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 Section A: Main
 Section B: Sports
 Section B continued
 Section C: North Florida Focus
 Section D: North Florida Focus:...
 Section E: Agri-Business














The Mayo free press
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028404/00121
 Material Information
Title: The Mayo free press
Uniform Title: Mayo free press (Mayo, Fla. 1958)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Bernard Guthrie
Place of Publication: Mayo Fla
Creation Date: April 26, 2007
Publication Date: 1958-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Mayo (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lafayette County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Lafayette -- Mayo
Coordinates: 30.051944 x -83.175556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 70, no. 27 (June 20, 1958)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002042475
oclc - 33286672
notis - AKN0339
lccn - sn 95047189
System ID: UF00028404:00121
 Related Items
Preceded by: Mayo free press and Lafayette County news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
    Section B: Sports
        page B 1
        page B 2
    Section B continued
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
    Section C: North Florida Focus
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
        page C 9
        page C 10
    Section D: North Florida Focus: Classified Marketplace
        page C 11
        page C 12
        page D 1
        page D 2
        page D 3
        page D 4
        page D 5
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
        page D 9
        page D 10
    Section E: Agri-Business
        page E 1
        page E 2
        page E 3
        page E 4
Full Text





nflaonline.com












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AI riHusnes
NN.;IUYI~I -j
't 11
XV. a


Weather Eye On Mayo


Weather art submitted
by, Jordi Olquin,
fifth grade.
High: 86
Partly Cloudy
Low: 60


I Vo.11,N.73400 TURSAYAPRL2,072AG


LCA 3rd Annual drama production


It's a girl!


Page 2A


Lady Hornets District Champs


Page 3A


HEALTH

ALERT:

Heavy

smoke

blankets

area
IRA MIKELL
Free Press Reporter
mayohetipt 'ez-itsl 'alll.n'et
Heavy smoke from a
colossal wildfire in Ware
County Georgia recently
impacted our area.
Dubbed the "Sweat
Farm Road Fire," the
massive wildfire has al-
ready, consumed 56,000
acres, destroyed numer-
ous homes, and is ap-
proximately 45 percent
contained, according to
the Georgia Forestry
Commission.
The dry weather,
drought-like conditions,
and strong shifting
winds are limiting the
ability of forestry per-
sonnel and firefighters
to put out the blaze that
is intent on widening its

SEE HEALTH, PAGE 5A


One injured in two




vehicle accident


IRA MIKELL
Free Press Reporter
mayofreepressl@alltel.net
On Wednesday, April 18, at approxi-
mately 4:50 p.m., emergency personnel
and law enforcement officials from both
Lafayette and Suwannee counties quickly
arrived at the scene of a two vehicle acci-
dent at the intersection of CR 349 and SR
27. The Florida Highway Patrol was also
present at the crash site. FHP Trooper


Glen Gainus investigated the accident.
According to the FHP report, Frank M.
Dees of Branford was in the process of
making a left turn from SR 27 onto CR -
349 in a 1969 Ford pickup into the path of
Claud M. Crosier, who is also a Branford
resident. Crosier was driving a 1989 Ford
pickup and was traveling east on SR 27.
The total estimated amount of damage.
to both vehicles, as indicated in the re-

SEE ONE, PAGE 5A


Law enforcement and emergency personnel assist each other at the scene of a two vehicle
accident. Photo: Linda Smith.


Karen and Jimmy Walby address Mayo Rotarians on the benefits
of the Fair Tax. Photo: Ira Mikell.


Fair Tax...

will it benefit Americans?


IRA MIKELL
Free Press Reporter
mayofreepressl@alltel.net
Americans growing
weary of the current tax
code and are clamoring
for change, have a repre-
sentative voice in Ameri-
cans for Fair Taxation.
Two representatives of
this nonprofit organiza-
tion met with Mayo Ro-
tarians on Wednesday,
April 18, to discuss the
Fair Tax issue and explain
why they believe it is su-
perior to the Internal Rev-
enue Service.


The intensity of the Fair
Tax debate has been
growing since it was first
proposed by United
States Congressman John
Linder nearly a decade
ago. It was met with
heavy opposition as the
movement got started.
But, today, mariy people
who were skeptical that it
could work have now
joined others in their en-
deavqr to transform it
into a national issue.
. One of the leading con-
tenders for tax reform is

SEE FAIR, PAGE 5A


Working to make schools

safer in Lafayette County


Becky Sharpe, Safe
Schools Healthy
Students Project
Coordinator
We all join the nation in
mourning the loss of the
33 students and faculty of
Virginia Tech University.
Inevitably,, we begin to
wonder about the safety
of Lafayette County, our
own children, and what
our local schools are do-
ing to keep them safe.
I would like to take this
opportunity to let you
know that Lafayette
County is working hard
to prevent school violence
and to promote a healthy
environment in our
schools and community
through an innovative


program called Project
SAVE, a federally funded
Safe Schools Healthy Stu-
dents Initiative.
We join more than 200
schools and communities
nationwide that are com-
mitted to finding solu-
tions to the problem of
youth violence by work-
ing to provide safe, sub-
stance-free environments
where.students can learn,
grow, and succeed. Pro-
ject SAVE provides two
Prevention Specialists to
teach researched-based
drug and violence cur-
riculum to our children
ages preschool through
high school; after-school

SEE WORKING, PAGE 5A


LA students pose at state conference. See more photos on page 4B.


Lafayette

FBLA wins

Sat State!
Lafayette FBLA recently re-
turned home from the FBLA State
Conference in Orlando. They ar-
rived with a first place in High
School Business Math won by
Tony Fluriach and a fourth place
;"4 in Middle School Career Explo-
':,.ii, ration Won by Jennifer Garcia.
The 14 Lafayette students who
attended the State Conference
gained invaluable business experi-
ence as they networked with busi-
ness students from across the state,
participated in voting sessions, and
attended business workshops.
The LHS FBLA would like to
thank all community members that
participated in fundraisers and .
gave donations. These contribu-
tions made this trip a reality.


Lighthouse Realtv
igl t R I

_~rqI 1'irIf. N e ii Ii,,i 1h I.t. _
NEW LISTING 'ry w ll.lopr M- on P', ret Horn,
hlsi fulllehts d uvo red I I r oj. i,.,,,h .. i mli,,Jll .tilin .
F ,nilLhi 5 dollt, h" ,'.1o '1 in i rro ,id .n, ',Ilv
S[fie l 'i-.l Lig, i .eal-rn I lIh,3ri a weIjll a ,i:,t r,.',',i Mb
{,,t i lse do;.ublO wrniv garii,,r, ub s,;,parat(. Sho'%'Ar rl,.q1y
H t i cleared and great for horses. Outswae you wilt line beautiful
Heather Neill azaleas, fruit/pecan trees, grape vines, 21x21 metal
Broker storage, 1Ox1O shed, and carport. #59038 $20901000I O
g Corner US 27 & Hwy. 51 Mayo, FL (386) 294-2131 wwwv.LighthouseRealty.us


Courthouse to be closed!
The Lafayette County Courthouse will be closed on
Friday, May, 4, while a back-up generator is installed.
If you have an emergency that requires help from any
of the offices, please call the constitutional officer at
home or call the Lafayette County jail at 386-294-1301.
They will call the appropriate person to assist you.
Any legal deadlines that fall on this date will be ex-
tended to Monday, May 7, by order of the Chief Judge of
the Third Judicial Circuit, State of Florida.


COOKIE
For Kids
12 & Under I
I I
No Purchase Necessary
Must Present Coupon
Limit 1 Per Person
Good 04127107 Only
L-----------------------.


LaaeteCunysnessoresic 88.Wer rodt sre


FBLA


Page 4B








PAG 2A_ THE MAY FREE PRESS Mo FL TRDY APRI 26 200


The ground has been
broken, the building is
completed and Bethel of
Mt. Sinai Church joyously
invites community friends
to come help celebrate the
grand opening and dedica-
tion of the new Outreach
Center, on Saturday, April
28, at 12 noon.
The Bethel church family
has been excited about this
God-given vision, this has
been unseen with the nat-
ural eye for the past three
years, but by faith, realized
in the spirit. With the help
of members, friends, com-
munity, and the Campers
on Mission team we have
accomplished through the
grace of God what many
Said couldn't be done. This
building project began in
October '06 and was com-
pleted in March '07. TO
GOD BE THE GLORY.
Since so many have
helped bring this vision to
pass for the community,


Share your
faith
-A


the grand celebration
would not be the same
without community cele-
brants. The event will start
with a royal grand proces-
sion from the main sanctu-
ary of the church led by
Pastors Carolyn and
Chester Demps, church of-
ficials, supporting neigh-
borhood pastors, govern-
ment officials and other
community leaders.
After a prayer of thanks-
giving has been prayed
and the ribbon has been
cut, the celebrants will en-
ter to be a part of the dedi-
cation ceremony of the
newly constructed center.
A free will offering will be
accepted from those
friends who have not had
the opportunity to give.
After the ceremony, a
tour of the center will be
provided. A barbeque din-
ner will be served as our
way of saying thanks you
to the community.


Naked Truth



Rally May 4-5


Region

What is your
church
doing?
Let us hear
from you!

Have an article
you want printed?
Send it to us!

Phone: 294-1210
Fax: 294-2666
n/c


Alms of Bethel Out-
reach Center will be
sponsoring the "Naked
Truth Rally" on Friday,
May 4 beginning at 7
p.m. for Parent/Students
and Saturday beginning
at 11 a.m.
There will be:
Rally
Testimonies
Skits
Entertainment
Door prizes
Food
Abstinence Idol Con-
test
The kick off for the
weekend Rally will be on
Thursday evening, May
3. A panel discussion
highlighting questions
written by students be-
fore hand, will be the fo-
cus of the evening.
Friday evening will
focus on a keynote
speaker, music and
dance.
Parents are encouraged
to attend on Friday
evening so that they can
hear and support the in-
formation that will be


Take the Plunge!

Make a splash with Jesus!


Hang on to your life
preserver! The VBS crew
at Riverside Baptist
Church in Mayo is prepar-
ing for a water park ad-
venture. They are getting
ready to Take the plunge
and Make a Splash with
Jesus! As kids move from
one whirlwind activity to
the next, they will soak up
lessons that will last a life
time.


Kids will Take the
plunge into Obedience,
Worship, Courage, Faith,
and Service! It will be a
day of fun and excitement
sure to make a splash with
kids of all ages. The twist-
ing and turning will be.
April 28, from 9 am-3 pm.
To dive into the excite-
ment and register, or for
more information Call
Kelly at 294-3976.


The 5th 9th grade students of Lighthouse Christian Academy are
preparing for their 3rd Annual Drama Production.


Lighthouse Christian


Academy prepares


for 3rd annual


drama production


given to their children.
Every adult attending
will receive a gift. And a
special prize will be giv-
en to two lucky parents.
Any youth who wishes
to participate in Satur-
day's Abstinence Idol
Contest may call ABCD,
Inc. at 386-294-1183 or
fax 386-294-1365.
This rally is funded by
the Florida Department
of Health. Why are we
sponsoring the "Naked
Truth Rally?" It's sim-
ply.... Our mission: To
create a culture shift in
our community where
abstinence till marriage
becomes the norm in-
stead of the exception.
The "Naked Truth Rally"
will empower-our youth
to avoid society's trap
and longings for sexual
desires and purity.
Parents will receive
valuable expert "How
To: methods for dis-
cussing sex with youth
and supporting their de-
cision to remain sexually
pure.


is afraid .of work; Kate, a
runaway teenager with
Broadway on her mind;
and Vivian, a rich snob who
is simply too good for
camp.
All of these characters,
combined with many more,
help to shape a wild and
"krazy" plot that is sure to
leave audiences in stitches.
Don't miss this entertaining
comedy that is suited for
the whole family. Play
dates are April 27, at 7 p.m.
and April 28, at 2 p.m. Tick-
ets are $5 in advance/$7 at
the door. Call 294-2994 for
more information.


SNational Day

of Prayer

National Day of Prayer will
be observed in Mayo at the
I 7 town park from 12-1 p.m. on
Thursday, May 3.
This event is sponsored by
local churches. Everyone is invit-
ed to come out and support this event!


AIRLINE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC......294-2676
Pastor Rev. Chip Parker
Sunday
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship, 11:00 a.m.
Prayer Meeting 5:30 p.m.
Discipleship Training.. 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Fellowship Supper 6:00-6:30 p.m.
Awanas, Faith, Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
Located Four Miles East of Mayo on Highway 27
"0 Come Let us Worship The Lord" Ps. 95:6 320065-F

ALTON CHURCH OF GOD 294-3133
Pastor Rev. Charles E. Hodge, Jr.
Youth Pastor Chan Perry
Music Director Blanche Perry
Children's-Pastor Ryan & Tiffany Perry
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service/K.I.D.S. Church 10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Family Night Youth Club Church ............7:00 p.m. Wednesday
State Road 27 320067-F


BETHEL HOLY CHURCH 294-1932
"Affiliated with,Mt. Sinai Holy Churches of America Inc."
Pastor Elder Carolyn Demps
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.
Worship Service 12:00 p.m.
Thursday Bible Study 7:00 p.m.


357 Pine Street
"Membership means Discipleship"


320069-F


HATCHBEND APOSTOLIC CHURCH..935-2806
Pastor Rev. Steve Boyd
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Light for Living 7:30 p.m.
Located 4 miles South on Hwy. 349,
then left on CR 138, follow signs. 72-F

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD.................294-1811
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
S.aiy Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
S Kid's Church 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
iA,,yYouth Impact 7:00 p.m.
VetdtestAdult Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
Pastor: Rev. Kenny Sullivan
Youth Pastor: Daryl Fletcher
Located at 294 SE Mill Street, Mayo "Renewing Hope and Building Lives"
LIGHTHOUSE CHRISTIAN CENTER...294-3089
Pastor, John Whittington
Sunday Praise and Worship Service 10:30 a.m.
Children's Church 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Night Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Children's and Teen's Service 7:00 p.m.
State Road 51 Mayo ~ "Love Never Fails" 351s00.F


Methodist Church
Phone: 386-294-1661
MAYO FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Located SE corner of Hwy. 27 & FL 51 Mayo
Pastor Jim Gamble
Sunday School 10:00 a'.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.

"The Friendly Mayo Methodist" 320091-F

MAYO BAPTIST CHURCH...........(386)294-1020
916 N. Fletcher Ave.
Pastor: Brother Jimmy Legg
Interim Music Kathy Palamino
Sunday Schedule
Bible Study 9:45 A.M.
Worship Service 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Night Service 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday Night Schedule
Supper 6:00 P.M.
Prayer Service & Youth & Children Meeting........................7:00 P.M.
mayobaptistchurch@alltel tct ,32f4 0.F


MIDWAY BAPTIST CHURCH 935-4993
Pastor: Danny Rogers
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service 11:00 a.m.
Discipleship Training 5:00 p.m.
Evenmg'Worship 6:00 p.m.
Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:00 p.m.'
Located on County Road 354
"For If Ye Forgive Men Their Tresspasses Your Heavenly
Father Will Also Forgive You" Matt. 6:14 9Anno4F


ST. MATTHEW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Contact Number in Mayo (386) 294-2218
Vicar Rev. Linda Lowry
Sr. Warden Pippy-Cashman
Celebration of Holy Eucharist at 7:00 PM
each Wednesday to be followed by light
refreshments and Christiani Education.
Located One Block North of the Courthouse in Mayo. -

Brewer Lake Baptist Church
Off Hwy. 53 in Day, FL 386-294-1578
"We're Going, Gowing and Glowing for God"
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Morning Worship 11 a.m.
Training Union 6 p.m.
Evening Bible Study 7 p.m.
Wednesday
Children, Youth & Adult 7 p.m.
Matt Swain, Pastor 'William Sircy, louth
Visit us on the web at www.brewerlakebaptistchurch.com
"Come To Day...Come Today!" 333334-F


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Rev. Charlie Walker
Sunday Early Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Discipleship Training 6:00 p.m.
Evenng Worship 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Visitation 5:00 p.m.
Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
Mission Classes 7:00 p.m.
Located Two Miles North of Mayo Off Highway 51
"Come And Hear, All Ye That Fear God" Ps. 66:16 324603-F

PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC).294-1306
Pastor Ted Rushing
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Discipleship Training..............6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Evening Training 6:00 p.m.
Team Kids Night 6:30 p.m.
Seven miles West of Mayo, left on CR 534 then right on 350A
Jesus Saves -- 24804-F

NEW HARMONY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
160th St.
(Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right)
Pastor: Stan Posey
Phone (386) 776-1806
SUNDAY
Sunday Worship 9:30 ami
Bible Study 10:30 am
WEDNESDAY
Women's BibleStudy 10:00 am
324879-F

Bethel Creek Baptist Church
Pastor : Jerry Tyson
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
Nursery available for all services
located 3 miles North of Day on Highway 53
Where you are always welcomed 3246S-F

Hatch Bend Baptist Church
Pastor George Dunn ,
935-0943
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening 7:00 p.m.
3029 S.E. CR 500 351696-F


Jesus Christ Fellowship
Community Church,
A Full Gospel Ministry
of Mayo Florida, Inc.
294-1656
Deacon Lemon Curtis Watson,
Chairman of the Deacon Ministry
Mother Emma Watson, General Mother
Located on Lake St.
at the corner of San Pedro St.
Church Services
Sunday School.....................10:00 a-m.
Morning Worship................11:00 a.m.
Tuesday Service.....................7:00p.m.
(Prayer Meeting and Bible Study)
Worship means Celebration, Communication,
and Consecration.
Church Membership means Commitment.
Discipleship means a student of the
word of God. 324652-

New Beginnings Church
a place for you
Pastor...............Wayne Hudson
Phone Number........386-294-1244
newbeginningschurch@alltel.net
Pliptfose Statemenat
Neto Beginnings exists to provide an environment
there People can discover and develop passion for
God that is Real, relevant, and relational
New Location:
163 W. Main Street, Suite 500
SemviceSdiedule
Sun. Morning Worship ...........,........IO am.
wvw.newbeginningsdurchmayo.com
328269-F

Ephesus Advent
Christian Church
Pastor Bill Talley
963-5600
209-9626
Sunday School Service.... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service.............. 11:00 a.m.
Prayer Meeting.................7:00 p.m.
351708-F


To Place Your Church In Our

Directory, Call Myrtle at 362-


The 5th 9th grade stu-
dents of Lighthouse Christ-
ian Academy are preparing
for their 3rd Annual Drama
Production. Audiences
have been thrilled and
amazed as the talented ele-
mentary and middle school
students performed The
Ransorm of Red Chief and
,the 50s musical comedy
Rock Around the Block.
This year's. play, Krazy
Kamp, is a zany comedy
full of interesting charac-
ters, such as: Theodora, a
young camper who is a
compulsive eater; Willard,
a college camp leader who


Alms of Bethel


Outreach Center


grand opening


Saturday April 28


- .


.


THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2007


PAGE 2A -~ THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


i . . .










-Socra/i ac v.s


6 ititu 1 f \ i( a
Send us your
social news
Deadline -
,/c Monday Noon


Call: 294-1210
Fax: 294-2666
Drop box: located at
Crofts Thriftway

PRICES
WITH PHOTOS
Wedding/
Engagement $25
Birth Announcement $10
Birthday wishes $2.50
per column inch


THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2007 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 3A


toL maq L
ko nzazzy JI'lay 5


It's a girl!
"SEffie"

JI&JdF cEfizag.st/ Ei 'UIon


Matt and Kenna Frier-
son of Branford are
pleased to announce the
birth of their daughter,
Jesse "Ellie" Elizabeth
Frierson. Ellie was born
Feb. 12, 2007 at 11:10
p.m. She weighed seven
pounds and eleven
ounces and was 19 and a
half inches long.
Maternal grandparents
are Keith and Elizabeth
"Sang" Cranford of
Branford. Paternal
grandparents are Doyle
and Sheila Frierson of
Cross City.


Maternal great grand-
parents are Louise and
the late William Cran-
ford of Branford, Mamie
Lou Futch Virpsa and
the late Bill Jess Futch
and the late Mike Virpsa,
all of Rocky Creek. Pa-
ternal great grandpar-
ents are Carl and Coleen
Wells of Cross City, and
the late Buck and Sally
Frierson of Branford.
Ellie is also welcomed
home by big brother Colt
and big sister Dallas, as
well as countless aunts,
uncles and cousins.


S"'I






Jason Michael Troutman and Andrea Breanne Flickinger

A Un29 ,- zouatman


to mnazzut ,j z1 73

Mr. and Mrs. Rick Flickinger are proud to announce the
wedding of their daughter, Andrea Breanne to Jason
Michael Troutman, on June thirtieth, three o'clock in the
afternoon at Airline Baptist Church.
Andrea is a 2005 graduate of Lafayette High School. She
graduated in December 2005 from Lake City Community
College with a degree in Applied Technology for Emer-
gency Medical Technician. Currently she is enrolled in the
LPN program at Suwannee Hamilton Tech Center and
will graduate in July.
Andrea is the granddaughter of NB and the late Alma
Chancey of Wildwood, and Peter and Anna Weaver of
Gettysburg, PA.
Jason is A 2006 graduate of Lafayette High School, and is
currently employed with the Department of Corrections in
Perry. He is the son of the late Gary Troutman of Mayo
and Peggy Troutman of Wellborn.
Jason is the grandson of Walter and Margaret Becker of
Brooksville, PA and John and Marybelle Troutman of
Brooksville, PA, all deceased.
The couple will reside at their home in Mayo.
All friends and family are invited to attend the wedding.
No local invitations will be sent.


Bethel Creek Baptist hosting sing
Bethel Creek Baptist will be hosting the Southern Gospel
Quartet "The Floridians" on Sunday, May 6, at 6 p.m.
All are welcome. This will be the last singing group fea-
tured until September.


^w-----
^ll~j~llllj^H~lJ~J^II~l.' i- V fkS il -


Jeanne Louise Klug and Christopher Douglas Permenter:
Jeanne Louise Klug and Christopher Douglas Permenter
would like to announce their wedding plans.
Jeanne is the daughter of Betty Jean Windham and the
late Laurence Denman Windham Sr. of Mayo.
Christopher is the son of Wesley and Darlene Permenter
of Green Cove Springs.
The wedding will take place at 1 p.m. on May 5, 2007 at
New Hope Baptist Church in Mayo.
Following the ceremony there will be a Southern style
pot luck in the reception hall.
All friends and family are invited to attend.
The couple will reside in Mayo.


"Gathering" visitors explore Madison County, May 4-6


Cultural heritage tour sponsored
by Fla. Humanities Council


Fifty-three inquisitive
Floridians will explore
Florida's Old South culture
and traditions during a
weekend visit to Madison
County May.4 6. De-
scribed in tour literature as
an area of "gracious ante-
bellum homes, Civil War
memories, and enduring
traditions in farming and
cattle-raising," Madison is
the Spring site for "The
Gathering," a cultural-her-
itage tour sponsored by The
Florida Humanities Coun-
cil.
Gathering trips discover
the distinct qualities that de-
fine the histories and cultur-
al identities of communities
around Florida. Several


Gathering tours are sched-
uled each year. The Fla.
Humanities Council is the
nonprofit statewide affiliate
of the National Endowment
for the Humanities.
The Madison Gathering is
filled with activities that
feature the rich history of
the area. Events include a
tour of Madison's antebel-
lum homes, dinner at the
historic Wardlaw-Smith-
Goza Mansion, an authentic
cattle auction, arid a tour of
the 1930s communal Cherry
Lake Project.
Local historian and au-
thor, Joe Akerman, genealo-
gist Elmer Spear, and
African-American historian
Andrea Oliver will share in-


formation about the area.
Novelist Lee Gramling will
talk about his "cracker
westerns" and musicians
Pete Gallagher, Kelly Green
and Whitey Markle will en-
tertain with Florida folk
songs.
The Madison County
Tourist Development Coun-
cil provided partial funding
for the tour and North
Florida Community College
provided in-kind sponsor-
ship. The Madison County
Chamber is encouraging lo-
cal businesses to welcome
visitors with special tales
and displays.
For information contact
Monica Rowland, Florida
Humanities Council, 727/
873-2005, or e-mail mrow-
land@flahum.org. The
Madison gathering is fea-


tured on the FHC website at
www.flahum.org/ gather-
ing.
gathering.>


Fifth

Sunday
night

service
Mt. Paran Baptist
Church will host the
Fifth Sunday night ser-
"Ice of iKe Lal-aette
Mini sei Iftssociation
Sunday, April 29 at 6
p.m.
The church is located
on CR 450 in Lafayette
County. Everyone is cor-
dially invited to attend.


4. \


"Make yourself at home !


19-, 21-, 25- or 27-hp** OHV engines
48", 52" or 61" mower decks
Speeds up to 10 mph
14 gallon fuel capacity
Twin-lever controls
7-gauge steel mower deck and frame
Heavy-duty pump/wheel motor drive
ROPS with seatbelts


Pridgeon Garage
410 SW County Road 300
Mayo, FL 32060
386-294-2926
J 1 i WWW.SNAPPERPRO.COM


A mortgage with less fees means extra funds
you can use to buy the things that make your
new house a home.


6,12e.-P.i -f tayczl, 2,


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them/ for a mortgage

estin.. ,.' with less fes.


Live Oak Office:

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w w w i. ff s b c o m


344666-F


THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2007


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 3A







DA"Ce AA -. T I-I MAYV FRFF PRFRRS Mavo FI


Ag Literacy


.5*5


Day observed around Mayo



4A ,-..!.. ,

; N ... ..A


-. -- .f A-~
I ~
I ,*~*
"*W


' of


Scdoolunch 5

April 30-May 4, 2007
Mon. Tues. Wed.
30th 1st 2nd


Thurs.
3rd


Breakfast Cereal, French Toast Sausage Cheese Pancake
Crackers, licks Syrup, Biscuit, Juice, Grits, Juice, i/syrup,
Juice, Milk uice. M Milk Milk Juice, Milk
Lunch Hot Dog w/Bun, Macaroni & Spaghetti, Chicken & Pizza,
Elem Baked Beans, Ham Tossed Rice, Corn,
El.em. Sweet Potato Casserole, Salad, Turnips, Applesauce
School Pudding, Peas, Rolls, Cornbread, Milk
Pineapple, Tangerine, Fruit Cup, Peaches,
Milk Milk Milk Milk
cheeseburger Tacos
Lunch w/bun Del Turey Chicken & Rice, izza (Turkey BBQ Chicken (Chicken Fajita),
Sandwich), (Little Caesa Salad), Sandwich (Little ttuce &
Lett mc orna to Ca sar S lad) Caesar Pizza), Lettuce &
LettuceiTomato/ Pizza), Baked Potato, Baked Bes CTomato,
School Dll Chip Corn,
FrenchSFries, Collard Greens, Broccoli Tossed Salad,
Carrot & Celery Corn,Apple, w/CheeSe Orange d e, Tapple
Sticks, Orappe, OrangeWedes, Tidbits
Orange Wedges, Oange Juice, Sauce, Orange Juice, Apple Juice,
Pineapple Tidbits, Appled Cris iCowboyl londe
Peanut Butter Sweet Polato Apple Crisp, Cookies, Brownies,
Bars, Milk Pudding, Milk Apple, Milk Milk Milk


S MAYO Sponsored By: Crofts Thrift-Way
PHARMACY ,Hw, ,1y 27
At Croft's Thrift-Wa -
294-3500 'i 294-1165


UNINSURED?
We have a sliding-fee program
for those who qualify at

Mayo Health Services

Bogdan Maliszewski, MD

You can also save $ on your
Prescriptions from us when filled at
North Florida Pharmacy of Mayo

Call 294-1226 for an appointment

Mayo Health Services
144 S.W. Virginia Circle
Mayo, Florida 32066
348811-F


Ag Literacy Day was
observed at Lafayette
Elementary School
on Monday, March
12. Photos: Ira Mikell.


In hC~ii,.; or On1line co,' .*,< '. ',

Classes Start

May & June26
Schedule available online at www.nfcc.edu

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THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2007


iY
'

.~e~. I


~









TII JP5flA APRIL 2) 200 THE MAY FREE PRESS MaoF PGE5


Working


Continued From Page 1A

programs at Lafayette Ele-
mentary School, Lafayette
High School, Lighthouse
Christian Academy, and
Alms of Bethel Community
Development, Inc.; and ad-
ditional law enforcement
services on campus during
school and after school
through the Lafayette
County Sheriff's Office. The
partnership is working to-
gether and using programs
and services with proven
track records to provide our
students with safer school
environments.
Project SAVE is working
to reduce the risk factors
that can come between our
children and their ability to
learn at home and in the
classroom. Four evidenced
based prevention programs
are being implemented to
help teach children to make
good choices in life by fos-
tering self-confidence and
creating meaningful activi-
ties for them: Too Good for
Drugs, Second Step, Too
Good For Drugs and Vio-
lence, and Al's Pals.
Our initiative will also ad-
dress student needs in the
areas of mental health ser-
vices and early childhood
development. The Project
SAVE Initiative isproviding
a licensed mental-health
counselor and behavioral
therapist on-site through
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare; and a home vis-
itation nurse and case man-
ager to work with children
ages 1-5 and their families
at the Lafayette County
Health Department.
The partnership will also
collaborate to develop col-
laborative crisis manage-
ment plans to enhance
school safety.
Lafayette County Schools
was awarded a 3-year,,
$953,963 grant in August
2006 by the U.S. Depart-
ments of Education, Health
and Human Services, and
Justice. For eight years,
communities across the
country have been selected
for these grants to improve
the way schools, families,
and the community work
together in response to ris-
ing concerns about youth
violence and school safety.
This Federal grant recog-
nizes that violence among
young people is caused by a
multitude of factors includ-
ing early childhood, family
life, mental health, and sub-
stance abuse issues and that
no single action can be
counted on to prevent it.
Building on the Initia-
tive's collaborative frame-
work, Lafayette County
Schools Project SAVE, mis-
sion brings together stu-
dents, parents, educators,
mental health agencies, lo-
cal law enforcement, and


other community-based or-
ganizations to talk about vi-
olence prevention. The
members of the Lafayette
County Schools Project
SAVE Partnership includes:
Lafayette County Sheriff's
Office, Lafayette County
Schools, Lighthouse Christ-
ian Academy, Alms of
Bethel Community Devel-
opment, Inc., Lafayette
County Juvenile Justice
Council, Lafayette County
Health Department, District
III Substance Abuse and
Mental Health Program Of-
fice, Lafayette Emergency
Management, Lafayette
County Emergency Medical
Services, and Mayo Correc-
tional Institute. In turn, Pro-
ject SAVE, and its partners
are working to create a safe
school environment that ad-
dresses prevention and in-
tervention needs for vio-
lence and substance abuse
issues, provides mental
health services to students
in need, offers early child-
hood development services,


and establishes safe school
policies.
We all share a role in the
effort to prevent youth vio-
Slence. Talk with your chil-
dren, your students, and
the children in your com-
munity. Be involved in
their lives. It is my hope
that we can continue to
work together, not only to
identify the solutions to end
youth violence but also to
implement those solutions.
Please contact Becky
Sharpe, Safe School Healthy
Students Project Director,
(386-294-1417 or
bsharpe@lafayette.kl2.fl.us)
if you would like more in-
formation on the Project
SAVE Initiative or the Pro-
ject SAVE Partnership. Part-
nership Meetings are held
in the Safe Schools Healthy
Students Building (old
White Foundation building)
at 9:30 a.m. on the second
Tuesday of each month.
Parents and community
members are encouraged to
attend.


. The skies over Lake City,
will roar with the sound of
supercharged airplanes and
split with the sights of sen-
sational aerial aerobatics
during the Rotary Air Show
April 28-29 at Lake City
Municipal Airport.
Headlining the event is
world-renowned aerobatic
pilot Jim Leroy. Leroy, who
now makes his home in
Lake City, will be flying his
Pitts Bulldog single-engine
plane in a stunning display
of daring and skill.
Joining Leroy for the
show are Jack Wells and his
L-29 jet and the popular
Lima Lima Flight Demon-
stration Team. Pre-show
events are scheduled for
each day also, including
Grounds the Limit skydiv-
ing team, a display of
World War II and experi-
mental aircraft.
An extra special and
timely event will be a 35-
40 minute Homeland Secu-
rity demonstration involv-
ing local law ,enforcement
and emergency personnel.
The public address an-
nouncer will inform the


crowd of a simulated sce-
nario in which a terrorist/
may have infiltrated the air
show area and planted a
bomb on one of the air
shbw aircraft.
Many of the acts per-
forming at the show are ap-
pearing at rates well below
their customary charge.
Their generosity is on dis-
play in part because all
profits from the show will
benefit Haven Hospice
Suwannee Valley Care Cen-
ter and the Columbia
County Senior Services
Lifestyle Enrichment Cen-
ter.
"This may be the best
show yet," said Mike Lee,
Lake City Rotarian coordi-
nating the charitable event.
"I've been involved with
our local air show for many
years and each time, the
show proves to be a fun-
filled, family oriented event
that the community really
supports."
Tickets for the show are
only $5 each day, children 6
and under free. Gates open
at 10 a.m. April 28 with a 2
p.m. show time, and 11


-7 AMERICAN CANOE
w ADVENTURES
10610 BRIDGE ST. WHITE SPRINGS, FLORIDA 32096
Wendell Hannum (386) 397-1309
owner/operator www.acal .com


Mayo Health Fair
Wednesday, May 9
7:00 to 9:00 a.m.

