Pictures for our darlings

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Material Information

Title:
Pictures for our darlings
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Kilburn, Samuel Smith ( Engraver )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher:
D. Lothrop & Co.
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1876   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1876   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1876
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

General Note:
Some illustrations engraved by Kilburn.
General Note:
Prose and poetry.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002224568
notis - ALG4834
oclc - 20959367
System ID:
UF00028402:00001


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BOSTON:
D. Lothrop & Co., Publishers.
30 AND 32 FRANKLIN STREET.































Copyright, I876, by D. LOTIROP & Co.







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MADAME MOB-CAP.

BY MARY E. BRADLEY.

THIS is lit-tle Ros-a-belle-
No! I beg her par-don,
This is Mad-ame Mob-cap,
Walk-ing in her gar-den.

What a fine cap it is!
NWhat a wide bor-der!
Spec-ta-cles and walk-ing-stick,
And ev-e-ry-thing in or-der.

Hop, toads, clear the way!
Bees, hush your hum-ming!
La-dy-birds and but-ter-flies,
Grand folks are com-ing!

She must have a king-cup,
And a prince's feath-er,
With a crown-im-pe-ri-al,
Tied up to-geth-er.





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THE PRETTY FIRE.
BY ROSETTA B. HASTINGS.

BRIGHT fire, pret-ty fire, Nice fire, pleas-ant fire,
Won-der what you are? Warm the ba-by's nose;
Draw the ba-by nigh-er, Put the foot-ies closer,
In his lit-tie chair. Warm the lit-tle toes.












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See the shin-ing spar-kles, Ba-by wants to catch you,
How they snap and fly! Pret-ty, pret-ty fire.
Guess they're in a hur-ry
To twin-kle in the sky. n
But he'll have to learn
Danc-ing yel-low bla-zes, That the pret-ty fire
Jump-ing high and higrh-er; Will burn-y, bunr-y, burn.






FOR VERY SMALL \\ IDE-AWAKLS.


WHAT BEN-NY TAUGHT CLAR-ENCE.
ONE day Pa-pa Bell said to and smiled. Ben-ny will be
Mam-ma Bell, My dear, you good for him," he said.
are mak-ing a sweet lit-tle girl Think of my lit-tle boy
of my son." dressed in rough frieze and
Now Clar-ence Bell did not bea-ver cloth!" sighed mam-
look like a lit-tle girl. He ma.
was a fair-sized boy, and wore But Clar-ence ad-mired his
a tru-ly" vel-vet coat, and rough clothes, be-cause they
" tru-ly" trow-sers, and" tru-ly" were like his cous-in Ben-ny's.
boots. But his fore-head was He en-joyed the long, snow-y
ver-y white, and his fin-gers road to the fun-ny red school-
were love-ly, and his throat house be-cause he went with
fair, and his cheeks a dain-ty Ben-ny. Ben-ny was full of
pink. He sat be-fore a rose- fun. He e-ven en-joyed snow-
wood desk, cov-ered with ball-ing Ben-ny when they were
books. His gov-ern-ess sat a-lone in the back-yard.
near. It woZld be wise, sir, One noon, at school, he rode
to send your son to the pub-lic down the long hill in front of
schools," said she. Ben-ny on the bob-sled. Three
"I won't go," said Clar-ence. times Ben-ny tipped the sled
" The boys are rough. They o-ver pur-pose-ly, and rolled
throw snow-balls." the lit-tle cit-y man in the
But the next week Mr. Bell nice coun-try snow.
and his son went in-to the Clar-ence staid near-ly all
coun-try. Mr. Bell came home win-ter. When he went home
a-lone. Mrs. Bell was sad. he was not at all like "a sweet
But Mr. Bell rubbed his hands lit-tie girl."





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A SUM-MER CHRIST-MAS.

BY AUNTIE KINNIE.

FAIR lit-tle Grace Grey lives The A-mer-i-can ice and
in a land ma-ny thou-sands of snow are Grace's fa-vor-ite
miles from here. In that dis- fair-y-sto-ry.
tant land Christ-mas day comes Lit-tle Grace was a Christ-
when the woods are green, and mas ba-by. She was born on
the coun-try is all in flow-er. Christ-mas, so her birth-days,
Her pa-pa and mam-ma are ev-e-ryone, come on Christ-mas
mis-sion-a-ries, and pret-ty lit- day. On that day she wears
tie Grace was born in that her love-li-est white frock, and
warm land o-ver the sea. She sits out un-der the trees in a
has nev-er seen an-y snow, nor camp-chair, and holds an odd
an-y ice, for she has nev-er been lit-tle birth-day re-cep-tion.
"home." Like pa-pa and mam- The black chil-dren all
ma, lit-tle Grace calls A-mer- the na-tive peo-ple in that land
i-ca "home." She looks in her are black -dear-ly love the
A-mer-i-can pic-ture-books at lit-tle white Mis-sy Gra-cy."
the win-ter pic-tures, where the They nev-er tire of look-ing at
ground is all white, and the her rose-tint-ed cheeks, nor of
chil-dren are skat-ing, and she touch-ing her fine soft gold-en
thinks it is so fun-ny that the hair; and on her birth-days
dark, wet rain can change and they bring her flow-ers, and
come down white and dry, and fruit, and shells, and birds.
in the shape of small feath-ers, And on that day the lit-tle
and so ver-y fun-ny that the white Mis-sy" gives each
cold can build a floor on the black cheek a kiss, and says,
wa-ter so sol-id that a lit-tle Be good, so that I can al-
girl can run a-cross it. ways love you "






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A SUMMElnR CHRISTMlAS.





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PHI-LE-NA.
ONE day a lit-tle girl called sick-room ver-y soft-ly. Some
out in great dis-tress, Til-ly one was moan-ing. On tip-toe
Til-ly! what sha/l I do? Phi- he ap-proached. Be com-
le-na is ver-y sick--do come posed, my dear mad-am," he
and look at her!" said to Sue. Then he placed
Til-ly, be-ing Sue's sis-ter, his hat in a chair, took out his
must have been Phi-le-na's watch, and lift-ed Phi-le-na's
aunt; and she came in much hand in his. Ah! pulse
haste. Phi-le-na, who was a two-forty," he said.
large wax doll, lay in Sue's "Oh, dear," shrieked Sue
lap. As Til-ly bent o-ver her, and Til-ly.
Sue said, I knew this morn- Hush! do not dis-turb the
ing she was go-ing to be sick, pa-tient," said the doc-tor, tak-
for she just lay and stared at ing out some pow-ders.
me, and I put on her wrap-per What do you think the dis-
so as to be read-y. Just see ease is? asked Til-ly.
how stiff her back is! Would Well," said the doc-tor,
you put her feet in wa-ter?" 'glanc-ing a-round grave-ly,
Til-ly laid her hand on Phi- it's my 'pin-ion you keep too
le-na's fore-head. "I should man-y flow-ers in the room.
go for Doc-tor Lee." But I will call a-gain," and he
"I wish you wouldd" said bowed him-self out.
Sue, for what is mon-ey to a The flow-ers were put in the
child's life ?" next room; and when Doc-tor
So Til-ly went for Doc-tor Lee came again, he found his
Lee, who lived next door. pa-tient well, and dressed to go
He and Til-ly en-tered the to a con-cert,





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'AH i PULSE TWO-FORTY."





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LEARNING TO READ.
BY E. F.

ONCE there was a lit-tle girl, and her name was Kit-ty;
There was a lit-tle cat, and her name was Kit-ty, too.
Ev-e-ry-bod-y thought the lit-tle girl was pret-ty,
Ev-'ry-bod-y thought the lit-tle cat was pret-ty, too.

Well, this lit-tle Kit-ty-cat was as nice as could be,-
She nev-er mew-mewed, and I know she was no thief;
She kept her yel-low sat-in fur just as it should be,-
Her on-ly troub-le was with the A-B-C leaf.

Kit-ty-cat could-n't read -she could-n't, or she would-n't,
And lit-tle Kit-ty-girl said 'twas "a ded-ful shame
That a bright cat, wiv such gwate, big, gold-en eyes, should-n't
A-ble be to spell out her own short lit-tle name."

So ev-'ry day, to have her read, her name was print-ed
Big and bold, -" C-A-T," let-ters three, big and bold ;
And ev-'ry day was she brought, and she sat and squint-ed
At the marks, and she smelt them all, and heard them told.

But to say that C-A-T" was Cat!" she knew bet-ter!
And what do you think that Kit-ty-cat at last did do ?
One day she raised her back, and squalled at ev-'ry let-ter,
And with her i-vo-ry claw she tore them right in two!






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"WHAT BOS-SY SAID.

BY FANNY PARKER.

Moo! moo! moo! would treat folks so, if it was
Lit-tle boy, why don't you turned round ?
give me some wa-ter ? Moo, moo! Why do cows
Lit-tle Em-i-ly Ann, why have soft, kind hearts, and
don't you bring me a pail of folks such hard ones ? I think
wa-ter ? I am so dry. I am so much of lit-tle Em-i-ly Ann;
al-most choked. Moo moo! in the sum-mer I try to be at
moo! the milk-ing-place, so she need
In the sum-mer time I can not wait and tire her lit-tle
help my-self. I can find my lungs in call-ing for me; and if
way to the bright, cool brook, I am not there, when I hear
and drink all I like. But in her, I come run-ning as hard
win-ter I am shut in the barn- as ev-er I can. But, moo!
yard, and I can not get a drop moo! lit-tle Em-i-ly Ann don't
of wa-ter un-less some one care. Nor Bob-by nei-ther.
brings it to me. Some-times I Bob-by shuts my sta-ble door,
am so thirs-ty I lick the snow and I can't get in to lie down
from the ground and from the all day long, and the wind is so
fence, and then I am thirs-ti-er cold!
than ev-er, and my poor tongue Oh! I wish I could have
is full of fe-ver, oh, moo! some wa-ter, and get in-to my
moo! moo! snow is so bad and warm sta-ble. Oh, moo! moo!
parch-y for cows. Moo! moo! that pump that pump! the
I am so wea-ry of see-ing bless-ed sound of that flow-ing
folks go to the pump and for- water dis-tracts me!
get to bring me an-y. Moo! I be-lieve I shall jump o-ver
moo! Do you think cows the fence and help my-self.





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THEY DIDN'T MEAN TO.

BY MARGARET EYTINGE.

