Ann, 386-
362-6926.

Saturday
June 21
Suwannee River Bluegrass Association
to hold potluck dinner
Suwannee River Bluegrass Association will hold its
third Saturday of the month potluck dinner at 6
p.m., Saturday, June 21 in the "Pickin' Shed" at
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park, US 129
North, Live Oak. Come with your instrument
or just listen to the music. Info: 386-362-
2456.

Saturday
June 21
Wild Adventures to
present Aly & AJ
Wild Adventures Theme Park will present Aly &
AJ at 7 p.m., Saturday, June 21. Park is located at 1-75
Exit 13, Valdosta, Ga. Info/tickets: 229-219-7080,
wildadventures.net.

Tuesday
June 24
Adult CPR/AED classes in Lake City
American Red Cross will conduct Adult CPR/AED
classes beginning at 6 p.m., Tuesday, June 24 at 264 NE
Hernando Ave., Suite 102, Lake City. Fees apply. Pre-
payment and pre-registration required. No refunds.
Info/registration: 386-752-0650, .....
http://alachua.redcross.org.

Tuesday
June 24
NFCC will conduct TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education)
North Florida Community College will conduct TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education) at 1:30 p.m. and at 5
p.m., Tuesday, June 24 at NFCC Testing Center (Bldg.

LEGAL SERVICES
DIRECTORY


More than 70 countries across the globe now have some form of freedom
of information legislation. Such laws vary by country, but typically
provide public access to. government information or records. In the United
States, the Freedom of Information Act became law in 1966 under then-
President Lyndon Johnson. The Act was then updated with the Electronic
Freedom of Information Act amendments under President Bill Clinton in
1996. While the act only applied to federal agencies, all of the states and
territories have statutes requiring the disclosure of information by state and
local governments. The United Kingdom enacted their own Freedom of
Information Act in 2000, while Canada's Access to Information Act in
1983 allowed citizens access to government-controlled information. The
trailblazer for freedom of information legislation is believed to be Sweden,
who enacted their Freedom of the Press Act in 1766, though the act at that
time was far more limited that the more open acts of today, including
since-updated laws in Sweden. 435148-F

EXPERIENCED TRIAL

Serving North Florida Since 1938 .

BRANNON, BROWN, HALEY
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386-752-3213
Auto Accidents Personal Injury Workers' Comp
Product Liability Commercial and Real Property
General Practice Medical Malpractice
Nursing Home Abuse Wrongful Death
"The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you written information about our qualifications
and experience."
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No. 16), on the Madison campus. TABE is required for
acceptance into vocational/technical programs.
Photo ID required. Pre-registration is required.
Info/pre-registration: 850-973-9451.

Tuesday and Thursday
June 24 and 26
Adult/Child/Infant
SCPR/AED and First Aid
classes in Lake City
American Red Cross will conduct
Adult/Child/Infant CPR/AED and First Aid
clauses beginning at 6 p.m., Tuesday June 24 and
Thursday, June 26 at 264 NE Hernando Ave., Suite
102, Lake City. Fees apply. Pre-payment and pre-regis-
tration required. No refunds. Info/registration: 386-752-
0650, http://alachua.redcross.org.
June 25
NFCC will conduct CJBAT
(Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test)
North Florida Community College will conduct CJ-
BAT (Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test) on computer
at 8:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Wednesday, June 25 at NFCC
Testing Center, Building 16, on the Madison campus. CJ-
BAT is required for acceptance into Corrections & Law
Enforcement programs. Photo ID required. Pre-registra-
tion is required. Info/registration: 850-973-9451.
June 25
Lady of the Lake Quilting Guild
to meet
Lady of the Lake Quilting
Guild will meet at 10 a.m.,
':" '" ',. Wednesday, June 25 at
SSuwannee River Regional
Library, 1848 US 129
' South, Live Oak with so-
S. cial time beginning at 9:30
a.m. The Guild is an orga-
.. nization for anyone.interest-
ed in quilts and the art of
.. quilting. Members make and
distribute over 100 quilts a year
to variouss charities and non-profit
organizations. The program for June will
feature local artist Carolyn Spilatore who will speak on
one stroke painting. The Guild will also have a "show
and tell" session where quilters showcase their recent
projects. The Guild is co-sponsoring the Stephen Foster
Quilt Show being held on Oct. 17-19 in White Springs.
The theme is "Turning Twenty on the Suwannee." Info:
Marcia Kazmierski, president, 386-752-2461,
mrckaz@aol.com, or Loretta Kissner, first vice-president,
386-754-9330, KissnerLC@aol.com.
June 26
Eating disorder awareness support
group to meet
An eating disorder awareness support group will meet
from 6:30-7:30 p.m., Thursday, June 26 at Suwannee
River Regional Library, 9828 US 129 South, Live Oak.
The group will meet every other Thursday. Info: 386-
362-2317 or Sandy 386-362-6566, after 6 p.m.
June 26
NFCC will
conduct
College, aNo t
Placement FlO rida
Tests (CPT)
North Florida
Community College
will conduct College
Placement Tests
(CPT) on computer
on at 8:30 a.m. and
1:30 p.m., Thursday,
June 26 at NFCC COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Testing Center, Build-
ing 16, on the Madi-
son campus. Persons taking the tests will be required to
register in NFCC Student Services 24 hours before test-
ing. Info/registration: 850-973-9451.
Thru June 28
Driver's license checkpoints
The Florida Highway Patrol will conduct driver's li-
cense and vehicle inspection checkpoints through June
28 on .Brown Road, CR 252, CR 252-A, CR 252-B, CR
25-A, SR 47, SR 341, US 441, US 41, CR 245, CR 238,
CR 135, Turner Road, SR 100, Trotter's Road, Fairfield
Farms Road, CR 250, CR 349, SR 247 and SR 25 in Co-
lumbia County; CR 132, CR 136, CR 136-A, CR 137,
CR 249, CR 250, CR 252, CR 349, CR 49,-CR 795, SR
20, SR 247, SR 10, SR 51, US 129 and Mitchell Road in
Suwannee County; and CR 136, CR 152, CR 143, CR
249, CR 137, CR 251, CR 146, CR 135, CRI 141, CR
150, CR 145 and US 41, SR 6, SR 25 in Hamilton
County. Recognizing the danger presented to the public
by defective vehicle equipment, troopers will concen-
trate their efforts on vehicles being operated with defects
such as bad brakes, worn tires and defective lighting
equipment. In addition, attention will be directed to dri-
vers who would violate the driver license laws of Flori-
da. The Patrol has found these checkpoints to be an ef-
fective means of enforcing the equipment and driver's li-
cense laws of Florida while ensuring the protection of all1
motorists.


