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The Mayo free press
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028404/00108
 Material Information
Title: The Mayo free press
Uniform Title: Mayo free press (Mayo, Fla. 1958)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Bernard Guthrie
Place of Publication: Mayo Fla
Creation Date: January 25, 2007
Publication Date: 1958-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Mayo (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lafayette County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Lafayette -- Mayo
Coordinates: 30.051944 x -83.175556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 70, no. 27 (June 20, 1958)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002042475
oclc - 33286672
notis - AKN0339
lccn - sn 95047189
System ID: UF00028404:00108
 Related Items
Preceded by: Mayo free press and Lafayette County news

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
    Section B: Sports
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
    Section C: North Florida Focus
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
    Section D: North Florida Focus: Classified Marketplace
        page D 1
        page D 2
        page D 3
        page D 4
        page D 5
        page D 6
        page D 7
        page D 8
        page D 9
        page D 10
Full Text





nflaonline.com









. marr


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Reid outstanding


as Lafayette turns


back Hawthorne


ALL FOR ADC -320 000000
'3IJEBSCRIi3ER UNIVERSITY OF' FLA LIBR
HIS LIB WiEST
PO eOX( 1!7001
GAINESV/ILLE FL 32611-7001


Weather
Eye On

Mayo
Partly Sunny
High: 61
Low: 35


Weather art submitted by,
Charlene ihoden, second grade


Toxi Roundup



Lafayette County

Feb. 17 at Mayo Community Center


Bring household haz-
ardous Ua-te's such as
paint. in-ecticides. used oil,
solvents, fluorescent lamps.'
used battene< old tertiliz-
er. cleaning chemicals and
stale ga-oline to the 2007
Lafa\ ette Count\ To\ic
Roundup. Tlhe To\ic
Roundup will be at the
lMa-o CommurutV Center
on Saturday February 17.
from 9 a in. 3 p.m. These
items- are some of the many
household hazardous
wa -te, that the To\ic
Roiundiup will safel\ dis--
pose ot tor \ou. Proper dis-
posal ot these products will
help prevent contamination
of our water supply and
keep our environment safe.
Simply bring your house-
hold hazardous wastes to
the collection center and
the trained attendants will


unload and handle all Your
hazardous wastese; there is
no need to even get out ot
\our car! The process is
quick, eas\ and free of
charge for Latawe. Coun-
tv residents and fee based
tor businesses
To transport these haz-
ardous materials carefully
pack the hazardous waste
containers in boxes with di-
viders If a container leaks,
pack it in a larger container
with an absorbent material
such as cat litter or oil ab-
sorbent Do not mix differ-
ent or unknown materials
together. All containers
must be labeled If you can-
not identify the contents la-
bel it "unknown."
Do not bring explosives
such as ammunition, dyna-

SEE TOXIC, PAGE 9A


Darren Jackson


ready to judge

Ira Mikell,
Free Press Reporter


Darren Jackson, a life-'
long resident of Lafayette
County and a 1989 gradu-
. ate of Lafayette High
School, was elected by vot-
ers of the community in the
Nov. 2006 election to re-
place Harlow H. Land, Jr.,
as Lafayette County Judge.
Jackson assumed his new
role on Jan. 2 and will serve
for six year term.
Jackson is very excited
about being county judge
and looks forward to hav-
ing a prosperous career. "I
am proud to have been se-
lected by this community to
serve as their county judge.
When Judge Land an-
nounced that he would not
seek reelection, I decided to
present myself and my ex-
perience to this community
and ask for their support as
the next County Judge. I
proudly accept this honor,"
Jackson said.
Well versed in the field of
law, Jackson previously
worked as an Assistant


Correction
In the article "Two vehicle
accident near Mayo Baptist
Church: One minor injury,
one serious," the individual
charged with careless dri-
ving was Roy Powers, not
Robert Holliday. We apolo-
gize for the error.





ECCOOKIEI
SFor Kids
I PlH I*12 & Under I
I I
No Purchase Necessary
I Must Present Coupon
Limit 1 Per Person
Good 01/25/07 Only
---..-----..


The Honorable Judge Jackson.
Photo: Ira Mikell.

State Attorney handling
many felony, misde-
meanor, and juvenile cases.
He gained his knowledge
and expertise from Cum-
berland School of Law, Ju- .
ris Doctor degree, graduat-
ing from there in 1998. He
also graduated from Flori-
da State University in 1993
with a B.S. degree in Biolo-
gy. .
For several years, Jackson
has served Lafayette and
surrounding counties with
his own private law prac-
tice on main street in
Mayo. He was serving in
this capacity until becom-
ing judge of Lafayette
County.
Since beginning his six
, year term an Jan. 2, Jackson
has been involved in at-
tending the Florida County
Judges Conference and the
Florida Judicial College,
Phase I. Accordithese activ-
ities helps to enhance the
judicial experience. "Such
events allow for group
instruction and par-
ticipation by County
and Circuit Judges from
all over the state," Jack-
son said.
Jackson, his wife
Heather, and their three
children reside in Mayo.


SEE JACKSON, PAGE 9A
A


Left to right: Greg Marshall, Leon Murphy,
Linda Cone, Terry Sullivan, and
Taylor McGrew, take a moment to rest
and admire their finished product.
PFriol Ir Mv i .- ll


Mii Ma ) ID~~wrCnn. L~wh


Ira Mikell
Free Press Reporter
A small group of local officials
assembled at Mayo Town Park to
observe Arbor Day on Friday, Jan.
19.. Attending the event were
Greg Marshall, Lafayette County
forester, Terry Sullivan,, council
member, Taylor McGrew, mayor
of the town of Mayo, Linda Cone,,
town clerk, Leon Murphy, senior
ranger, and Larry Grubbs, forest
area supervisor. Marshall and
Cone spearheaded the event.'
Arbor Day, according to Mar-
shall, is a special time when the


Test your
knowledge
and win!!
Test your knowledge with
our weekly "Trivia Contest."
We will have one Trivia ques-
tion featured each week some-
where in our paper. The an-
swers will be multiple choice
and will cover a vast variety of
subjects. All you have to do is
locate the question for that
week, (it will always be in the
starburst, but may be located
anywhere in the paper), call
the Mayo Free Press office at
294-1210 and give us your an-
swer. You have until the next
edition comes out to call in
your answer for the week.
If your answer is correct
(first guess only) we will take
your name and phone number
and enter it into a drawing to
be held at the end of the con-
test which will run through
the end of March. Each week
that you guess correctly, we
will enter your name again. So
the more you play the more
chances you have to win!! Get
ready to play.
Winner will receive four
tickets to Wild Adventures or
a gift card of $25 to Dollar
1 General, your
LV. i f4A choice.


community gathers together to
plant trees of various species
around the area. "Arbor Day
commemorates the many benefits
trees provide people and commu-
nities and is typically honored by
planting trees in neighborhoods,
parks, and places-where people:
come together," Marshall said.
The trees chosen to plant at the
park this year were three dog-
woods; three redbuds, and 10
crape myrtles. Marshall, Murphy,
and Grubbs assisted McGrew and
Sullivan in digging the holes, set-
ting the trees into the ground,
carefully shoveling the dirt back
into the holes, placing a thick


mulch around the trees, and wa-
tering them.
Arbor Day was founded in
April 1874 in Nebraska by J. Ster-
ling Morton who loved nature.
His passion for nature influenced
him to promote the field of agri-
culture and the importance of
planting trees to help prevent
the wind from removing lay-
ers of soil, to be used as fuel,
and building materials,
and for shade in hot
sunny days.
Se


Lafayette County

Forestry plants trees

at collection sites


Ira Mikell
Free Press Reporter

Lafayette County
Forestry received a
small amount of grant
money to plant various
trees at the trash collec-


tion sites scattered
throughout the county.
They are located on CR
251 near Day, the land-
fill, in the town of Mayo,
in Cooks Hammock, and
near the Fourth District

SEE LAFAYETTE, PAGE 9A


Left to right: Randy Ward, and Greg Marshall get ready to
head out to plant more trees. Photo: Ira Mikell


Lost child

found safe

and sound
A three year old child,
who temporarily wandered
away from his home in
Mayo, was found safe, but
hungry, approximately
three-fourths to one mile in
the woods nearby. The
child went missing on
Tuesday, Jan. 16, at approx-
imately 10:30 a.m., found
approximately one half
hour later, according to the
Lafayette County Sheriff's
Office (LCSO).
LCSO personnel were
quickly on the scene franti-
cally searching for the child
The Mayo Correctional In-
stitution K-9 Unit was dis-
patched to provide assis-
tance in the search and res-
cue.
Before the MCI K-9 Unit
arrived, the child was suc-
cessfully located and
brought back to his family.
Sheriff Carson McCall re-
cently stated that he com-
mends everyone who be-
came involved, determined
to find the child no matter
how long it took.


Lighthouse Realty
of N. rth Florida, Inc.


NEWLREI~OFi_ -This mobile was completely
remodeledin 03 into a brick home adding two
enormous brick additions, giving the home the look
and feel of a sturdy, site-built home. New roof. Lovely
dining and living room, big front porch. Big kitchen
,Heather Neill with custom cabinets. Partially fenced. Large storage
at rroom and detached carport. Nice neighborhood
tlrokcr convenient to everything. #57017 $127,000
Corner US 27 & Hwy. 51 Mayo, FL (386) 294-2131 .* www.LighthouseRealty.us


,-


b -mlowbm-if


.)ft


I








F 2. .- THEMAYO FR- E PRESS. ,.-Yo. FL.THURSDAY, JANUARY25,2007


Share your
faith
0


F !







FROM FLORENCE.C


COME JOIN US
FOR A IGHT OF PRAISING GOD IN SON

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3rd
7:00pm
at
WALKER CREEK BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH
SR 349 (Hatqh Bend Area)


Lafayette Band Booster meeting
Lafayette Band Boosters will meet on January 30, at 6
PM in the Band Room. Everyone that is interested in sup-
porting the Lafayette Band is encouraged to attend.


Reigion

What is your
church
doing?
Let us hear
from you!

Have an article
you want printed?
Send it to us!

Phone: 294-1210
Fax: 294-2666
n/c


Northside Church


to host series....

"Overcoming Discouragement"
The Northside Church of Christ in Mayo will host a
three part series entitled "Overcoming Discouragement,"
beginning in the primary worship hour this Sunday at
11 a.m., Jan. 28. .. '
The series w%'ill be presented in three consecutive Sun-
days. All are invited to atterid.
"Dealing with discouragement is a. problem for every-
one of God's children at one time or another," said John
Zellner, the new preacher at the Northside congregation.
"In today's world, discouragement is likely the most se-
rious spiritual disease posing a threat to Christians.
"We live in a world where attention is beset by war,
by liberalism, by hypocrisy, by the thought of sexual
predators living among us and I could go on and on.
Our, minds are literally being attacked by evil from
every direction. Knowing what's going on in our nation
today, it's almost impossible for us to say we don't get
discouraged to some degree by all the negativity."
Hebrews 12:3 teaches that we should consider Christ,
so that we do not grow discouraged (or weary) and lose
heart.
"That one verse shows us that if we don't stay focused
on Jesus, it is entirely possible for us to lose'heart, mean-
ing to lose the battle against sin completely," said Zell-
ner. "If we don't learn how to manage discouragement,
it will manage us. So it is imperative we learn this les-
son."
The first lesson in the series this Sunday morning
takes a look at the many Bible characters who had to
work through discouraging times. From there, the series
presents a Bible formula for not growing discouraged.
"Jesus got discouraged when his closest followers did-
n't have enough faith to watch while he was praying,"
Zellner said. "Moses got discouraged in the book of Exo-
dus, Samuel was discouraged by Saul's sin in 1 Sam. 15,
and we could go on and on. God's children have had to
deal with this subject over the centuries, so that means it
can be dealt with. And that's an encouraging place to
start."

First Assembly of Mayo

.holding Valentine's Day

fundraiser
First Assembly of Mayo will be holding a Valentine's
fundraiser. They will be offering 10" valentines cookies,
goodie bags, and baskets.
To order you may contact any member of the church, or
you may call Donese Hicks at 294-1108 or Daryl Fletcher at
209-0257. Order must be received by Feb. 10.


AIRLINE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC)......294-2676 Methodist Church NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH .
Pastor Rev. Chip Parker Phone: 386-294-1661 Pastor Rev. Charlie Walker
Sunday MAYO FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday Early Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Located SE corner of Hwy. 27 & FL 51 Mayo Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Prayer Meeting 5:30 p.m. Pastor Jim Gamble Morning Worship 11:00a.m.
Discipleship Training 6:00 p.m. Discipleship Training 6:00 p.m*
Evening Worship 7:0Q p.m. Sunday School ;..................10:00 a.m. Evening Worship 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m. Wed. Visitation 5:00 p.m.
Fellowship Supper 6:00-6:30 p.m. Evening Worship 6:00 p.m. Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
Awanas, Faith Bible Study 6:30 p.m. Mission Classes 7:00 p.m.
Located Four Miles East of Mayo on Highway 27 Located Two Miles North of Mayo Off Highway 51
"0 Come Let us Worship The Lord" Ps. 95:6 32a00-F i"The Friendly Mayo Methodist" 320091-F "Come And Hear, All Ye That Fear God" Ps. 66:16 324603-F


ALTON CHURCH OF GOD 294-3133
Pastor Rev. Charles E. Hodge, Jr.
Youth Pastor Chan Perry
Music Director Blanche Perry
Children's Pastor Ryan & Tiffany Perry
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service/K.I.D.S. Church 10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Family Night Youth Club Church............7:00 p.m. Wednesday
State Road 27 320067-F


BETHEL HOLY CHURCH 294-1932
"Affiliated with Mt. Sinai Holy Churches of America Inc."
Pastor Elder Carolyn Demps
Sunday School 11:00 a.m.
Worship Service 12:00 p.m.
Thursday Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
357 Pine Street
"Membership means Discipleship" anna.


HATCHBEND APOSTOLIC CHURCH..935-2806
P, astor Rev. Steve Boyd
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Light for Living 7:30, p.m.
Located 4 miles South on Hwy. 349,
then left on CR 138, follow signs. 20072-F


FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD................
Sunday School
Sttnday Worship Service
Kid's Church
Evening Worship
edayYouthImpactI
viedin5 Adult Bible Study
Pastor: Rev. Kenny Sullivan
Youth Pastor: Daryl Fletcher
Located at 294 SE Mill Street, Mayo "Renewing Hope and Build
Hatch Bend Baptist Church
Pastor George Dunn
935-0943
Sunday School
Sunday Morning Worship
Sunday Evening
Wednesday Evening
3029 S.E. CR 500


.294-1811
\...9:45 a.m.
10:30 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:00 o.m.


MAYO BAPTIST CHURCH...........(386)294-1020
Pastor: Brother Jimmy Legg
Interim Music Kathy Palamino
Sunday Schedule
Bible Study 9:45 A.M.
Worship Service 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Night Service 6:00 P.M.,
Wednesday Night Schedule
Supper 6:00 P.M.
Prayer Service & Youth & Children Meeting.........................7:00 P.M.
manvobattistchurch@alltll net 32460MF


MIDWAY BAPTIST CHURCH 935-4993
Pastor: Danny Rogers
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service 11:00 a.m.
Discipleship Training 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
Located on County Road 354
"For If Ye Forgive Men Their Tresspasses Your Heavenly
Father Will Also Forgive You" Matt. 6:14 324602-F
ST. MATTHEW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Contact Number in Mayo (386) 294-2218
Vicar Rev. Linda Lowry
Sr. Warden Pippy Cashman
Celebration of Holy Eucharist at 7:00 PM
each Wednesday to be followed by light
refreshments and Christian Education. i
Located One Block North of the Courthouse in Mayo.


PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH (SBC).294-1306
Pastor Ted Rushing
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Discipleship Training...............6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Evening Training 6:00 p.m.
Team Kids Night 6:30 p.m.
Seven miles West of Mayo, left on CR 534 then right on 350A
-- Jesus Saves -- 324604-F


NEW HARMONY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
160th St.
(Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right)
Pastor: Stan Posey
Phone (386) 776-1806
SUNDAY
Sunday Worship 9:30 am
Bible Study 10:30 am
WEDNESDAY
Women's Bible Study 10:00 am
324879-F
Bethel Creek Baptist Church
Pastor: Jerry Tysonf
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
Nursery available for all services
located 3 miles North of Day on Highway 53
Where you are always welcomed 324605-F


To Place Your Church In


[dinge Li Our Church Directory,



945 a.m. Call Myrtle at 362-1734
9:45 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
324569-F


Jesus Christ Fellowship
Community Church,
A Full Gospel Ministry
of Mayo Florida, Inc.
S 294-1656
Deacon Lemon Curtis Watson,
Chairman of the Deacon Ministry
Mother Emma Watson, General Mother
Located on Lake St.
at the corner of San Pedro St.
Church Services
Sunday School.....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. .
Tuesday Service.....................7:00 p.m.
(Prayer Meeting and Bible Study)
Worship means Celebration, Communication,
and Consecration.
Church Membership means Commitment.
Discipleship means a student of the
word of God. 324652-F


To Place Your
Church
In Our Church
Directory,
call Myrtle at
362-1734


New Beginnings Church
a place for you
Pastor...............Wayne Hudson
Phone Number........386-294-1244
newbeginningschurch@alltel.net


Purpose Statement:
New Beginnings aists to provide an environment
where People can discover and develop a passion for
God that is Real, relevant, and relational.


New Location:
163 W. Main Street, Suite 500
Service Schedule:
Sun. Morning Worship.....................10:00 a.m.
At NA\ &pgin~Lu Ohs t'sarys "a plaa forau.,"
www.newbeginningschurchmayo.com


"FACING THE

GIANTS" showing

at New Beginnings

Church
NE\'ER G iE UP. NEV-
ER BACK DOWN NE\V-
ER LOSE FAITH....... ....
Have you heard about
FACING THE GIANTS?
This i-, the film that has al-
ready made national
headlines because it was
rated PG for religious con-
tent. If you liked "Remem-
ber the Titans,"
"Hoosiers," or "Rudy,"
you'll love this great un-
derdog story that shows
the power of faith and
prayer in dealing with
life's problems. FACING
THE GIANTS is not only
pure fun wrapped in an
unstoppable teaming of
faith and football, it's also
the first independent,
church-made fihn to be re-
leased by a major studio!
New Beginnings
Church will show "Facing
the Giants" on Sunday,
January 28. at 2 pm. New
Beginnings Church is lo-
cated at 163 West Main
Street, downtown Mayo.
For more information call
294-1244. Admission and
popcorn are FREE!



Do you want

to ride?
Come to the next meeting
of the 10 Mile Pond Riding
Club, cn.Saturday, January
27, from 12 p.m. until??
Come out with or with-
out your horse, plan on eat-
ing, riding and having fun.
For more information
call: 208-6090, 294-2855, or
294-3358.
Negative Coggins re-
quired on all horses!


Imogene Sullivan
Imogene Sullivan, 70, of
Branford, passed away Sat-
urday, January 20, 2007 at
her home following a short
illness. Mrs. Sullivan was a
native of Adel, Georgia, but
lived most of her life in the
Lafayette. County area of
Hatch Bend. The homemak-
er attended the Bethel
Walker Creek Baptist
Church 'and was an avid
fisherman.
She is. survived by her
daughter, Carolyn Williams
of Branford, two sons, Jim-
my D. Sullivan of Branford
and Joe F. Sullivan of Met-
ter, GA; one sister, Shelby
Williams of Branford; one
brother, Curtis K. Davis of
Branford, twelve grandchil-
dren and four great grand-
children.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Sullivan were conducted
Tuesday, January 23, 2007
at 2 p.m. in the chapel of the
Daniels Funeral Home in
Branford with the Rev.
Steve Boyd and Rev. Chief
Lambert officiating. Inter-
ment followed in the Hatch
Bend Baptist Church ceme-
tery.
Daniels Funeral Homes
and Crematory, Inc. of
Branford was in charge of
all arrangements.


Bethel

Creek Baptist

Church sing
Bethel Creek Baptist
Church will again be
hosting a singing group
on the first Sunday
evening of the month.
The Hyssongs will be
giving a gospel concert
on February 4 at 6 p.m.


-


THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007


PAGE 23A THE MALYO FREE PRESS, Mavo, FL


a








RSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007


So~aii JM~u


1A


fEktzila c-7/(axliEJd?
Send us your
social news
Deadline -
n/c Monday Noon


Call: 294-1210
Fax: 294-2666
Drop box: located at
Crofts Thriftway

PRICES
WITH PHOTOS
Wedding/
Engagement $25
Birth Announcement $10
Birthday wishes $2.50
per column inch


....~ *42A~


-A


Matthew Gregory Snider and Helen Nicole Daniels.
Photo by Timeless Treasures Photography

Daniels and Snider uniting in marriage
Mr. and Mrs. Dudley Daniels and Mr. and Mrs. Andy
Snider would like to announce the upcoming marriage
uniting their children,
Helen Nicole Daniels
and
Matthew Gregory Snider
The celebration will take place on Saturday, February
17, 2007 at 5 o'clock in the afternoon at O'Brien Baptist
Church.
A reception will follow in Branford at the Shrine Club.
All family and friends are welcome to attend. No local
invitations will be sent.


Dennis-Walker a
Pam Dennim and Alan \Valker
will marry lanuary 26. at 6 p.m. at
Siloam Nlethodist Church.
All inend.s and relaht\e' are in-
.' ,s united to attend.


In.>... *:_ : a.u.m iz e mmm eI-.A. a."5--&, ..' :. -
Ira Benjamin Mikell and Amanda Taylor Songer


012 0 i Jl[d/d f


to mazzy

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry A. Songer of Christiansburg, VA are
pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter Ms.
Amanda Taylor Songer to Mr. Benjamin Ira Mikell. Ira is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Clifton W. Mikell of Bell, Florida.
Ira is the grandson of Mrs. Juanita Roberts and the late
Leon Roberts. He is also the grandson of Mrs. Louise
Mikell and the late Edsel Mikell. Amanda is the grand-
daughter of Mrs. Margaret Taylor and the late Sherman
Taylor. She is also the granddaughter of the late Mr. and
Mrs. Marshall Songer.
Ira graduated from Florida College in 1997, and from St.
Leo University in 2001. He is currently employed by the
Mayo Free Press.
Amanda is currently attending Florida Community Col-.
lege at Jacksonville and majoring in Hospitality and
Tourism Management.
The couple will wed upon Amanda's completion of her
degree.


Lordy,

Lordy,

look who 's

40 x2

Happy

Birthday!


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 3A

Could your home be chosen

for "If Walls Could Talk?"
Homeowners who If Walls Could Talk" will
would like to be be coming to North Florida
considered for soon and your house could
be filmed for future airings.
the program should "If Walls Could Talk" the
contact Jenna weekly series, Sundays on
Friederich at HGTV, is coming to the
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email at proximately a 2-hour radius
of Tallahassee) to film
jfriederich@highnoo- homes with intriguing
nentertainment.com pasts, unusual stories and
valuable objects found in-
side. Now in production on its 8th season, the series kicks
off with new homeowners who make surprising historical
discoveries about their homes as they explore and restore
them. A lucky few will be amazed to learn that the historic
artifacts they've discovered are worth a fortune when the
"If Walls Could Talk" appraiser drops by for a look.
Could that be the description of your home? Could you
be one of the ones selected to have your home show-cased
on "If Walls Could Talk" next season?
Area residents who believe their home fits the descrip-
tion of a home where historic finds have been made are
encouraged to get in touch with "If Walls Could Talk" and
see if your home is what they are looking for.
If you live in Lafayette County in the coverage area of
the Mayo Free Press and your home is chosen for the
show, the Free Press will be given an exclusive interview
session with you on the day of shooting, according to "If
Walls Could Talk" officials.
Each half-hour episode features homeowners from
across the country who share their amazing discoveries.
Recent stories include:
A Connecticut family moves into a neglected 1800s Vic-
torian only to find antiques and a mysterious locked cabi-
net. What they find inside tells the touching story of their
home's original owner. Then, in the attic they discover
original paintings and the "If Walls Could Talk" appraiser
pays them a visit. The expert reveals their discoveries are .
worth thousands of dollars.
A Michigan couple inherits the husband's family home.
While cleaning up the place, they find out it once be-
longed to a Civil War general, and he left art and furniture
behind that could be worth a fortune. The "If Walls Could
Talk" appraiser drops by and tells them what it's all worth.
A husband and wife in Colorado find books, clothing
and jewelry in their new home. The clues add up to the
story of a best-selling author who lived in the house until
she disappeared.
A New York bachelor buys a 100-year old mansion and
makes a chilling discovery in the basement his home
sweet home u-sed to be a funeral home!
The senes.. which premiered in September of 1998, has
aired over 200 episodes each filmed in historic neighbor-
hoods throughout the country.
"If Walls Could Talk" is produced for HGTV by High
Noon Entertainment in Denver,-CO. Homeowners who
would like to be considered for the program-should con-
tact Jenna Friedench at 303-712-3146 or email at
friedenchd,''hi ghnoonentertainment.com


4 ,. 0 :




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6 month Fixed Intro

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rho I *


S Send us your favorite Cupid,
young & old alike, along with a
special message of 20 words or less
for $10. Each photo that is submitted
will be entered into a drawing, for a
special Valentine's prize package

Please fill out coupon
below and submit photos with
message to the Mayo Free
, Press, P.O. Box 248, '
Mayo, FL 32066 or use the ,
drop box at Mayo Thriftway.
* Please send a self-addressed, -:.
stamped envelope for the
return of your photos.

i Cupid's Cuties will run in the Feb. 8 editiofi of the
Mayo Free Press. The drawing will be held on
Feb. 9, and the winner will notified by phone. Be
sure to include your name, address and phone
number along with your message.
--- -------------------
Name:
Address*
Phone"
Print message below
I o







Deadline is Feb. 1,2007
S0 328887-F
l D0 4 4eadine F.

A V


Awl








DA(I AiX -M MAYA rFF RF Mvcv ILT


O.A. Winburn, Jr.
ScrubHammock@aol.com
-; A familiar sound that an-
nounced the coming of day
around Mayo was the
V .s blowing of the whistle .at
S f Baker's Mill. It blew at the
same time each week-day
morning, at 6 a.m. I believe. That gave no-
tice to those who worked at the mill that
they would soon be required to begin
their chores. Power for the mill was a
steam engine which had to be
fired up each morning. The /iff -
millwright was there to
see that the steam en-





gine was fired up as he prepared the ma-
chinery for the day's tasks that lay ahead,
filing the saw, setting the saw and replac-
ing any broken or missing teeth. I
watched that procedure a time or two and
it was interesting the way he would take a
little hammer and ping that saw from
time to time as though it were a tuning
fork. The sawyer's work was interesting
also, watching as he rode to and fro, mak-
ing increments of adjustment as the log
was fed into the saw. A person with a
cant hook stood nearby and would turn
the log over as required. The bark was
thus removed and boards developed as
the sawing continued. The sawyer had to
know how many of what size boards
were to be cut from each log, thereby re-
ducing waste. Further tending to the
steam engine was no doubt carried out by
someone who's duty was to maintain the
steam for the mill.
Baker's mill sat in the vicinity of where
Boogie Priadgeon's home is now located.
The house where Tom and Grace Prid-
geon live was the Harvey Baker home
and it sat on some acreage where Tom
and Grace later farmed, raising tobacco.
The commissary sat across the road where
the Kirby's house sits. There were tenant
houses along the tracks north of the mill
and maybe some behind the commissary.
Mr. and Mrs. Baker raised a large fami-
ly. Tom and D. Pridgeon both married
Baker sisters, Grace and Mary. Mabry
Green took one for his wife, Louise. Bud
Austin married Evelyn and Betty is mar-
ried to a Mr. O'steen I believe and I be-


lieve they reside in Lafayette County.
Dorothy married a Mr. Durden and they
lived in the county in later years also. I do
not know who Hazel married. There were
two boys, Harvey, Jr., and Billy. I was in
the same class with Harvey at school and.
we were friends. I sometimes went home
with him in the afternoon. It was not far
from my house by walking down -
the railroad track. After the sawmill
shut down for the day we would






sometimes play on the sawdust pile and
there was always sawdust in my pockets
after I got home.
One morning at the usual time the
whistle blew at Baker's mill in an unusual'
manner. It normally blew a few short
bursts and then stopped but on this morn-
ing it let out a continuous blast and just
kept blowing. I later learned that the mill
had caught fire and had burned down.
I do not know the circumstances sur-
rounding Mr. Baker's death but he did not
live long after the fire and there was no
more Baker's mill in Lafayette County.,
Harvey once came to Mayo and paid me a
visit. At that time he was employed with
an underwater pipe construction compa-
ny involved in laying underwater pipe
lines in the Gulf for the oil industry. He
told me that he made good money but
that it could get a little scary down there
at times. Billy came with him and I be-
lieve he was doing the same kind of work.
That was about fifty years ago and I don't
believe I have seen either of them since.
A few years passed and a Mr. Bolen
came to Mayo and operated a saw mill at
the same location and ran it for a few
years. The Bolens were a welcome addi-
tion to Mayo and ran a successful milling
operation for a number of years before
failing apparently due to some local com-
petition and they eventually filed for
bankruptcy I believe. I was friends with
the son, Johnny and filled in for him at
the mill a couple times during the sum-
mer when he would go on vacation. I did
a tally on the lumber as it was loaded into
a flat car on the rail siding. By this time I
was an up and coming teenager and was
paid a quite respectful wage of eighteen
dollars a week.......


Bailey's first deer.....
Bailey Edwards center is shown with her first deer. Bailey shot the deer Nov. 3 with a muzzle loader.
Her sisters, Quincey Tompkins and Kasey Edwards, right are also shown in the photo with her.





$100.00 REWARD

Missing Dog-Female

Black & Dark Grey

Lab & Catahoula Leopard Mix

1 eye is a half moon also know

as a blue eye

Short hair 40 to 45 Ibs.

Lime green collar

Lost around intersection of CR 300

and 320 (Old Edward Perry Dairy area)

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE CALL

KIM RICE

KIM'S ENCHANTED FLORIST

386-294-1000, 208-2125, 208-2140
330019-F


Dining out, weighing i


With two out of three
Americans overweight to-
day, it's getting harder to be-
lieve that all this extra fat is a
simple problem of self-in-
dulgence or poor personal
discipline.
In fact, researchers and
clinicians from various sci-
ences say unequivocally that
it's not. Certainly adults are
responsible for what they
put in their mouths. But
when so many are affected,
from all across the American
demographic, we have to
also look What's going on in
our culture at large.
And one thing that's going
on is that there's a lot more
going out. In 1978, just 18
percent of the calories Amer-
icans consumed were eaten
away from home. But by
2003, that was up to half.
Why should that even mat-
ter? A calorie is a calorie is a
calorie, right?
At the bottom line, yes.
The trouble is that when we
eat out, we simply have
much less control over what
ends up on our plates, and
from there, on our bottom
line. That shows up in a vari-
ety of ways. Nutritional re-
search indicates that for al-
most any given dish that you
might choose to prepare at
home, when it's compared
to a restaurant dish of the
same name, it's often not the
same thing at all. So even
trying to consciously select
what looks like the healthiest
choice on the menu might
not do you much good.
Restaurants tend to use
more oils and fats, more sug-
ar, and more salt in their
food preparations. The rea-
son is simple: if the food is
yummy, you'll come back!
But that tends to add up to a
lot of extra calories you
weren't counting on.
And speaking of extras,
how about all those extra
nibbles: the plates -of appe-


tizers, the baskets of warm
bread with pots of cool but-
ter, the bonus beverage spe-
cials? Most families simply
don't have all those edible
accoutrements with regular
home meals.
But at a restaurant, your
drinks are brought before
you even order. You often
get bread or rolls to eat dur-
ing your wait, and appetiz-
ers and desserts are helpful-
ly suggested by your server.
Yet those extras can have
even more calories than your
meals! An order of buffalo
wings with blue cheese
dressing? That's a tidy 1,010
calories before dinner. For a
fried onion blossom with
dip, figure around 2,000.
Even a basket of garlic bread
is about 800 calories. How
many people are sharing
those calories at your table?
Then you get to the main
attraction, and the major
problem with dining out-
portion size! Restaurant
meals are often three to four
times larger than a normal
serving size.
Even plates, glassware
and utensils have grown.
Very often, the dinner plate
you get in a restaurant
would qualify as a platter in
any home kitchen, but then,
they have to be bigger to ac-
commodate those super
servings!
It wouldn't be such an is-
sue if we were. better at
walking away. An old adage
about fitness says that the
most important exercise to
do is "pushbacks," as in,
when you've had enough,
push back and get up from
the table.
But research shows that
Americans in general tend to
be "completers," and many
of us were raised to feel a
sense of guilt if we left food
on our plates. Add that pro-
gramming to a giant dish of
pasta, and suddenly, you're


MAYO FREE PRESS
Published weekly every Thursday, USPS #334-600
Phone: (386) 294-1210 Fax: (386) 294-2666






Myra Regan, Linda Smith, Ira Mikell
Publisher Manager Reporter

Annual subscription rate:
$16 in county / $23 out of county
Periodicals postage paid at Mayo, Florida
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
The Mayo Free Press
P.O. Box 248
Mayo, Florida 32066
Office located at 705 NW Suwannee Ave. Branford, FL
Editorial Policy: The Mayo Free Press encourages readers to write let-
ters to the editor expressing their opinion. All letters should be brief and to
the point and those selected for publication (we reserved the right to accept
or reject all letters) may be edited for space reasons. Letters must be signed
and include the writer's address and phone number to be considered for
publication. All letters become the property of The Mayo Free Press.