DEAR, wee, blue-eyed, dim- ful sto-ry tel-ler. I asked him,
pled-chinned Pat-ty-mam-ma i 'What's his name?' and he said,
calls her lit-tle pie," for that Bow-wow.' Tree-four times
is what Pat-ty real-ly means- I asked him, and tree-four
came home the oth-er daywith times he said, 'Bow-wow,' when
the fun-ni-est ba-by frown on I just know his name's Chriss-
her ba-by brow. fur Clum-bus Bright.
She had been tak-ing a short Then a bird sat on a fence,
walk a-cross the field, from the and singed, and singed; and I
big oak where the blue-birds said,'I'm Pat-ty; who are you?'
live, to the ma-ple where the He did-n't look like a
spar-rows have their nests. li-ar-bird, not the least-est bit;
Why, what is the mat- but he was. He said, Sweet,
ter ? said mnam-ma, when she sweet, sweet,' and that's to say
saw the frown, Sweet lit-tle a-bout can-dy and su-gar and
pies should not have wrin-kles." me. 'Tisn't any name at all.
They all tell sto-ries "Then I spoke to a cow. I
eb'-ry one," said Pat-ty. didn't speak near. I hol-lered
"They do?" said mam- at her, 'What's your name?'
ma, ver-y much as-ton-ished. 'Moo-oo-oo,' she said, when
"Oh! how sor-ry I am. Give she knowed all the time it was
me a kiss, and tell me all Dai-sy. So I made a frown
a-bout it." and comed home."
Well," said Pat-ty, af-ter But, Pat-ty," said mam-ma,
she had giv-en the kiss, I they did-n't mean to tell sto-
took a walk, and a dog met me ries."
- a good look-ingdog- Miss But they did," said Pat-ty,
Bright's dog- but, oh! a ded- and I want a piece of cake."






FOR VERY SMALL WIDE AWAKIES.





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It is mid-night deep; "Grain 's hard, any mousC
Men and dogs are a-bed; knows;
The snakes are a-sleep ; Eat like me,- clo-ver blows."
It is time you were fed Greed--m when you eat,
What, ho! come out, mer-ry "Greed-y-maw! when you eat.
hat, ho come out, r'er-ry I "
Stand up to chew your wheat.
mice!
"Sweet wheat is milk-y and nice. Hist !" ev-er-v tooth is still;
On the clo-ver-v bank There's noise on yon-der hill!
Hear them chank,chank,chank!
SPearl-paw, White-throat, and
A squeal, ti-ny and clear Fay,
" I've hurt my tooth, 0, dear!" Dow- the hole and a-way





FOR VERY SMALL WIDE AWAKES.



A NEST TO LET.
BY AUNTIE KINNIE.

THE lit-tle nest had stood Jean-ie's great joy she saw
emp-ty all win-ter. them, more than once, up-on
It was built up-on the brack- the brack-et, look-ing at the
et of one of the ve-ran-da read-y-made nest. How she
pil-lars. Jean-ie oft-en looked hoped they would take it!
up at it, and hoped some bird The next morn-ing the old
would come and rent it in the nest lay on the ve-ran-da
spring, it would be so han-dy, floor, bot-tom side up. The
a nest read-y-made lit-tle land-la-dy was much
One morn-ing in A-pril she grieved. She felt ver-y anx-
was wa-kened by some-thing ious. But the brown birds
sweet--sweet as a kiss -not had not gone. Be-fore noon
on her eyes, nor cheeks, nor she saw them build-ing a new
lips, but on her ears. She nest on the brack-et. Per-
had heard the notes of a haps the old one need-ed too
bird just a dear lit-tle twit- many re-pairs ; the roof leaked,
ter. or the chim-ney did not draw
Be-fore Jean-ie was dressed well.
she had seen them, a pair of Jean-ie watched them bring
lit-tle com-mon brown birds. twigs, and dried grass, and
They flew a-bout the lo- hairs, and moss, all day. She
custs and li-lacs all day. To put out a nice din-ner and





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sup-per for them on the ve- Ah, it was the young wife,
ran-da floor. pret-ty, mod-est Mrs. Brown,
At last the nest was done. stiff, cold, dead
The Browns moved in. M1r. Brown was no-where to
One morn-ing Jean-ie fan- be seen.
cied she did not see her ten- Some cat, sure!" Bridg-et
ants in the nest, or a-ny-where. said. But why, if it was a
She ran out with but one shoe cat, did he not eat both
on. She car-ried a chair. She birds?
climbed up. She could just It has been a sad sum-mer
reach to the nest. to the lit-tie land-la-:!,. The
It was emp-ty new nest stands emp-ty. Since
As she was get-ting down, the mys-te-ri-ous trag-e-dy all
her eyes full of tears, she saw birds shun the ve-ran-da.
a bird ly-ing on the ground.




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Iwo pets
Ber-tie fair,
Lit-tle Shag:
Mer-ry pair.
M~er-ry pair.






FOR VERY SMALL WIDE AWAKES.


WHERE DID IT GO?

BY MADGE ELLIOTT.

IT was a beau-ti-ful ball of Well, they gave him a bath
soap; so clear that you could in his lit-tle bath-tub, and they
al-most see through it, and of used this love-ly ball of soap,
a love-ly gold-brown col-or, and ba-by splashed it in the
more gold than brown though, wa-ter, and laughed as cun-
and they bought it to wash the ning as could be.
ba-by with. But they for-got to take it
And when the ba-by saw it, out when they took ba-by out;
he cried for it. A-ny smart and they did not think of it
ba-by would have cried for it, un-til af-ter baby had played
it was so pret-ty. And he took This lit-tle pig went to mar-
it in his ti-ny, fat, dim-pled ket" with his toes, and had
hands, and 0, what fun it been kissed all o-ver, and
was to see it skip a-way, and dressed, and sung to sleep.
roll on the floor, and in-to the Then they went to look for
cor-ners. it, but it was gone.
Once ba-by grabbed it ver-y Noth-ing in the bath-tub
tight, and put his one tooth in but some soap-suds, with the
it; but it could not have tast-ed sun-shine mak-ing wee rain-
nice, for he made a dread-ful bows in them.
face. Where did it go?







CAT, KITTENS, AND PIGEON.





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FOR VERY SMALL WIDE AWAKES.


THE MIN-NIE CAT.
MIN-NIE is a dear lit-tle girl, that out at the barn she of-ten
and it is a pit-y that her cat in-sists up-on play-ing I spy "
should have such a bad rep-u- with them, and that she makes
ta-tion, and still be known it a cru-el and mur-der-ous
ev-er-y-where as The Min- game. The love-ly young Sil-
nie Cat." ver-wings fell a vic-tim to that
The cat and her lit-tle mis- a-muse-ment.
tress were ba-bies at the same And ask the mice! Ver-y
time, and were brought up in ear-ly in her life she brought
the same cra-dle. Girl-ie and "the Mouse-king from the cel-
kit-ty were great friends; and lar," and laid him life-less at
as mam-ma had a cat too, and the feet of her mis-tress. One
as there were of-ten ma-ny by one she al-so brought the
oth-er cats on the place, this roy-al prin-ces, the lit-tle gray
one came to be known as mouse-sons," with their pink
the Min-nie Cat-known and eyes and soft, pink feet. A
fear-ed by that name. few poor sub-jects lurk in the
For the Min-nie Cat is such fast-ness-es of the dis-tant
a swoop such a prowl-er! barn; but the roy-al fam-i-ly
All day she is so nice, sit- it-self is now ex-tinct. Their
ting in the win-dow, and wash- al-lies, also, the moles and the
ing her-self, and not of-fer-ing cgo-phers, have been rout-ed,
to harm e-ven a fly. Who cap-tur-ed, tor-tur-ed, and eat-
would think mis chief and en a-live.
mur-der of so plac-id a crea- And now the rab-bits are in
ture ? dan-ger of the same fate. Sev-
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FOR VERY SMALL WIDE-AWAKES.
fought in the sum-mer moon- chil-dren lives at the next
light. Ma-ny a no-ble Bun- house, and the heart-less moth-
nie has been laid in state un- er robs his sau-cer too. At
der the so-fa. that house she can, in sum-
But the Min-nie Cat is most mer, look in-to the cel-lar
ter-ri-ble up-on a win-ter's through the slats of the win-
night. Then she vis-its the dow, and see the milk-rack,
wood-shed of ev-e-ry cat for and the gol-den cream in the
miles, and drinks the milk pans. Some-times she tears
from all the cat sau cers. the slats off with her strong
When the chil-dren let the kit- paws, and gets in. Next
ties out in the morn-ing, and morn-ing the la-dies see the
find the milk gone, they say, bro-ken lat-tice and the bare
" It is that Min-nie-cat." spots in the cream, and they
One of the Min-nie Cat's say, It is that Min-nie Cat!"




ROSA'S CARES.

ALL day I've sewed such ded-ful tears
My old-est dirl made in her Sun-day clothes;
I have so ma-ny mis'ble cares
And wor-ries for these dirls, no-bod-y knows.

They nev-er fink their mam-ma's tired -
I see a win-kle round my nose to-day.
I wish I'd got their sew-ing hired,
Then 'haps I'd have some time my-seff to play!



















I 6 (/-


































"I HAVE SO MAY MIS'BLE CARES,






THE STORY OF TWO FORGOTTEN KISSES.




THE STORY OF TWO FORGOTTEN KISSES.


BY KITTY CLOVER.


1 HEN little Dimple Dum- And in stole savory sniffs of steaks and rolls,
1 Ipling, one chill fall Quick from his chair did Dimple clamber;
I I evening, And as he knew that little leggies bare
IWas tucked up, all in Were not received at mamma's breakfast table,
'' 'white, within his He thought he'd better oil and 'fume his hair
downy bed, And button on his frock himself if able, -
His mamma quite forgot to The scarlet frock, -
come and kiss him, The sky-blue sock,-
And in the morning, too, He was in it
forgot to come, 'tis In a minute !
said:-
i Of course 'tis strange that But down stairs Dimple hourly grew more cross,
two forgotten kisses And o'er the house with awful noise went rushing,
I Should make such mis- Till all his folks stood up, quite at a loss
Chief in the house in To hit upon some brand-new means of hushing.
just one night;
S But when Boy Dumpling
Swoke up in the morn- i "
---- ming, "
His lips, they say, had lost their sweet, his eyes -- -
their bright, -- ,
And he, who'd always been a darling, '
He fell at once with nurse to quarreling. l '':

He would not wear his scarlet frock, --- -
Although the morn was chill and frosty;
And off he kicked his sky-blue sock,
Till nurse called him
",. Mister Crosstie," But on his friends the ogre frowned,
And, all at once, giving a And in the desks and drawers went prowling,
dreadful groan, Until a fierce jack-knife was found
S She left cross Dimple That just exactly matched his scowling.-
Dumpling all alone. Then Dimple opened every blade,
SI' And went right at his dearest treasures,
SAnd hacked, till every toy was made
But when the sounds of The victim of his savage measures.
silver spoons and
bowls Next Dimple growled aloud he'd "keep a school ;"
,I Came up and jingled So up hopped Minnie, merry as a linnet,
I i round in Dimple's And offered picture-book and painted rule-
chamber, But "no," he shrieked, "he wouldn't have her in it I







THE STORY OF TWO FORGOTTEN KISSES.