June 28
Wild Adventures to present MercyMe
Wild Adventures Theme Park will present MercyMe
at 6:30 p.m., Saturday, June 28. Park is located at
1-75 Exit 13, Valdosta, Ga. Info/tickets: 229-219-
7080, wildadventures.net. []


June 28
Adult CPR/AED and First
classes in Lake City
American Red Cross will conduct
Adult CPR/AED and First Aid classes


beginning at 9 a.m., Saturday, June 28 at 264 NE Her-
nando Ave., Suite 102, Lake City. Fees apply. Pre-pay-
ment and pre-registration required. No refunds. Info/reg-
istration: 386-752-0650, http://alachua.redcross.org.
June 28
Turkey shoot












American Legion Harry C. Gray Memorial Post 107
will hold a turkey shoot at 12:30 p.m., Saturday, June 28
using 12 gauge shotguns only, shells furnished by Ameri-
can Legion. Location: 10726 142nd St., McAlpin. Six
miles south of Live Oak on US 129, left on 142nd Street.
Food, snacks and other refreshments available. Open to
the public. American Legion: 386-362-5987. Info: 386-
658-2447.
Continues thru Sept. 7
Florida Museum in Gainesville offers
new exhibit "Inside Africa"









BASED ON "AFRICA," A PERMANENT
EXHIBITION AT THE FIELD MUSEUM
MADE POSMBULE $

Journey into the heart of Africa and experience its peo-
ple and rich cultural history with the new "Inside Africa"
exhibit at the Florida Museum of Natural History,
through Sept. 7. The 6,000-square-foot exhibit takes mu-
seum-goers through a journey to selected sites on the
world's second-largest continent. Admission is $6.50 for
adults, $5.50 for Florida residents, seniors ages 62 and
above and students, and $4 for children ages 3-12. Info:
352-846-2000 or www.flmnh.ufl.edu.
July 1
Democratic Executive Committee
meeting
Suwannee County Democratic Committee will meet
Tuesday, July 1, at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park,
US 129 North, Live Oak. A sit-down dinner is served at
6:30 p.m. for $10 per person. The meeting starts at 7
p.m. Dinner is not required to join us for the meeting. All
Democrats are invited to join us in participating in the
Democratic Process. Meetings are held the first Tuesday
of each month. Info/RSVP for dinner: Monica, 386-330-
2036.

July 3
High Springs Farmers Market to host
All American Buy Local Block Party
High Springs Farmers Market will host All American
buy Local Block Party from 2-6 p.m., Thursday, July 3
in James Paul Park. The park entrance is located at the
comer of NW 2nd Avenue and Main Street, at the heart
of the downtown business district. The Market features
locally produced fresh fruits and vegetables, plants, trees,
shrubs, flowers, jams, jellies, baked goods and many oth-
er agricultural products. Info: 386-454-3950,
Sharon@yeago.net, or www.city.highsprings.com.
July 4
Cannon family reunion
The annual Cannon family reunion will be held Friday,
July 4 at Hart Springs in pavilions A and B. All ancestors
and descendants of William "Bill" Jackson Cannon and
Henrietta "Aunt Hett" Clementine Townsend Cannon are
invited. Please bring a covered dish, drinks, goodies, etc.
All paper products, silverware, cups and ice will be fur-
nished. Meeting at 12:30 p.m. and lunch will be at 1 p.m.
Looking for all cousins to be there again. Don't be late!
Info: June Howard, 904-25926050 or 904-864-1400 or
Brenda (Isaac) Wagenman, 386-935-3723.
July 4
Millennium Nights
Millennium Nights will be held firom 7-10 p.m., Fri-
day, July 4 at Millennium Park, downtown Live Oak.
Featuring country/western, gospel, bluegrass and
karaoke. Bring your lawn chair and enjoy the fun. Food
and drink available. No admission charge. To be on the
program call Herold White, 386-362-3263 or 386-590-
0129.
July 4
Free Gospel Concert in Lee
Free Gospel Concert will be held at 6:30 p.m., Friday,
July 4 at Lee Worship Center Church, 397 Magnolia Dri-
ve, Lee. The event is held every first Friday of the
month. Proceeds benefit the building fund of the church.
Bring a covered dish, meat will be provided. If you want
to get on the show, call Allen, 850-971-4135 home, or


850-673-9481 cell.
^ July 5
Bluegrass Pickin in Trenton
Suwannee Valley Bluegrass Pickin will ,
be held at\6 p.m., Saturday, July 5 at Otter
Springs Resort Lodge, 6470 SW 80th Ave.,
Trenton. It is free to the public. Info: Cloud Ha-
ley, toll-free 800-990-5410.


CONTINUED ON PAGE 11C


115 South Ohio Avenue
Live Oak, FL 32064


CANCIO &

ROMAGNOLO, PA.
Attorneys at Law

Personal Injury Wrongful Death
Family Law Criminal Law

386-362-2212
"The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you written information about our
qualifications and experience." 441558-F


American Red Cross


I


I Se Habla Espahol









NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JUNE 18 19, 2008, PAGE 11C


Continued From Page 10C


July 5
Stephen Foster State
Park First to host
Saturday
Coffeehouse
The First Saturday
Coffeehouse will be
held at 7 p.m., Satur-
day, July 5 at Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Cen-
ter State Park in White
Springs.-Songs, stories,
music or poetry may be
performed at this open stage
night held in the park auditorium. Coffee and desserts
available for sale. Fees: This event is free! Info: 386-
397-4331 or www.FloridaStateParks.org/stephenfoster.
July 5
HCHS classes of 1980-1995
to hold multi-class reunion