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stuffed!
The truth is, no matter
how we're raised, or whether
we're slim or fat, if more is
put in front of us we'll eat
more, period. And usually,
we're not even particularly
aware of it. This has been
proven out by study after
study, in both the United
States and abroad.
And that's not all. The re-
search also shows that as we
become accustomed to those
mega-sized meals we're pre-
sented in restaurants, we
tend to prepare bigger por-
tions at home, as well. We
may not use all the extra oil,
salt and sugar that restau-
rants do, but we're certainly
having more of our main in-
gredients, and we're eating
big and heai ty.
The other thing that
restaurants have over the
home meal is variety. Even
the most accommodating
home cook typically won't
make a different special meal
for each member of the fami-
ly. Again, the nutritional re-
search shows that the more
different things you can
have, the more you'll eat
overall.
United States Department
of Agriculture studies
showed that when offered
three varieties of a given
food item-say, sandwiches
or cobkies-people would
eat more than if they were of-
fered three items of the same
variety. That's part of why
those all-you-can-eat buffets
are such a caloric catastro-
phe. Who ever has just a lit-
tle?
Given the demands of to-
day's busy lifestyles, dining
out nowadays is not only a
pleasure, but a time-saving
survival tool. Restaurants
may eventually be required
to provide nutritional facts
for their meals, but even
without hard numbers,
awareness of the pitfalls can
go a long way toward help-
ing us control those calorie
counts.
We just need to think
about what we're up"against
when someone else is serv-
ing, so that when we're eat-
ing out, we're not taking so
much in.
Caroline J. Cederquist,
M.D. is a board certified
Family Physician and a
board certified Bariatric
Physicians (the medical spe-
cialty of weight manage-
ment). Dr. Cederquist is the
founder of ,Diet To Your
Door, a home diet delivery
program that specializes in
low calorie gourmet food
that is delivered to your
home or office. Diet To Your
Door serves as culmination
of Dr. Cederquist's expertise
and experience in the world
of medical weight loss.


OPEN HOUSE
There will be an Open
House for Jesse and
Deanna Mullis at their
new home on North US
51, Mayo, on Saturday,
January 27, from 3-5
p.m. This Open House is
hosted by First Assem-
bly of God Women's
Ministries. NO GIFTS
PLEASE!




Join the
Scrapity-Doo-Da's!
New to scrapbooking or
looking for time to work
on your photo albums?
Imagine a room full of
energy, enthusiasm, and


people with a common
goal completed albums!
The Crop Club is a great
way to get inspiration,
share ideas, and, of
course, complete pages.
For more information,
Contact
Kathy 386-935-3487
Email
katherinej@alltel.net
Shop online
www.mycmsite.com/kstark
322161-F


THURSDAY, JANUARY 25,


P~rI 4A- TH MAO FRE PESS.Mav. F


r /.II ." I Il"l V I ~*. Ik l ,I l v









Lighthouse Christian Academy BETA

Club attends State Convention


On November 3-5, five
members of LCA's Beta
Club, along with their
parents, attended state
convention in Orlando.
Approximately 50 schools
were represented from
around the state.
Each school's BETA club
was given the opportunity
to compete in several dif-
ferent categories including
Arts and Crafts; talent, the
Brain Bowl, and Living
Literature. LCA's Sandra
Wainwright won third
place in the Arts and
Crafts division.
LCA's BETA club also
chose to participate in the
Living Literatu re competi-
tion which consists of
each club choosing a fa-
vorite scene from a book
and literally "bringing it


to life". Members must
build a set and make cos-
tumes which accurately
depicts the scene they
have chosen. LCA chose a
scene from. the favorite
children's book "Where
the Wild Things Are."
With help from Cassie Sel-
leck, Joanna Williams, and
their sponsor, Pam Wain-
wright, the LCA BETA
group spent many hours
constructing their scene
and designing their cos-
tumes.
Even though they didn't
win their event, LCA's
BETA club scene was
complimented by rmany
convention goers. The
girls had a great time on
their project and are look-
ing forward to next year's
convention.


Y"I

7-, -7-


Left to Right: Cassie Selleck, Michelle Bledsoe, Raven Parnell, Emily Selleck,
wright, Karen Williams, Frances Hilton, Betty Jo Hilton


r.


''.
I'-1


I A


Raven Parnell


Emily Selleck


Introduction to the
Internet Workshop
When: Friday, January 26, at 10 am.
Where: Lafayette County Public Library
Cost: FREE
This workshop is geared for adult beginners with lit-
tle or no experience who want to learn about the inter-
net and searching the World Wide Web.
SPACE IS LIMITED YOU MUST SIGN UP AT THE
LIBRARY
For more information please call 386 294-1021


Sandra Wainwright


Sandra Wainwright, Jessica Williams, Pamela Wain-


Join us for a Microsoft Word

Adult Beginner's Workshop
WHERE: Lafayette County Public Library
WHEN: 1 P.M.
DATE: January 26, 2007
Cost: FREE
Class size is limited and you must sign up at the library.
This workshop is geared for adult beginners with little. or
no experience working with Microsoft Word. For more in-
formation please call 386-294-1021.
Sponsored by the Three Rivers Regional Library System



Narconon


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Helping to take steps to overcome addiction
At Narconon Arrowhead, we understand that taking
the steps to overcome addiction can be difficult. Let us
help you start the New Year off right. Call Narconon Ar-
rowhead today at 800-468-6933 for free counseling, as-
sessments, and referrals to centers nationwide or log
onto "http. /www.stopaddiction.com'" wwww.topaddic-
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THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 5A


THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007


.Y


.~t2bic,









PAGE 6A .- THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007


YEAR IN REVIEW


JANUARY
Restoration Project of 1898 Mayo Free Press
Building In Need Of Funding
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
The Lafayette County Historical Society is currently
restoring the 1898 Mayo Free Press building to its original
condition and converting it into a historical museum.
Since it was first built in 1898, it has seen many uses. For
example, it once housed Dees Drug Store, established by
J. J. Dees.

'Work Continues On Old
Mayo Free Press Building
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
On Friday, Jan. 5, some of the MCI (Mayo Correctional
Institution) Work Camp crew began regrouting the outer
and inner brick walls of the old Mayo Free Press build-
ing. They were working together as a team trying to get
as much regrouting done that day as possible.

-, -
_, { .-" .- ":-


'A .' -



.





Croft's Thrifway changes hands
Left to Right: Michele Freeman, Chuck Spradling, Jr., Barbara
Hewett, Danny Croft, and Chuck Spradling, Sr. Photo: Ira Mikell.

FWC Investigates Large Number Of
Dead Alligators In Mallory Swamp
A large number of dead alligators found in the Mallory
Swamp area in Lafayette County has the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) concerned.
According to Capt. Roy Brown, area supervisor for
Lafiayette County, numerous alligators have been'"fouind
shot and floating along the North and South Canal grades
and the L.A. Bennett grade which borders private lands
and the Mallory Swamp Wildlife Management Area.

FEBRUARY
Name for Lafayette
Elementary Newspaper announced
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
On Friday, Jan. 20, Karen Callis fifth grade students
discussed possible names for their school newspaper. Ac-
cording to Callis, the students listed 21 names to vote on
the following Friday, Jan. 27. Examples include "Hornets
News," "Hornets' Monthly Gazette," "Hornet Pride,"
"Hornet Times," and "Team Press."


Lyons Family named 2006 Farm Family Of The Year
The Lyons family, left to right: Front-Chris, Emily, Krista, and Dale;
Back-Kelly and Sarah. Photo: Ira Mikell.

Lafayette County School
Board Keeps Current dress code
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
A School Uniform survey was made available to par-
ents, staff, and students of Lafayette High School by the
Lafayette High School Advisory Council. The purpose of
the survey was to gather input from parents, students,
and staff of LHS on whether school uniforms are needed.

Operation Crack Up yields 5 more arrests
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
The Lafayette County Sheriff's Office arrested two res-
idents of Mayo, along with three non-residents of
Lafayette County, on drug charges. These arrests result-
ed from "Operation Crack Up," an ongoing investigative
effort by LCSO which began Sept. 2, 2005.


MARCH
Step-Up-Florida Enjoys
Success In Lafayette County
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Step-Up-Florida, an annual event sponsored by the
Florida Department of Health, enjoyed a great success in
Lafayette County on Friday, Feb. 17. The total number of
participants for this year, according to Robin Pearson,
Lafayette County Health Department Director of Nurs-
ing, was 1,198. In 2004, when Step-Up-Florida began, 153
people participated. Then, in 2005, the number more than
doubled to 705.

Croft's Thriftway
Celebrates 60 Years Of Service
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
William G. Croft, Jr., a native of Lafayette County,
started Croft's Thriftway on Feb. 20, 1946. He owned and
managed his business until retiring completely 50 years
later. Croft then gave complete control of the grocery
store over to his children.

School Bus Involved In Accident
No Injuries Reported
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
A Lafayette County school bus was involved in a traf-
fic crash which occurred at approximately 3:51 p.m. on
Feb. 24. According to the Florida Highway Patrol report,
the accident took place on Arabian Road, four miles
south of Branford and one mile south of SE River Road.
Trooper Walter L. McGauley was the investigating offi-
cer.

APRIL
Wildfire Preparedness
How Prepared Are You?
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
The latest forecast from the Florida Division of Forestry
indicates an increase in the chance of wildfires due to the
continuing hot and dry weather. "The current weather
pattern is preventing rainfall from reaching the state and
as a result, there are significant drying conditions across
the state," Deborah Hanley, meteorologist for FDOF, said.

"Help Protect Those Who Protect You"
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
A new sticker advocating the Move Over Law, passed
in 2002, will soon be placed at all gas stations in Florida,
according to the Florida Highway Patrol. The purpose of
this campaign is to help make the public more aware of
this law in hopes of encouraging everyone to follow it
when encountering law enforcement and emergency ve-
hicles on the roadway.

MAY
Seven Month Drug Investigation Comes To
An End
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
The Lafayette County Sheriff's Office, with the help of
Investigator Boatright and Florida Department Of Law
Enforcement Investigator Arthur Erickson, made 9 drug
arrests from April 26 to May 1, bringing the seven month
long "Operation Crackup drug investigation to a close.

Gas Prices On The Rise
Coping With The Pain At The Pump
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter ,
The price of gasoline for all three grades was slightly
going up and down for awhile like a ride on a rollar
coaster. Recently, within the last few months, gas prices
have been rising steadily, sometimes jumping as high as
10 or 12 cents per gallon.

Lafayette County Observes
National Day of Prayer
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
On Thursday, May 4, several county officials as well as
various members of the community gathered together in
front of the courthouse in Mayo to observe the National
Day of Prayer. The event began at noon and lasted for
about 20 minutes.

Doctor's Memorial
Hospital Holds Health Fair In Mayo
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Doctors' Memorial Hospital held a Health Fair in Mayo
at the Mayo Community Center on Hwy 27 across from
Hornet Hose.
The event took place from 7 a.m to 9 a.m. on Thursday,
May 11. This is the first time DMH has held a Health Fair
in Mayo. Various members of the community came out
to participate by getting a health screening.

JUNE
Residents Of Hands
Of Grace Enjoy Gardening
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter


This spring two gardens were planted by several resi-
dents of Hands of Grace. One of the gardens was owned
by Ray Dees. The other garden belonged to Tracy Imler,
Connie Sullivan, James Bell, and Diane Steniak.
These residents enjoyed planting their own garden,


taking care of it, and harvesting the fruits of their labor.
They grew their gardens to help supply the cafeteria with
plenty of food.


New subdivision
to bring additional revenue to Lafayette County
Marvin Buchanan poses beside a map of the Fort Akinson Planta-
tion. Photo: Ira Mikell.

Lighthouse Realty Expands its Services
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Heather Neill, owner of Lighthouse Realty, has been
serving the citizens of Lafayette County as a Realtor for
approximately three and one-half years. Neill under-
stands the needs and concerns of the community. Every-
one who walks through the doors of Lighthouse Reality
is treated like family.

Fifth Grade Excels In FCAT
Number One In State In Math
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
The results are in and' it's official. The fifth grade class
at Lafayette Elementary excelled in taking the Florida
Comprehensive Achievement Test. They scored the high-
est in the state in math, according to Lafayette County
Schools Superintendent Fred Ward. "Seventy-seven per-
cent of the fifth grade students at LES scored proficient
on FCAT math," Ward said.

The 2006 Hurricane Season Is Officially Here
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Hurricane season is officially here. The National Hurri-
cane Center recently issued the list of names for this
year's Atlantic.hurricane season. These names are: Alber-
to, Beryl, Chris, Debby, Ernesto, Florence, Gordon, He-
lene, Isaac, Joyce, Kirk, Leslie, Michael, Nadine, Oscar,
Patty, Rafael, Sandy, Tony, Valerie, and William.


.'~. .J


1*


Grandparents raising
grandchildren in a troubled world
George Dunn, .shown holding a photo of his grandparents,
is thankful they provided him with a loving and stable home.
Photo: Ira Mikell

JULY
Local Resident Wins First Place
In Unpublished Writing Contest
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Cassie Selleck, Outreach Coordinator for Three Rivers
Library System, was very elated when she found out she
had won first place in the Novel Chapter-Unpublished
category of the 2006 CNW Publishing/Florida Freelance
Writers Association Florida State Writing Competition.
Her novel, "Pecan Man," was among 105 manuscripts
that were submitted to this contest.
Lafayette High School FFA
Members Receive Top Awards
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Members of the Lafayette High School Future Farmers
of America participated in various competitions at the
78th annual Florida FFA State Convention June 5-9. This
year's convention was held in Orlando.


PAGE 6A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007


i4~


_ _









THURSDAY JANUARY 25, 2007 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 7A


YEAR IN REVIEW


Scarborough speaks about upcoming Suwannee
River Management District projects in Lafayette County
Community members and other guests enjoy their meal before the SRWMD presentation begins.


Photo: Ira Mikell.


Local Author Donates Signed Copy of Book
To Lafayette Library
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Local author and former resident of Lafayette County,
Marilyn Bishop Shaw, donated a signed copy of
"Solomon," her first book, to the Lafayette County Li-
brary. A book signing was held at the library on Wednes-
day, June 21 from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m.

New School Resource Officer Appointed
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
A familiar face, but new to the job, Scott Hamlin, who
currently works as a Sergeant with the Lafayette County
Sheriff's Office, is very eager to begin work as the School
Resource Officer for Lafayette County Schools. "I am
looking forward to working with our school system and
all involved to keep our schools safe and drug free,"
Hamlin said.

August
Croft's Thriftway Changes Hands
Same Family Service To Continue
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Croft's Thriftway has been serving the town of Mayo
for over 60 years. W. G. Croft began the business on Feb-
ruary 20, 1946 until handing'it over to hs childi'en, Dan-
ny Croft Thomas Croft, and Barbara Hewett, in 1996.
After continuing their father's grocery business for 10
years, the children have decided that it was time to retire
and let someone else continue the same family service.

Hodge, Walker Named
Mr. And Miss LHS 2006
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Homecoming festivities for Lafayette High School have
not been finalized, but news and excitement is already
buzzing around campus about the new Mr. and Miss
LHS 2006. The two students that received this honor are
Charles Hodge and Katy Jo Walker.

Mayo Volunteer Fire Chief Lawson Resigns
Tyre Takes Over As New Chief
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
James Lawson recently resigned from the position of
Mayo Volunteer Fire Chief citing a growing concern and
dissatisfaction with the way certain issues were being
handled from within the department. Although he is no
longer serving as Fire Chief, Lawson stated that because
of the support of residents in Lafayette County, he still
works as a volunteer assisting other volunteer firefight-
ers responding to fire calls.

Lafayette County Students
Return To School With A Smile
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
On Monday, August 7, students at both Lafayette Ele-
mentary and Lafayette High School began arriving on
campus at 7:30 a.m. with a smile on their faces ready to
begin another school year. Many of the students came to
school by bus, some were dropped off by their parents,
and others either walked, drove their own vehicle, or
rode their bicycle.

SEPTEMBER
Resources Available For
Grandparents Raising Their Grandchildren
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
If you are currently facing one or more adversities as
you are raising your grandchildren, you are not alone.
"Grandparents raising grandchildren is a phenomena
that affects families of all ethnic, financial, and educa-
tional backgrounds," the National Center on Grandpar-
ents Raising Grandchildren said.

Grandparents raising
grandchildren in a troubled world
Hatch Bend resident tells his success story
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
George Dunn is a local living example of how grand-
parents have raised their grandchildren successfully, re-
gardless of how many adversities this world throws at
their feet. He hopes his success story will provide inspi-


ration and encouragement
to grandparents every-
where, and especially for
those in our county, who
are raising their grandchil-
dren in a troubled world.

Ludger "Pep" Pepin
Visits Mayo
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Ludger."Pep" Pepin vist-
ed Mayo residents on
Wednesday, September 6,
ini the lobby of the
Lafayette State Bank. He
talked about the National
Wheelchair Veterans
Games and being a very


.active participant since
1999.
Pepin is a combat-wounded veteran of Vietnam. He
served as a Seabee in the Navy.

Lafayette County Industrial
Park Adds 8,000 Square Feet
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
A groundbreaking ceremony for the expansion of the
Lafayette County Industrial Park was held on Friday,
September 8, at noon. Those present at the ceremony
were Charles Driver, Gail Garrard, Jack Byrd, and Ernest
Jones, Lafayette County Commissioners; Elvoy Land and
Angie Ceraso, members of the Develpment Authority;
Hal Lynch, Contractor; Chuck Clemons, State Director of
Rural Development; Lyn Bannister from Senator Nel-
son's Office; Kevin Doyle, from Senator Martinez's Of-
fice.; and, Mary Gavin. Mary Miles, and Steven Dix from
Rural Development.

OCTOBER
Little Miss Pioneer Day
has new sponsor
Mowrey steps down, Lyons takes the helm
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Tammy Mowrey crowned the winners of Little Miss
Pioneer Day for the last time on Saturday, September 23,
at the Mayo Community Center. At this year's event, 70
girls applied, but only 60 showed up to compete, accord-
ing to Mowrey. She has been the organizer and sponsor
of the event for 11 years.

New subdivision to bring additional revenue
to Lafayette County
small town of Day to experience new growth
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
The times are changing, and so is the landscape of the
town of Day. This small country town, rich in history, is
going to experience a growth spurt Lafayette County has
not seen. for many years. Day is approximately 14 miles
northwest of Mayo.

Pioneer Day 2006 Granny and Pappy
"Originators of Pioneer Day"
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
In 1971, when Jim and Claire France made Lafayette
County their home, they were completely incognizant of
the type of impact they would have upon this small, yet
close-knit community in the years that followed. Their
strong love toward and dedication to-preserving the his-
tory of this county won them recognition and they were
named this year's Granny and Pappy on Wednesday, Oc-
tober 4.

Pioneer Day 2006...Huge Success!
Approximately 20,000 Participated
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
If you were unable to attend this year's Pioneer Day on
Saturday, Oct. 14, and Sunday, Oct. 15, you missed out
on a lot of pickin' and grinnin', and plenty of good eatin'.
The skies were clear, a cool fall breeze was gently blow-
ing, and there were no hints of rain. "The Lord blessed us
*with a beautiful day," Jim Hollis, Lafayette County
Chamber of Commerce member, said.

NOVEMBER
Senior Class of 1955 Donate "Triad of
Excellence" to Lafayette High School
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Lafayette High School continues its journey of
excellence with a collection of awards in a 24 sq.
ft. wall-mounted display case donated by the se-
nior class of 1955. The generous gift, at a cost of
$3,000, was installed before homecoming on Oct.
24, during their class reunion.

Zoning Board Addresses Heated Issue
After much debate and discussion, new proposed
restaurant will be able to serve alcohol
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Wally Powell went before the Zoning Board
on Monday, Nov. 27, to seek an exception to Lighthi
serve alcoholic beverages along with their meals present
at his restaurant that he and his wife, Vicky, plan Fifth anc
to open in the building to the right of New Be- Mikell.


house Christian Academy
ts Patriotic Program
d sixth grade students at LCA recite the American Creed. Photo: Ira


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 7A


THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007


innings Church on mainstreet in Mayo. The meeting
was held in the county commissioners meeting room at 7
p.m.

Proposed Restaurant On
Main Street Raises Concerns
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
A new restaurant is planned to be constructed on
mainstreet in Mayo next to New Beginnings Church. Ac-
cording to Mayo Town Hall, the restaurant is owned by
Wally and Vicky Powell of Mayo.
Serious questions have arisen regarding this new ven-
ture from concerned citizens of Lafayette County who
are very adamantly opposed to it because of the alcoholic
beverage issue. Advocates of the business, on the other
hand, say it will be of great benefit to the community and
will be family-oriented.

Three Year Old Battles WILMS Disease
Strong Heart Keeps Her Fighting
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
When you watch three year old Lanah Parker playing
with a bubbly expression upon her face and a bounce in
her step, you may not be able to tell how much pain she
has endured over the past year. She is a sight to behold
and her story about her strong will to overcome her
struggles with cancer will give you goose bumps as well
as bring warmth to your heart. Her family hopes her suc-
cess story will give others the boost of confidence they
need to keep fighting and not to lose hope should you
find yourself in similar circumstances.

Lighthouse Christian Academy
Presents Patriotic Program
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Dressed in patriotic regalia and colors, the children at
the Lighthouse Christian Academy put onI a patriotic
program that received a standing ovation from the audi-
ence as well as thunderous applause. This was the third
annual program presented by LCA.

DECEMBER
Judge Land Roasted And Toasted
Honoring 22 Years Of Service
Ira Mikell, Free P.ress Reporter
For several weeks, Judge Harlow Hank Land, Jr., knew
about his retirement party, but had no idea what else the
Lafayette County Commissioners and others had in
mind. He was completely unaware that a surprise cere-
mony was being put together in his honor for everything
he has done since donning the judicial garb in 1985. The
festivities began in the courtroom at the Lafayette Coun-
ty Courthouse at 4 p.m., followed by a reception at 6 p.m.
in the Lafayette High School cafetorium on Tuesday,
Dec. 19.

Will there be a fourth
Volunteer Fire Department?
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
Despite objections from David Tyre, Fire Chief for the
Mayo Volunteer Fire Department, and other concerned
members of the community, Lafayette County Commis-
sioners Jack Byrd, "Boogie" Pridgeon, Donnie Hamlin,
Charles Driver, and Ernest Jones have forged ahead to
develop another volunteer fire department.

Christmas parade and park festivities
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
A fairly large crowd of homefolk and visitors from
Mayo and surrounding areas came to watch the lighted'
Christmas parade scoot down mainstreet, Mayo, and also
participate in the festivities at the park that followed on
Saturday night, Dec. 9.

Mayo Town Park receives face-lift
Ira Mikell, Free Press Reporter
During the Christmas festivities at the Mayo Town
Park on Saturday, Dec. 9, everyone who was there was
able to get a glimpse of the changes taking place. Linda
Cone, of Mayo Town Hall, said the renovations to the
park should be completed very soon.








PAGE 8A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


FFA Chapter co
On December 5, 2006 the Lafayette FFA Chapter traveled
to Cross City to compete in the sub-district contest. The
dairy teams took 'a written test and the Sr. team will advance
to compete in the live evaluation on February 14 and 15 in
Tampa at the Florida State Fair. The members of the dairy
team are Blaine Hendrick, Brandon Adams, Kevin Waters,
and Quinn Frier. Mary Thomas Hart competed and won
first place in the Middle School Prepared Public Speaking
contest. Cecelia Koon competed and won first place in the
Middle School Extemporaneous Public Speaking contest.
The Opening and Closing Ceremony Team won first place
in their contest and the members of that team are: Ashlyn
Buchanan, Heidi Hendrick, Julia Bames, Olivia Celedon,
Emily Koon, Jane Hannah Hewitt and Shelby Hart.
The Middle School Parliamentary Procedure Team won
second place and the members of that team are: Mary
Thomas Hart, Kali Sharpe, Brett Maxwell, Ellen Lashley,
Shelby Hart and Lindsey O'Steen. The High School Parlia-
mentary Procedure Team won third place in their contest
and the members are: Kevin Waters, Lacey Moore, Brett
Maxwell, Courtney Reinbott, Nathan Broughton and Bran-
don Adams. The sponsors for the teams are Emily Land and
Julie Conn.
The first place winners will competed in Ft. White on'Jan-
uary 18, 2007.


THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007


Smpetes in Sub-District Contest



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Sponsors, Emily Land and Julie Conn with Mary Thomas Hart.


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THURSDAY JANUARY 25, 2007 THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 9A


Lafayette


Continued From Page 1A
Community Center.
The small portion of the
money that Lafayette
County received was part
of a $13,500,000 grant that
the USDA Forest Service
gave to Florida to help re-
pair damage from the four
major hurricanes 2004.
Marshall stated that this
funding was divided
among the counties ac-
cording to how severe the
damage was in their coun-
ties. Those eligible for the
grant included local gov-
ernments, non-profit or-
ganizations, educational
institutions, and native
american tribes. This
grant allows for the re-
placing of damaged trees
and to plant new ones that
will help to protect certain
areas that are deemed vul-
nerable to future storm
damage.
According to Marshall,
all of the trees that were
planted were provided by
Central Florida Land and
Timber Nursery, owned
by Marvin Buchanan in


Day. "The county planted
98 trees consisting of Pond
Cypress, Magnolias,
Crape Myrtles, Live Oaks,
and American Hollies,"
Marshall said.
Lafayette County Divi-
sion of Forestry, US
Forestry Service, Lafayette
County, and the Lafayette
County Extension Service
(IFAS) worked together to
complete this project. The
Mayo Correctional Insti-
tution Work Camp Crew
assisted in planting the
trees.

Birding walk
Friends of the Suwan-
nee River State Park will
host a birding walk be-
ginning at 8 a.m., Satur-
day, Jan. 27. Meet at the
park office. The entrance
fee is required. Enjoy the
migratory residents. The
citizens group hosts a
birding walk the fourth
Saturday throughout
most of the year. Info:
Schoenfelders, 850-971-,
5354, wbs@surfbest.net.


A little spring cleaning for


your trees and shrubs


By Sharon Lilly
Spring is a time when we tradi-
tionally do some thorough cleaning
around the house washing win-
dows, scrubbing floors, and cleaning
out cluttered closets. But did you
know that spring can be a great time
to give your trees and shrubs a little
cleaning too? .
When arborists professionals in
the care of trees talk about "clean-
ing," it means to prune out dead, dy-
ing, diseased, and broken branches
from a tree or shrub. Although clean-
ing can be done throughout the year,
spring is the ideal time, just before
the plant puts out a new flush of
growth.
To maximize flowering on spring-
blooming trees, prune just after your
tree or shrub has finished flowering.
Pruning at this time avoids cutting
off the flower buds for next year. The
general rule of thumb to prune just
after flowering can also be applied to
plants that flower later in the season.
Most routine pruning to remove
weak, diseased or dead limbs can be


accomplished at any time during the
year with little effect on the tree.
Some trees, such as maples and
birches, tend to "bleed" if pruned
early in the spring. This may be un-
sightly, but is of little consequence to
the tree.
A few tree diseases, such as oak
wilt, can be spread when pruning
wounds allow spores access into the.
tree. Susceptible trees should not be
pruned during active transmission
periods.
Heavy pruning just after the
spring growth flush should be avoid-
ed. This is when trees have just ex-
pended a great deal of 'energy to pro-
duce foliage and early shoot growth.
Removal of a large percentage of fo-
liage at this time can stress the tree.
Newly planted trees
Pruning of newly planted trees
should be limited to corrective prun-
ing. Remove torn or broken branch-
es. Save other pruning measures for
the second or third year.
The belief that trees should be
pruned when planted to compensate


for root loss is misguided. Trees
need, their leaves and shoot tips to
provide food and the substances
which stimulate new root produc-
tion. Unpruned trees establish faster,
with a stronger root system than
trees pruned at the time of planting.
Be an informed consumer
One of the best ways to be assured
you are making wise decisions re-

garding your trees is to educate
yourself on some of the basic princi-
ples of tree care. The International
Society of Arboriculture (ISA) offers
a number of brochures designed to
inform consumers about trees. These
can be downloaded at no cost from
www.treesaregood.com.
SGet advice from an arborist
A qualified arborist can give you
sound advice and can provide the
services your trees may need. Good
arborists will perform only accepted
practices. When choosing an arborist,
look for ISA Certification, member-
ship in professional associations, and


SEE LITTLE, PAGE1OA


Toxic


Continued From Page 1A
mite and blasting agents;
reactives such as crystal-
lized ethers, picric acid and
sodium and phosphorus
metals; infectious wastes;
or pressurized cylinders
such as compressed gases;

Jackson
Continued From Page 1A
Grace is six years old, Au-
drey is five years old, and
Bishop is nine months old.
The Jacksons are expecting
their fourth child in May.
Jackson and his wife are


For more information,
call the County Extension
office at 386-294-1279. The
Toxic Roundup is spon-
sored by the Florida De-
partment of Environmen-
tal Protection and
Lafayette County Commis-
sion.


actively involved in Ro-
tary, church, and school
activities. "My wife and I
enjoy being a part of this
community and believe
that there is not a better
place to raise a family,"
Jackson said.