He seized her wooden dolls that couldn't smile- How do I know but a terrible hunger
for 0, Gnaws at the hearts of motherless boys ?
O, how he hated smiles, grim Dimple Dumpling How do I know but 'tis that that destroys
And all the time they sat there in that wooden row All that is good, until boys that are younger
His yellow head against the wall was crumpling, Than you, Boy Dumpling, make the streets sorrowful
places,
', ' And the angels weep at the look on the wee, wee
ll faces ?
S_ But off ran sclfsh Dimple through the pink peach
- trees,-
S"I's goin' by myself into the meadow,"
'itHe screamed, instead, he fell upon his chubby
-knees
"And tumbled over in the brambly shadow.
Then loud did Dimple shriek, Minnie hornets and
S -- bees!"
It must have been so sore, -but there he sat, like He rolled, he struck before, and struck behind him,
stone, While little Minnie flew along the pink peach trees, -
And kicked the floor till mamma cried, O, this is dear Dimple Dimple darling! to find him.
Ve'-y bad -but, ah, if mamma'd only known
Her little boy was bad for lack of kisses !' '"

Well, all at once, the silver sun shone out, -, "
And Minnie played she'd never heard those
speeches,
But led cross Dimple out, with skip and shout, ..
Down where the wind had blown the rareripe .
peaches.,
Just one single Red-Cheek lay on the grass,
And O, how Dimple pushed and rushed to get it, W\''
Though Minnie stepped aside to let him pass Ah, well, perhaps the hornets like a naughty fellow!
And, then, away he ran to stand and eat it. For there they rested on his round and rosy cheeks,
O, Dimple Dumpling! 0, such a bad little man, And there they clung upon his hair so soft and
All for two kisses! I wonder if this can yellow,-
No wonder that the tender little sister shrieks!
Si; And when they heard her not a hornet missed her
r '-- Th cy stung her blind just 'cause she was his sister !-
Poor little sister, poor little brother,
''- \ One ran one way, and one the other!
'_- I V '' \' 1 All day long was dear little Dimple lost,
And all the house was out and calling, "Dimple!
'' I Dimple! "
'Till just at dark a dingle dim was crossed,
"And there, asleep, down in the grass, all sweet and
S d simple,
The reason be that so many a little brother And like a lily. Dimple was; and mamma, in her joy,
Goes wrong his life long,-for lack of kisses and Kissed and kissed him, and he woke up Her Own
mother Good Boy.





EXPECTATION.



II







































EXPECTATION.
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SOFT raiment ade in Tyrian looms, No treat to Grip and Vic afford

Ablaze with lanps and gilding, That floors a worn-out building.
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Abl~~~~~~~~ze~~~ ,.il 1;1-.p ':.gldnTatforsa~ -o u ulig.






HUNTING EGGS.





HUNTING EGGS.

BY MARY D. BRINE.

W E were hunting for eggs in grandpa's barn, "Play I'm queen cried the little maid,
Bessie, and Bertie, and I. "And you my slaves shall be,
It is fifty years since that merry day And I'll give a kiss to the smartest boy
Ah me! how the time does fly! Who brings most eggs to me "
Bertie was such a handsome lad, How we shouted, and how we searched
Bessie was sweet and fair, For eggs that old loft through,
And she lifted her eyes with a roguish smile While Bessie laughed at the startled hens
And a toss of her golden hair. As right and left they flew.






- -. ._ -
W_- 'V I. I

4. A i.



















Which of us won ? Well, Bertie lost ; Alas how little I thought me then,

"Beitie," I said, "if Bessie will, Time would crown with the mark of age

So there in the dear old barn, at last, Bessie and Bertie, long ago
Bessie, and Bertie, and I, They passed to the better land.
Gave and received the sweet reward, I wonder if there they wait for me,
Laughing, and glad, and sh. acing alone the river's strand.
S-
.-












Which of us won ? Well, Bertie lost; Alas how little I thought me then,
but we made it right by this-- That out of the happy three
"Bettie," I said, "if B essie will, Time would crown with the mark of age
I'll let you share my kiss Only O only me 1
So there in the dear old barn, at last, Bessie and Bertie, long ago
Bessie, and Bertie, and I, They passed to the better land.
Gave and received the sweet reward, I wonder if there they wait for me,
Laughing, and glad, and shy. Pacing alone the river's strand.





J L.NE.



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FOR VERY SMALL WIDE AWAKES.



WINK-ET'S VAL-EN-TINE.
WHERE'S mine?" asked lit- We will see," said mam-
tie Wink-et Price. ma. Don't cry."
Kate and Dick had read They called their ba-by
a-loud the names on a pile of Wink-et" be-cause she was so
love-ly pink and gilt val-en- nice a-bout cry-ing. In ma-ny
tines; and none of the pit- things she was not nice;
ty" pic-tures were for Wink-et. but when she was a-bout to
Where's mine ?" she said. cry, she would wink ver-y hard
0," said Dick, "Wink- and fast, and keep the tears
ets don't have val-en-tines." back, and sob to her-self, all
"They wait un-til they are so brave.
big-ger," said Kate. She stood wink-ing now,
But it is to-mo'-wo, and un-til, soon, mam-ma car-ried
me tan't be big-ger in dess one her up stairs fast a-sleep.
night." Next morn-ing, when Wink-
But Dick and Kate ran et had tied on one slip-per, she
down stairs, to send the coach- spied a let-ter on the stand, all
man off to the post-of-fice with blue and sil-ver. And the in-
ev-er-y one of the love-ly let- side was so odd a crim-son
ters. heart, with one part of it stuck
Wink-et came, all sad, and full of lit-tle, bright, black
stood by mam-ma. pins. There were an-gels and
I've known sweet pic-tures roses a-round the edge, and at
to grow in one night," said the bot-tom what Wink-et
mam-ma. called some po-et-ty."
For me ?" said Wink-et. She laughed and danced






FOR VERY SMALL WIDE-AW\AKES.


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FOR VERY SMALL WIDE AWAKES.

un-til mam-ma came in. It Wink-et looked up at mam-
did grow, mam-ma! Now ma ver-y hard, and drew her
yead me the po-et-ty." mouth into a fun-ny smile. But
Mam-ma yead-ed it. all the time she was go-ing
down stairs she winked fast.
" Mam-ma's heart be-longs to Wink-et, M st- stik ins in my
And, though \Vink-et may not think it, m
When Wink-et's naugh-ty, she sticks in mam-ma s heart a-ny more,
Poor mam-ma's heart a cruel pin." she said all to her-self.



AN AF-TER CHRIST-MAS TALE.

BY FAN-NY PAR-KER.

OUT of doors, up-on the What's the mat-ter with the lad;
ice, Shall I tell, lit-tle Pe-ter
Grand-pa's lit-tle men make Per-ry ?
mer-ry; 0, the tale is ver-y sad,
Christ-mas skates and sleds go Sad and shame-ful, ver-y,
nice, -ver-y !
But where is lit-tle Pe-ter
Per-ry? He did cram on Christ-mar
Day,
On the bed, with-in the house, Stole a glass of Grand-pa's
May be found poor Pe-ter sher-ry;
Per-ry. Coaxed Tom's or-an-ges a-
All a-bout he does ca-touse," way, -
Pale and dull his cheeks of And now he aches, poor Pe-
cher-ry. ter Per-ry.






FOR VERY SMALL WIDE-AWAKES.
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FOR VERY SMALL \IDE AWAKES.



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_-" ") 'ETTING WORS'


No, I don't want to see the the St. Nic/-o-las. I tell you
boys-don't let 'em in here! my tooth aches, and I want it
Don't bring the WIDE A-WAKE. kept still in here, and have
I hate the WIDE A-WAKE and things done for me !





FOR VERY SMALL WIDE-AWAKES.












"J .. -( J BETTER


















WHAT a long day! How I'll bet I'll toss this blank-et
afraidd ev-er-y bod-y is, just be- and pil-low sky-high be-fore
cause a fel-low has had the to-mor-row night! See if I
tooth-ache a lit-te! don't.
GETTING BETTER.


WHAT a long day! How HI'1 bet I'1 toss this blank-et
'fraid ev-er-y bod-y is, just be- and pil-low sky-high be-fore
cause a fel-low has had the to-mot-row night! See if I
tooth-ache a lit-tle! Don't.






FOR VERY SMALL WIDE AWAKES.


BOUND FOR BOS-TON IN A BAS-KET.

BY E. F.

BOUND for Bos-ton in a bas-ket,
Room for four, and for no more;
Ba-by dear, you must-n't ask it;
'Tis a squeeze to take us four.

Frank, the back seat's for the la-dy;
I should think it was a squeeze !
Thought this seat would be some sha-dy-
Dear me, John, what aw-ful knees!

VWhat's the mat-ter ? can't dis-cov-er
Why no-bod-y can sit still !
You fat John, you'll have us o-ver,
Go-ing down this dread-ful hill!

There your foot is through the bas-ket,
Crowd-ing so a-gainst that side!
Tell you, sir, you need-n't ask it,
Not a-gain with me to ride.

Next time not a sin-gle bod-y
Shall go ride with sis-ter Poll,-
On-ly pa-tient ba-by Rod-dy,
And good Jen-ny with her doll.






FOR VERY SMALL WIDE AWAKES.
















141
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BOUND FOR ObOTON IN A BASKET.






FOR VERY SMALL WIDE AWAKES.


LIZ-ZY AND HER SLATE.

BY FAN-NY PAR-KER.