Al-Anon Family Group-Live Oak Mondays, 7:30
p.m. at St. Luke's Episcopal Church, 1391 SW Eleventh
St., Live Oak, across from Suwannee County Coliseum.
Info: Pat, 386-330-2741 or Carol, 386-362-1283.
Al-Anon/Mayo Al-Anon Group now meets with Ban-
ford Al-Anon Group Tuesdays and Fridays, 7:30 p.m.,
at First United Methodist Church on the comer of Express
and Henry Streets, Branford. Info: Barbara, 386-294-
3348; Linda, 386-935-5362.
Alcoholics Anonymous Branford Tuesdays, Fri-
days and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., Branford United Methodist
Church, Express and Henry St., Branford. Info: 386-963-
5827.
Alcoholics Anonymous Jasper Tuesdays, 7 p.m., at
Jasper Library, 311 N. Hatley St., Jasper. Info: 386-963-
5827.
Alcoholics Anonymous Live Oak Tuesdays, Thurs-
days and Fridays, 8 p.m., Precinct Voting Building, No-
bles Ferry Road, Live Oak. Info: 386-688-6037.
Alcoholics Anonymous Mayo Group Sundays,
Monday, Wednesdays and Thursdays at 8 p.m.; Manna
House, Pine Street, Mayo. Info: 386-674-6424.
Alcoholics Anonymous Trinity Group Mondays, 7-
8 p.m.; Jasper Library; Info: 386-963-5827.
Alcoholics Anonymous White Springs Courage to
Change Mondays, 8 p.m., Methodist Church, White
Springs. Info: 386-397-1410.
American Legion Post 107 BINGO every Tuesday,
games at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m.; smoking permitted; public in-
vited; must be 18 or older; Turkey shoot Saturdays, 12:
30 p.m. Directions: US 129 south to 142nd Street, go east
1 mile, on the right. Info: 386-362-5987, noon-6 p.m.
Bluegrass Association Saturdays; 6 p.m.; bluegrass
jam at the Pickin' Shed; except during main festival
events; Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park, US 129 North,
Live Oak; potluck dinners third Saturday of each month;
Info: 386-364-1683.
Bridge Club Mondays, 6:45 p.m., Golden Corral
Restaurant, Live Oak. Info: 386-362-3200.
Boy Scout Troop 693 Mondays, 7 p.m., Shrine Club,
Bass Road, until further notice. Info: 386-590-6121.
Christian Home Educators of Suwannee (C.H.E.S.) -
a homeschool support group that meets weekly in Live
Oak. Info: e-mail ches3inl@yahoo.com.
Civil Air Patrol Suwannee Valley Composite
Squadron Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m., at the EAA
hangar at the Suwannee County Airport, Live Oak. Mem-
bership open to children ages 12-18 and all adults. Info:
Capt. Grant W. Meadows Jr. in Live Oak, 386-208-0701
or Capt. Rick Peters in Lake City, 386-623-1356 or
www.gainesvillecap.org or www.cap.gov.
Dowling Park Volunteers Saturdays; (1100 hours) 11
a.m.; at 22992 CR 250, Live Oak.
Eating disorder awareness support group An eating
disorder awareness support group will meet from 6:30-
7:30 p.m., every other Thursday at Suwannee River Re-
gional Library, 9828 US 129 South, Live Oak. Info: 386-
362-2317 or Sandy 386-362-6566, after 6 p.m.
Farmer's Market Suwannee County Small
Farmer's Market open from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. (or sold
out), Wednesdays only, May 7 thru most of July at 208
Ohio Avenue North, Live Oak. The location will be the
same as last year, on the east end (loading dock) of the
Suwannee County Museum, known as the old railroad de-
pot. You can turn off Ohio Avenue (US 129 North) on
Haines Street. The farmer's market will honor both W.I.C.
and Senior Farmer's Market Nutrition Coupons, as well as
cash and checks. Info: Senior Farmer's Market Nutrition
Coupon, 386-362-1164; W.I.C. Farmer's Market Nutrition
Coupon, 386-362-2708 and for vendors, 386-362-1728.
Food free to anyone in need Alapaha River Band of
Cherokee, Inc., a non-profit organization, will give away
free food to anyone in need first and third Fridays, from
noon-3 p.m. at Free Food Service Pantry, 3589 NW 28th
Terrace, Jennings. NOTE: Closed Friday, July 4. Info:
Chief Joan Nelson, 386-938-4625 or 386-938-3609, or
www.thealapahariverbandofcherokeeinc.com.
Girl Scout Junior Troop 1077 every Friday; 3:30
p.m.; Suwannee River Regional Library, US 129 South,
Live Oak. Info: Jenise Freeland, 386-364-4932 or
jenifree@alltel.net.
Greater Vision Support Group every Friday; 9:30
a.m.; Christ Central Ministries, 1550 S. Walker Ave., Live
Oak. Info: 386-208-1345.
Healthy Horizons, a chronic illness support group -
6:30 p.m., second and fourth Thursdays at Christ Central
Ministries, 1550 Walker Ave. SW, Live Oak. Group dis-
cussion, educational materials and friendly support pro-
vided to enable all to live to their fullest potential. All who


Hamilton County High School classes of 1980-1995
will hold a multi-class reunion at 7 p.m., Saturday, July 5
at Jasper Civic Center. Party, party, party. Dancing, food,'
fun and photos. Info: April Johnson, 386-842-2545 or
apriljohnson6@yahoo.com.

July 5
Wild Adventures to present
Randy Owen
Wild Adventures Theme Park will present Randy
Owen at 6:30 p.m., Saturday, July 5. Park is located at I-
75 Exit 13, Valdosta, Ga. Info/tickets: 229-219-7080,
wildadventures.net.

July 5
Independence Day Weekend
Celebration
Saturday, July 5, on or about 9:45 a.m. the 40 and 8
Voiture 1352 TRAIN will depart the Old Piggly Wiggly
Center and travel up US 90 and US 129 in Live Oak.
Members of Voiture and Caban 1352 and American Le-
gion and Auxiliary 107 will be onboard and passing out
small American Flags. Come out and enjoy the fun and
help us celebrate Independence Day.