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL PAGE 9A


A








PG A T


Mayo Legals
AGENDA
LAFAYETTE COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
SPECIAL SESSION, JANUARY 31, 2007
Special Session, January 31, 2007, in the
School Board Administration Building begin-
ning at 11 a.m.
I. Call toprder
II. Presentation
SACS District Accreditation Oral Exit Report
III. Action Items
A. Award bid: LES Four Classroom Project
ANY PERSON'WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL
ANY DECISION MADE BY THE BOARD
WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSID-
ERED AT SUCH MEETING WILL NEED A
RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS, AND
THAT, FOR SUCH PURPOSE HE OR SHE
MAY NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM
RECORD OFTHE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE,
WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTI-
MONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE
APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
1/25-1-D
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 06-140-CA
DIVISION
ASHLEIGH D. BROWN,
Petitioner
and
KEVIN DEWAYNE WORLEY,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: Kevin Dewayne Worley whose last known
address is Bonifay, Florida.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been
filed against you and that you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if any,
to it on Ashleigh D. Brown whose address is
16921 186th Street, Live Oak, Florida 32060
on or before February 1, 2007, and file the
original with the clerk of this Court at P.O. Box
88, Mayo, Florida 32066, Lafayette Clerk of
Court before service on Petitioner or immedi-
ately thereafter. If you fall to do so, a default
may be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this case,
including orders, are available at the Clerk
of the Circuit Court's office. You may re-
view these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office notified of your current ad-
dress. (You may file Notice of Current Ad-
dress, Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in
this lawsuit will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain auto-
matic disclosure of documents and infor-
mation. Failure to comply can result In
sanctions, including dismissal or striking
of pleadings.
Dated: December 27, 2006.
RICKY LYONS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Hannah C. Owens
SDeputy Clerk
01/11, 18,25, 02/01
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Lafayette County Commission will be ac-
cepting sealed bids to re-roof the Agricultural
Complex (Extension Service) Building. The
bids willbe6 opened at a regular Board meet-
ing on February 12, 2007 at 11 a.m. Bids must
be turned in to the Clerk of Court's office by 12
p.m. on Friday, February 9, 2007. Listed below
are the specifications for the job:
1. Remove existing shingles, felt, power vents
and other accessories
A) Install new boots on pipe penetrations.
B) Inspect all roof accessories before rein-
stalling (repair-replace)
C) Roof to be properly vented per FBC 2004.
2. Inspect condition of sheathing, nail patterns
repair or replace as needed
3. Install thirty (30) pound felt (per manufac-
ture recommendations)
4. Install new drip edge to match existing facial
metal
5. Install Tamko 30 year Architect shingle or
equal (per manufacture recommendations)
6. Permit to be issued by Building Department
and inspected
7. State certified or local (registered) roofing li-
cense required for bidding
8. Dumping of debris will be worked out with
the Clerk of Court.
The Board of County Commissioners of
Lafayette County, Florida reserves the right to
Reject any and all bids, to waive formalities, to
re-advertise and award the bid to the best in-
terest of Lafayette County, Florida and to ac-
cept the lowest and best bid.
By Order of:
T. Jack Byrd, Chairman
1/18-1/25-2-D
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
LAFAYETTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 06-141-CA
L. D. REVELS, JR., and
BILLIE T. REVELS,
Husband and Wife,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
ESTATE OF W.G. CROFT, SR., ALL HEIRS,
DEVISEES, AND/OR OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST W. G. CROFT, IF LIVING,
AND .IF DECEASED, HIS UNKNOWN
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
CREDITORS, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST HIM; AND ,
ESTATE OF EULA CROFT, ALL HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, AND/OR OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST EULA CROFT, IF LIVING,
AND IF DECEASED, HER UNKNOWN
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
CREDITORS, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST HER;
AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY WHICH IS
THE SUBJECT MATTER OF THIS ACTION,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE


TO: ESTATE OF W.G. CROFT, SR., ALL
HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND/OR OTHER PER-
SONS CLAIMING INTEREST BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST W. G. CROFT, IF LIV-
ING, AND IF DECEASED, HIS UNKNOWN
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
CREDITORS, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST HIM; DECEASED/RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN
AND
ESTATE OF EULA CROFT, ALL HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, AND/OR OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST EULA CROFT, IF LIVING,
AND IF DECEASED, HER UNKNOWN
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
CREDITORS, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST HER; DECEASED/RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
has been commenced for Complaint to Quiet
Title on the following real property, lying and
being situated in Lafayette County, Florida,


Mayo Legals
more particularly described as follows:
A parcel of land in Section 1, Township 5
South, Range 11 East, Lafayette County, Flori-
da, being more particularly described as fol-
lows: For the POINT OF BEGINNING, com-
mence at the Southwest Corner of the South-
east Quarter of Section 1, Township 5 South,
Range 11 East; thence N 88 25'25" W along
the South line of said section a distance of
520.57 feet to the East Right of Way line of
State Road 51; thence N 04'23'49" E along
said Right of Way line a distance of 50.02 feet;
thence S 8825'25" E a distance of 886.06
feet; thence S 046'09" E parallel with the
West line of the Southeast Quarter of said
section a distance of 50.00 feet to the South
line of said section; thence N 88'25'25" W
along said South line a distance of 370.00 feet
to close on the POINT OF BEGINNING.
The above described parcel contains 1.02
acres.
This action has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fense, if any, to it to Leenette W. McMillan, At-
torney at Law, whose address is Post Office
Box 1388, 152 West Main Street, Suite C,
Mayo, Florida 32066, on or before.thirty (30)
days after the first publication of this Notice of
Action and file the original with the Clerk of
this Court, whose address is Post Office Box
88, Mayo, FL 32066, either on or before Feb-
ruary 9, 2007, or immediately thereafter; oth-
erwise a default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint.
This Notice shall be published once a week for
four (4) consecutive weeks in the MAYO FREE
PRESS.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of this
Court on this 28th day of December, 2006.
RICKY LYONS
Clerk of the Circuit Court "
By: Hannah C. Owens
As Deputy Clerk
LEENETTE W. MCMILLAN
Florida Bar No.: 0075779
Post Office Box 1388
Mayo, Florida 32066
(386) 294-1688
Attorney for Plaintiffs
1/4-1/25-4-D


Little


Continued From Page 9A

ask for proof of insurance. Be weary of
individuals who go 'door-to-door offer-
ing bargains for doing tree work.
Don't be afraid to check references.
Six simple strategies
for spring Pruning
1 : Blossom basics timing is
everything. To maximize flow-
ering on spring-blooming
trees, prune just after your tree
or shrub has finished flowering. Prun-
ing at this time avoids cutting off the
flower buds for next year.
: Less is more when pruning a
newly planted tree. Limit
pruning at the time of planting
to removal of damaged
branches. The tree will develop a
stronger, more extensive root system if
it has a fuller crown.
: Flushing is for toilets. Cutting
Branches flush with the trunk
removes the important
3 "branch collar," which helps
the tree to close the wound. Cut just
outside the branch collar at the base of
the branch.
: Put away the paints. There is
no need to apply wound
dressings. Research has shown
that the common wound
dressings do not inhibit decay, do not


prevent insect entry, and do not bring
about faster wound closure. In fact,
many of the commonly used dressings
slow wound closure.
: Topless trees are indecent.
Don't top trees! Topping trees
can make them prone to fail-
ure down the road. Topping
leads to decay and weakly attached
branches. Besides, topping makes trees
ugly.
: No tourniquets required.
While some trees such as
maples and birches will
"bleed" or lose sap from prun-
ing cuts made early in the spring, this
bleeding does not hurt the tree. Be-
cause bleeding is unsightly, you might
want to prune these species during the
dormant season.


American Red

Cross Adult

CPR/AED class

in Lake City
American Red Cross of Suwannee Val-
ley; Adult CPRIAED cla:s; 6-9 3U p.m.,
Monday, Jan. 29: 264 NE Hernando
Av.e., Suite 102. Lake City Info- 386-
752-0650.


Eye on the

local news


I'.


How are we doing?
We'd like to hear from our
readers to see how you
think we're doing in
covering the local news.
Is there is a particular type
of news coverage that you'd
like to see? Please let us
hear from you and we'll do
our best to make it happen.
Email us at
mayofreepress@alltel.net,
write to us at
P.O. Box 248, Mayo,
or call 294-1210.


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PAGE 10A THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007


,~at~~


Llr








SLAFAYETTE COUNTY







Lafayette County's news source since 1888. We're proud to serve!
THURS Aj JANAR 25 207Th MyoFeePrssPae


Reid outstanding


as Lafayette turns


back Hawthorne
by Ed Taylor
Sports Correspondent
For most of the 2006-07 basketball season, Lafayette
girls coach Jimmy Blankenship has been more of a sub-
dued coach just walking the sidelines and having not too
much to say during the progress of a game. The usually
quiet Lady Hornet mentor came alive along the sidelines
last Saturday night as third ranked Lafayette entertained
eighth ranked Hawthorne in a shootout at the Lafayette
High School gymnasium.
Eighth-grader Sunshine Reid did it all for the Lady Hor-
nets en route to a convincing 58-
45 victory. Lafayette pulled out
"We took a one point victory in an earlier
matchup on the road at
some Hawthorne. This game was an
shots we even bigger game because of the
1 state rankings of the two
did not schools. "It was, a big win for
us," said Coach Blankenship. "It
need to was a big win over a quality op-
ponent. We told the girls that
Sbe taking." we needed to come out quick
and not let them get a quick
Coach Jimmy anu
starton us.
Blankenship Reid came to play against
Hawthorne and that was evi-
dent from the onset. Reid scored
21 points, pulled down 12 rebounds and dished off seven
assists. Reid dominated the boards' against the taller
Hawthorne Lady Hornets. The win allowed Lafayette to
go to 20-1 on the season. It also was the final home game
of the season for the Lady Hornets.
"Sunshine stepped up real good for us," said Coach
Blankenship. "She had to have a nice stat sheet tonight.
But she seems to always step up when we play the big
teams. She did a great job on the boards and played
smart."
Game scoring honors went to Lafayette's Natalie Land
who netted 27 points. She had 10 rebounds and three as-
sists.
Coach Blankenship liked the win over a state ranked
team but admitted that the game revealed some flaws in
his teams play against a quality team. "There were some
things we didn't do well," he said. "We didn't press as
much as we wanted to. We knew it was going to be a half-
court type of game. They are so big and our press gave
them some things early."
It was Reid who played far above her age. when she
scored her teams first seven points. The Lady Hornets
press bothered Hawthorne in the early goings causing the
visiting Lady Hornets to turn the ball over four times be-
fore they got on the scoreboard at the 5:03 mark of the
first period. Land, who was doubled teamed most of the
night, completed an old-fashion three-point play that
made it a 12-1 game. She later drained a three-point bas-
ket and Lafayette led 15-3.
Coach Blankenship said his team made some mental
mistakes but they also took shots that were not there. "We
took some shots we did not need to be taking," he said. "I
thought we rebounded well with them being so tall. I told
the girls that if they would position themselves we would
, be all right."
Lafayette got solid floor play from Kelsy Land and
. ;Sharhonda Cherry. Both contributed two points each.
Cartesha Macklin, another outstanding eighth-grader,
chipped in with four points.
The Lady Hornets of Lafayette took a 34-23 lead to the


SEE REID, PAGE 2B


LAFAYETTE'S SUNSHINE REID (5) WAS ALL business Saturday
night in leading the Lady Hornets to a 58-45 win over eighth
ranked Hawthorne. Reid scored 21 points, pulled in 12 rebounds
and had seven assists. The Lady Hornets will close their regular
season at Dixie County Friday night. photo by Ed Taylor


LAFAYETTE'S JAMAL REID PULLED in a rebound against Suwannee last Friday night. The Hornets
edged.the Bulldogs 53-52 on Jonathan Sellers free throw with no time left in. the game. It was the
final home game of the season for the Hornets. photo by Ed Taylor



'Lafavette escapes




Suwannee 53-52

Seller's free throw sinks Bulldogs


by Ed Taylor
Sports Correspondent

The scoreboad read:
Suwannee 52,
Lafayette 52.

The time on the
scoreboard read:
00:00..

At the free throw line
was Jonathan Sellers, junior
guard for the Hornets with
no time left in the game. A
miss meant overtime. A
made free throw meant vic-
tory.
In the balance was a gal-
lant comeback effort by
Suwannee.
After the Bulldogs had
tied the game at 52-52 on a
lay up by Marcus Walker
with six seconds left to
play, Sellers speed got him
down court quick as he
went to the basket only to
be fouled just before the
last second ticked off. After
the three officials huddled,
they ruled that Sellers had
been fouled before time ran
out. Sellers was awarded
two shots from the charity
stripe knowing they were
big ones.
Alone at the free throw
stripe, Sellers only needed
to make one of the two to
secure a win for his team in
their final home game of
the season. He lofted the
first attempt and the ball
bounced wide off the left
part of the rim. In disgust,
Sellers walked away from
the charity stripe. His sec-
ond attempt though was on
target as it nestled in the
basket securing a 53-52 vic-
tory for the homestanding


Hornets.
It was an elated Lafayette
coach who celebrated with
his team. "Tonight we start-
ed knocking down our free
throws," said Coach Derek
Garland. "It was our big
guys who stepped up for
us. The ones we wanted at
the line. Sellers did a great
job for us and he made a.
big, big free throw for us
tonight."
Lafayette overcame a'
sluggish start only to right
themselves in picking up
their seventh win of the
season against 10 losses.
The Hornets had built a 10
point advantage early in
the third period until Jay
Chambers got the hot hand
". .. .',;:*


for Suwannee-in bringing
his team back with two
three point baskets against
the Hornets 2-3 zone --
something that had been
good to the Hornets in pre-
vious games. "We had to
come out of our zone be-
cause 33 (Chambers) got
hot. I knew they were
quick and we were kind of
tired," Garlandc said. "We
have had success lately
with the zone that is the
reason we played it
tonight. Once 33 started
hitting we had to man up
(go to a man-to-man de-
fense) and put a hand in
33s face."

SEE ESCAPES, PAGE 2B
:. .1 A.,: .
"", ." : n


4" ,
.


LAFAYETTE GUARD, ERIC MCINTYRE (10) DRIVES against
Suwannee's Marcus Walker (55) last Friday night. The Hornets
pulled out a hard fought 53-52 win over the Bulldogs. McIntyre
scored eight points in the win, photo by Ed Taylor


Lafayette


holds off


Branford
by Ed Taylor
Sports Correspondent
In a low-scoring affair,
the Lafayette Hornets
held off a determined
Branford team in district
play last week en route to
a 44-38 win. Josh Scott
tossed in 13 points to lead
the Hornets scoring.
Joseph Edwards netted 10
points. The Hornets im-
proved to 7-9 on the sea-
son but more importantly
they secured a second
seed in the upcoming dis-
trict tournament by going
to 6-2 in the district
standings. Lafayette has
dropped district games to
both Trenton and Bron-
son but later avenged
both defeats.
The Hornets held a 14
point advantage entering
the final quarter. Shylar
-Morgan's three-pointer
just ahead of the buzzer
in the third period gave
the Hornets a 42-28 mar-
gin. But Lafayette seemed
not able to stand prosper-
ity and saw Branford
claw their way back into
the game.
Branford held Lafayette
without a field goal in the
final eight minutes. Coach
Derek Garland pulled out
a daring move by having
his team milk the clock
with over three minutes-
to play. The stall tactics
kept Branford on the back

SEE LAFAYETTE, PAGE 2B


LAFAYETTE'S JOSH SCOTT
(33) scored 13 points, includ-
ing two three-point baskets, as
the Hornets posted a 44-38
win over district rival Branford
last week. The Hornets im-
proved to 6-2 in district play
and 7-9 overall, photo by Ed Taylor


Branford

JV's fall

to Lafayette

74-50
by Ed Taylor
Sports Correspondent
Kade Bell and Arthur
Sellers combined for 43
points as the Lafayette
Hornets junior varsity
team posted their sev-
enth consecutive win to
go over the five hundred
mark for the first time
this season. The junior
Hornets go to 7-6 on the
season. They dropped
their first six games of
'the season but has drasti-
cally improved since.
then. Coach Mike Harris
has his ballclub playing
the best basketball of the
season.
Bell led all scorers with
24 points in his teams 74-









PAGE 2B .- THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL THURSDAY, JANUARY 25. 2007


ARTHUR SELLERS (33) SCORED 19 points to
help lead the Lafayette junior Hornets to a 74-50
win over visiting Branford. last week. It was the
seventh consecutive win for the Hornets.


Reid


Continued From Page 1B

locker room at the half.
Reid had drilled a three-
point basket and grabbed
an offensive rebound for a
put back that gave the 11
point cushion to the Lady
Hornets.
In the third period, the
Lady Hornets extended
their lead to 13 points on a
nice cross-over dribble and
short jumper from Reid.


k~~~'' '


Macklin hit a short jumper
off a nice assist from Land
and scored again from a
Reid assist that gave
Lafayette an 20 point lead,"
46-26.
The Lady Hornets will be
the number one seed in the
upcoming girls District
Tournament at Trenton
next week. Coach Blanken-
ship said his team will re-
group and work out some
kinks in their game. "We


will try and do a better job
the next time," he said. "We
need to improve on the
mental part of our game,"
Lafayette will close out
their regular season tomor-
row night (Friday) on the
Road at Dixie County
(Cross City). The Lady
Hornets open district play
January 31 Feb 3. The
Lady Hornets finished 8-0
against district foes this
season.


Escapes


Continued From Page 1B

Chambers second trey
narrowed the margin to
three points, 32-19. The
Hornets could only man-
age a five point lead the
rest of the third period
taking a 44-39 lead into the
fourth quarter. Sharrod
Lee came off the Suwannee
bench and controlled the
fourth quarter for the Bull-
dogs with three consecu-
tive rebound put backs.
Marcus Walker made it a.
one point game, 48-47 on a
strong move. inside.
With 1:04 left to play,
Suwannee reclaimed the
lead at 49-48. Walker's free
throw with 25 seconds to
play gave the Bulldogs a
two-point 50-48 lead.
Walker missed the second
attempt with Jonathan Ed-
wards getting the rebound
for Lafayette. Lee was
whistled for an over the
back call where Edwards
sank two free throws to tie
the game at 50-50. On an
exchange of baskets the
two teams remained tied at
52-52 before Sellers hit the
big free throw for the win.
. The problem of finishing


plays underneath the bas-
ket almost came back to
haunt the Hornets against
a good Suwannee team.
"We had started to getting
better in the last few
games," said Coach Gar-
land. "Joey (Watson)
missed an easy one. Joseph
(Edwards) on some put
backs missed some easy
ones. But I have to credit
the team, they kept fight-
ing back and kept crashing
the boards."
Coach Garland said he
felt his team failed to re-
bound well against the
Bulldogs. "We did not re-
bound well tonight out of
zone," said Garland. "We
gave them too many sec-
ond chances."
It was the second game
in as many nights for the
Hornets, third in the week
and six in the past two
weeks. The Hornet coach
said his team may have
been feeling the crunch of
it all. "We looked like a
tired team. Having played
McClay the night before.
But this team played hard
and they did enough to
win."
Coach Garland cited the


physical play of the game
as taking the Hornets out
of their game. "We just
have to learn to adjust
when it goes that way," he
said. "We need to do a bet-
ter job of adjusting to it
early."
Edwards led the Hor-
nets scoring with his 14
points. Sellers finished
with 13 points but his
overall play on the floor
will not show up in the fi-
nal stats. Eric McIntyre
added eight points with
Watson finishing with six
points. Watson had two
big rebounds for the Hor-
nets. Jamal Reid scored
five points with Shylar
Morgan, Josh Scott and
James Dees scoring two
apiece. Darren Powe had
one point.
Lee led Suwannee with
his 12 points followed by
Walker who finished with
11. Chambers had three
three-point baskets for his
nine points. Scott Butler
and Frank Snead netted
eight points each.
The loss dropped the
Bulldogs to 4-14 on the
season. Lafayette im-
proved to 7-10.


Lafayette
Continued From Page 1B

of their heels just watching as the
Hornets held the ball.
The visitors got a break twice when
Lafayette turned the ball over two
mental mistakes. However, Branford
could only convert one miscue for a
basket in trailing 42-31.
Brian Bullock's three-point basket
narrowed the Hornet lead to eight, 44-
36 with less than a minute to play.
They missed two other opportunities
but could not capitalize on two Hor-
net turnovers and missed free throws.
Lafayette controlled the basketball
and went on to post the win.
Lafayette never trailed in the game
opening up a quick 10-0 lead at the
start of the game. Edwards and Scott
led the first quarter scoring that net-
ted the Hornets a 15-8 first quarter
lead. Both scored four points in the
period. McIntyre drilled a three-point
basket for a 15-6 lead before Jacob
Luvlam scored on a long jumper. Tim
Clark made it a four point game with
a free throw and a rebound basket be-
fore the Hornets went on a 6-0 run
for a 10 point lead in the second peri-
od. Scott led a 13-5 run giving
Lafayette a 28-16 lead. Scott drained
his second trey and just missed the
third with 2:18 to play in the half. The
Hornets owned the 30-16 lead at the
half.
McIntyre finished with seven points
for the Hornets with teammate
Jonathan Sellers scoring five. Morgan
finished with five and Jamal Reid had
four.



Lafayette will close

out their regular

season tomorrow
/
night (Friday) on

the Road at Dixie

County (Cross City).

The Lady Hornets

open district play

January 31- Feb 3.

The Lady Hornets

finished 8-0 against

district foes this

season.


:$ .~ ~i
A.


photo by Ed Taylor


PAGE 2B THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007








...T...J.ANUARY.25. 20 THEMA i P M F


What you should know



about debt collection


If consumers do not
have the money to pay all
their debts, they must
make difficult choices
about which debts to pay
first. Constant harassing
calls and letters from col-
lection agencies can cause
consumers to pay the
wrong debts first, result-
ing in serious conse-
quences for the family.
Just as dangerous to the
consumer is feeling over-
whelmed, and ignoring all
bills in the unrealistic
hope that they will simply
go away.
The following provides
a summary of your rights
when dealing with collec-
tors and some guidelines
for determining what
debts should be given pri-
ority in a financial crisis.
Even when you do not
have the money to pay
bills, you do not have to
be subjected to collector
pressure tactics.
WHICH DO I PAY
FIRST?
You should use your
money to pay for what is
most necessary for your
family food, clothing,
shelter, and continued
utility service. Because
there is very little a debt
collector can actually do
to you, debt collection ef-
forts should have little ef-
fect on your decision
about which debts to pay
first. Threats to bring suit,
to seize household goods
or garnish wages should
be given little weight un-
less a lawsuit has actually
been filed and you receive
court papers.
SOME GENERAL RULES
FOR SETTING PAY-
MENT PRIORITIES
ARE:
Mortgage and rent
payments should always
come first.w.
Make whatever pay-


ments are necessary to in-
sure essential utility ser-
vices are not disconnect-
ed. The utility company
may not require payment
in full even if you are be-
hind.
A car loan should be
paid after critical items
(food, rent, clothing), but
before most other debts
for nonessentials.
Generally, loans with
only household goods as
collateral should be paid
after more pressing debts.
Debts without proper-
ty pledges as collateral,
such as credit cards, doc-
tor and hospital bills, and
accounts with merchants,
should have low priority.
The threat of a lawsuit
should not raise the prior-
ity of a debt above that of
mortgage, rent, utility
payments, and a car loan.
Do not pay those
debts that you have a
good legal reason not to
pay, such as when the car
you borrowed the money
for is a lemon. Instead,
seek legal advice as to
how to best fight for your
rights.
When a creditor wins
a lawsuit, the consumer's
home and other assets
may be at risk depending
on state law and the
amount of equity in the
property. If the property
is truly at risk, make this
a high priority debt.
Tax liabilities and stu-
dent loans should be paid
ahead of low priority but
after the top priority
debts.
The foregoing advice is
provided by the lawyers
at Three Rivers Legal Ser-
vices, Inc. a non-profit
corporation which re-
ceives funds from various
local agencies and indi-
viduals, as well as from
the federal government


through Legal Services
Corporation (LSC).
For specific advice on
your particular situation,
we suggest that you con-
sult with a lawyer of your
choosing. If you cannot af-
ford a lawyer, you may
call your local legal ser-
vices office to find out if
you qualify for free legal
assistance.


Free Hunter

Safety

Course
Lafayette County:
From 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Feb. 10 and 11 at the
Mayo Correctional fa-
cility, 8784 W. U.S. 27.


Groundhogs belong to
the group of large ground
squirrels known as mar-
mots. While most marmots
live in the mountains,
groundhogs, also known as
woodchucks, are actually
lowland creatures, hence
the reason many people
have seen or can recognize
a groundhog at first glance.
Another reason for that is
the groundhog's prevalence
in popular culture, particu-
larly that of North America.
Each year, in both the Unit-
ed States and Canada,'
Groundhog Day is celebrat-
ed. Traditionally the day
serves to determine how
long winter will last. If the
groundhog sees his shad-
ow, that means there will
be six more weeks of win-
ter. If not, that means win-
ter will end shortly. Differ-
ent regions of the country
boast different local prog-
nosticating groundhogs, the
most notable of which is
Pennsylvania's Punx-
sutawney Phil. While the
earliest American reference
to Groundhog Day dates
back to the mid-nineteenth
century, the holiday actual-
ly extends back several cen-


I p .hTTai l


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(Behind Foodland Shopping Center)
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turies into German and
French folklore. Perhaps
the holiday's ability to
withstand the test of time
is a testament to the physi-
cal strength of the ground-
hog. Known for its cute


We love you!
Love,
Nana and Papa
Linda &
Sammie Smith


.' .n


and cuddly appearance,
the groundhog is actually
quite strong. Exceptional
burrowers, groundhogs are
said to move 700 pounds of
dirt when digging a bur-
row.


Happy 3rd

Birthday

Casey!

January 22


Wa handle .7o t an
Bank Payoffs -
-Title Work
Financing
>Warranty
",Scheduling Appointments
> and more...
Bring your registration and/or title and your bike.
Come down for a free appraisal and let us show you
how to sell your bike the Interstate Cycle way!








Interstate CYCLES
T 580 Southwest Gateway Drive, Lake City, FL
Open:Tues. Fri., 9-6; i
S'Sat 9-4 (386) 758-2453
I N -877-596-2i453



UNIQUE EVENT TO BE

HOSTED BY LOCAL

CAR DEALER
Valdosta, Georgia


S3 months


Soft the



SMayo Free Press













Hurry, you must call and ask for the

"Sweetheart of a Deal" by

Wednesday, 5 p.m. February 14th.
pr'-II .:..w'. ITI.J I I-. I .r. ....l I nlit bi.. I a ll% v.s.. : n.i l e F r ti a3 .1 a P ,


Mayo e utPss

PO Box 248, Mayo, FL 32066
t .386-294-1210
w...-ve


Valdosta will again
experience a "first" thanks
to a local business. Prince
Automotive in Valdosta
will be hosting a very
unique type of automotive
event called "Write Your
Own Deal" starting the
Thursday This type of
event is brand new to this
area and is expected to
draw a significant number
of area residents during
it's four day run.
The event functions in a
manner very different
from typical automotive
events. Customers are
actually provided a sales
worksheet on which they
structure their own car
purchase. The worksheet
actually allows the
customer to appraise their
own trade in if they have
one, setting the value and
entering it on the form. the
customer is also asked to
set the price for the vehicle
they are interested in
purchasing on the same
worksheet. After
settingthese two amounts,
the customer is asked to
set the monthly payment
goal, the amount they
would prefer to pay as the
payment on the car they
are interested in
purchasing. Basically the
customer is allowed to set
the price on the vehicle
they want, assign a value
to any vehicle they wish to
trade and set a payment
goal so that financing can
This is a Paid a


be structured to suit their
budget.
According to used car
manager Mike Yates; "It is
an opportunity that we
had to take -advantage of
for our customers.
Allowing them to take
control of all aspects of
the car purchase puts all
the power in their hands
and we couldn't wait to
bring this type of event to
Valdosta. We hope that
everyone in the immediate
area takes the time to
come in during these four
days and see how they like
this new way of buying a
preowned car, truck or suv.
We have over seventy
preowned and one
hundred new vehicles on
the lot and every single
one is approved for the
write your own deal
program."
Although currently
planned as a one time
event for four consecutive
days only, 'this Thursday
through Monday, Yates did
not rule out a return of the
special program if it's
success warranted it.
Special hours will be
offered for this event and
staff will remain on hand
until the last customer on
the lot has the opportunity
the "Write their own deal".
The Prince Automotive
Group is located at 4550
North Valdosta Road off
Interstate 75 at exit 22 in
Valdosta.
advertisement 330338TG


Did You Know?


|


| -


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mavo, FL PAGE 3B


TH-URSD)AY, JANUARY 25, 2007


I


t,,.








PAGE 4B THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL

Be a sport when cheering on kids
Sportsmanship is some- sion. While you may be a plied to all areas of life,"
thing children learn at a very baseball fan, she may like notes Murph. "Keep score at
young age, whether partici- volleyball. Let children try the games, but don't make it
pating in an organized many activities so they can the only thing that matters. If
league, playing on an ex- find the one they enjoy. "My your kid loses, focus on oth-
tracurricular team or joining kids have tried things as var- er successes in the game."
a pick-up game with neigh- ied as swimming to soccer," Cheer on all players
borhood friends. The values offers Murph. "It's only equally. "Learn the names of
children learn through through this experimenta- all the players so you can
sports can provide a number tion that they learn their cheer on everyone equally.
of benefits, from improving range of abilities, talents and Your son or daughter isn't
physical health and teaching interests." the only star of the show -
camaraderie to developing Allow coaches to coach. the team is ultimately what
coordination and learning "We've all heard stories of matters."
how to problem solve. Par- parents and other fans get- More inside sports tips
ents may enhance what their ting in the faces of coaches, from Gregg Murphy can be
children learn through or thinking they can do it found every weeknight on
sports by offering positive better," says Murph. "Re- "Out of Bounds," airing at 7
sideline support and other specting the expertise of the p.m on CN8. The show of-
team-playing behaviors, coach sets a good example fers one-on-one interviews
"Sports can turn from fun for young athletes who with athletes and coaches,
to fury when parents get should also mind the offi- nightly predictions and fast-
caught up in the occasional cial's instructions." paced debates with a team of
drama that occurs during the Teach that sports are not experts. For those wh6 can't
game," says Gregg Murphy just about winning or losing. tune in live at 7, every
a.k.a. Murph, a multiple "It's important for kids to episode is available to Com-
Emmy Award-winning learn the lessons involved cast Digital cable customers
sports journalist and host of with winning and losing, as via ON DEMAND for three
CN8's weeknight sports pro- this is something that is ap- days following broadcast.
gram, "Out of Bounds." "I
encourage adults to under-
stand how their behavior
can affect their children and uwannee Valley Regional
find ways to ensure their
kids take away all the fun Science and Engineering Fair
and athleticism sports of- The Suwannee Valley Regional Science and Engi-
fers." neering Fair will also be held at Lake City Community
As both a television sports College February 14-15, 2007. The region is comprised
host and father of three, of 10 counties: Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Dixie,
Murph understands the ins Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee,
and outs of sports both on and Union. Judging of the projects will take place on
and off the field. Murph's Wednesday, February 14 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Open
children, ages 8,5 and 2, par- house for the community will also be held on February
ticipate in swimming, soft- 14, 3 p.m.-6 p.m. The awards ceremony will be held on
ball, soccer and T-ball. Thursday, February 15, 10 a.m. in the Levy Performing
Leveraging his professional Arts Center at LCCC. The winners will advance to the
and personal expertise, State Science and Engineering Fair held in Ft. Myers,
Murph offers these tips for Florida at Florida Gulf Coast University on April 11,
being a good sport. 2007. The 2007 Intel International Science and Engi-
Let your child be the neering Fair will be held in Albuquerque, New Mexi-
star. "There are many par- co, May 13-19, 2007.
ents who relive their own For more information contact Cheryl Boice, microbi-
glory days through their ology professor at Lake City Community College. She
children," says Murph. "This -can be reached by calling (386) 754-4251 or via e-mail
isn't fair to your child. Just at
because you were a star boicec@lakecitycc.edu
quarterback doesn't mean Barbara Lawson
your son will be as well. Al- Desktop Publishing Specialist
low your kids to have fun Lake City Community College
and not worry if they're the 149 S.E. College Place
best player out there or fol- Lake City, FL 32025
lowing in your footsteps." (386) 754-4248
*-Encourage your child to lawsonb@lakecitycc.edu
discover his or her own pas-


THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007

Madison Co. Community Bank makes


major gift to
The North Florida Com-
munity College Foundation
announced that the Madi-
son County Community
Bank has made a gift of
$22,500 to NFCC for schol-
arships. Edward Meggs,
bank president, presented
two checks to NFCC Presi-
dent Morris G. Steen, Jr.
Thursday, Dec. 14, 2006.
Part of the donation will im-
mediately go toward stu-
dent scholarships for the
spring 2007 term.
"One of our missions is to
be good corporate citizens.
A quality education for our
young people is an invest-
ment in a successful com-
munity. What better way
for us to' reinvest in our
community than through
education? The citizens of
Madison have been very
supportive of our bank and
we appreciate their busi-
ness," said Meggs.
Founding bank members,
who comprise the board of
directors, established the
gift on behalf of Madison
County Community Bank.
The bank, founded May 6,
1999, is building new offices
on Highway 90 across from
the courthouse in Madison.
Of the $22,500 donation,
$12,500 will establish an en-
dowed NFCC scholarship


NFCC Foundation





"..








Madison County Community Bank makes generous gift to educa-
tion. MCCB President Ed Meggs (left) presents gifts to Faye Brown-
ing of the Madison Co. Foundation for Excellence in Education and
NFCC President Morris G. Stpen. The $22,500 gifts will support
scholarships administered through the NFCC Foundation, Inc.


fund. Meggs also presented
$7,500 to the Madison
County Foundation for Ex-
cellence in Education for its
Take Stock in Children ac-
count with NFCq. Faye
Browning, president, and
Dr. Edith Day, board mem-
ber, accepted the award.
The Take Stock in Children
program purchases prepaid
scholarships for grade
school children who meet
certain criteria. The re-
maining $2,500 will be
awarded this semester to
students in general educa-
tion and registered nursing


programs.
"NFCC Foundation
scholarships are eligible for
matching state funds,
which, in effect, double the
scholarships available to
current and future NFCC
students," said Gina
Rutherford, executive direc-
tor of the NFCC Founda-
tion.
For information about
this or other giving oppor-
tunities through the NFCC
Foundation, contact
Rutherford by calling
850/973-9414 or email
Foundation@nfcc.edu.


NFCC Community Education

announces January courses


HEALTHCARE PROVIDER CPR: Sat-
urday, Jan. 27, 8 a.m.-1 p.mn. Instructor:
Tammy Thompson.


RESUME WRITING: Monday, Jan. 29,
6-8 p.m. Register by Jan. 23. FREE
COURSE. Learn how to make your re-
sume the best it can be. Instructor: Debbie
Bass

ALL AGES CPR: Tuesday, Jan. 30, 6-9
p.m. Instructor: Tammy Thompson.
For more information or to register for
any of the above listed courses, call Suzie


Godfrey at (850) 973-9453 or email Com-
munityEd@nfcc.edu. Fees do apply unless
otherwise noted.
NFCC Community Education offers
courses throughout the year. Courses
scheduled in February include basic first
aid, preparing for the ages, self defense
class for women, beginning computers for
senior adults, business plans, introduction
to Quickbooks, life skills for the real
world, healthcare provider update CPR
and a first time driver's course. For a
complete list of courses, visit
www.nfcc.edu, keyword Community Ed-
ucation.


For more information about advertising

on our Business Directory call

0 t 4 ar M rr lrf ss. at 294-1210

3180 Highway 19 S. -'gC6helfe 1' Mon.-Fri.
Perry, FL.32348 10:00 to 5:30
Ph. (850) 584-3098 Sat. 9:00 to 2:00
Fax 584-3099 MICHELLE B.
h COUNCE, Owner


WESTERN WEAR and TACK
Purchase $5.00 Raffle Tickets for opportunity to win:


DANIELS FUNERAL

HOMES, INC.
Branford 935-1124
Live Oak 362-4333
t James (Jim) B. Daniels, III, L.F.D.
SV Keith Daniels, L.F.D.
J.B. Daniels, Jr.
(Local) Family Owned & Operated
324070-F


Mon.-Fri.
8:30 am- 6:00 pm
Saturday 9 am-1 pm
Sunday Closed


Everything For Your Home Recovery
Oxygen and Medical Equipment


229 West Main St.
Mayo, FL 32066
(386) 294-3777
324072-F


, JORDAN AGENCY, INC.