LIT-TLE Liz-zy May did not be some-thing ver-y wrong and
like her books, and she was strange a-bout Miss Simp-
nine years old. Some lit-tie son's nose.
folks on-ly sev-en could read One day the real Miss Simp-
bet-ter than she could. son came down the aisle and
But she was not dull. She saw these oth-er Miss Simp-
saw all that took place, with sons on the slate. Then she
her droll, large blue eyes. She knew why the boys and girls
heard all that was said, with laughed so much. She had to
her sharp ears: Nor was she smile be-hind her book. Then
i-dle. At school she was bus-y she stood Miss Liz-zy on the
with her slate. Not print-ing floor, and bade her hold up
let-ters or do-ing sums. She the slate ten min-utes for the
was draw-ing pict-ures. Such school to see.
fun-ny pict-ures, too! So fun- While she stood there, there
ny, that when Miss Simp-son, was a knock at the door.
the teach-er, did not see, the Lo! it was Liz-zy's pa-pa
slate would pass from seat to and three oth-er men. They
seat for the boys and girls to were the School-Board. How
look at. a-shamed Liz-zy's pa-pa felt to
There Miss Simp-son would see how his lit-tie girl spent
be on the slate, with a braid her time His face grew red;
on her head so big it had and he could not make any re-
tipped her o-ver back. There marks to the schol-ars. How
Miss Simp-son would be with could he, when his own lit-tie
her over-skirt puffed so be- girl was so bad ?
hind it had tipped her o-ver Now Liz-zy's slate is kept at
forward. There would al-so home.













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GRANDMA'





FOR VERY SMALL WIDE AWAKES.



GRAND-MA'S POCK-ET.

A LET-TER FROM BIRD-IE TO BA-BY.

BY M. E.

DEAR lit-tie cun-nin' cous-in,
Bird-ie's got a lock-et.
Where you think her found it?
In my gran-ma's pock-et.

Has your gran-ma's pock-et
Bunch o' keys and mon-ey ?
Spool o' thread and thim-ble?
Can-dy made o' hon-ey ?-

Lit-tie dolls and chest-nuts ?
Let-ters wrote all o-ver ?
Hank-ch'f with co-logne on
Smell-in' sweet as clo-ver ?-

Ver-y nice wee crack-ers ?
Gold chain and a lock-et ?
I's glad I got a gran-ma !
I's glad her got a pock-et !





PUSS SPEAKS.





PUSS SPEAKS.


I'Y M RS E. 1). KENDALL.


T HERE'S a great, lym- My chair and my table
phatic Are out in the stable,
i That's lazy, they say), And I make my bed on the fragrant hay;
S' iistocratic, Neither handsome nor sleek,
Old cat lives over the way. I never was meek,
S He's handsome and Nor pretended to be, I am happy to say.
sleek,
.A,.1 '.....s as meek No, I'm proud,--as proud as a peacock, in fine;
l, oses. Who was Moses, But who wouldn't be proud, with five kittens like
I ay ? mine ?
f i- I:.-1,-r is blue For we've rid the old barn of mice and of rats.
ii! 1 I I, i.,stress tells true-
St:,i: i I !,. sweet little girl with the
"' i .lden hair) ; --
-' And he wears a collar
That cost a dollar, - i7 ;- '
And sits all day in a damask chair. ,
- ,,' '' 1 i i I '/ i11' I

In the pretty bay window he sits and dozes,
Right under the heliotropes and roses;'
Not a fig cares he for the cellar rats; N .
They steal their fill,
And always will.
Catch them? Not he
He's too fine, you see, A- .
This most phlegmatic-
Of handsome, lymphatic, .. --
And placidly aristocratic old cats,
Old cat.,
Of placidly aristocratic old cats. 'They steal no more
From our master's store;
His name is Goliah For they fear the sight,
0, feathers and fuss By day or by night,
I'm glad I aspire Of the most rapacious,
To be only just Puss! Fierce, and voracious,
For I'm merry and free Of very vivacious kittens and cats,
As a feline can be, And cats, -
And hope I shall always be thus. Of very vivacious kittens and cats.






NIB AND MEG.


















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"THEIR FACES TWINKLING WITH I-IILES AND SUNbHINE.






WATCHING FOR PAPA.


















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T WO little girlies at the close of day, Papa knows that there in the twilight dim
/"



























One with blue ees, and the other with gray, Two little flowers stay open for him
Blue as the blue-bells, and gray as a mouse, But the moments slip, and the blue-bells close,
Go sit at the window of papa's house. And papa will find but one little rose.
WO~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~; litegrisa h lseo aPp nw ht hr ntetiih i
One ~~~ ~ ~ '/ wit bleeeadteohrwt ry Toltl lwr tyoe o Im
Blue ath bu-blan gryaa os, Bthemmnssi p, adtebu-lscoe,r
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TONY.



TONY.


BY MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES.





W HISK!-away in the sun
- -V His little flying feet
S' Scamper as softly fleet
S.As ever the rabbits run.
He is gone like a flash, and then
j -v/ wi i_ In a breath is back again.



The silky losses shine
Down to his very toes:
Tipped with white is his nose:
And his ears are fleeces fine,
Blowing a shadow-grace
Breeze-like about his face.



SQuick to a whistled call
S'Hearkens his ready ear,
Scarcely waiting to hear;
i. Silk locks, white feet, all
Rush, like a furry elf
Fumbling over himself.



How does he sleep? He winks
Twice with his mischief eyes; .-
Dozes a bit; then lies "'
Down with a sigh; then thinks
Over some roguish play,
And is up and away!






DANDELIONS.





: --- ;-_--v :_-- - -- ... .. --

.-. -.-.. ~..





SDAN DELION S. i
BY L. G. WARNER. 2
STwo little maids went wondering,
Over a meadow of May,
How, all in one sunny morning,
1 Came the dandelions gay, -
/ k TwoGay little happy flowers, ing,
That laugh up out of the grass, .
" -- .>,j The merriest, gladdest welcome -
UK i To the children as they pass. -. ,
S :- Margery ponders and ponders,- -
S-' :' "They're bright, like the stars up high;
S-.Perhaps they are stars, Jenny, -.
That have dropped down from the sky.
\O0, perhaps this is one of the places -
When the sky is all smooth and empty,
.- And the dark night gone away."
S. That night, when the daylight faded,
Two little maids stole out i-
Into the still, gray meadow,
And eagerly searched about.
Not one gay, golden blossom '
But, far up overhead,
SThe countless stars were shining,
SAll wonderful, instead i
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CRY-BA-BY JOE."

LOOK at him! We all know For, my poor Joes," I am
him don't we ? sor-ry for you I know you
He is the boy that gets hurt nev-er have a good time that
ev-er-y time he falls down. He is half-an-hour long. I know
is the boy that sus-pects Tom, your lit-tle knees, and el-bows,
or Jim-mie, has stol-en his and cheeks, are soft and ten-
pen-cil when-ev-er he los-es der, and feel the hurts they
it; that al-ways ac-cus-es Rob- get. Shall I tell you what
bie, or Ned, of cheat-ing at will tough-en them ?
mar-bles. He is that boy that Laugh-ing will do it.
al-ways comes in cry-ing when When you fall, jump up,
snow-ball and slid-ing time and laugh, and run a-long.
comes. In short, he is that You won't mind it in a min-
lit-tle fel-low that none of the ute. If some oth-er boy rubs
boys want a-long when there is your face with snow, get a-way
go-ing to be some rare, good the best you can, or else laugh,
fun. and rub his face. He won't
I do not like to say it, but I care, if you laugh while you
am a-fraid that each school- rub
house in the land has such a That is the way to bring the
" Joe." good, warm blood up to the
This lit-tie talk is for these hurt spots. When the mer-ry
" Joes." blood gets there, it will cure







FOR VERY SMALL WIDE-AWAKES.











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FOR VERY SMALL WIDE-AWAKES.

and tough-en them. No-tice, him and makes his nose bleed,
now, and see wheth-er laugh- or he gets his fin-ger bruised.
ing boys feel a hurt long. He doesn't hold a grudge
A-bove all else, don't runz a-gainst a boy that beats him
and tell! Your teach-er gets at a game not he! ie
tired of hear-ing it. E-ven thinks a fel-low that can beat
your moth-er oft-en wish-es imn is a grand fel-low!
her lit-tie Joe was like oth-er If you should not grow out
boys, and could make his own of cry-ing, and moan-ing, and
way. com-plain-ing, when you get
Ev-er-y one of you knows to be a big boy, the lit-tle
some big boy that you ad- fel-lows will not look up
mire. You mean to be like to you, and wish to be like
him when you grow up. Well, you.
no-tice him. He nev-er cries. In-stead, they will, per-haps,
He nev-er runs off, all doub- call you more dis-a-gree-a-ble
led up and cry-ing, to tell names than "Cry-ba-by Joe"
his moth-er when the ball hits e-ven.





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FOR VERY SMALL WIDE-AWAKES.











IN-
















LITTLE FISH.

SwI a-long, lit-tle fish; They will look by the logs
Too tempt-ing you look! For your sil-ver-y side.
There are three boys com-ing,
Each with line and hook. In the mid-die of the stream
Is the sa-fest place:
Be cun-ning, lit-tle fish! In the broad day-light
Don't you try to hide- You can give them a race.





FOR VERY SMALL WIDE AWAKES.


















OD-DY WAD-DLE.

BY LITTLE FLOY.

His mam-ma called him the look-ing-glass had a dread-


in Cam-bridge. But the lit- when he walked.
tie ba-by man was al-so wise One day Od-dy Wad-die's
and wit-ty, and he called him- mam-ma was sick. Ev-er-y-
self Od-dy Wad-die," af-ter bod-y was gone, even old Rose,
a fun-ny lit-tle fel-low that the black cook. So Od-dy
lived in the look-ing-glass. sung his mam-ma to sleep, and
This fun-ny lit-tle fel-low in ith hen went down to make
lived~~~~~ ~ ~~ ,..' ....., '. okigglssn hsmmm osep
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FOR VERY SMALL WIDE-AWAKES.
some broth. He put some He did not fin-ish the broth,
milk in the sauce-pan and set but still mam-ma's lit-tle boy
it on the stove. He was ver-y had be-come black al-most all
tired by that time; and he o-ver be-fore she woke, chin,
stopped to rest. Pret-ty soon cheeks, nose, e-ven the front of
he said, Od-dy Wad-dle, his frock had be-gun to turn.
look at 'oo pod-dies! 'Oo'll In fact, they had to scrub him
turn brack, like ole Ro-sy, if sound-ly be-fore Od-dy Wad-
'oo cooks, -yen 'oo mam-ma die was a lit-tle white man
won't love 'oo" a-gain.