live with a chronic condition are invited to attend. Open to
all members of the community. Info: Laura, 386-288-8988
or Sean, 386-209-1323.
Home Front Ministries Tuesdays, 7 p.m. at Wellborn
Church of God; open to all women; offers spiritual and
emotional support to women going through separation, di-
vorce or a troubled marriage; also, offers individual prayer
ministry to women, regardless of marital status, for heal-
ing life's hurts. Info: 386-963-4903.
Jasper Kiwanis Club of Hamilton County Wednes-
days, 12:15 p.m., J.R. Lee Complex, Jasper. Call .for an
application, 386-792-3484, 386-755-4896 or 386-792-
1110; leave name, address and phone or contact number.
Kiwanis International of Live Oak meets at noon,
Wednesday at Farm Bureau, 407 S. Dowling Ave., Live
Oak.
Lake City Guys & Gals singles group Lake City
Guys & Gals, a singles group, in conjunction with Lake
City/Columbia Department of Parks and Recreation,
meets Fridays from 7-10:30 p.m. at Teen Town Recreation
Center, three blocks past Post Office, next to Memorial
Stadium, Lake City. Info: Lorene Hamilton, 386-984-
6071.
Narcotics Anonymous-Branford Thursday, 7:30
p.m.; .at United Methodist Church, comer, Express and
Henry, Branford. Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated
with United Methodist Church. Help Line: 352-376-8008,
http://fdt.net/~-ncoastna.
Narcotics Anonymous-Jasper Wednesdays, 8 p.m.;
at Jasper Public Library, 311 Hatley St., NE. Narcotics
Anonymous is not affiliated with Jasper Public Library.
Help Line, 352-376-8008, http://fdt.net/~ncoastna.
Narcotics Anonymous-Live Oak Tuesday, 7 p.m.,
Thursday, noon and Saturday, 7 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, 311 South Ohio Avenue, Live Oak.
Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated with First United
Methodist Church. Help Line, 352-376-8008,
http://fdt.net/~ncoastna.
Narcotics Anonymous Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6-7
p.m.; Closed sessions. Info: Lee Devore, 386-294-3220.
Quarterback Club Meeting Mondays, 6:30 p.m.; at
Old Nettie Baisden school next to the football stadium.
Square Dance 7 p.m., Thursdays at John H. Hale
Community Park & Recreation Center, 215 NE Duval St.,
Live Oak. Learn to square dance, it's fun, meet new
friends and get great exercise. First lesson free. Ralph
Beekman, caller. Info: 386-752-2544.
Suwannee County Animal Shelter volunteers first
and third Wednesdays, 10 a.m., 11150 144th Street,
McAlpin, eight miles south of Live Oak off US 129 on the
same road as the large county landfill. Everyone welcome!
Info: shelter office, 386-208-0072 or Ana Smith, 386-364-
5584.


Register now!
July 7
Live Oak Senior Citizens to meet
Live Oak Senior Citizens will meet at 10:30 a.m.,
Monday, July 7 at Exhibition II Building, Coliseum
Complex, 1302 SW Eleventh St., Live Oak. The group
meets the first Monday of each month. Escorted tours are
available, prices vary. Deposits due at registration, bal-
ance due before trip. Schedule: May-Haw, July 19; Al-
hambra Dinner Theatre, Oct. 11; Bahamas, Nov. 10-15;
Radisson Opryland "A County Christmas," Dec. 15-18.
Info: Walter and Charlene Howell, 386-842-2241.

July 7
Basic Water Safety classes
in Lake City
American Red Cross will conduct Basic Water Safety
classes beginning at 6 p.m., Monday, July 7 at 264 NE
Hernando Ave., Suite 102, Lake City. Fees apply. Pre-
payment and pre-registration required. No refunds.
Info/registration: 386-752-0650,
http://alachua.redcross.org.


Suwannee County Small Farmer's Market opeil
from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. (or sold out), Wednesdays only, May 7
thru most of July at 208 Ohio Avenue North, Live Oak.
The location will be the same as last year, on the east end
(loading dock) of the Suwannee County Museum, known
as the old railroad depot. You can turn off Ohio Avenue
(US 129 North) on Haines Street. The farmer's market
will honor both W.LC. and Senior Farmer's Market Nutri-
tion Coupons, as well as cash and checks. Info: Senior
Fanner's Market Nutrition Coupon, 386-362-1164; W.I.C.
Farmer's Market Nutrition Coupon, 386-362-2708 and for
vendors, 386-362-1728.
Suwannee River Riding Club Membership fee $25
per year. Team roping first and third Friday night. Speed
events first and third Saturday night. Info: 386-935-2622.
Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. free activ-
ities for seniors Monday-Friday, free full lunch and bus
pickup for seniors in Suwannee County. Other free activi-
ties at 10 a.m., Wednesdays, including free BINGO with
prizes and at 11:30 a.m. free full lunch; Located at 1171
Nobles Ferry Road, Live Oak. Info: Bruce Evans, 386-
362-1164.
Suwannee Valley Barbershop Chorus Tuesdays, 7
p.m., Crapps Meeting Room, Suwannee River Regional
Library, US 129 South, Live Oak; Info: Fred. Phillips, 386-
362-1886.
TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 662; Thurs-
days; meeting 9 a.m.; at Live Oak Community Church of
God, 10639 US 129 South, Live Oak; Affordable weight
loss support group. Info: Pat, 386-935-3720 or Sherry,
386-776-2735.
TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 798;
Wednesday; meeting 9 a.m.; at Live Oak Community
Church of God, 10639 US 129 South, Live Oak; Afford-
able weight loss support group. Info: 386-362-5933.
Vagabond Squares square dancing 7 p.m., Thurs-
days, at John H. Hale Community Park & Recreation
Center, 215 NE Duval St., Live Oak. Learn to square
dance, it's fun, meet new friends and get great exercise.
First lesson free. Ralph Beekman, caller. Info: 386-752-
2544.
Weight Watchers Mondays, 9:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.,
St. Luke's Episcopal, toll-free 800-651-6000.
The Town of White Springs Weekly Farmer's Mar-
ket every Tuesday, from 2-6 p.m. at the Nature & Her-
itage Tourism Center, on US 41 sponsored by the Town
of White Springs. If you are interested in selling your
farm fresh produce, contact Asa or Lucinda Maynard at
386-884-0035, or you can register on Tuesdays. Produce
must be local and 60 percent grown by the vendor. Other
homemade products such as jams, jellies, cheeses, etc.,
are also welcome.