Joe Jordan '.'
405 SW Highway 27 203 E. Howard St.
Branford, FL 32064 Live Oak, FL 32060
935-6385 362-4724
324080-F


& Excavating
Front End Loader Limerock *
CAT Back Hoe Top Soil
Gradall Clearing *
Earthmoving Site Prep
Pond Digging Fill Dirt *
Kenny Hart Jr., Owner 386-294-2621 324095-F




WUOLFE PLUMBING, INC.
Repair Remodeling Drain Cleaning
New Construction
7 Days 24 Hours
386-935-0616
S, ate Certified #CFC051621
Serving All North Central lorida 324091

Trees and Trails

REALTY
F. Brack Jackson
Licensed Real Estate Broker
Corner of Clyde and Main Office: (386) 294-1366
P.O. Box 1426 Mobile: (386 208-9272
Mayo, Florida 32066 Fax: (386 294-1282
E-mail: brackjackson @alltel.net www.treesandtrailsrealty.com
323940-F


16"Textran Roping Saddle ($1,450 value)
or
15" Ladies Turquoise Ostrich Leather Saddle ($999 value)
Need not be present to win 330048-


3XoA I Aums
3IJ 1 .urus
FUNERAL HOME
1400 Johnson Stripling Road, Perry Florida 32347
Toll Free 800-343-3151
Leila F. Allen
Family Services Counselor
Advance Funeral Planning


Mayo Chapel
386-294-2658


Perry Chapel
850-584-4149
240A84-F


Byrd's Power Equipment
Sales & Service
All Makes & Models


U- HUSQVARNA.
10203 SE CR 405, Branford, FL 32008
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-5 p.m. 935-1544
Closed Sat. for winter months (386) 935-1544
Nov. 4, 2006 Feb. 2007 324077-F

Gordon Williams
Repair
Mobile Service
P.O. Box 723, Branford, FL 32008
Mechanic Welding A/C Work
Tractors, Farm & Construction Equip.
Office 386-935-3779
Mobile 386-365-4775 32,,91-F


NORTH FLORIDA
PHARMACY
OF BRANFORD & MAYO


Vicky Noling, PharmD, CPH
Cherry Lumbert, RPH
Pharmacist


- ~IC~a


I ~IBbdBsW.










. IFFA Chapter mimAn Tvv7 RMtary Local attorney

Jr. FFA Chapter members visit Rotary Local attorney
;*. ;_ ,_' % :l:;. .','*.*: '.;,;y^? *' *.1 -. f, I.,.9


'pi,2-.` 11


7















-- *.
'. 1 *'' "












Chuck Spradley, Mayo Thriftway owner, to the club. Photos: Linda Smith
*,'zz
It; "'":" '


Cecilia .Koon was one of
Lafayette Jr. FFA members to
practice her speech to Rotari-
ans on Wednesday, January 17.
These FFA members are prepar-
ing for their next completion.


Rotary member


Mary Thomas Hart also pre-
sented her speech to Rotarians
in an effort to be ready for the
next competition The Opening
and Closing Ceremonies Team
also gave a nice presentation
of their respective duties at the
weekly Rotary meeting.


Encouraging reading beneficial to kids


Nowadays, television
seems to be more popular
than ever. Programs ap-
pear to be more hyped, ad-
vancements in technology
make television viewing
akin to going to the movies
and busy schedules have
many people feeling as if
some time with the tube is
a great way to relax..
The American Academy
of Pediatrics (AAP) recom-
mends no more than two
hours of quality program-
ming per day for children.
Yet, despite such recom-
mendations, the AAP re-
ports children in America
typically watch four hours
of television per day. This
includes children under
the age of,two, who thIe
AAP suggests should not
watch any television at all,
for fear of stunting cogni-
tive, social and emotional
development.
Watching TV is far more
damaging to kids than it is
to adults for a number of
reasons.
Weight problems.
Common sense tells you
sitting on the couch won't
benefit you physically and
it hurts children even
more. The AAP reports
that children who spend
four hours or more per day
watching television are
more likely to be over-'
weight. Overweight chil-
dren do not develop ap-
propriate patterns of exer-
cise, which will hurt them
well into their adult years.
What television teach-
es. Studies have shown
that television has consis-
tently reinforced gender
roles and racial stereo-
types. In spite of a parents'
best efforts, subtle nuances
between what parents
teach their children and
what the television is
teaching them could be
negatively influencing how
they see the world.
What kids might see.
While adults have the abil-
ity to differentiate between
reality and the fictional
world of television, chil-,
dren might not always be
able to do so. For example,
studies have indicated that
children who see violence
on television are more like-
ly to believe something
bad will happen to them,
despite the two being en-
tirely unrelated.
For parents, each of
those potential conse-
quences should under-
standably be cause for con-
cern. Limiting television
time is one solution some
childcare professionals
have suggested, while oth-
ers suggest replacing typi-
cal programming with
more educational program-
ming. Where most advo-


cates seem to agree con-
cerns varying children's
activities to include exer-
cise and reading, among
other things. While most
children enjoy exercise,
getting them to read can
be a different story, mean-
ing parents might have to
come up with some cre-
ative ways to get their
kids to embrace reading.
Don't force it. As any
parent knows, telling kids
they have to do something
often results in them not
doing it. Such is the case
with reading. Forcing a
child to read can turn him
off to reading forever. Try
establishing a time each
day when the television's
'turnedofl and everyone
reads. Parents don't need
to force reading during
these times, but since chil-
dren are greatly influ-
enced by, their parents' be-
havior, chances are they
will also start reading.
Buy kids magazines.
Magazines geared toward
children can be great ways
to get them excited about
reading. For example, chil-
dren who like sports
would likely enjoy a sub-
scription to Sports Illus-


treated for Kids.
Unlike adult
magazines, these
magazines will
feature stories
written at read-
ing levels more
appropriate for
children. In addi-
tion, most kids
enjoy getting
mail, so a sub-
scription in their
name will be
something that
excites them.
Consider a
reading al-
lowance. Al-
lowances aren't
just for video


.kL.


.'- .

Encouraging kids to read can be a great
way to promote their cognitive develop-


games or ice ment.
cream cones.
Along with their usual al-
lowance, give kids an al-
lowance for reading mate-
rials, be it books or maga-
zines. Make sure they
know such an allowance is
intended solely for reading
material, and bring them
along each time you go to
the bookstore. Again, since
children often mimic their
parents' behavior, if they
see you buying a book,
they'll be more inclined to
buy one, too.


The frugal housekeeper tip

Good sewing scissors will be dulled by cutting any-
thing but fabric and thread. Relegate the cutting of paper,
canvas, and other materials to all-purpose household
shears.
Combat wintertime static cling in clothing by stroking
a wire hanger over the outfit several times to eliminate the
static .charge. This technique works to tame staticky hair,
too.
'* Save leftover scraps of wallpaper when you redo a
room. The scraps will come in handy for patching future
tears or stains.
Zippers will last longer if you close them before
putting the items into the washer or dryer. Also, fasten
hooks and eyes on clothing, such as women's underwear,
before putting them through the wash. Unfastened hooks
tend to catch on other clothing and cause giant clothing
tangles and even snags and rips.
Old Farmers Almanac








WANTED OFFICE POSITION
Broiler Chicken AVAILABLE
Nlanure. We bu) Year At BAHA CRUISER BOATS, INC
Round. (all Boyd Bros. C,:rita,: CeryD, Byrd at 3m86.24-2447'or
appli in r-,Ir,,i At 66 FRetlcher Ave ,
386-935-0120 ,,, 1,, FL l:.n .Frn 8r i 4 i30. p n


Lafayette Apartments INC.BAHA c BOATS
Hurry in and apply at "The is looking for
Best Place to Live!" Rental Job Seekers
sit e to Le B C P Interviews held Tuesdays at
Assistance, 1, 2, & 3 BR HC & ne w SHARP ate
8 a m. SHARP at
non-HC accessible apartments. 668 N. Fletcher Ave., Mayo,
Laundry facility & playground. FL.If hired, can start
We pay water, sewer & immediately, bring S.'S. card
garbage. Mayo, FL. Ph: 386- & driver's license. All positions
29-21, TDD/^ 711. Equal available, experience
294-2720, TDD/TTY 711. Equal preferred but will train.
Housing Opportunity 326012-F Call 386&294-2447
328282-F


The third novel written
by Pierce Kelley, an attor-
ney in the Lake City office
of Three Rivers Legal Ser-
vices, Inc., was released by
iUniverse Publications re-
cently. It is entitled "A Ple-
nary Indulgence" and is
based on a true story that
occurred in Tampa when a
restaurant owner, chased af-
ter a man who had robbed
him at gunpoint and killed
him. The Hillsborough
County State's Attorney of-
fice charged the man with
the crime of Manslaughter
after a lengthy investiga-
tion. The case became front
page news in the Tampa
community.
All of Mr. Kelley's novels
have been in the
legal/courtroom drama
genre. His first novel, "Fist
fight at the L and M Sa-
loon," involved a fight at
the L and M bar in Cedar
Key and addressed the le-
gal issue of an accessory af-
ter .the fact. His second nov-
el, "A Very Fine Line," was


a story about a high school
football coach who had a
few beers after celebrating
a state championship victo-
ry and accidentally struck a
man jogging along the side
of a rural two-lane road
when blinded by the lights
of an oncoming vehicle. Be-
cause he was over the legal
limit of .08, the man was
charged with DUI
Manslaughter. The book
takes the reader from the
incident to a verdict and ex-
plains the legal procedure
involved in an entertaining
and easy to read story.
Mr. Kelley has also au-
thored a legal text, "Civil
Litigation: A Case Study.,"
and a how-to-instructional
book, "Introducing Chil-
dren to the Game of Ten-
nis." His books are avail-
able through local book-
stores or by calling 1-800-
AUTHORS.
For more information
contact Pierce Kelley at 386-
965-5728 or
piercekelley@yahoo.com


Dear Parents:
Lafayette Recreational League Basketball will begin on
Saturday, January 27, at 9 a.m. at the Lafayette County
High School gym. Any girl or boy in grades 3-6, not over
the age of 12 years of age, interested in playing, needs to
be at the gym around 8:45 a.m. t6 sign up.
We will be hosting a mini clinic starting around 9 a.m.
After the clinic coaches will begin drafting teams.
The cost is $20 per person to participate. If you can not
be .there on the above date, but your child would like to
play, please give me a call prior to this date and I will
place your name on the draft sheet.
If you have any questions please feel free to give me a
call at 364-3222 daytime or 294-3443 after 5:30 'p.m.
Thanking you in advance,
AIIn Murphy


Inn Business

Pension Fund Develops Upscale Hotels Across State


Ay Phillip Rawls
Associated Press Writer
Forget Hilton or Holiday Inn. With
half a billion dollars in investments,
Alabama's state pension fund has
become the largest hotel developer in
the state, with a string of upscale
destinations that are changing
Alabama's image as much as the Robert
Trent Jones Golf Trail did.
The eight hotels, stretching from the
Tennessee River to Mobile Bay, are next
to or a short drive from the golf trail.
Both were developed by the Retirement
Systems of Alabama for two purposes --
making money and ending Alabama's
image as a place to drive through on the
way to the beach.
"The golf courses give people a fresh
and compelling reason to come to the
state. Then the accommodations seal
the deal as far as the image of our
state," state tourism director Lee
Sentell said.
Retirement Systems CEO David
Bronner; ,a blunt-talking, cigar-
chomping Minnesota native, took over
Alabama's pension funds for public
employees in 1973.
For years, he made traditional
investments, but in the late 1980s, he
took an unusual path that raised plenty
of eyebrows.
Bronner decided to start building
golf courses and lured famed designer
Robert Trent Jones Sr. by promising to
make them his legacy.
By the time the construction ended
in 2005, there were 432 holes at 10
locations across the state. The courses
started off slow, but soon were drawing
praise from golf magazines throughout
the world. Today, they're a hit, drawing
about 500,000 visitors a year -- most
from outside Alabama.
But Bronner soon saw a problem
with the golf trail's success, particularly
among business executives using it to
entertain clients.
"A lot of people liked the trail, but we
didn't have first-class housing to bring
in clients," Bronner said.
His answer: Buying historic hotels
and renovating them and building new
ones -- all on or near the golf courses in
Point Clear, Mobile, Prattville,
Montgomery, Opelika, Birmingham and
Florence.
The high-end hotels "catapult
Alabama to the next level as far as
being a tourism destination," said Liz
Bittner; executive director of the
tourism promotion group Travel South
USA.
The Retirement Systems' hotel arm,
PCH Hotels and Resorts, is currently
operating 1,464 rooms and will add-587
more next year when the restoration of
the historic Battle House Hotel is
complete in Mobile and construction
ends on, the new.- Montgomery
Convention Center Hotel and Spa.
The hotels operate under the
Marriott brand or its more upscale
Renaissance label, and their pries can
approach $300 pei night. But finding an
open room at some locations -
particularly the Renaissance Ross
Bridge Golf Resort and Spa in
Birmingham -- can be difficult at times.
"People want first-class facilities,"
Bronner said.
In the capital city of Montgomery,
Bronner has worked with local officials
to build a convention hotel and spa that
is part of a riverfront development
project including an expanded
convention center, a Broadway-stylc
theater, a minor league ballpark, an
amphitheater; and a riverside park.
"This is the linchpin," Mayor Bobby
Bright said as hie stood inside the hotel
scheduled to open in late 2007.


S.


Poolside at the magnificent Ross Bridge Gi
Birmingham, AL.


Sentell, whose office is a few blocks
away, said it's amazing to see the
change along Montgomery's riverfront.
"This will bring a lot of people to
Montgomery who've just driven down I-
65 to the beach," he said.
At the Florence-Lauderdale Tourism
Bureau, executive director Debbie
Wilson said the opening of the Marriott
Shoals Hotel and Spa on the Tennessee
River in 2005 made the northwest
corner of Alabama a destination for
regional conventions for the first time.
"We've never been able to host a
meeting of that size," she said.
The success is proven by local
lodging tax collections, which were up
52 percent for the first nine months of
the year, she said.
The Retirement Systems' hotels and
a new office tower added to the Battle
House in Mobile represent more than
$500 million in investments.
The Retirement Systems uses other
investments in TV stations and
newspapers across the country to get
several million dollars in free
advertising each year to-promote its golf
courses and hotels. It's a freebie other
resort developers can't match.
But not all has gone according to
Bronner's plan.
Hurricane Katrina in August 2005
closed the Grand Hotel Marriott Resort
in Point Clear for a year and delayed
renovation on the Battle House across
the bay in Mobile.
. Because of that, the hotels lost $5
million in fiscal 2006 because of the
shutdown of the Grand Hotel and
skyrocketing insurance rates that
followed the hurricane. The pension
fund is forecasting a $5.5 million profit
this year.


Bronner said he never expected a
quick return. "A convention hotel runs
negative for two or three years until you
get in the convention cycle," he said.
Praise, however, has been quick for
Bronner.
"Dr. Bronner is the most significant
developer in Alabama's tourism
industry ever," Sentell said.
If you go
The Retirement Systems' hotels,
range for room rates, and phone
numbers:
* Grand Hotel Marriott Point Clear
Resort and Spa, Point Clear, $169-$279,,
251-928-9201
* Marriott Shoals Hotel and Spa,
Florence, $109-$169,256-246-3600
* Montgomery-Prattville Hotel and
Conference Center at Capitol Hill,
Prattville, $129-$189, with the
presidential cottage, including personal
chef and butler for $5,000, 334-290-1235
* Marriott Auburn-Opelika Hotel and
Conference Center at Grand National,
Opelika, $109-$159,334-741-9292
* Renaissance Ross Bridge Golf
Resort and Spa, Birmingham, $179-$249,
with suites up to $1,500, 205-916-7677
* Renaissance Riverview Plaza Hotel,
Mobile, $129-$189,251438-4,000
* The Battle House, Mobile, $149-$209,
251-415'3086 (opening April 2007)
* Renaissance Montgomery Hotel and
Spa, Montgomery (opening late 2007).
On the Net:
* Hotels: pchresorts.com
* Golf: rtjgolf.com


Advertisement


authors




third novel


THE MAYO FREE PRESS, Mayo, FL ~ PAGE 5B


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PAGE 6B THE MAY\O FREE PRESS, Mayao, FL


THURSDAY, JANUARY 25, 2007


... .. .. .


Vw











North Florida


January 24-25, 2007
Live Oak Publications, Inc.


':1


ar


Medical techniques keep soldiers in battle


By Eric Reinagel
CNHI News Service

You hear the mortars going out, but
you don't know where they'll land. This
could be the last breath of your life.
Marine Lance Cpl. Bret McCauley of
Kokomo, Ind., recalls crouching close to
the ground, moving warily through a Sun-
ni rebel neighborhood in Fallujah just be-
fore dusk.
He'd been in Iraq two weeks, he says,
not enough time to fully absorb thd
treacherous uncertainty of the landscape
and yet sufficient time to see the' bloody
reality of war.
It is March 26, 2004, and the sounds of
combat are loud in McCauley's ears as his
infantry unit moves from
house to house. Suddenly, a
rocket-propelled grenade
flies over his right shoul-
der, smashing into the
building in front of him.
McCauley says he in-
stinctively dived behind a
cinder block structure
cradling a propane tank and
starts shooting at insurgents ..
perched on a rooftop.
Before he can find a
safer location, a bullet from
an AK-47 rips through his .
left thigh. Then the gunfire
stops.
"Who's hit?" someone
calls out. "Who's hit?"
McCauley says he re-
sponds, "Dude, I'm hit!"
Blood drips from a
jagged hole in his camou- .
flage pants. He tries to get
up but his left leg buckles. E R
A corpsman tells him to Eric Reinage
stay down on the ground, a reperw
and administers a shot of
morphine.
McCauley says he is picked up and
moved to a Humvee. The limp body of a
fellow Marine who had bummed a ciga-
rette only an hour earlier rests next to
him. The Marine is dead, shot in the face,


"Primary medical train

during Vietnam was w

we called sticks and i

says McCauley, and "his blood covers
me."
They. know where we are. This is where
I'll die. Not in this place. Not in this
stinking place.
But the 23-year-old McCauley won't
die. The efficiency of modem military
medicine whisks him off to a field hospi-
tal in Fallujah. Within minutes, doctors
clean, medicate and suture his thigh injury
and tell him he's among the lucky. He's
suffered a flesh wound.
The doctors explain they can helicopter



PATH TO RECOVERY
On 5 0 k, 6W20 COp. W K wa W

m.on .n f1i.lus, aqT hr.e e dys Znd omor 1
6 W 108 14 0s\ h e OYe ff qfl a (Offm ,
9 MA Ho itM in WtiA104tow, KC,


him to the main combat
hospital in Baghdad for
air transfer to the region-
al military hospital in
Landstuhl, Germany, and
more medical attention -
if that's what he wants.
He will then return home
to the United States
within a day or two.
Or he can stay and re-
join his 1st Marine Divi-
sion infantry unit in Fallujah when he's
feeling up to it. The choice is his. He will
get a Purple Heart either way.
McCauley, who enlisted in the Marine
Corps before graduating Kokomo's Taylor
High School in 2001, elects to remain in


Sam Houston, Texas, says
the military is returning
more wounded soldiers to
combat and saving more
lives because of improved
medical knowledge and
faster response.
There are, he said, three
primary causes for death
in the first 10 minutes of a
battlefield injury: bleed-
ing, obstructed airways
and collapsed lungs. He said the military
teaches trauma skills to first responders so
they can treat these conditions rapidly and
effectively.
Combat medical packs, for example,
contain special tourniquets and emergency


l is a CNHI News Service Elite Reporting Fellowship recipient. He writes for The Meadville, Pa., Tribune. Dan
th the Kokomo, Ind., Tribune, also contributed to this story.


the war zone. Marines are trained to be
tough, he says, and you do your job just
as long as you are able to do it.
McCauley thus becomes one of the
10,600-plus American soldiers in Iraq
who have suffered injuries and yet were
able to return to combat
since the U.S. invasion in
ning March of 2003.
"I just got here," he re-
Mhat calls saying. "I watched
my friend get killed. I'm
rags. not going to go home. I'm
out for blood."
His next encounter with
the wounds of war will not be so fortu-,
nate. But McCauley says the swift, expert
medical treatment he received for the bul-
let through his thigh was an example of
the military's new techniques for treating
battlefield injuries.
There's nothing to do but lay in bed, lis-
ten to Blink 182 on my Walkman and eat
canned sardines and oysters sent in CARE
packages.
Sgt. Maj. David Cahill, a Vietnam War
medic and now an official at the U.S.
Army Medical Center and School at Fort








aI i WO1. Mauley wWs
trafrteod POtN 45 ilNo
to the Army' main hospjtl =
in N h td.(d w surgery


It.. AtowIOu w w 2. from 0900d IR,
A hJoqtor DC agfJlyjqw5ftwn ~JQ iA
-. M@I 4,10 to frow M~ileff o wcQv~r in ih@


trauma bandages with elastic
pressure, tails to stop exter-
nal bleeding. They also carry
.a dressing called QuickClot.
that instantly stops the flow
of blood, and a 14-gauge
needle to open a two-way
flow of air to the lungs.
That's in addition to mor-
phine, oxygen, IV lines and
high-tech digital instruments
that measure heart rate,
blood pressure, respiration
and other telltale signs of
life or death. Some medics
even carry portable heart-
lung niachines to supply
oxygen.
"Simple little things," said
Maj. Gen. George W.
Weightman, a medical doc-
tor and the center's comman-
der. "But they address 90
percent of all the reasons
people die in those first 10


minutes."
Lifesaving statistics tell the story. Med-
ical improvements have reduced to less
than 10 percent the number of wounded
American troops in Iraq who do not sur-
vive, according to the Pentagon.
That's the best.survival rate of any U.S.
war. In the Gulf War, 22 percent of in-
jured U.S. soldiers died. The rate was 24
percent in the Vietnam War, and 30 per-
cent during the Korean War and World
War II.
Weightman, Cahill and others credit ad-
vances in combat casualty care to superior
medical research, technology and training
by the military. These factors, they said,
have led to corpsmen, medics, nurses,
doctors and the soldiers themselves pro-
viding critical medical as-
-:- distance far forward on the
o battlefield.
Iraq's compact geogra-
phy and flat landscape
also help. Rapid-response
S*;-' '- medevac crews can land
by helicopter almost any-
where, lifting injured sol-
diers to one of four strate-
gically located combat.
hospitals in less than an
hour. The severely wound-
ed are transferred to Ger-
many for further treatment
before they are sent to the
Army's Walter Reed Hos-
pital in Washington, D. C.,
or the Naval Hospital in
Bethesda, Md. '
Pentagon medical offi-
cials said it can take as
S few as 36 hours to move
an injured soldier from the
battleground to a hospital
ielle Rush,
SEE WOUNDS, PAGE 7C


,, ....' q jiW. : "'* ^. .,

Lance Cpl. Bret McCauley nearly lost his life when a 500-
pound bomb blew up the 7-ton truck he was riding on outside
of Fallujah, Iraq, on Sept. 6, 2004. Seven Marines and three
Iraqis were killed in the attack. ERIC REINAGEL/CNHI NEWS SERVICE


BERRI-LICIOUS!
You don't need a lot of space to grow
tasty blueberries, strawberries,
blackberries and raspberries! We'll show
you how you can easily plant them in
your landscape. Soon you'll be enjoying
perfectly ripened delicious fruit!
2 year blueberries ready
to bear fruit $4.99

HOUSEPLANTS
ARE HEALTHY!
Not only do tropical houseplants make
your home beautiful but they also clean the
air, reduce your blood pressure and stress
levels and they absorb sound! Stop by
today and we'll show you which plants are
easily grown indoors!
9248 129th Road Live Oak
(386) 362-2333
Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.mn.-4:00 p.m.
Closed Sunday
"For over 30 Years"
WWW.NOBL]SGREENHOUSE.COM


327108-F








PAGE 2C, JANUARY 24-25, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS




Suwannee Valley Humane Society




S~ tte^ dwe f


Suwannee Valley Humane Society, 1156 SE
Bisbee Loop, Madison, FL 32340. Directions:
Two miles south of Lee off CR 255; from 1-10
Exit 262; take CR 255 north 1/2 mile, follow
the signs.
Suwannee Valley Humane Society is a limit-
ed space shelter (no kill) and depends on adop-
tions to free available space. A drop-off dona-
tion is required for any animal brought to the
shelter. You must check with us prior to'bring-
ing a drop-off animal to the shelter. Hours:
Tuesday- Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., or by ap-
pointment. Visit our Web site and see the
homeless animals who need a really good home
at www.geocities.com/Suwanneehs, or e-mail
us at suwanneevalley@earthlink.net.
Adoption fee of $50 includes spay/neuter,
deworming, heartworm/feline (leukemia) test-
ing and rabies shot. Please visit the shelter, the
animals would love to meet you. The shelter
also offers optional micro-chipping when you
adopt for $10 more.
If you have lost a pet or found one, the hu-
mane society will help you find your pet. Call
us at 850-971-9904 or toll-free at 866-236-
7812. Leave a message if they are closed, your
call will be returned. Remember to always call


your local animal control or shelters if you
have a lost or found animal.
They really appreciate donations; they could-
n't operate without them. Donation are the
heart and soul of its thrift shop income. Please
consider bringing them donations of clothes,
household goods, furniture and toys. They ask
that all donations be in good condition; other-
wise, they cannot sell them. Thank you!
Volunteers are wanted and needed four hours
a week on the day of your choice. Call to learn
more. People are always needed to hold, pet,
love and walk the homeless animals at the shel-
ter, so if you can't adopt you can always come
help in many other ways.
Newspapers and aluminum cans recycled:
They have a recycle newspaper bin at 305
Pinewood Drive, Live Oak, just west of John-
son's Appliance/Radio Shack. They also collect
aluminum cans to recycle, just bring them to
the shelter. All the money goes to help the
homeless animals.
Featured animals for adoption:
DOGS:
2902-BLU-1 1/2 years old, Heeler/mix,
black, white and silver, male and has been
neutered. He is very good with children and


other animals.
2928-KING-Hound/mix, male and white
and black. He has been neutered.
2948-GUY-1 1/2 years old, Sharpei/mix,
brown and brindle and has been neutered.
2980-PINKY-1 1/2 years old, Lab/Kur-
rblack, tan, female, spayed. She is housebroken
and good with children. She is also good with
all animals.
2987-NIKKI-1 year old, Shepard/Mix, black
and brown and has been spayed.
CATS:
3035-Baby Dolly-10 months old and is
black. She has been spayed and is very lovable.
3036-Bubba-3 1/2 y old, Tabby, male, gray
with white boots. He has been neutered and is
quite playful.,
3046-Marty-2 years old, male, neutered,
white and black. He would love to go home
with you,
3047-Capri-1 1/2 years old, female, gray and
white and has been spayed.
3050-Morris-2 1/2 years old, orange cat,
neutered and like all of our cats would love to
find a home.,
We also have kittens of all age groups. So
you should drop by and see all the animals that


are here.
SPECIAL KITTIES:
2592-MILLIE-Tabby, 3 year old cat, white.
and spayed. She is very sweet. Older cats make
wonderful pet for an older person. Does not
like children and does not like to be held all the
time. This is a very special cat and you can
adopt her for $60 because she has a micro-chip
in case she gets lost.
2240-SISSY-This is a real special kitty. She
is 3 years old and is a black and gray Tabby.
She does not like children but, would make a
wonderful companion for and older person.
She does have to have special food. If there is
an older person, who would love to have this
cat, she can be adopted for a special price of
$25. Come in and see her.
LOST AND FOUND ANIMALS:
LOST CAT:
Lost an all black male cat, his name is JJ,
wearing a red rhinestone collar. He was lost at
Yogi Bear Camp ground. JJ is sometimes not
friendly towards strangers. Owners want him
back, so if you found him please call them at
the camp ground, 386-364-1683, ask for
David Hudson or their home phone, 229-242-
0851.


TESTS THAT CAN HELP SAVE YOUR LIFE


DISEASED CAROTID ARTERY



-.


Jasper community helps promote health and wellness


Residents living in and
around the Jasper community
can be screened to reduce
their risk of having a stroke.
Life Line Screening will be at
the Woman's Club of Jasper,
403 NW 6th Ave., Jasper on
Wednesday, Jan. 31. Appoint-
ments will begin at 9 a.m.
A stroke, also known as a
"brain attack," is ranked as
the third leading killer in the
world, and the second among
women. Through preventive


screenings, the risk of having
a stroke can be greatly re-
duced.
Screenings are fast, pain-
less and low cost. They in-
volve the use of ultrasound
technology, and scan for po-
tential health problems relat-
ed to: blocked arteries which
can lead to a stroke, aortic
aneurysms which can lead to
a ruptured aorta, and 'harden-
ing of the arteries in the legs,
which are a strong predictor


pg oORefte y.p; IIte C-N 386-362-4539
SI *K ^4 .Jl 123 E. Howard Street- Live Oak, FL 32064 TsL r 1-800-557-7478
M ond"-FrdEy &OLAM-S-30PM
tu OOAM .OOPM EMAIL: bnfo@pooeraIty.comM


of heart disease. Also offered
for men and women, is a
bone density screening to as-
sess their risk for osteoporo-
sis.
"It saved my husband from
having a major stroke."
William and Harriett West,
Zephyrhills.
All four screenings take
less than an hour to complete.
A complete vascular screen-
ing package, including the
Stroke/Carotid Artery, Ab-
dominal Aortic
Aneurysm and Ankle

ing of the -arteries)
screenings is $ 109.
Sign-up for a complete
vascular package; in-
clude the osteoporosis
screening and pay only
$129.
Life Line Screening
was established in 1993,
and has since become
the nation's leading
provider of vascular
screenings. Over 85 ul-
trasound teams are on


staff to travel to your local
community, bringing the
screenings to you. These non-
invasive, inexpensive and
painless, ultrasound tests help
people identify their risk for
stroke, vascular diseases or
osteoporosis early enough for
their physician to begin pre-
ventive procedures.
For more information re-
garding the screenings or to
schedule an appointment, call
toll-free 800-697-9721 or vis-
it us on the Web at www.life-
linescreening.com. Pre-regis-
tration is required

WHO: Life Line Screening
WHAT: Stroke screening
WHEN: By appointment,
Wednesday, Jan. 31
WHERE: Woman's Club of
Jasper, 403 NW 6th Ave.,
Jasper
COST: $109 vascular pack-
age or $129 with osteoporosis
screening
CONTACT: Toll-free 800-
697-9721, www.lifeline-
screening.com


ONE STROKE

PAINTING CLASSES
Since .no local stores carry any Donna Dewberry
supplies, books, brushes, kits, etc, or Plaid Paint
Supplies anymore, you can now call me. I have
supplies on hand or will be glad to special order
anything for you. Prices will be
comparable or cheaper than
any local store was. I will
also be starting new classes
right after Jan 1,.2007. Call
me for more info. Carolyn
S Spilatore 386-208-4828
-*J Email: crs@alltel.net or
4 L : carolyns@poolerealty.com
S326120-F




Sat. Jan. 27 10AM Preview 9AM
9436 169th Rd. Live Oak
China Cabinet 2 A/C (110)
2 Dressers/Mirrors Air Tools
2 Chest of Drawers Electric Tools
2 Corner Cabinets 2 Mowers
2 Washers 3 Bicycles
Dining Table Hand Tools
Desk Smoker Grill
Queen Bed Computer
Electric Bed New Pots/Pans
Toddler Bed Stereo & Speakers
Toys, Many New Body by Jake Exerciser
Clothes by the box 4 Chrome Rims
2 Microwaves Several TVs
Small Appliances Gas Weedeater
New Wedding Decorations Propane Heater
2 Small Rockers 6 Pet Carriers
Baby Swing, High Chair, Ice Coolers -
Playpen Welder's Helmet
Collectibles: Watt Bowls, New Roofer's Kit/Safety Harness
Wicker Lamp, Cypress 6 Ft. Step Ladder
Lamp, 1950's Hand Painted Levels, Shovels, Extensions Cords
Tray, Autumn Leaf Bowls, 2 Pool Cover
Old Typewriters/Much More MUCH, MUCH MORE
This is one auction you don't want to miss!!!!
Directions: West on CR 136 from Round-About. Follow signs to
169th Rd. Turn Left (So.) to auction site. Auctioneer: C.R. Maxwell
AU998. 10% Buyer's Premium. Bring Lawn Chair. Food on site.
Dealers bring copy of sales tax certificate. Info: 386-330-5343
328923-F


nee Landill


o 1u-F








NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JANUARY 24-25, 2007, PAGE 3C


FREE!
Thru Jan. 31 or as long as vaccine is available
Free flu shots
Suwannee County Health Department in Live Oak and Bran-
ford will offer free flu shots for anyone older than six months
as long as vaccine is available. They are available at Suwannee
County Health Department from 8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m., Mon-
day-Friday and at the Branford Health Department office from
8-11 a.m. and 1-4 p.m. on Fridays. Info: 386-362-2708 in Live
Oak and 386-935-1133 in Branford.