At Mayo Community Center
(Hwy 27 across the street from Hornet Hose)
You are never too young to be interested in your health!,
Find out if you are at risk for heart disease, hypertension,
diabetes, and cancer.
Blood Pressure checks & Blood Screeninas


iuose(Blood Suga) PSA statee Cancer Test)

For more information call 386-294-2475
Tour DMH Air Medic Helicopter & visit vendor, supplier, &
information booths learn about DMH services! '


- DOCTORS'
_ HOSPITAL
-HOSPITAL


Fair


Continued From Page 1A

Neal Boortz who is a
well-known radio talk
show host and author. He
has joined Congressman
Linder on the Fair Tax is-
sue and they co-wrote a
book titled "The FairTax."
"The FairTax is the most
thoroughly researched
piece of tax reform legis-
lation ever presented to
the U.S. Congress. Well
over $20 million has been
spent on economic and
sociological research in
putting this plan togeth-
er, and the research con-
tinues to this day," Boortz
said.
Karen Walby, Director
of Research, and son, Jim-
my, Florida Grassroots
Liaision, are firm believ-
ers in the Fair Tax as
well. They stated at the
Mayo Rotary meeting
that the tax code that is
currently in place needs
to be abolished and re-
placed with a system that


is less taxing and more
fair to individuals, small
businesses, and corpora-
tions.
According to Walby, if
this plan is passed into
law, Americans would be
able to keep more of their
hard earned money in-
stead of giving a heafty
amount to the govern-
ment. They would also
have more money to save
for retirement and other
important necessities of
life. "The Fair Tax propos-
al is a comprehensive
plan to replace federal in-
come and payroll taxes.
The Fair Tax allows
Americans to keep 100
percent of their paychecks
(minus any state income
taxes), ends corporate tax-
es arid compliance costs
hidden in the retail cost of
goods and services, and
fully funds the federal
government while fulfill-
ing the promise of Social
Security and Medicare,"
AFT said.
For additional informa-
tion about the Fair Tax,
visit www.FairTax.org.
You may also contact
Karen Walby at 1-800-324-
7828, ext. 109, or Jimmy
Walby at 850-223-3402.


a.m. Sunday, April 29, with
a 3 p.m. show.
Advance tickets for the
Lake City Rotary Air Show
are available at the Lake
City Reporter and Lake
City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce.
Tickets will also available at
the gate on show dates. Ad-
ditional information oft the
air show can be found at
*www.rotaryairshow.net.


One
Continued From Page 1A

port, was $3,000. Dees has
been charged with viola-
tion of right of way.
Crosier received minor in-
juries and was transported
to Lake City Medical. The
report stated that both dri-
vers were wearing their
seatbelts at the time of the
accident.


FARM

BURAU


MAYO FREE PRESS
Published .weekly every Thursday, USPS #334-600
Phone: (386) 294-1210 Fax: (386) 294-2666






Myra Regan, Linda Smith, Ira Mikell
Publisher Manager Reporter

Annual subscription rate:
$16 in county / $23 out of county
Periodicals postage paid at Mayo, Florida
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:,:
The Mayo Free Press
P.O. Box 248
Mayo, Florida 32066
Office located at 705 NW Suwannee Ave. Branford, FL
Editorial Policy: The Mayo Free Press encourages readers to write let-
ters to the editor expressing their opinion. All letters should be brief and to
the point and those selected for publication (we reserved the right to accept
or reject all letters) may be edited for space reasons. Letters must be signed
and include the writer's address and phone number to be considered for
publication. All letters become the property of The Mayo Free Press.


Serving Madison, Jefferson,

Taylor & Lafayette Counties

Auto, Life, Health, Home


Freddy Pitts, Agency Manager

Jimmy King, Agent
233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071

Doug Helms, Agent
105 W. Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-2213

Freddy Pitts
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371

Lance Braswell, Agent
Lafayette County Mayo, FL (386) 294-1399

24/7 Claim Service: 1-866-275-7322
"Helping You Is What We Do Best."


352876-F


* These are fasting tests. Please have
nothing to eat and drink only water
after midnight Tuesday! 348851-F


Pilots take to the


skies for good cause


Mother's Day Lunch Buffet at
Camp Weed & Cerveny Conference Center

Sunday, Ma y 13, 2007
11:00 am 2:00 pm

Ham and Beef Carving Stations "Have It Your
Way" Egg Station Baker's Table Hot Sides
Salad Bar Crab Bisque Dessert Table
'.,po]li reservations require, ,lani accepted until 11. I
s25.00 / Person -. "
Children 12 & Under: *10.00 / Person
Infants: Free -
40' Includes Taxes and Gratuiry

C -114 \\wF1- I Ccrvenuiq ConftrncEc G IEnF V
386-364-5350 C
Located 6 miles East of Live Oak off US 90 _


Health
Continued From Page 1A

destructive path. GFC is
continuing to solicit assis-
tance from firefighters in
Florida and other states in
this long and arduous situa-
tion.
According to a GFC
spokesperson, a tree that fell
on a power line sparked the
fire on Monday, April 19. In
a few days, the fire quickly
spread, affecting thousands
of residents who were evac-
uated to safety.
In the early part of last
week, Jacksonville and the
surrounding areas endured
the thick smoke. Then, in
the latter part of the week,
the winds shifted and sent
the smoke in our direction.
Until the wildfire is com-
pletely out and the smoke is
no longer impacting our
area, Greg Marshall,
Lafayette County Forester,
urges residents to use cau-
tion when doing any out-
side activity. "These fires
are still impacting visibility
in north Florida. If you
have asthma or any other
medical condition affecting
breathing it would be a
good idea to stay indoors
when smoke is present,"
Marshall said.


~


---~ ----~~- -~~--


illr





c


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 5A


THURSAY. ARIL 2,200







DACr U A -TIJ mAyA IrF rF% MVIVoTU D A I22


Check out sports Page 1-2B Everything you need to know
I i i I .l. l .. . i


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about handwashing you probably
learned in preschool


(www.itsasnap.org)


Why should you wash
your hands?
Keeping hands clean
is one of the most impor-
tant steps we can take to
avoid getting sick and
spreading germs to others.
When should you wash
your hands?
Before preparing or
eating food
After going to the
bathroom.
After changing diapers
or cleaning up a child who
has gone to the bathroom
Before and after tend-
ing to someone who is sick
After blowing your
nose, coughing, or sneez-
ing


After handling an ani-
mal or animal waste
After handling garbage
How should you wash
your hands?
Wet your hands and
apply liquid, bar or pow-
der soap.
Rub hands together
vigorously to make a lather
and scrub all surfaces.
Continue for 20 sec-
onds it takes that long for
the soap and scrubbing ac-
tion to dislodge and re-
move stubborn germs.
Need a timer? Imagine
singing "Happy Birthday"
twice through to a friend!
Rinse hands well un-
der running water.
Dry your hands using
a paper towel or air dryer.
'. If possible, use your


To the citizens of
Lafayette county
The Lafayette County Volunteer Fire Department
would like to take this opportunity to thank each and
every one of you who participated in some way last
weekend in our drive to raise money for our county
fire department: purchasing something during our
bake sale, just giving a donation at that time, or for
your generous donations made during our helmet
drive.
Your county volunteer fire department is honored
to be at the disposal of the citizens of Lafayette Coun-
ty to assist you in any way possible.
.We are very pround of each and every one of our
volunteer fire fighters. Being a newly formed depart-
ment, our funds are limited and with your help we
will be able to purchase much needed equipment and
training for our firefighters.
We plan to have additional fund raising events in
the near future and hope that you will continue to
support y our local county fire department. With you
helping us it enables us to assist our citizens more ef-
fectively and safely.
Again, on behalf of all of our volunteer fire depart-
ment members \we thank you.
Chief Willian (Billy) Robinson


AG-L S S S S


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............................... .................; .......... ........- ., ...- ,,.


Remember:if soap and-:
'based wipes or gel formu- '
lasto clean your hands.--









For more information cal
Priscilla Cashman
papertowel to turn off the am,
faucet.te County Coopera-
Remember: if soap and
water are not available,
consider using alcohol-
based wipes or gel formu-
las'to clean your hands, :
For more information calur-
Priscilla Cashman, Pro-ling
gram Assistant, Universityh lunch
Nutrition Program, : 7'

Lafayette County Coopera-,*"'
tivll be nsionService at1 p.m.
386-294-1279. ::

Starling Reunion
set for April 29
You are invited to the
Starling reunion on Satur-
day, April 28, at the Starling
Lake House on Pickett is
Lake. A covered dish lunch-'
will be served at p.m. njoy!

Fillyaw Family:T
Reunion set 1-
for April 29 .,
The Fillyaw Family Re-':
union will be held on Sun-
day, April 29, at the Lurav-
ille Community Center
around 1 p.m. Everyone is ,.
invited to attend and may-,
bring a covered dish. Come&
and enjoy!


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I


THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2007


PA(-I= A HE MYO FEE RESS Mav. F


t


AG-LOT3Xl 004rS. "r


.1--1-








I [LAFAYETTE COUNTY


E Or




Lafayette County's news source since 1888. We're proud to serve!
7HRDY APRL 6,207 heMao re Pes-PgeI


1r


17~
%r.


q. Hornets trip up


Fort White 7-5


- ,


A CLOUD OF DUST. Thomas Byrd stirred up a little dust as he slid safely into third base against Fort White last week. Byrd collected
two hits in the game which the Hornets won 7-5. photo by Ed Taylor


by Ed Taylor
Sports Correspondent
The Lafayette Hornets
pushed across four runs in
their half of the fifth in-
ning to erase a 4-2 Fort
White lead and went to
post a 7-5 win on the visit-
ing team. Serigo Perez led
the Lafayette offense with
three runs batted in to go
with his two hits. The Hor-
nets pounded Fort White
pitching for 11 hits in the
game. Thomas Byrd,
Christian Mercedes and
Cody Singletary each col-
lected two hits apiece. Sin-
gletary and Mercedes
drove in a pair of runs
each.


Lady Hornets district champs


J.D. behind

the Mike;

Moore


outstanding

by Ed Taylor
Sports Correspondent
It was district softball
tournament time at
Lafayette High School last
Friday night and the large
crowd that gathered under
some beautiful weather
saw a first class game.
Both teams represented
their respective schools
with a lot of dignity.
.1 have seen a lot of high
school pitchers in girls
softball but one of the best
I have seen in a while was
Bell's Holly Moore. Not to
take anything away from
Lafayette's Lindsey Ham-
lin, but Moore throws the
,ball hard. Moore struck
out 12 batters in the game
which Lafayette won 6-1,
but she did not get any bat
support in the final game.
The Lady Bulldogs will
move on to regional play
and I wish them the best
in the tournament this
week.
Hamlin seems to just
take everything in stride
and never appeared to be
shaken any time during
the game. Her team held a
slim 2-1 lead going into
the bottom of the sixth in-
ning. I spoke to her after
the game and she said she
had a lot of confidence in
her team's defense, al-
though, "...I was a little
nervous." You would
have never known it.
It was great team effort


SEE FROM, PAGE 2B


J.D Young


Wr i
.. ... ........,

THE LAFAYETTE LADY HORNETS were all smiles after winning their second consecutive district softball tournament with a 6-
1 win over Bell. The Lady Hornets advance on to regional play earlier this week. photo by Ed Taylor


by Ed Taylor
Sports Correspondent
-he Lafayette Lady
Hornets exploded
for four runs in their
half of the sixth in-
ning to break up a
pitching duel between Bell's Holly
Moore and Lady Hornet Lindsey
Hamlin in the championship game
of the district tournament last Fri-
day night at Lafayette.
Three of the runs in the sixth
was courtesy of Natalie Land's
three-run home run that cleared
the centerfield fence helping the
Lady Hornets to a 6-1 in the title
game. The time before at the plate
with the bases loaded, Land's pop
out to shortstop to leave the bags
jammed. "The time before the
home run I didn't wait for my
pitch," she said. "I was more pa-
tient this time and waited for the
ball to come over the plate. Moore
is a great pitcher and
pitched a good game."
Both pitchers went dif-
ferent avenues in getting
outs. Moore struck out 12
Lady Hornet batters while
Hamlin used a little more
finese in forcing the Lady FLY
Bulldogs to hit the ball on got
the ground. Hamlin had i
11 ground ball outs and r
was backed by good de- bl
fense in both the outfield rui
and infield. The lone Bell lea
run was unearned in the Ho
first inning when Kalie win
Sapp dropped Amy Er- Bu
gle's fly ball. Ergle scored It W
to make it 1-0 on Moore's
run batted in single. La
Lafayette had trouble tric
getting their bats around p1


on the fast pitching of Moore so
Coach Derek Garland wanted to
try another scheme -- try bunting.
"We wasn't making contact at the
plate and I thought we just needed
to put the ball in play and so we
tried bunting the ball," explained
the Lady Hornets mentor. "It
worked for us. We thought if we
could get the other team to field
and throw the ball it would work
better to our advantage."
"Both pitchers pitched well.
Moore really set the tone from the
start. Lindsey did a great job bat-
tling and getting a lot of ground
balls and keeping us in it," said
Garland. "I was very frustrated in
the fourth when we left the bases
loaded. I thought maybe we
should have kept bunting. Moore
did a great job of making pitches
when she had to."
Moore struck out the side in the
first inning but not before Land





WATCHING IT
SNatalie Land
Small of the ball
n the sixth in-
ning when she
asted a three-
n home run in
ding the Lady
rnets to a 6-1
over the Lady
Ildogs of Bell.
as the second
home run for .
and in the dis- .. -
t tournament.
hoto by Ed Taylor


stole the show. Land led off the
game with a base hit, stole second
and third and stole home to tie the
game at 1-1. Her base running
skills is something that came by
being aggressive as a Little Lea-
guer. "Ever since I was in Little
League I run the bases aggressive,"
she said. "That is my favorite part,
running the bases."
Land was instrumental in giving
the Lady Hornets the lead in the
third inning when she reached on
an error at shortstop, stole second
and moved to third on a wild
pitch. She scored when Hamlin
laid down a perfect bunt for an in-
field base hit. The run gave
Lafayette a 2-1 lead.
Hamlin was nearly untouchable
over the next six innings in.shut-
ting down Bell while scattering
four hits. Moore doubled in the

SEE CHAMPS, PAGE 2B


.,.~
'1 ~


SEE LADY, PAGE 2B


Chad Hempstead went
the distance for the Hor-
nets in securing the win in
seven innings. He allowed
five runs on seven Fort
White hits. He struck out
three and only issued one
walk in a strong outing.
After allowing a lead off
single by Capalla, Hemp-
stead retired the next three
batters in the opening
frame. In the bottom of the
inning the Hornets plated
two runs to assume a 2-0
lead. Kurt Skelly, the des-
ignated hitter, started the
rally with a base hit and
moved to second when

SEE HORNETS, PAGE 2B




Williston


topples


Hornets
by Ed Taylor
Sports Correspondent
Lafayette starter Colby
Keen had to wonder what
went wrong when he faced
Williston in the sixth in-
ning last week. All Willis-
ton did was send 11V
to the plate in. theitming"-a
scoring seven times en
route to a 10-7 win over the
Hornets.
Keen was cruising with a
4-1 lead through the first
five innings until the bot-
tom dropped out in the
sixth. He faced the mini-
mum of batters in the sec-
ond, third, fourth and fifth
innings being in complete
control of his pitches.
Keen did not get much
help from his defense in
committing two costly er-
rors behind him. He hit one
batter in the inning that
forced home a run and he
surrendered four hits in the

SEE WILLISTON, PAGE 2B


Lady


Hornets


Advance
by Ed Taylor
Sports Correspondent
You knew it was not go-
ing to be a good day for
the Branford girls softball
team in facing Lafayette in
the opening round of the
girls district tournament
last week. Branford saw
the host Lady Hornets
push home 10 runs in the
first inning and was help-
less as the Lady Hornets
rolled to a 17-3 win that
vaulted them into the
championship game
against Bell.
Kalie Sapp picked up the
win for Lafayette in the
five inning shortened
game. She did not allow a
hit in the game. Junior Na-
talie Land carried the big
stick for the Lady Hornets
as she came to the plate
twice in the first. She dou-
bled to open the first in-
ning and later drilled a
long home run in the same
inning. Kristian Millard









r'A-L. CJ I I *I- liil I -- *, I*Iv, I -


Hornets
Continued From Page 1B

Aaron Gresham was hit by
a pitch. Skelly was forced
at third base on Byrd's
bouncer back to the
mound. But Singletary
roped a base hit to right
center to score Gresham.
Perez scored Byrd with a
base hit to left field.
The scored remained 2-0
until Fort White batted in
the third inning. Both runs
scored with two outs in
the inning. Both runs were
unearned. Fort White took
their first lead with a pair
of runs in the fifth inning
to lead 4-2. Hatcher had an
RBI single in the inning.'
The lead was short-lived
as the Hornets struck for
four in their half of the
fifth frame. Singletary
picked up his second RBI


Champs


with a base hit and one
run scored when Perez
reached on a fielder's
choice. Mercedes complet-
ed the scoring with a two-
run single to left center-
field. The Hornets led 6-4
after five innings.
Ethan Perry opened the
Hornets sixth with a base
hit. He came around to
score when Gresham
bounded out to shortstop
to give Lafayette a 7-4
lead. Fort White got one
back in the top of the sev-
enth on a two-bagger by
Hatcher. Hempstead set
them down after that to
pick up the win.
Brian Little started for
Fort White in suffering the
setback. He worked the
first four and third innings
before giving way to Dou-
glas in the fifth.


Williston


Continued From Page 1B

frame. Through the first
five innings Keen had only
given up one base hit and
only allowed two base
runners.
Williston took an early
1-0 lead in the first ining
scoring an unearned run,
but the Hornets came back
in their half of the inning
to tie it at 1-1. Aaron Gre-
sham had a one out single
and he came around to
score Cody Singletary's
RBI single. Kurt Skelly led
off the Hornets second
with a double and scored
when Thomas Byrd tripled
him home. The run gave
Lafayette a 2-1 lead.
With Keen keeping
Williston at bay, the Hor-
nets plated two runs in the
bottom of the fourth in as-
suming a 4-1 lead. Chad
Hempstead, Serigo Perez
and Jamal Reid collected
consecutive singles with
Reid driving in Hemp-
stead. Perez scored the
second run in the inning
on a grounder off the bat


of Skelly. Keen got Willis-
ton in order in the fifth but
the fatal sixth did him in
as Williston took a 8-4 lead
with seven in the sixth.
Lafayette mounted a
comeback of their own
with three runs in their
half of the sixth inning to
make it a one run game at
8-7. Perez and Reid had
one out singles and both
runners trotted home on
Ethan Perry's two-run
triple. Williston put the
game away with two runs
in the seventh inning with
the help of a Hornet error
to lead 10-7. Hempstead
singled in the bottom of
the seventh for Lafayette
but the Hornets could not
mount any offense in los-
ing 10-7.,
Gresham hurled the sev-
enth inning for Lafayette
in giving up the two runs.
Keen suffered the loss in
going thefirst six.''Wiliston
could only collect four hits
against Keen and had five
for the game. The Hornets
pounded out 14 hits in a
losing cause.


Continued From Page 1B

Bell second inning but was
tagged out on a ground
ball to Land at shortstop.
Hamlin retired the last five
batters she faced.


The Lady Hornets
sixth inning unfolded
Marla Alcazar lining
gle to right center, he
ond hit of the night.
doubled in the fourth
ning. Kristin Millard


a~e ,.d -.


.
*.. -, ,. .. *; .. 1'. ", .:, -,
.K ,;..^ i':, *-'.. ', *~ :**
:fL i? .*:. ;;? .^ w


.. :.
ASHLEY MYERS was all smiles round the bases after clul
long home run in the second inning against Branford in thi
ing round of the girls district softball tournament last wei
ers drove in two runs with the round-tripper as Lafayette


big ficed her to third with a
I with bunt. Ashley Myers laid a
a sin- bunt in front of the plate
*r sec- where the ball was fielded
She by Moore, who made a
in- fake throw to first only to
sacri- catch Alcazar in a run-
down between third and
home. An errant throw by
Bell allowed Alcazar to
dent home plate for the
third run of the game and
a 3-1 lead. However, the
-A: Lady Hornets were not
through. Kelsey Land
reached on a bunt single
putting runners at .first and
second. After Carthea
., Macklin skyed out to left
. .: ",field, Land crushed the ball
''. over the centerfield fence
for a three-run blast and a
6-1 lead.
Hamlin got Bell out in
order in the top of the sev-
enth on three ground ball
outs. Hamlin said she was
nervous during the game
but knew her defense
would be there for her.
"Holly (Moore) did an ex-
bbing a cellent job for Bell," said
3 open-
ek. My-
posted .... Lf "


Hamlin. "She came out
throwing strikes. She got
me on a few."
Hamlin said she was
thinking strikes in the late
innings and her team hold-
ing a precariously 2-1 lead.
"I just wanted to get the
ball across the plate and let
the defense get it," she
said. "Natalie hit the home
run. She is a great player.
Marla had two big hits for
us. But she has been doing
that all year for us."
The Lady Hornets had
but the one first inning er-
ror. Hamlin got the win
holding Bell to one run on
six hits. She fanned two
batters but more impor-
tantly she issued but two
walks.
Moore was outstanding
but appeared to tire in the
late innings. She allowed
six runs on nine Lafayette
hits. She too walked but
one batter. Bell stranded
six base runners in the
game. They committed one
error.


a 17-3 win. photo. by Ed Taylor

Lady


Continued From Page 1B

had an RBI single in the
first besides adding some
strong defense at the hot
corner for the Lady Hor-
nets. Sapp helped her own
cause with a single that
scored two runs.
Ashley Myers got the
pitch she wanted in the
second frame and parked
it over the left centerfield
fence for a two-run home
run. The Lady Hornets
pushed across six runs in
the second for a 16-0 lead.
Katie Jo Walker had a two-
run double in the second
inning.
Branford avoided being
shut out with two runs in
the third inning for a 16-2
game. They added a single
run in the top of the


fourth. The Lady Hornets
got their final run in the
bottom of the fourth when
Cara Young, who walked,
came home on Lindsey
Hamlin's RBI single.
Sapp retired the first six
batters she faced forcing
Branford to hit the ball on
the ground. In an unusual
play that could have been
the first hit for Branford,
Gillespie grounded what
appeared to be a base hit
into right field. However,
Marla Alcazar, who was
playing shallow, fielded
the grounder and tossed to
Myers at first for the out.
Sapp walked four batters
in the game and struck out
one. Uncharacteristic of
the Lady Hornets, they
committed four errors in
the game.


LINDSEY HAMLIN WAS all business against the Bell Lady Bull-
dogs last Friday night in the championship game of the district
tournament. Hamlin went a full seven innings in picking up the
win in the 6-1 victory, photo by Ed Taylor .


From


General Store




May 2nd ~ 2:00 p.m.

112 SW Carber Rd., Mayo
(Hwy. 51 S. in Cooks Hammock between Mayo & Tennile)

386-294-1084

DRAWING FOR $25 GIFT CERTIFICATES @ 2:30 p.m.


We'rw te One-Stop Pacae 7 Shop

If we don't have what you're looking for...
just ask and we'll get it!


ilome Cooked Meals"
Dinners w/2 sides


WE OFFER:


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Sandwiches & Deli Items:
Turkey & Ham Sandwiches,
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Convenience Items: Specials! Homemade Desserts!
Milk, Bread, Beer, Ice, We Cook (Items change daily)
Soft Drinks & More 7Days Cakes, Pies, Cobblers, & Mo
A Week Mnnda vs: Honmmade


Livestock & Pet Products
Dog, Horse, Hog & Cow Feed
Corn for your feeders
Dog Collar Magnets


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Hunting & Fishing Gear:
Tackle (Salt & Fresh Water)
Deer Feeders, Skinning Gambrels
General Ammunition Stock &
Special Orders Available!
Scalloping Gear, Frog Gigs
Knives, Batteries, CB Radio Gear,
Propane Tanks to Buy/Exchange
We can provide weight scales &
Skinning rack


Continued From Page 1B

and you have to throw, a
lot of the credit coach
Derek Garland's way. He
saw his team was not go-
ing to catch up with the
hard pitching of Moore
and so he went to the
bunting the ball and it
worked out. "We wasn't
putting the ball in play,"
he said. "I wanted to make
them have to field the ball
and throw it to a base."
The game was a good
one and the hamburgers at
the concession stand was
equally as good. The folks
on the grill had the town
of Mayo smelling of a cook
out. It is a wonder the
whole town did not con-
gregate that way for a
burger.
Behind the scenes are
those who help make the
tournament a success and
add a different flavor to
the game. J. D. Young is
one of those people. J.D.
did the public address
work for the tournament,


something he has done at
all home games this year,
and he did a fantastic job.
At one home game he
gave the players humor-
ous nick names. I was hop-
ing he would use those
names throughout the
tournament.
The only hat I had to
wear to the games had
"UK" on it. Asked what it
stood for (I was hurt), I
told them. "Where is your
Hornet hat?," I was asked.
I replied that I have been
trying to get a red hat with
an "L" on it for the past
four years.
It is good to be around
such good folks as we
have in the Lafayette
school system. I really ap-
preciate all the hard work
they do with their respec-
tive teams. I have said it
before and I repeat myself,
they are some of the finest
folks that I have been
around in the 18 years of
covering sports. I really
enjoy being around all of
them. I have made some


IMYOCASSFID


Wanted
Musicians to work on
Gospel CD (original material).
If interested call:
386-935-6927 353106-F

Lafayette Apartments
Hurry in and apply at "The
Best Place to Live!" Rental
Assistance, 1, 2, & 3 BR HC &
non-HC accessible apartments.
Laundry facility & playground.
We pay water, sewer &
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Housing Opportunity 326012-F


SURPLUS
PROPERTY SALE
Three Wheelchair equipped vans.
Envelopes marked Sealed Bids
must be received by mail by
Suwannee River Economic
Council, Inc. P.O. Box 70, Live
Oak, FL. 32064 by Monday, May
24, 2007. The vehicles may be
inspected at the Suwannee River
Economic Council, Inc. building in
Starke, FL, the Suwannee River
Economic Council building in
Cross City, FL and the Suwannee
River Economic Council' building
on Industrial Avenue in Live Oak,
FL. For information, call (386)
362-4115 ext 242.
Suwannee River Economic
Council, Inc. reserves the right to
refuse or reject any bid.
354840-F


Advertise your YARD SALE,VEHICLES OR UNWANTED ITEMS IN THE CLASSIFIED FOR ONLY $5.
Call (386) 294-1210 or 1-800-525-4182 to place your ad today. 328282-F


good friends and I really
enjoy all the kids who play
the games.
Until the next time, good
sports everyone and be
good sports!


Graduating

class of 1967

planning



40th



reunion
The graduating class of
1967 is planning to have
their 40th reunion. If you
would like to assist in the
planning, we will meet at
Brenda Land's home on
May 17, at 7 p.m. For more
information, please call 294-
2996.

Booth Space

Available for

Annual River

Reunion
The Branford River Re-
union committee is taking
applications for booth
spaces at the Fourth of July
celebration. This is an an-
nual event held each year
on the Fourth of July. It will
be on Wednesday this year.
Deadline is June 15, and the
fee is $30, made payable to
Bradford River Reunion.
Further information
maybe obtained by calling
Peggy at 386-935-0021,
leave message.


THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2007


PA(4 9R T1F MAO FEE PESS Mav. F


i







THE MAYO FREE PRESS. Mavo. FL PAGE 3B


I t1U nbJAM, ?I A-M ILL .U, (I I I .III


Lighthouse


Christian Academy third quarter awards


Lighthouse Christian Academy would like to congratulate the following students for
their academic achievements during the 3rd quarter:


The following students made all A's during the 3rd quarter
Back Row (left right) Chelsey Jackson, Anna Bonura, Caleb Smith, Raven Parnell, Zachary Smith,
Alex James, Dixie Smith Front Row (left right) Kira Whittington, Evie Byrd, Celia Bonura, Katie
Brown, Tony Bonura, Kendall Calhoun, Taylor Land, Grant Fletcher


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Christian Character Awards:
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Tanya Buchanan, Kenzie Pearson, Evie Byrd, Thossie Williams


: Diligence AWards:
Back Row (left,- right) Dylan Bledsoe, Ashley Flowers, Trevor Boyd Front Row (left right) Kobe O'S-
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PAGE 4B THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2007


Lafayette FBLA


wins at State!
See story Page 1A


4,,
1*


,. .7
5,, 1
1. ~
~ ~e'K2I' ~
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Jennifer Garcia, fourth place winner


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Licensed Real Estate Broker


Corner of Clyde and Main
P.O. Box 1426.
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Office: (386) 294-1366
Mobile:. 386) 208-9272
Fax: 386) 294-1282


E-mail: brackjackson@alltel.net www.treesandtrailsrealty.com
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Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-5 p.m.
Open Saturdays 7 a.m.-12 p.m.


(386) 935-1544
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Keen Forest

Management
119 NWCR 290
Mayo, FL 32066
Land Clearing
Road Grading
Building Pads
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Clinton Keen
386-362-8345 35352-F

3Jte p. Burnr
FUNERAL HOME
1400 Johnson Stripling Road, Perry Florida 32347
Toll Free 800-343-3151
Leila F. Allen
t .....% Services Counselor
Advance Funeral Planning


Mayo Chapel
386-294-2658


Perry Chapel
850-584-4149
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For more information
about advertising on our
Business Directory call


at 294-1210


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7 Days 24 Hours
386-935-0616
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DANIELS FUNERAL
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Branford 935-1124
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f1 James (Jim) B. Daniels, iE, L.F.D.
Keith Daniels, L.F.D.
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(Local) Family Owned & Operated
JORDAN AGENCY, INC324070-F
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Joe Jordan
405 SW Highway 27
Branford, FL 32064
935-6385


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Live Oak, FL 32060
362-4724
324080-F


NORTH FLORIDA Mon.-Fri.
SPHARMACY 8:30 am-6:00 pm
SA MAY Saturday 9 am-lpm
OF BRANFORD & MAYO Sunday Closed
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Oxygen and Medical Equipment


Vicky Noling, PharmD, CPH
Chenyrr Lumbert, RPH
Pharmacist


229 West Main St.
Mayo, FL 32066
(386) 294-3777
324072-F


PAGE 4B THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2007


V.-













Mayo Legals
ANNOUNCEMENT
OF FILING OF NOTICE OF
MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANY
REORGANIZATION

This is to inform the public that First Federal
Savings Bank of Florida (the "Bank") located
at 4705 West U.S. Highway 90, Lake City,
Florida 32055, will file application materials
with the Office of Thrift Supervision ("OTS") on
or about April 2, 2007, advising the OTS of Its
intent to reorganize into the mutual holding
company structure pursuant to 12 CFR Part
575 ("Reorganization Notice"), and to charter
an interim federal savings association that will
merge (pursuant to 12 CF.R. 563,22) with and
Into the Bank, with the Bank as the surviving
institution, to facilitate the mutual holding com-
pany reorganization.

This public notice will appear at approximately
one-week intervals over a thirty-day period be-
ginning April 4, 2007 and ending May 9, 2007.