PAGE 12C, JUNE 18 19, 2008 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) Staff Branford -
third Wednesday; Town Hall, Council Chambers, Bran-
ford; 1-2:30 p.m.; trained staff visits to assist con-
stituents; Info: 202-225-5235, www.house.gov/boyd/.
Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) Staff Live Oak -
third Wednesday; City Council Chambers, City Hall,
101 SE White Ave., Live Oak; 9:30-11:30 a.m.; trained
staff visits to assist constituents; Info: 202-225-5235,
www.house.gov/boyd/.
Alzheimer's Support Group third Thursday (ex-
cept December) at 3:30 p.m.; Good Samaritan Center,
Dowling Park. Info: Angie Paarlberg, 386-658-5594.
American Legion Post 59 third Tuesday, 7 p.m.,
Sister's Restaurant, Branford.
American Legion Post 107 The Harry C. Gray II
Memorial American Legion Post No. 107 business
meeting, first Thursday at noon and third Thursday at
,6:30 p.m., at 10726 142nd St., east of US 129 (Blue
Lake Road), McAlpin. This is to accommodate both
those who cannot travel after dark and those who work
during the day. Info: Richard Buffington, 386-364-
5985.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit No. 107 first
Saturday; 10 a.m.; Harry C. Gray II Memorial Ameri-
can Legion Post No. 107, 10726 142nd Rd., Live Oak.
Info: Tanya Lees, 386-364-8331.
American Legion Post 132 second Tuesday; 7
p.m.; Wellborn Masonic Lodge, on CR 137, downtown
Wellborn; Info: Gerald McKean, 386-963-5901.
Bluegrass Pickin Suwannee Valley Bluegrass
Pickin first Saturday, 7 p.m., Otter Springs Resort
Lodge, 6470 SW 80th Ave., Trenton. It is free to the
public, in a nice, air-conditioned building. Info: Cloud
Haley, toll-free 800-990-5410.
Branford Camera Club third Thursday; 7:30 p.m.;
Branford Library; second Thursday; Note: no August or
December meeting; Info: Carolyn Hogue, 386-935-
2044.
Chamber of Commerce Suwannee County sec-
ond Thursday; 7:30 a.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live
Oak; Info: 386-362-3071.
Christian Mission in Action first Tuesday, 6 p.m.,
at Triumph the Church and Kingdom of God in Christ
Youth Center, 12001 NW Seventh St., Live Oak; Info:
Audrey Sharpe, 386-364-4560.
Christian Mission in Action Ministry free food
and clothing give-away, second Saturday, 11 a.m.-1
p.m., at John H. Hale Community Park and Recreation
Center, Duval Street, Live Oak; Info: Audrey Sharpe,
386-364-4560.
Citizens for Positive Progress third Friday, 6:30
p.m. at American Legion Post 107, 10726 142nd St.,
McAlpin, off US 129 SQuth. Potluck supper before the
meeting. Info: Ana SrAM"d. 386-364-5584. .~ ,i':
Council for Progress of Suwannee County second
Tuesday; 7:30 a.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak;
Info: 386-362-3071.
Cub Scout Pack No. 408-Tiger, Wolf, Bears and
Webelos dens (grades one five) every Tuesday,
Aug.-May only; 6:30-8 p.m. at First Baptist Church,
Live Oak.
Disabled American Veterans Chapter No. 126 -
second Thursday; 6 p.m.; 226 Parshley St., S.W, Live
Oak; Info: 386-362-1701.
Disaster Animal Response Team (DART) first
Tuesday, 5:30 p.m., Companion Animal Hospital, 605
N. Houston Street, Live Oak. DART helps out with
pets, livestock, horses, birds and all animals during nat-
ural disasters. Volunteers needed. Info: 386-208-0072.
Dowling Park Volunteers first Saturday; 1100
hours (11 a.m.); training each following Saturday at
1100 (11 a.m.); 22992 CR 250, Live Oak.
Drug Free Coalition of Suwannee County last
Thursday, 5:30 p.m. at 813 Pinewood Way, Live Oak.
Info: Mary Taylor, 386-362-2272, suwannee coali-
tion @' mac.comrn. \ w w.drugfreesuwannee.com.
Fibromyalgia support group first Monday, 6 p.m.,
at Suwannee Rjier Regional LibrarN. 1848 Ohio Av-
enue South. Ljie Oak. Feel'free to bring family mem-
bers. Info: 386-842-5206.
Florida Gateway Charter Chapter of the Ameri-
can Business Women's Association second Thurs-
day; 6 p.m.; locations change; Info: Sandy Harrison,
386-754-0434 or 386-752-0516. ,
Friends of Suwannee River State Park second
Tuesday; 10 a.m.. board meeting; Suwannee River
State Park, ULS 90 West. Live Oak; Birding walks for
2008 will be held these Saturdays only: Sept. 20 and
Oct. 25; meet at park 8 a.m.; bring water, binoculars
and favorite bird ID book; wear comfortable shoes or
boots. Park entrance fees apply. Info: Membership
Chair Walter Schoenfelder, 850-971-5354, wbs @surf-
best.net or 386-362-2746, fosrsp@surfbest.net.
Ft. White Quilt Sisters last Saturday, 9 a.m.-until,
at Ft. White Tow n Hall near Library. Quilters of all skill
levels are welcome to join us for a relaxing time of fun,
fellowship and of course quilting. No dues or fees re-
quired just the love and desire to quilt. Bring your
lunch and quilting make new quilting friends. Info:
386-497-4179.
Food free to anyone in need Alapaha River Band
of Cherokee. Inc.. a non-profit organization, will give
away free food to anyone in need fili .and third Fri-
days, from noon-3 p.m. at Free Food Service Pantry,


3589 NW 28th Terrace, Jennings. NOTE: Closed Fri-
day, July 4. Info: Chief Joan Nelson, 386-938-4625 or
386-938-3609, or www.thealapahariverbandofqhero-
keeinc.com.
GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak first Friday;
noon; 1308 Eleventh Street, Live Oak.
Girl Scout Leaders, Girl Scouts of Gateway Coun-
cil '2 first Monday; 7 p.m.; First Advent Christian
Church, Live Oak; Info: Peggy Rudser, membership
specialist, 212 N. Marion Ave., Suite 230, Lake City,