DOL-LY'S WINGS.

BY LAURIE LORING.

MAM-MA BID-DY, look up here.
See my dol-ly; ain't her dear ? .-'
Love your chick-ies? So does I.
Wish my dol-ly'd learn to fly. i1._.
Mam-ma Bid-dy, how get- ,
wings?
Buy 'em with the ped-dler L ,
things ? "
Guess I'se got free cents and -
two;
Mam-ma Bid-dy, won't that
do ?-- -





COMPANY A, DIMPLE-CHIN GIRLS.


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March, march a-way! March, march a-way
Com-pa-ny A, the Dim-pie- I ve stol-en pa's hat out of his
chin Girls, lap,
Cat-i-taine Jen, a wig on her Ros-a-mond's got grand-ma-
III
























curls ; mas cap,
Dress pa-rade and a train-ing And hat-ted with bas-ket gces
day- May-
March, march a-way! March, march a-way!
March, march a-way! M arch, march a-way!






FOR VERY SMALL WIDE AWAKES.




















rIII






















turned this way and thatway, town.
turned this way ant that way, town.





FOR VERY SMALL WIDE AWAKES.
Said one wee bird to the The fierce wee bird sat down
oth-er, What bad boys live on the door of a pew to rest.
here in Ken-na-way town The good wee bird flew a-way
Said the oth-er wee bird, I up, and a way down, and
hope when they die they will stepped on the or-gan. My
go where there is noth-ing but own dear," she called, this is
sticks and stones, and they the great bird with many voices
must throw them night and that men praise God with."
day !" She kissed it and flew down-
Said the first wee bird, ward and kissed her mate, and
" Pray do not you, my own then flew up-ward a small way,
dear, show the same cru-el spir- and stepped on the Bible.
it as these boys." My own dear," she called,
And the good bird, turn-ing this is the Ho-ly Book in
her bright eyes this way and which We are spok-en of."
that, saw, down be-low, a She kissed it, and flew all
church, with its win-dows o- a-round and a-round. All at
pen. Said she, I have a once she lit up-on a carved
hap-py thought, my own dear. this-tlewhichor-na-ment-ed the
Be-low us is a Ho-ly Place. top of the pul-pit. Oh, my
In a Ho-ly Place no boy dares own dear, come and see!" she
throw a stick or stone. The caiied.
win-dows are o-pen. Let us The oth-er wee bird flew up
fly down swift and sud-den, and looked. The cup of the
and en-ter." this-tle flow-er was hol-low.
So they flew down swift and Then both wee birds sang a
sud-den, and en-tered. song of praise, and lined the
In the Ho-ly Place it was flow-er with soft grass, and went
si-lent, and cool, and love-ly. to sleep safe in the Ho-ly Place.





























" WHERE, tru-ant, ha'st thou "What say-est thou to the cat ?
heen ? What cast thou, Lieb-chen,
I set her I write, Bring e now, Cat,
Mam-ma, I can't come in, Old C at., the Mouse-king-
For I must fin-ish up my fro' i te cl-l./









"A bi .- one, mam-ma dear! -V -" .



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LIEBAIEN s LETIR.







let-ter '.Mind, Cat! the white Mouse-






write it." lon't for-g-et it!-.
write it.") don't for-get it !'"






TALKING IT OVER.





















TALKING IT OVER.











BY L. G. WARNER.
F VE little people had been to walk, And a spangled dress as light as air,

Some one way and some another, Fit for Cind'rella's ball.
And at night, as they toasted their ten little feet
Round the fire, a voice that was always sweet Then Harry, dear little fat, round Hal,
Said, "What did you see ? Tell mother." (Sometimes called Roly Poly), -
"What did he see but a gorgeous sled,
Then Tom, by birthright, began: "I heard With a flying horse in flaming red,
The merriest sleigh-bells ring, And its name, all yellow, was, "Go AHEAD."
And there was the least little mite of a sleigh, "O, mother, I tell you 'twas jolly "
And a little bay pony so chipper and gay.
The boy that drove must be happy all day, And now it was Birdie's turn: Mamma,
As happy as any king." I heard a faint little kee,'
Next Bess, the brownie: 0, mother, I saw, And there was a clear little, poor little kitty,
In a window so large and clear, Just shivering with cold, and 0, so pretty i
A bird in a cage all gold and blue, Nobod oned her in all the city;
"And over and round it long vines grew, o 've brought her to lve with me.
And lovely roses and fuchsias too.
How I wanted it, mother dear! Then mother said softly, "Good night, my dear"
With whispers of this and that;
And Fan, -what caught her longing eyes And kisses many, for sweet refrain,
Was a wonderful, wonderful doll, Were given, over and over again,
With flowing curls of yellow hair, Till they all went off with their wishes vain
And a smiling face so soft and fair, But Birdie, who carried her cat.


























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THE MILLER'S LITTLE MAN.














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THE VOICE i'F THE MILL. les o water and land
W is the miller's little man;.. .

And he grows fast as ever le can, That fly by papa's mill, -
"iecause the mill calls loud, "Willy, Willy such beautiful birdies!
S g Black velvet wings, silver throats,
SPtp keips all te wheels o, rgo hryo Yellow vests and scarlet coats.
SaStill thie mill calls \illy hurry, hurry! ,
\3 White-bread, brown-bread, eat it, and grow, Winglets, wilets, and wingets,
grow; That whiz round papa's mill, --
Johnny-cake, too. Hurry, hurry, hurry L, such beautiful winglets
With the chick-a-bids goes lie to bed, They whiz and sweep right in my
And the mill grinds That's it; early, early! Dragonfies and butterflies. eyes,
Lull-lull-lull-a-by. seep, seepy-head, ""%- Stars, and stars, and a inoonie,
Seep, seep away ; I'll call early, early !" l. 'l' eight over papa's mill, -
Though, deep in the night, the mill sleeps too, 0 you white shepherd moonie,
It sings in its dreams aloud of Willy: Creeping through the cloudy hars,
0, sweet is the old mill's drowsy coo Sell me your flock of pretty stais.
All, all night long, "Willy, Willy. Willy!" ." Fly, fly away, you owlie,
Nor sail round papa's mill, -
"S-uch a great, big, dark owlie !
Such great, cruel, flapping wings!-
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J"j. ': EAR lavish blos..,,-. l i hr li l. .. .
And fold our fiel.I- I i 1 1.I,
SIi '' 'I those pure petals I h !I...
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Jl th the placid surg, .. i ... I l I. -
I;,ight largess that f -,, ei. . I n
In her sweet wise way, . .1 i I ii .... .I- I
t daisies, dainty and c.. I I" '.,
i When I watch you blooming, I always seeing i f--7 -.
To be wandering back, in a drowsy dream
Where the meadows of childhood glimmer ciii'
The meadows that manhood sees no more,
.- f~.. The meadows of story and of song, .
Where Little Red Riding-Hood trips aloi,_. -
I r To knock at her grandam's cottage door ,"
Where the ghost of Bo-Peep goes roaming, ...,
-"'". '- And seeks her flock while she rubs both t L
5 1' The meadows where elfin echoing rise
From the phantom horn of Little Boy Blue' /i'j


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THE QUEEN'S COACH.

BY FANNY PARKER.

Now the queen is go-ing out to Blow, lit-tle driv-er, blow your
ride, horn!
Run, men, run and clear the Tell the queen the coach is
cit-y! read-y !
Tell thecom-mon folks to stand Miss Queen, I fed your horse
a-side, some corn,
Queens must-n't see what is- So he, may-be, won't go
n't pret-ty. stead-y."






FOR VERY SMALL WIDE-AWAKES.

Toot toot! how the trump-et Smooth, smooth, rolls the char-
blows, i-ot now!
While the queen steps in her Swift we go by street and
car-riage ; stee-ple !
Tuck her dress in, and a-way See the gra-cious lit-tle prin-
she goes, cess bow!
To at-tend her daugh-ter's See the queen smile on the
mar-riage. pe-ople!

Howthe tall out-rid-ers prance! Round the street, and round,
How the hoofs go, click-ing, and round the street,
clack-ing Queen Vic-to-ri-a, Prin-cess
How the hat-plumes nod and Al-ice !
dance! Buy 'em both a stick of can-dy
.How that frisk-y horse is sweet,
back-ing! And take 'em to the pal-ace















"IT IS YOU THAT GNAWS THE PLANTS, IS IT?"






FOR VERY SMALL WIDE-AW\AKES.


THE SAME DAY.

BY MARGARET EYTINGE.

(Rain' in the morn-zng.) This is a ded-ful cry-ey
JES-SIE sat by the win-dow; world.
the sky was dark, the rain was
fall-ing fast. (Sun in the After-noon.)
It's a naw-ful day!" she JES-SIE ran to the front door.
said, with a pout. The poor The rain-bow the rain-
flow-ers are 'most bathed to bow!" she cried, clap-ping her
death, and they hang their lit-tie hands, a great, big, boo-
heads as low as a-ny-thing, and ful one, with both feet on the
one's broke, I do be-lieve- the ground.
pret-ty lil-y what wears the And there's for-ty six birds
sweet, white dress; and the in the peach-tree, and the lil-y
bees, and the but-ter-flies, and is-n't bro-ken af-ter all, and her
the fun-ny hop-toads, have all white dress is nice-ly washed
hid-den a-way, and the bird-ies and starched, and the flow-ers
have gone home in a ter-'ble have such bright, clean fa-ces,
hur-ry, to shut their win-dows, just like mine, and a fat bee
I s'pose, so's the rain can't come is tell-ing the hon-ey-suck-le
in; and the win-dow is cry-ing, some-thing, and I see two hun-
I see the tears run-ning down dred hop-toads, a-hop-pingand
it's glass face- oh, my! how laugh-ing.
miz-za-ble! '' I believe I must laugh, too.
I can't stand it! Imust cry, "This is a ver-y fun-ny
too. world !





FOR VERY SMALL WIDE-AWAKES.

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THE STREET-SINGER.





THE STREET-SINGER.


BY CARL DYKEMAN.