Anyone may submit written comments in con-
nection with the application within 30 calendar
days of publication of this notice. The com-
ments must be sent to the Regional Director,
Office of Thrift Supervision, Southeast Re-
gional Office, 1475 Peachtree Street, N.E., At-
lanta, Georgia 30309, and to the attention of
Keith C. Leibfried, President and Chief Execu-
tive Officer of First Federal Savings Bank of
Florida, to its address stated above. Written
comments in opposition to the Application
should address the regulatory basis for denial
of the Application, and be supported by the in-
formation specified in 12 C.F.R. Section
516.120(a). You may request a meeting on the
Application by a written request for a meeting
with your comment with OTS. Your request
should describe the nature of the issues or
facts to be discussed and the reasons why
written submissions are insufficient to ade-
quately address these facts or issues. OTS will
grant a meeting request only when it finds that
written submissions are insufficient to address
the facts or issues raised, or otherwise deter-
mines that a meeting will benefit its decision
making process.

You may inspect the non-confidential portion
of the Reorganization Notice and non-confi-
dential portions of all comments and informa-
tion filed by the public in response to the Re-
organization Notice by contacting the Region-
al Director or the Information Services Divi-
sion, Office of Thrift Supervision, 1700 G
Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20552. If you
have any questions concerning these proce-
dures, contact the Regional Director at (404)
888-0771 or the Information Services Division
at (202) 906-6000.
04/05, 12, 19, 26, 05/03, 10

RECEIVING SEALED BIDS

THE LAFAYETTE COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD WILL RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
FOR THE FOLLOWING:

PEST CONTROL SERVICES

Bids must be returned by 3 p.m., Monday, May
14, 2007 at which time bids will be opened.
The School Board will award bid on Tuesday,
May 15, 2007 at 10:30 a.m.

Bid packets may be picked up at Lafayette
County School Board, 363 NE Crawford St.,
between the hours of 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. For
more information, please contact Pam Tyre,
Purchasing Clerk, at (386) 294-4344.
4/26-5/3-2-D


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 07-10-CP
Division: Probate

IN RE; ESTATE OF

WILLIE LEE BUCHANAN
Deceased.

NOTIGEIQQGREOITQBR

The administration of the estate of WILLIE
LEE BUCHANAN, deceased, whose date of
death was January 16, 2007, and whose so-
cial security number is 264-66-6582, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Lafayette County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is Post Office Box 88, Mayo, FL 32066.
The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is
required to be served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OFTHE FIRST PUBLICATION OFTHIS
NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODEWILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date 'of first publication of this notice is
April 19, 2007.

Personal Representative:

CHRISTIE MOBLEY
652 N.W. County Road 280
Mayo, Florida 32066

Attorney for Personal Representative:

LEENETTE W. MCMILLAN
Attorney for Christie Mobley
Florida Bar No. 0075779
Post Office Box 1388
Mayo, FL 32066
Telephone: (386) 294-1688
4/19-4/26-'2-D

THE LAFAYETTE COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD WILL RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
FOR THE FOLLOWING:

LAFAYETTE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM
ADDITION MILLWORK

A mandatory pre-bid conference will be held
on Monday, May 7, 2007, 9:00 AM at Lafayette
County School Board, 363 NE Crawford St.
Mayo, FL. Bid packets and specifications will
be available at the meeting. Please contact
Joey Pearson at 386/294-1351 for further in-
formation.
04/26, 05/03


I IU UC ,lV i, ir Ii ,,,, 9.,-,V IvIT T L-H M-Y F E R SS .. .. 1M.y... F-L -.PAGE..


Mayo Legals

NOTICE OF PROPOSED MERGER

Notice Is' hereby given that application has
been made by First Federal Savings Bank of
Florida (the "Bank"), 4705 West U.S. Highway
90, Lake City, Florida 32055, .to the Office of
Thrift Supervision, 1700 G Street, N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20552, for approval to
merge with First Federal Interim Bank II, a to-
be-formed federally chartered interim savings
bank, to be headquartered at 4705 West U.S.
Highway 90, Lake City, Florida 32055. The In-
terim savings bank is being chartered for the
purpose of accomplishing a reorganization of
the Bank into a two-tier mutual holding com-
pany through the establishment of First Feder-
al Bancorp, Inc., a Federal corporation, as a
mid-tier stock holding company and First Fed-
eral Bancorp, MHC, a Federal corporation, as
a mutual holding company.

This notice is published pursuant to 12 U.S.C.
1828(c) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act
and 12 C.F.R. Section 563.22 of the regula-
tions of the Office of Thrift Supervision. This
notice will appear at approximately one-week
intervals over a 30-day period beginning April


Mayo Legals

4, 2007 and ending on May 9, 2007.

Anyone may submit written comments in con-
nection with this application within 30 calendar
days of the initial publication date of this no-
tice. The comment must be sent simultane-
ously to the Regional Director, Office of Thrift
Supervision, Southeast Regional Office, 1475
Peachtree Street, N.E., Atlanta, Georgia
30309 and to the attention of Keith C.
Leibfried, President and Chief Executive Offi-
cer of First Federal Savings Bank of Florida to
its address stated above. Written comments in
opposition to the application should address
the regulatory basis for denial of such applica-
tion, and be supported by the information
specified in 12 C.F.R. Section 516.120(a). You
may request a meeting on such application by
including a written request for a meeting with
your comment to OTS. Your request should
describe the nature of the issues or facts to be
discussed and the reasons why written sub-
missions are insufficient to adequately ad-
dress the facts or issues. OTS will grant a
meeting request only when it finds that written
submissions are insufficient to address the
facts or issues raised, or otherwise deter-
mines that a meeting will benefit its decision


Mayo Legals

making process.

You may view the non-confidential portions of
the application and the non-confidential por-
tions of all comments filed with OTS by con-
tacting the OTS Regional Office listed above.
This Information Is available for public viewing
at the appropriate OTS Regional Office during
regular business hours. If you have any ques-
tions concerning these procedures, contact
the OTS Regional Office at (404) 888-0771
04/05, 12; 18, 26, 03, 10


PUBLIC NOTICE

This is to inform you that Lafayette County will
hold a prebid conference and walk through for
the rehabilitation of three (3) single family
dwellings in the Lafayette County SHIP pro-
gram.

This meeting will be held Thursday, May 3,
2007 beginning at 9 a.m. at Suwannee River
Economic Council, Inc. Outreach Office, High-
way 27 North, Mayo, Florida.


Mayo Legals

The conference aid walk-through is mandato-
ry,, no exceptions, for contractors who plan to
bid. Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc.
requires each contractor to be properly li-
censed, carry general liability insurance of at
least $1,000,000.00 and workers compensa-
tion during construction.

Bids for these units will be due by 12 noon
Thursday, May 10, 2007 at Suwannee River
Economic Council, Inc. Outreach office, High-
way 27 North; Mayo, Florida 32066. Please
mark envelope "Sealed Bid for Name of
Homeowner, SHIP." Bids to be opened Thurs-
day, May 10, 2007 at 1 p.m.

The cost of repairs shall not exceed
$30,000.00.

Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc. has
the right to reject any and all bids.The bids will
be awarded on the most cost effective basis.

Lafayette County is a fair housing and equal
opportunity and ADA employer. Minority and
Women Contractors are urged to participate.
4/26-1-D


A '




lnGRD ADulations | M 11050

Family & Friends!
It's time to get your thoughts *-.'
& pictures together to let '
everyone know how you feel
about your favorite high
school graduates) this year! --' ii


Stop by the
Mayo Free Press office by
May 3rd to have your
sentiments published in our
2007 Graduation tab.


4-1210
rmation


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(Behind Foodland Shopping Center)
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Bargain/Matinee's.....$4.00 all seats ^177
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"R.."

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R-


THIJR~~kY APIL 6- 00


THE MAYO) FREE PRESS, Mavo, FL PAGE 5B


;T--~c


"^
*'%.


Call 386-294-
for more inforx





G T T A


70TH ANNUAL MEETING
of the
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Will be held at the
Suwannee County Coliseum
Saturday, April 28, 2007
In Live Oak, Florida

ENTERTAINMENT, PRIZES, BUSINESS, FELLOWSHIP


8:00 a.m
8:45 a.m. -9:50 a.m.
10:00 a.m. Invocation


PROGRAM
Registration
"Delivered", Lake City, FL Entertainment
Rev. Matt Swain Brewer Lake Baptist Church
"Meeting Begins"


Welcome
Introduction of Guests
Announcement of Quorum
Reading of Official Notice & Mailing Thereof
Treasurer's Report
Manager's Report
Business Session
Election of Trustees'
Drawing of Prizes
Adjourn


Jerry Goff, President
John C. Martz, CEO/VP
George Poucher, Secretary
George Poucher, Secretary
Sidney Lord, Treasurer
John C. Martz, CEO/VP
S. Austin Peele, Attorney
S. Austin Peele, Attorney
R.H. Scott, Jr./Hugh Hunter


OVER 100 PRIZES GIVEN AWAY (MUST BE PRESENT TO WIN)
"ST Prize: UP TO $100 credit per month for the next twelve months
21 Prize: Up to $75 credit per month for the next twelve months
3RD Prize: Up to $50 credit per month for the next twelve months
(REGISTRATION CLOSES AT 10:00 a.m.)
MANY OTHER GREAT PRIZES GIVEN AWAY
(EACH REGISTERED MEMBER RECEIVES DOOR PRIZE)


SERVING SUWANNEE, HAMILTON, LAFAYETTE, and COLUMBIA COUNTIES
1937-2007
S"OWNED BY THOSE WE SERVE"

ffS^S~aaieee $'at~e^


Ceetz6c


Live Oak, FL We Get Our Power From You
(386) 362-2226


-W5d5.F


THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2007


PAGE 6B THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


R qr..r.







C, n


.- 1 F I s i Di I '!


North Florida


April 25 26, 2007
Live Oak Publications, Inc.




Now that's


..- 'M %OOF v 1 VL


funnY


Larry the Cable GuyLarry the C


By Kelly Kazek
CNHI News Service
If Cara Whitney hadn't gotten to the birth
certificate first, she might have a son named
"Got-R-Did."
But Cara, who married Larry the Cable
Guy in 2005, prevailed with the name Wyatt
for their son born in August. Cara doesn't go
by "Mrs. Cable Guy." She and Wyatt use the
name Whitney, Larry's real surname.
Larry's choice of baby names comes from
the catch phrase "Git-R-Done," which he
made famous as one of the most widely
quoted and marketed comedians today. His
other catch phrases include "That's funny,
right there; I don't care who you are," and
"Lord, I apologize."
Born Daniel Lawrence Whitney on Feb.
17, 1963, in Pawnee City, Neb., Larry
adopted his stage name from an early radio
show persona, which happened to be south-
ern.
Now known as part of the Blue Collar
Comedy Tour with Jeff Foxworthy, Bill En-
gvall and Ron White, and a bonafide movie
actor, Larry is on tour. His latest projects in-
clude a new CD, "Morning Constitutions,"
which will also be released as a DVD in
June and air as a Comedy Channel special
June 3, and a film, "Delta Farce," will be in
theaters May 11.
He previously starred in "Larry the Cable
Guy: Health Inspector" and was the voice of
Mater in the animated film "Cars," both re-
leased in 2006.
Larry has also developed an animated
half-hour pilot for Comedy Central. He cre-
ated, wrote and will star in the show, which
will begin production this year.
In Larry's wordsLarry the Cable Guy may
have cultivated his reputation as a simple
guy, but the reasons behind his appeal are
complicated.
Though his comedy has drawn thousands
of fans (his CD "The Right to Bare Arms"
was the first comedy album to hit No. 1 on


country charts), he also has detractors.
While much of his act focuses on his fiction-
al family and jokes about bodily functions,
he also makes jokes targeting the handi-
capped (including a running gag about a
deaf brother with Tourette's syndrome).
He refuses, however, to use four-letter
words in his act.
Still, his comedy reaches a broad enough
audience that "Git-R-Done" apparel, key
rings and baseball caps are hot sellers.
In a recent interview, Larry talked about
his career and his success:
Q: What rating would you give your
shows?

A: PC-17 politically correct for 17
seconds. If you bring kids, you'll
have to cover their ears probably
five times. Actually, PG-14 is probably the
rating I would give my show.
: It would seem your biggest fan
base is in the South, or have you
been surprised to find a large fan
base outside the South?
: Misconception. I have great fans
and play to packed venues all over
the country. My fans are awesome. By the
way, I'm huge in Chinatown. Did you know
that "Git-R-Done" is spelled with the sym-
bol of an upside down house with a duck in
it?
iQ: How do you sound so Southern
if you were raised in Nebraska?

: Another misconception. I have
relatives in Nebraska, Kansas and
Missouri. In some parts of South-
east Nebraska and Missouri, you hear some
Southern accents. I grew up and worked in a


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cattle barn when I was a kid and a few of
them old farmers had a bit of a twang. Also,
my dad was a backwoods preacher and used
to have a drawl when he would get fired up
preachin'. I've always been a dialect
chameleon, so going into a Southern accent
was always really easy for me to do as a kid.
It wasn't until I moved to Florida and started
hanging out with Florida crackers that I real-
ly learned it. I went to college in Decatur,
Ga., and my roommate was from Dalton and
had the thickest southern accent I had heard.
I perfected it from him. It's almost impossi-
ble to live with a dude from Dalton and not
talk like him after four years. Later, when I
met Jeff Foxworthy we used to riff stories
off one another using Southern accents.
From that point on, it just kind of evolved.
Now it's to the point when I'm with my
Florida buddies, it just comes out naturally
without even realizing.
: Talk about your new CD and
movie.

A: The new CD is called "Morning
Constitutions." This is my fourth
CD I have put out and can honest-
ly say I think it's my best. I don't stray too
far from what I know and do best, which is
one-liner type comedy and this CD is
packed with laughs from beginning to end. I
love doing this style of comedy and think
it's a style that's kind of been forgotten. My
new movie is call "Delta Farce," with Bill
Engvall and D.J. Qualls and it's kinda like
"The Three Stooges meets Platoon." When
we Blue Collar guys visited Walter Reed
Hospital, I got the idea from the troops
when they all said they loved our stuff and
that they had "Git-R-Done" written all over
the place in the Middle East. They said that
they liked "Health Inspector" and that I
should do a funny army movie kinda like
"Stripes," so we came up with a script called
"Delta Farce" about these three goofballs
that accidentally get called to go to Iraq and
on the way over the C-130 hits some bad
weather and dumps a Humvee they are
sleeping' in out of the back and it parachutes
down to the desert and when they wake up
they think they're in Iraq but are really in
Mexico. I'm wiping off my mantle now for
the Oscar.
Q: How does your family particu-
larly your sisters, if you really
have them, and grandmother feel
about your family jokes?
A: They all have a great sense of hu-
mor and understand they are all
jokes. One time my overweight sis-
ter got mad because I said Cracker Barrel


had a restraining order out on her, but she
got over it real quick when she went there
and they said, "Hey, you're Larry's fat sis-
ter," and gave her extra biscuits so now
she's kind of a celebrity and wanted me to
write more jokes about her.
Q: Were you surprised when "Git-
R-Done" became a catch phrase?
Do you ever get tired of your fans
expecting to hear it?
A: I never get sick of my fans
yelling, "Git-R-Done!" It's a fun
thing to say and funny and it's
what helped me get my name out. I love it
and love when people say it. I've named my
children Git-R-Done and Got-R-Did!
Q: At what moment did you know
you were famous?

A: When I signed an autograph at a
urinal.

Q: What do you 4o with all your
shirt-less sleeves?

A: I usually sign them and give them
away to charities.

Q: What are the upcoming plans for
the Blue Collar bunch?

A : No plans as of now because we're
all doing other things. We are all
good friends and speak frequently.
We wanted to maybe do Blue Col-
lar on Ice, but it's hard enough for Ron to
walk on land while he's drinking, let alone
ice! That's funny, I don't care who ya are.
Q: What is it like working with Jeff,
Bill and Ron?


A


: It was the time of my life. I love
them like brothers and wouldn't
trade any of those experiences for
anything. Just a flat-out blast!


Q: What's the dumbest thing you
ever did?

A: We went toilet papering houses
on Halloween when I was a kid


SEE NOW, PAGE 3C


Air show set for Lake City

The Rotary Club of Lake City will present a charitable air -
show on Saturday April 28-29 to benefit Haven Hospice of
Suwannee Valley and the Columbia County Senior Life En-
richment Center.



WOW! FLOWERS THAT

HavinE a colorful \ard isn't hard at allHL
when \ou plant perennials! What could be
easier than planting blooming flowers like
verbena, sal% .as, and coeopsis and ha ing
them return ever- spring to re"w ard you
with loads of colorful blooms! Our
selection si at its best right no",
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Sunday 12:00-4:00 p.m. ...... I-
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PAGE 2C, APRIL 25 26, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Suwannee Valley Humane Society



Critter eoer A


Suwannee Valley Humane Society,
1156 SE Bisbee Loop, Madison, FL
32340. Directions: Two miles south of
Lee off CR 255; from 1-10 Exit 262; take
CR 255 north 1/2 mile, follow the signs.
Suwannee Valley Humane Society is a
limited space (no kill) shelter and de-
pends on adoptions to free available
space. A drop-off donation is required for
any animal brought to the shelter. You
must check with us prior to bringing a
drop-off animal to the shelter. Hours:
Tuesday- Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., or
by appointment. Visit our Web site and
see the homeless animals who need a re-
ally good home at
www.geocities.com/Suwanneehs, or e-
mail us at
suwanneevalley@earthlink.net.
Adoption fee of $50 includes
spay/neuter, deworming, heartworm/fe-
line (leukemia) testing and rabies shot.
Please visit the shelter, the animals
would love to meet you. The shelter also
offers optional micro-chipping when you
adopt for $10 more.
If you have lost a pet or found one, the
humane society will help you find your
pet. Call us at 850-971-9904 or toll-free
at 866-236-7812. Leave a message if
they are closed, your call will be re-
turned. Remember to always call your
local animal control or shelters if you
have a lost or found animal.
They really appreciate donations; they
couldn't operate without them. Donation
are the heart and soul of its thrift shop
income. Please consider bringing them
donations of clothes, household goods,
furniture and toys. They ask that all do-
nations be in good condition; otherwise,
they cannot sell them. Thank you!


Volunteers are wanted and needed four
hours a week on the day of your choice.
Call to learn more. People are always
needed to hold, pet, love and walk the
homeless animals at the shelter, so if you
can't adopt you can always come help in
many other ways.
Newspapers and aluminum cans re-
cycled: They have a recycle newspaper
bin at 305 Pinewood Drive, Live Oak,
just west of Johnson's Appliance/Radio.
Shack. They also collect aluminum cans
to recycle, just bring them to the shelter.
All the money goes to help the homeless
animals.
NOTE: Suwannee Valley Humane So-
ciety's Spring Fling will be held from 10
a.m.-l p.m., Saturday, May 5 at 1156 SE
Bisbee Loop, Madison. Join them for
fun, food and a huge yard and plant sale.
Mix and mingle with staff, other support-
ers and some of the most popular resi-
dent. From 1-10, exit 262, go 1/2 mile
north, turn left on Bisbee Loop and fol-
low the signs.
Featured animals for adoption:
DOGS:
2936-MS. WIGGLES-1 year 7 months
old, Sharpei/Lab/mix, female, brown and
spayed. She is a very sweet dog and is
ready to go home with someone now.
2948-GUY-l year 7 months old,
Sharpei/mix, male, brown and brindle
and neutered. He is a real friendly guy.
2986-BLACKIE-a Shepard/mix, all
black, male, neutered and weighs 42
pounds. He is looking for a home.
3024-BABY-1 year old, Rotti/mix, fe-
male, black and tan and spayed.
3026-BENNY-11 months old,
Boxer/mix, male, brown and neutered.
He is a lot of fun.


3029-AMOS- Hound/mix, male and
brown. He is a very special dog, is good
with children and other animals and a lit-
tle shy of men. Needs room to run, but
also needs a fenced in yard with a high
fence. The adoption fee has been lowered
to $25 because he is a lovable dog and
needs a good home.
CATS:
2990-PUNCH-1 year 10 months old,
calico, female and spayed. This is a very
friendly kitty and she loves kids.
3008-PRISSY- 1 year 7 months old,
black, female and spayed. She is good
with children ages 6 and up.
3030-MONROE-4 years 10 months
old, male, all black and neutered. He is a
very nice cat and is great with kids 9 and
up.
3036-BUBBA-3 years 10 months old,
gray tabby with white boots, male and
neutered. He is good with kids ages 9
and up.
3035-BABY DOLL-1 year 2 months
old, black, female and spayed. She is
good with children ages 9 and up.
All of our cats are looking for a home
and someone to love them. Stop by and
see come wonderful they are. We also
have kittens of all age groups, so you
should drop by and see all the animals
that are at the shelter.
SPECIAL KITTIES:
-2592-MILLIE-Tabby, 3 year old cat,
white and spayed. She is very sweet.
Older cats make wonderful pet for an
older person. Does not like children and
does not like to be held all the time. This
is a very special cat and you can adopt
her for $60 because she has a micro-chip
in case she gets lost.
2240-SISSY-This is a real special kitty.


She is 3 years old and is a black and gray
Tabby. She does not like children but,
would make a wonderful companion for
an older person. She does have to have
special food. If there is an older person,
who would love to have this cat, she can
be adopted for a special price of $25.
Come in and see her.
LOST AND FOUND ANIMALS:
DOGS:
FOUND: A male Daschund, black and
tan, male and wearing a leather collar.
He is healthy but a little thin, but is real
friendly. He was found in Lee on N.E.
Cayene Drive. If you have lost him
please, please call Sonja, 850-971-7208.
FOUND: Chocolate Lab, male, about
2 or 3 years old found on 90th Drive in
Luraville. He is in good health, although
a little slim. He gets along with other
dogs/may have been trained and was
wearing a blue collar. If this is your dog,
please call Marsha Lee, 386-776-2324.


Restricted to site built homes only.
Near town, several lots to choose


PAGE 2C, APRIL 25 -26, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


-








NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS -, APRIL 25 26, 2007, PAGE 3C



a~~ oO)[[?'lif


Register now!
NFCC offers EMT course
set for July in Mayo
North Florida Community College (NFCC) offers a basic
Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) training course begin-
ning July 17 in Mayo. The course will run Tuesday and
Thursday, from 6-10 p.m., through Dec. 6. The Mayo class
will need at least 10 qualified students and a list of intereast-
ed prosepcts is being compiled. Candidates must be 18 years
old and have a GED or high school diploma. Prospects must:
(1) Complete applications for NFCC.and EMT-B; (2) Take
the College Placement Test (CPT) at the college, and (3) Pass
a background check and be fingerprinted which requires a
$60 fee. Info: 850-973-1629, or e-mail cashR@nfcc.edu.

Donations needed!
Another Way, Inc. plans
old fashioned fish fry
Another Way, Inc., is. planning an old-fashioned fish fry in
May and is in need cash donations. Fish of any kind, cleaned
and dressed are also needed. Fishermen who fish for the fun
of it and maybe throw them back, or give them away or
maybe their freezer is already full may wish to donate them
for this worthy cause. The organization is a non-profit do-
mestic violence and rape crisis center with two shelters, one
in Lake City and one in Chiefland. Info: Brenda Sanchez,
386-792-2747, brendasanchez@anotherwayinc.net.

Register now!
May 4
Cattle Baron's Golf Tournament
Fifth Annual Cattle Baron's Golf Tournament will be held
Friday, May 4 at Southern Oaks Golf Club in Lake City.
Silent auction and drawing for sports memorabilia and golf
packages; hole-in-one contest for a Chevrolet Avalanche. Pro-
ceeds going to support The American Cancer Society, High
Five Unit (Bradford, Columbia, Hamilton, Suwannee and
Union counties). Sponsorships and sponsor/player packages
are available. Info: Jimmy Swisher, 386-362-5332 or Vemrn
Lloyd, 386-752-4885, or visit Suwannee County Chamber of
Commerce office.

Thursday
April 26
NFCC will conduct
College Placement Tests (CPT)
North Florida Community College will conduct College
Placement Tests (CPT) on computer on at 8:30 a.m. and 1:30
p.m., Thursday, April 26, in the NFCC Testing Center, Build-
ing 16, on the Madison campus. Persons taking the tests will
be requiredtdt6 register in NFCC Student'Services 24 hours
before testing. Info/registration: 850-973-9451....., ,

Thursday-Friday
April 26-27
Judy Gail's History Tales presents
"Carry A. Nation" Dinner Theatre
Judy Gail's History Tales presents "Carry A. Nation" Din-
ner Theater in three performances Thursday-Friday, April 26-
27 at Advent Christian Village, Dowling Park. Thursday,
April 26 in Phillips Dining Room, Dinner: 5-6:30 p.m.;
Show: 7 p.m.; Friday, April 27 in Phillips Dining Room, Din-
ner: 5-6:30 p.m.; and Show 7 p.m.; and show only: Thursday,
April 26 in Dacier Manor, 3 p.m. RSVP for Phillips Dining
Room performances. Tickets: ACV members: $15; adults:
$20; students (ages 13-18): $7; children, 5-12: $5.
Info/RSVP: 386-658-5291, or e-mail dgrillo@acvillage.net.



Now


Friday
Note change in location!
April 27
Millennium Nights
Millennium Nights will be held Friday, April 27 at Relay
for Life at Suwannee High School Track. It will move back
Friday, May 4 to Millennium Park, Live Oak and will be held
every other Friday from 7-9 p.m. Individuals or groups who
want to perform need to pre-register. Info/registration: Herold
White, 386-590-0129, www.heroldwhite.com.

Friday
April 27
Suwannee County Voters
League Annual Dinner Banquet
Suwannee County Voters League Annual Dinner Banquet
will be held at 7 p.m., Friday, April 27 in African Baptist
Church fellowship hall. Speaker" Matthew M. Carter II,
Commissioner: Florida Public Service Commission. Info/tick-
ets: Jessie Philpot, 386-362-4540.

Thursday-Saturday
April 26-28
High Springs Farmers' Market will
hold National Arbor Day Celebration
High Springs Farmers' Market will hold National Arbor
Day Celebration Thursday-Saturday, April 26-28. Schedule:
During regular hours from 2-6 p.m., Thursday, April 26, tree
sale and tree information, live music with Ekendra Dasa and
storytelling by High Springs Library; noon, Friday, April 27-
City of High Springs Arbor Day Tree Planting Ceremony at
Catherine L. Taylor Park, 210 SE Douglas Road; Saturday,
April 28-City of High Springs Arbor Day Citywide Clean Up;
11 a.m.-3 p.m., Saturday, April 28 "Jazz in the Park" Concert
Series with Moondancer featuring Cathy deWitt. The Market
is open every Thursday from 2-6 p.m. and seasonal Saturdays
from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and is located in James Paul Park in
downtown High Springs. It has access and parking from
Main Street at NW 2nd Avenue and from NW 1st Avenue, US
27, at City Hall, 110 NW 1st Avenue and features locally pro-
duced fresh fruits and vegetables, plants, trees, shrubs, flow-
ers, jams, jellies, baked goods and many other agricultural
products. Info: 386-454-3950 or www.city.highsprings.com.

Friday-Saturday
April 27-28
Four Freedoms Festival
Four Freedoms Festival in Madison will include a street


dance at 7 p.m., Friday, April 27 featuring the sounds of US
Highway 19, with food, games galore and the world's largest
pin-ball machine. Parade at 11 a.m., Saturday, April 28. Live
entertainment: Jimmy Fortune of the Statler Brothers, Encore,
The Hodges Sisters, The Faithful Few, The Marine Corp
Band. Classic Car Show. A wide variety of food and drinks,
as well as many'arts and crafts will be;available for purchase.
Old fashioned games on the courthouse lawn include: water-
melon seed spitting contest, frog hop, dunking booth, rock
climbing wall, firefighters challenge, and more. Info: 850-
973-2788.

Friday-Sunday
April 27-29
Paralounge Drum Gathering
The Paralounge Drum Gathering will be held Thursday-
Sunday, April 27-29 at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park,
US 129 North, Live Oak. This event promotes multi-cultural
interaction, community development and musical expression
through rhythmic events. Fushu Daiko will amaze you with
Taiko drumming, Lucid Druid will present a unique blend of
Celtic fusion music, Dragon Fly Rhythms bring the Aus-
tralian Didgeridoo, and Tocamos provides Afro-Caribbean
music. Participate in workshops designed for your entire fam-
ily. Learn how to play exotic instruments such as the African
Djembe or Australian didgeridoo. Each workshop is an expe-
rience you will learn from and enjoy with your entire family.
Please check out this great event at
http://www.paralounge.net/. Info: 386-364-1683 or visit
www.msiclives her.com.

Saturday
April 28
SHS Golf Team Golf Tournament
The first SHS Golf'Team Golf Tournament will be held
Saturday, April 28 with an 8:30 a.m. tee time at Suwannee
Country Club, 7932 US 90 East, Live Oak. Format: Three
man scramble, shot gun start; Entry fees: $50 includes green
fees, golf cart and lunch; $100 hole sponsorship; $300 hole
sponsorship and three players. Your generous contribution
supports the SHS Golf Team. Send check to: SHS Golf
Boosters, Inc., 16857 CR 49, Wellborn, FL 32094. Register:
Roger Spiwak, 386-362-1147. Info: Eddie Hillhouse, 386-
688-2105, eddy7868@alltel.net; Susan Lance, 386-963-3822,
M6256@alltel.net; Joyce Fullbright, 386-362-9583, rejoy-
ful@alltel.net; SHS Golf Coach Joe Sprague,
jspraguel@suwannee.kl2.fl.us.

Saturday

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 4C


Continued From Page 1C

and it was my first time and
they never told me I was sup-
posed to use fresh toilet paper!

Q: Do you make your
entourage call you
Mr. Cable Guy?

: Actually the only
A request I make is that
they call me "Tanya"
after midnight on


weekends!


Q : Do you ever get
tired of stupid ques-
tions from journal-
ists?

A: There are no stupid
questions, just stupid
journalists! Not you,
of course. Git-R-Done!Kelly
Kazek writes for The News
Courier in Athens, Ala. Copy-
right 1999-2006 cnhi, inc.


Cattle Baron s
I Golf

STournament
Friday, May 4
Southern Oaks Golf Club,
Lake City
Four Person Scramble Format
Hole-in-One for new Chevy Avalanche
Prizes, Raffle, Silent Auction, Golf Contests
S Lunch Provided 11:30
Tee-Off 1:00p.m.
For Info & Forms Call


Vern Lloyd 386-752-4885
Jimmy Swisher 386-362-5332
All P,.,.,UBd. O3iicti t
AM, I C .Mc Li.I ,Ict. ,, ,.L. ,,'








PAGE 4C, APRIL 25 26, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


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Calendar


Continued From Page 3C

April 28
Colin P. Kelly Freedom Run in Madison
The Colin P. Kelly Freedom Run will be held Saturday,
April 28 during the annual Four Freedoms Festival in Madi-
son. Two races: Fun Run and 5K Rui. The 5K Run is open t
all ages and begins at 8 a.m. Fee is $10. The one mile Fun
Run is open to youth up to 16 and begins at 8:30 a.m. Entry
fee is $5. Sign in begins at 7:30 a.m. the day of the race. Th
5K course takes runners through beautiful, historic downtown
Madison and onto the campus of North Florida Community
College. Both runs begin and end on the corner of Range an
Marion Streets. Ribbons and trophies will be awarded win-
ners in several age categories. The NFCC chapter of the
Florida Association of Community Colleges is sponsoring th
race to raise funds for textbook "scholarships" for NFCC stu
dents. Info: Enid Mazzone Kozlowski, 850-973-1637 or
Denise Bell, 850-973-9481, e-mail belld@nfcc.edu.

Sunday.
April 29
Fillyaw family reunion
Fillyaw family reunion will be held Sunday, April 29 in
Luraville Community Center. Eat at 1 p.m. Please bring a
covered dish and enjoy.

Tuesday
May 1
Democratic Executive Committee meet-
ing
Suwannee County Democratic Executive Committee will
meet Tuesday, May 1 at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park,
US 129 North, Live Oak. A sit-down dinner is served at 6:30
p.m. for $10 per person. The meeting starts at 7 p.m. Dinner
is not required to join us for the meeting. All Democrats are
invited to join us in participating in the Democratic Process.
Meetings are held the first Tuesday of each month.
Info/RSVP for dinner: Monica, 386-330-2036.

May 3
Business Development Training for
non-profit or for-profit businesses
The Entrepreneurial Rural Business Development Project
(ERBDP) has developed a series of workshops focusing on
non-profit and for-profit business development and manage-
ment for residents of Hamilton County. Workshops will be
free of charge. Pre-registration is required. The training will
be held from 6-8 p.m., Thursday, May 3 at Hamilton Cooper
ative Extension Office, 1143 US 41 NW, Jasper. Series III:
Financing Your Business I, "What Strategies to Use" and
Nonprofit Fund-raising, "How to Locate the Funding."
Info/pre-registration: Allen Tyree, 386-792-1276.