FL 32055, 386-758-3230 or toll-free 866-295-1727.
Hamilton County Governmental, Bellville Volun-
teer Fire/Rescue executive board second Monday, 7
p.m.
Hamilton County Alcohol and Other Drug Pre-
vention Coalition fourth Wednesday; 9:30-11 a.m.,
Hamilton County School Board meeting room, JRE
Lee Administrative Complex, Jasper; Info: Grace Mc-
Donald, 386-938-4911, mcdonaldgl@alltel.net
Hamilton County Board of Commissioners first
Tuesday, 9 a.m., and third Tuesday at 6 p.m., County
Commissioners' Board Room, courthouse, Jasper.
Hamilton County Chamber of Commerce, Inc. -
first Thursday; 6 p.m.; 1153 US 41 NW, Suite 4, Jasper
(courthouse annex); Info: 386-792-1300.
Hamilton County Council on Aging, Inc. needs
volunteers; home-delivered meals program; Info:
Mazel Spencer; 1509 S.W. First Street, Jasper, 386-
792-1136.
Hamilton County Democratic Party 7 p.m., sec-
ond Monday, Jasper Public Library. All registered De-
mocrats are invited to come. Info: Rhett Bullard, 386-
303-2039.
Hamilton County Development Authority second
Thursday; 7 p.m., at 1153 US 41 NW, Suite 4, Jasper
(courthouse annex); Info: 386-792-6828.
Hamilton County Pink Ladies second Tuesday,
10:30 a.m., odd months meeting held at Suwannee Val-
ley Nursing Center, 427 NW 15th Ave., Jasper; even
months at Trinity Community Hospital, 506 NW 4th St.
Jasper. They hold fund-raisers to benefit nursing center
and hospital.
Hamilton County Planning and Zoning Board -
second Tuesday, 6 p.m.; Hamilton County Board of
County Commissioners meeting room, Hamilton Coun-
ty Courthouse, Jasper; open to the public.
Hamilton County Riding Club first Saturday; 5
p.m., meeting-games; Hamilton County Arena, Jasper;
third Saturday; 5 p.m.; trail ride-dinner, location an-
nounced at the first Saturday meeting; new members
welcome; Info: 386-792-2725.
Hamilton County School Board board meetings,
second Monday (third Monday during June and July);
School Board workshops-fourth Mondays as needed.
For times and locations, visit the district's Web site at
www.fimrn.edu/schools/hamilton/hamilton.
Hamilton County Tourist Development Council -
second Wednesday; noon; 1153 US 41 NW, Suite 4,
Jasper (courthouse annex); Info: 386-792-6828.
Healthy Horizons, a chronic illness support group
meets at 6:30 p.m., second and third Thursdays at.
Christ Central Ministries, 1550 Walker Ave. SW, Live
Oak. Group discussion, educational materials and
^frintdly:support'provided to enable allto-live'.to their-,
fullest potential. All who live with a chronic condition
are invited to attend. Open to all members of the com-
munity. Info: Laura, 386-288-8988 or Sean, 386-209-
1323.
Home and Community Educators (HCE) first
Wednesday, 9:30 a.m., at Suwannee County Extension
Office, Coliseum Complex, 1302 Eleventh Street, Live
Oak; new members welcome; Pleasant Hill-second
Monday, at 10 a.m.; McAlpin Community Center,
McAlpin; Formerly known as Pleasant Hill Home Ex-
tension Club. Short business meeting, followed by a
workshop of different projects for the community. Vis-
itors are always welcome. Info: Donna Wade, presi-
dent, 386-963-3516, or Barbara Parks, 386-362-3044.
Happy Homemakers-second Wednesday; Suwannee
County Coliseum Complex, 1302 Eleventh Street, Live
Oak. Info: 386-362-2771.
Homeless Services Network of Suwannee Valley -
second Tuesday, 4 p.m. at Columbia County Senior
Services, 480 SW Oleander Glen, behind the Depart-
ment of Transportation District 2 offices on Marion
Street in Lake City. United Way of Suwannee Valley
serves as the lead agency for the Homeless Services
Network of Suwannee Valley, which serves the coun-
ties of Columbia, Suwannee, Lafayette and Hamilton.
The network includes agencies and individuals interest-
ed in the services available to those who are homeless
or threatened with homelessness. Agency representa-
tives, individuals, homeless and formerly homeless,
with an interest in the needs of those who are experi-
encing homelessness or are threatened with homeless-
ness are encouraged to attend. -
Humane Society, Suwannee Valley Animal Shel-
ter second Monday; noon; at the shelter located on
Bisbee Loop, south entrance, ini Lee off CR 255, Madi-
son County; Info: toll-free 866-Adoptl2, 866-236-
7812, www.geocities.com/suwanneehs.
Jasper City Council Meeting second Monday; 6
p.m.; Jasper City Hall.
Jennings Town Council Meeting first Tuesday, 7
p.m.; Jennings Town Hall.
White Springs Town Council Meeting: second
Tuesday; 7 p.m.; White Springs Town Hall.
Lady of the Lake Quilting Guild fourth.Wednes-
day, in Lake City; for anyone interested in quilts and
the art of quilting; the quilting public is invited. Info:
Sandy Lindfors, president, 386-362-6850,
riverfolk@alltel.net or Joan Murray, 386-758-5980.
Leona 4-H Community Club first Monday; 7
p.m.; home of Avon and Betty Hicks, 6107 180th St.,


McAlpin; Info: Betty Hicks, 386-963-4205; Pam Net-
tles, 386-963-1236.
Lion's Club second Tuesday and fourth Tuesday; 7
p.m.; Farm Bureau meeting room; Info: Richard Tuck-
er, 386-963-4577.
Live Oak Artist Guild first Tuesday; 7 p.m.; 213
NW Second St., Live Oak; Artwalk from 7-9 p.m.,
third Friday. Artwalk End of the Season Celebration
will be Friday, June 20. Artwalk will resume again Fri-
day, Oct. 17. Info: 386-364-5099 or Linda Ruwe, 386-