Wednesday
Jan. 24
American Red Cross CPR for
Professional Rescuer class in Lake City
American Red Cross of Suwannee Valley; CPR for Profes-
sional Rescuer class; 6-10 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 24; 264 NE
Hemando Ave., Suite 102, Lake City. Info: 386-752-0650.

Begins today!
Jan. 24-Feb. 27
Lady of the Lake Quilt
Guild Quilt Exhibit
Lady of the Lake Quilt Guild invites you to enjoy an exhibit
of over 50 hand-crafted quilts being shown Wednesday, Jan.
24-Tuesday, Feb. 27 during regular library hours at Columbia
County Public Library, 308 NW Columbia Avenue, Lake
City. Info: Delores Reiter, 386-752-4240, tinkal@atlantic.net.
or library, 386-758-2101.

Thursday
Jan. 25
American Red Cross CPR for Profession-
al Rescuer class in Lake City
American Red Cross of Suwannee Valley; CPR for Profes-
sional Rescuer class; 6-10 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 25; 264 NE
Hernando Ave., Suite 102, Lake City. Info: 386-752-0650.

Thursday
Jan. 25
"Fiber Fun" at High
Springs Farmer's Market
"Fiber Fun" with Lynnann Lassen, a new monthly series,
starts Thursday, Jan. 25 with "Joy of Socks" at High Springs
Farmer's Market. This new series will feature monthly
demonstrations of fiber art techniques. The market, open
Thursday from 2-6 p.m. and located in James Paul Park in
downtown High Springs, features locally produced fresh,fruits
and vegetables, plants, trees, shrubs, flowers, jams, jellies,
baked goods and many other agricultural products. Info: Sharo
Yeago, 386-454-3950, www.city.highsprings.com.

Friday
Jan. 26
Space available for escorted
tour to Gaither Concert
Space is still available for Live Oak Senior Citizens escort-
ed tour planned through a tour company for Friday, Jan. 26 to
the Gaither Concert in Jacksonville. Tour prices vary and
membership is not required to take the tours. Walter and Char-
lene Howell will escort the tour. Next escorted tour will be
Tuesday, March 6 to the Carl Hurley Show in Lakeland. Se-
nior citizens are invited to join the group which meets at
10:36 a.m., the first Monday of each month in Exhibition II
Building, Coliseum Complex, 1302 SW Eleventh St., Live
Oak. Info: Walter and Charlene Howell, 386-842-2241.

Friday
Jan. 26
World premiere of String Theory Jan. 26
The Turtle Island String Quartet and The Assad Brothers
present the world premiere performance of String Theory Fri-
day, Jan. 26 at 7:30 p.m. at University Auditorium in
Gainesville; Cost: $30, front orchestra and mezzanine; $25,
rear orchestra; $20, balcony. Info/tickets: Phillips Center.Box
Office, 352-392-2787 or toll-free 800-905-2787 or Ticketmas-
ter at 904-353-3309.

Saturday
Jan. 27
Royal Ballet Principals and
Soloists to appear at Phillips Center
Andrew Ward, former Royal Ballet dancer and soloist of
Boston Ballet, has invited Principals and Soloists of the Royal
Ballet to join him in presenting a special gala evening of
dance at the Phillips Center in Gainesville Saturday, Jan. 27 at
7:30 p.m. Cost: $40, front orchestra and mezzanine; $30, rear
orchestra; $20, balcony. Info/tickets: Phillips Center Box Of-
fice, 352-392-2787 or toll-free 800-905-2787 or Ticketmaster
at 904-353-3309.

Begins Saturday!
Jan. 27-28 and Feb. 2-4
21st Hoggetowne Medieval
Fair in Gainesville
The 21st Hoggetowne Medieval Fair will be held 10 a.m.-6
p.m., Saturday-Sunday, Jan. 27-28 and Friday-Sunday, Feb. 2-


4 at Alachua County Fairgrounds, Gainesville. Tickets: $12
adults, $5 children 5-17. Friday, Feb. 2, from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. is
school day and tickets are half-price. Info: Linda Piper, 352-
334-ARTS or 352-334-2787, www.gvlculturalaffairs.org.

Register now!
Jan. 27-Feb. 1
Fort White Girls Softball Association


spring season registration
Fort White Girls Softball Association will hold spring sea-
son registration Saturday, Jan. 27, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Tuesday,
Jan. 30, 4-7 p.m.; and Thursday, Feb. 1, 3-7 p.m. at the con-
cession stand at Sports Complex, SR 47, north of Fort White
High School. Birth certificate required for new players. Fee:
$40. Info: Becky Binge, 386-719-7273.

Saturday
Jan. 27
Suwannee River Friends
of Library meeting
Suwannee River Friends of the Library will hold its annual
meeting at 11 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 27 in the meeting room at
Suwannee River Regional Library, US 129 South, Live Oak.
Any present, past members or interested persons are welcome
to attend. Election of officers and board members will be held.
Light refreshments will be served.

Saturday
Jan. 27
Birding walk
Friends of the Suwannee River State Park will host a bird-
ing walk beginning at 8 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 27. Meet at the
park office. The entrance fee is required. Enjoy the migratory
residents. The citizens group hosts a birding walk the fourth
Saturday throughout most of the year. Info: Schoenfelders,
850-971-5354, wbs@surfbest.net.

Saturday
Jan. 27
Fifth Annual Miss Georgia
Cotton Scholarship Pageant
Applications are being taken for the Fifth Annual Miss
Georgia Scholarship Pageant to be held, Saturday, Jan. 27 at
the Tift Theatre in Tifton, Ga. Age divisions: Baby Miss, ages
6-23 months; Teeny Miss, 2-3; Tiny Miss, 4-6; Little Miss, 7-
9; Junior Miss, 10-12; Teen Miss, 13-16 and Miss, 17-23.
Info/applications: Mary Walker, director, 229-386-5567 after 6
p.m., mary@chickashaofgerogia.com, missgacotton@bell-
south.net or visit www.missgacotton.org.

Sunday
Jan. 28.
Gainesville premiere of "I Can't Stop
Loving You-The Music of Ray Charles"
"I Can't Stop Loving You-The Music of Ray Charles" will
premiere Sunday, Jan. 28 at Phillips Center for the Performing
Arts, Gainesville; Note: one performance only; Cost: $25-$45;
group rickets also available; Tickets: PCPA Box Office, 352-
392-2787, toll-free 800-905-2787, Ticketmaster, 904-353-
3309 or fax, 352-846-1562. www.ticketmaster.com. Info:
www.geniusofray.com.


Monday
Jan. 29
SHS Class of 1997
plans for 10th
reunion
Suwannee High School
Class of 1997 10-Year Class
Reunion planning committee
will meet at 7 p.m., Monday,
Jan. 29 at Suwannee River
Regional Library, US 129
South, Live Oak. Questions
please call 386-208-1993 or
386-266-8238. Anyone inter-
ested in helping is welcome!

Monday
Jan. 29
American Red
Cross Adult
CPR/AED class
in Lake City
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley; Adult
CPR/AED class; 6-9:30 p.m.,
Monday, Jan. 29; 264 NE
Hernando Ave., Suite 102,
Lake City. Info: 386-752-
0650.

Tuesday
Jan. 30
North Florida
Tobacco
Shortcourse
The Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services is sponsoring the
North Florida Tobacco Short-
course to be held at Suwan-
nee County Extension office
on Jan. 30 in Exhibition II
building, Eleventh Street,
Live Oak. Registration begins
at 1:30 p.m. The meeting will
open with CORE pesticide
training from 2-3 p.m. CEU's
and CCA credits will be of-
fered. Key tobacco topics in-
clude variety updates, cultur-
al practices and energy con-
servation while curing. Guest
speaker: J. Michael Moore of
the University of Georgia.


Info/registration: 386-362-2771.

Tuesday
Jan. 30
American Red Cross Infant/Child CPR
and First Aid class in Lake City
American Red Cross of Suwannee Valley; Infant/Child CPR
and First Aid class; 6-9 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 30; 264 NE Her-
nando Ave., 'Suite 102, Lake City. Info: 386-752-0650.

Wednesday
Jan. 31
Stroke screenings in Jasper
Life Line Screening will hold stroke screenings by appoint-
ment, Wednesday, Jan. 31 at Woman's Club of Jasper, 403
NW 6th Ave., Jasper; Cost: $109 vascular package or $129
with osteoporosis screening ; Info/appointments: toll-free 800-
697-9721, www.lifelinescreening.com.

Submit entry now!
Jan. 31
Contest for new market logo
High Springs Farmers' Market is holding a contest for a
new market logo. Entry deadline is Wednesday, Jan. 31; De-
liver entries to the market or City Hall, 110 NW 1st Avenue
.during normal operating hours, or mail to: P.O. Box 2114,
High Springs, FL 32655-2114; must be postmarked by
Wednesday, Jan. 31. 2007. Prize: $75. Note: Award will be
presented at "Crescent Cuisine" dinner fund-raiser on Friday,
Feb. 23,'at High Springs New Century Woman's Club; Con-
tact: 386-454-3950 or www.city.highsprings.com.

Enter now!
Deadline Wednesday, Jan. 31
South's International
Folk Dance Competition
South's International Folk Dance Competition is accepting
registration for its folk dance competition to be held from 2-6
p.m., Saturday, March 3 at James Rainwater Conference Cen-
ter off 1-75 and Highway 84 in Valdosta, Ga.; Cost: free with.
the annual Azalea International Folk Fair admission of $5;
Note: entry deadline Wednesday, Jan. 31; Info/registration:
www.folkdancecompetition.org or Serena Huang, 229-506-
1973 or e-mail her at serenahuang@valdostaasianfestival.com.

Donations needed!
Feb. 1-2
CCS yard sale
Comprehensive Community Services will hold a yard sale
'from 9 a m -2 p m Thursday-Frida ,Febr.-.'Tff rT'l Gold
Kist Blvd., Live Oak. All proceeds *will purchaseaining ma-


SEE COMMUNITY CALENDAR, PAGE 4C


ARE You HARD


OF HEARING?
A major name brand hearing aid provider wishes. to
field test a remarkable new hearing instrument in
the area. This offer is free of charge and you are
under no obligation.

The revolutionary 100% Digital instruments are
the latest technology to comfortably and almost
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If you wish to participate, you will be required to have your hearing tested in
our office FREE OF CHARGE to determine candidacy. You will be asked to
report your results with the hearing instruments each week, for a two week
period.

At the end of this period, you may purchase the instrument, if you so desire,
at a significantly reduced charge. Otherwise, there is no fee whatsoever for
participating in this field test. Special testing will be done to determine the
increased benefits of this technology.

Benefits of hearing aid vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise
environment, accuracy of hearing test, and proper fit. This is a wonderful
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CALL NOW IF YOU WISH TO BE INCLUDED
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Mon., Jan. 29 Fri., Feb. 2


FIELD TEST AVAILABLE:
Beltone Hearing Aid Centers

LIVE OAK
109 E. Howard St. (Old Helvenston Insurance Building)
386-362-5452
The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or
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CALLTDYT MAKE YORRESERATOFRTH
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PAGE 4C, JANUARY 24-25, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS




& ~ O fl'S'?'W@flf


Continued From Page 3C

trial as well as community activities fbr their day training
prograin. A variety of items available: ornamental concrete
products donated by G&G Enterprises of North Florida, Inc.;
.iliiiig. knickknacks, puzzles and household items. CCS is a
member organization that provides advocacy and services for
persons with disAbilities in Suwannee, Hamilton and Baker
counties. It is community based, private and not-for-profit.
Donations accepted, contact Maria Reckner, 386-208-1404;
you can also drop donations off at 511 Gold Kist Blvd., Live
Oak. All donations are appreciated!

Feb. 3
Olustee Festival Pageant
2007 Olustee Festival Pageant will be held Saturday, Feb. 3
at Columbia County Schools Administrative Complex in Lake
City. Deadline for entries Tuesday, Jan. 23. Open to girls ages
2-20 and boys 2-6 who reside or attend school in Baker, Co-
lumbia, Hamilton, Union or Suwannee counties. Applications
available at area libraries. Info: Elaine Owens, 386-752-3430.

Feb. 3-May 28
Florida Museum to
display Tibetan treasures
Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville will host
the exhibit, "Tibet: Mountains and Valleys, Castles and Tents:
Feb. 3-May 28. Exhibit from The Newark Museum's
renowned collection includes rare objects and photos. Info:
352-846-2000, or visit www.flmnnh.ufl.edu.

Feb. 3
Presentation on the Tuskegee Airmen
A presentation on the Tuxkegee Airman, the first African
American Military Pilots will be held Saturday, Feb. 3 in the
Civic Center Activity Room at Advent Christian Village
(ACV), Dowling Park. Schedule: 9:30 a.m. Continental break-
fast; 10 a.m. Norman Jackson, Ph.D. will present "History of
the Tuskegee Airmen" with a display of memorabilia; and at
11 a.m. tour of ACV homes, rentals and HUD apartments.
Info: 386-658-5410.

Feb. 3
Suwannee BaseballAlumni Game
The second Suwannee Baseball Alumni Game will be held
Saturday, Feb. 3 at Suwannee High School Varsity Baseball
Field, Live Oak. Home Run Derby at 1 p.m., followed by the
game at 2 p.m. Cost: $3 admission. Concessions available.
Last year 24 alumni played representing five decades of
Suwannee Bulldog Baseball. Info: Bruce Tillman, 386-590-
0715 or Kevin Greene, 386-590-0802.

Feb..3
Italian Spaghetti Night
Branford Womali's Club in Branford will offer Italian
Spaghetti Night from 4-8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 3 at its club
house across from The Gath6ring Cafe in Branford. Dine in or
dine out. Cost: Single serving $5, all you can eat $9 and kids


under 3 $3. Prepared by a true Italian and served to your table
with bread, dessert and beverage. Advance reservations pre-
ferred. Proceeds fund various charities. Info/reservations: Ter-
ri, 386-935-6532.

Feb. 5-April 14
Free tax help in Live Oak,
Branford and Jasper
AARP Tax Aide will provide free tax help for taxpayers with
middle and low income with special attention to those age 60
and older, beginning Monday, Feb. 5-Saturday, April 14.
Bring last years income tax return with 2006 W-2s, 1099s and
social security numbers for all dependents. Location and
schedules for Live Oak, Branford and Jasper: Live Oak:
Tuesday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., at Community Presbyterian Church,
Pinewood Way, across from Winn-Dixie, Live Oak and Satur-
days from 9 a.m.-noon, at Suwannee River Regional Library,
US 129 South, Live Oak; Branford: Monday afternoons by
appointment only, 386-935-1556, 4-7 p.m., at Suwannee Riv-
er Regional Library, corner Suwannee Avenue and US 129,
Branford; Jasper: Wednesday afternoons, 4-7 p.m., 386-792-
2143, by appointment only, at H.C. Pharmacy Assistance
Building, formerly old library. Info: Jack Wilson, local coor-
dinator, 386-963-5023, Linda Young, district coordinator,
386-364-8396, toll-free 888-AARPNOW (888-227-7669) or
visit www.aarp.org/taxaide.

Feb. 6
Democratic Executive Committee meet-
ing
Suwannee County Democratic Executive Committee will
meet Tuesday, Feb. 6 at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park,
US 129 North, Live Oak. A sit-down dinner is served at 6:30
p.m. for $10 per person. The meeting starts at 7 p.m. Dinner'
is not required to join us for the meeting. All Democrats are
invited to join us in participating in the Democratic Process.
Meetings are held the first Tuesday of each month.
Info/RSVP for dinner: Monica, 386-330-2036.

Feb. 8
"Getting A "Grip" on Kids"
parenting program
Jim "Mr. H-A-P-P-Y!!!" Atkinson will present a parenting
program, "Getting A 'Grip' on Kids" Thursday, Feb. 8 in the
Columbia County School Board Auditorium, 372 W. Duval
St., Lake City. Schedule: parents, 10 a.m.-noon and 6:30-8:30
p.m.; teachers, 3-4 p.m. Admission is free! Evening child care
provided by Pride & Joy CHILD CARE, reservations re-
quired, call 386-758-4872. Topics: The Supreme Importance
of Attitude, Building Strong Self-Esteem, Utilizing the Power
of Positive Communications, Setting & Reaching Desirable
Goals and Discovering the Zest for Life. Question and answer
session follows. Info: contact your child's school or Tina .
Roberts at 386-758-4872, robertst3@fim.edu or visit-
www.gethappyl3.com..

Buy tickets now!
Feb. 9


National Wild Turkey Federation Hunt-
ing Heritage Banquet
National Wild Turkey Federation will hold its H..r .; Her-
itage Banquet Friday, Feb. 9 in the Family Ministry Building
at First Baptist Church, 401 W. Howard Street, Live Oak.
Doors open at 5 p.m., seafood buffet served at 7 p.m.
Info/tickets: John Baucom, 386-590-0256: Jeff Scott, 386'-
590-0759; or Bruce Tillman, 386-590-0715.

Feb. 12
Hamilton County Democratic
Executive Committee meeting
Hamilton Couniv Democratic Executive Committee will
meet at 7 p.m., Monday, Feb. 12 at the Jasper Public Library.
The group meets at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each .
month at Jasper Public Library. All interested Democrats are
invited to attend. Refreshments will be provided. Info: Rhett
Bullard, 386-303-2039.

Feb. 13
Early Learning Coalition
finance committee meeting
Early Learning Coalition of Florida's Gateway, Inc. finance
committee meeting will be held at 3 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 13,
2007 in the Coalition office, Lake City. Info: Heidi Moore,
'386-752-9770.

Order now!
Deadline Feb. 14
Garden Club will take
orders for caladium bulbs
Live Oak Garden Club will take orders for caladium'bulbs
through Feb. 14. Available are reds, pinks and green/whites
for $6 per 10 bulbs. You may order from any Garden Club
member or call 386-364-4586 to place an order. The bulbs or-
dered will be available for pick up at the Garden Club on Sat-
urday, March 24. Thank you for your support of the Garden
Club.

Feb. 16-18
Battle Of Olustee Reenactment
Living history reenactors will present historically accurate
portrayals of daily life during Battle of Olustee Reenactment
from 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Friday-Sunday, Feb. 16-18 at Olustee
Battlefield Historic State Paik, Olustee. The park is located on
US 90, 15 miles east of 1-75 and Lake. City and 50 miles west
of Jacksonville and 1-95. Admission $5 adults, $2 children
over 5. School Day is Friday, Feb. 16 with $1 admission for
students. Food concessions available. Saturday's battle begins
at 3:30 p.m. and Sunday's battle is at 1:30 p.m. Info: Mitzi
-Nelson, 386-397-4461, www.FloridaStateParks.org/olustee/. -


SEE COMMUNITY CALENDAR, PAGE 5C








NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JANUARY 24-25, 2007, PAGE 5C


/?Q r


Continued From Page 4C
Feb. 20
LCCC presents the
musical Urban Cowboy
Tuesday, Feb. 20 Lake City Community College showcases
the musical Urban Cowboy. See the story of "Bud," the mod-
ern cowboy, looking for love and life with a spirit of youth
and curiosity in this exciting show of rugged urban song and
dance. Performance begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Levy Perform-
ing Arts Center on the campus of LCCC. Info: 386-754-4340

Feb. 20
Some Enchanted Evening
NFCC Artist Series presents Some Enchanted Evening: The
Songs of Rodgers and Hammerstein at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Feb.
20 at Van H. Priest Auditorium, NFCC campus, Madison.
Info/tickets: 850-973-1653, ArtistSeries@nfcc.edu.

Rent tables now!
Feb. 24
Suwannee County 4-H yard sale
Suwannee County 4-H yard sale is scheduled for 8-3 p.m.,
Saturday, Feb. 24. The public may purchase table space in Ex
hibition II building at Suwannee County Fair Grounds, 1302
Eleventh Street, Live Oak. Inside tables are available for $10
and outside tables are $5. The 4-H council will be using the
money earned from the table rentals for the awards banquet.
Info: 386-362-2771.

Donations needed!
Feb. 24
Space and tables available at
Anna Miller Circle -yard sale
Anna Miller Circle of Live Oak Elks Lodge on US 90 East
will have space and sale tables available for use during its
yard sale on Saturday, Feb. 24. Set up with your own table fo:
- $5 or for space and use of their table $10. Additional tables
available for $2 each. LifeSouth will be there for blood dona-
tions. All proceeds will go to charity. Make an appointment tc
drop off all monetary and material donations at the Elks
Lodge. Info/donations: Jody Walker, 386-364-4601 or Jeanne
Fannin, 386-658-3362.

Deadline Feb. 28
LCCC calls for art
Lake City Community College (LCCC) is issuing a call for
art to artists in its five-county district, and throughout North
Florida. The college seeks indoor art from resident artists in
each of the counties served by the colJege (Baker, Columbia,
Dixie, Gilchrist and Union) and outdoor art from artists in the
region or throughout Florida.: Deadline for submission of pro-
posals is Feb. 28. Info: LCCC Executive Director Library and
Community Services Jim Morris, 386-754-4337, e-mail mor-
risj@lakecitycc.edu.

Thru Feb. 28
Driver's license checkpoints
The Florida Highway Patrol will conduct driver's license
and vehicle inspection checkpoints through Feb. 28 on Brown
Road,.CR 252, CR 252-A, CR 252-B, CR 25-A, SR 47, SR
341, US 441, US 41, CR 245, CR 238, CR 135, Turner Road,
SR 100, Trotter's Road, Fairfield Farms Road, CR 250, CR
349, SR 247 and SR 25 in Columbia County; CR 132, CR
136, CR 136-A, CR 137, CR 249, CR 250, CR 252, CR 349,
CR 49, CR 795, SR 20, SR 247, SR 10, SR 51, US 129 and
Mitchell Road in Suwannee
County; and CR 136, CR
152, CR 143, CR249, CR Clai
137,CR 251,CR146,CR Chelatio
135, CR 141, CR 150, CR Now avi
145 and US 41, SR 6, SR 25
in Hamilton County. Recog- North Cent
nizing the danger presented
to the public by defective ve- A proven, I
hicle equipment, troopers treatment for d
will concentrate their efforts and other chr
on vehicles being operated
with defects such as bad
'brakes, worn tires and defec- Call for an app
tive lighting equipment. In your sessions
addition, attention will be di- evaluation ma.
erected to drivers who would firt tra
violate the driver license
laws of Florida. The Patrol
has found these checkpoints "
to be an effective means of
enforcing the equipment and Three R IV4
driver's license laws of Flori- Branf
da while ensuring the protec- ( 9
tion of all motorists. (386) 9

March 3
Country Dance and I' -
Barbecue Night O_
Branford Woman's Club in f .-.,"-
Branford will offer Country *J I'C'e I
Dance and Barbecue Night .
Saturday, March 3. Dinner: TWO MAGICAL I
4-8 p.m. with a country ALACHUA COUNTY FAIRG
dance from 7 p.m.- until. The Ch
event will be held at Bran- B is o
ford Shrine Club and the ad- Birdsof Pr


jacent Land's loading Visit the Marketj
dock/pole barn. Cost: Dinner )erl, rinances by
$5; Dinner/dance $8; or
Dance only $5. Crazy "J" anu
will play all your favorite ..-,'i'
country dance music and
DeeAnna Horton will teach
line dances. Hay rides for the "^ "
kids, with signed permission '
of course, and door prizes. 2 Q")>i
Dine in or dine out. Advance Presented by the City ofG.ainesvill
reservations preferred. Pro- www.gvlculturalaffai


ceeds fund various charities. Info/reservations: Terri, 386-935
6532.

March 6
Democratic
s Executive
Committee meeting
Suwannee County Democratic Executive Committee will
meet Tuesday, March 6 at Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park
US 129 North, Live Oak. A sit-down dinner is served at 6:30
p.m. for $10 per person. The meeting starts at 7 p.m. Dinner
is not required to join us for the meeting. All Democrats are
invited to join us in participating in the Democratic Process.
Meetings are held the first Tuesday of each month.
e Info/RSVP for dinner: Monica, 386-330-2036.

Tuesday
March 6
Escorted tour'to Carl
Hurley Show in Lakeland
Live Oak Senior Citizens plan an escorted tour through a
tour company for Tuesday, March 6 to the Carl Hurley Show
in Lakeland. Tour prices vary and membership is not required
to take the tours. Walter and Charlene Howell will escort the
tour. Senior citizens are invited to join the group which meets
at 10:30 a.m., the first Monday of each month in Exhibition II
Building, Coliseum Complex, .1302 SW Eleventh St., Live
Oak. Info: Walter and Charlene Howell, 386-842-2241.

March 12
Hamilton County Democratic
Executive Committee meeting
Hamilton County Democratic Executive Committee will
meet at 7 p.m., Monday, March 12 at the Jasper Public Li-
brary. The group meets at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of
each month at Jasper Public Library. All interested Democrats
r are invited to attend. Refreshments will be provided. Info:
Rhett Bullard, 386-303-2039.

March 13
The Piano Men
NFCC Artist Series presents The Piano Men starring Jim
Witter at 7 p.m., Tuesday, March 13 at Van H. Priest Auditori-
um, NFCC campus, Madison. Info/tickets: 850-973-1653,
ArtistSeries@nfcc.edu.

March 16
LCCC presents The Piano Men
Friday, March 16 Lake City Community College presents
The Piano Men. Enjoy the experience of Jim Witter and his
band as they brilliantly recreate music from the 70s with hits
from music greats such as Elton John and Billy Joel. Perfor-
mance begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Levy Performing Arts Center
on the campus of LCCC. Info: 386-754-4340.


Tickets and
ad space
on sale now!
March 17
Banquet with silent
auction
The Boys & Girls Club of
Suwannee County, a 501(c)3


n Therapy
ailable in
tral Florida!

non-surgical
clogged arteries
onic diseases.

ointment to start
.' Lab work and
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ers Medical
ord, FL
35-1607


WEEKENDS AT THE
ROUNDS IN GAINESVILLE,FL
heer Battling Knights, .
ey, and Human Chess Games.
place where artisans sell their wares.
y Magicians, Musicians and Jesters.
ary 27-28 & February 3-4
10 am 6 pm
i12 adults / $5 Ages 5-17

Friday, February 2
9 am 4 pm
Admission half price .
e Parks, Recreation & Cultural Affairs
irs.org 352-334-ARTS


5- not for profit organization, will hold a fund-raiser banquet
with silent auction at 6 p.m., Saturday, March 17 in the ban-
quet facility at African Baptist Church, 590 Walker Ave., Live
Oak. Cost: $25 donation for adults and youth 13 and up,
$12.50 donation for children 5-12 and under 5 free' Note:
Sponsorships are welcome for donations of $25 and table
sponsorship for eight attendees for donations of $200. Ban-
quet tickets available thru Thursday, March 8. Souvenir book-
let ad prices: full page, $100; 1/2 page, $50; 1/4 page $35;
business car d, $25; and patrons, $10. Deadline for ads
Thursday, March 1. Info: Yvonne Scott, 386-362-2789, evs-
cottt894@aol.com. or Pastor Jeffrey Dove, 386-867-1868, jef-
freydove@hotmail.com.

Thru March 18
Diane Farris Sandhill crane photo exhibit
The Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville will
-host "In the Open: Sandhill Crane Studies" by Gainesville
artist Diane Farris through March 18. This 19-piece exhibit of
photography montages is inspired by the Sandhill crane,
which appears across North America and in Gainesville dur-
ing the winter months. Check http://www.sg.ufl.edu/Spe-
cialEvents/MuseumNights/ for a complete-schedule. Farris
will discuss her work with museum visitors from 5-10 p.m.,
Thursday, Jan. 11 during Museum Nights. Info: 352-846-
2000, www.flmnh.ufl.edu.

March 24
I Garden Club caladium bulbs,
orders available for pickup
Caladium bulb orders will be available for pick up at Live
Oak Garden Club, Eleventh Street, Live Oak Saturday, March
24. Thank you for your support of the Garden Club. Info:
386-364-4586.

Buy tickets now!
March 31
93.7 K COUNTRY Jamboree
93.7 K COUNTRY Jamboree featuring Brad Paisley and
Phil Vassar and three acts to be announced at a later date will
be held from 2 p.m.-into the evening, Saturday, March 31 at
Alachua County Fairgrounds; Cost: Advance tickets $55 or
$70 at the door; Note: Tickets available thru Ticketmaster;
proceeds benefit Shands Children's Hospitals; Info: 352-338-
6704, www.countrymusic4kids.com.

Sponsorships and
tickets available!
April 14
Fund-raiser to benefit Haven Hospice'
Fund-raiser featuring live Zydeco music, Cajun cuisine, and
auctions of celebrity-decorated gator art pieces will be held at
6 p.m., Saturday, April 14 at Rembert Farm in Alachua to
benefit Haven Hospice; Note: Tickets and sponsorship infor-
mation are available; Info: 352-271-4662, or log onto
www.vivameanslife.com.


~J~)


'Opry,


MIKE SNIDER


February 16 & 17,2007


ice: Music Hall


at The Spirit of the

Suwannee

Music Park


Show time: 7:00 p.m.


Tickets are $15.00, seating will be limited,

so get your tickets now by calling

The Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park

@ 386-364-1683.
327349-F


N


~-~1;J '1: d~L1;7:Z, t~F~,


Plad







PAGE 6C, JANUARY 24-25, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Jl We Take



I I IHealth to


Your



Heart


Ull 9 I VA" "URn WJ fl 1Wvw ,'7


Doctor-patient communication vital to


dealing with rheumatoid arthritis


Nearly 70 percent of people being treated for rheumatoid arthritis, or RA, still experience
pain, stiffness or fatigue on a daily basis. Many patients don't realize that better
communication with their rheumatologist could lead to improved care. Studies have shown
that earlier management of RA can limit joint damage, which can limit loss of movement.
"Talking to your doctor and effectively communicating how RA affects your life are keys :
to improving the management of your disease," said Dr. John H. Klippel, CEO of the '
Arthritis Foundation. "Patients need to recognize that the rheumatologist has the very same i
goal as they do to understand how RA affects their life and to develop a plan to manage .
their disease."
RA is a serious form of arthritis that impacts more than two million people in the United
States alone. Chronic inflammation in the lining of joints can lead to decreased range of
motion, and permanent joint damage.
The Arthritis Foundation suggests RA patients do some homework before visiting their
doctor by "Taking P.A.R.T.":
PREPARE: You should keep a journal of symptoms and compile a list of questions for
your doctor. List all of your medications, including prescriptions, over-the-counter
remedies, and even herbal supplements.
ASK QUESTIONS: You should ask questions whenever something doesn't seem clear.
This will help to ensure you understand what's going on and how to best manage your
condition. Keep it simple, specific and direct.
REPEAT: Take notes and repeat the instructions and information you receive from your
doctor to make sure you heard and understand it. Ask for written handouts and instructions.
TAKE ACTION: Be part of the solution. Let your doctor know about your lifestyle,
concerns, and preferences so a treatment plan can be customized to your specific needs.
This fall, the Arthritis Foundation launched a yearlong national campaign called "Let's
Talk RA" to educate RA patients on how to effectively communicate with their
rheumatologists and to highlight how important a doctor-patient relationship is to improving ;
patient care. Bristol-Myers Squibb has sponsored the Arthritis Foundation campaign.
A free Let's Talk RA communication guide that can help RA patients take a more active
role in their care is now available on the Arthritis Foundation Web site, www.arthritis.org, or
by calling 1-800-568-4045.
On the Net:; Let's Talk RA site: www.arthritis.org '


Ophthdlmology
GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
Located In SHANDS At Live Oak
1100 SW llth St. Live Oak
(904) 373-4300 or 1-800-435-3937




COPELAND

MEDICAL

CENTER
ADVENT CHRISTIAN VILLAGE
AT DOWLING PARK

-


Clinic: Family Practice, Urgent Care,
Geriatric Consultations, Women's Health, School Physicals
Rehab: Physical Therapy, Speech Theiapy, Occupational Therapy
Pharmacy
10820 Marvin Jones Blvd., Dowling Park, FL
386-658-5300
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Nasseer NMasoodi, NI.D.
Rich Corley, PA-C
Accepting Medicare and Most Insurance,
Sliding Scale Also Available 325923-F.




North Florida


Pharmacy

Medical
Equipment
Oxygen

"Everything For Your
Home Recovery"

Locally Owned & Operated
101 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL 32008
(386) 935-6905
229 W. Main St., Mayo, FL 32066
(386) 294-3777 324537-F


=7 :
"ES


Nj .r ~

n"~ ,..


To place an ad on this page, please call Myrtle at 386-362-1734 Ext. 103


Physician Referral








HeartlandW.
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Lxton,.PTA
Kalie Hi.gson PTA







Lisa Garrett, PTA

Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports
Medicine, Pediatrics Providers
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS Providers
405 llth St.,. Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051 324554-F


E EYE CENTER of NorthFlorida
SGeneral Eye Care & Surgery
EYE EXAMS CATARACT SURGERY
GLAUCOMA MACULAR DEGENERATION
R A DIABETESTILASERS
Eduardo M. Bedoya, MD
Board Certified, American Board of Ophthalmology
o b I Eye Physician & Surgeon


Medicare, Medicaid, Avmed,
Blue Cross/Blue Shield
& other insurance accepted.
Se habla espafiol.
917 W. Duval St
Lake City
866-755-0040 "


Family Dentistry
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH, C,.
D.D.S, P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL .
(386) 362-6556
1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County) 324532-F


Ronald R. Foreman, 0.D., P.A.
Kimberly M. Broome, O.D.