May 4
Cattle Baron's Golf Tournament
Fifth Annual Cattle Baron's Golf Tournament will be held
Friday, May 4 at Southern Oaks Golf Club in Lake City.
Silent auction and drawing for sports memorabilia and golf
packages; hole-in-one contest for a Chevrolet Avalanche. Pro
ceeds going to support The American Cancer Society, High
Five Unit (Bradford, Columbia, Hamilton, Suwannee and
Union counties). Sponsorships and sponsor/player packages.
are available. Info: Jimmy Swisher, 386-362-5332 or Vern
Lloyd, 386-752-4885, or visit Suwannee County Chamber of
Commerce office.


Donations needed now!


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FOUR FREEDOMS FESTIVAL
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Saturday April 28th
Parade 11:00
Lime Entertnrnieritn E turng:
JIMMY FORTUNE Or FHE STATLER BROTHERS
tf ENCORE
THE HODGES SISTERS
THE FAITHFUL FEW
THE MARINE CORP BAND
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S i l' n e. l I m .- n : h -. ur rhl ,r ,,. ,i .n I % I I I l j 1
WATERMELON SEED SPITTING CONTEST
FlOG HOP
D1 INKING IOOTH
ROCK CLIMBING WALL.
FIREFIGHTERS CHALLENGE
,,j ,,,. ,: ,, ,


May 4-Lake City
May 11-Live Oak
Pregnancy Crisis Center yard sale
The Pregnancy Crisis Center is accepting -donations of your
good quality, unwanted household and furniture items for its
annual yard sale fund-raiser scheduled for Friday, May 4 in
o Lake City and Friday, May 11 in Live Oak. Freshly laundered
baby items are always welcome. This year no clothing will be
sold, so please, no clothing donations. All proceeds go to
e help pregnant women and their babies in crisis situations. Re-
n ceipts for tax deductions available upon request. Note: Free
pregnancy tests, maternity clothing and baby clothing
d available. Confidential. Open Wednesday-Friday. Info:
386-330-2229.

,e Register now!

May 4-7
Spring Bicycle Festival in White Springs
Enjoy great off-road rides along the banks of the Suwannee
River, scenic road rides along beautiful quite roads lined with
wildflowers, relaxing canoeing/kayaking, tubing adventures
and more fun activities, catered by Country Caterers, meals
will be served at Nelly Bly's Kitchen in Stephen Foster State
park. The entire campground has been reserved for registered
riders, enjoy the Used Blues Band on Saturday evening dur-
ing the Corn Social and dinner. Info/registration: Kim Fraw-
ley, 904-797-7290, www.suwanneebike.org.

May 5
Branford Woman's Club will host W2W
Shopping Extravaganza
Branford Woman's Club will host W2W Shopping Extrava-
ganza from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Saturday, May 5 at its clubhouse
located on SR 247, across from The Gathering in Branford.
The one-day sale is your chance to save dollars on some of
your favorite products. Vendors include Latasia Jewelry,
Home & Garden Party, Pampered Chef, Creative Memories;
Gold Canyon Candles, Stampin UP!, purses by LFW De-
signs, and more. Door prizes, give-aways, refreshments and
fun, so come on out! A donation will be made to Branford
Woman's Club. Info: Kathy Stark 386-935-3487, or Martha
Sherrod, 386-497-4056.

May 5
Job Fair will be heldijn Perry
A job fair will be held at Workforce Innovations in Perry
from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., Saturday, May 5. Production work-
ers may fill out applications for work in Lafayette County.
All persons seeking jobs are invited to attend. Info: Suzan
_ Bain, 850-584-7604 or Charles Sadler, 386-294-3634.

May 5
North Florida Chapter Newborns
in Need, Inc. will hold yard sale
North Florida Chapter Newborns in Need, Inc., a 501(c)3
non-profit organization, will hold a yard sale from 8 a.m.-3
p.m., Saturday, May 5 at St. Luke's Episcopal Church, 1391
Eleventh St., Live Oak. If you have items you would like to,
donate, call Sister Marie Ann, 386-362-6926 or Mabel Gra-
ham, 386-59.0-4075.
)-
May 5
Spring Fling
Suwannee Valley Humane Society's Spring Fling will be
held from 10 a.m.-1 pDm., Saturday, May 5 at 1156 SE Bisbee
Loop, Madison..Join them for fun, food and a huge yard and
plant sale. Mix and mingle with staff, other supporters and
some of the most popular resident. From 1-10, exit 262, go
1/2 mile north, turn left on Bisbee Loop and follow the signs.
Info: 386-971-9904 or toll-free, 866-236-7812 Tuesday-Sat-
urday.

Donations needed!
May 5
Yard sale
Christian Mission in Action Ministry will hold a yard sale
from 7 a.m.-until, Saturday, May 5 at John H. Hale Conmmu-
nity Park & Recreation Center, 215 NE Duval St., Live Oak.
Donations of household items in good condition are needed.
Info: Susie Seay, 386-362-2115 or Audrey Howell, 386-364-
4560.

May 5-6
Gainesville Fine Arts
Festival at Oak Hall School


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Gainesville Fine Arts Association in conjunction with the
Oak Hall School will exhibit fine art for sale from 10 a.m.-5
p.m., Saturday-Sunday, May 5-6 at Oak Hall School, Tower
Road and SW 14th, Gainesville. Exhibit includes paintings,
sculpture, glass, jewelry and photographic arts and more.
Good food, live music, lively entertainment and excellent art
from 50 artists. Cost: Free of charge. Info: 352-333-7508,
www.gainesvillefmearts.com.

May 6
Doyle Dykes will minister
in music at The Village Church
Doyle Dykes, master fingerstyle guitarist, will minister in
music at 6 p.m., Sunday, May 6 in The Village Church, Ad-
vent Christian Village, Dowling Park. He will lead the
evening praise and worship service. A free-will offering will
be taken. Info: Dick Grillo, 386-658- 5291, dgrillo@acvil-
lage.net.

Register now!
May 7-July 31
NFCC offers new astronomy course
North Florida Community College offers Introduction to
Astronomy May 7-July 31 taught by full-time amateur as-
tronomer and area expert, Bill Skelley of Tallahassee. The
three-credit course may be taken for college credit or audited.
Classes are Tuesdays, 6-7:40 p.m. Labs are Thursdays, 7:40-
8:40 p.m. Info:. 850-973-1632, deliaa@nfcc.edu, or
www.nfcc.edu.

May 7
Fibromyalgia Support Group will meet
Fibromyalgia Support Group will meet at 6 p.m., Monday,
May 7 at Suwannee River Regional Library, 1848 S. Ohio
Ave., Live Oak. Family members welcome. Speaker: Dr.
Mansoor, Rheumatologigt from Lake'City. Info: 386-842-
5206. -

May 7
NFCC begins summer hours May 7
Beginning Monday, May 7, North Florida Community Col-
lege (NFCC) offices will open Monday through Thursday, 8
a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Campus will close on Fridays. Regular
Monday through Friday hours will resume Monday, Aug. 13.
Info: 850-973-1653, news@nfcc.edu.

May 8
Love and Remembrance Memorial
Haven Hospice's Love and Remembrance Memorial will
be conducted at 6 p.m, Tuesday, May 8 at Alligator Lake
Park, Old Country Club Rd., Lake City. The memorials are
open to anyone in the community who has lost a loved one.
Attendees are encouraged to bring pictures and mementos of
loved ones that can be placed on our Table of Memories. Re-
freshments will be served. Info: Nina Powell, 352-692-5100,
or toll-free, 800-727-1889 or nmpowell@havenhospice.org.

May 11
Millennium Nights
Millennium Nights will be held from 7-9 p.m. Friday, May
11 in Millennium Park, Live Oak. Millennium Nights is
scheduled every other Friday. Individuals or groups who want
to perform need to pre-register. Info/registration: Herold
White, 386-590-0129, www.heroldwhite.com.

May 11-12
Quilt Walk and Mother's
Day Tea in Lake City
Lake City Quilt Walk will be held in historic downtown
Lake City. "Sew Much Love." Quilts will be on display in
merchants windows and stores. A Mother's Day Tea is
planned for 2-4 p.m., Saturday, May 12 at Tucker's Restau-
rant in the Blanche Hotel, $15 per person. Reservations re-
quired for tea, contact Cyndie at 386-758-1312 or toll-free
877-746-4778. Presented by the Downtown Action Corpora-
tion, proceeds from the Tea will go to the Columbia County
Senior Services. Info: 386-758-1312, www.LakeCityDown-
town.com.

May 12
5K Run/Fun Walk
Copeland Community Center in Dowling Park will sponsor
a 5K Run/Fun Walk (3.1 miles) Saturday, May 12 to cele-
brate 12 years of health and fitness activities at CCC! Regis-
tration begins at 8 a.m. Race begins at 9 a.m. and will travel
through the beautiful campus of Advent Christian Village lo-
cated on the historic Suwannee River and will begin and end
at Copeland Community Center located at 10420 Marvin
Jones Blvd., Dowling Park. Water stations will be provided at
various points during the race. Please join them for a celebra-
tion brunch featuring live entertainment immediately follow-
ing the race. Brunch tickets: $5. Employees are encouraged
to join the tfun by participating in the run/walk or by vohun-
teering to help with the event. Volunteers needed in the areas
of registration, refreshments/hydration, set-up and clean-up,
and traffic control and more. Info: 386-658-5387,
dburch@acvillage.net.


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NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS APRIL 25 26, 2007, PAGE 5C


We


Take


? Health to


Your



Heart


Keep 'Pink Eye' From Coming Back


Most parents are familiar with conjunctivitis. While the
official name likely won't ring a bell, its more common name,
"pink eye," surely will.
An inflammation of the membrane that 'covers the whites of
the eyes as well as the inner eyelid, pink eye seems to affect
every kid at least once. But some parents might not know that
conjunctivitis comes in different forms, each with different
symptoms and signs.
Bacterial conjunctivitis: this will be in both eyes and result
in a heavy, greenish discharge.
Viral conjunctivitis: this typically affects just one eye,
resulting in slight watering and a light discharge.
Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC): arguably the most
severe form of conjunctivitis, this affects both eyes and can
hinder a person's ability to wear contact lenses. It's also
characterized by itching, red bumps on the inside of the eyelids,
and heavy discharge and tearing.
Allergic conjunctivitis: this will also affect both eyes and
result in an itching sensation and redness. In some instances,
the nose will experience those symptoms as well. Excessive
tearing is also common.
Because there are different types of conjunctivitis, the causes
vary. GPC sufferers often find their contact lenses cause and
aggravate the symptoms, while people with allergic
conjunctivitis will find that allergens, such as dust or pollen,
trigger the problem.
The best thing a parent can do to help their child is have them
avoid anything that has caused or can cause conjunctivitis.
Because conjunctivitis is so contagious, keeping it under wraps
is essential for both your child and the people your child spends
time with. Some good tips for keeping the condition from
worsening or spreading include:
Wash your hands. Anyone who's had conjunctivitis, even a
mild case, knows how hard it is to avoid touching or rubbing
your eye. If your child does either of those things, wash their
hands immediately and remind them to do their best to keep
their hands away from the infected areas.
Don't share. While every parent wants to teach their
children to share, in this instance, not sharing should earn a
child brownie points. Wash cloths, towels and pillowcases
should not be shared. Once a wash cloth or towel has been
used, launder immediately. After your child wakes up in the
morning, change the pillowcases and wash those immediately
as well.
Not sharing extends beyond the linen closet as well. Eye care
products, such as drops or lens cleaners, should not be shared,


Children'who'repeatedly battle bouts of c,.nju1nciC iis night be due for an eye examination.

nor should mascara or other cosmetic items.
Avoid close contact with others. While parents will want
to kiss their kids goodnight, do so with caution while not
alienating your child.
Seek a doctor's advice. If your child wears contact lenses
but conjunctivitis keeps coming back, it might be time to
revert to regular eyeglasses. If a child doesn't wear glasses but
has a history of conjunctivitis, bring that up with their eye
doctor, especially if the doctor feels it's time for glasses or
contact lenses.


To place an ad on this page, please call Myrtle at 386-362-1734 Ext. 103


North Florida
Pharmacy


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A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com W
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore


Family Dentistry
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH,
D.D.S, P.A.-'
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-6556
1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County) 34


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We are a
total care
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Now seeing patients at Shands at Live Oak
Welcoming New Patients at
our two offices at:
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Please call (386) 755-16559
Waeem Khan, M.D. for an appointment or information
All Chemotherapy administration and management


Specializing in:
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4 'LZ',r LqLa

Quist, Lafaydti. Cowzhy, CowztV itdtig29.
Prhlvals ootm, lff/aenciEs, 24 zou caz.
Visit us on the web at www.oakridgealf.com
Email: oakridgealf@alltel.net
Mayo, FL County Rd. 251 -A (386 294-5050
License # AL9863 (386) 29 4-5050


Ophthalmology
GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
Located In SHANDS At Live Oak
1100 SW 11th St. Live Oak
(904) 373-4300 or 1-800-435-3937


Physical Tlin-uapy

HeartlandV
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA
Kalie Hingson, PTA
Lisa Garrett, PTA
AQUATIC THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports
Medicine, Pediatrics Providers
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS Providers
405 11th St., Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051 ....


Kimberly M. Broome, O.D. Julie L Owens, O.D.

North

Florida


EyeCare
Examination and Treatment of the Eye
Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses


PHONE (386) 362-5055
FAX (386) 208-8660


Live Oak, Florida 32066
324533-F


0 EYE CENTER of North Florida
General Eye Care & Surgery
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Eduardo M. Bedoya, MD
Board Certified, American Board of Ophthalmology
Eye Physician & Surgeon

Medicare, Medicaid, Avmed,
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& other insurance accepted
Se habla espafiol.
917 W. Duval St.
866-755-0040
"r


'U..
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PAGE 6C, APRIL 25 26, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Warm temperatures,


Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H. Bronson recently
warned of a higher wildfire threat this spring
due to warm temperatures and a lack of wide-
spread rainfall. Although wildfires can occur
throughout the year in Florida, the most active
time for wildfires is from March to June. Be-
cause of the higher wildfire danger, Bronson
* is asking all Floridians to be extremely care-
ful with outdoor burning.
"People are the major cause of wildfires in
Florida whether it is the crime of arson, es-
caped fire from land-clearing, children exper-
imenting with matches or an unattended yard
fire," Bronson said. "People are responsible
for about 85 percent of all Florida wildfires."
For many people, disposing of yard waste


lack of rainfall increasing wildfire threat


(leaves, grass clippings, tree limbs, palm.
fronds, etc.) with a small fire is a routine part
of spring cleaning. This activity is permitted
in most Florida counties without any specific
authorization.
But Bronson emphasized that the fire must
be attended at all times and be in a pile no
greater than 8 feet in diameter, or in a non-
combustible container. In addition, the fire
must be at least 25 feet from the home of the
person burning or any wooded area, at least
50 feet from any paved roadway and at least
150 feet from other occupied buildings.
If the wildfire threat becomes severe, coun-
ties, municipalities or the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services could
enact a burn ban that prohibits all outdoor


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burning until weather conditions improve.
Residents should check with their local office
of the Florida Division of Forestry or the
nearest fire department to learn if a' burn ban
is in effect and how to burn legally and safe-
ly.
"We all need to be sure that our careless-
ness does not create a wildfire that endangers
the property of others," Bronson said.
Inadequate or widely scattered precipitation
typically means an increased wildfire danger
and is monitored by the Keetch-Byram
Drought Index (KBDI). The Keetch-Byram
Drought Index measures the amount.of mois-
ture in the upper three feet of soil on a scale


which ranges from 0 (flood conditions) to 800
(desert-like conditions). In recent weeks, the
KBDI has risen to a statewide average of 404,
with a simultaneous increase in the number of
wildfires. Twenty percent of the state is now
recording KBDI measurements of over 600.
The Division of Forestry maintains a toll-
free Arson Alert Hotline 800-342-5869 for
anonymous tips on arson in wooded or forest-
ed areas and offers a reward of up to $5,000
for information leading to the conviction of
an arsonist.
Since Jan. 1, the Division of Forestry has
responded to 516 wildfires that have burned
31,470 acres.


Live Oak's Empowered Parents Conference

Because the tougher it gets to be a kid...
the tougher it gets to be a parent!

Friday Evening, Saturday, and Sunday Morning
May 4, 5 and 6th


Place:
Christ Central Ministries of Live Oak
1550 SW Walker Avenue
Live Oak, Florida 32064

For Information and Registration Contact:
Empowered Parents Conference
(386) 623-7568
OR


CCM of Live Oak: 386-208-1345 ,


We promise concrete
answers for every question
you ask:
Never argue again w/your child
Improve school attendance and
performance
Prevent or intervene in alcohol and
other drug use
Find resources to help


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Live Oak, FL
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F







NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS APRIL 25 26, 2007, PAGE 7C


t


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1,11n


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Salmon and tuna provide rich sources of

health-enhancing Omega-3 fatty acids


FAMILY FEATURES
Imagine a food low in carbohydrates, fat and calories but high in protein.
Imagine a food that improves heart health, reduces hypertension, boosts
the immune system, helps fight autoimmune disease, improves mental
health and cognitive performance and reduces the risk of certain cancers.
Sound fishy? It is!
Omega-3 powerhouse foods like tuna, salmon and sardines boast a lengthy
list of health benefits, as well as amazing versatility and ease in the kitchen.
"Salmon and albacore tuna are especially low in fat, contain high amounts
of protein and have a variety of essential vitamins and minerals," says regis-
tered dietitian Margo Kraus, a nutritional consultant for Bumble Bee Foods
and a champion of healthy eating habits.
Kraus notes that salmon, tuna and sardines are all excellent sources of
Omega-3 fatty acids, and the conveniently packed Bumble Bee canned
and pouched seafoods lend themselves well to simple and flavorful food
preparations.
A colorful Mediterranean pasta featuring tomatoes, garlic, rosemary, red
bell pepper, olives and tuna makes short work of dinner. A quick saut6 in the
skillet turns out a zesty sauce, perfect for tossing over your favorite pasta.
Add a dash of aged grated parmesan, a pinch of hot pepper flakes or a sprink-
ling of minced parsley, and you have a dish elegant enough for company or
simple enough for weeknight family fare.
In the mood for a good sandwich? Try a tasty salmon burger spiked with
lemon zest and Dijon, married with crisp celery and green onions. Top it off
with a savory, creamy dill sauce. Add some chunky slaw and oven-baked
potato wedges to round out the meal.
Whatever the preparation, the American Heart Association recommends
eating fish (particularly fish with Omega-3 fatty acids such as salmon, tuna
and sardines) at least two times a week as part of a healthy diet. Your doctor
will thank you ... and so will your taste buds.


- Amazing Omegas


Omega-3 fatty acids, or essen-
tial fatty acids,.are critical for
goodliealth. Since the body
can't produce sufficient
essential fatty acids on its
own, Omega-3s must be con-
sumed through food sources.
Omega-3s are found naturally
incoldwater fish, with salmon,
albacore tuna End sardines
ranking among thie top fish
sources of Omega-3 fatty acids.


Among Omega-3's many health
benefits are:
* Improved heart health
* Decreased risk of cancer
* Reduced hypertension
* Reduced inflammation
* Enhanced mental health
* Superior immune system
performance
* Improved cognitive performance


For more fish recipes rich in Omega-3s, visit www bumblebee.coin.


1/4 cup rinel\ chopped green onion
1/4 cup finely chopped celery
1/2 cup diced bread crumbs
1 large egg. lightly beaten
I tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon grated lemon rind
2 hamburger buns
Dill Sauce:. ; :
1/4 cup sour cream
1 cup finely sliced cucumber
1 teaspoon fresh dill
1 teaspoon finely chopped
fresh mint
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
Salt and pepper to taste
Combine salmon, green onion, celery,
bread crumbs, egg, mustard and lemon
rind. Mix well. Form into two patties.
Chill one hour or until ready to cook. In
lightly greased skillet, cook burgers over
medium-high heat 2 to 3 minutes on each
side, until lightly browned.
For dill sauce, combine all ingredients;
mix well. Serve burgers on buns with dill
sauce.
Nutrients per serving (salmon burger
with 3-ounce portion of dill sauce):
440 calories (130 from fat); 14g fat
(6g saturated); 155mg cholesterol; 990mg
sodium; 45g total carbohydrates; 3g fiber;
6g sugars; 34g protein
Nutrients per serving (salmon burger
only): 370 calories (70 from fat); 8g.fat
(2g saturated); 145mg cholesterol; 920mg
sodium; 43g total carbohydrates, 3g fiber;
5g sugars; 33g protein


Festive Mediterranean-Style
Rigatoni Pasta
Makes: 6 servings
2 6-ounce cans Bumble Bee
Solid White Albacore tuna
in water, drained
4 ounces unsalted butter
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil,
divided
1 large sweet onion, cut into
1/4-inch dice
2 medium red bell peppers,
seeded and cut into
1/4-inch dice
1 large vine-ripe tomato, diced
5 cloves garlic, minced
1/3 teaspoon fresh rosemary
leaves
Sea salt and freshly ground
pepper
1/2 cup dry white wine


1 5-3/4-ounce jar Spanish
olives (green olives stuffed
with pimientos), drained
1/2 pound rigatoni pasta, cooked
according to package
directions, drained
1 tablespoon thinly sliced
fresh chives
Dry aged parmesan, grated
Pinch of crushed red hot
pepper flakes (optional)
Heat butter and 1/3 olive oil in large
saut6 pan over medium-high heat. Add
onions, bell peppers, tomato, garlic
and rosemary. Season mixture with salt
and pepper, cover pan and cook over
low heat 10 minutes.
Add wine and simmer 5 minutes.
Then, add olives and tuna to sauteed
mixture. Cover and cook until tuna is
heated through (approximately 3 to 5
minutes).


III laige
bowl, toss.

then ..iuce '11

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vidt.ial Plates'
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PAGE 8C, APRIL 25 26, 2007- NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS



Geocaching provides family entertainment


By Lindsay J. Spaulding
CNHI News Service

AVON, Ind. The Novreslke fam-
ily recently discovered a new hobby
that they can all participate in -
Geocaching.
Geocaching is a sport or activity
that uses a GPS device to locate hid-
den "caches."
The Geocaching website describes
the basic idea as having individuals
and organizations set up caches all
over the world and share the loca-
tions of those caches on the Internet.
GPS users can then use the location
coordinates to find the caches.. Once,
found, a cache may provide the visi-
tor with a variety of rewards, and all
the visitor is asked to do is leave
something behind for the next per-
son.
Dan and Angel Novreske, along
with their 7-year-old son Jared and 5-
year-old twins Matthew and Ashley,
have been Geocaching for about two
months now. They purchased a "mid-
dle-of-the-road" GPS device and
quickly became involved in the ac-
tivity.
Dan said the GPS.devises cost any-
where from $80 to several hundred
dollars.
"The kids think it's treasure hunt-
ing," Dan said. "They have a lot of
fun."
The family visited McCloud Na-
ture Park in North Salem over spring
break to hunt for caches.
Caches are often found in parks,
they said, but also cemeteries and
rest stops. They said there are a num-
ber of caches in Brown County, and
even one on Monument Circle in
downtown Indianapolis.
Dan and Angel recently traveled to
Pennsylvania and searched for
caches along the way.
Several guidelines go along with
Geocaching to ensure it's fun for
everyone. Caches are to be hidden
above-ground only, and no shovels
are allowed on hunts.
The Novreskes currently have two
caches hidden in Washington Town-
ship Park. One is called "JAM's
Cache on the Sparrow." JAM, of
course, stands for "Jared, Ashley, and
Matthew," and Sparrow refers to the


name of the trail that runs through
the park.
Most caches contain items for peo-
ple who find them to take and leave,
along with a notebook that logs who
has visited and where they're from.
Some caches have a "travel bug"
planted in them. A travel bug resem-
bles a dog tag necklace and has a pic-
ture of a bug on it with a unique
tracking number. When caches with
travel bugs are found, the finder
takes it, and places it in another
cache. Sometimes the travel bugs
have specific instructions as to where
the owner wants it to go next.
Angel explained that there are sev-
eral types of caches. The traditional
cache is placed in an ammo box or
Rubbermaid container, and has trin-
kets and small items in it. A micro
cache, is a smaller version, and is
more difficult to find because it's
easier to hide. And a virtual cache is
an item or place that already exists,
such as a scenic view or a tombstone.
Caches are listed on the website
and visitors can search by zip code to
find ones nearby. Some GPS devices
have the capability to be plugged di-
rectly into the computer to allow the
caches locations to download to the
device. They can be loaded manually
as well.
Each cache has a nickname, and
the person who hides it uses a screen
name. The date it was hidden is list-
ed, as well as each time it's found. If
it has a travel bug, the number on it is
entered, so the owner can track its
progress. The caches are rated from
one to five, depending on the degree
of difficulty to find and the terrain, as
well as whether they're kid-friendly.
"For some of the caches you have
to drive off-road to find them," Dan
said. "You might have to drive all
day to get there."
Angel added, "We try to find two
or three a day. Jared has probably
found the most."
When Geocachers search for
caches, they have to be on the look-
out for "muggles," or people who
watch them find the cache, then go
and take everything out of it when
they leave.
"We were at the park finding a
cache, and Jared saw people coming


Dan Nvreske and his 5yearold son, Matthew, look inside the box they found during a Geocaching search.
Dan NQvreske and his 5-year-old son, Matthew, look inside the box they found during 'a Geocaching search.


and said, 'Watch out for the mug-
gles!'" Angel said.
For more information on Geo-
caching, visit the website at
www.geocaching.com.
Lindsay Spaulding writes for the
Hendricks County Flyer in Avon,
Ind.
lindsay.spaulding@flyergroup.co
m Copyright 1999-2006 cnhi, inc.


NFCC begins simmer hours May 7
Beginning Monday. May 7. North Florida Community College
(NFCC) offices will open Monday through Thursday. 8 a.m. until 4 30
p.m. Campus w ill close on Fridays.
Regular Monday through Friday hours will resume Monday. Aug
13.
For more information, please contact 850-973-1653 or e-mail
ne\ s(infcc edu. ._ ... ... .


19






NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS APRIL 25 26, 2007, PAGE 9C


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--------- -----I----------------








PAGE 10C, APRIL 25 26, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS



Pioneer women's lives chronicled


By Be'tty Smith
CNHI News Service
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. Pioneer
women scratched a living from the
earth because they had so little to
work with.
They watched family members
murdered by outlaws and endured the
hardships of the Civil War in eastern
Oklahoma.
These women and their descen-
dants told their stories to 112 partici-
pants in the Works Progress Adminis-
tration Writers' Project in 1936 and
1937. Many of their accounts will be
part of a book compiled by Dr. Terri
Baker and Connie Henshaw of North-
eastern State University. The book
goes to the publisher later this
year.During the 1930s, the interviews
with the pioneer women were com-
piled by legendary Oklahoma histori-
'an Grant Foreman. They consisted of
about 45,000 pages.
"The best interviews were gathered
by women," Baker said. "It apparent-
ly was easier for a pioneer woman to
relate to another woman as they
rocked on the porch or performed
household tasks."Baker, chair of the
NSU Department of Languages and
Literature, and Henshaw, lecturer in
the Department of English, gave a
moving presentation of these
women's narratives Thursday during



5 DAYS

ONLY!


the 35th annual Symposium on the
American Indian.
"They were living universal experi-
ences as women," Baker said. "The
women thought their experiences
were worth recording, and this is an
important point."Some women quot-
ed related their own experiences,
while others spoke of their mothers
and grandmothers.
"We're not historians," Baker said.
"Rather, we're literary scholars with
an interest in history."
She commented on the narratives
while Henshaw read excerpts from
the interviews conducted with the
women during the Depression.
The stories they presented dated to
the Trail of Tears, when one woman
related an ancestor's tale of an officer
.who killed a 4-day-old infant because
it wouldn't stop crying. He "dashed
its little head against a'tree and killed
it."
Others date to the early part of the
20th century and the days surround-
ing statehood.Baker and Henshaw
have been asked many questions, es-
pecially by students and other
women, about their research and what
pioneer women's lives were like.
What did they wear? What were
their houses like? What did they
cook? Who helped them deliver their
babies? Did they work all the


time?"That answer was usually yes,"
Baker said.
Women also asked them about do-
mestic violence in pioneer days. Hen-
shaw recounted the story of a women
who supposedly had gone to another
city with other people. Her body later
was found in a creek. She supposedly
was killed by her husband, although
nothing was ever done about it.Baker
said the average person's lifespan
during pioneer days was 40 years.
Ages of the women interviewed range
from 40 to 104.
Henshaw told of 4 Chickasaw-
Cherokee woman who used to hoe
the garden with her grandmother,
who insisted on wearing her hoops
even for that task. The only time the
grandmother wouldn't wear her
hoops was during a thunderstorm, for
she was afraid the metal hoops would
attract lightning. So family members
crafted her some hoops of briarwood
for use during those days.
The woman who told that story
also talked of building rail fences,
sawing timber, and working in the
fields.
"As women, would we have been
so brave, so stalwart?" Baker said.
"Did those women think they were
brave, or just that they were doing
what they thought they should have
been doing?"She said many people


.1' -


Dr. Terri Brown enthusiastically discusses the lives of pioneer
women in Oklahoma.


have written about pio-
neer women, but have
not let the words of the
women themselves come
through.
Henshaw read an ac-
count by a Sac and Fox
woman of a smallpox
outbreak. As many as
five people died daily.
"The gravedigger
could not dig the holes
fast enough, so he dug a
large hole and they
dumped the bodies in,"
the woman told the in-
terviewer.That episode,
and a subsequent in-
fluenza epidemic, nearly
wiped out the tribe.
A Cherokee woman
born in 1877 gave a hap-
pier account. Her father
had constructed a primi-
tive merry-go-round
with swinging seats. It
was a popular attraction
at local events. She and
her siblings got to ride
when there were empty
seats and they got as
sick as the other riders.
She also read an ac-
count of cattle thieves.
The woman interviewed
had a relative who rode
past a scene where a
thief was butchering a
stolen cow. The thief lat-


I i~l ;


er came after the man, intending to
kill him. The man's wife found out
and jumped bareback on the horse,
galloping across country to warn him.
So the man was prepared when the
thief arrived, his rifle at the ready.
They exchanged shots, and the thief
was fatally shot.
Another terrifying incident oc-
curred during the Civil War, when
one woman watched as her uncle's
heart was cut out.
Baker and Henshaw have been
working on the book for five years.
Its genesis came when Baker began
searching for her Choctaw roots. She
shared stories with Henshaw, who be-
carme interested and joined in the pro-
ject.
They logged many hours of re-
search in the Special Collections de-
partment of the John Vaughan Library
at NSU.
"We just started collecting all kinds
of things from the Indian Pioneer Pa-
pers. The Indian Pioneer Papers are
addictive. You start working on them
and you have to be dragged away,"
Baker said.The women they write
about lived through events that
changed the national culture and
shaped the way people live.today
."We do believe the communality
of these experiences unifies these
women on the Oklahoma frontier,"
Baker said.
Betty Smith writes for Tahlequah
(Okla.) Daily Press. Copyright
1999-2006 cnhi, inc.


Boyd works for north

Florida communities


Congressman Allen Boyd
(D-North Florida),. a mem-
ber of the House Budget
Committee, recently criti-
cized the Administration's
Fiscal Year 2008 Budget for
proposed cuts to programs
that are vital to our rural
communities. The Presi-
dent's budget freezes fund-
ing for rural education, phas-
es out rural health grants,
and proposes another round
of cuts to Community De-
velopment Block Grants
(CDBGs).
The Adhnimstiation's bud-
get provides $2 6 billion for
CDBGs, which local com-
munities use to address chal-
lenges like affordable hous-
ing, job creation, and eco-
nomic development. This is
a cut of $1.1 billion, ol 294
percent, belo\\ the 2007 lev-
el.
"The Administration's
budget cuts back on pro-
grams that help our commu-
nities meet their most press-
ing needs," said Boyd. "The
CDBG program is a signa-
tuic piogiam in North Flori-
da that helps to create jobs,
spin economic development
and small buince~ opportu-
nities, and expand home-
ownerslup. CDBG is a pro-
gram that works in our coni-


munities, and this proposed
reduction undermines the
economic well-being of
Florida's communities."
The President's budget
also reduces the Clean Water
State Revolving Fund by
$396 million from the 2007
level, providing only $688
million for 2008. The Clean
Water State Revolving Fund
is used to enhance water
quality by helping local
communities improve drink-
ing water and sewage treat-
ment facilities. Many coun-
ties in North Florida, includ-
ing Leon. Jefferson, Taylor.
Jackson and Bay Counties,
have utilized this program in
the past.
"Throughout North Flori-
da. there is significant de-
mand for water and waste-
water treatment expansion
and modernization, but the
Administration's budget
does not recognize this
need," Boyd stated. "Ameri-
cans deserves a fiscally re-
sponsible budget that does
not shortchange our rural
communities. I will work
with my colleagues in the
House Budget Committee to
reject these proposals and
fight the Administration's at-
tempt to ihaim ruinl Amern-
ca."