362-0985.
Live Oak Artist Guild's Theater group meets third
Monday, 6 p.m., Cultural Arts and Gallery, 213 Second
St. NW, Live Oak. Members of the community are en-
couraged to join them.
Live Oak Garden Club September-May; Morning
Glories-third Friday; Night Bloomers-third Tuesday,
1302 S.W. Eleventh Street, Live Oak.
Live Oak Senior Citizens first Monday; 10:30
a.m.; Exhibition II Building, Coliseum Complex, 1302
SW Eleventh St., Live 'Oak; escorted tours available,
prices vary; Deposits due at registration, balance due
before trip. Info: Walter and Charlene Howell, 386-
842-2241.
GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak first Friday at
noon; 1308 Eleventh Street, Live Oak.
Suwannee Valley Humane Society Animal Shel-
ter second Monday; noon; at the shelter located on
Bisbee Loop, south entrance, in Lee off CR 255, Madi-
son County; Info: toll-free 866-Adoptl2, 866-236-
7812, www.geocities.com/suwanneehs.
Live Oak, Suwannee County Recreation Board -
second Wednesday; 5:30 p.m. Suwannee Parks &
Recreation offices, 1201 Silas Drive, Live Oak; Info:
386-362-3004.
MADD Dads Third Thursday; 7 p.m.; Suwannee
County Courthouse.
Man To Man Group second Thursday; 7 p.m.;
Marvin E. Jones Building, Dowling Park; free; refresh-
ments provided; Info: American Cancer Society toll-
free 800-ACS-2345 or the local office toll-free 888-
295-6787 (Press 2) Ext. 114.
Market Days Advent Christian Village first Sat-
urday; 8 a.m.-1 p.m.; Space-first-come, first-serve ba-
sis, $10 each; Village Square shops open; Info: Lodge
Office 386-658-5200.
McAlpin Community Club second Monday; 7
p.m.; covered dish dinner first; everyone welcome; pur-
pose to acquaint members of the communityof ser-
vices available in the county; Info: Donna Wade, 386-
935-3516 or Shirley Jones, 386-963-5357; building
rental: Leslie Owens, 386-364-3400.
MOAA (Military Officers Association of America)
- fourth Thursday, 6:30 p.m., at Elks Club, Lake City;
former and present officers meet for dinner and pro-
gram; Info: Dennis Tarkington, 386-719-7092 or Tandy
Carter, 386-719-9706.
MOMS Club second Wednesday; 11:15 a.m. at the
fellowship hall of Bethel Missionary Baptist Church,
go West on US 90 seven miles from 1-75, and 1-1/2
miles from the Columbia/Suwannee County line, 12
miles from Live Oak; Info: 386-397-1254, MOM-
SClubofLiveOakLakeCityFl@alltel.net
'National Active and Retired Federal Employees
(N.A.R.F.E.) Association third Tuesday; 11:30 a.m.;
at 628 SE Allison Ct., Lake City; guest speakers; all
present and retired federal employees invited; Info:
Miriam Stanford, 386-755-0907; 386-755-8570,
purvislkcty@aol.com; or 386-752-6593,
rhursti67 @comcast.net..
North Florida Chapter of Newborns in Need first
Tuesday; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; in the small conference room
at Suwannee River Regional Library, 1848 US 129
South, Live Oak.. Please join them if you crochet, knit,
sew, serge or can cut out or package. Help them take
care of the premature ,babies. in our area. Info: Mabel
Graham, 386-590-4075.
North Florida Conservation and Airboat Alliance
- second Tuesday; 7 p.m.; John H. Hale. Community
Park & Recreation Center, 215 NE Duval St., Live
Oak; all meetings covered dish; airboaters and sports-
men working to keep public lands and waterways open
for everyone to use and enjoy. No December meeting.
President Winston Williams; Vice President Garry
Garrison; Secretary-Treasurer Patty Wood-Williams.
Info: Winston Williams, 386-362-6716; or e-mail
pattyannwood@realtyagent.com.
North Florida Hope Share second Tuesday, 6
p.m., Suwannee County Sheriff's Office, Criminal Di-
vision Training Room, (old Mastec building), 1902 NE
Duval St., Live Oak. Non-profit support group for
grieving parents and family members. Light refresh-
ments served. Info: Missy Norris, 386-364-3789 or
386-364-4064.
Nursing Mom's Group second Friday; 10 a.m.;
Suwannee River Regional Library, Live Oak; Info:
Michelle, 386-776-2955.
Pink Ladies of Jasper second Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.,
odd months meeting held at Suwannee Valley Nursing
Center, 427 NW 15th Ave., Jasper; even months at Trin-
ity Community Hospital, 506 NW 4th St. Jasper. They
hold fund-raisers to benefit nursing center and hospital.
Pleasant Hill Home and Community Education
(HCE) Club, formerly known as Home Extension
Club second Monday, 10 A.m., McAlpin Community
.Center Small business meeting, followed by a work-
shop of different projects for the community. Visitors
are always welcome. Info: Donna Wade, president,
386-963-3516, or Barbara Parks, 386-362-3044.
Remembering the Loss of Your Baby first Thurs-
day; 11:30 a.m.-l1 p.m.; Hospice of North Central Flori-
da, North Building Counseling Room, 4305 NW 90th
Blvd., Gainesville; open support group for families
who have experienced the loss of a baby; Info: Cheryl


Bailey, 352-692-5107, toll-free 800-816-0596.
SHINE Serving Health Insurance Needs of El-
ders Advent Christian Village Dowling Park -
trained volunteers help elders and their caregivers in
Dowling Park area of Suwannee County to understand
Medicare and other health insurance programs make in-
formed decisions on insurance, Medicare Prescription
Drug Cards and on discounted prescription drug pro-

CONTINUED ON PAGE 13C








NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JUNE 18 19, 2008, PAGE 13C



NeW W....


Continued From Page 12C

grams and eligibility requirements; free; Info: appoint-
ment 386-658-3333 or 386-658-5329; Florida Depart-
ment of Elder Affairs toll-free 800-262-2243, Monday
Friday, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of El-
ders) Branford statewide program of the Florida De-
partment of Elder Affairs. Free unbiased Medicare
counseling provided. Trained SHINE Volunteers offer
information and assistance with Medicare, Medicare
Prescription Drug Plans, Medicare supplemental insur-
ance, Medicaid programs, and prescription assistance
programs offered by pharmaceutical companies. They
can also provide valuable information about Medicare
to persons soon to turn 65. Call the following number
and they will refer you to the shine counseling site at
Branford Public Library or a shine counselor will call
you if you cannot visit this site. Info: Elder Helpline,
toll-free 800-262-2243.
SHINE Serving Health Insurance Needs of El-
ders Jasper Monday-Friday, 1-4 p.m.; Hamilton
Pharmacy Assistance Program, Sandlin Building, 204
NE 1st Street, Jasper; trained volunteers help elders and
their caregivers in Suwannee County to understand
Medicare and other health insurance programs make ih-
formed decisions on insurance, Medicare Prescription
Drug Cards and on discounted prescription drug pro-
grams and eligibility requirements; free; Info: Florida
Department of Elder Affairs toll-free 800-262-2243,
Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
SHINE Serving Health Insurance Needs of El-
ders Live Oak second Monday, 1-3 p.m. or second
Thursday, 1:30-2:30 p.m.; Suwannee River Regional
Library, US 129 South, Live Oak; trained volunteers
help elders and their caregivers in Suwannee County to
understand Medicare and other health insurance pro-
grams make informed decisions on insurance,
Medicare Prescription Drug Cards and on discounted
prescription drug programs and eligibility require-
ments; free; Info: Florida Department of Elder Affairs
toll-free 800-262-2243, Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m.-
4:30 p.m.
SHINE Serving Health Insurance Needs of El-
ders White Springs first and third Thursday; 9:30-
11:30 a.m.; Library, 12797 Roberts Street, White