SOFTLY falls the snow, Up he climbs the stair,
Soft and fleecy and thick in the evening air, But the street-singer's step is laggard and old,
The lighted city stands like a lady fair His hot cheek sinks in his jacket's snow-wet fold,
Wrapped in her ermine cloak and her jewelled hair, He shivers and says that all sweet things are cold, -
Daintily the snow Even children fair
Doth enfold her so. Have no coins to spare.

Dark the alley-way; But he goes along
The beggar-folk are gone on the merry street, His feverish, trembling way through the snowy
And the snow, like a holy winding sheet, streets,
Is dropped from the sky and spread, all pure and Under the street-lamp turning his singing-sheets
sweet, Like a fairy flute his liquid warble greets
O'er the sodden clay, With a summer song
Hiding it away. The hastening throng.

Dark the cellar-door; Vain the music made ;-
But all so clear in the whitened stairway stands They look at the cheeks that burn like a crimson rose,
A beautiful boy, with music in his hands, They see the small, bare feet in the drifting snows;
And in his eyes the warmth of southern lands, But in his hand only his dog's wee, wet nose
"Dolcc" ripples o'er Lovingly is laid
Lips so like a flower. When alms are prayed.

Kisses he the snow; No money, nor bread -
To his olive cheek he holds the fleece of light, He ruffles his sheets to find a sweeter song;
He cools his burning hands with the flakes so white, The Christmas hymns and carols he shoves along, -
"Dolce, dole, sweet," murmur the lips so bright, "The Christ-child rules but a day in this land of
"Dolce," he says low, With a drooping head [wrong,"
And kisses the snow. Bitterly he said.

But the pet dog whines ;
He looks at his little master's dark, bare feet, All the city slept well through the stormy night,
And up the steps he runs to the snowy street, But soundest of all, neathh a coverlet white,
And back he scamp'ring comes with eyes so sweet, With his doggie, lay the little singer-wight, -
"O, it's time," he signs, Well, money nor bread,
For the street lamp shines !" He better be dead !







THE STREET-SINGER.
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FOR VERY SMALL \VIDE-AWAKES.


BOTH SIDES.
EAR! dear! groans the gro-cer-y man,
SP'1 H ow it d o es co st to k eep th is cat !
: i y la-dy is too del-i-cate
i I 'To dine on com-mon mouse and rat,
j j But calls for milk, and mews for cheese,
And helps her-self to this and that,-
"Oh, dear, dear!" groans the gro-cer-y man,
I'll live with-out her if I can!"
Ho! ho!" laugh the mer-ry rats,
"Oh, what a nice old gro-cer-y store "
"Let's at the great, soft, yel-low cheese,
Let's bring the rice out on the floor;
Let s have a crack-er and a cake,
57 And do let's have two, three eggs more.
-Oh, ho ho !" laugh the mer-ry rats,
Long live the men that don't keep cats!"


IN AN EGG.
HERE'S a lit-tle sing-er, shut up Tum-ti-tz-zm, crack-a-crack, and
in an egg, out pops his head, -
Wish-es to come out, tziu-tz- You must sing a song, be-fore
tuzm, hear him beg! you can be fed;
Well, lit-tle fel-low, you'll have For how do we know that
to peck your way, you're a bird at all ?
All the oth-er bird-ies had to, Queer bird to wear a coat and
so they say. col-lar -fal-lal!





FOR VERY SMALL WIDE-AWAKES.

S -, No doubt 'tis a tight place, but
S- A p lay lo n g p lay w ell,
'ItS' And you will play your way,
-.- sir, out of the shell;
7 Ni And if you mu-sic make from
a board and stick,
The king '11 send a sil-ver fid-
dle pret-ty quick.



THE RIVALRY OF THE FLOWERS.

BY FANNY PARKER.

ONE day, ma-ny ages a-go, a been do-ing?" "Do-ing!" said
sweet lit-tle girl stood be-fore the rose; if col-or is the test
a flow-er wo-man's bas-ket. of in-no-cence, why are you so
There was a rose, a lil-y, and pale ? what do you fear ?"
a bunch of vi-o-lets. The That is the way the ri-val-ry
flow-er wo-man was cross, and be-gan. Since then the two
all the blos-soms hoped to be beau-ti-ful la-dies have nev-er
bought and ta-ken a-way. The been friends; and, al-though
child chose the vi-o-lets. The they oft-en meet in bou-quets,
rose and the lil-y were in a sad they nev er speak. Some
tem-per at be-ing left, and be- praise the rose, and some hold
gan to pick up-on each oth-er. up the lil-y.
" Why do you blush ?" cried But every-bod-y loves the
the lil-y; "what have you vi-o-let. Hap-py vi-o-let!





FOR VERY SMALL WIDE-AWAKES.


THE MOUSE, THE FROG AND THE LITTLE RED HEN.

ONCE a Mouse, a Frog, and a Who'll make a fire to bake
lit-tie Red Hen, the bread?"
To-geth-er kept a house: Said Mouse a-gain, Not I;"
The Frog was the la-zi-est of And, scarce ly op'-ning his
frogs, sleep-y eyes,
And la-zi-er still was the Frog made the same re-ply.
Mouse.
The lit-tle Red Hen said nev-
The work all fell on the lit-tle er a word,
Red Hen, But a roar-ing fire she made;
Who had to get the wood, And, while the bread was bak-
And build the fires, and scrub, ing brown,
and cook, Who'll set the ta-ble ?" she
And some-times hunt the said.
food.
food. Not I," said the sleep-y Frog,
One day, as she went scratch- with a yawn ;
ing a-round, Nor I," said the Mouse,
She found a bag of rye: a-gain.
Said she, Now who will make So the ta-ble she set and the
some bread ? bread put on ;
Said the la-zy Mouse," Not "Who'll eat this bread ?"
I!" said the Hen.
" Nor I," croaked the Frog, as "/wi//! the Fd the Frog, "And
he dozed in the shade. //" squeaked the Mouse;
Red Hen made no re-ply, As they near the ta-ble drew.
But flew a-round with bowl "A Not much you won't!" said
and spoon, the lit-tie Red Hen,
And mixed and stirred the And a-way with the loaf she
rye. flew.








THE MAGIC CARPET.









































































WHAT THE WIDE AWAKES SAW IN THE JUNGLE.







THE CRICKET S STORY.




THE CRICKET'S STORY.


BY EMMA HUNTINGTON NASON.


~-r; Inviting, in his majestical way,
-- Her pupils to sing at his grand soir6e,
-=-- --- That perchance among them my lord might find
1 ---- Some singer to whom his heart inclined.
- What wonder, then, when the evening came,
S -And the castle gardens were all aflame
S- With the many curious lights that hung
I O'er the ivied porches, and flared among
S! The grand old trees and the banners proud,
That many a heart beat high and loud,
. While the famous choir of Glendare Bog,
Established and led by the Brothers Frog,
S-w Sat thrumming as hoarsely as they were able,
In front of the manager's mushroom table!

T HE high and the mighty lord of Glendarc, The overture closed with a crash then, hark
The owner of acres both broad and fair, Across the stage comes the sweet-voiced Lark.
Searched, once on a time, his vast domains, She daintily sways, with an airy grace,
His deep, green forest and ; II l plains, And flutters a bit of gossamer lace,
For some rare singer, to make complete While the leafy alcove echoes and thrills
The studied charms of his country-scat With her liquid runs and lingering trills.
But found, for all his pains and labors, Miss Goldfinch came next, in her satin gown,
No sweeter songster than had his neighbors. And shaking her feathery flounces down,
With much expression and feeling sung
Ah, what shall my lord of the manor do ? Some Oh's and Ah's in a foreign tongue;
Ile pondered the day and the whole night through. While to give the affair a classic tone,
lie called on the gentry of hill-top and dale Miss Katydid rendered a song of her own,
And at last on Madame the Nightingale, In which each line closed, as it had begun,



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THE CRICKET'S STORY.

With some wonderful deed which she had done. Quite worthy, of course, but we couldn't bring" -
Then the Misses Sparrow, so prim and set, Thundered His Mightiness, "Let her sing I "
Twittered and chirped through a long duet; The Nightingale opened her little eyes
And poor little Wren, who tried with a will, Extremely wide in her blank surprise;
But who couldn't tell Heber from Ortonville," But catching a glimpse of his lordship's rage,
Unconcious of sarcasm piped away, Led little Miss Cricket upon the stage,















And courtesied low o'er a huge bouquet Where she modestly sang, in her simple measures,
Of crimson clover-heads, culled by the dozen, Of Home, sweet Home," and its humble pleas-
By some brown-coated, plebeian cousin. ures.
And the lord of Glendare cried out in his glee,




Then, as flighty Miss Humming-bird didn't care Yet, notwithstanding, we find it true,
To sing for the high and mighty Glendare, As his lordship does will the neighbors do;
The close of the evening's performance fell So nhis is the way, as the legends tell,
To the fair young Nightingale, Mademoiselle. In the very beginning it befell
Ah! the wealth of each wonderful note Thatnd the lord of Glendare cried outevening's gloam,
That came from the depths of her tiny throatsing To sing at our hearths of "Home, sweet Home."
She carolled, she trilled, and she held her breath,
"Till she seemed to hang at the point of deathBut the world said, "Really" and, "Ah, indeed
She ran the chromatics through every key, So this is the way, as the legends tell,
And ended triumphant on upper C; .
Airing the graces her mother had taught her f f7 RN ..
In a manner quite worthy of Madame's daughter. ''

But his lordship glared down the leafy aisle '.'
With never so much as a nod or smile,
Till, out in the shade of a blackberry thicket,
He all of a sudden spied little Miss Cricket; % .! C-' -
And, roused from his gloom, like an angry bat,
He sternly demanded, "Who is that ?"
"Miss Cricket, my lord, may it please you so, I i
A charity scholar-ahem! -you know- -






THE MAGIC CARPET.

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L.,- AFRICAN H LINMINI III'', 'INI I LINE THIS N. .T..
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\VIDE-AWAKE ADVERTISER.



LITERARY GOSSIP.