DAYS

ONLY!










t 386-362-1734

ssied Marke800-25-4182


..... Section D
I> -te April 25 26,
'i ,"." 'l i,, -, 2007


This i1?B6!A fItIWeAdf A tW1o' th:RecentdW tbtions'l dluB 3 ya s 3 0
lAmriirae lloring d.outle plan ie inulaled ',rindows rnd new ferii.g Thl master I
,.i ,e, *.,:,, .r ,d ,,,. :a .,,I i ,,..Ie.: )rI d p rf Li Ih The, I cher,
t, l s :re" ,,, :,. i ,. I.,:,,:,,r,, .4,:. r.i,, ,- ,-. [ e& l ; *.,, :,, :,bir.i-I., rid kA
laurdr y rooni, juu O nt storage ;ried, tiot tub *, ad6.lN,.Lt ML-# L04231 1.

J.W. Hill & Associates All you need to know about real estate!


Come and take a look at this beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bath home in
Maynoi Subdivision. Perfect home for just the right family, fenced'in 'the
back. MLS# 58816. $173,900.


UUlStandi,.n J u ro, niii 2 La11i.i. il .i i ii ..-ii ,'i''" .r 1iie
qrowinq family Hcome.n hs elra STORAGE PACE rIn:i ir.d :.oult
Surrounding trees makes this home a TRUE HOME. Above ground
pool have warranty papers. Some ceramic tile throughout the home.
LS# 58425 $124 999.


0] 386-755-6600
Toll free 1-877-755-6600
540 W. Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida 32055
O. Nc hallmark @bizsea.rr.com
& www.hallmark-realestate.com


,I l I llh. "Real Estate Done Right"

J.W. HILL 1105 HOWARD ST. W., LIVE OAK
& ASSOCIATES 386-362-3300
Real Estate Broker & jwhillrealestate.co
Auction Company a.F


.. '" -- ..|
S-T-R-E-T-C-H OUT on 10 beautiful acres!
2003 Fleetwood Doublewide with IN
GROUND POOL, 4 bedrooms/2 baths, den
with fireplace. MLS 58483 Call Tanya
Shafter 3gS-755-544R-


GREAT BUY! Brick home in town with NE IRL1 NEt%' Cuilom .buil, br.ck
refinished wood floors, re-done kitchen home close to shopping and medical.-
with new cabinets, countertops and new Formal dining room,- popular split
stove. Deck on back of house overlooks bedroom plan, double car attached
spacious chain linked yard. $124,000 garage. Built 2005. MLS 58358 Call
MLS 56684 Call Sharon Selder 386-365- Janet Creel 386-755-0466
1203 LAND AND MORE!

1 ACRE wooded, paved frontage 10.01 ACRES Rural. wo-oded. A place to
$33,000 MLS 55764 Call Ginger Parker get away from ,a all' $ 1i5-00,f MLS
386-365-2135 ?n3 Caill Sharor Selder 385-365-1203'..


6.76 ACRES Well and Septic. Quiet area
close to the river.1 $82,000 MLS 58456
Call Sharon Selder 386-365-1203


26.66 ACRES Chlas% d Roid area 3
;eparale parLeli a.-.alable Timber
3pproi, It -,ear~ old $r. ., i.i per acre'
MLS 57102 Call Janet Creel 386-755-g
0466


SIWUllWlt-Very well-kept
H on 15,72 acres. Home has
ll-length, covered back porch,
cathedral ceilings, skylights,
double closets in all rooms,
id is mostly furnished. Large,
at-in kitchen as well as great
om..MB has double vanity,
arden tub & separate shower.
ostly cleared and great for
horses. Outside you will find
sautiful azaleas, fruit/pecan
ses, grape vines, 21x21 metal
orage, 10x10 shed, and
airport. #59038 $200,000


G8Ra lllltlt-Spacious & cozy
4/4 log hornet Big kitchen with lots
of counter space & cabinets.
Gracious living room with 18'
vaulted ceilings and fireplace.
Great 1.02 acre yard with mature
trees and lots of room for the kids
to run while you're relaxing onthe
porch. Located just outside of
town in a quiet, safe
neighborhood. #53216 $199,900


Jtj RMEBIE -ie ., with
r s -hiii' :"' H.,'; Front
..n .:,i :.Ip ,,-ri ,: cleared
a,', L-. 1,l ,. '.:.oded .
pr-.ri, :i ri.j ,rd dry
,',o i ria.. i:,pp6A K 5 ft of
froril S.-a i> H.y 27.
P'r,:,r, .Iul I .ed for
.,, 'i,'ulhlu. l ,u ,'i(lOSeS,
,- ,. .,,t,,,r,.. ..... t. r 8102
. a..-? ; .. #,tl ."..=


212 HOMIE -Newer, well-kept
home inside city limits. GREAT
insulated 20x20 workshop with
covered 20x20 carport.
Sprinkler system, 1-car garage,
screened back porch, paved
road. Very good area close to
school and shopping. Nice yard
with mature trees. Motivated
seller, #58624 $189,500


VHWMItMlmlirfh-:0
rsot ,.-tk ,. r.,, 'I.,
lv>d J lN.il .: I. I',.- I IIAtA

10 iasel 6 01 i dill road.
ionveniieni to Live Oak.
,:21 i' i '.t,









PAGE 2D, APRIL 25- 26, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Joan Holmes Radford, Realtor
with Marie Lee Realty ~
Cell: 386-208-5267, Office 386-364-2828
www.askrealtorjoan.com
The feel of living in a tropical paradise!
'Large 3 bedrm., 2 bath home on 5 acres. Lovely
creek runs through back of yard. Yard is beautiful and
well kept. Storage/workshop and much more. Banana
trees complete the touch. You must see this one.
S Priced to sell at just $275,370. Wait-just reduced to
$267,370-make an offer!
Or
The same home is available on 20.12 acres MOL. Enjoy country living at its best!
Nice hardwood and older pine on prop. The extra acreage brings you an even better
price. WAS $456,810. Now REDUCED to $448,810. MAKE AN OFFER. 354159-F

24-Hour Recorded Information Hotline!


Call 1-800-871-1870 Anytime 24 Hours a Day for a
Recorded Description of Any of These Fine Properties!
then enter "talking ad" ID number to hear a property description


Auctions
PIKEVILLE, TN SEQUATCHIE
VALLEY Absolute Auction 5/12/07:
195 Acre Farm, mountain views &
some waterfront tracts, John
Simpson Auction Real Estate, firm
license #72, 931-212-3842
www.auctionzip.com ID 9044
PUBLIC LAND AUCTION Online
bidding starts May 3, 2007 ends May
8, 2007. Buildable lots in Avon Park,
FL. See website' for:
pictures/maps/sizes/prices.
www.FloridaLotsUSA:com 1-877-
983-6600
Business Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do You
Earn $800 in a Day? 30 Machines
and Free Candy All For $9,995. Call
1 -888-753-3430 AIN#BO02000033
Call Us: We Will Not Be Undersold!
BATHTUB REFINISHING ... Renew
/ Change Color. Tub, Tile, Sink &
Chip Repair. Commercial &
Residential. 5yrs. Warranty. Quick
Response, Insured. Serving Florida
Over 10yrs. "Florida's Tub Doctor." 1-
888-686-9005


OWN YOUR OWN BUSINESS!
Need a challenge in day to day
work? It's hard work, but exciting
work. Plans, Support, Training. Free
Info! 800-210-3006
www.TheHomelncomeSolution.com

Miscellaneous
FirstDay
AMERICAN
Old Bills Wanted
$1 -$5 $10 Before 1930
or Coin Collection
Call for appt. Gerald 1- 877-563-
9050
LAWN CARE, TREE TRIMMING,
Bush Hogging, Bulldozer, Backhoe,
Front End Loader Root Rake, Dump
Truck, Land Clearing, Pond Digging,
Free Estimates, Custom Contracts to
suit your needs HAGAN LAWN
CARE 386-209-1284
SPINNET PIANO
Excellent condition. 386-208-0572


FirstDay
SWIMMING POOL STAIRS (cake
type) $100.00 Pool pump 1.5 HP
w/sand filter $100.00, 2 Futons
$100.00, Dresser 6 drawer $60.00,
Baby Stroller $25.00 386-935-3720

FirstDay
Want to be a CNA?
Don't want to wait?
Express Training Services
is now offering our quality
Exam Prep Classes in Live Oak.
Class sizes limited.
Next class 05/28/07.
Call 386-755-4401

Secondary
CAN YOU DIG- IT? Heavy
Equipment School. 3wk training
program.
Backhoes, Bulldozers, Trackhoes.
Local job placement. Start digging
dirt Now. Call 866-362-6497 or 888-
707-6886
YOUR ACCREDITED HIGH
SCHOOL DIPLOMA IN 30-DAYS
OR LESS. No classes. Free
evaluation.1-866-290-6596
www.FinishHighSchool.com


529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax= (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990
Realtor Assoc. M. Elizabeth Elliott, Evening 842-2372


aAcres, well; 8ep1C, 1 I-ectlc- reny-yon unot3 iNeain luwi iNear o n]]iy va mei lsylue ru.
On Paved Road- Reduced! $40,000 Huge Screened Porch -$149,500 1.6 Fenced Acres -$70,000
Recorded Info 24 Hours Recorded Info 24 Hours Recorded Info 24 Hours
1-800-871-1870 ID# 1005 1-800-871-1870 ID# 1095 1-800-871-1870 ID# 1065

Sun & Stars Realty, LLC
Let Us Help You Reach For Your Dreams
4221 N CR 53 DAY FL 32013 386-294-3671 OFFICE: 850-223-1849 Debby Howard
119 E GREEN ST, STE 207A, 207A PERRY FLORIDA 32347 www.sunandstarsrealty.com 386-590-0848, cell f1


386-965-1997
a startpacking@alltel.net
www.c21cindycarter.com


310 Helvenston St.. 7.l gi bath Vintage
home 6* Ilos ,t'e$ 109,000


Patty Wood-Williams
386-961-5399
pattyannwood @ realtyagent.com


Grow a large family and some animals on this private 31 acres
with a house that has over 4,000 square feet under roof!! It has
3 bedrooms, an atrium, a huge loft and a bonus room that could
be an office, craft room, whatever you need. Call or email me
for more information or to schedule an annppointment '


4 Bedroom, 2 bath Gorgeous home built in
1909, completely renovated with screened pool,. How about a large, well-maintained, split-level, brick home in
Lake City? This home features 4 bedrooms, 3 baths and an
hardwoods thru out, in city limits. $275,000 office. Also has a brick workshop/storage area and a beautiful
yard. Only 205,000. Call or email me for more information.
.TIps6for Sellers- The other day, I was.bo-aing a very nice homn that .Was priced 'r1ght;,The buyers
walked inland the. smnell of cigarettes was so strorig that they walked odt. ithuot e veriobklnh,-at the
Stofi the-house'Please smoke 'obtsird if you are trying to sell. Also,'thierare'coripaniew.hdo will
re-hovethe smell of cigarettes for a price; Remer6iber, you only getone timetO.na'pfi resSione
S .. .. .- -.
Tips 4 fo uyers: Every6ori6 saying t's a6i 's.rnarket and it is. Howe lone' be0ieve0 eriythjR6'
iybu rad- or hear Making outrageous offrs.really a waste of your tii' 'i ..as e' lersand
your realtor. There is a huge .difference. between fair Offer and *insulting, th,'eIlers tti offers. thby
-would never accept. '
Put our hometown knowledge of the Suwannee Valley area to work for you.


t to Subscribe?


a


The Suwannee
Democrat,
The Jasper News,
he Mayo Free Press
and The Branford
News is online,
so it's easier
than ever to
stay informed.


ww, nf I a UK Kn lEI i ne. Ill


(1) Commercial: 11.79 ac +/- with
approx. 540 ft on US 129 with a
multipurpose central heat & air
condition commercial bldg. cont.
approx. 21,800 sq. ft. under roof
ample paved parking. Good
location excellent commercial
potential. $1,920,000.
(2) Saddle Club: Nice four acre
tract in grass with scattered trees
fenced. Good buy @ $49,950
terms.
(3) Off US 27: 80 acres planted
pines in a cropland site 16 years
old, on good county road, good buy
at $11,000 per acre.
(4) CR 51: Nice four acre tract on
CR 51 with trees fenced, good
area. Priced to sell at $55,000.
(5) Branford area: 15 acres in good
cropland, with county roads and
fence on three sides. Excellent
location near US 27 & US 129.
Reduced to $10,995 per acre
(6) Hamilton Co: 1/2 acre tract on
CR 148 with a 3/2 CH/AC mobile
home in good condition, kitchen
furnished. $48,500.
(7) Off CR-349: Two acre wooded
corner lot near Royal Springs.
Good buy at $19,900.
(8) 167th Rd.: 3 Bedroom, 2 baths
CH/AC brick with garage, kitchen
furnished. 2 ac. homesite. Reduced
to $135,000.
(9) Off Central Rd.: 10 acres in
grass fenced, scattered trees,
survey $85,000. Good Buy.
(10) Suwannee River: Two wooded
lots with 200 ft on the water. 4"
well, septic. MH needs some R&R
$189,000.
(11) Off CR49: 40 acres in Coastal
Bermuda grass on good 1/4 mile on
county road. $10,900 per acre.
(12) Jasper, FL: Nice 3/2 CH/AC
brick home, kitchen furnished, like
new. $89,900.
(13) Suwannee River: One acre
wooded tract on paved road with
107 ft. on water, elevation survey
buildable, good buy @ $72,000.
(14) Falmouth Area: five acre tract
with a 2 bedroom, 1 bath
singlewide mobile home, 8x20
shop. $84,500.


(15) Suwannee River: 1.6 acre
wooded tract with 100 ft. on the
water, together with a 3 bedroom,
2 1/2 bath CH&AC DWMH cont.
approx. 1700 sq. ft. with detached
storage. Priced to sell @ $145,000.
(16) Off CR 349: 10 acres wooded
with CH&AC log home with
30'x40' pole barn, kitchen
furnished, washer & dryer, 10'x12'
storage. Good area. Reduced to
$215,000.
(17) Dowling Park: 5 acre wooded
on paved road, $59,900.
(18) 121st Street: 90 acres in good
coastal Bermuda. Old homesite
with pecan trees, 4" well, etc. Good
area $11,550 per acre.
(19) Near City: 3 bedroom, 2 bath
CH/AC brick home cont. approx.
1600 sq. ft. under roof. Kitchen
furnished, washer & dryer, 2 car
detached garage, 10'x20' storage,
3/4 ac. lot. Priced to sell @
$145,000.
(20) Suwannee River: 2 lots with
230 ft. on the water on, good county
road near a good boat ramp.
$105,000 for the pair, owner will
divide.
(21) Suwannee Valley Estates: 4-
acres wooded on good county road.
$35,000.
(22) Branford Area: Nice central
heat and air conditioned home,
constructed in 2005, approx. 2350
sq. ft. under roof plus large deck.
Kitchen furnished, good area.
Priced to sell at $209,500.
(23) Perry, FL: Nice 3/2 CH/AC
brick home with garage, numerous
upgrades. Priced to sell @ $89,500.
(24) Branford, FL: Nice 3/2 CH/AC
brick home in excellent condition,
kitchen furnished, 12x28 shop.
Good buy @$115,000.
(25) Lake City: Deer Creek, 5
bedroom, 3 bath DWMH, kitchen
furnished, two car carport. Good
area.$166,000.
(26) Peacock Lake: Two lot one on
the lake the other lakeview. $79,900
for both.
(27) Industrial Park: 1.13 acre
corner tract good exposure. Priced
to sell at $39,500. 348074-F


~ 1 /, d" 4 L a601 FI Howard Street

N r ~ ~'~ .16-362-3402
ll,'U bring you horne! Ens: 3N.62-MMS0


Outstanding Commercial Lot
on HWY 129! $65,900, Call
Jay Wetzel 386-688-3646
MLS#58801
JiUt **,alaIr-fy'F lrIA


uwn a piLece 0 IiILAUiy, 1 w
over 3600 sq/ft, $385,000 call
Ben Fekula 386-362-3402,
ML .# 59 s7


Welcome to the country, 3/2 In Ciy Limni, ilth Great
D/W, $59,900, call Cheryl price, 4/1 house, $85,000,
Sellers 386-590-4085, Cheryl Sellers 386-590-4085,
MLS #58910 ML l5ona


Great river property, I acre, Great location, 3/2 1,286
67,500, call Cheryl Sellers sq/ft house, $169,900, Call
386-590-4085 Bob Sellers 386-590-4085
MLS# 59040 MLS# 59342


Beautiull 86 acres on Lake
Louise, $1,299,000, Call Ben
Fekula 386-362-3402
MLS# 59150


Country Log Cabin, ureat
price, 2/1, $249,500, Call Jay
Wetzel 386-688-3646
MLS# 58880 a354732.


Pets for Sale
AKC BOXER PUPS Health certs,
shots, tails and dew claws done.
Taking deposits to reserve now.
Ready for your home May 3rd. Have
both parents and AKC line. Live
Oak/Dowling Park. $550.00 386-658-
3600
LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072. M-F
from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Pets for Free
FREE TO GOOD HOME with land to
run and herd. Border Collie/Auzzie
Shephard. 8 wk old pups. 3 male-3
female. Call 364-2199 to arrange
adoption.
Building Materials
LUMBER LIQUIDATORS Hardwood
Flooring, from $ .99/Sq.Ft. Exotics,
Oak, Bamboo, Prefinished &
Unfinished. Bellawood w/50 year
prefinish, plus A Lot More! We
Deliver Anywhere, 5 Florida
Locations, 1-800-FLOORING (1-800-
356-6746)
Electronics
RENT-A-GEEK Statewidd Service
On-Site Repair. Virus & Spyware
Removal, Hardware & Software,
Repair, Network Design & Setup,
Etc. 813-600-3305, 727-230-2261,
toll free 1-866-601-4907
'geeksoc.com *Free Vista upgrade
software (on select Dells!!)
Furniture
MEMORY FOAM ALLVISCO New
Orthopedic NASA Mattresses 25
Year Warranty Cost $1995,. sell,
$398 Queen; $498 King. All sizes
available. Fast Free Florida Delivery,
Original TempurPedic & Dormia from
$699. Guaranteed Best Price!
Electric 'Adjustables. 24hours. Toll
free 1-866-476-0289; Store
Numbers: Hillsborough 813-889-
9020; Pinellas 727-525-6500;
Sarasota 941-929-7570; Polk 863-
299-4811; Dade 305-651-0506;
Broward 954-364-4989. Member
BBB. www.mattressdr.com



NICE- LIKE NEW
Very Clean 28x64, FP, 3/2 $29,900
Beautiful, 16x80 3/2, $19,900
Like New 14x60 2/2, $12,900
Very Beautiful, Zone II, FP, 28x64,
3/2, built-in porch, $34,900
All have central heat/air
229-247-0060 35342twv





You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Myrtle at

386-362-1734
312239-F


-FOR RENT-
2 or 3 BR
Singlewide
mobile home,
Central H/A.
First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
No pets.
386-330-2567


31U0 US Hwy. u90, LaKe City, FL


4t a ime oaw415,Omd& ~0a 4


PAGE 2D, APRIL 25 26, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


WA


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


WC










* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS APRIL 25 26, 2007, PAGE 3D


362-1734 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE 1-800-525-4182


You are just a call away... call 1-800-525-4182, ext. 102 to place your ad FAX 386-364-5578


Mon. Fri. 8 a.m. 5 p.m. *You are just a click away... find the classified marketplace online at www.nflaonline.com


MERCHANDISE
c---------MERCHANDISE


ANNOUNCEMENTS PERSONAL SERVICES RECREATION




EMPLOYMENT EDUCATIONAL SERVICES REAL ESTATE FOR REI




BUSINESS SERVICES PETS REAL ESTATE FOR SAI





FINANCIAL SERVICES AGRICULTURE TRANSPORTATION



To Place Your Ad

Monday througli Friday by calling 386-362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182, faxing to 386-364-5578 or mailing to:
Classified Marketplace, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064



WE ACCEPT:" rrsPersnal C
1 L H00 money orders Personal Checks


We Will Help You

GAIN EXTRA ATTENTION
To Your Classified Ad On
The First Day It Runs!
With the


Logo in the Classified Marketplace


IF IFc3IC The

IT CA1_ u


h elbjlelps, u rctr
LE be al lerbjCa er, Ilck vanl,
aiel per- a Pit al tOo cle or b hoa




O .....n,, nn arabbdinp92 c 2 o
Tom ye or oat.


Your Classified Ad can

appear in 5 paid

newspapers:

The Suwannee Democrat

on both Wed. & Fri.,

XZ the Jasper News,

The Branford News &

The Mayo Free Press on

Thursday; a total of

15,200 issues weekly!

Increase your promotional reach and tap into
potential new markets... Ask about placing your
advertising message into: The Valdosta Daily
Times, The Thomasville Times-Enterprise; The
Lowndes Edition-Mailbox Post; The Thomas
County Buyer's Guide; or a network of over 20
other publications, serving over 30 counties; with
over 20,000 readers in South Georgia.
Ask about our
"Service Directory" rates


FLORIDA (id6) i- L",A : L *,.: i May..' 3.13
While Springs*.362, 364 Uve Oak* 397 White
I.,,. ',.' ,,), 'i,:p,, "4:. :. 1 Virli. (,',A
Dowling Park 752, 755,758 Lake City, 776
Luraville 792 Jasper 6842 Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch (Live Oak) 935 Branford 938 Jennings
S 961 Lake City. 963 Welborn 965 Lake City
GEORGIA (229) 219 Valdosta 224,225,226,
227,228 Thomasville 241,242,244,245,247,
249,251,253,257,259 Valdosta 263 Quitman.
268 Vienna 268 Lilly. 271,273 Cordele 282,
283,285,287 Waycross 293 Valdosta 324 Bedrlin
* 333 Valdosta 345 Nicholls* 346 Coolidge 359
Ambrose 362 Milan 363 Lumber City 365
Rochelle *367 Baxley. 375 Hazelhurst 377,378
Cairo 381 Douglas 382 Tt an 383, 384
Douglas 385 Rhine 386, 387 Tifton 389,393
Douglas 422 Pearson 423,424 Fitzgerald 433
Byromviile 449 Blackshear 455 Ray City 467
Abbeville 468 Ocila 472 Montezuma 472
Oglethorpe 482 Lakeland *487 Homerville* 498
Boston 528 Omega 532 Alapaha, 533 Enigma.
534 Willacoochee 535 Warwick 546 Lenox
.549 Sparks *559 Lake Park *567 Ashburn *574
Ocklochnee 594 Uvalda* 624 Pineview. 627
Unadilla* 632 Alma !637 Fargo 643 Rebecca
*648 Pits *649 Buena Vista *683 Meigs 686
ri ;,.,i,; 7 i. B r T6. E jr,,igrim T,.' -
'iorT,,,,P, ii s M ,-.,,tri 7i, ,,I. :i:-r ''8.L
833 Jacksonville 846 Smithville 853 Cobb.
859 Pavo *863 Blackshear *868 McRae 873
Moultie 874 Leslie *887 Richland *890, 891
Moultrie 896 Adel *899 Moultrie 924,928
Americus 929 Pinetta 938 Jennings. 941
Funston 973 Madison *985 Moultrie


eatum. E IN F illI:E AD : For Wednesday Publication11 a.m.,
our ad with a border | | | oe o n t Friday (pror),
only 4pO.SO | I r For Friday Publication, 11 -a.m.,
D A II f R 11A S Wednesday (prior).
We reserve the right to cancel any special offer Or promotion in the Classified Marketplace upon a 30-day notice.*


Miscellaneous
A+ POOL HEATERS Factory Direct:
Solar, Heat Pump or Gas Installed
or Do-It-Yourself Heater Kits. Free
Phone' Quotes. 1-888-754-2740
Tw2.SolarDirect.com
Lic#CWC029795/lnsured. Dealer
Inquiries Welcome!
DIRECTV Satellite Television, Free
Equipment, Free 4 Room Installation,
Free HD or DVR Receiver Upgrade
w/ Rebate. Packages from
$29.99/mo. Call 1-800-380-8939.
GIGANTIC MIRRORS Wholesale
jobsite leftovers. 48"x100"x1/4" (15),
$115/each. 72"x100"x1/4", (11),
$165/each. 60"x100", (8),
$145/each. Free-delivery. Anywhere.
Installation available. 800-473-0619.

Garage/Yard Sales
FOXBORO SUBDIVISION Annual
Neighborhood Yard Sales. Sat. April
28th, 8am. CR 136-WEST.
GARAGE SALE Fri 27th 7am-7pm,
Sat 7am-2pm. 3 Dining Room sets.
Furniture, Antiques, beds, lamps &
more.. McAlpin, 81st Rd, Follow
signs. 386-362-3582.
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
FRI & SAT 4/27 & 28TH. 518 Barclay
St. SW. Lots of clothes, household
items and more.

Boats/Supplies
CAROLINA SKIFF 2001, 19.8 ft.
long. 115 Yamaha motor, Minnkota
70 lb. 24V. Radio depth finder GPS.
$8500. Call 386-294-2613

























Mobile Homes

and

Land for sale.

Financed

by owner.


Ask for
Larry Olds.


386-362-2720


Campers/Motor Homes
FirstDay


WINNEBAGO 1985 Class A, 28',
85,000 miles with generator. Nice,
must see! $7200.00,386-362-3623
Apartments for Rent
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal to
advertise "any preference, limitation
or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability, familial
status or national origin, or an
intention, to make any such
preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial : status
includes' children under the' age of 18
living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of children
under 18.



EQUAL. HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain of
discrimination call HUD toll-free 1-



FOR RENT-

3BR,'2BA DWMH,

CENTRAL H/A.

FIRST MONTH'S

RENT PLUS

DEPOSIT TO

MOVE IN.

WATER, SEWER

& GARBAGE

INCLUDED.

NO PETS

386-330-2567
324464-F


MOWING BUSH HOGGING l
AND MUCH MORE *

FREE ESTIMATES '

1 4--4--j =W ~A-FTk14d:1=


800-669-9777. The toll-free number
for the hearing impaired is 1-800-
927-9275


DRIVERS
Class "A" CDL
Contractors 0/OS

HOME DAILY
Local Delivery Opptys Available For
National Transportation Company.
Clean'MVR'Age 23+, Strong
Customer Service Skills, & 1 Year
T/T Exp. Req'd.

904-781-1916
Cardinal Logistics
www.cardlog.com


Announcements

What Destroys Relationships? Answer pg 446 Buy and
Read Dianeiexs by L. Ron Ilubbard Send S8.00 to: lHubbard
Dianetics Foundation. 3102 N. I tibana Ave., TampaFl FL 33607
(813)872-0722,
Auctions

Auction 72+/- acres divided. Colquitt County. GA, Friday,
May 4, 10am. Prime development, beautiful home sites, mer-
chantable timber. (800)323-8388' www rowellauctions conl
10% BP, GAL AU-C002594.
Prime Florida Residential Real Estate; Homes, condos.
building lots. Cape Coral, Bonita Springs, Estero. Punta
Gorda, Naples. Auction: April 28. Preview online! (866)898-
6558 www prcnierrealestateauctions comr
Auction 164+/- acres divided. Prime farmland, cultivatable
acres, beautiful home sites. Ben Hill County, GA., Fri. May 4
@ 3prm. (800)323-8388 www rowellauctions corn GAL AU-
C002594.
Waterfront Condo AUCTION 5/12/07 2BR 2BA w/dock.
Exclusive Nobel Point, Pompano Beach, FL. Sold Absolute
at or above $290,000: Broker Cooperation
www.fisherauction com L. Fisher AU93; AB106 (800)331-
6620 xl6. Sale subject to all terms.

Automotive

Police Impounds for Salle Honda Accord 1994$4001! Nissan
Seitra 1994 $200! Ford Escort 1997 $700!1 for listings call
(800)366-9813 Ext.927 1.
$500 Police Impoundsl Cars From $5001 Tax Repos. US
Marshal and IRS sales! Cars, Trucks, SUV's, Toyota's. I londa's,
Chevy's., more! For listings Ca11l,(800)425-1730 s2384.

Building Supplies


M ETAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ buy direct from tnuttheturer.
20 colors in stock with all accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery Available.. (352)498-0778 Toll free (888)393-0335
code 24. www GuiltCostSunnIV coUm.
Business Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/day? 30
Machines. Free Candy All for $9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033. CALL US: We will not be undersoldl
Guys Get lHaircuts. Guys watch Sports. Every franchise
investment shoul.d-be so obvious. Recession proof. All casl
Full Training and Support. Financing available (800)872-
4247 / www SorlIClios cotn

VENDING ROUTE:Snacks. Drinks. All Bntuns, All Sizes.
Energy & iealihy Tool Gretl E'quiuicnlt, Gr eat S'uppor ll
Financing Available w/$7,500 Down. (877)843-8726, local
1bO#200)2-037.

Employment Services

Notice: Post Office Positions Now Available. Avg. Pay $20/
hour or $57K annually including Federal Benefits atd OT.
Get your exam guide now. (800)709-9754 EXT.5799 USWA
Fee Req.

Help Wanted

Drivers...ASAPI! 21 CDL Drivers Needed *36-43CPTM/
$1.20* Sign-On Bonus. $0 Lense New Trucks. Only 3 rmos
OTR req'd. (800)635-8669.
Ilurrleina. SSetont, is corning Become a trained Insuranee
Clatistrophic Chtims Aidjutster. Earn 1BIG31 money following the
nuajor storms. Log onto www jcbliiustler.blost~oLcom ,tf
dclniled informationo.
Driver-IIYNIM 'TRANSPORT needs qualified drivers far
('elntrIl Florida- Local Naitioal OTR positions. Food grade
innker. no hlinut,t. .no pumps, great bellncils,coipeilive pay &
nw equipment. (866)GO-DVNUMIM. Need 2 years experience.
Driver-CLASS-ACD ).DRIIVIRS- NowlliriugOTRtl cal
Drivers- New Equipmoent; Griet lenits.; Pi'cmiuni Pay Pack-
nge. Call Oakley lrnnspoit,. (877)484-3042.
I)river: DON"' JUST START IOUIJIt CARI 'It, S I AIT I I
RIGHT! Coispny Sponsored C'DL trainiig in 3 weeks. Must
be 21. Hlvce CDL? Tuition icianbursement! CRST. (8(10)0)17-
2778.

( Week ofApril 23, 2007


BUSINESSES


SERVICES


LAKE WOOD 1. O4d4" I
APARTMENTS IN RENi
RentalOAssistance HUD VAK o chr elcomeC
I, 2. 3, & 4 BR HC & Non- LIVE OAK 1,2 & 3 BRHC& Non-HC
2.3C Accessible Apar ents ., Accessible Apartments
Access At Quiet country living ( 11 n e#>

705 NW Drive. Live Oak, FL 2 bedroom duplex. 705 NWDri veOak,TL
386-364-7936 Call 362-3110 386-364-7936
TDD/TY 711 11 TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housine Opportunity 4 324475.F Equal Housing Opporuity -n
,; .' "





CLASSIFIErS WORK!


"Can You Dig It?" Heavy Equipment School. 3wk training
program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Tnrckhoes. Local job place-
ment. Start digging dirt Now. Call (866)362-6497 or
(888)707-6886.
Run Close to Home! $.43/mile! Excellent Miles! liHome week-
ends and during the week! New Equipmnent! Blue Cross/Blue
Shield! Detlal! 401kl HEARTLAND EXPRESS (800)441-
4953 vwww.leartlaudexprcss.con.

Homnes For Rent
HUD HOMES! 4BR/2BA S199/ol! Stop Renting! 5% dw, 20
yrs @ S% APR. 5BR/3BA Foreclosure! $317/mo! For Listing
(800)366-9783 Ext 5853.
3BR/2BA Foreclosure! 30000 l Only S238/Mo! 5% down
20 years @ 8% APR. Buy 6/BR S215/Mo! For listings
(800)366-9783 Ext 5798.