Council for Progress of Suwannee County second
Tuesday; 7:30 a.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak;
Info: 386-362-3071.
Suwannee County Conservation District third
Thursday, 7 p.m., at Suwannee River Water Manage-
ment District Office, US 90 and CR 49, Live Oak.
Open to the public. Info: District Office, 386-362-2622,
ext. 3.
Suwannee County Development Authority sec-
ond Tuesday; 5:30 p.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live
Oak; Info: 386-362-3071.
Suwannee County Tourist Development Council -
fourth Tuesday; 1 p.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak;
Info: 386-362-3071.
Suwannee County Senior Citizens first Monday;
10:30 a.m., Exhibition II Building, Coliseum Complex,
1302 SW Eleventh St., Live Oak; escorted tours avail-
able, prices vary; Deposits due at registration, balance
due before trip. Info: Walter and Charlene Howell, 386-
842-2241.
Suwannee Elementary School (SES) School Advi-
sory Council (SAC) meets at 6 p.m., third Tuesday,
in the media center at SES, 1748 South Ohio/Martin
Luther King Jr. Avenue, Live Oak. All interested parties
are welcome to attend..
Suwannee High School (SHS) Band Boosters sec-
ond Thursday, 6:30 p.m., in the band room at Suwannee
High School, Live Oak.
Suwannee River Valley Archaeology Society third
Tuesday; public library, Branford; Info: 386-935-4901.
Suwannee Valley Bluegrass Pickin first Saturday,
7 p.m., Otter Springs Resort Lodge, 6470 SW 80th
Ave., Trenton. It is free to the public, ifi a nice, air-con-
ditioned building. Info: Cloud Haley, toll-free 800-990-
5410.
Suwannee Valley Builders Association second
Thursday; 6 p.m.; Cheryl's Noon Buffet, Fifth Street,
Live Oak; $5 per person for meal and meeting.
Suwannee Valley Genealogical Society first
Thursday; 7 p.m., Wilbur St., Live Oak; Open Tuesdays
and Thursdays, 9 a.m.-noon and 1-5 p.m.; Info: 386-
330-0110.
Suwannee Valley Humane Society Animal Shel-
ter second Monday; noon; at the shelter located on
Bisbee Loop, south entrance, in Lee off CR 255, Madi-


son County; Info: toll-free 866-Adbptl2, 866-236-
7812, www.geocities.com/suwanneehs.
Suwannee Valley Quilters first and third Thurs-
day; 10 a.m.; Info: Jane, 386-776-2909 after 4 p.m.
Suwannee Valley Kennel Club third Tuesday; 7:30
p.m.; Hospitality and Recreational Building, Columbia
County Fairgrounds, Lake City.
Tourist Development Council Suwannee County
- fourth Tuesday; 1 p.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave. Live
Oak; Info: 386-362-3071.
Vision SSeeds, Inc. second Tuesday, 6 p.im.
promptly, at location to be announced. Spiritual-Social-
Educational-Economic Development. Save our chil-
dren! Unity in Christ Jesus-Empowerment. All are wel-
come. Info: Otha White Sr., president, 386-364-1367.
Vivid Visions, Inc. first Monday; 5:30 p.m.; Dou-
glass Center Conference Room; a shelter and outreach
agency for victims of domestic violence;-Info: 386-
364-5957.
Wellborn Community Association (WCA) second
Thursday; 7 p.m.; Wellborn Community Center; Info:
Bonnie Scott, 386-963-4952, 386-208-1733-leave a
message..WCA fund-raiser to benefit building fund
- Blueberry Pancake Breakfast first Saturday; cen-
ter of Wellborn, Andrews Square; blueberry pancakes,
sausage and orange juice or coffee. Blueberry Festival
- first Saturday in June each year.
Wellborn Neighborhood Watch last Thursday, 7
p.m., Blake Lowe Building, 1517 4th Ave., Wellborn;
Info: Bruce or Jane, 386-963-3196.
White Springs Town Council Meeting: second
Tuesday; 7 p.m.; White Springs Town Hall.
The White Springs Folk Club 2007-2008 season
features performances by well known artists at Telford
Hotel, River Street, White Springs. Dinner and lodging
are also available, call 386-397-2000 for reservations.
Concert room opens at 6:30 p.m. A reception, drawing
and. intermission performance session featuring
local/regional performers will follow. Cost: $12.50 per
person at the door, performance and reception. Info:
Club, 386-397-2420 or mckenziew@alltel.net.
GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak first Friday at
noon; 1308 Eleventh Street, Live Oak.


Springs; free; trained vol-
unteers help elders and
their caregivers in Suwan-
nee County to understand
Medicare and other health
insurance programs make
informed decisions on in-
surance, Medicare Pre-
scription -Drug.Cards and-
on discounted prescription
drug programs and eligi-
bility-requirements; Info:
Florida Department of El-
der Affairs toll-free 800-
262-2243, Monday Fri-
day, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Suwannee Chapter of
the Florida Trail Associ-
ation second Monday; 7-
9 p.m.; Suwannee River
Water Management Dis-
trict, US 90 and CR 49,
Live Oak; Info: Sam Big-
bie, 386-362-5090; Don
Neale, 386-362-4850;
Sylvia Dunnam, 386-362-
3256.
Suwannee County Ani-
mal Control Governing
Board at 5 p.m., second
Tuesday at Suwannee Riv-
er Regional Library, 1848
S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak.
Public invited. Info: 386-
364-1860.
Suwannee County Ani-
mal Shelter Volunteers
first Wednesday, 10 a.m.
at the shelter, located at
11150 144th Street in
McAlpin, the same road as
the county landfill, off US
129 South. Info: shelter,
386-208-0072 or Ana
Smith, 386-364-5584.
Suwannee County De-
mocratic Executive
Committee dinner
meeting, first Tuesday,
6:30 p.m. for dinner, meet-
ing at 7 p.m., Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park, US
129 North, Live Oak;
Info/RSVP: Monica, 386-
330-2036.
Suwannee County
Cattlemen's Association
- third Thursday; 6:30
p.m.; Farmers Co-op
meeting room; Info: Herb
Rogers, 386-362-4118.
Suwannee County
Chamber of Commerce -
second Thursday; 7:30
a.m.; 816 South Ohio Ave.
Live Oak; Info: 386-362-
3071.
Suwannee County:


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PAGE 14C, JUNE 18 19, 2008 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


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