IN SUNSET MOUNTAIN, Mrs. Porter, who TN no way can money be better invested for D R. GRAT AND THE MOUNTAIN NESTO-
is never feeble, or wanting in a high aim. the young than in good books. They fur- RIANs, The New York Observerspeak.
pictures the life and scenery that make a New nish the best of all good company, and are a r ing of the intense interest awakened in the
England village noticeable, and give to it s(* safeguard against temptation to evil. No ri churches by Dr. Grant's thriving adventures
personages an intere-t that is real and endur- series of books have been more eagerly read L-', in the mountains of Kurdistan says, They
rag. -- Te preaching of THE iM RBLE i . and widely commended than the $10os Prize seemed to reproduce the heroic deeds of
PREACHER lone of the celebrated 1aooo prize Series of sixteen elegant volumes published & Chivalry in our prosaic age." It is a hand-
stories) is most truthful. telling, and success- by D. Lothrop & Co., Boston Dr. Lincoln some volume of 418 pages with map and
ful -- iEN'S BOYHOOD is a real, lifc-lke says. "They meet the want of the day for numerous illustrations.-- A new edition
story. Little people will get pleasure and books which instruct and improve while they of WILLIAM THE SILENT, and the Nether-
profit out of it.- PETER'S STRANGE fascinate the reader" The $500 Prize land War," 480 pages, by Mary IBarrett, is
STORY, unusual in its plan. and effective in I Series, issued by D. Lothrop & Co., Boston, ready. There is scarcely a character in
its presentation, blends a touching pathos and are books that have a standard reputation history surrounded with more interest than
a wholesome moral lesson. -- NORA, THIE I for excll nce, and that have everywhere i that of William the Silent Prince of Orange
FLOWER-GIRL- a simple, sweet story for proved among the most popular additions to the great champion of Protestantism. The
the wee ones -is fitted to awaken the charity the library. First Series, 8 vols., $2 ; second :' work of the author is admirably done.
of the strong for the weak.-- CaiuNG TO Series, 13 vols., $I6.75-- THEOLD STONE ,' Books of this class will do a good deal of
THE LIGHT sets firth the methods by which a HoUSE is one of those sweet stories whose valuable teaching among young readers and
soul finds its way to the higher plane, where pathos touches the heart, and whose charac- deserve an extensive sale-- RANCHES
light from above fills freely upon the pathway. s ters linger in the memory to ennoble life. o Lvery beautifully teaches the true
~cOaNET iR- -, ciy -Wa n nxmtis adesesed Or PALMs very beautifully teaches the true
-- MARGARET WORTHINGTON is written ,i -- WALTER IMACDONALD is a deservedly nature of religion as a. principle that enters
.. nature of religion as a principle that enters
with a thorough appreciation of the quiet, .i popular book. Not a few strange and strik- into every part of the life and controls the
modest, womanly, but heroic spirit, in which ng events are wrought into the intensely in- whole b t
fidelity to the class of the gospel sometimes e whole being. -- 'ITHe ILUNGENER TISTOR(I-
fidelity to the claims of the gospel sometimes I ) teresting narrative, and the motive underlying ..
gets itself embodied in social and domestic all is high and Christian. -- THE WADS- CAL SERIEs, just published by D. Lothrop
life, and which this young girl so beautifully WRTHt Boys is not sensational, but thought- & Co., brngthe characters and age of Lous
and forcibly illustrates. EVENING RESTiS '. ful, pleasant, and wholesome; truly exalting XIV, and Louis XV, before the reader in a
one of the most original stories in. S. S. lte- whatever is noble, and putting under ban -i strikingly vivid manner.-- THLE TROPICS
rature. It opens a new vein, and works it whatever is mean, though seemingly respect- is a model book for young people relating to
with wonderful success. -- THOSE BOYS, able. The Hon. George T. Angell says, the scenery and life of the tropics.--
anclegantvolumejustpublishedbyD. Loth- .' STRIKING FOR THE RIGHT, price, $1.75, for Kingston has written two capital sea stories
rop & Co., will show the boys their own w. which the unequalled premium of $iooo was .- for boys viz. THE FISHER BOY, and PETER
photographs, or if they do not recognize .I given, "is undoubtedly the best book of the '-, THE SHIP BOY to which is added the Wood
them their friends will. It is a capital book kind in the world." Henry Bergh says, "I *'. Cutter of Gutech," by the same author in
to inspire to noble living.-- Pansy's new wish it were in my power to place it in the the edition published by D. Lothrop & Co.
story, HOUSEHOLD PUZZLES, is told in '. hand of every man, woman, and child in the HISTORICALS F THE YOUNG FOLKS, is
Pansy's most charming and inimitable style. land, as it deserves to be." SILENT TOM, the unpretending title of a hook by Oro
The S. S. Times says, for practical sense, the second book of the $1000 prize series, is Noque, in which the most interesting epi-
honest feeling and literary style we can no less popular than the first. The story is sodes of American History are narrated,
commend it as one of the very best stories startling, and told with great power. It is a .) and characters described more fully and
published. Itis as keen as a sharp axe and picture of the life of our time, and will hold entertainingly than can be done in a school
cuts with ease the knotty problems to be I readers with a magnetism they cannot resist. history. The subjects are such as Capt.
found in the grain of our household woods. W quote from The CoengregationalQuarter- :-' John Smith, Pocahontas, John Elliot, Un-
- MODERN PROPHETS, like Cough's lect. -i y, D. Lothrop & Co., of Boston, seem cas, King Phillip's War, The Dunstan Fam-
ures contains pathos and humor enough to careful not only to publish books which -'" ly, Roger Williams, Heights ofAbrahan &c.
bring both smiles and tears, and it is also w ill sell, but to confine their public. *, A convenient chart is prefixed giving at a
a most convincing and stirring argument for tions to works which will exert a good glance the date and the event. As an ac-
effort in the temperance cause,- Dr. I religious ormoral influence. Having issued companiment to severe studies in the same
Lincoln writes, STELLA AND THE PRIEST some time since, The Marble Preacher, direction the book will have a large place
isatimelybook. Thecharacters arestrong- written by Mrs. Clarke, whose late husband r- and use."- The Advance.
ly drawn and the story has an intense ex- was for some twenty years a favorite preach- Ki KITTY KENT'S I ROUBLES. By Julia A.
j Eastman. The S. S. Tmes says, A s wel-
citement for the reader, and is a good book er and pastor in Philadelphia, they now pre- Eastman. The S.S. 7..T es says, "A well-
for the family and Sunday School.-- sent the public with a sequel to that work meant and well-managed story, such as we
ANNA MAYLVIE. By Ella Farman. Bos- '" by the same author entitled Their Chil- have here, is just the thing for the Sunday
ton: D. Lotihrop & Co. Price, $1.5o. The dren. The former volume derived its title ,, School. Its literary merit is very great, as
Rural Carolina says, A story of earnest r from a remarkable piece of carving wrought the author s careful to prheerve a sustained
,( C im s, -'A itory lf earliest * -' /-, jthed gracuthor s care trousho uL ilr e arsuationd.
religious work, and is pervaded by a spirit by a Christian captive in his dungeon, and graceful stle ther says, This is aton
of sweetness and pathos which must touch representing the elements of the Christian I a e and vies sory fr a nr
p h\ el "ment" f* attractive and vigorous story from a writer
every heart." The if witness says. "Asa Sun- character and the method of their de- wh has c-on both me and money by he pre-
clay School book, it could scarcely be im- velopment The first volume won the favor ho has p on of her pe and imo by the pre-
proved." The Boston journal says, On its of a large class of readers. The second, vious productions of her pen, and is issued in
terryy side it is a superior product. lut is equally instruct and full f intense esrs. ). Lthop & Co.'s usual fine style
Si is equally instructive and full of intense The lesson of Kitty Kent's life is, that the
Excellence and the charm lie chiefly in the interest. The religious influence of thisof Kitty Kent's life is that he
aire, high-toned. gracious and stimulating new wor is very decided, and bot are only road to happiness lies through he land
nwwors. ey decide, and bot r. g of goodness, and that the sovereign of this
-'U:gious spirit that pervades the entire work." worthy of high commendation. l land is the blessed Saviour "
J o L'^ cla is the blessed Saviour-








D. LOTHROP & CO'S SELECT LIST OF BOOKS

JUST ItEA.DY.



ALICE SUTHERLAND. By Mrs. Mlary C. DICK'S STRENGTH. I6mo. Illustrated.. . 6
Bristol. 16mo. I llustrated. . . . . . .. I 25 A story from which every boy may learn how to gain strength for the battle
Individual influence for good impressively portrayed, of life.

BRITISH NOVELISTS AND THEIR STYLES. EASY READING FOR LITTLE FOLKS.
By Davitd Masson. i6mo. New Edition. . . . i 25 6mo. Large print. Fully illustrated. . . .. ... 40
A critical sketch of the history of prose fiction. It is a keen and searching
critilqu, and will be read with interest by all whto can appreciate genuine literary EFFIE'S FRIENDS, and other Stories. By Lauric
merit. Lo 'ilg,. I6mo. 30 full-page illustrations. . . ... So

BARBARA. By the author of" Silent Tom." I6mo. EXCELLENT WOMAN (The), as described in
Illustrated. . . . . . . . . . . i 50 the Book of Proverbs. With an introduction by the'Rev.
A stoiy of superior merit, with characters of high order, and finely drawn. Willi/am B. Sfrague, D. D. Embellished with numicronus
A popular book, one of the author's best. I. LiscoLN, D. D. illustrations engraved by Baker. Large I6mo. Illustrated. I 50
Extra So. . . . 2 50
BONNIE iERIE. By the author of Evening A beautiful commenntary on Solomon's description of a virtuous woman,
Rest." Large 16mo. Illustrated . . . . . I 50 inculcating some of the soundest maxims of wisdom.
It is admirable. It will encoireie ge and help ministers, Sabbath School teach- B Tan
ers, and all who are working in a hard field, and facing formidable obstacles. GRANDPA'S DARLINGS. By Pansy. i6mo.
H. LINCOLN, D.D. Illustrated.. . . ... . .. . . . ... I 25
Many a "darling will be delighted uitlh this charming and instructive book.
BOOK OF BIRDS. 16mo ............ 40 it s not only a true story from life, but the naime given of the real "darlings"
are their real Balnes.
A collection of beautiful bird-pictures air poemsc, for young people.re real es.