Homes For Sale
PALM HARBORUHOMESCertifiedModular& Mobile Home
Specialists, Call for FREE Color Brochures (300)622-2S32.

A 5/BR HUD! $39,900! Only S317/Mo! Won't Last! 5%
down 20.years @ 8% APR. For listings call (800)366-9783
Ext 5760.
4BR/2BA Foreclosure! $20,0001 3BR/2BA $14,900! More
I lomes Available now from $10.000! For listings (800)366-
9783 Ext 5796.

Instruction

HEAVY EQUIPMNENTOPERATORTRAINING FOR EM-
PLOYMENT: Bulldozers.3 ackhoes. Loaders, Dump Trucks.
Graders, Scrapers. Excavators; National Certification, Job
Placement Assistance; Associated Training Services
(800)251 -3274 w 2wcaIuiloncrao.com.

AMERICA'S DRIVING ACADEMY Start your Driving
Career Today! Offering courses in CDL A Low tuition fee!
Many payment options! NO REGISTRATION FEE!
(866)889-0210 in2o@it0erieasdrivingactdemy.com.
Ileavy Equipmient Opterator CERTIFIED. Hands on Train-
ing. Job Placemenl Assistance, Callll l Fre (866)933-1575.
ASSOCIATED TRAINING SERVICES. 5177 Ilomosassa
Trail, Lectanto, Florida, 34461.


Land For Sale


*LAND AUCTION* 200 Props Must ec Sold Low Down/
E-Z Financing, Free Catalog (866)554-3852
w3w.LANDAUCLQOVL .1m NRLL F ;ast:AB2509,
Bulzuk:AU3448, ,lohnston:AU3449, Miuk:AU3447,
AUCTION 2,7114/- Acres I)'ltded. Sat.. May 5, I 1:00 am,
Alkinso CLoutttyv. GA I ee is the pcl cct t 'ectvitiotul ptrop-
erty (or hie serious ltitt-r or serious lIad investor. This
untiqe property sells divided into 3 tracts tiro 634-1/- to
945--/- acres, 2,630 actes in Wellnt Rcscrve Conservation
Prognau,. extraordinary hultinIg and fisltung. I'lthe is 81 acres
nol iin conservation program, perect1 lor cabin,, or lodge. Pay
20% down. 10% buyer's pretiuitin. Call obr information
(800)479-1763, GAL#2034. Auction conducted by John
Dixon & Associates vww'.ioldiovn comt)
So. Central FL Private Gated Lakel'ront Consmintity was
$179,900 NOW 79,900 I to 3 aere lake access. Owner must
sell. Call (888t)320-8399 x 1242.

Miscellaneous

DIVORCE$275-$350*COVIERS children. etc. Only one sig-
niature required! excludess govt. Ites! Call weekdays
(800)462-2)000. ext.600. (,1m-6|pn) Alta Divorce. LLC. Es-
tablished 1977. *
AIIR.INIES ARE. IIIRING Train Ibr high paying Aviatilon
Maintenance Carecr. FAA approved program. Finalcial aid if
qualilled Jlob plalcinul assistance. ('Al.L Aviation Insti-
tlte of lMaitlcauce (88.)3.49-5387,
ATTENDI COL.11G' ONIlINE Iron ho 1 Iedietal hbui-
tess. paralegal, cotput|ilrs criinnil justice, J1ob picclnecnt
dassitsatcc Fit social aid alm, eoul~,crtIt ided it ,qtualilied.
C(Ull 6(86)858-2121! w ,w3. Jit'l' i atlclerl o3htlttm.
SUSPENI)C1I5S will pIattced "No Slip clip" Lifetie tr-
anlee. FRlli:l catalog (800)17)00-1515 'YWnslL-tlte .com,
IVANTEI: It0) IOMESTo SIwhot ltur New Lileti ne s lte
rior5 Pi7tl. Call Now ot, sel i )your hein quailile (8S00)96-
85,17. (l.ic.10CIt ()l(O I I)


Real Estate
AAH Cool Mountain Breezes! Murphy, North Carolina
Affordable Land. Homes, Mountain Cabins, on Lakes, Moun-
tains &Streams. FREE BROCHURE (877)837-2288 Exit
Realty Mountain View Properties ww-exitmurohv corn

BEAUTIFUL N. CAROLINA. ESCAPE TO BEAUTIFUL
WESTERNNCMOUNTAINS FREEColorBrochure & Infor-
mation MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES with Spectacular views,
Homes, Cabins, Creeks, & Investment acreage. CHEROKEE
MOUNTAIN GMAC REAL ESTATE...
cherokeemountainrealtv corn Call for free brochure (800)841-
5868.
ADIRONDACK- TUG HILL LAKES 30 AC Borders ADK.
Lake- S 169,900 10 AC- Tug Hill Lake- $69,900 88 AC-
Wildlife Pond/ Trout Strenam $159,900 25 AC- Lakefront
Central NY- $129,900 Coming Soon- Largest Adirondack
River lots w/waterfalls. Call Christmas & Associates (800)229-
7843 www landandcamos com, .
NC Gated Lakefront Community. Pleasantly mild climate
1.5 acres, 90 miles ofshoreline. Neveroffered before with 20%
pro-development discounts, 90% financing. Call (800)709-
5253.
GotNorth GA Mountain Fever? We HaveThe Cure... We can
Help You Find The Perfect Place Here. Sales and Rentals.
Toccoa Wilderness Realty & Cabin Rental, LLC.
www.ToccoaWildernessRealtvandCabinRental corn
(706)632-2606 OR (706)435-8735
NorthGeorgia4Sale@tds.net.
Land for Sale by Owner. South East Georgia. Private Financ-
ing. No Credit Check. Starting $198.00 monthly. (912)278-
7108 www blackwatcrrcserve corn
NC: Best buy in mountains! Owner financing, two acres
with spectacular view, paved road, restricted, Bryson City.
$45,000, $9,000 down. Call owner! (800)273-6213.
ww wildcatknob corn
COLORADO RANCH SALE 35 AC- S36.900 Easy Access,
sunset views. All utilities, surveyed. Financing available.
SCall owner today! (866)696-5263 x 2595.

LAKE PROPERTIES Lakefront and lake view homes And
parcels on pristine 34,000 acre Norris Lake in E. Tennessee
Call Lakeside Realty (888)291-5253 Or visit
ww\vw lokesiderealtv-t comn.
GA/ FL Border Huge Savings! 23.55 AC, only $99,900 (was
$124.900) Coastal region. Wooded, loaded w/ wildlife. Easy
drive to St. Sitmons Island! Subdivision potential CALL
NOW (800)898-4409 X 1178.

JUST $195.22/ MONTH* 1+ acres with FREE Boat Slips!
Nicely wooded lake access property in brand new premier
development oil spectacular 160,000 acre recreational lake
Prime waterfronts nvatilble. Call (800)704-3154, x 1113.
Price $34.900, *20% down, balance financed 30 years, 7,5%
fixcd. OAC

Coastal Georgia New. Pro- construction Golf Communtiity.
Large lots & condos w/ deepwatter. marsh, golf, nature views.
Gated, Golf, Fitness Center, Tennis. Trails. Docks. S70k's-
$300k. (877)266-7376. www coopersooint conl.
Coastal GA. 57.92 acres $199,9001 GA/ FL border. Mature
pines, abundant wildlife. Only an hour front Jacksonville. FL!
CALL NOW (904)206-5100 x 1195.
VIRGINIA MOUNTAIN CABIN New 3 BR log cabin with
loll on 5 acre mountaintop overlooking great big trout stream
near New River State Park and Gulax. must sell S299,500
owner (866)789-8535.
North Georgia Mountain Properties. Foryour freeguidecall
(877)635-6461 or to see entire book, visit
www nmretalestatcutidc coom and clickson front page picture.
Steel Buildings
STEEL BUILDINGS FACTORY Sale- As low as $3.89/
square t ot. Straight Wall Contmerinl Grade. 2.400 to 100,000
squamret feet. Gatagcs, Slhops. Strip Mulls, WaVrehouses, Mini-
SIoragcs, etc. Factory Erection Available. (800)720-6857,






Sr* i.- I,, ,Q 1 1, '1 l-l' II M r I LL' 4


5-


Double and

single wide

mobile homes

for rent on

their own lots

in the

Live Oak area.

Ask for

Larry Olds.

386-362-2720
__324377 F


I Catego


IllMIMillHMH


m


t Gee










PAGE 4D, APRIL 25 26, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS 3 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


362-1734 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE 1-800-525-4182


Dear Classified Guys,
After 15 years, my washing machine
finally quit. Just before the rinse
cycle it made a loud clanking sound
and never started again. It was clear
It was dead. It took me over an hour
to rinse the clothes by hand. And
that's not something I like to do with
my husband's dirty socks! When I
went to the appliance store, I was
surprised to find out that a good
washing machine was upwards of
$500 or more. And that price jumped
to over $1000 if you added the
matching dryer. I could live with the
new styles, but the cost was too
much for me. After all, it's a washing
machine, not a rocket ship. I see
them advertised in the classified all
the time, but I have a problem. It
seems very unhygienic to buy a used
washing machine. I mean, someone
else's dirty clothes were in it just like
my husbands socks. Who
knows what filth was left
behind? Tell me, should I
be concerned about the <'[
germs? Please help, the
laundry is piling up quick.

Carry: Sounds like you're worried
about other people's dirty laundry. But if
you can ring out your husband's dirty


_ Germ War


socks by hand, them buying a used
machine shouldn't be a big deal.
Cash: Viruses, bacteria and thousands
of other microorganisms are around us
everyday. You constantly come in con-
tact with them just by pressing an eleva-
tor button, turning a bathroom doorknob
or passing your credit card back and
forth to the cashier.
Carry: It's actually amazing that our
bodies fight off these germs on a daily
basis.
Cash: However, when buying a used
washing machine, you can relax. While
it is possible some residue was left
behind from a previous washing, it can
be cleaned and washed away. Today's
detergents, bleach and other disinfectants


are very good at removing germs from
clothing and the washing machine.
Carry: Otherwise, laundromats would
have a difficult time staying in business.
Their washing machines are used daily
by many different people.
Cash: After you buy a used washing
machine, simply run it through its cycles
a few times without clothing. Set it to
use hot water and add a high concentra-
tion of bleach or other disinfectant. A
few washings should remove any
unwanted germs. When it's complete,
wipe down the inside of the washer and
you're all set to go.
Carry: Before you know it, your hus-
band's socks will smell lemony fresh.
That is, until he wears them again!


'" ~-B


uFI-T I


Houses for Rent
BARN/PASTURE FOR RENT
Beachvill areal. 36x48 barn with fly
spray system, round pen, riding
arena, cross fenced pastures with T-
9 grass, owner.on site. Call 386-935-
1511
FirstDay
HOUSE FOR RENT 3BD/2BA 3 mi.
from Advent Christian Village.
$700.00 mo. 1st, last + deposit.
Open house April 28 from 2-4. Call
813-679-0980 or 386-658-1597
MAYO HOUSE FOR RENT 3Bd/2Ba,
+ Mother in law suite. $800 mo., 1st
and last. References. 2 mi. from town
Available immediately. Call 800-377-
5076
Mobile Homes for Rent
FirstDay
COUNTRY LIVING DOUBLEWIDE
On 1 acre. 3Bd/2Ba in Mayo, FL.
$500.00 mo. 1st, last + security
deposit.. No Pets. Call 386-754-
2679.
Vacation Rentals






North Carolina. Easy access, great
view, 10 min to Maggie Valley, 30 min
to Cherokee, 2 min to Parkway,
Mountain Stream with picnic area,
Fireplace, Sleeps 10. All Amenities.
$500/wk, $1600/mo. 386-330-4207
Lucy
TIMESHARE RESALES Sell today
for Cash! No commissions or broker
fees. Don't delay Go to
www.sellatimeshare.com or Call 1-
800-640-6886
Office Space for Rent
OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT In Live
Oak. Has approx. 1,300 sq.ft. For
further information call Poole Realty
386-209-1766
OFFICE WITH 2,100 SQ FT. Located
in -Live Oak for rent. For further
information call Poole Realty at 386-
209-1766
Homes for Sale
PALM HARBOR HOMES Factory
Liquidation Salel! Modular, Mobile &
Stilt Homes. 0% down when you
own your own land. Call for free
color brochure. 1-800-622-2832
Mobile Homes for Sale
FirstDay
MOBILE HOME 14x62
2 Bd/2Ba new floor & Carpet,
Remodeled. $7,500. 850-879-7095

1997 MOBILE HOME 24X40
2Bd/2Ba new floor & Remodeled.
$16,500. 850-973-2353


MOBILE HOME MOVER
State Certified, Call 386-755-1783
FREE ESTIMATES
WHY RENT? I can sell you a new
quad plex modular home, rent one
side out and LIVE FREE!

CASH TALKS I love cash deals, and
will give you the very best price on
New or Used MOBILE HOMES. I
really want your business 386-719-
0044

REDUCED FOR LIMITED TIME
2007 3Bd/2Ba doublewide $500.
down $396.58 per month.
INCLUDES setup, skirting, steps and
a/6 386-365-4774

OWN A NEW Manufactured Home or
MODULAR home for as little as
$500. down 386-288-4560

TWELVE PERCENT RETURN ON
YOUR MONEY GOOD
MORTGAGES FOR SALE (NO
BROKERS PLEASE) 100%
BUYBACK GUARANTEE CALL
STEVE @ 386-365-8549

FIRST TIME BUYERS PROGRAM
$2,500 DOWN AND $650 PER
MONTH! NO CREDIT NEEDED
FOR APPROVAL! 386-288-4560

NEW CUSTOM BUILT HOMES 900
to 4,000 sq ft. SINGLE OR 2 STORY
$2,500 DOWN! 386-303-1557

THREE BED/TWO BATH 10%
DOWN $595 MONTH OWNER WILL
CONSIDER FINANCING 386-288-
4560

LAND HOME PACKAGE $0 DOWN
If you want a. new home and have
OK credit 5.875% FIXED RATE
w.a.c. 386-303-1557

FACTORY DIRECT PRICES
ON MOBILE AND MODULAR
HOMES CALL RICK 386-719-0044

Move in FASTI New Modular
3Bd/2Ba. Home on land 20% down
and ONLY $836.51 mo. 386-288-
4560

HANDYMAN SPECIAL 3Bd/2Ba in
Deer Creek on huge lot 20% down
and ONLY $490.38 Month! SAVE
$20,000! 386-365-4774

SALE sale SALE! New doublewide
4Bd/2Ba $2,500 down and ONLY
$493.77 per mo! Includes SET UP,
Central a/c STEPS, skirting, SALES
TAX, TAG, TITLE AND CLOSING
COST! 386-365-4774.

OWNER FINANCE, I only finance
people who can NOT GET BANK
FINANCING! Example: NEW 4
Bd/2Ba DOUBLEWIDE home using
your paid for land as equity ZERO
DOWN and $789 per mo. 386-365-
8549.


Vacation Property,
FREE VACATION TENNESSEE
MTNS Free Vacation to visit our
mountain acreage community
overlooking the Tennessee River.
Call 706-657-7655*
A FREE BROCHURE At Western
Carolina Real Estate, we offer the
best Mountain .Properties in North
Carolina. Homes and Land
available. Call 800-924-2635.
www.WesternCarolinaRE.com
AAHI COOL MOUNTAIN BREEZE!
Murphy, North Carolina Affordable
Land, Homes, Mountain Cabins, on
Lakes, Mountains, Streams. Free
Brochure 877-837-2288 Exit Realty
Mountain View Properties
www.exitmurphy.com
ATTENTION INVESTORS!
Hernando Beach 3br/2ba/2car,
w/gulf access, appraised at $600,000
- sacrifice $379,000. 5 lots
Inverness $13,000/ea., 4 lots Dade
City $11,000/ea., & 1 home 10 acres
Dade City. 352-688-5761
BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAIN
PROPERTIES Western North
Carolina. Last of large land tracts.
See at eaglestar.net (search word -
Lares) Contact Michael 828-837-
2474
FLORIDA OCALA Great place to
live low taxes & insurance. Get 2-
free nights. 3/4/5 Br + in-law suites.
Under $200K 100% financing. 1-
888-800-0013
www.manddrealty.com
N.C. HOTSPRINGS. Gated
Community surrounded by Pisgah
National Forest! Clubhouse, hiking
trails, waterfall! Homesites from
$70K to $225K. Nature lover's
paradise 1-877-477-3473
www.FireflyMountain.com
N.C. / GEORGIA MOUNTAINS -
World's greatest views Homesites
starting $39,900. Land / Log home
package kits $99,900. Waterfalls,
creeks, rivers, lakes. Pre-
construction discounts. Limited
availability. 1-888-389-3504 x600.
NC MOUNTAINS New cedar chalet
nestled on 2.7 wooded .acres
$89,900 Mins to lake. Includes
decks, porches. EZ access, you
finish. Toll free 866-738-5522 Bkr
NC MOUNTAINS ... COOL COOL!
COOL! House on Pine Mountain
with 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, garage,'j
fireplace. $148,000 Buy Now, retired
later! Realty Associates (828) 430-
8888
NORTH CAROLINA Log Cabin
$99,900. E-Z to finish interior on a
acre site. Mountain homesites 1-8
acres w/dramatic views! .Paved
access, utilities. E-Z Financing. 828-
247-9966
THE BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAINS OF
N.C. Outstanding views, custom log
homes, creeks, wooded properties,
acreage, mini-farms, Vacation rental
get-a-ways Free brochure. Investors
Realty, Inc. 1-800-497-3334
www.investorsrealtyinc.com


UPSTATE NY HANDYMAN CABIN
5-acres-$59,900 Nice pond,
gorgeous woods, stonewall! 3 mi off
Rt 171 Priced way below market!
Owner terms Hurry! 877-892-5263
WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS Log
Cabin FSBO 1232 sq ft on 2+ acres
with nice stream $89,900. Views,
decks, easy access, needs finishing
828-286-1666 brkr

Buildings for Sale
JC'S BUILDINGS, GARAGES,
BARNS, CARPORTS Starting $595.
Galvanized Steel. 2 Styles 13
Colors. Free installation / quote on
any size. Florida certified 10year
warranty available. 386-736-0398; 1-
866-736-7308.
icscarportsandgarages.com
Lots
BEAUTIFUL TENNESSEE
MOUNTAIN LOTS, breathtaking
views high atop the Cumberland
Mountains. 2-5-10 acre tracts. River
access, bluff views, streams, virgin
like forest. Ideal for hunting, fishing
ATV, horseback riding. Near Dale
Hollow Lake, perfect for cabin
vacation home or permanent
residence. Utilities, paved roads.
Great investment or retirement
property. Owner financing tfom
$15,900. C rirallr ; loialed near
Nashville, Knox'ille, Chananooga.
931-839-2968, 888-939-2968

FirstDay
FOR SALE BY OWNER, CITY LOT
1/4 acre MOL. Great for SHIP
Program. $18,000.00 Call 800-401-
1625 or 386-364-1322

FOR SALE BY OWNER 2Bd/2Ba
Mobile Home on 2.1 acres. Garage
with office inside, like new
appliances. $59,000.00 Call 800-
401-1625 or 386-364-1322
TENNESSEE MOUNTAIN LOTS
.(24) 1/2 acres. Absolutely
gorgeous. Waterview overlooking
Cumberland River & Lake.
Sportsmen's paradise. Don't Get,
Blown Away! Introductory Pricing.
1-866-369-5247
www.DycusLanding.com
BSerina3@msn.com

Acreage
ARIZONA LAND LIQUIDATION!
Near Tucson, Football Field Sized
Lots. $0 Down/$0 Interest,
$159/Month ($18,995 total). Free
Information. Money Back
Guarantee! Toll Free 1-800-682-
6103 Op#10.
COASTAL GA. 57.92 AC $199,900
GA/FL border. Mature pines,
abundant wildlife. Only an hour from
Jacksonville, FL! Call Now 904-206-
5100 x1198
FLORIDA LAND Starting at $10,900
Financing Available. Over 100 Lots
available in Counties of Levy, Marion,
Clay, Calhoun, Putman & Highland.
Realtors & Investors welcome. 1-
718-797-0807
www.usalandventures.com


GEORGIA GLASCOCK CO. 186
AC $1,825/AC Wooded, paved
road, legendary hunting area, pine
can be thinned for income. 404-362-
8244 St. Regis Paper Co.
www.stregispaper.com
GA/FL BORDER HUGE SAVINGS!
23.55 AC, only $99,900 (Was
$124,900) Coastal region. Wooded,
loaded w/wildlife. Easy Drive to St.
Simons Island! Subdivision
Potential! Call Now 1-800-898-4409
x1180.
GEORGIA SE EMANUEL CO. 2-5
acre wooded lots. Site build only.
Horses welcome. Paved roads. 1-16
US1. Payments as low as $158/mo.
Low taxes. 912-585-2174
GEORGIA WARREN CO. 71 Acres -
$2,495/Acre Wooded, paved road
through the tract, keep one side &
sell the other. 404-362-8244 St.
Regis Paper Co.
www.stregispaper.com
KENTUCKY 100 acres, Exc.
hunting, farm income $200K. *Also
655 acres w/70ac lake. Beautiful
views! Hunting & fishing. Building
site, *Great Investments* Owner
270-556-3576


LAKE EUFAULA, ALABAMA Pre-
Construction Land Sale, Save,
$10;000. Saturday, April 28; 2007.
Horfresites start @ 5$59,990 -(Arer "
'Discount). Estate sites"'up to -3+
acres. Gated Community w/Owners
Clubhouse & Boat Slips. By
Appointment Only, call 866-880-2849
LAKE MARION S.C. 2 acres,
excellent building site. No Impact
Fee, low taxes and insurance.
$22,900 Owner Financing. 803-473-
7125.
LAND FOR SALE.
Middle Georgia.
Farm, hunting and timberland.
Call 478-984-4447 or 478-290-6435
LAND WHERE YOU LIVE
SUWANNEE LANDING
Offers resort style living in the heart
of original Florida. Amenities include
clubhouse, pool, hot tub, tennis, etc.
Taxiway lots start at $150,000 and
residential lots start at $75,000. Call
386-330-2446 or visit:
www.suwanneelanding.com
OHIO RIVER ACREAGE 260 Acres
w/3200 Ft of frontage on the
Muskingum River, hilltop property.
Just $2200/acre. Call 740-489-9146.
ONE HUNDRED & FIFTY ACRES
Older home, planted pines, Approx. 7
mi. SW of Live Oak, FL Total price
$1,350,000.00. Ph. 386-362-1143.
PENNINGTON TRAILS
An equestrian oriented development
complete with lighted riding ring,
common stable, gated, and miles of
riding trails. Five acre tracts start at
$79,900. Call 386-330-2446 or visit
www.penningtontrail.com
SO. CENTRAL FL Private Gated
Lakefront Community was $179,000
Now $79,900 1 to 3 Acre Lake
Access.' Owner Must Sell. Call 1-
888-320-8399 x 1241


TENNESSEE 1-3ac. homesites.
Premier Land Sales! Waterfalls,
lakes, bluffs, & utilities. Horseback
riding, golf, fishing, white water
rafting:. Owner Financing, low down.
Starting $19,900. 1-888-281-5456;
www.TNLots.com
TENNESSEE ACREAGE 5 Acres,
mostly wooded, mountain view.
Excellent cabin site. w/ city water.
River access. Near Crossville.,
$19,900. Owner Financing. 931-979-
1371
TENNESSEE!! MONTEAGLE-
SEWANEE, Beautiful Mountain
Properties. 600+ Acres; Tracts, 5
Acres & up. 4 miles from 1-24.
Gated & secluded! Gorgeous bluff &
creek. Wooded lots. George,
Timberwood Development Co., 423-
949-6887 www.timber-wood.com
Residential Wanted
ANGELO. BUYS HOUSES Cash
any condition. Handyman, fire,
distressed, vacant, occupied.
Anywhere in FL!. Apts. / Comm.,
residential. No deal too big/small.
Quick closing. 1-800-SELL-181; 1-
954-816-4363


WANTED: 20 HOMES To Show Off
Our New Lifetime Exterior Paint. Call
Now to See if Your Home Qualifies 1-
800-961-8547 iLcnCBC01O 111


Classified

Advertising

386-362-1734 eXt, 102

386-364-5578
e-mail
www.suwanneedemocrat.com

8am pm

We'd love to hear from you.

Classified

Marketplace
PO. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064


I I- m BBr"-o *Each Kit includes:
S. 3 Bright 11" x 14" All-weather Signs
'*m'i^f| ,, l ,| ^, Li Over 275 Pre-Priced Labels
I I,' .' Successful Tips for a "No Hassle" Sale
S* Pre-Sale Checklist
*i Sales Record Form




Run your Yard Sale in the

Wednesday North Florida Focus &

Friday Suwannee Democrat Classifieds

and get the Yard Sale Kit for FREE.

Deadline for placing your yard sale is Friday at 11:00 a.m.
-r


Each Kit Includes:
* 2 All-Weather Fluorescent "For Sale" Signs
* Successful Tips
"Get Top Dollar for Your Used Car"
Pre-Sale Checklist
Vehicle Options Window Display
E-Z Closing Forms
including Deposit Form & Bill of Sale


Run your Car For Sale classified in the Wednesday

North Florida Focus & Friday Suwannee Democrat

Classifieds and get the Car Kit for FREE.

Deadline for placing your ad is Friday at 11:00 a.m.

*Not valid with the $18.95 special 31,:,, F


Spin Cycle
While I was away on a business
trip, our washing machine broke.
My husband, who stayed home with
the kids, is not a Mr. Fix-It kind of
guy. Instead, he called the local
appliance store and immediately
ordered a new one.
The day after I arrived home, the
new machine was dropped off and
hooked up. I was trying to catch up
on the laundry when my husband
came in and pleaded for me to wash
his favorite shirt.
Jokingly, I told him to just wear it
inside out for the day. While I
laughed, he stood there holding his
shirt and replied, "I can't wear it
inside out."
To my surprise he continued, "I
already did that yesterday!"
(Thanks to Gina W.)



Sounds like a manly washing machine.


Germs.are everywhere. Most of us go
about our day without worrying about
them. However, for others, the fear of
germs can be debilitating. Mysophobia,
sometimes called "germ phobia", is an
anxiety disorder where people have a fear
of dirt or contamination. Even celebrities
such as Howie Mandel, host of the TV
show Deal or No Deal, suffer from the
disorder. But these people are not alone.
According to the National Institute for
Mental Health, more than 26% of the
population suffers from some sort of
anxiety or diagnosable mental disorder.
Efficiency
Many of us take for granted that we
.can wash an entire weeks worth of cloth-
ing with just a turn of a dial. That's all
thanks to the first rotary washing
machine, patented in 1858. Today we
have more choices than ever. If you're in
the market for a new machine, consider
this. While roughly 95% of the washers
sold are top loading, front-end loading
machines are typically more efficient.
They use 40% to 60% less water, 30% to
50% less energy, spin faster and use less
detergent.
*
Got a question or funny story? Call toll-free
at (888) 242-3644 or send to: P.O. Box 8246,
New Fairfield, CT 06812.


F


Get Your Yard Sale Kit



And Make Your Event a Success!


Get your CarFor. Sale Ki





* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


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PAGE 6D, APRIL 25 26, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS 3 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


362-1734 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE 1-800-525-4182


Your new career is waiting for you now! Check our employment listings, here and online at www.nflaonline.com


Help Wanted
FirstDay
AUTO BODY REPAIR TECH & PAINTER
Busy shop, good Pay & Benefits.
Apply @ "CLASS A" in Branford.
386-935-9334
C.N.A. NEEDED
Full Time with Benefits
3pm 11pm
Call Angela Akins
At 386-362-7860
Or Apply at
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston Street
Live Oak, FL 32064
EOE/DN/V/M/F.
CDL Drivers needed for local and
regional positions. A minimum of 2
years experience required. Drivers
home every weekend, avg. salary
$45-$50K per year. (386) 364-.
3250.
CLERICAL
Different Positions Available, All
Levels. Fax Resume to 386-755-
7911 or Call 386-755-1991 for an
app. Wal-Staf Personnel
FirstDay
COORDINATOR-INTERNATIONAL
STUDENT PROGRAM
Motivated self-starter. Enjoy teens &.
community service. Recruit host
families, supervise foreign high
school students. P/T, Flex w/travel
perks. Call Art Gillman at 1-800-555-
6211 ext. 416. www.pax.org
MH serv/repair
WAYNE FRIER
CORPORATE OFFICE
is now hiring for Mobile Home
Service and Used Home Repair
Position. Experience required. Call
Larry J. Olds for interview 386-362-
2720.
DELIVERY DRIVERS NEEDED
Cox Auto Trader is currently seeking
drivers to deliver our magazines in
Lake City, FL and surrounding Areas.


Computer knowledge helpful,
requires reliable vehicle, good driving
record, valid drivers license &
insurance. One day a week -
Thursdays. Pick magazines in
Madison. Call 386-590-1255
DIETARY AIDE PART TIME
Flexible Hours
Call Angela Akins
at 386-362-7860
Or apply at
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston Street
Live Oak, FL 32060
EOE/DN/M/F
FirstDay
Drivers
FABULOUS COACH LINES
HIGHLY MOTIVATED
PROFESSIONAL
OVERLY FRIENDLY
PEOPLE
CDL Required. Pax End a plus,
Good Driving Record Dealing with
fun groups on Charter Trips to
Exciting Places. PT/FT $125-
$185/day For information visit
FabulousCoach.com Or Call 1-866-
352-7295
FirstDay
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
BANK OF FLORIDA
has positions open for part-time
Tellers. Great opportunity for
individuals seeking part time
employment in a pleasant working
environment with good benefits.
Applicants must possess excellent
interpersonal skills, organizational
and computer skills and above
average math :skills. Previous cash
handling experience is required. You
may pick up an employment
application at any First Federal
Branch and forward to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029, Lake City,
FL 32056. IEqual Employment
Opportunity Employer.


HQM OF SURREY PLACE, LLC
is needing a FT Unit Manager.
Requirements include having a valid
FL RN license and 2-3 years
experience. A Full and
Comprehensive benefit package is
offered. Please apply in person at:
110 Lee Ave SE, Live Oak, FL 32064
or call 386-364-5961
INDUSTRIAL
New to Lake City or Live Oak? Tired
of looking for work on your own?
Various positions available/All Shifts,
Must be able to lift up to 70lbs.
Please call 386-755-1991 for appt
Drug Screens & Backgrd check req.
FirstDay
JOB OPENINGS

Paid training in welding, metal work,
,mechanics, and electronics.
Excellent pay and benefits with paid
relocation. Must be H.S. Grad, Age
17-34. For Interview Call 1-800-342-
8123 Mon-Fri.
LAFAYETTE APARTMENTS
Immediate opening for a manager,
32 hours per week with benefits.
Need office, computer, and people
skills. Drug-free workplace, must
have valid Dr. License &
transportation. Some travel required.
Applications may be picked up at
East 3rd Street & Main (176 SE Land
Avenue) or call 386-294-2720.
TDD/TTY 711. Equal Opportunity
Employer.


LAUNDRY POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Flexible Hours
Call Angela Akins
at 386-362-7860
Or apply at
Suwannee Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston Street
Live Oak, FL 32060
EOE/DN/M/F


MAINTENANCE DIRECTOR
Re-advertising of opening. Seeking
individual with knowledge and
experience in electrical trouble
shooting, blue print reading, basic
plumbing, and building maintenance.
A/C, heating experience along with
repair knowledge for kitchen
equipment preferred. One man
department. Must be self starter.
Contact: Richard Wisdahl, Lafayette
Health Care Center, 512 W. Main St.,
Mayo, FL 32066 386-294-3300
Maintenance
HELP WANTED maintenance man
with knowledge of plumbing, electric
and carpentry. Tools required.
Transportation a must. Drug free
workplace. Call (386) 330-2567

FirstDay
NEWSPAPER CARRIER NEEDED
for Fort White/ Branford area. Deliver
the Gainesville Sun newspaper, 7
days per week, home delivery and
single copy. Pays approx. $325.00
per week. Contact Donna @ 352-
338-3148 for more information.
Reliable car a must.
FirstDay
Nurse Practitioner
SHAFA CLINIC, PA
Part time/Full time Nurse Practitioner
for Internal Medicine for Rural Health
Clinic in Live Oak. Please send CV to
P.O. box 38; Live Oak, FL 32064 or
Fax 386-362-6403


OFFICE MANAGER FT position for
experienced office manager; PC
experience w/MS Office required.
Must possess strong communication,
customer service, and organizational
skills. Prior experience in supervision
preferred. Must be (or be eligible for)
Florida notary public commission.
HSD or equivalent required; AA or
office admin certificate preferred.
Good understanding of FDOT
passenger transport requirements
helpful. Benefits include health,


dental, life, disability, savings, AFLAC
supplemental policies, access to
onsite daycare and fitness facilities.
EOE; Drug Free Workplace, Criminal
background checks required. Apply
in person at ACV Personnel
Department Mon thru Fri, 9:00 a.m.
until 4:00 p.m., Carter Village Hall,
10680 CR 136, Dowling Park, FL; fax
resume to 386-658-5160; or visit
www.acvillage.net.