Frank A. Broom, ll, 0.D.
Julie L. Owens, O.D.


North


Florida

Eye-Care

Examination and Treatment of the Eye
Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses


PHONE (386) 362-5055
FAX (386) 208-8660


625 Helvenston
Live Oak, Florida 32066
S324533-F


Illiti-idl GIlni- l
Medicine




Dr. Renaldas A. Smidtas, MD
American Board of Internal Medicine Certified,
Fellow of the American Board of Balance Medicine.
Kathy Newman, ARNP, Pollyanna Bass, ARNP
SComprehensive patients care* Injection Therapy of Arthritis of Knees,
Shoulders and Back Low back pain treatment with Accu-Spina
technology *Conputerized dizziness and balance evaluation and
treatment Allergy evaluation and treatment Ultrasound diagnostics,
bone density evaluation Cosmetic BOTOX, dermabrasion
Live Oak Jasper
362-5840 792-0753
1437 N. Ohio Ave. 413 NW 5th Ave.
Visa. MasterCard Accepted 324527-F


Cancer Care of North Florida
Now seeing patients at Shands at Live Oak
We are a Welcoming New Patients at iAnemi9 in:
total care our two offices at: *Thrombocytopenia
Bleeding or clotting disorders
medical Shands @ Live Oak or Lake City. :Breast Cancer
oncology & Please call (386) 755-1655 OvornCancer
hematology Wsee,, for an appointment or information Muliple Myeloma
practice. Chemotherapy administration and manager. Leukemia
practice. All Chemotherapy administration and management Lymphoma
324547-F Acceptinq Medicare & Most Insurale


Assisted Living



ou aaE.

Quizt, -fafaqFttz County, aounwtyi ietttnq.
..-iatla aLomi, SffiaEdwi, 24 hotu calzi
Visit us on the web at www.oakridgealf.com
Email: oakridgealf@alltel.net
Mayo, FL -County Rd. 251-A (386
License #AL9863 (386) 294-5050
324529-F


Physical Thuraipy



* Physical Therapy* Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy
* Specializing In Arthritis Fibromyalgia Geriatrics* Spinal &
Joint Pain Sports Injuries Work Injuries Pediatrics
Manual Therapy Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Protegrity
Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross, Av Med
Jasper 792-2426 Medicaid-pediatrics
Branford 935-1449 Workers Comp
Mayo 294-1407 Most Other Insurance Plans
A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore

Urology, Urologic Surgery
& Impotence Center


ROBERT G. BUSCH, D.O.
ERIC ORDINARIO, D.O.
Board Certified Urology and Urological Surgery
Common Problems Treated:
* Infections Prostate Problems Kidney Stones Sexual
Problems Genital Surgery Cancer of the Urinary Tract *
Impotence Infertility Urinary Incontinence
Common Surgical Procedures In Office:
* Cystoscopy No Scapel Vasectomy Treatment of
Condyloma Prostate Ultrasound/Biopsy Bladder
Ultrasound Pcnil Vascular Studies
Common Surgical Problems In
Hospital or Ambulatory Surgical Center:
* Prostate. Kidney and Bladder Cancer Surge-ry
* Kidney Stone and Surgery Lithlotripsy Microscopic
Vasectomy Reversal Impotence Surgery Hernia Surgery
Specializing in the evaluation and treatment of Mule
Impotence Surgical and Medical Therapies
All patients are given
personal and confidential attention.
Lak Ciy &Liv O.
Call TollFre 1-88-31-65


*o.


~7~~







NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JANUARY 24-25, 2007, PAGE 7C


Wounds


Continued From Page 1C
bed in the United States, a speed unheard
of in previous wars.
"Primary medical training during Viet-
nam was what we called sticks and rags,"
said Cahill. "You put on a bandage or an
IV. It wasn't any advance trauma. The
training we give now is more directed at
trauma."
Like a mosquito or fly that won't go
away, mortars fall again. Somewhere they
.,, are being launched. Somewhere they fall
to earth in a violent collision.
Lance Cpl. McCauley is back with the
1st Marine Expeditionary Force in Fallu-
jah in May of 2004, five weeks after he
was shot by a Sunni sniper.
"I picked infantry because that's what
my idea of a Marine was," he says. "You
know, with a rifle, sleeping in the mud."
Only Marines in this war sleep on
bunks in the desert and wear body armor
to shield their abdomen and upper chest,
and Kevlar.helmets to protect against
head injuries. Arms, legs, armpits and
neck are about all that's exposed. That's
why the number of amputees in Iraq is
twice that of previous wars.
It is now Sept. 6, 2004, and McCauley
is assigned to a patrol in the heart of an
insurgency stronghold just north of Fallu-
jah. He mentally counts the days he has
left in Iraq .- "one month to go" before
jumping into the open bed of a supply
truck.


Then, he recalls, out of nowhere a car
loaded with explosives slams into the
convoy, blowing him like a rag doll
through the air. The car contained a 500-
pound bomb, 250-mm artillery shells and
makeshift shrapnel.
That's the last thing McCauley says he
remembers until awaking from a coma
two weeks later in Bethesda Naval Hospi-
tal back in the United States.
, He is told that extraordinary medical
care saved his life in an attack that killed
seven fellow Marines and three members
of the Iraqi National Guard. McCauley is
one of four Marines who survived the at-
tack. He also learns that a Navy corpsman
found him unconscious, blood flowing
from his mouth, ears and nose. The corps-
man inserted a tube through McCauley's
nostril to prevent blockage of his airway,
and placed a tourniquet under McCauley's
left armpit to stop the bleeding.
Within minutes, McCauley says, he's
stabilized at a combat field hospital and
transferred to the Army's main medical'
facility in Baghdad, where surgeons re-
move his spleen and a kidney. He's then
sent to the regional hospital in Germany
for recovery from the operation, and a
few days later, airlifted to Bethesda for
treatment of these other injuries:
Bruised liver and pancreas.
Ruptured corneas in both eyes from
heat and pressure.
Deep lacerations in his right arm, but-
tocks and neck from shrapnel.


Nearly severed left arm.
Ruptured left ear drum; pinhole in
right ear drum.
Second-degree burns on most of his
face and right arm.
Tumor-like blood clot on his head that
resembles a basketball.
Chipped teeth.
McCauley says he never expected to
find himself among the critically wound-
ed and dependent on modem military
medicine to keep him alive when he vol-
unteered for deployment to Iraq in Janu-
ary of 2004.
He says he willingly gave up his as-
signment as a Marine security guard at
Camp David, the presidential retreat in
the Maryland woods outside Washington,
for the adventure of combat duty in one
of the most dangerous places in the
world.
Yet he doesn't regret his decision then
or now. Marines, he says, are taught to .
sacrifice and to show courage and com-
mitment.
"Everybody wants the experience (of
war)," McCauley says. "I wanted to be
the best."
Coming in Part Two: Recovering from
war's psychological scars.
Eric Reinagel is a CNHI News Service
Elite Reporting Fellowship recipient. He
writes for The Meadville, Pa., Tribune.
Danielle Rush, a reporter with the Koko-
mo, Ind., Tribune, also contributed to this
story.


At Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas, 91 Whiskeys are trained by Army medics. Thirty to 60 percent of the medics will be deployed to Iraq
three months after completing the 16-week course. ERIC REINAGEL/CNHI NEWS SERVICE


F4 $399mo.

2007 Cadillac DTS
STK#44616


$36 997

2006 Cadillac CTS
,STK#44547A


$23,994 i

AIWH 2006 Cadillac Escalade ESV


STK#44618


$37,984


2003 Cadillac [
Only 22K Miles, STK44631,
.., ,.-Jft^ Wf.,


2006 Cadillac DTS
l,4wI --% M, )ir I


2004 Cadillac Escalade
Only 22KM Mles, S #771104

AkSM


Wounds of War:

Numbers
CNHI News Service

- Numbers
125,000: U.S. troops currently serv-
ing in Iraq.
2,667: U.S. soldiers killed in combat
in Iraq since March, 2003, invasion.
19,688: U.S. soldiers wounded in Iraq
since March, 2003, invasion.
10.600: U.S. soldiers who suffered
battlefield injuries but returned to
combat after treatment in Iraq.
3.000: U.S. soldiers who lost a leg,
arm or both limbs in Iraq.
1,200: Improvised explosive devices
detonated in Iraq in August of this
year by insurgents.
90: Percent of American soldiers who
have survived battlefield wounds in
Iraq.
72: U.S. civilians, including military
contractors, killed in Iraq since inva-
sion.
17: Percentage of U.S. soldiers who
served in Iraq and report they experi-
enced Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.
Sources: U.S. Department of De-
fense, New England Medical Journal.


Wounds of War:

Helpline
CNHI News Service

- PTSD Help Line
* Veterans Administration/
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
inquiries: www.ncptsd.va.gov
* Sidran Foundation:
410-825-8888.
* Anxiety Disorders Association
of America: 240-485-1001.
* American Psychological
Association: 800-964-2000.


7"w 2007 Cadillac DTS





2$574Ml00
1,999 due at signing, 12k miles/year, 48 months plus tax, tag & title.


&w 2007 Cadillac Escalade
ST171152


$727/mo.
*1,999 due at signing, 12k miles/year, 48 months plus tax, tag & title.


330055-F





PAGE 8C, JANUARY 24-25, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


$11,998


06 Ford" FFus o nw F. -.Sir
14,988 p11,488


"04 PT Cruiser
$9,988
.4-


'04 Ford Focus

$9,999


'...... 1 r ......... '... ... 3 For F 50 S/C 4x4 '99 Cadillac Deville

-7 i C t-
... ..... '- *e ;. .. r97 Olds Cutlass


129 98 $13,997 14,90o0


Chad Melton
Sales Manager


I '" '

Levis Odom
Sales


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Danny Shelley
Business Mgr.


&$ ; P rTa u ru s


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INCREASE YOUR


ON

I Mll THE

MOVE?


Employment Opportunities


NEVER KNOW

WHAT YOU'LL

SeDISCOVER

General Merchandise
and Services


E Section D
JAN. 24-25, 2007
386-362-1734
800-525-4182

NEED A RIDE?


Car, Trucks and Motorcycles


?frl- e.6ral Q fo fAQ pA4ctW I~o1(,IQ'

.oA wQmkw&ndq-a-waq,


J.W. Hill & Associates All you need to know about real estate!
r -1 ... ...


. u cnB .


m3;m- .1


71 .7 .4'.......
-11 ,f~t.1 ) .i.7.7.71...- ,.7..1 .. 1 .7.

Dam finlldn I I IIIi'' "" iiji



.t j-...IR.. .C..)

face111777 .r.o.le n- omv: .. .: i..]., I I.,
77, 11 p.7.-A I.:7 I. 7,,.,,,:1.Y -Xa.U
Piue.o I.. 7.777, 77.a7 707 .,,.
47 7., 11I'7ll*


dll -- h, "Real Estate Done Right"

J.W. HILL 1105 HOWARD ST. W., LIVE OAK
& ASSOCIATES 386-362-3300
Real Estate Broker & jwhillrealestate.com
Auction Company 321763-Fhillrealestat
321763-F


CLASSIC VICTORIAN HOME in the
. Historical District. Great lake view from
wide comfortable porch. 4/2 with 4
fireplaces! Large deep lot. MLS 54314.
Call Ginger Parker 386-752-674





WHAT A FIND! 3/2 brick home in town.
New paint, just refinished hardwood floors!
Good sized fenced yard. Close to schools,
churches and shopping. Only $133,500 MLS
56684 Call Sharon Selder 386-365-1203


386-755-6600
Toll free 1-877-755-6600
540 W. Duval Street;
S1- c. Lake City, Florida 32055
hallmark@bizsea.rr.com
www.hallmark-realestate.com






REDUCED 4 bedroom/2.5 bath home in HILLTOP VIEWS Lovely brick home
the country on 4 acres. Large gazebo and on 5 acres with huge garage/workshop.
detached 2 car garage! Remodeled Oversized back porch with built in BBQ.
recently! MLS 54038 Call Bryan Smithey Great for entertaining! MLS 55593. Call
386-965-2922 Tanya Shaffer 386-755-5448

LAND AND MORE!
POPULAR NIGHTSPOT now on the 5 ACRES wooded. Great location for your
market. 2.39 Acres w/150 parking spaces, new home or mobile. MLS 49456. Call
8869 sq. fl. bldg. Great investment or turn Sharon Selder 386-365-1203
key business opportunity! MLS 57319. Call
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973 10 ACRES Convenient to Ft. White,
Gainesville commuters and not far from Lake
16 ACRE spread. Partially wooded, remaining City. MLS 55552. Call Sharon Selder 386-
in pasture. MLS 54211. Call Vie Lantroop 365-1203
386-623-6401 7
THINKING OF SELLING? HALLMARK ADVERTISES IN 18 LOCATIONS!!


Lighthouse Realty
of North Florida, Inc.
Corner ot ii..y ) 27 ,. H- .1, 3!1, M!,I o. Fl.:ind i
Heather M. Neill, Broker

: Search the AMLS uat WV.L1GHrHOUsEREALvLY.U


NEWLY REMODELED This mobile was completely
remodeled. in '03 into a brick home adding two
enormous brick additions, giving the home the look and
feel of a sturdy, site-built home. New roof. Lovely dining
and living room, big front porch. Big kitchen with custom.
cabinets. Partially fenced. Large storage room and
detached carport. Nice neighborhood convenient to
everything. #57017 $127,000


GREAT INVtESTMENT vintage home in need or
vision What a neat little house this would be for the
right personal Azaleas line the columned front porch, and
there's a charming little fireplace in the living room,
making it a lovely step back in time. Nice 1/4-acre
corner lot in good area inside Mayo city limits. This
historic home, formerly owned by "Doq Green," has
been'reduced to basics and is ready to restore. #57005
$35,000
sm "VII 7WX-v1y'77t.l -1 e


excellent area just around the corner from Pickett Lake
and public boat ramp. Excellent area, quiet, peaceful
neighborhood. Good school system. Utilities readily
available. Cleared and ready for your site-built or new
mobile home. Additional adjacent lots available.
#56040 $50,000


ELEGANT & SPACIOUS This brand-new, beautiful
two-story log home comes complete with Australian fir
floors and pine walls and cedar-lined closets. It has
vaulted ceilings and Hickory cabinets, breakfast bar, all
new appliances. Master bathroom has a garden tub
with jets, custom made shower and double marble
sinks. French doors open onto a wrap around porch.
Situated on 10-acre parcel dotted with large trees,
within walking of the Suwannee River and a public boat
ramp. #47944 $299,000


COME HOME TO FHE COUNTRY! Escape dite l-IleIL'and
LuMliofl tt\In gonir tofl l5b 7acrparcl m Aili3 4 2 1,1 H.Spncciiti
rt.777tr17 T Ap'4Cd 2pplialrCet. -.; l.ck in p~inlt,. ilACL 11-111 J .iid
2 111,10tc~4It' fi llr3~r ~t~ Soterlixid dtors %21'111011(.All

I HIS 25 %CRFS of1 r i.ald pines 14Iocated v. tlttit 1)ilic, of
Lwo of i ld liJwte '1i~tm QH Wc~ i IinLDee., /W7-I',,
NI L so577.I -

PERFECTr pI...- 7Q ..clmird 2ClJ., I j ..cI..MoeI,-.
3!ti %i. jr i n -. .-ikig c iEc eran c i- rtc c. RIha i s 'ie I'Clt~t t
Ineqr' I Seller. 5004045 IIV.LS9l5g0,'9
36 %(Ri-S of hunting lard 7." ltIc''Ql..btiv. AA & Mn: ilc
6BWN rcpwne'and 3a cputs. 7ma.d Cr1 PPed rc..d troii7c, .%ar,




C U .TNI7 ILFr Su" o xLioeo 3u h-



H.-1w;si71onliii -.crv. Netiled in a heakoi~ltti t.,iiinlr, cniliiC-'
me-.r, .rccleare.1 :'rid N+ ,cre are -c .7'Cde.d [ L.7 A1'cl c n Li, C
41I. Iand Br.iro '.lE-.,~~ lie


RARE OPPORTUITiVl1-1,3 -cres direcil; across fthe steet
I.. l il e b-eautJ1ilul SI''% amw cCRiter ,si"td i' agi di'arce R1mm die
C lu~rIus Sprirgs boil ioitp Pei lcct 7I fci C 'itv~ierit. dt.-selopitientt
or N"M join o, or 7. idricit Itome wiun li~po oinwaO MONA('~55tl
MOM -.it KUtL. 2". 74ii kSio57lO
5 A(RES oil p ced hdIiti o u4"iultch an h1im un' Piern, 01i177011
Iik r,.jiii lil ii i, PcI: laId S(0.1100lI lCall Lont \llxir. i.



lcc' 3, bu. l 77 led hj17, -i1t1d iil1.1 Ci d l orad l g'it ()t I 11'.1ii %%ill

Ifin ACRES 3 12 'SV\ lIH1lirI, ilit itiles li on',io,%il Hen- ei-,
l-lLJICd 0111., 34 I khu h i l 11.1%tat C lr.ild $1 -2.5110l M itt1.iaecd
-villcI all[ zacl iidi SS2rilL>t 5!

rRETTIanow "jo wI r ou'~,777 isue NO nit tNIl-INoce .cild lilEt
u1'JI l N dl 'I,7.tl I UU. l '.t i l Ic, A2' I', O i~i lL,i n.~

COUiNT 10RtL~I N INGIM %DF F %S1 ..1 (t ticilli 1 -3,hi.1. li..71i
I ,iL "Ld1wd 7,c fco Id i nl77 l.i c1IiC at Ii

111f7447 1i(II IllI0(111d.1 N 11 .111 -'i' 244 N~l S:l7'
GETI A 1.O1 FO R VOURiRMlINEK .2-I -""kr 11. '. l -cieil
.iliil 7 ii c.i %C Illti.:l hi i- 7.1117177 2 7111 il i 1177.-tI. It1iniii% ill Li. -c

1470 TiLSHI'.n1"53


up Ot e 7p, .15 cre stolroal. iluy yaru 7wit twu 7 secU7ity
lights. Septic tank just pumped. Completely furnished
and includes all appliances and water softener. Great
screened front porch. Clean 10x10 storage shed.
Handicap ramp to home. #56204 $159,000


20 ACRES Great parcel in excellent location with nice
neighboring homes in area. Scattered trees, peaceful
surroundings and lots of wildlife. Additional acreage
available, #55449 $190,000

TO NEW FOR PHOTO
NEW LISTING Very nice, level, buildable,,
riverfront lot in good area one of the nicest
riverfront lots on the market right now, No slough
in property. Great trees and good river frontage.
Current boundary and elevation survey on file,
A,,1 i-.t i,,;,J, 7 1,:.n,, and property Is ready for
0,jI .:U .I.:T, 7, ll .,..:t '. IT. Elecaril.i y at


AFFORDABLE & WELL-KEPT Great investment,
starter home, rental or vacation retreat. Well kept home
and yard. Nice quiet neighborhood, just up the street
from the river. New roof and ANC. Nice front and back
deck. Situated on .5 acres. #54904 $65,00
^ ^^MSc.


1 ACRE Nicely wooded lot in subdivision close to
town. One minute drive to Suwannee River boat ramp.
Great area to live in; quiet and peaceful the perfect
place for your site-buill home or mobile home.
Additional adjacent lots available. Owner financing
available w/4,000 down and 10% interest, call for more
details. #49080 $17,500

lli DRY


square acres hosts large Granddaddy Oaks. Fronted by
paved and graded road. Approximately one mile to
Koon Lake. Nice rural area. #55221 $390,000
321775-F


-1~iII~ ~


Real Estates Listings


j









AG 2D JA Y 22 2- V


362-1734


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE


1-800-525-4182


PRESSURE WASHING DIRECT Satellite Television, Free
Mobile homes, houses, decks, etc. Secondary Equipment, Free 4 Room Installation,
Suwannee County and surrounding ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA Free HD or DVR Receiver Upgrade
areas. 386-935-3157 Leave at home FAST! Nationally accredited w/ Rebate. Packages from u 1
Message $399. Easy payment plan. Free $29.99/mo. Call 1-800-380-8939. opportunity T complain of
ANNOUNCEMENTS brochure. 800-470-4723 FREE DIRECTV 4 Room System! discrimination call HUD toll-free 1-
Opportunities www.diplomaathome.com. MERCHANDISE No Equipment to Buy or Start Up 800-669-9777. The toll-free number
Lost & Found ALL CA$H BUSINESS! $$$ Local TUTORING RISK FREE TRIAL $15 Costs! 250+ Channels! Packages for the hearing impaired is 1-800-
....i ...... ...- .,.. R ...i. candy vending route. $50K/yr an hour. Customized programs. Appliances Start $39.9.9! Free DVR. or HD 927-9275


FOUND DOG sall black & w cte
dog found by the Stadium in Live
Oak. Please call Tawanna at 386-
208-0597
LOST BLACK CAT Male, neutered,,
long legs, short hair with red color.
Last seen near Suwannee Music
Park morning of 01/03. If seen
please call 229-242-0851. Offering
$100.00 reward if brought back safe.
Auctions
FirstDay
ON SITE AUCTION
Saturday, January 27th 10:00 A.M.
9436 169th Rd Live Oak.See Ad this
paper CR Maxwell AU998
Special Notices
FirstDay
GUN SHOW
February 3rd and 4th
Columbia County Fairgrounds
Hwy 247 Lake City, FL
Sat. 9:00-4:00, Sun 9:00-3:00
Concealed Weapons Classes Twice
Daily. For info: 904-461-0273
NOTICE
This is to inform my former patients
that I am no longer associated with
Trinity @ River Oaks Clinic, Trinity
Community Hospital or any of this
organizations other businesses.
Thank You!
Lois Bias, MPAS, PA-C





BUSINESS SERVICES
FOR SALE
PARKING LOT SWEEPING BUSINESS
Established customers.
Positive Cash Flow. 386-776-1266


potential. 30 machines ,+ candy.
Special $5,995 Limited Time Only!!
Call Now! 1-800-704-5414 BO
#2547
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do You
Earn $800 in a Day? 30 Machines
and Free Candy All For $9,995. Call
1-888-753-3430 AIN#BO2000033
Call Us: We Will Not Be Undersoldl
VEND BIZ 4 Sale $6795 1-866-823-
0223 AIN #802523
Miscellaneous.
OLD PENNY (10), GUMBALL
MACHINE, $40, FREE XEROX
PICTURE. 1-225-753-0205




FINANCIAL SERVICES




PERSONAL SERVICES




EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
Want to be a CNA?
Don't want to wait?
Express Training Services
is now offering our quality
Exam; Prep Classes, day/eve, in
Lake City. Class sizes limited.
Next class 01/29/07.
Call 386-755-4401


Highest Qualityl (866) 993-2263 ext.
30 www.tutorowl.com
YOUR ACCREDITED HIGH
SCHOOL DIPLOMA in 30-Days or
Less. No Classes. Free Evaluation.
ww.FinishHighSchool.com 1-866-
290-6596




PETS
LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT?. Call Suwannee County'
Animal Control at 386-208-0072. M-F
from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Pets for Sale
PUPPIES FOR SALE
Chihuahua CKC registered. Deposit
will hold. Call 386-792-2188
PUPPIES FOR SALE


Sheltie Collies, CKC registered.
Deposit will hold. Call 386-792-2188


FOR SALE
Natural Gas Heater, 30,000 BTU for
$75.00 & Sears Portable Typewriter
for $20.00. Call 386-362-2705.
Building Materials
LUMBER LIQUIDATORS
HARDWOOD FLOORING from .99
CENTS SQ. FT.- Exotics, Oak'
Bamboo, Prefinished & Unfinished.
Bellawood w/50 year prefinish, plus
A Lot Morel We Deliver Anywhere, 5
Florida Locations,, 800-FLOORING
(356-6746). .
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ buy
direct from manufacturer. 20 colors
in stock all accessories. Quick turn
around. Delivery available, Mention
Code #50 352-498-0778. 888-393-
0335 www.GulfCoastSupply.com
Furniture


MEMORY FOAM* AL
New Orthopedic NASA M,
25 Year Warranty Cost $1
$398 Queen; $498 King.
available. Fast Free Florida
Original TempurPedic & Dor
$699. Guaranteed Be;
Electric Adjustables. 24h
free 1-866-476-0289;
Numbers: Hillsborough
9020; Pinellas 727-5
Sarasota 941-929-7570;
299-4811; Dade 305-I
Broward 954-364-4989.
BBB. www.mattressdr.com


FirstD
RECLINER FOR S
$60.00 386-294-386
AGRICULTURE Miscellaneous


24-Hour Recorded Information Hotlinel
1-800-871-1870 Anytime 24 Hours a Day for a Recorded Description of Any of These Fine Properties!
then enter "talking ad" ID number to hear a property description


lay
SALE
i3Call


BATHTUB REFINISHING.
/ Change Color. Tub, Tile
Chip Repair. Comm
Residential. 5yrs. Warrant
Response, Insured. Servin
Over 10yrs. "Florida's Tub I
888-686-9005
DIRECT FREE 4 Room
No Start Up Cost or.Equ
Buy! 250+ Channels! ,
Start $39.99! Free DVF
Receiver Upgrade! 1-800-5


L VISCO
mattresses
995, sell,
All sizes
a Delivery,
rmia from
st Price!
)ours. Toll
Store
81'3O889-


Receiver Upgrade! 1-800-490-1814
RENT-A-GEEK Statewide Service
On-Site & Remote Support, Virus &
Spyware Removal, Hardware &
Software Repair, Network Design &
Setup, Etc.' www.Geeksoc.com 1-
866-601-4907 *Ask about Free
Computer Repairs!
TIMESHARE RESALES Sell today
for Cash! No commissions or broker
fees. Don't delay Go to
www.sellatimeshare.com or Call
800-640-6886.




RECREATION
YAMAHA JET DRIVE 2000 115
outboard engine. Good shape. Best
offer. 352-347-2016.





REAL ES-A-E FOR RENT
Apartments


,,-t f PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
525-6500; All real estate advertising in this
0ok 863- newspaper is subject to the Fair
51-0506; Housing Act which makes it illegal to
Member advertise "any preference, limitation
or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability, familial
status or national origin, or an
like new intention, to make any such
evenings, preference, limitation and
discrimination:' Familial status
includes children under the age of 18
. Renew living with parents or legal
e, Sink & custodians, pregnant women and
ercial & people securing custody of children
ty. 'Quick under 18.
ig Florida This newspaper will not knowingly
Doctor." 1- accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
System! readers are hereby informed that all
ipment to dwellings advertised in this
Packages newspaper are available on an equal
R or HD .
574-2260 ,


Houses for Rent
FirstDay
EXECUTIVE HOUSE IN LIVE OAK
3Bd/1.5Ba. $600.00 mo., 1st, last +
$250.00 deposit. 1 Yr. lease, no pets.
Call 239-455-6542

HOUSE FOR RENT 3BD/2BA
Dining & Family room, fencedcyard,
storage shed. $850.00 mo. 1st, last &
Security. 5 Minutes to Live Oak. Call
386-362-6556


Mobile Homes for rent
FirstDay
COUNTRY LIVING 12 mi. NW of
Live Oak. '98 3/2 DWMH CH&A,
1150 sq. ft. New tile, carpet & paint..
$550.00 mo. + $550.00 deposit. 904-
261-5034. Available now.

MOBILE HOME FOR RENT
3Bd/2Ba, w/car port on 5 acres. 3
miles from Live Oak. $450.00 mo.
Call 386-362-1601.

FirstDay
SINGLEWIDE 2BDI2BA 12 mi. NW
of five Oak. $500.00 mo. Available
Feb 1st. 386-842-2346

Vacation Rentals






North Carolina. Easy access, great
view, 10 min to Maggie Valley, 30 min
to Cherokee, 2 min to. Parkway,
Mountain Stream with picnic area,
Fireplace, Sleels 10. All Amenities.
$500/wk, $1600/mo. 386-330-4207
Lucy .


rerry, 4u Acres $ ws,ouu per acre
Recorded Info 24 Hours
1-800-871-1870 ID# 1022


Ochloct nee Rver Loi .565,000 245T.000 2/1 MH near Sprng Warner 1.70 000
Recorded Info 24 Hours Recorded Info 24 Hours Recorded Info 24 Hours
1-800-871-1870 ID# 1032 1-800-871-1870 ID# 1042 1-800-871-1870 ID# 1062


Sun & Stars Realty, LLC**
Let Us Help You Reach For Your Dreams
2 locations to serve you w .
4221 N CR 53 DAY FL 32013 386-294-3671 www.sunandstarsrealty.com
119 E GREEN ST, STE 207A, 207A PERRY LORIDA 32347 850-223-1849, CELL 386-590-0848 Email: debbyh@comcast.net ,



Allbritton's Pontiac-GMC

End-of-the Year Clearance
.. 1 ,I-


id m l '06 Mazda Tribute '

low
-05 GNIC Save
Crew Cab B "1 r
Save 4.5/. E[ff
OffN Nuw New
MSRP. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and other optional equipment extra.
**Tax, title, license, dealer fees and other optional equipment extra. See dealer for details.
@2005 GM Corp. All rights reserved. The marks of General Motors and its devislons are registered trademarks of General Motors.
*..-,. 1 /--7-\^ : AWAk .I of, ,


SAND MUCH MORE *

FREE ESTIMATES.


1 :{I{~j4{k


ED
REALTOif


529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990
Realtor Assoc. M. Elizabeth Elliott, Evening 842-2372


(1) Commercial: 11.79 ac +/-
with approx. 540 ft. on US 129
with a multipurpose central
heat & air condition
commercial bldg. cont. approx.
21,800 sq. ft. under roof ample
paved parking. Good location
excellent commercial potential.
$1,920,000.
(2) Saddle Club: Nice four acre
tract in grass with scattered
trees fenced. Good buy @
$49,950 terms.
(3) Off US 27: 80 acres planted
pines in a cropland site 16
years old, on good county road,
good buy at $11,000 per acre.
(4) Off CR 250: 10 acres
partially wood. Approved well
& septic tank. Good County
Road $11,000 per acre.
(5) Branford area: 15 acres in
good cropland, with county
roads and fence on three sides.
Excellent location near US 27
& US 129. Reduced to $10,995
per acre Y
(6) Dixie County near Rock
Bluff: Four two are tracts
wooded, good area. For all four
lots $98,000.
(7) Off CR-349: Two acre
wooded corner lot near Royal
Springs. Good buy at $19,900.
(8) 167th Rd.: 3 Bedroom, 2
baths CH/AC brick with
garage, kitchen furnished. 2 ac.
homesite. Reduced to $149,900.
(9) Off Central Rd.: 10 acres in
grass fenced, scattered trees,
survey $85,000. Good Buy.
(10) Hamilton County: Two
nice wooded acres on (CR 150
paved rd) Priced to sell at
16,500. Terms.
(11) Off CR49: 40 acres in
Coastal Bermuda grass on
good 1/4 mile on county road.
$10,900 per acre.
(12) Off US 129 South: Five
acres partially fenced scattered
trees & grass. Good land home


tract. $49,950.
(13) Suwannee River: One acre
wooded tract on paved road
with 107 ft. on water, elevation
survey buildable, good buy @
$72,000.
(14) Falmouth Area: five acre
tract with a 2 bedroom, 1 bath
singlewide mobile home, 8x20
shop. $84,500.
(15) Hamilton Co.: CR 158, 5
acres in grass with a few trees.
Seller will furnish survey.
$74,900.
(16) Lafayette Co.: 5.3 acres
with 1996 CH/AC DWMH
24x36 motor home storage, 628
ft. on US 27. Reduced to
125,000.
(17) Jasper, FL: Vickers Court
4/3 CH/AC brick home with
kitchen furnished, garage
approx. 2,100 sq. ft. under roof.
$196,000.
(18) Off CR 349: 10 acres
wooded with CH&AC log home
with 30'x40' pole barn, kitchen
furnished, washer & dryer,
10'x12' storage. Good area.
Reduced to $215,000.
(19) Dowling Park: 5 acre
wooded on paved road, $59,900.
(20) 121st Street: 90 acres in
good coastal Bermuda. Old
homesite with pecan trees, 4"
well, etc. Good area $11,550 per
acre.
(21) Near City: 3 bedroom, 2
bath CH/AC brick home cont.
approx. 1600 sq. ft. under roof.
Kitchen furnished, washer &
dryer, 2 car detached garage,
10'x20' storage, 3/4 ac. lot.
Priced to sell @ $145,000.
(22) Suwannee River: 2 lots
with 230 ft. on the water on
good county road near a good
boat ramp. $105,000 for the
pair, owner will divide.
(23) Suwannee Valley Estates: 4
acres wooded on good county
road. $35,000.
321627-F


Office Space
OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT In Live
Oak. Has approx. 1,300 sq.ft. For
further information call Poole Realty
386-209-1766

























You. can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper







312239-F


Double and


single wide
mobile homes

for rent on
their own lots

in the
Live Oak area.