BOOK OF NATURAL HISTORY. 16mo. Large GOSPEL LIFE OF JESUS (The). By L. A.
-na , ,.is. i6m o . . . . . . . . . .. I oo
print. Fully illustrated ............... 40 6o.... ...........
n s f f t y hie fruit of study and labnr, carried on with great enthusiasm and fidelity,
Ss and the work is well done. 11. LINCOLN, D. D.
100B K OF ANIMALS. 16mo. Large print. 40 IIISTORIC HYMNS. Prepared by Rev. W F.
Entertaining stories of animals, for little folks. With numerous pictures. Crafts. Music arranged b Dr. E. Tourre. . . . o
Per hundred . . 7 00
BIRDS AND FISHES. 6mno. Fully illustrated. 40 A choice collection of more than one hundred poIulrar hynl.s, r.ferred to in
Large-print stories for young readers.."Trophies of Song ; for Praise Meetings, Concerts, Conventions, Congre-
gational Singing, and Social Meetings ; also containing Responsive Exercises
BERT'S CONFESSION. By Laurie Loring.
i6mo. Short Stories, with 30 full-page illustrations. .50 HI-LL FARM. By Crona -Temfisc. I6mo. Illus-
trated. .......... .............. 6o
BRAVE BOY (A). Smo. . . . . . 2 An interesting story of honesty and faitlifullness
Bright stories with beautiful pictures. ILLUSTRATED PRIMER Largeprint.
ILLUSTRATED PRIMER. i6rno. Large print.
CHRISTMAS MORNING, and other Stories. Fully illustrated. . . . ..... . . . . 40
By Laurie Loriing. I6mo. 30 utll-page illustrations. . o5
"KNO\VLEDGE IS POWER. By Chas. Ki7ght.
CONCERT (The), and other Stories. By Laurie I2mo. New Edition....... . . . . ...2 oc
Lorinll. 16mo. 30 full-page illustrations ...... 50 Full of information, and well read may make the fortune of many a young
man. Providence Tribune.
CUNNING WORKMEN. By Pansy. 16mo. LILIAN GREY. By .Z IzI Holt. 16mo.
Illustrated.. .. .. . .. . . . . . . Illustrated .. . . . . . . . . . . 1 2
A story of rare interest and va!ue t, all interested in Sabbath School work. e o ae rea tat interesting story eitled "Fern Glen," will be
Tirrse rwrho have read tirat interesting story eritled "Fern Glen," will ire
CHRISTMAS VISIT (The). By Lauric Lo-\ing. 7 glad to find this no less cihai ing story, in which the same characters reap-
CHRIS MAS VISIT (he). B LaiicLor ear.
Square 16mro. Numerous full-page illustrations.. . 75
Large-print stories for little folks. LIFE OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. By Rcv. .
Chathlin. Large 16mo. Illustrated . . . . .I 50
CHARLEY LAUREL. By IV. 'H. G. AKinzgston. This new life of the great Ihilosiopicr and statesmian meets a want long felt.
Large 16mo. Illustrated . .. .... . ... .I 25 t i the most complete and interesting life of Franklin eer issued in a single
While this is one of the most intensely interesting and graphic stories of sea volume.
life, it enforces lthe highest and miost practical lessons.
LIFE OF DANIEL WEBSTER. By J. Banvard,
DR. DEANE'S \VAY, and other Stories. By Fayc D. D. New Edition. Large t6mo. Illustrated. 1 50
H tlinlilgton and Pansy. I6mno. Illustrated... . 25 Narrative of a great man, in his earli trials and joys, his manhoodr'spron;i;e,
The authors' names are a sufficient guarantee for its value and interest, and his niaturer hours, As such it is a fitting volume for every youth.







D. LOTHIROP & CO'S SELECT LIST OF BOOKS.

LIFE OF AMOS LAWRENCE. By TW R. SOLDIERS AND PATRIOTS OF THE REV-
,awrcence. New Edition. Large 16mio. Illustrated. I 50 OLUTION. By 'oseph Banvard, D. D. i6mo. II-
So young man who has in him the basis for excellence, can read this volume lustrated. . . . . . . . . . . . I 25
without feeling a noble ambition to imitate the goodness and the usefulness of The incidents are interesting, and the history valuable. H. LINCOLN, D. D.
its subject. R ichmond Disfiachk. STORIES OF ANIMALS. For Young Readers.
LITTLE MOTHER AND HER CHRISTMAS 16mo. With numerous illustrations. . . . ..... 75
(The), and other Stories. By Plhcbe McKeen. With n SAILOR BROTHER, and other Stories. By
original illtrations E. White .......... SAILOR BROTHER, an other Stories. By
original illustrations b\ E. 1. White . . . . .1 00 Laurie Loring. 16mo. 30 full-page illustrations. . 50
A beautiful picture of family lit. Nobody can read it itlhout feeling the L e Lr 6o. 3 fl-page ilttrations .... 5
better impulses stirred to healthy action. H. LINCOLN, I). D. SACRED SONGS, with Music. For Social WVor-
LITTLE MAY'S PICTURE, and other Stories. ship. i8mo. 224 pages . . . . . . .. 50
By Lauric Loring. 16mo. 30 full-page illustrations. 50o Per hundred, . . 40 oo
MR SIGNET RING, and other Gems. By Rev. I. De
MRS. DEANE'S WAY. By Faye sy liutlingtlon. LicJde. 6mo. New Edition .. ...... ....... .I 25
16mo. Illustrated . . . . . . . . . 1 2l The highest teaching is presented with exquisite skill. Many a feast may
The value and happiness of trusting in God happily exemplified. the Christian derive from this delightful book.
MABEL'S FAITH. i6mo. Illustrated . . .. 75 SUNSHINE FOR BABYLAND. Entirely New
A practical story. and Original. 4to. On extra calendered paper. Over
MY PETS, and other Stories. iSmo. With nil- to100 full-page illustrations. Boards, with a beautiful pic-
merous beautiful pictures for the little ones. . . . 25 tutre cover. . . . . . . . . . . .I 25
In extra cloth binding. ... . . . . I 75
NEW BIRTH (The). By Prof. Austin Phicl/s, The largest and best printed original volume of its kind ever issued at so
]). D . . . . . . . . . . . . I 25 lhw a price.
OUR BERTIE, and other Stories. Bv Laurie STILL HOUR: or, Communion with God. By
Loring. Square I6mo. Large print. Numerous full- Prof. Austin Ph/clfs. D. D. New Edition. Plain. . 60
page pictures..... .. ...... ......... 75 Tinted paper, gilt edged ............. .. I oo
More than oo00,000 copies have been sold, and we know of no other work of
PAPA'S BOY. By Mrs. C. E. K. Davis. 16mo. the kind having so constant a sale, or receiving such high commendations.
Illustrated ... I oo
A ch.t... in.g st, with ele .....iginal illustrati SOMEBODY'S DARLINGS, and other Stories.
By Laurie Loring. Square 16moo. Large print. Nu-
QUEER CARRIAGE (A), and other Stories By Inerous full-page pictures . . . . . . .. 75
Laurie Loring,. Square 16ino. Large print. Numerous
full-page picture...e... ge int............crous. 75 THE TEMPERANCE REFORMATION, and
its Claims upon the Christian Church. By Rev. James
RALPH AND DICK. By W. H. G. Kingslon. Smith, of Scotland. Octavo. 403 pages. . . .. 2 50
16ino. Illustrated . . . . . . . . .. I 00 The Prize Essay for which 250 guineas were paid.
A sea story. TROPHIES OF SONG. By Rev. TV F. Crafts.
SONGS FOR LITTLE FOLKS. Illustrated. 75 6no. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 25
Charming and familiar poems and lullabies, widl pictures, for the little ones A rich storehouse of articles and incidents illustrating hymns, and the power
at home and ministry of sacred music. The hymns referred to in this volume may be
STORIES OF BIRDS. For Young Readers. found in a small book entitled Historic Hymns.
16mto. With nuLnelrus illustrations . . . ... 75 TOM'S OPINION. t6mo. Illustrated ..... 75

SALVATION BY CHRIST. A Series of Dis- A spa-kling story of school life in Eigland.
courses on some of the most important Doctrines of the THREE LITTLE BROTHERS. By Emma
Gospel. By Francis Wayland, D. D. . . . ... I 50 Marshall. I6mo. Illustrated. . . . . . . 75
The leading doctrines of the Gopel ame presented and discussed with the
clea.ness atnd riclihess whiclhi clharactcrize the productions of Dr. Wayland. WHITE HAND (A). By Ella .Farman. 16mo.
STICKING TO TIlE RAFT. By i/i's. G. Glad- Illustrated. A story of American society. . . .. 50
one. Illustrated For many a girl it will correct false standards of feeling, and warn many a
one. 16 Illustrated . . . . . . . 60 ar heart of the danger that lies in "just a friendship."
A choice English story.
WORD PICTURES; or, Thoughts and Descrip-
STOR[ES. B- Airs. L. C. Alounlton, n. Stuart i tions from Popular Authors. Bv Gertrude Strohm.
P/helfs, Ella Farman. Rossiter )JoJhnson, and other I6mo. Illustrated. . . . . . . . . .. 2 co
famous story-tellers. Elegantly illustrated . . 2 00 This elegant volume contains charming selections from W. D. Howells,
Elegant in its printing, illustrations, and binding, it makes a very charming E. E,. Hale,Bayard Taylor, Mrs. A. D. Whitney, Miss Alcott, Miss E. Stuart
presentation volume. Phitslps, Adeline Tr.ifton, and other favorite authors.


-The abovc books are for sale at the Bookstores; but -evhen you do not find them, send to us, enclosing
-price, and w'e -z'ill send /hem Postpaid. Please secud for our full Catalogue.

D. LOTHB.OP & CO., Publishers, 38 & 40 Oornhill, Boston.









K A. VW OL"1E Ow

WIDE AWAKE PLEASURE BOOK.


T/he Children's Book of 1he Season:


FULL OF

BRIGHT STORIES, SPARKLING SKETCHES, AND BEAUTIFUL POEMS,

LOUISE CHANDLER MOULTON, ELLA FARMAN, MRS. R. H. STODDARD, EDGAR
FAWCETT, SOPHIE MAY, CLARA DOTY BATES, MRS. S. M. B. PIATT,
jI-EZEKIAH PUTTERWORTH, MARY E. C. WYETH,
Authllor Of UGLY GIL PAPERS,"
AND fIAYY OTIIER -4-1MOUS WRITERS.

THE LARGEST,

Most Fully Illustrated, and Handsomely Printed Volume
EVER ISSUED IN THIS COUNTRY AT SO LOW A PRICE.

Black and Gold Back Die. Boards. Chromo Side $1.50.
Extra Binding, Cloth, Gilt. . . . . 2.00.


S::F Every one desiring the freshest and choicest Book for
Young People, will do well to ask their bookseller for it before the
supply is exhausted.


D. LOTHROP & CO., PUBLISHERS,
30 AND 32 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON.

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