FirstDay
REGISTERED NURSE
Avalon Health Care Center is
currently accepting applications for a
Unit Manager position.
Competitive Salary and Excellent
benefit package. Interested
applicants please apply in person or
fax resume to attention of Human
Resources:
Avalon Health Care Center
1270 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
Call 386-752-7900 or fax 386-752-
8556. EOE
FirstDay
WESTWOOD BAPTIST CHURCH
is currently accepting applications for
paid NURSERY WORKER..
Experience preferred. Applications
available in Church Office at 920
SW 11th Street in Live Oak between
the hours of 8:00-5:00, Monday-
Friday.
FirstDay
OPS MUSEUM GUIDE
PART TIME $6.70 PER HOUR
The Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park, located in White
Springs, is seeking an outgoing
individual for the position of OPS
Museum Guide. This is a part-time
position that requires working every
other weekend, every other
Monday and Tuesday and some
holidays. No benefits are provided.


Duties include, but are not limited to
receiving and conducting visitors
through the visitor center; giving
interpretive and informative talks
about various exhibits; relating the
history of the area and the park;
providing information about park
facilities and events; performing
janitorial duties and other related
duties as required. Training provided.
A Class E valid driver's license is
required.
A resume or State of Florida Job
Application, which may be obtained
from: www.peoplefirst/myflorida.com
must be submitted to:
Elaine McGrath, Events Coordinator
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State. Park
Post Office Drawer G
White Springs, Florida 32096
Deadline for submission is
May 7, 2007.
SOCIAL SERVICES OPENING
Full Time With Benefits
Must have BS/BA
Sociology, Social Work
Or Health Care Related Field.
Call Angela Akins at
386-362-7860. Or apply Suwannee
Health Care Center
1620 E. Helvenston St
Live Oak, FL 32064
EOE/D/V/M/F

SECURITY OFFICERS
Class D License required
FT & PT 10p to 6a $8.25 hr
Apply www.sfi.appone.com or
Call 721-9121


RFP FOR CUSTODIAL SERVICES
contract at North Florida Community
College. Information available on
website at http://www.nfcc.edu


... .... .. ,' *. -. ... ..; -,', .. ; .'.',,,.: ,,*- '.' 7 ..,. ",., .,,. -_ -. ,*.s-tr4Si,,, ;.i. ,.-,-...... '^, ,S.,...^^,

These local businesses are here to ake o care of
SKI 0TE.4I ....

Pint TL 4/.


TO PLACE AN AD, CALL (386) 362-1734. DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.Mf


omez wij L tl id i., ai ...







386-294-3921,
We are located r.ghl on of US Highway 27. Mayo. FL
Our mission is to proL i.Je professional quality healthcare services
to Your loved ones in a hoie-li e setting


BC: 1255151
Custom Homes


Tracd
Wol


PH: 386-697-3650
PH: 386-963-3723


tor I, ,:ll.:, '.,
AO wuia fttKn


Cv Mark Wilkinson, Owner
20+ years Experience


Residential
Commercial


METAL ROOFING
PAHEL A ID COMPONENTS
WERE THE MANUFACTURER



232 SE INDUSTRIAL PARK CIR,
Mayo, FL 32066
386-294-1720
25 to 30 Years Metal Finish Warranty








0. Bryer's Paving
Blacktop, Concrete, Seal Coating,
Gravel. Driveway's



386-314-2095

I1-800-917-7022


DUNCAN TIRE & AUTO
"Complete One Stop Service For Your Vehicle"
Alignment Specialists



24 HOUR TOWING
62-4743 1-888-362-2568
US 129 North @ Hamilton Ave.
IV LEN A. DUNCAN


CDL TRAINING
DARE TO COMPARE!
-.-. DAY/EVENING
S'' CLASSES
...' Sage@LCCC
-Classes every
3 weeks
LA, '.., HM866-522-2669
*I "1 1 -- r 386-754-4405

LAKECITY@SAGESCHOOLS.COM J


TO PLACE AN


AD, CALL


(386) 362-1734


DEADLINE IS


FRIDAY AT


2:00 P.M.


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* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


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These local businesses are here to take good care of you.


TOPLACE AN AD, CALL (386) 362-1734. DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M.


9 -mm


Trees. Trimmed or Removed Firewood Affrdamles
Licensed & Insured Free Estimates A ordable SamGutters
SSatisfaction Guaranteed
TEE W O R K I Specializing In: Carl Kirk
TR EE W O R K- Seamless Gutters .0, i 386-776-1835
Bucket Truck and Climbing Soeait & Fasia C Cell
S0269& 386-209-2740
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES E-4.t/IL) OilVNED & OPERATED


ABBEY MINI STORAGE Ce Metal Roofing LIVE OAK
All New Units Qualit Metal Roofing & Accessories At Discount Prices!! M INI ST ORAGEiJ
5X15 5X20 10X15 10X20 15X20 3'widegalvalume Cut to your desired lengths! 5x15 5x20 10x15 10x20
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd. 3 Ymde painted Delivery Service AvailableO
2'Rwrde 5-v Ask about steel buildings CLNIATE CONTROLLED STORAGE
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak G t In 5x5 5x10 10x10 10x20
3 4Gulf Coast Supply &Mfg. Inc. Units located on Gold Kist Road
364-5300 CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-393-0335 Rental Ofce: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-6626


1TCCHARD
Skid Steer Brian
SScrvic e Pritchard
S_. rvDAYSFort White,
'7 DAYS Florida
% A WEEK SERVICE
Lighl Land Clearing Culverts "Brush & Debris Removal
Trenching Driveways Fill Dinrt Lime Rock
Trash Removal Down Tree Removal Demolition
gTT':T.T:"T" nT'I


Plantation Shutters APARTMENTS
Call today for your IN LIVE OAK
Free Estimate
11e bring the showroom to you Quiet country living 2 bedroom dupl
git 1 / 4 i 1 rt


386-208-0604 877-4BLIND1


Rev's Mowing
386-855-0111
Mike WUirt, Owner
Residential and Commercial
"Free Quotes"
Mowing Edging
Trimming Weeding
No Job to Large or to small
Call To-day!
MOWING ANDMOR 1


Stump G iding Bush Hogging Landclearing Hauling
Su p Gri iI Stump Removal *Discing 'Fencing

BILL'S BACKHOE
& LAND CLEARING
0 | FREE Estimates
W 612150 196th Terrace
Jim Sellers 386-776-2522 (386) 364-1418 O'Brien, FL 32071


2


SERVICEHONORING'
TH OLE RL


(_ ljr, 'Sena t- llfth Qualirt Prices
i), r Se icet i, d Repair Spec'iiah lt
Drigger's Heating,
Air Conditioning
and Refrigeration
Residential and Commercial
1803 E ergreen. ve. (386 1364-5734
Lise Oak, FL 32064 Clark Driggers. Owner
License # CAC025404 ... p '.


W Commercial & Residential
WB U ILD Custom Building
Remodeling &
Renovations
D E K S AD Roohting All Types
Footings & Foundations
PORCHES Anthon:
Metal roofing, wood, vinyl, Building & R
chain link fencing CBC1252728
Call 386-209-1073 :.i19-
A:Fax 386-362-1199


Professional
pressure washing,
painting, gutters,
water seal,
roof coatings, Vinyl
siding and skirting
Call 386-209-1073


y
9ooti


Sheet Metal & Copper 1 11
Screen & Patio Enclosures
Roof Inspections
WindowsLeak Repair. s4 GENERATIONS OF EXPERIENCE"
Custom Cupola 24 HR. EMERGENCY PUMP SERVICE
Sullivan I l


ng Contract


r
CQC 1326357


15708 58th Terrac
Live Oak. FL 3206


a


Well Drilling


904 X uwnne v


3-I3


HOWARD Stay on Top of all your Tree
iHOWAR D E-LIMB-INATORS, INC. Tri m
E-MB-I TORS,IN Trimming & Removal Needs with
SEPTIC TANK SERVICE, INC. Complete Tree Seice
SiAEROBIC SYSTEMS Licensed & Insured ".
*PUMP OUT SERVICE Owners:
SPRE CAST SEPTIC TANKS Keidi & Glenda Hudson i .
DRAIN FIELDS RELAID 21653 W. Shekiah Place ON TOP TREE SERVICE
"PORTABLE REST ROOMS" O'Brien, FL 32071 Licensed & Insured
P. BOX 180 (386) Phone 386-935-1993 "'
Braniord. FL 300 935-1518 Fa\ 386-935-3321 Rodn 386-623-0298
www.howardandsonsseptic.com Rodney 386-623-0298


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TOI, P-L A'CIF' tr', A E),
O OPLACEAN D,,

CALL (386) 362-1734

D EALINE IS

FRIDAY AT.2:00 P.M.


L -e r z -. fo Jo 59 % 1') 7 ,; -
Office (386) 364-5045
Mobile (386) 362-9178
Michael Guenther, ...,


Interior
Exterior
Drywall
Wallpaper
Licensed
Insured
Pressure
Cleaning
Site
Clean
Up


j .'r U -%V U Y-r U -1r U U

SDoors/windows
Drywall,
Cabinets,
vanities,
Tile, Carpet
Custom closets
Blinds & molding
Call 386-288-9264


ORTH FLORIDA FOCUS APRIL 25 26, 2007, PAGE 7D


Richard's Logging
I buy hardwood trees,
pine, cypress, large &
small tracts.
386-752-1231 (Home)
386-433-0712 (Mobile)


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S362-1 734 CL-SSIFIED MARKETPLACE- 1- 800I--525-4I-182----

362-1734 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE 1-800-525-4182


FirstDay
PART-TIME LIBRARY AIDE II
LEE PUBLIC LIBRARY
Madison County is currently seeking
applicants for the position of regular
part-time Library Aide II at the Lee
Public Library. The applicant will work
approximately 8 hours per week
regularly and also be used as a
substitute during other days of the
week when needed. Minimum
qualifications include graduation from
a standard high school, ability to type
and experience with Internet and
computer software. Library
experience is desired. Salary is
$6.80 to $10.24 per hour depending
on qualifications and experience.
Interested applicants may obtain an
application at the Lee, Greenville or
Madison Public Libraries, or at the
Suwannee County Administrative
Services Department, 224 Pine Ave.,
Live Oak, FL 32064, telephone (386)
362-6869. Applicants are
encouraged to submit resumes,
letters of reference and other
biographical information with their
applications. All applications must be
returned to the Administrative
Services Department in Live Oak.
Position will remain open until filled.
Successful completion of a drug test
is a condition of employment.
EEO/AA/V/D.

FirstDay
OPS PARK ATTENDAN
PART TIME- $7.50 PER HOUR
The Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park, located in White
Springs, is seeking an individual for
the position of OPS Park Attendant.
This is a part-time position that
requires working some weekends
and holidays. No benefits are
provided.
Duties include, but are not limited to;
performing janitorial duties and
housekeeping of the Suwannee
River Wilderness Cabins, and other
related duties as required. Training
provided.

A Class E valid driver's license is
required.
A resume or State of Florida Job
Application, which may be obtained
from: www.peoplefirst/myflorida.com
must be submitted to:
Sandra Cashes,
Assistant Park Manager
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park
Post Office Drawer G
White Springs, Florida 32096
Deadline for submission is
May 2, 2007.


Want To Work in N. Florida?
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Live Oak, Suwannee County, FL
Due to growth we have new
employment opportunities in our
modern poultry operations.
*Examples of available jobs:
Deboner: $9.46
Packers: $8.91
Warehouse: $9.26
Night Sanitation: $9.26
Live Hangers: $11.40
Maintenance: $9.20-$14.00
*Includes Perfect Attendance
Bonus of $1.05/hour
Successful candidates must be
able to perform the essential
functions of the job with or without
accommodations, and be legally
authorized to work. Will train.
Overtime work available daily and
weekend. Medical and life
insurance, dental, vision and
prescription .drug programs, paid
vacations, paid holidays, credit
union and more.
Apply Now!!!
PILGRIM'S PRIDE
19740 US Hwy 90 W.
Live Oak, Florida 32060
English 386-208-0205
Espanol 386,208-0190
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
EOE-AA-M-F-V-D

APPLICATIONS also ACCEPTED
Employment CONNECTIONS
LOCATIONS:
1416 N. Ohio Ave. 200 W.Base
Live Oak, FL Madison, FL
FOOD SERVICE SUPERVISOR
for Correctional Feeding Program
with experience in food production
-'and sanitation. Clean background &
Drug screening required. Call Ms.
Alma Howes 386-364-3782 For
application and interview


FULL CHARGE BOOKKEEPER,
DISPATCHER and CLASS A
CDL OTR DRIVERS
heeded, two (2) years experience
required. Health insurance,
retirement, & paid.vacation.
Call (386) 294-3411 To apply in
person. Drug Free WorkPlace.


FirstDay
LICENSED 4-40 OR 2-20 CSR
To work personal lines in a local
insurance agency. Group health &
group life coverage, retirement plan,
paid holidays, vacation, and sick
leave provided. Experience with
applied systems agency
management system helpful. Call
386-364-3762, anytime.


DRIVERS LCT WANTS YOUI
OTR drivers, solos or teams. 6
months experience & CDL-A / HAZ
required. Full benefits package.
2003-2005 Equipment. Call 1-800-
362-0159 LCTransportation.com
SECURITY ALARM DEALERS,
CCTV Installers: Increase Cash
Flowl Perform local service &
installations for nationwide alarm
company. Call Safe Security, 1-800-
669-7779 ext. 238 for details.

Autos for Sale
CAMPER-'93 JAYCO sleeps 6,
chevy 350 engine.. 56,000 mi. on
motor and built in generator 1650 hrs
on it.
$10,000 OBO.386-209-0505
FirstDay
FORD ESCORT 1996 engine
trouble, great shape otherwise, good
paint, good interior, 4 new tires, good
radio/cd. Asking $700.00. 386-776-
1565
FORD MUSTANG. LX 1993, 5.0 L
high output engine, auto,
flowmasters, ponys 80k miles,
$10,000 OBO 386-854-0211

Trucks for Sale
CHEVY '05, SILVERADO CREW
CAB. 4WD, 32K miles. Tow pkg.
Rhino Liner. Never used for work.
Cover over Bed. Like newly
$23,750.00 Call 386-362-8609 or
386-362-3526
DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
2004. 38,900 miles. SIvr-Mettalic.
Good Condition. $18,000 Call 386-
362-4863
Vans for Sale
DODGE VAN 1990 metal shelves,
good tires, good condition. $2,000.
Call 386-208-5653 or 386-294-2613

To place


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call Tami at


386-362-1734


Job List
AVON GENERAL INFO Earn Extra today!
$$$! 1-800-796-2622 Ind.sls.rep.


Plans underway for 'huge'



Civil War encampment


By Katie Farrell
CNHI News Service
AMESBURY, Mass. -
Last year's "Raise the Arm!"
Civil War Encampment was
barely over before Paul
Jancewicz began planning
this year's event: a two-day
festival that is expected to
draw thousands of people to
Amesbury over a summer
weekend.Though the event is
six weeks away | set for June
2 to 3, at Woodsom Farm I
Jancewicz called the months
of preparing to bring the
large-scale exhibit to Ames-
bury "intense." Jancewicz,
who is organizing the event
with Lars Johannessen and
Steve Klomps, said they are
preparing for as many as 500
re-enactors, and no fewer than
300, over the course of the
weekend. A camp will be set
up at Woodsom Farm with
tents where the participants
will stay."
For this area, it's huge,"
Jancewicz said. "It's probably
the biggest (re-enactment) to
occur in this part of Massa-
chusetts. We haven't been do-
ing much Civil War re-enact-
ing up this way."
The theme this year "'Two'
Arms!" continues last year's
effort to raise funding to re-
store the 11th Massachusetts
Infantry monument in Gettys-
burg, Pa. The statue was van-
dalized, toppled and pieces
were stolen, including the
arm. The name is also meant
to pay tribute to Amesbury
being the birthplace of two
local abolitionists, William
Lloyd Garrison and John
Greenleaf Whittier, Jancewicz
said. The theme also relates to
the fact that it is the second


gathering and is meant as a
play on the "To Arms!" re-
cruitment call for volunteers
during the Civil War, he
added.
Proceeds from this year's
event will again go toward
"raising the arm" at Gettys-
burg and monument preserva-
tion, Jancewicz said. Last
year, the event raised $2,500
toward repairing the broken
statue.
"For such a small commu-
nity, that's a great thing,"
Jancewicz said. "They were
extremely grateful."
The re-enactment will be
held rain or shine and is free
to the public, but donations
will be accepted. Events be-
gin at 9 a.m. Jancewicz is still
planning the final schedule of
events, but programs will in-
clude battle re-enactments,,
drill and weapon demonstra-
tions, living history presenta-
tions and period-based song,
and poetry ceremonies. Con-
cessions will be sold by the
Bartlett Museum.
Re-enactors will come from
all around New England,
Jancewicz said, including
Connecticut, Rhode Island,
Vermont and Maine. The New
England Brigade and The
Liberty Greys are among the
groups that will attend to take
part in the battle re-enact-
ments. Historical figures will
likely be portrayed by re-en-
actors, including Robert E.
Lee, Ulysses S. Grant, and
perhaps even Abe
Lincoln.Booths will be set up
displaying and selling replicas
of items from the Civil War
era, Jancewicz said. Local or-
ganizations, including the
Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts,


S..Weird Al Yankovlc............ May26

-. ...-.. .. ."" -, Steve M iller Band ............ M ay 27
S.Gretchen Wilson ............. June 2
All Concerts VREE with park admission

Ss>I -rs d by=@BELLSOUTH I I\ }


are slated to help out during
the day. Jancewicz, a high
school history teacher, said
some of his current and for-
mer students will also be at-
tending the re-enactment. Of
course, as with any large out-
door event, one item of cloth-
ing is very important I
Jancewicz cautioned partici-
pants to wear a good pair of
shoes. "People should plan on
walking," he said.
Organizers are hoping to
bring in a shuttle to bring
people to the different battle
scenes, as well as around to
Amesbury's museums or his-
torical sites, but no definite
plans have been made.
The Newburyport Five
Cent Savings Bank, the Prov-
ident Bank and SPS New
England are sponsoring the
Civil War Re-enactment. For
more information, e-mail His-
toricusrex@yahoo.com or vis-
it
http://www.cwevents.org/Am
esbury/Amesbury.html.
Katie Farrell writes for The
Daily News of Newburyport,
Mass.



So long, and

thanks for all

the pollen
Bi Sti Hutson
352-392-0400
It's potentially the
biggest mystery in natur-
al science today, and
finding answers means
more than saving our
honey supply
Across the globe, hon-
eybee colonies are dying
in near-epidemic num-
bers v, ith no knowxv
cause. Guesses at what
may lie at the root of the
culling range from new
viruses to radiation from
cell phone towers. How-
ever, University of Flon-
da's Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences
(UF/IFAS) researchers
say that the die-offs are
most likely a culmination
of man-made effects-and
potentially a potent warn-
ing for our own -future.
"'This is absolutely
bizarre in the fact that
such a widespread-and
potentially devastating-
event is taking place, and
we have 'yet to be able to
point out a likely cause,"
said Jamie Ellis, a UF as-
sistant professor of ento-
mology and bee ecology
expert. Ellis says the die-
off is most likely the re-
sult of several factors in-
cluding, but not limited
to: genetic weaknesses
inadvertently bred into
bees over time, parasite-
spread pathogens, side
effects of pesticides, and
environmental pollutants.
"The fact that this is a
cumulative effect shows
that it's not just a prob-
lem with the bees." Ellis
said. "It's an environ-
mental issue as well-the
bees are just the tip of the
icebeig."
Ellis is finishing an in-
formational document on
bee colony collapse dis-
order for honc.bce pro-
fessionals, and is avail-
able for media inter-
views. For more intbonrma-
tion on bees as "bioindi-
cators" of human health,
you may also contact
Gabriela Chavarria, sci-
ence director of thIe Nat-
ural Resource Defense
Council at
gchavarm ia(a!nrdc.org.


Fo i movie infoinition
on honeybees, contact
Volusia Counts extension
agent Dana Venlick 3S6-
S 2 2 5 7 7 8.
dvenricki, tftl.edu


I


PAGE 8D. AbPRIL 2.5 26, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


E CLASSIiFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA













Cape May: America's oldest seaside resort


By Dave Zuchowski CNHI News
Service
NEW CASTLE, Pa. On our
trip through New Jersey to Cape
May, a friend and I drove right
into a nor'easter.
The cold, windy and wet storm
off the Atlantic meant an arduous
drive along rain-soaked roads in
the dark. After, our cozy suite in
the Montreal Inn was very wel-
coming. Through the plate glass
doors leading out to the balcony,
we could see the surf pounding
its way on shore, driven by 30
m.p.h. winds.
Famished after our travels, we
headed to the Pilot House
Restaurant, a seafood eatery in
the center of the town's historic
core, where we sat next to a gas
lit fireplace, sipped a Chocolatini
(a mix of Stoli vanilla vodka and
Godiva chocolate liqueur) and
made our menu selections. (I can
still almost taste my wonderful
tuna wasabi on soba noodles with
crispy, deep-fried spinach).
Fortunately, the next day the
rain let up and the sun warmed
the picturesque beach community


to a comfortable mid-60s, afford-
ing us a perfect opportunity for
taking a walking tour of the his-
toric district offered by the Mid-
Atlantic Center for the Arts.
Founded by a Dutch explorer
named Cornelius Mey in 1620
(the British later anglicized the
spelling to Cape May when they
later took 'over the colony), the
town of approximately 4,035
year-round residents swells to
more than 100,000 in the summer
months.
Tourists have known about the
oceanfront town since the 1700s,
and, by the 19th century, Cape
May had built a reputation as one
of the nation's finest resorts.
By 1970, though, Cape May
was in such bad shape largely
because the automobile gave vis-
itors an entire gamut of new des-
tinations to choose from de-
velopers had plans to raze many
of the old homes to build tract
housing. Luckily, people of fore-
sight began restoring the old
buildings and, today, Cape May
has the nation's second-largest
collection of Victorian homes,.


trailing, only San Francisco.
By 1976, the town's entire cen-
tral core was designated a Na-
tional Historic District. Ever
since, tourists have been coming
to enjoy not only the town's ar-
chitectural splendors, but also its
thousands of acres of wetlands
and natural areas, sandy beaches
and fishing for the more than 40
salt water species that inhabit the
ocean and Delaware Bay.
The area is also considered one
of the top 10 birding hot spots in
North America, drawing birders
from all over the world during
migration season.
Following our walking tour, we
poked into the shops along Wash-
ington Street Mall, a pedestrian
street pleasantly devoid of traffic.
As if we hadn't already walked
enough that morning, we then
headed to the Cape May Light-
house.
Built in 1859, the still-operat-
ing'structure is 157 feet, 6-inches
tall, and we were determined to
climb to the top every one of the
199 steps in its cast iron spiral
staircase. The effort was worth it,


however, because the lofty view
of the town, beaches and ocean is
spectacular.
Almost as exhilarating was our
walk along the trails that lead out
into the marshes surrounding the
lighthouse. The tranquility and
beauty of the landscape with its
reeds, willows and grasses was
truly memorable.
, We capped the day with
gourmet dinner in the Ebbitt
Room at the Virginia Hotel, a re-
stored 1879 landmark that's won
awards and kudos for its cuisine
and wine list. While listening to
the soft piano music of Steve
LaManna coming from the fire-
place lounge, we dined on execu-
tive chef Andrew Carthy's grilled
Gulf shrimp with white bean
puree, eggplant- caponata and
oregano vinaigrette and bacon
wrapped halibut with artichoke
and squash barigoule, roasted
tomatoes and swiss chard.
It definitely made us forget
about the previous day's
nor'easter.
Dave Zuchowski writes for the
New Castle (Pa.) News.


IF YOU'RE GOING: For more in-
formation on Cape May. call the Cham-
ber of Commerce at (609) 884-
5508.For more information about
walking tour of the historic district of-
fered by the Mid-Atlantic Center for
the Arts, call (800) 275-4278.For a
place to stay, the Montreal Inn. Beach
Street at Madison, has private balconies
overlooking the ocean, a heated pool,
whirlpool, health club, sauna, game
room, mini-golf and full service restau-
rant. Call (800) 525-7011 or visit
www.Montreal-lnn.com.For a place to
dine. the upscale Ebbitt Room at the
Virginia Hotel, 25 Jackson SL, features
creative dishes are prepared with the
freshest of ingredients. The ambiance is
both romantic and elegant. Call (800)
732-4236 or visit
www.VirginiaHotel.com.The Pilot
House Restaurant. 142 Decatur St., is a
local favorite also popular with the
tourist trade. More casual and family
oriented, chef Mark Stillwagon's eclec-
tic menu specializes in seafood and
steak but also lists gourmet burgers,
sandwiches and salads. Call (609) 884-
3449.
Copyright 1999-2006 cnhi, inc.


Treasured Anne Bradstreet manuscript returns to town


By Drake Lucas
CNHI News Service

NORTH ANDOVER
,Mass. A historical
document will make its way
home to North Andover for
the first time in more than 30
years.
The only surviving hand-
written Anne Bradstreet
manuscript will take a trip
out of its climate-controlled,
secure case at the Houghton
Library at Harvard
University and go on display
in the Lehman Art Center at
Brooks School.
"The Bradstreet
manuscript is tiny, but
irreplaceable," said Lehman
Art Center Director Michael
McCahill.
Bradstreet is considered
the first American female
poet to be published. She


came to America in 1630 and
eventually settled in North
Andover, then known as
Andover.
Her brother took her
poems to England, where
they were first published in
1650 as a collection titled
"The Tenth Muse." While
she was known for her
intellectual poetry in her
time, Library Trustee Mary
Ellen Osgood said it is
Bradstreet's poems about
daily life that people can
connect with now.
She wrote about her love
for her husband, a fire that
destroyed her house and her
thoughts on family.
Bradstreet is not as widely
known as some other poets,
but interest in her was
reignited during the feminist
movement.
Bradstreet wrote about the


difficulty of pursuing art in
the Puritan community
where she lived: "I am


obnoxious to each carping
tongue,/ Who says, my
hand a needle better fits."
Stevens Memorial Library
Director Sue Ellen Holmes
described Bradstreet as a
woman who was ahead of
her time, writing and
publishing her work while
raising eight children, taking
care of her home and
supporting her husband, who
was in politics.


"The things she was able
to do are things that women
weren't doing," she said.


The manuscript is a small,
leather-bound book, slightly
bigger than a paperback,
where Bradstreet wrote
thoughts, ideas and
observations.
Osgood said she is "awe-
struck" the book survived the
centuries, as it was passed
down through the family and
read often.
"This is an artifact from
our own town," she said. "It's


a way to touch the past,"
McCahill offered to
display the manuscript in the
gallery after Osgood
mentioned the trustees
wanted to show the
manuscript as part of the
library's 100th anniversary
celebration.
Insurance costs in the
thousands of dollars and the
fragility of the pages had
kept the library trustees from
bringing out the manuscript,
which was put in their care
after 1951. The manuscript
was placed in safe-keeping at
the Houghton Library in
1972 and hasn't been on.
display since.
Leslie Morris, curator of
modern books and
manuscripts at the Houghton
Library, said the book is not
in great condition, but its
survival was still


remarkable.
"It is quite old, quite well-
thumbed over the years," she
said..
Because of its condition,
the book cannot be opened
and looked at often. At the
Lehman Art Center, the
library is hiring a
conservator just to open the
book correctly so it displays
a page.
Morris is working with the
Stevens Library trustees on
plans to bring the manuscript
into the 21st century I by
making color digital
photographs of the pages to
put online.
Drake Lucas writes for
The Eagle-Tribune of North
Andover. Mass. E-mail her at
dlucas@eagletribune.com
Drake Lucas writes for
The Eagle-Tribune in North
Andover, Mass.


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NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS APRIL 25 26, 2007, PAGE 9D


Bradstreet is considered the first
American female poet to be published.
She came to America in 1630 and
eventually settled in North Andover,
then known as Andover. I


I-No IIN NI M II eMI --P "- NJL i


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA












Cape May: America's oldest seaside resort


By Dave Zuchowski
CNHI News Service

NEW CASTLE, Pa. On
our trip through New Jersey
to Cape May, a friend and I
drove right into a nor'easter.
The cold, windy and wet
storm off the Atlantic meant


an arduous drive along rain-
soaked roads in the dark. Af-
ter, our cozy suite in the
Montreal Inn was very wel-
coming. Through the plate
glass doors leading out to the
balcony, we could see the surf
pounding its way on shore,
driven by 30 m.p.h. winds.


Famished after our travels,
we headed to the Pilot House
Restaurant, a seafood eatery
in the center of the town's
historic core, where we sat
next to a gas lit fireplace,
sipped a Chocolatini (a mix
of Stoli vanilla vodka and
Godiva chocolate liqueur)


and made our menu selec-
tions. (I can still almost taste
my wonderful tuna wasabi on
soba noodles with crispy,
deep-fried spinach).
Fortunately, the next day
the rain let up and the sun
warmed the picturesque
beach community to a com-


fortable mid-60s, affording us
a perfect opportunity for tak-
ing a walking tour of the his-
toric district offered by the
Mid-Atlantic Center for the
Arts.
Founded by a Dutch ex-
plorer named Cornelius Mey
in 1620 (the British later an-


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354728-F


glicized the spelling to Cape
May when they later took
over the colony), the town of
approximately 4,035 year-
round residents swells to
more than 100,000 in the
summer months.
Tourists have known about
the oceanfront town since the
1700s, and, by the 19th cen-
tury, Cape May had built a
reputation as one of the na-
tion's finest resorts.
By 1970, though, Cape
May was in such bad shape
- largely because the auto-
mobile gave visitors an entire
gamut of new destinations to
choose from developers
had plans to raze many of the
old homes to build tract
housing. Luckily, people of
foresight began restoring the
old buildings and, today,
Cape May has the nation's
second-largest collection of
Victorian homes, trailing
only San Francisco.
By 1976, the town's entire
central core was designated a
National Historic District.
Ever since, tourists have been
coming to enjoy not only the
town's architectural splen-
dors, but also its thousands of
acres of wetlands and natural
areas, sandy beaches and
fishing for the more than 40
salt water species that inhabit
the ocean and Delaware Bay.
The area is also considered
one of the top 10 birding hot
spots in North America,
drawing birders from all over
the world during migration
season.
Following our walking
tour, we poked into the shops
along Washington Street
Mall, a pedestrian street
pleasantly devoid of traffic.
As if we hadn't already
walked enough that morning,
we then headed to the Cape
May Lighthouse.
Built in 1859, the still-op-
erating structure is 157 feet,
6-inches, tall, and we were
determined"'tolfib to the
top every one of the 199
steps in its cast iron spiral
staircase. The effort was
worth it, however, because
the lofty view of the town,
beaches and ocean is spectac-
ular.


I


PAGE 10D, APRIL 25 26, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GE~ORGIA





NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS APRIL 25 26, 2007, PAGE 11D


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


-?-
'a '


;Fdday until 7 p.m.m
Starts Monday,
April 23 .
: t ;.F .^ .


".' "-* -''' '" -
'. i. .. '"


t~h


NOT A SCRATCH
, AND DENT SALE!


We're over stocked with new inventory
and more is coming in


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April 2007


ARE MOSQUITOES


DRIVING YOU BATTY?