Ask for
Larry Olds.
386-362-2720

324377-F
324377-F


Call


I S.C. Suffiman Agency[


-


PAGE 2D, JANUARY 24-25, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


N CLA SSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA









U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JANUARY 24-25, 2007, PAGE 3D


362-1734


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE


1-800-525-4182


You are just a call away... call 1-800-525-4182, ext. 102 to place your ad FAX 386-364-5578


Mon. Fri. 8 a.m. 5 p.m. *You are just a click away... find the classified marketplace online at www.nflaonline.com
We Will Help You Your Classified Ad can IT-7MM
C t o X GAIN EXTRA ATTENTION
To Your Classified Ad On appear in 5 paid FLORIDA(386)208 Live Oak .294Mayo
.___Tho Firs .. .- Tl, r l -t lDav It Runs! WhileSprinr 362.i364Liveak'1397W


PERSONAL SERVICES



EDUCATIONAL SERVICES



I2 PETS



AGRICULTURE


MERCHANDISE w't"). .
With the


RECREATION


Firs Da
Logo in the Classifled Maketpac


REAL ESTATE FOR RENT
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE



TRANSPORTATION


newspapers:
The Suwannee Democrat
on both Wed. & Fri.,
P the Jasper News,
The Branford News &
The Mayo Free Press on
Thursday; a total of
15,200 issues weekly!
Increase your promotional reach and tap into
potential new markets... Ask about placing your
advertising message into: The Valdosta Daily
Times, The Thomasville Times-Enterprise; The
Lowndes Edition-Mailbox Post; The Thomas
County Buyer's Guide; or a network of over 20
other publications, serving over 30 counties; with
over 20,000 readers in South Georgia.
Ask about our
"Service Directory" rates


Springs *454 High Springs 497 Fort White


ANNOUNCEMENTS



EMPLOYMENT



BUSINESS SERVICES



FINANCIAL SERVICES


To Place Your Ad
Monday through Friday by calling 386-362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182, faxing to 386-364-5578 or mailing to:
Classified Marketplace, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064


WE ACCEPT: rPersnalcks
ML HUUL~~~i Mony Orders *esnlCek


33
303
while
'658


Dowling Park 752,755,758 Lake City 776
Luravile *792 Jasper *842 Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch (Live Oak) 935 Branford 938 Jennings
S961 Lake City 963 Welborn -965 Lake City
GEORGIA (229) 219 Valdosta 224, 225, 226,
227, 228 Thomasville 241,242, 244,245,247,
249,251,253,257,259 Valdosta '263 Quilman'
268 Vienna 268 Uily 271,273 Cordele 282,
283,285,287 Waycross '293 Valdosta 324 Berlin
*333 Valdosta 345 Nicholls' 346 Coolidge 359
Ambrose* 362 Milan 363 Lumber City 365
Rochelle 367 Baxley *375 Hazelhurst 377,378
Cairo -381 Douglas '382 Titon -383,384
Douglas 385 Rhine 386, 387 Tifton 389,393
Douglas 422 Pearson 423,424 Filzgerald 433
Byromville 449 Blackshear 455 Ray City 467
Abbeville,- 468 Ocilla 472 Montezuma 472
Oglelhorpe 482 Lakeland 487 Homerville 498
Boston 528 Omega* 532 Alapaha *533 Enigma *
534 Willacoochee 535 Warwick 546 Lenox
* 549 Sparks *559 Lake Park *567 Ashburn *574
Ocklochnee 594 Uvalda 624 Pineview 627
Unadilla 632 Alma 637 Fargo' 643 Rebecca
*648 Pitts 649 Buena Vista 683 Meigs* 686
Nashville 735 Barwick 762 Whigham n 769
Norman Park 775 Morven 776 Sylvester *782
Doerun 794 Hahira 824 Plains* 831 lrwinville
*833 Jacksonville 846 Smithville -853 Cobb *
859 Pavo 863 Blackshear 868 McRae* 873
Moultrie 874 Leslie 887 Richland 890,891
Moultrie *896 Adel 899 Moultrie* 924,928
Americus 929 Pinetta 938 Jennings* 941
Funston '973 Madison -985 Moultrie


S dE r h FR LINEA ff or Wednesday Publication 11a.m.,-
,1YI I n LI U I I For Friday Publication, 11 a.m.,
IUWednesday (prior).
*We reserve the right to cancel any special offer or promotion In the Classified Marketplace upon a 30-.day notice.*


OFFICE WITH 2,100 SQ FT. Located
in Live Oak for rent. For further
information call Poole Realty at 386-
209-1766


REAL ESTATE FOR

Homes for Sale
ESTATE SALE! LOVELY 2/
+ guest suite. AdventC
Retirement Village.
www.littlerevelations.com/ho
$283,700.386-658-1090
FLORIDA: NEW HOMES
3/2/2.in a nice area for $154
not included). For
www.FloridaLotsUSA.com
6600


LOVELY 2003 4BD/2BA on 5 acres.
Fresh paint, new appliances and
verticals, .laundry room, garage.
Seller. may assist with closing cost.
Reduced $290k 386-963-4956
SOUTH CENTRAL FLORIDA.
Owner Says Sell! 5 Acres $99,000
50% Below Recent Certified
Appraisal. Unbelievable opportunity
to own 5 acres of meadows & woods
in excellent location. 50% Off recent
appraisal! Great financing Call now
1-866-352-2249 x 1098.

Mobile Homes
FirstDay
BY OWNER, DWMH 3/2 on 1 + acre.
Sunroom, workshop and fenced. Off
Hwy 49 between O'Brien & Branford.
$79,900.00 OBO no owner finance.
Call 386-935-4481 or 863-258-1049
FLEETWOOD 1994 14X76 3/2 in
good condition 3818 CR 53 S, in
Madison $9500.00
1992 28X56 FLEETWOOD on 1/2
acre near Cherry Lake $65,000.00
Call 850-973-2353 or 850-879-7095
Mobile Home for Sale, 4BR/2BTH
1 Acre/ Pecan trees & Grape Arbor
Close to Dowling Park and Prison
Owner finance/Small Down
$750 per-month / 866-877-8661
Ext. 51p,


Vacation Property
A FREE BROCHURE At Western
Carolina Reall Estate, we offer the
best Mountain Properties in North
Carolina. Homes and Land
available. Call 800-924-2635.
WesternCarolinaRE.com


BRING YOUR BINOCULARS! Oh
SALE heck, you don't even. need them to
watch the bikini clad surfer girls
strolling by, just to see the fish being
pulled in from the nearby ocean pier!
/2 HOME In Daytona Beach Shores, one of the
Christian prettiest beaches in Florida. 2
visit bedrooms, 2 baths, garage with
mes opener, storage, big balcony
overlooks sparkling heated pool,
kiddy pool & the beach. Watch the
sunrise over the ocean from your
- build a pillow here! $359,900. Call Betsey
,000 (lot Lindley 386-212-1557.
pictures: arthurkowitzrealty.com


877-983-


KENTUCKY West Kentucky 300
acres available. World Class Deer
Hunting. Also 2,000 acres available,
rolling hills. Call for more info.270-
556-3576
N.C. / GEORGIA MOUNTAINS -
World's greatest views! Homesites
starting $39,900. Land / Log home
package kits $99,900. Waterfalls,
creeks, rivers, lakes. Pre-
construction discounts. Limited
availability. 1-888-389-3504 x600.
N.C. MOUNTAINS!! LOG CABIN
SHELLS $99,900. Homesites 1-10
acres, w/dramatic viewstl Proposed
lake. Near 2 state parks, lakes,
national forest & Blue Ridge
Parkway. E-Z financing. 828-652-
8700
OHIO COUNTRY CABIN By Owner,
carpet, appliances, completely
furnished. Ready to move in to.
Includes land. All this for only
$59,900. Call Lowell 740-260-2267
TENNESSEE MOUNTAIN
ACREAGE 2 Acres, perfect wooded
mountaintop getaway, excellent cabin
site. River access, $39,900: Owner
Financing 772-263-3775 or 1-800-
763-0085 Ask about mini vacation!
TENNESSEE Mountain Property
33.39 unrestricted acres in Jasper.
Ideal for single home or can be
divided. 25 minutes to Chattanooga
423-458-0489; 423-837-8167
www.mtnlandsale.com


THE BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAINS OF
N.C. Outstanding views, custom log
homes, creeks, wooded properties,
acreage, mini-farms, Vacation rental
get-a-ways Free brochure. Investors
Realty, Inc. 1-800-497-3334
www.investorsrealtyinc.com


Buildings
JC'S BUILDINGS, GARAGES,
BARNS, CARPORTS Starting $595.
Galvanized Steel. 2 Styles 13
Colors. Free installation / quote on
any size. Florida certified 10year
warranty available. 386-736-0398; 1-
866-736-7308.
jcscarportsandgarages.com

Lots
BEAUTIFUL TENNESSEE
MOUNTAIN LOTS, breathtaking
views high atop Cumberland
Mountains. 5-10 acre tracts. River
access, bluff views, streams, virgin
like forest. Ideal for hunting, fishing
ATV, horseback riding. Near Dale
Hollow Lake, perfect for cabin,
vacation home, permanent
residence. Utilities, paved roads.
Great investment / retirement
property. Owner financing from
$29,900. Centrally located near
Nashville, Knoxville, Chattanooga.
931-839-2968, 888-939-2968









All'05,'06 AND NOW'07
Vol0vs & Freightliners
3,000 Mi/Wk Avg
Weekly Home Time
One-Day Orientation
.30 cpm starting pay for 6 mo. exp.
Must Be22 Yrs. Old, Class A CDL Required

866-863-4112SBSB


BUSINESSES


RentalAssistance
I, 2,3, & 4 BR HC & Non-
HC Accessible Apartments
C<:eN (4a4w I svtme 705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY 711
Equal Housing Opportunity -


SERVICES


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living
2 bedroom duplex.
Call 362-3110.
324475-F


row'_..


it!


Mobile Homes
and
Land for sale.
Financed
by owner.

Ask for
Larry Olds.

386-362-2720


HUD Vouchers Welcome!
1, 2 & 3 BR HC & Non-HC
Accessible Apartments

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housing Opportunity


Classified
S CI Marketplace

iT place your ad
S in the Classified
Marketplace,
call us at
1-800-525-4182.
S. '. -. 4 .-. .


it!


FOR RENT-
3BR, 2BA DWMH,
CENTRAL H/A.
FIRST MONTH'S
RENT PLUS
DEPOSIT TO
MOVE IN.
WATER, SEWER
& GARBAGE
INCLUDED.
NO PETS
386-330-2567
324464-F


-FOR RENT-
2 or 3 BR
Singlewide
mobile home,
Central H/A.
First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
No pets.
386-330-2567
_244" -F


And Make Your Event a Success!


I7i *T 1Each Kit includes:
3 Bright 11" x 14" All-weather Signs
a.,a,. X*,, *. Over 275 Pre-Priced Labels
S' Successful Tips for a "No Hassle" Sale
..' ^ .r-" .,'' Pre-Sale Checklist
S- Sales Record Form



Run your Yard Sale in the

Wednesday North Florida Focus &

Friday Suwannee Democrat Classifieds

and get the Yard Sale Kit for FREE.
Deadline for placing your yard sale is Friday at 11:00 a.m.
L 312296-F j


Sell Your Car for "Top Dollar"




Each Kit Includes:
S -- 2 All-Weather Fluorescent "For Sale" Signs
Successful Tips
"Get Top Dollar for Your Used Car"
FOR SALEP e -* Pre-Sale Checklist
S. Vehicle Options Window Display
.- 7 E-Z Closing Forms
including Deposit Form & Bill of Sale



Run your Car For Sale classified in the Wednesday
North Florida Focus & Friday Suwannee Democrat
Classifieds and get the Car Kit for FREE.*
Deadline for placing your ad is Friday at 11:00 a.m.
1 *Not valid with the $18.95 special a32,-F


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Ei CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JANUARY 24-25, 2007, PAGE 3D


Get Your Yard Sale Kit
I k4kak&uk.- .1









PAGE 4D, JANUARY 24-25, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


3 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA ;


362-1734


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE


1-800-525-4182


Dear Classified Guys,
I slap mud onto walls for a living, not
real mud, but joint compound. I'm
one of those guys that finish drywall.
Yes it's messy, but the work is pretty
steady considering I work independ-
ently. Most of my clients are home-
owners who see my ad in the
classified and then want me to help
finish a room they started or hang
drywall in the addition they're build-
ing. The problem is that just about
every homeowner I meet complains
about money, their mortgage, the
cost of living, and oh yeah, my rate!
I'm priced less than all of my com-
petitors, but my clients still want me
to cut my price so they can save a
few bucks.To be honest, I'm not very
good at fielding complaints so I.usu-
ally give them a break, even
though they live in a nicer
house than mine. Any
suggestions on how I
should be handling these
customers?
Cash: No matter how much money
you have, it never seems like enough.
And sadly, many homeowners tend to
overextend themselves. Although some
of your customers may simply be trying
to get the best price they can.
Carry: I can't blame them. I'm


THE


CLASSIFIED







Duane "Cash" Holze
& Todd "Carry" Holze


.5


@2007 The Classified Guys


always looking for the best deal as well.
Cash: Since you have your own busi-
ness, it's very important that you brush
up on your negotiating skills. After all,
your time and services do have a signifi-
cant value.
Carry: Without your help, the home-
owners would most likely be sitting in a
new addition of studs and insulation, not
quite the homey affect they would be
hoping for.
Cash: It seems like you already have
some good knowledge of your market
aind competitors' pricing. Now you just
need to work on interacting with your
customers.
Carry: First, realize that if your


clients made the decision to add on to
their home or redo a few rooms, then
they already decided to spend the money
to do so. Your rate is simply a part of the
project costs.
Cash: It's considerate to lend a sym-
pathetic ear, but don't let it impact your
pricing. Point out the positives of your
work and let them know that they
received a great price. A professional
approach is always best.
Carry: Another option that may help
you in your business is to expand your
advertising. When you have more cus-
tomers looking to hire your services,
you can choose the jobs that fit your
schedule and have the best value.


Drywall
Before World War II the interior walls
of most houses were finished using a
process called lath and plaster. Not only
was the method a lot of work, but it often
took weeks to apply, longer if the weath-
er was damp. Although a type of drywall
was developed in 1916 by the United .
States Gypsum Company, it didn't catch
on until the government needed a faster
and cheaper method to build military
structures. Today,' drywall is the standard
in the home construction industry with
the average new home using over 7.3
metric tons.

Savings Education
If you feel like you're living paycheck
to paycheck, you're not alone. According
to some surveys, more than 50% of peo-
ple don't save their money. A recent test
given to 1000 individuals by the The
Consumer Literacy Consortium found
that most people have poor knowledge
when it comes to saving money and con-
sumer purchasing. In fact, the average
score was 53%. Only 38% were able to
choose the best life insurance policy and
a mere 9% knew how to find the best
price on funerals. Fortunately, about
75% understood that missing a credit
card payment could increase your annual
interest rate.


Fast Food
As a real estate broker, I've learned
to size people up quickly. One couple
I met were complete opposites. The
husband was simply worried about
the price, while his wife was interest-
ed in finding the perfect home.
I took them to a few houses in their
price range, but each time the wife
Complained that the homes were too
small and the husband complained
that they were too expensive. Finally,
I brought them to a house that was
outside their price range to see what
they thought.
I The wife immediately commented,
"I love it! Let's go see the kitchen."
"Why bother," her husband com-
plained. "With the mortgage payment
on this place, there's no way we could
afford food."
(Thanks to Lee M.)



This "duct" worker job is for the birds.

nHELP WANTED
HeatL/Cooling company
es, looking for duck worker
G Good salary plus benefits.
i ------M-et


Acreage
BEAUTIFUL SE TENNESSEE
PROPERTIES! You pick! 1 200
acre tracts, wooded, creeks, bluffs,
mountain & valley views. George
Hamilton Land & Auction Company,
TAL1557, 1-800-516-8387.
COLORADO, 5 ACRES, Near Ski
Resort, Lake & Hunting. Mountain
Views! Level & Buildable. On County
maintained roads. $300 Down &
$95/month. $7900 Total. Also
available 35 acres. 1-505-770-6451
FL LAND BARGAIN! 67 Acres Only
$10,000/AC Beautiful oaks, great
pastures, secluded setting. Trophy
hunting! Close to state park & easy
access St. Mary's River. 30 mins
Jacksonville, FL. Call Now 1-800-
898-4409 x1107.
FLORIDA LAND starting at $19,900
in fast growing areas. Great for
building or investment. No qualifying
$1,000 down, $190/month. Visit our
website for pictures, maps, sizes &
prices. FloridaLotsUSA.com or877-
983-6600.
GA 105+ACRES GILMER
COUNTY. .5mile county road
frontage, creeks, bottomland, ridges,
views, wildlife, great investment.
$12,500/acre, can be divided! Add'l
property can be purchased!
Owner/Agent 706-273-6938
GEORGIA LAND Starting at
$1,995/acre: For retirement, hunting,
short-term or long-term investment.
Town & Country Real Estate (478)
552-5681 www.tandcrealestate.com


GA/FL BORDER. Grand Opening
Salel 20 AC $99,900 Pay No
Closing Costs 20 wooded acres in
GA. Coastal region. Loaded w/
wildlife. Long rd frontages, utils, new
survey. Subdivision potential.
Excellent financing. Call Now 1-800-
898-4409 x1116
GEORGIA JOHNSON COUNTY.
141 AC $1,795/AC. Two creeks,
planted pine,- hardwood, adjoins
large farm. 404-362-8244 St. Regis
Paper Co. www.stregispaper.com
GEORGIA.LAND North Central 1 to
10 acre tracts. Beautiful wooded
homesites. Beautiful weather year
round. Terrific investment w/
financing available. Limited
availability! Starting $6,000/acre.
706-364-4200
HUNTER'S PARADISE: 50 acres for
sale in the heart of the chiggers and
ticks hunting club. Just of 27. Call
Broker Julie Cole, Cole & Sharp
Development 352-871-5354.

KENTUCKY 56 acres Great
building site, hunting & fishing, pond,
timber, $1750/acre. 880 acres -
Timber, creek, trails, incredible
hunting. $1695/acre. 1-270-791-
2538 www.ActionOutfitter.com

LANDWHERE YOU LIVE
SUWANNEE LANDING
Offers resort style living in the heart
of original Florida. Amenities include
clubhouse, pool, hot tub, tennis, etc.
Taxiway lots start at $150,000 and
residential lots start at $75,000. Call
386-330-2446 or visit:
www.suwanneelanding.com


Auctions

Estate Auction-314+/- acres divided. Excellent
farm, timber & homesites. Pierce County, GA. Sat.,
Feb. 3, 10:00 a.m. www.rowellauctions corn
(800)323-8388 GAL AU-C002594 10% BP.

Auction-542+/- acres divided. Excellent hunt-
ing, timber, homesites. Early County, GA. Saturday,
February 3, 10:00a.m. Near lakes Seminole and
George. Great recreational tracts.
www.rowellauctions.com GAL AU-C002594
(800)323-8388.

Automotive

$500 POLICE IMPOUNDS Cars from $500! Tax
Repos, US Marshall and IRS sales! Cars, Trucks,
SUV's, Toyota's, Honda's, Chevy's & more! For
Listings Call (800)425-1730 x2384.

Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ Buy Direct From
Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock with all Accesso-
ries. Quick turn around! Delivery Available
(352)498-0778 (888)393-0335 Mention code 24.

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you cam $800/
day? 30 Machines, Free Candy All for $9,995.
(888)629-9968 B02000033. CALL US: We will
not be undersold!

Learn to buy Foreclosures, tax liens, and rehabs
for pennies on the dollar. Mentor walks you through
each deal A-Z to ensure SUCCESS (800)433-4556..

Help Wanted

Driver ASAP 36-43cpm/$1.20pm + Sign On Bo-
nus $0 Lease NEW Trucks CDL-A + 3 mos OTR
(800)635-8669.

$2.90)t \\ EEILLI unaranleid! Jj.e len iei'.c
extra income. No experience necessary. Free infor-
mation. Start immediately! Write: A&G PUBLI-
CATIONS, 2370-G Hillcrest Rd. #147-H, Mobile,
AL 36695.

We are recruiting RN, LPN, certified coders and
medical records specialists for a 10-week medical
record review project. Immediate positions avail-
able in/around Miami/Ft. Lauderdale areas. Must
have high-speed internet access, reliable transpor-
tation and ability to commit 20+ hrs/wk. More
information at www.outcomesinc com. Apply online
or call (727)943-7642.

Post Office Now Hiring. Avg. Pay $20/hour or
$57K annually including Federal Benefits and OT.
(800)709-9754 EXT.5799 USWA Exam/Fee Req.

Earn Up to $550 WEEKLY Wgrking through the
government PT No Experience. Call Today!!
(800)488-2921 Ask for Department W21.,

Drivers -Car hauling career. GREAT 1HOME
TIME! Exceptional Pay & Benefits! Paid Training!
Min. 1 yr.Class-A CDL exp.req. TIIE WAGGONERS
TRUCKING (912)571-9668 OR (866)413-3074.

DRIVER: YOU WANT IT, WE HAVE IT! Solo,
teams, owner operaltrs, company drivers, students,
recent grads, regional, dedicated, long haul. Van,
flatbed. Must be 21. CRST Career Center. (800)940-
2778, www.driveforcrst com.

CLASS-A CI)L DRIVERS- Now Hiring OTR &
Local Drivers- New Equipment; Great Benefits.;
Premium Pay Package. Call Oakley Transport.,
(877)882-6537.


Diesel Mechanic; Sunstate Carriers is needing a
mechanic to perform PM's and light maintenance
on company equipment Benefits include Healtlih
lnsurancc,401K,paid vacation and holiday call
(866)317-5050 ask for Tony.


MID OHIO ACREAGE 5+ Acres
Excellent building site on gently
rolling property with Gorgeous view.
$19,900 Owner Financing 740-489-
9146.
MINI FARM** Beautiful 45 Acres, 2
story 4BR home, needs TLC. Four
newer buildings, totaling 8000/sq.ft.
Located in N.E. Ohio. Many
possibilities $199,500 Owner
Motivated 740-489-9146'
NC LAND: 30acs, possible
pondsite: $189K. 9acs, woods:
$49K. Also, 23acs VA riverfront:
$89K. Near Kerr Lake/ Raleigh. We
Fly You Here! Pictures:
owner@newbranch.com; 919-693-
8984
FirstDay
ONE HUNDRED & FIFTY ACRES
Older home, planted pines, Approx. 7
mi. SW of Live Oak, FL Total price
$1,350,000.00. Ph. 386-362-1143.
PENNINGTON TRAILS
An equestrian oriented development
complete with lighted riding ring,
common stable, gated, and miles of
riding trails. Five acre tracts start at
$79,900. Call 386-330-2446 or visit
www.penningtontrail.com
POND ACREAGE 2 Acres, excellent
building site, gently rolling property
w/ view of pristine pond. 30 minutes
from Columbia, SC. $24,900. Low
Down, Owner Financing. 803-473-
7125.
TENNESSEE 500+/-.Acres Minutes
From Fall Creek Falls State Park.
Road' or Creek Frontage.
$2,150/Acre 931-946-2697 ext 3


Homes For Sale

PALM HARBOR Factory Liquidation Sale.
2006 Models Must Go! Modular, Mobile & Stilt
Homes. 0% DOWN When You Own Your Own
Land!! Call for FREE Color Brochure. (800)622-
2832.

BANK FORECLOSURES! Homes from $10,000!
1-3 bedroom available! Repos, REO's, HUD, FIIA.
etc. These homes must sell! Listings call (800)425-
1620 ext 4237.

$0 DOWN HOMES Gov't & Bank Foreclosures!
Low or no down! No credit OK! Call Now! (800)749-
2905.

Instruction .,

HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR TRAINING
FOR EMPLOYMENT: Bulldozers, Backhoes, Load-
ers, Dump Trucks, Graders, Scrapers, Excavators;
National Certification, Job Placement Assistance;
Associated Training Services (800)251-3274
www.ecquipmentooerator.com.


AMERICA'S DRIVING ACADEMY Start your
driving career today! Offering courses in CDL A.
Low tuition fee! Many payment options! No reg-
istration fee! (866)889-0210
info@americasdrivingacademy.com.

Lots & Acreage7

FL LAND BARGAIN! 67 ACRES Only $10,000/
AC Beautiful oaks, great pastures, secluded setting.
Trophy hunting! Close to state park & easy access
St. Mary's River. 30 mins Jacksonville, FL. Call Now
(800)898-4409 x 1106.

Miscellaneous

DIVORCE$275-$350*COVERS children, etc.
Only one signature required! *Excludes govt. fees!
Call weekdays (800)462-2000, ext.600. (8am-6pm)
Alta Divorce, LLC. Established 1977.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if qualified Job, placement
assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Mainte-
nance (888)349-5387.

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.* Medi-
cal, *Business, *Paralegal, *Computers *Criminal
Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer pro-
vided. Financial Aid if qualified. Call (866)858-
2121 www onlincTidewatcrTech corn

WOLFF TANNING BEDS Buy Direct and Save!
Full Body units from $22 a month! FREE Color
Catalog CALL TODAY!, (800)842-1305
www 1no etstan.com

WANTED: 10 HOMES To Show Off Our New
Lifetime Exterior Painlt. Call Now to see if your
home qualifies. (800)961-8547. (Lic.#CBC0101 I I


Pools/Miscellaneous


The New Kayak Pool/Demno Homesites Wanted
Early Bird Special! Save Now Supply Limited 2006
prices$. Finest above ground pool available. FREE
ESTIMATE, Financing (866)348-7500.
www.KavakPoolsFlorida.com,

Real Estate

NC MOUNTAIN VIEW LOTS Top Views starlat
$50,000. Amenities include Club, Pool, Equestrian
Facilities, Hiking Trails and IH-i-Speed Internet. One
half to 3.5 acre sites.
www.hIiglhlanidsmoiiunta inoroperties' corn CALL
(888)625-8950 Today!


BEAUTIFUL N. CAROLINA. WINTER SEASON
IS HERE! MUST SEE BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL
WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS Homes, Cabins,
Acreage & INVESTMENTS. Cherokee Mountain
GMAC Real Estate... cherokccmountainrealtv coin
Call for free brochure (800)841-5868.


S. CAROLINA ACREAGE By
Owner, 2 acres, beautiful building
tract w/view of pristine pond on
gently rolling property. Near
Columbia SC. $24,900. Low Down,
Owner Financing. 803-473-7125
SUWANNEE COUNTY
Beautiful, new subdivision on C R
349. 1 mi. S. of C R 252, right on
160th Trace. 5 & 7 acre lots starting
at $89,000.00. Owner financing.
Call 1-866-386-2376.
www.bullardproperty.com
TENNESSEE!! MONTEAGLE-
SEWANEE, Beautiful Mountain
Properties. 600+ Acres; Tracts, 5
Acres & up. 4 miles from 1-24.
Gated & secluded! Gorgeous bluff &
creek. Wooded lots. George,
Timberwood Development Co., 423-
949-6887 www.timber-wood.com

Residential Wanted
ANGELO BUYS HOUSES Cash
any condition. Handyman, fire,
distressed, vacant, occupied.
Anywhere in FL! Apts. / Comm.,
residential. No deal too big/small.
Quick closing. 1-800-SELL-181; 1-
954-816-4363

WANTED: 20 HOMES To Show Off
Our New Lifetime Exterior Paint. Call
Now to See if Your Home Qualifies 1-
800-518-5532 (Lic#CBC010111)

WANTED: 20 HOMES To Show Off
Our New Lifetime Exterior Paint. Call
Now to See if Your Home Qualifies 1-
800-518-5532 (Lic#CBC010111)


North Carolina Cool Mountain Air, Views &
Streams, Homes, Cabins & Acreage. FREE BRO-
CHURE (800)642-5333. Realty Of Murphy 317
Peachtree St. Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.rcaltvofmurplhv con,

WYOMING RANCH DISPERSAL 35 acres -
$59,900; 75 acres $108,900; Snow-capped moun-
tain views. Surrounded by gov't land. Abundant
wildlife. Recreational paradise. Low taxes. EZ terms.
Call Utah Ranches, LLC. (888)541-5263.

NO STATE INCOME TAX! Low property taxes,
Four Seasons, Southern Hospitality, Tennessee
Lakefronts starting under $100,000 Views Proper-
ties from $25,000 Lakeside Realty (888)291-5253
www.lakesiderealtv-tn com (1248).

Lake Access Bargain 1+ Acres, $34,900 with
. FREE Boat Slips! RARE opportunity to own land on
spectacular 160,000 acre recreational lake! Mature
oak & hickory, park- like setting with lake access.
Paved rd, underground utilities. Excellent financing.
Prime waterfronts available. Call now (800)704-
3154, X 916.

NEW PRICE! 10+ AC- $299,000! UPSCALE
Equestrian Gated Community! 200 Year old Oaks.
Established lush pastures. Paved private rds, u/g
utilities. 2 miles from HITS! Exc financing! Call
(868)352-2249 X 1156.

VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS Large 5 acre tracts
along very wide trout stream with private elevated
homesites, secluded, great view, trees, nearby river,
$59,500 owner (866)789-8535.

WATERFRONT BARGAINS! 1 TO 7 acre water-
fronts in Alabama from $49,900- Boat to Gulf of
Mexico! Beautifully wooded, panoramic water views,
trophy fishing/ hunting. Next to state parks. County
road frontage, utilities, county water."Excellent
financing. Must see. Call now (800)564-5092 X
527.

LARGE POND, INCREDIBLE MTN VIEWS, 1200'
OF MTN. STREAM, 17 AC $239,900. Possibly the
greatest mtn views anywhere! Build overlooking
your very own private pond. All useable- easy
access. Only I with pond. Call owner directly now
(877)777-4837.

SPORTSMAN'S PARADISE DIRECTLY AD-
JOINING 700,000 ACRE NATIONAL FOREST,
16+ AC $143,500. Unlimited hunting, hiking, camp-
ing and trophy trout fishing all in your back yard.
New Release! Hurry; only one! (877)777-4837.

South Central Florida. Owner Says Sell!! 5 Acres-
$99,000. 50% Below Recent Certified Appraisal.
Unbelievable opportunity to own 5 acres of mead-
ows & woods in excellent location. 50% OFF recent
appraisal!! Great financing. Call now (866)352-
2249, x 1097.

270* UNOBSTRUCTED; 40 MILE MTN VIEWS,
STATE ROAD FRONTAGE 8 AC $114,800. Build
your dream cabin with direct 40 miles mtn views all
around you. Private ownership to direct National
Forest access & stocked trout stream. Ready to build.
Call now (877)777-4837.

.


ADvLI ii.iriIC, 4E rLUfl.)PK. OF FLORIDA

Cassified 'of January 22, [r 7)y






(Week of January 22, 2007^


EMPLOYMENT

Help Wanted
ACCOUNTANT
Suwannee County, Florida
Administrative Office

GENERAL RESPONSIBILITIES:
The incumbent will process financial
transactions of the organization on
the General Ledger computer
system, perform audit and checking
functions in accordance with
instructions, issue vendor payments
and travel reimbursements as
necessary and prepare and issue
financial reports as directed.

Submit Resume to: Suwannee River
Economic Council, Inc., RP.O. Box 70,
Live Oak, FL 32064

Equal Opportunity Employer.
Persons with disabilities are
encouraged to apply for employment.
Should special accommodations be
necessary, please call (386)362-
4115 Voice/TDD.

Deadline for Receipt of Resume:
OPEN
FirstDay
CONCESSIONS MANAGER
To Work as Needed

RECREATION DEPARTMENT


SUWANNEE COUNTY is seeking
applicants for the position of
Concession Manager at the
Recreation Department to work on
an as needed basis. Must be able
to work in a high stress environment
and possess excellent customer
service skills. Food preparation,
menu development, inventory
control, quality control, equipment
maintenance, special event planning
and miscellaneous programs are
some of the responsibilities required
of this position. Must be able to work
on evenings and weekends.
Requires one year experience in
customer service and food industry
and the ability to receive ServSafe
Sanitation certificate or equivalent
within 6 months. Graduation from a
standard high school or partial high
school education. Minimum
beginning rate of pay is $7.29 per
hour based on qualifications and
experience. Applicants are
encouraged. to submit resumes,
letters of reference, or other
biographical information with their
applications. Applications are
available at the Suwannee County
Administrative Services Department,
224 Pine Avenue, Live Oak, FL
32064, (386) 362-6869. Position will
remain open until filled. Successful
completion of a drug test, is a
condition of employment.
EEO/AA/V/D.
Cooks/Servers
SPIRIT OFTHE SUWANNEE
is looking to for a cook
and servers at the
SOS CAFE.
Please call 386-364-1703
for an interview.


FirstDay
ADVENT CHRISTIAN VILLAGE
Current JOBS Line Advertisement
Call 386-658-5627
or visit www.acvillage.net
24 hrs / day, 7 days / week

RN direct long-term care staff
(FT/PT)
Nonrestricted FL license required;
LTC experience w/knowledge of
LTC regs preferred.

LPN direct long-term care staff
(FT/PT)
Nonrestricted FL License required;
Experience preferred.

CNA direct long-term care staff
(FT/PT)
FL certificate required;
Experience preferred.

ARNP or PA (FT)
FL license 'required; established
rural health practice; brand new
facility; share on call with MD & PA

BOOKKEEPER (FT)
Accounting experience / PC
experience required. Post
secondary academic training
preferred but not required. Must be
detail oriented.

BUILDING MAINTENANCE
SUPERVISOR (FT)
Light general mainienarnce /
custodial for two apartment
buildings (residential & common
areas); experience preferred;
excellent communication skills
required; occasional
on-call may be required.

Competitive wages & competitive
benefits for FT position's (health,
dental, life, disability, supplemental.
Insurance; 403b; paid time off,) plus
access to onsite daycare and
fitness facilities.

Apply in person at Personnel Office
(Carter Village Hall) Monday
through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until
4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials
to 386-658-5160

EOE / Drug-Free Workplace
Criminal background checks
required.

ATTENDANTS
Five positions available, complete
training provided to perform janitorial
services in Suwannee/Hamilton
area. Need dependable
transportation; able to lift 35 Ibs.
Uniforms provided. ADA/EOE/Drug
Free Workplace. Apply in person at:
Comprehensive Community
Services, Inc., 506 S. Ohio Avenue,
Live Oak, FL 32064

CAN YOU DIG IT? Heavy
Equipment School. Operate
Backhoe, Trackhoe, Bulldozer. 3wk
Nationally Certified Program, Local
Job Placement, $0 Down financing
Call 1-800-219-2352 or 1-888-707-
6886


CDL Drivers needed for local and
regional.positions. A minimum of 2
years experience required. Drivers
home every weekend, avg. salary
$45-$50K 'per year. (386) 364-
3250.


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362-1734 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE 1-800-525-4182

PM I YMFNT OPP RTIINITY preferred. Bachelor degree or higher I niiIMr ci r.R MIN .. .. ...... skilled labor as directed by


F-Irstuay
Driver New Pay Package!
GUARANTEED *
Home EVERY Wkend
Avg. $825 $1025/week
NO TOUCH FREIGHT
65% preloaded/pretarped
CDL-A req'd 877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com

FirstDay
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

CITY OF LIVE OAK
POLICE DEPARTMENT

Duties: Provides law enforcement
services and police duties
associated with the protection, safety
and welfare of the citizens within our
community.

Minimum Requirements: Must be at
least 19 years of age, possess State
of Florida Law Enforcement
Certification, U.S. Citizen, High
School Diploma or G.E.D., no felony
or misdemeanor convictions for
perjury or false statement, never
have received a dishonorable
discharge from any of the Armed
Forces, successfully pass a
background investigation as required
by Florida Department of Law
Enforcement, successful completion
of pre-employment testing
requirements (Drug Screen
Psychological Examination, and
Physical Examination). Possess a
valid Florida Driver's License.

Entry Level Salary: $26,915.63

Benefits: All equipment including
uniforms and other required
equipment are provided. Florida
State Retirement System (special
risk, 3% per year), vested in six
years. Ten paid holidays -and one
personal paid holiday. Those
employees required to work on a
holiday are paid at time and one half
for the hours they work. Paid
vacation, sick leave and employees
Health Insurance Package provided.
Take home car program based on
position, seniority and providing yqu
live in Suwannee County.

Application Deadline: Application
must be submitted to the Live Oak
City Hall, 101 SE White Avenue, no
later than 5:00 p.m., Friday, February
2, 2007.

Drug Free Work Place: Successful
Applicant will be subject to the City
of Live Oak Drug Free Work Place
Policy.

A FAIR HOUSING / EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY / DRUG FREE
WORKPLACE / HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE JURISDICTION

FirstDay
LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSE
The Suwannee County Health
Department is seeking a Licensed
Practical Nurse, (OPS temporary
position) PSN# 64961048. This is a
paraprofessional 10 month position
in school health. The rate of pay will
be $12.00 per hour. Must have a
valid Florida nursing license. Must
be fingerprinted. May be required to
work extra hours or days in the
event of an emergency.
Applications will be
accepted online at:
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/
State of Florida applications may be
mailed to State of Florida, People
First, Staffing Administration, PO
Box 44058, Jacksonville, FL 32231
or faxed to 904-636-2627 by
1/26/07.
EEO/AA/VP Employer.

DRIVERS LCT WANTS YOU!
OTR drivers, solos or teams. 6
months experience & CDL-A / HAZ
required. Full benefits package.
2003-2005 Equipment. Call 1-800-
362-0159 LCTransportation.com


POLICE CHIEF


DUTIES:
Employee in the position allocated to
this class is responsible for planning,
organizing and directing the activities
of the police department. Duties
include analyzing crime prevention
and law enforcement problems of the
City; developing solutions and
departmental methods and activities
to meet problems; and to improve
operations and effectiveness.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:
Must have a minimum of an
Associate Degree, eight years of
work experience in law enforcement,
three years of which must have been
in a supervisory capacity.

Two 'years of work experience as
police chief or assistant police chief
may be substituted for the required
supervisory experience.

Bachelor of Science degree in
criminology, law enforcement or
related field from an accredited four-
year college or university may be
substituted for two years of non-
supervisory work experience.

ESSENTIAL PHYSICAL SKILLS:
Acceptable eyesight (with or without
correction)
Ability to communicate orally and in
writing
Acceptable hearing (with or without
hearing aid)
Acceptable driving skills and ability

LICENSES AND CERTIFICATION:
Florida Law Enforcement
Certification
Valid Florida Driver's License

SALARY:,Open

HEALTH INSURANCE:
100% employee health insurance
paid by City.

APPLICATION DEADLINE:
Applications are available and must
be submitted to the office of the City
Manager 101 S.E. White Avenue,
Live Oak, Florida 32060, by 5:00
p.m., February 28, 2007.

A FAIR HOUSING / EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY / DRUG FREE
WORKPLACE / HANDICAP
ACCESSIBLE JURISDICTION









FLORIDA SHERIFFS
YOUTH RANCHES, INC.

DATA ENTRY SPECIALIST
High school diploma or GED with
two years office e perience.
Proficiency with Windows based
software, including Microsoft
Office products is required.

$9.00 PER HOUR
EXCELLENT BENEFITS

SEND/FAX APPLICATION
Donna Pittman
Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches
PO Box 2000
Boys Ranch, FL 32064
Fax: (386) 842-2429
EOE/DFWP



FirstDay
EXPERIENCED ACCOUNTANT
Large company based in Lake City is
seeking an experienced accountant
for a fast paced industry.
Construction background and
management/supervisory experience


required. Salary commensurate with
experience, competitive benefits pkg.
Drug Free Work Place/EEO
Employer Please fax resumes to
386-755-9132.
TRUCK DRIVER
Short to medium hauls.
CDL Class A with clean MVR.
Full time / Commission and
Benefits negotiable.
SUWANNEE FARMS
Call 386-776-2946
Drug Free Workplace / EOE
PRE-SCHOOL TEACHER NEEDED
Must hold a current CDA with 1yr.
experience. 1 wk paid vacation, 12
pd. holidays. $7.50 start pay. For info
call 386-362-7901

FirstDay
FT Teacher (Live Oak Head Start) -
HS Diploma/GED, Age appropriate
CDA credential or minimum of 2 yr
degree in early childhood education
or child development preferred; 5
Hour Literacy Course, 3 yrs of
classroom exp. working with young
children preferred. Must pass
physical and DCF background
screening requirements. Current First
Aid/CPR preferred. Excellent
Benefits-Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual
Leave. $.8.12 w/CD. Apply in person
to 843 SW Marymac St. Live Oak
362-4944 or mail resume to PO Box
2637, Lake City, FL 32056-2637 Fax
386-754-2220. EOE
HAIR CUTTERY We have
opportunities available for licensed
creative stylists. Excellent pay,
bonuses, medical plans, paid time
off, 401K & Free advanced
education/etc. 1-800-askjobl EOE

HOUSING COMPLEX MANAGER
SUWANNEE FARMS

Generous Salary plus incentive
share profits, housing and other
benefit package options.

MUST BE BILINGUAL, mature
and able to manage work force,
stable, healthy, drug free and
industrious. Carpentry, plumbing,
appliance and electrical skills a
plus.

Contact Suwannee Farms Office
386-776-2946 to set up interview.

Drug Free Workplace / EOE

INDUSTRIAL
New to Lake City or Live Oak? Tired
of looking for work on your own?
Various positions available/All Shifts,
Must be able to lift up to 701lbs.
Please call 386-755-1991 for appt
Drug Screens & Backgrd check req.


FirstDay
INVENTORY ASSOCIATES NEEDED
$8.00 hr.. Travel Monday, horne
Thursday. Lodging and transportation
provided. Apply at the Employment
Connection in Live, Oak. Interviews
on the 29th and 30th of January.

FirstDay






Jasper Dairy Queen is now
accepting applications for
MANAGERS, ASSISTANT
MANAGERS & CUSTOMER
SALES ASSOCIATES
is seeking highly motivated
individuals with initiative to excel.
Full and Part time employment, all
shifts. Competitive Salary, Bonus,
Paid Holidays and Vacation, 401 K
Plan.
Please apply at the store at 6580
US 129 South, Jasper or call. 386-
792-2679 for directions.
FirstDay
MECHANIC WANTED
Full Time / aSalary optional:
Preferred Pine Straw
386-935-2773


HQM of Surrey Place is looking for
Energetic and friendly staff for the
following Positions:

FT / PT LPN
PT RN Weekend House Supervisor
FT/PT C.N.A.
PRN shifts available for all positions.

Please apply in person at:
Surrey Place Care Center
110 Lee Ave SE
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-364-5961
Maintenance
HELP WANTED maintenance man-
with knowledge of plumbing, electric
and carpentry. Tools required.
Transportation a must. Drug free
workplace. Call (386) 330-2567

FirstDay
medical


"G E N T SIVs,!_:.,


LAKE CITY & LIVE OAK
BRANCHES

Great healthcare has come
homeSM We are rapidly growing
and looking to add several
seasoned clinicians to our current
team:

FULL TIME
PHYSICAL THERAPIST
and flexible Per Diem
SPEECH LANGUAGE
PATHOLOGIST
$Sign on Bonus$
and Per Diem Home Health Aide

Min. 1 yr clinical experience
required, home care training
provided. Competitive Salaries
with excellent benefits that start
1st month of employment!

Call Ashlie Sitter toll free @
1-866-GENTIVA or email resume
to ashlie.sitter@gentiva.com

EOE M/F/D/V ETA

FirstDay
Medical








ATTENTION TOP HEALTH
CARE PROFESSIONALS!

We have immediate openings for:

*RN
PACU
OR
Med/Surg
IMC

Inquire about our sign-on bonus plan!

Lake City Medical Center has been
voted 'Best of the Best' Hospital by
the Lake City Reporter for the last
7 years due to our dedicated
healthcare professionals providing
excellent patient care.

COME JOIN US TODAY!

We offer a generous benefit
package that includes health,
dental, life insurance, vision, stock
purchase plan, 401(k) retirement,
paid time off and many more!
EOE and Drug Free Work Place
For more information and to apply:
Call: (386)719-9020
Fax: (386)719-9028
Online: www.lakecitymedical.com
FirstDay"


STABLE HELP NEEDED PART
TIME. 5 days a week. Various duties.
Please call 386-776-2197 ask for
Betty


r-VIL TIIP rCl1UV -. -.- -- --- u m u vvrin i v v.


FirstDay
TEMPORARY ROAD
MAINTENANCE WORKER I

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT

The Suwannee County Public Works
Department is currently recruiting for
a temporary Road Maintenance
Worker I position.. Responsibilities
include but are not limited to
performing manual and/or semi-


SEARS HOME IMPROVEMENT has
openings for inside marketing reps.
PT positions. Earn great money
talking to customers. Call 1-800-
379-8310. Retirees always welcome.
EOE/DFWP

PARKS MAINTENANCE WORKER I

SUWANNEE PARKS AND
RECREATION,

Suwannee Parks and Recreation is'
seeking applicants for the position of
Parks Maintenance Worker I. This
is a regular full-time position working
under close supervision. Is in a local
parks and recreation system of over
200 acres at 16 parks, and requires
the knowledge, use and routine
maintenance of mowers, weed
eaters, blowers, edgers, trailers and
other light equipment. This is a
semi-skilled manual labor position
that performs in a variety of adverse
and uncomfortable weather
conditions. Duties performed include
general parks/grounds maintenance,
including but not limited to the
following: picking up trash, mowing
weed eating, edging, blowing,
trimming, pressure washing,
painting, cleaning, and the
inspection, maintenance & repair of
equipment used. Partial high school
education and one year work
experience in general grounds
maintenance, commercial lawn
maintenance or other related
experience required. Must possess
a valid Florida Drivers License.
Starting salary is $8.10/hour.
Retirement, health insurance, paid
holidays, annual and sick leave
benefits are included. Interested
applicants are required to submit a
County application to the
Administrative Services Department,
224 Pine Avenue, Live Oak, FL
32064, 386-362-6869.Position will
remain open until filled. Successful
completion of a drug test is a
condition of employment.
EEO/AA/V/D.

Want To Work in N. Florida?
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Live Oak, Suwannee County, FL
Due to growth we have new
employment opportunities in our
modern poultry operations.

*Examples of available jobs:.
Deboner: $9.46
Packers: $8.91
Warehouse: $9.26
Night Sanitation: $9.26
Live Hangers: $11.40
Maintenance: $9.20-$14.00
*Includes Perfect Attendance
Bonus of $1.05/hour

Successful candidates must be
able to perform the essential
functions of the job with or without
accommodations, and be legally
authorized to work. Will train.
Overtime work available daily and
weekend.' Medical and life
insurance, dental, vision and
prescription drug pr-ogram-n, paid
vacations, paid holidays, credit
union and more.

Apply Now!!!
PILGRIM'S PRIDE
19740 US Hwy 90 W.
Live Oak, Florida 32060
English 386-208-0205
Espanol 386-208-0190
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
EOE-AA-M-F-V-D

APPLICATIONS also ACCEPTED
Employment CONNECTIONS
LOCATIONS:
1416 N. Ohio Ave. 200 W.Base
Live Oak, FL Madison, FL


Call and ask about our
Vehicle Special!


To place your classified ad
Call Tami 362-1734 Ext. 102

BUICK CENTURY 2002 model.
$5,000.00 Call 386-938-4209.

Trucks for Sale
FirstDay
GMC PICK UP X/CAB 2003 A/T,
A/C Power windows/Locks, $50,000
mi. Good Condition $11,500.00 Call
386-364-8088
Utility
ATV 2001 Polaris 335, 4x4.
Excellent condition, low miles.
$2,500 OBO Call 386-590-6964

FirstDay
UTILITY TRAILERS
3- 16'X 6' dual axle, 1 unpainted
frame, $875. 1 black, painted frame,
$975. Plus your choice of flooring; 1
black, painted frame, red fenders,
2"X 6" flooring, $1250. 386-590-0990
YAMAHA BRUIN 2006 4 Wheeler.
$3,700.00 Call 386-364-9333


HOPKINS NISSAN SALES EVENT


ALL SANERSA 2007 NISSAN SENTRA NE
2 or SPECIAL.EDITION Mode

M T 7Model#42717 ST
STK#73160
,73115





$ 49$15,99 $



NE RA NEW NISSAN FRONTIER SE NE
Mode CREW CAB KING
S Model#73316 M
STK#63468
63404






s $19, S


Hopkins




MOTOR COMPANY


Hwy 90 West Lake City



386-752-5050 1-800-881-6862


330052-F


'CYERSHO 2/


supervisor. May perform minor
repairs/adjustments or maintenance
on equipment. This position will
primarily work in the Branford area.

Qualifications include one year of
manual labor experience and
education equivalent to a partial high
school education. Must possess a
valid Florida Drivers License. Rate
of pay is $7.29 per hour.

Interested applicants are required to
submit a County application to the
Administrative Services Department,
224 Pine Avenue, Live Oak, Florida
32064, (386) 362-6869. Position will
remain open until filled. Successful
completion of a drug test is a
condition of employment.
EEO/AA/V/D.


Think


"Inside"


the box!
Add a border
to your classified
line ad for higher
visibility and more

Results!
To place your classified ad
Call Tami 362-1734 Ext. 102






TRANSPORTATION
Antique Autos for Sale
FirstDay
WE BUY WHOLE JUNK CARS
$100.00. Free Pick-Up.'Call 386-878-
9260. or 386-752-3648 after 5p.m.
Autos for Sale


BIG


RESULTS

Sell Your Car


v


0 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS JANUARY 24-25, 2007, PAGE 5D













Winter brunch a winner


(Family Features) Cabin fever? Not me!
Being housebound in February is
just my cup of tea. Winter
weather is a great excuse for
baking and coo'kin; And ti '.,
not ditticult tOe- c,,.
other- into
dthe


mid-winter's party. Plan an easy menu
that includes a lot of comfort.
Gather your crowd
for some


Choose a heartwarming classic
casserole as a centerpiece entr6e.
Add a fruit salad, a loaf of pumpkin
bread or some rolls from the bakery.
Pour cofttee, make hot cocoa and
have the kids pass a
plate of home-
baked


'4.-,


is


A'..


heart
of the
home with
warmth and
tempting aromas..
So look no further than "winter"
for an excuse to get together. Gather the
kids to do some fun baking bars or
other favorite cookies to prepare for a


n. .. ; -.










cookies
and bars.
Play a
favorite board
game, get out a
deck of cards or play
charades- for good old-


comfort and coddling:
Invite friends, and include the kids, for a
casual weekend brunch.


Io NAeNING If your credit score is
I riRNC U ING420 or 820, call today

wise f EIERNm E for pre-approval
SERYUNE 386-755-2424
"" ,-" "I" _-


fashioned un mndoor-s.
Comfort classics like a cheesy casserole,
quiche or chowder can take the chill out of
winter. This twist on the all-American,
popular-with-everyone mac 'n' cheese
includes three different types of cheese,
including Pepper Jack to spice things up.
Heartwarming winter baking ideas and
cooking inspiration can be found at
www.VeryBestBaking.com.

SPICY JACK MAC & CHEESE
WITH BROCCOLI

Serves 8

2 cups (8 ounces) dry elbow macaroni
2 cups chopped frozen or fresh broccoli
2 cups (8 ounces) shredded sharp


VIX It Up .
With Jenny .


Harper


cheddar cheese
2 cups (8 ounces) Pepper Jack cheese
1 can (12 ounces) Nestl6 Carnation
Evaporated Milk
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese,
divided
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
2 tablespoons bread crumbs

PREHEAT oven to 3500F. Lightly butter
2 1/2-quart casserole dish.
COOK macaroni in large saucepan
according to package directions, adding
broccoli to boiling pasta water for last 3
minutes of cooking time.
COMBINE drained cooked pasta,
broccoli, cheddar cheese, Pepper Jack
cheese, evaporated milk, 1/4 cup
Parmesan cheese and black pepper in
large bowl. Pour into prepared casserole
dish. Combine remaining Parmesan
cheese and bread crumbs; sprinkle over
macaroni mixture. Cover tightly with
aluminum foil.
BAKE covered 20 minutes. Remove foil;
bake additional 10 minutes until lightly
browned.
NOTE: For a less spicy version,
substitute 2 cups (8 ounces) Monterey Jack
cheese and a few dashes of hot pepper
sauce (optional) for the Pepper Jack
cheese.
Nutrition information per serving: 420
calories (210 calories from fat); 23g total
fat; 13g saturated fat; 80mg cholesterol;
490mg sodium; 31g carbohydrates; 2g
dietary fiber; 6g sugars; 24g protein; 20%
Daily Value vitamin A; 35% Daily Value
vitamin C; 60"-. Daily Value calctirh; 8%
Daily Value iron. .- ,,
Jenny Harper is Senior Culinary
Specialist for the Nestl6 Test Kitchens and
VeryBestBaking.com.


GOO .BU CASHH CASHP t t iMMEDIATE^
GOOD-BUY "jw' MMED ,
CLASSIFIED OB M


101W TO9 WRITE A CLASSIFI4I AD
8 Simple Steps to Creating a Classified Ad That Sells:


niotigi iN'S 1 uu
Balance FLUSH
Tires E' ;,.,nn
01S O lCompnter t s
Change .15 Balancelle Fn ei[ i
USED CAR SUPERCENTER ZM0I P ..= -,"',' u,
-- -- --- -- Let us help you buy a car,
2310 U.S. Hwy. 90 W. (Across from Publix) 755 2 2 not push.you into a car
Lake City, FL 32055 .C.OO 38V"l'45 In you don't want.


What do you have to offer? Start your
advertisementby naming the item or service
you are presenting.
Are you being clear? Complete, concise
information will encourage a quick response
from readers.
Can the reader reach you? Be sure to include
m ,a your telephone number or address.
If necessary, list a preferred time to have
potential buyers contact you.
Are you giving your ad enough exposure?
Consecutive publication of your ad will
generate the greatest amount of reader
attention. Generally, a 15-day run time is the
best and most cost-effective arrangement.
SWhat's the best part of your offer? Identify
and write about the most beneficial feature
of the product or service you are advertising.


Have you covered all of your bases? Make
sure you are providing sufficient information
about the merchandise or service you are
offering, including the price! Does the reader
know what you are selling, why they should
buy it and how they can contact you for more
information?out the most beneficial feature of
the product or service you are advertising.
How can you reach the greatest number of
prospective buyers? Place your classified ad
with The Classified Marketplace.
Call 1-800-525-4182 today!



ScIIEDUI .. '.C .. -
DEPARTMENT ,,,, ..
oKPOrNKNnY Sm


These local businesses are here to take good care of you.


TO PLACE AN AD, CALL (386) 362-1734. DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M.


Top Dollar Paid for Your Pine Timber!
If you're thinking about selling your timber
or need an estimate, call Kelley Holton
at 850-843-5502


M


Mincy Land & Timber, Inc.


BRAD'S
Mower & Golf Cart Repair
Gas or Electric
Trailer R lpait & it'liitin Sen ice j
20 E,.,. ,E l fI .'.T,, I'
S Pickup & l k n.-hl\ '\aiiluhlt' ,
NIon.-Fri. 9-4 386-638-0098
Saturday 9-12 Jasper. Florida


Honey Do This, Do That, Do This!!
If your HONEY DO LIST never gets done?
Call HONEY DO HANDYMAN Services!!!
All your concrete needs Concrete Foundations. Patios,
Raised Patos O or Movile Homes Sideallks and Dret ays.
All your Carpentr\ Needs Intenrior Trim Croann Molding
Chair Rails Pantries. Cabinets Hand Rails
Stidmgq & Custom Enlertaintriment Centers
Remodel the Exterior or your Mobile Home or Pressure WashM!!
Licensed & ln.?Jurd
5251 S W 42rnd Cl Bob SlitrunK 904-635-2836
Jasper, FL -2052 Pops Strunt 90--303-285-
Ofhice 386-935-.3706 Gerri Srunk 386-855-5095
1186-81-509


We Buy Timber and Timberland


L;!L.i.TT,-m 41 Pun


PAGE 6D, JANUARY 24-25, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


EI CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Xt;~







* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


These local businesses are here to take good care of you.



SPOTLIGHT


_ON SERVICE
STOPLACE AN AD, CALL (386) 362-1734. DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M.


ABBEY MINI STORAGE
All New Units
*5X15 5X20 10X15 10X20 15X20
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd.
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak


3' wide galvalume Cut to your desired lengths!
3' wide painted Delivery Service Available*
2' wide 5-v Ask about steel buildings
Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg. Inc.
CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-393-0335


Mw


LIVE OAK
MINI STORAGE
5x15 5x20 10x15 10x20
CLIMATkI CONTROLLED STORAGE
5x5*5x10 10x10 o 10x20
| Units located on Gold Kist Road
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-6626
... .. ... ...


DUNCAN TIRE & AUTO
"Complete One Stop Service For Your Vehicle"
Alignment Specialists
l A 5ASMK--
24 HOUR TOWING
S 1 62-4743 1.-ss-362-2568
US 129 North @ Hamilton Ave.
LEN A. DUNCAN



LEWIS WALKER ROOFING INC.
"AFFORDABLE QUALITY"

EXTENDED
i ROOF WARRANTY REPAIRS
S RE-ROOFS ,l[it : ,'Mi%. Qn l k, 1' IF\
E MTAL *SHINGLES LICENSED & ihi F *.i))HliMa b.I Lb
FL \T ROOF, GR\% EL. INSURED 'I %iItiNer-. *
LO M SLOPED 1NS MI.
"THE BEST POSSIBLE ROOF AT THE BEST POSSIBLE PRICE"
fi 3,h-fl'c,: -|4I9"
, PO BOX .12 Ti!! Free I -.h.."L\\ -ROOF '
Fon White, FL 32038. RC1'.i6''4-12 F... 35?4'"-1'-45:2


Affordable Seamless Gutters
"Satisfaction Guaranteed"


Specializing In:
* Seamless Gutters
* Soffit & Fasia
* Vinyl Siding


Carl Kirk
386-776-1835
Cell
386-209-2740


Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTI31.4TES FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED


ONE
David
MCialaughlin


Remodeling & Renovations
! 386-963-1391
A Licensed & Insured
A Division of
KARDAV ENTERPRISES, INC. FEI 067-20200
A Dtwstono


yok do the fLLL,., we'LL do the h vLi.!
WE BUILD Stump Grinding N. FL. WASTE

DECKS & SOLUTIONS
.~ PORJCHES otanCRoll off --- ResidentialI
PORCHES eontainer
rental Commercial
Fully Licensed & Insured ental
86- 29-17 Call us todaN! 386-935-1685 or
8 U9 1073 A Jim Sellers 386-776-2522 Email to: nt1wastel'atalannec.net
,.,. v v E.d o:nlwst2 .atatfzl


N~UNAN~N~T
U
- ~--


(Jali/ rpl'i UfIn t a1 lil Qul- Pri,:ma t l-
-',,, S ,, ,. d R, p ru,. pc(al/isl
Drigger's Heating,
Air Conditioning
and Refrigeration
Residenual and Commercial
1803 Eiergreen Aie. 13861364-5734
Lie Oak. FL 32064 Clark Driggers. Owner
License # CAC025404 'Z7-


LAKEW OOD Trees, Trimmied or Removed. Firewood A-;iI
Licensed & Insured Free Estimates
APARTMENTS "4 GENERATIONS OF EXPERIENCE"
I L IV CA K 24 HR. EMERGENCY PUMP SERVICE
IN LIVE OAK TREE WORK M P
Bucket Truck and Climbing
Quiet country living 2 bedroom duplex Well Drilling
Call 362-3110 96-5 0FI St L ,c..630
..'w5 0 ,.1 1 t ic


- -n I- 312064-F


. ... .


HOWEARD Bush Hogginc
Handyman HOWAR5 D E-LIMBDATORS0, INc S
; llSEPTIC TANK SERVICE, INC. Complete Tree Service BILL'S
SNO JOB TOO SMALL C- AEauBIC SYSTEMS ceLicensed & Insured & LANE
ALL WORK GUARANTEED (386) 209-1073 AEROBIC SYSTEMSEI
AD PUMP OUT SERVICE Olners: 644E
Carpentry Windows & Doors Prefab Carports PRE CAST SEPTIC TANKS keil & Glenda Hudson .
Decks Garage Doors Porches DRAIN FIELDS RELAID 21653 W. Shekinah Place -.
.-oers, .,, Tie ein ,es "BIGGER PORTABLE REST R MS" O'Biien, FL 32071 t
Downspouts Cabinets Mobile Home P. BOX 180 935-1518 Phone 386-935-1993
Playgrounds Yard Work Skirting Brn, ld FL 3'00 (386) 935-1Fa 38651935-33
Lawn Care Pet Doors Ouldoor Storage wwwhowardandsonsseptic.com (386) 364-1418
Iaewww.howardandsonsseplic.com j[8)3411


U~U~UN1UN~1NU
'A
,-A--------- I


METAL ROOFING
PAHEL'- AIlND fl I F ET --.
SWE ARE THE MANUFACTURER
S,'AGr~E-i U ,iah.

232 SE INDUSTRIAL PARK CIR,
Mayo, FL 32066
i ~ 386-294-1720
25 to 30 Years Metal Finish Warranty
...11


4 U ~ 11~F~1~3


g Landclearing Hauling
oval Discing Fencing
BACKHOE
) CLEARING
B Front End Loader for rent
th Operator $500 per day
FREE Estimates
12150 196th Terrace
O'Brien, FL 32071


ODrywall Hang, Finish;
Textures;
Plaster & Stucco
any, In. Repairs;
[Interior & Exterior
38t-3w5 995 Painting
386-54-2580 386-752-241 2


CALL DOES IT ALL
For Your
HOME
Improvements & Repairs


I


No Job Too Small Free Estimates



FMeing& Tractor
Mowing, Grading, Construction
Clean-up, Tree trimming, Discing,
Hauling, Fill Dirt,
& Lime Rock
Wayne Selph (386) 963-4520
Wayne Sep cell: 386.-330-4197


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calcium the organic way


Old Fashioned mac and cheese
(Family Features) Growing bodies
need calcium. Kids love macaroni and
cheese. See an equation here? It's is easy
to make this family pleasing entree with
organic ingredients. Plus, it features a
whopping dose of that bone building,
miraculous mineral: calcium.
"Little kids need about 500 mg (of
calcium) per day, bigger ones about 800
mg and teens need 1,300 mg to fuel
those growing bones," said Sara' 2
Tedeschi, Organic Valley's community "
nutrition educator. "There's no better .
way to get calcium than from organic
dairy foods." .
Milk drinkers will get 300 mg of
calcium for every cup. Not all kids are.. .,. ".
milk drinkers, but most love cheese-and
other dairy foods. Nurturing the strong
bones that are formed during the
growing years will help prevent "."
osteoporosis later in life. And, adults -
especially women need 1,000 mg of
calcium per day.2,
Macaroni and cheese come together .
for a calcium-rich entree that pleases .
the palate, the soul and the kid in all of, .
us.
Getting Calcium into Kids
Cheese, Please: A 1.5-ounce serving of
cheddar cheese has 300 mg of calcium.
Offer a snack of cheddar cubes or try
Organic Valley Stringles.
Juicy News: 1 cup of Organic Valley
Organic "With Calcium" Orange Juice
contains 300 mg of calcium.
Yummy Yogurt: An 8-ounce serving.,.....
of yogurt contains 300 mg of calcium.
Green Goddess: Dark green
vegetables like broccoli contain calcium.
Serve broccoli "trees" with a tangy dip ...
made with Organic Valley Lowfat Sour
Cream or Cottage Cheese.
Soup It Up: Make soups with milk for
a calcium boost. '
Jump for Joy: Combine a calciumn-rich

S.... diet with plenty of
exercise. It takes both to
17-"build strongoones.

: 'Homemade Organic Baked
.-Mac and Cheese
..Serves: 61to 8

5 tablespoons Organic
-,Valley Cultured Unsalted:.
Butter, divided
1 /2 cup homemade
bread crumbs
1/4 cup Organic V alley
Shredded Parmesan
Cheese
-. 1 pound organic dry
IRV S a pasta in elbhow.-or other
hasmall tubular shape
wit S"urd:Fb.ul-4 tablespoons organic
r..., "-_W Saturmag flour

f EE 4 admi ion ups Organic Valley
Whole Milk
Ai Tob'Us r.U S 1 teaspoon dry mustard
W _, 6 cups (24 ounces) grated
".. 'Organic Valley Sharp
'n ,hand/or Mild Cheddar

*-.Slow ,la' areas Salt and pepper to taste
much........ mor"..'Preheat oven to 4000 F.
"IMelt 1 tablespoon butter
"1..' and combine with
breadcrumbs and
-. .Parmesan cheese in a small
,. bowl. Set aside.
Cook pasta per package
I directions, drain, and
return to pot.
In large heavy saucepan,.
melt remaining butter over
low to medium heat. Add
-4 flour and whisk until
S*. golden. Add rmilk;
continue whisking and


cooking until sauce
A- thickens slightly. Add dry
,-mustard and grated
cheese, whisking until
-W. p0W t cheese melts into sauce.
InIiO tlO~ l Al u Otr Io i iO i eperTaste and add salt and
EniVo the Fun All. Year Long pepper as desired.
Now i ludes FRee ring Pour sauce over pasta
and stir to combine well.
5Sfr COIElf Lill-~IP LIR rRIIi RIOES, OI' A IALS ALL N STransfer macaroni to a 4-
. BEST CONCERT LINE-UP.VER* TBRILLIG RIDES EXOTIC ANIMALS ALL MEW SOWS quart baking dish. Sprinkle
$69.95 Per person, plus tax. Unlimited admissions until 12/31/07 to Wild Adventures Theme Park of Valdosta, GA,
Cypress Gardens Adventure Park of Winter Haven, FL, Splash Island Water Park located inside both Parks, over 100 all-star concerts, With breadcrumb mixture.
over 100 thrilling rides, including 15 coasters*, daily shows and hundreds of wild animals. Includes Free Parking until 12/31/07 Bake 25 to 30 minutes
'The Staorlner, Floridas Original Scream Machine coming to Cypress Galdens Adventure Park In 2007.
229.219.7080 1-75 Exit 13, Valdosta, GA wildadventures.net until lightly golden and
bubbling.


PAGE 8D, JANUARY 24-25, 2007 NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


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