Submitted by Carolyn S. Saft
Suwannee River Partnership Education-
al Coordinator / Horticulture Agent
Suwannee County UF/IFAS Extension

Agghhhh... .The joys of spring and sum-
mer: shorts, sandals, cool rains, balmy
evenings and mosquito bites the size of a
mountain. Experts tell us to wear long-
sleeve shirts and pants, avoid going out after
dusk, or spray ourselves with chemicals.
These suggestions are effective, but not very
practical. We have another suggestion: in-
stall a bat house. These furry fellows enjoy
mosquito buffets and leafhoppers or beetles
for dessert.
An insect-eating bat can consume from
500 to 1,000 insects per hour or well over
3,000 a night. A moderate size colony of
300 bats can eat one million insects per
night. Most of our Florida bats are effective
at controlling insect populations and can
save you money that might have been spent
on insect traps or chemicals, "No way" you
say, "I don't want bats sucking my blood,
giving me rabies or getting tangled in,my
hair." Take a deep breath, put your fears
aside, and give these endangered critters a
chance. First, there are no vampire bats that
live in the United States, so your blood is
safe from bats. Second, bat rabies account
for only one human death peri year in the
U.S. On the other hand, dogs, "man's best
friend" (I have three best friends), attack and
kill more humans annually than die from bat
rabies in a decade. Keep in mind that bicy-
cles, playground equipment and pools are
linked to more deaths than bats.
Rabies is almost always transmitted by a
bite, though non-bite exposures can result
from contact between infected saliva and
open wounds or the mucous membranes of
the eyes, mouth or nose. Careless handling
is the primary source of rabies exposure in
humans from bats. Tens of thousands of
people have closely observed the emergence
of 1.5 million Mexican free-tailed bats
(Tadarida brasiliensis) in Austin, Texas each
summer for 16 years without incident. What
can you do to help prevent the rare transmis-
sion of rabies to hInunans? Vaccinate dogs
and cats, and teach children to leave bats
alone, just as they are taught to leave bees
and unfamiliar dogs alone. Bats rank as
North America's most rapidly declining and
endangered land mammals. The largest
knoivn cause of decline is exaggerated hu-


man fear and maltreatment.
We encourage bats to live in our neighbor-
hoods, but as with any wild animals, precau-
tions to exclude them from our living quar-
ters should be taken. .Most bats that enter
homes are lost youngsters looking for a safe
environment. Exclusion of bats can be
achieved by sealing cracks or holes in walls,
keeping tight fitted screens on open win-
dows and avoiding loose fitting doors to the
outside or attic.
O.K., now you're willing to install a bat
house, but have no idea what one looks like.
General guidelines for bat houses include a
minimum height of two feet, a diameter of
14 inches or more, a landing area extending
below the entrance at least three to six inch-
es and one to four- roosting chambers. Roost
partitions should be spaced three-quarters to
one inch apart. All partitions and the land-
ing area should have a rough surface. Air
vents are necessary in our warm climate.
Wooden houses should not be made out of
pressure treated lumber, but painted or
stained instead. The color of the outside de-
pends on high temperatures in July. Our
best bet is to use light colors or white for the
outside due to our high summer tempera-
tures. However, the inside should be coated
with two applications of black stain, not
paint (paint fills in the rough or grooved sur-
faces).
Site selection should be a place where
there is a minimum of six hours of direct
sunlight. Mdst nursery colonies choose
roosts within one-quarter mile of water.
Mounting of houses should be on poles or
buildings; this offers the best protection
from predators. The house should be 15 to
20 feed above the ground and away from
any bright lights. Even though you have in-
stalled the perfect bat house, it may take a
while for the bats to inhabit their new abode.
Patience is a virtue when working with
wildlife.
The University of Florida has one of the
largest occupied bat houses in North Ameri-
ca. Located next to Lake Alice, this house
hosts about 20,000 bats that consume 10 to
20 million insects each night. If you are vis-
iting Gainesville, plan a trip at dusk to see
the bats disperse; it is a very interesting
sight to see.
To receive a publication on how to build a
bat house, call the Suwannee County Exten-
sion office at 386-362-2771 or visit batcon-
servation.org or www.batcon.org.


:i :~:~$~








PAGE 2E, APRIL 25 26, 2007 AGRI-BUSINESS



SPRING CANNING GREEN BEANS


"The gardens are being tended
and the results are being harvest-
ed. We can tell by the questions
asked of the Family and Con-
sumer Sciences Department at
the Suwannee County Extension
Service" says Merry Taylor,
County Extension Director.
One of the most frequently
asked questions is how to can
green beans. "And the first part
of the answer is they cannot be
processed in a water bath can-
ner," states Taylor. All non-acid
foods, including green beans,
must be canned in a pressure can-
ner (either dial or weighted
gauge). Following are the recom-
mended USDA (United States
Department of Agriculture)


guidelines for canning green
beans.
An average of 14 pounds is
needed per canner load of 7
quarts. An average of 9 pounds is
needed per canner load of 9 pints.
Select tender, crisp pods. Re-
move and discard diseased and
rusty pods. Wash beans and trim
ends; break or cut into 1 to 2-
inch pieces.
Raw pack Pack beans into
clean hot jars. Gently tamp beans
into jars without pressing them
down. Leave 1-inch head space.
Add 1/2 teaspoon salt'to pints; 1
teaspoon to quarts, if desired. Fill
jar to within 1-inch of top with
boiling water. Remove air bub-
bles. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids.


Process in a pressure canner at 10
pounds pressure.

Pints 20 minutes

Quarts 25 minutes

MORE
Hot pack Cover beans with
boiling water; boil 5 minutes.
Pack hot beans into hot jars,
leaving 1/2-inch head space. Add
1/2 teaspoon salt to pints; 1 tea-
spoon to quarts, if desired. Fill
jar with boiling hot cooking liq-
uid, leaving 1-inch head space.
Remove air bubbles. Wipe jar'
rims. Adjust lids. Process in a
pressure canner at 10 pounds
pressure.


Pints 20 minutes

Quarts 25 minutes

If you have any canning ques-
tions, or wish additional informa-
tion contact the Suwannee Coun-
ty Extension Service at 386-362-'
2771.

Extension programs are open to
all people regardless of race, col-
or, sex, religion, disability or na-
tional origin. In accordance with
the Americans with Disabilities
Act, any person needing a special'
accommodation to participate in
any activity should contact the
Suwannee County Cooperative


Extension Service at 1302
Eleventh Street, SW, Live Oak,
Florida 32064 or telephone 386-
362-2771 at least five working
days prior to the event. Hearing
impaired can access the forego-
ing telephone by contacting the
Florida Relay Service at 1-800-
955-8770 or 1-800-955-8772
(TDD).


TIPS FROM UF/IFAS EXTENSION: BEAT THE HEAT WITH LANDSCAPING


By Carolyn S. Saft
Suwannee River Partnership Educational
Coordinator/Horticulture Agent
Suwannee County UF/IFAS Extension

The summer heat is beginning to arrive and our electric
bills are starting to escalate. April to November sunlight in-
tensities elevate air temperatures far above the human com-
fort level. In Florida, about 35 percent of our annual residen-
tial energy expense is for cooling homes during Florida's
five-to-seven-month long summer. Our unique climate pro-
vides many opportunities for using landscape materials to
moderate the home environment and actually reduce monthly
utility bills by as much as 30 percent.
We all know that we can't change the weather, but we can
create landscapes to cast shade, channel winds and, reduce
temperatures near our homes. Plants provide shade, insulate
the home from heat loss or heat gain and cool the air that sur-
rounds their leaves. We can begin by making a list of specific
problem areas we would like to correct. Does our house have
particular windows that need to be shaded? Glass windows
and doors can account for between 30 and 60 percent of a
building's total heat gain by providing the most direct entry
for heat into our homes during the sunumer. Consequently,
special attention may need to be given to walls containing the
most windows and glass doors and especially those with west
or east exposures. Is humidity a problem around one side of
your home? Would you enjoy your backyard more if ther6
was more shade or wind movement? An area that is shaded
can create a dramatic effect by dropping ground temperatures
by 3-6 degrees in only five minutes. Let's take a look at some
planning ideas.
Shading with Trees
House walls are the most practical to shade because new
tree plantings take many years to cast an effective shadow on
the roof. Heat transmitted through the roof is best reduced by
using attic insulation and ventilation. This is because tree
limbs over the roof can present a nuisance from plant debris


clogging rain gutters, staining roof tiles, or even wearing of
roof surfaces from rubbing branches. In addition, there is a
risk of injury or damage if heavy limbs fall off in a storm. A
tree planted 15 feet from the west wall can shade an area four
times longer than a tree planted 25 feet from the wall. The
shape of the tree also influences the duration of the shade.
Spreading, round and vase-shaped tree canopies provide
shade longer than columnar, oval or pyramidal canopies.
Trees like Red Maple, Red Buckeye, Fringe Tree, Flowering
Dogwood, Loblolly Bay, Dahoon Holly, Crab Apple, Chap-
man Oak, Shumard Oak, Sweetleaf and Carolina Basswood.
Mature tree height should also be considered when select-
ing plants. Generally, small or medium sized trees (26 to 30
feettall).are preferred for shading walls. If taller trees are se-
lected, they should be planted further away from the house so
they don't become a safety hazard. Be wary of fast growing
trees that increase in height by three feet or more per year.
Most fast growing trees are short-lived and weak-wooded,
two undesirable characteristics.
Channeling Winds
Managing breezes with landscaping is a very effective
means of controlling indoor home temperatures. A common
mistake we make is channeling summer breezes toward our
homes. This technique was used years ago before the use of
central air conditioning. Today, most people can't even imag-
ine life without central air conditioning. Steady wind move-
ment around the home during the cooling season may actual-
ly increase your energy costs by allowing warm humid air
into your home. This humid air can enter your home through
any structural cracks or gaps. Shrubs and trees should be po-
sitioned around the air-conditioned home to steer the summer
southern breezes away from the home. This practice is the
opposite of what early settlers and pioneers used to do when
they had no air conditioning.
Reducing Temperatures
Heat rippling off of sunbaked paved surfaces is a familiar
site in Florida during the summer. Asphalt and concrete sur-
faces absorb the sun's heat increasing surface temperature by


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15 to 25 degrees and radiate it back into the immediate envi-
ronment. Groundcover planted around paved surfaces can
help reduce these temperatures. Turfgrass is undoubtedly the
most commonly used groundcover. No other plant material
can withstand as much foot traffic as turfgrass. However, tur-
fgrass doesn't grow well in dense shade and is difficult to es-
tablish in wet or dry areas. There are several alternative
groundcovers that adapt well to conditions unsuitable for
turf. In fact, evidence has shown that taller groundcovers
with their larger leaf surfaces provide more cooling than the
shorter mowed turfgreass. The use of groundcovers such as
Holly Fern, Blue Daze, Society Garlic, Liriope, Partridgeber-
ry and Junipers can provide a more beautiful profusion of
color, texture and contrast than turfgrass.
Creative landscape planning with trees, shrubs, vines and
groundcover can help alter the climate outside your home
and modify the temperatures on the inside. This variety of
plant types also provides areas for wildlife, especially birds
and butterflies. You may even find yourself enjoying the
great outdoors during the summer while sitting under the
canopy 'of your favorite tree and watching the wildlife-work
the day away.


EAT FROM THE RAINBOW


From Your Suwannee Extension Service

The National Cancer Institute currently recommends eat-
ing 5 to 9 servings of fruits and vegetables each day.
Summer's bounty of fruits and vegetables can make eating
these foods more interesting. Colorful fruits and vegetables
reduce the risk of cancer. The colors themselves act as an-
tioxidants or anti-inflammatory agents.
The deeper the color, the more powerful the action. Here
are just a few of the colorful foods that help fight cancer and
heart disease.

Blue-Purple:
Re'd cabbage
Eggplant
Purple grapes
raisins
Dried plums
Plums, fresh in season
Blueberries, frozen


-Lowers risk of some cancers
- Promotes a healthy urinary tract system

Red:
* Watermelon
* Red potatoes
* Red apples
* Tomatoes
* Red onions
* Red grapes
* Pink/Red grapefruit
* Beets
* Strawberries
* Red peppers

- Promote a healthy heart
- Lower the risk for some cancers
- Maintain a healthy urinary tract system

White-Tan-Brown:
* Brown pears
* Potatoes
* Onions
* Bananas
* Garlic
* Cauliflower
* Mushrooms
* White peaches
* Dates

- Promotes heart health
- Lowers risk of some cancers


Yellow-Orange:
* Yellow apples
* Carrots
* Cantaloupe
* Lemon (grate the rind)


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places. That's why you can rIntsl
Farm Credit when you're looking jor
land in the country. After all, it's
where we live and work.
Farm Credit has been /financing land
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everything.you need for your place in
the country.
Call us. We're the experts.


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Yellow summer squash
Corn
Oranges
Butternut squash
Sweet potatoes
Peaches "

Promote a healthy heart
-- Promote good vision
Support healthy immune system

Green:
Green cabbage
Green Pears
Brussel sprouts
Green apples
Broccoli
Leafy greens, especially spinach
Limes (use the rind)
Green grapes
Kiwi fruit
Green pepper

Support strong bones
Lower risk for certain types of cancer

Tips to Save You Money:
Buy in-season produce and take advantage of sales.
Stock up on in-season items by freezing them for a later
date
Search produce stands, which usually offer some savings
over grocery stores.

FYI
When we eat for health, we all have different concerns -
some people want to prevent cancer, others want to clear out

SEE EAT, PAGE 3E



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`, .'1, 351817-F







AGRI-BUSINESS APRIL 25 26,2007, PAGE 3E



UF/IFAS Florida Yards and Neighborhoods


Program
Submitted by Carolyn S. grani
Saft, Suwannee River Part- and
nership Educational Coor- help
dinator/ Horticulture Agent scap.
Suwannee County resi- 1)
dents can learn how to se- Place
lect plants for their yard, eval
manage yard pests and tions
conserve water in their that
landscape. A landscape 2)
program developed by Uni- Offel
versity of Florida IFAS Ex- lands
tension staff will help resi- kler
dents create and maintain folks
attractive landscapes, teams
. The Florida Yards and irriga
Neighborhoods (FYN) pro- save


offered in Suwannee County


i has nine principles
many yard actions to
people with their land-
ing needs.
) Right Plant-Right
e-Teaches folks how to
uate their site condi-
and then select plants
will do well there.
) Water Conservation-
rs ideas on how to
scape without a sprin-
system. For those
with sprinkler sys-
, there are tips to make
nation more efficient to
us money and water.


3) Mulching-Learn
about the benefits of
mulching, proper depths,
how far to keep it from
buildings, plant stems and
tree trunks.
4) Fertilizing-Find out
what to use, how much to
use, when to apply and the
importance and value of
slow release fertilizers
5) Managing Yard Pests-
Learn which bugs are good
guys, which bugs cause
what damage and how to
deal with them
6) Composting and Re-


cycling-Gain knowledge on
how to recycle and com-
post yard debris and create
your own rich soil for plant
beds
7) Provide Wildlife
Habitat-Learn which plants
are food sources, host
plants and cover for
wildlife. Get tips and tech-
niques on plant placement
and design
1 8) Reduce Stormwater
Runoff-Find out how you
can keep pollutants and
soil out of beautiful springs
and the historical Suwan-


nee River
9) Protect the Water-
front-Learn the special re-
sponsibilities of living on
the banks of the Suwannee
and Santa Fe Rivers.
The program also recog-
nizes homeowners who fol-
low Florida Friendly land-
scaping guidelines by do-
ing a yard evaluation of
maintenance practices. De-
pending on the points accu-
mulated, the landscape is
awarded a level of achieve-
ment via a yard sign. The
resident is encouraged to


display the yard sign so
others can see that they are
doing their part to be stew-
ards of our environment.
For more information on
obtaining the Florida Yards
and Neighborhoods hand-
book or learn about up-
coming classes, contact
Carolyn Saft at the Suwan-
nee County Extension of-
fice at 386-362-2771 or e-
mail csaft318@ufl.edu.
You can also go on-line to
www.SolutionsForY-
ourLife.com/fyn or visit
www.FloridaYards.org.


Suwannee River Partnership helps farmers


save money and protect our natural resources


Submitted by Carolyn S. Saft, Suwannee
River Partnership, educational
coordinator/horticulture agent
The cost of fanning continues to rise as
fertilizer prices increase and transportation
costs soar. Through these difficult times,
there is good news and help for farmers
through the Suwannee River Partnership
(SRP). This group of government agencies,
educators, commodity organizations and
,businesses are helping farmers lower their
costs by following Best Management Prac-
tices (BMPs). Even though the mission of
the SRP is to assess sources of nutrient
loading and optimize reductions in loading
to water of the Suwannee River basin em-
phasizing voluntary, incentive based pro-
grams for protecting public.health and the
environment. The group is also helping
farmers reduce fertilizer and irrigation costs.
For example, a local corn grower reduced
nitrogen fertilizer inputs by 2,100 pounds
on a seventy acre field using BMP tools.


This was a fertilizer cost saving of over
three hundred dollars. On another farm, a
watermelon grower achieved record crop
yields using BMP irrigation and nutrient
management tools. This farmer reduced his
fertilizer use by 3,500 pounds and saved
over five hundred fifty dollars just in fertil-
izer costs. Both farmers using BMPs also
saved time and labor expenses.
To date, 50 of 55 (90 percent) area dairies
have conservation plans. Dairy farmers are
reducing nitrogen to groundwater by 25-55
percent.** Some of the BMPs being imple-
mented are replacing dirt lots with waste
collection facilities, adding liners or con-
crete to waste storage lagoons and separat-
ing solids from liquids. In addition, farmers
have free access to UF/IFAS, Which oper-
ates a livestock waste analysis lab where
cow manure and chicken litter is analyzed
and application rate recommendations are
given. Soil test kits and tools are also avail-
able from the UF/IFAS County Extension


offices.
Along with dairies, poultry farmers are
also reducing nitrogen loads by following
BMPs. There is a nitrogen reduction of
14,936,000 pounds resulting in up to an 80
percent reduction of nitrogen leaching.**
Poultry farmers are covering litter stacks '
and placing the litter on concrete pads to re-
duce nitrogen leaching. Itn addition, dead
birds are composted and recycled for animal
feed.
Row crop farmers are reducing nitrogen
application on 70,000. acres of farmland re-
sulting in a 35-50 percent decrease in nitro-
gen leaching.** Farmers are using GPS
equipment to pinpoint fertilizer applications
and to help reduce overlap during the
spreading process. This in turn allows the
fertilizer to be placed for better plant uptake
and reduces the amount of fertilizer. Farm-
ers are using plant sap meters to measure
nutrient content so they can adjust their fer-
tilizer applications and rates. Growers are


also using soil moisture probes for better ir-
rigation scheduling. One less irrigation
event can save up tol.5 million gallons of
water per crop.** Growers have also up-
graded and retrofitted their irrigation sys-
tems to save a billion gallons of water in
2006.
Our Suwannee River Basin farmers are
making changes to reduce their farming
costs while at the same time helping protect
our precious water resources. Area farmers
provide food for us, provide habitat for
wildlife and preserve our rural heritage. The
Suwannee River Partnership is proud of our
farmer's progress and look forward to con-
tinued success of protecting our natural re-
sources and helping the farmer's bottom-
line.
For more information, contact the Suwan-
nee River Partnership team: Darrell Smith,
Joel Love, Hugh Thomas, or Carolyn Saff at
386-362-1001.
** FDEP Literature Review 2007


Cookbook features Florida agriculture products


Simply Florida: A Taste of Fla-
vors from the Sunshine State is a
cookbook project of the Florida
Extension Association of Family
and Consumer Sciences
(FEAFCS). FEAFCS is a profes-
sional organization educating
Florida's Extension Family and
CoAsumer Sciences professions to
empower individuals and families
to make informed decisions. Fami-
ly and Consumer Sciences profes-
sionals live and work in Florida's
67 counties and are your neigh-
bors and friends. We serve as an
extension of Florida's land grant
institutions as employees of the
University of Florida Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences
(IFAS) and Florida A&M Univer-
sity, providing information and
teaching skills to help people im-
prove their lives.
University of Florida/IFAS Ex-
tension is part of the nationwide
university-based system integrat-
ing agriculture and health and en-
vironmental and public outreach
activities. The Family and Con-
sumer Sciences Educators in
Suwannee County, Merry Taylor
and Cathy Rogers, work to en-


hance the personal, social, eco- -
nomic and environmental well-be-
ing of individuals and families
right here in the communities of
Suwannee County.
Research-based educational pro-
grams offered throughout the state
include:
Health and Nutrition
Food Safety
Money Matters
Housing
Aging and Caregiving
Children
Relationships
The Simply Florida project is a
part of our educational program-
ming and is a great resource of in-
formation about purchasing and
using high-quality, safe Florida
commodities. Today's Extension
Family and Consumer Sciences
professionals continue the tradi-
tion and mission of the Coopera-
tive Extension Service to help
people help themselves using re-
search, technology and education-
al skills of the land grant institu-
tions. Though equip-
ment and techniques
have changed, the im-
portance of teaching' mil


Eat


Continued From Page 2E

their arteries, control their
moods, win a race or keep
up energy. No matter what
your particular health con-
cern, part of the basic pre-
scription is the same: eat a
diet high in colorful fruits
and vegetables. The same
foods that offer protection
against cancer also offer


many other health benefits.

Don't worry too much
about whether to eat your
foods raw or cooked just
don't overcook them. Some
nutrient compounds are lost
when you heat a food, but
others are released. Try to
get each of your colors in a
variety of ways as you "eat
from the rainbow."


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Services In The Suwannee River Valley

. Florida Toll Free 1-800-426-8369
U.S. 27 E. Branford, FL ,,.

(386) 935-0824
A\lli Hour- i 3s',t;. 14 013 -' ... '


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Simply Florida bookcover

nutrition, food preparation, safety
and preservation to Florida's fami-
lies to help maintain good nutri-
tion and healthy" families has re-
mained the same.
Come by the Suwannee County
Extension Office, located beside
the Coliseum, to see these beauti-


J GAS SERVICE


ful hardbound books. You can pur-
chase them by going on-line at
www.simplyflorida.org or pur-
chase them at the Extension office
(1302 Eleventh Street, SW, Live
Oak, Florida 32064) at the dis-
counted price of $20 a book. For
further information, call 386-362-


2771.
Cathy Rogers
Suwannee County
Extension Service
1302 Eleventh Street, SW
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-2771


I Florida Poultry Division
Wy^ P.O. Drawer 1000
Highway 90 West
Live Oak, FL 32060
(386)362-2544




Providing the finest in fresh
and further processed chicken
for the commercial food service
industry and for retail sale.
312-F


4 NW Waldo Street
Post Office Box 2101
Lake City, FL 32056-2101
386-755-2458
Fax: 386-758-2219
300 Palm Street
Live Oak, FL 32060
386-362-4422
3518o07-F www.crmconcrete.com


Complete
LP Gas
Service

P.O. Box 308
hHwt Mayo, FL



(386) 294-1801

John Hewett, Owner


We do it right... Evervtime

STEAKS
CHOPS U MORE


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PAGE 4E, APRIL 25 26, 2007 AGRI-BUSINESS



UF/IFAS researchers design folate-packed tomato


Stu Hutson
UF/IFAS
Leafy greens and beans now aren't the only.
foods that pack a punch of folate, the vitamin
essential for a healthy start to pregnancy.
Researchers at the University of Florida's
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
have developed a tomato with a full day's
worth of the nutrient in a single serving.
"This is a technology that could potentially
be beneficial worldwide," said Andrew Han-
son, the plant biochemist who developed the
tomato along with fellow folate expert Jesse
Gregory and doctoral degree student Rocio
Diaz de la Garza with funding from the Na-
tional Science Foundation.
"Now that we've shown it works in toma-
toes, we can work on applying it to cereals
and crops for less developed countries where
folate deficiencies are a very serious prob-
lem," said Hanson.
Folate is one of the most vital nutrients for
the human body's growth and development,
which is why folate-rich diets are typically
suggested for women who are planning a
pregnancy or pregnant.
Without it, cell division would not be possi-
ble because the nutrient plays an essential role
in both the production of nucleotides the
building blocks of DNA- and many other es-
sential metabolic processes.
Deficiencies of the nutrient have been


linked to birth defects, slow growth rates and
other developmental problems in children, as
well as health issues in adults, such as anemia.
The vitamin is commonly found in leafy
green vegetables like spinach, but few people
eat enough of this type of produce to get the
suggested amount. So, in 1998, the Food and
Drug Administration mandated that many
grain products such as rice, flour and corn-
meal be enriched with a synthetic form of fo-
late known as folic acid.
However, folate deficiencies remain a prob-
lem in many underdeveloped countries where
adding folic acid is impractical or simply too
expensive.
"There are even folate deficiency issues in
Europe, where addition of folic acid to foods
has not been very widely practiced," Gregory
said. "Theoretically, you could bypass this
whole problem by ensuring that the folate is
already present in the food."
So, will doctors be recommending a serving
of tomato one half of a cup for would-be
pregnant women anytime soon? Probably not,
the researchers say.
. "It can take years to get an engineered food
plant approved by the FDA," Hanson said.
"But before that is even a question, there are
many more studies to be done, including a
better look at how the overall product is af-
fected by this alteration."
And there is another hurdle the researchers


From left, Rocio Diaz de la Garza discusses a high-folate tomato plant with Drs. Andrew Hanson and
Jesse Gregory. Photo: Thomas Wright


must clear. As the published paper notes,
boosting the production of folate in the toma-
toes involved increasing the level of naturally
occurring molecules in the plant, known as
pteridines. Little is known about these sub-
stances, which are found in all fruits and veg-
etables.


Some vegetables contain many times more
pteridines than the biofortified tomatoes. For
example, the velvet bean used in traditional
Ayurvedic Indian medicine for centuries and
found in some body-building supplements -
contains 25 times the amount.
Used by Permission from FloridAgriculture


Making gardening


good again


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It's more than a little frustrating. You envisioned
a relaxing evening watering your garden, checking
on plants and enjoying the warm weather. Instead,
you've been wrestling with the hose for 10 minutes
and finally have it in place only to discover that you
have dirt from the hose on your lands and clothes
and now a kink is prohibiting the water flow, re-



ing. Sound familiar?
"Rewinding the hose is one of those things that
people just hate to do," says Ken Bevillard, vice
president of North American Business for Hydro-
Industries.
They hate it so much, in fact, that many home-
owners develop counter-productive coping strate-
gies to avoid dealing with the hose. Eitheands and lothey
leave the hose lying in the lawn creating those tell-
leave the hose lying in the lawn creating those tell-


in lawn and garden reno-
Svation and replacement.
These aggrat anons
have had ergonomics ex-
perts searching for solutions. The result: products
that are designed to eliminate the hassle of water-
ing, while making gardening what you want it to be
-- easier and enjoyable. Products like the No-Crank
Hose Reel, which will rewind your water hose with
the flip of a lever, accomplish that. Instead of using
muscle-power to wind up the hose, No-Crank uses
water pressure to power a three-piston engine that
automates the hose retraction, eliminating the stress
and frustration associated with manual hose
rewinding.
Don't confuse the new automated hose reels with
theyou-crank reels of the past. With these, there is
absolutely no cranking involved, and no trying to*
ensure that the hose rolls up evenly by manually
pushing, each row in place on the reel. Depending
on your needs, there are several No-Crank models
available with different features, including a swivel
base that lets you easily pull the hose in any direc-


'"..'":, tion; an auto-sort guide that ensures
; the hose rewinds perfectly and even-
0'. ly every time; a tow-and-go handle
and a built-in wheel that lets you
move the reel from the front to the
Siv. '" back of the house or wherever you
need to water; and reels'that hold up
to 150 feet of hose to allow for maxi-
mum reach.
.f To find these automated reels and
other time and labor saving products,
visit www.no-crank.com.
Water smart to save money
N lost homeowners over-water their yards, unwit-
ungln \% casting money every time they turn on the
hose. Adopting water-savvy habits not only helps
reduce this waste, it saves money while promoting
a healthier lawn and landscape. According to the Ir-
ngation Association, you should follow these tips to
ensure that you're lawn is getting the most out of
.our % atenng schedule.
Water it right
atermnng at the right time of day, when the sun is
lo\\. the winds are calm and temperatures are cool,
will sa\ e a lot of water as much as 30 percent --
by reducing evaporative losses. The best time to
water is late afternoon, evening and just before sun-
rise.
--Saturate the root zones. Roots are generally
within the top 6 inches of soil. Water roots, then let
the soil dry. Watering too frequently results in shal-
low roots, weed growth, disease and fungus.
--Don't water too long. Water each zone several
times for short periods rather than in one long ses-
sion. This reduces run-off.
--Take careful aim. Be sure sprinklers are not wa-
tering driveways, sidewalks, patios or buildings.
That's all water down the drain.
Plan right and plant right to save water
Conserving water doesn't have to involve a lot of
trenching and plumbing. These tips can be imple-
mented as part of your normal landscaping and gar-
dening routine.
--Aerate your lawn and around trees at least once
a year to ensure good water penetration. Turn and


Innovation
eliminates


cultivate soil, adding watering
compost, or fertilizer,
when planting. headaches --
--Mulch well around and backaches
plants, bushes and
trees. Using 2 to 4 inches of mulch reduces evapo-
ration, moderates soil temperatures, improves wa-
ter penetration and helps to control weeds that com-
pete for water.
-Landscape to suit your lot. Evaluate your yard
conditions (sun, shade, dry and damp areas) and
purchase turf or plant species that have low water
requirements and are well suited to the area of the
yard where they will be planted.
-Hydro-zone your yard. Group landscape plants
with similar moisture needs in the same area. Sep-
arate them from turf areas, which have different
water requirements.
-Plant in spring or fall when less water is need-
ed to establish new plants. Smaller plants require
less water to become established.
-Create functional turf areas, for example, in
play areas. Avoid using turf where it's difficult to ir-
rigate properly, such as on steep slopes..Good'alter-
natives for hard-to-irrigate areas include ground
covers, perimeter plants and mulch.
-Plant shade trees to lower the air and soil tem-
peratures. This will reduce soil moisture loss.
-Maintain your yard by mowing, weeding, prun-
ing and irrigating as needed. A well-maintained
yard requires less water.
Upgrade your watering tools
The key to sticking with any irrigation program
is to make it as efficient as possible. This means not
only using the amount of water you need, but also
streamlining the whole irrigation process. If you
love caring for your lawn and garden but hate the
hassle of prepping watering 'equipment and
wrestling with the hose, consider using an automat-
ed hose reel, such as the No-Crank hose reel
(www.Ho-crank.com) that rewinds the hose with
the flip of a lever. It not only keeps you and your
yard cleaner, but can also help keep you on track
with irrigation.
All materials courtesy of Hydro Industries


Dig without getting yourself


in a hole.
Trenchers. Bobcats. Mini loader
backhoes. For rent. Along with
the related supplies you'll need,
including advice, all in one place.


RENTAL at JXe/a&t.



W.B. HOWLAND CO.
"Serving North Florida Since 1926"
y 602 11th St., Live Oak 362-1235 351a8s.,


FARMERS COOPERATIVE
US 90 West 924 S. HorrySt
Live Oak, FL Madison, FL
362-1459 www.farmandhomedepot.com 973-2269

32% SOUTHERN POND 17% Goat Pellets... 9.3
FISH FOOD 40#,.................'9.25 "

SOUTHERN STATES DOG LEGENDS 12
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Toasted bite size chunks coated with flavor. Designed for stamina at peak m.
Nutritionally complete. 21% protein and 8% performance levels.. ak...................11.40
fat $11.25-50 lbs. ermanelevls. 4

RELIANCE 10 RELIANCE 12 P
Formulated with high quality oats, corn, cane A Complete feed that already contains
molasses & other nutritious ingredients, it's adequate roughage (primarily from
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LEGENDS 12 P SOUTHERN STATES
Afeed formulated with the proper balance of HI-PRO FORMULA
protein, amino acids, energy, minerals, and For working dogs! A powerful blend of
vitamins in order to support a heavy stressful Protein. Contains all essential vitamins,
training and or show schedule .......... 8.99 minrais and nitrients


12% SWEET FEED
An economical feed that provides balanced
nutrition to growing and finishing cattle
15.99

PRO-BALANCED
PERFORMANCE &
ADULT FORMULA
'15.95
The diet of choice for many professional
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provide concentrated nutrition
.......................Performance 18.75


25% Protein, 12% Fat
111.75 50 lbs.

SOUTHERN STATES
DOG RATION
Tasty, fully balanced! Toasted, bite-size
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10.95 50 lbs.

16% Hi-Tech Layer
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18.75
351812-F


, JORDAN AGENCY, INC




Specializing in all forms of

Insurance for

Agriculture and

Agri-Business to include:


Farm Packages

Pivots & Farm Equipment

Business Insurance

General Liability

Workers' Compensation


Live Oak

386-362-4724


Branford

386-935-6385
351803-F


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