• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Preface
 Lucy Locket
 Pippin's Hill
 The lazy scholar
 The north wind does blow
 Tom Thumb
 Nimble Jack
 Rub-a-dub-dub!
 John Smith (blacksmith)
 Goosey, goosey, gander
 The cat up the plum-tree
 Nebuchadnezzar
 The ride
 The lion and the unicorn
 Hush-a-bye, baby
 Dickory Dock
 Margery Daw
 Old King Cole
 Banbury Cross
 For every ill
 Little Tom Tucker
 The aquarium
 Wishes
 Three little kittens
 The three bears
 The weakly chicken
 Dame Wiggins of Lee
 Litter Jack Horner
 Man and wife
 Hark! Hark!
 The snail
 Ice-sick-all
 Peter Piper
 Mary Contrary
 The little cock-sparrow
 The carriou crow
 Bad companions
 John Cook
 Molly
 Idle Jenny
 This pig and that pig
 Toddlekins
 Tommy Torment
 Robin and Richard
 Rolly-Polly, Gammon and Spinac...
 The beggars
 Little goody twoshoes
 Unlicensed victualler
 Little boy blue
 Baby bunting
 The Yankee Doodles
 Eccentric
 Beauty and the beast
 Tommy Tittlemouse, esq.
 Aunt Bantry
 Curly locks
 Blue Beard
 Hisksy, Dicksy, Daisy!
 Cock-a-doodle-do!
 A bird in hand
 The dog ticket
 Peter Prickett
 Simple Simon
 My mother and your mother
 I would tell you a story
 Dolly taken ill
 Michaelmas
 The old soldier
 Jack Sprat
 Billy Taylor
 The hedgehog
 Spot and Topsy
 Naughty puss
 When I was a bachelor
 Tom and the Tinker's son
 The Queen of Hearts
 Tippling John
 The little sour old maid
 Freddy Rickets
 The little man and gun
 Taffy the Welshman
 A bed
 Sing, Sing!
 Dance a baby, diddy
 Pussy-cat mew
 Pease pudding
 The little husband
 The babes in the wood
 Jacky Tweazles
 Polly Hopkins
 Baa baa, black sheep
 Needles and pins
 Who comes here?
 Nan Etticot
 Hide and seek
 Little Bo-Peep
 A man of words
 Puss in boots
 Stokey Jokey
 Rain, rain!
 The house that Jack built
 Tweedledum and Tweedledee
 The little bird
 The donkey ride
 Old chairs to mend
 Little Red Ridinghood
 The milking maid
 Three jolly sailors
 Polly, put the kettle on
 The owl
 Tell-tale tit
 Little Miss Muffet
 The accident
 Humpty Dumpty
 Multiplication
 Higgledy-piggledy
 Blow, wind, blow!
 Rumty-idy-idity
 Pigs in the wood
 A song of sixpence
 Hey, diddle diddle
 Charity Jones
 Old Mother Hubbard
 A was an archer
 Bow, wow, wow!
 Roaming puss
 Jack and the beanstalk
 Charlie
 Cinderella
 The three niggers
 Pretty maid
 Lady bird
 Pat a cake
 Ding, dong, bell
 To market, to buy a fat pig
 Doctor Foster
 Cross-Patch
 The racing stud
 The old woman in the shoe
 Three blind mice
 Polly Flinders
 Doctor Faustus
 Jumping Joan
 Bye, baby! Bye!
 The well
 Say, Sawyer Sack-o'-down
 Cuckoo on cherry-tree
 Henny Penny
 Come, shoe the young horse
 Birds of a feather
 Rats and mice
 Little Pussy
 Pretty Polly
 Cry, baby! Cry!
 Jack and Jill
 Ding dong darrow
 Little dolly dumps
 Jack the giant-killer
 No doubt
 Gee wo, Dobbin!
 Popsy Trotsy
 Samuel Morgan
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Extraordinary nursery rhymes and tales : new yet old : translated from the original jingle into comic verse
Title: Extraordinary nursery rhymes and tales
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028401/00001
 Material Information
Title: Extraordinary nursery rhymes and tales new yet old : translated from the original jingle into comic verse
Alternate Title: Extraordinary nursery rhymes
Physical Description: 148 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Griffith and Farran ( Publisher )
Publisher: Griffith and Farran
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1876
 Subjects
Subject: Racism in art -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1876   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1876
Genre: Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes.   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by one who was once a child himself ; with sixty illustrations.
General Note: Some illustrations are caricatures; page 120 contains a caricature of three black minstrels.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028401
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225974
notis - ALG6256
oclc - 31774771

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Table of Contents
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Preface
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Lucy Locket
        Page 7
    Pippin's Hill
        Page 8
    The lazy scholar
        Page 8
    The north wind does blow
        Page 8
    Tom Thumb
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Nimble Jack
        Page 14
    Rub-a-dub-dub!
        Page 15
    John Smith (blacksmith)
        Page 16
    Goosey, goosey, gander
        Page 17
    The cat up the plum-tree
        Page 17
    Nebuchadnezzar
        Page 17
    The ride
        Page 18
    The lion and the unicorn
        Page 18
    Hush-a-bye, baby
        Page 19
    Dickory Dock
        Page 19
    Margery Daw
        Page 19
    Old King Cole
        Page 20
    Banbury Cross
        Page 21
    For every ill
        Page 22
    Little Tom Tucker
        Page 22
    The aquarium
        Page 22
    Wishes
        Page 23
    Three little kittens
        Page 23
    The three bears
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    The weakly chicken
        Page 27
    Dame Wiggins of Lee
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Litter Jack Horner
        Page 30
    Man and wife
        Page 30
    Hark! Hark!
        Page 30
    The snail
        Page 31
    Ice-sick-all
        Page 31
    Peter Piper
        Page 32
    Mary Contrary
        Page 32
    The little cock-sparrow
        Page 33
    The carriou crow
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Bad companions
        Page 35
    John Cook
        Page 36
    Molly
        Page 36
    Idle Jenny
        Page 36
    This pig and that pig
        Page 37
    Toddlekins
        Page 37
    Tommy Torment
        Page 38
    Robin and Richard
        Page 38
    Rolly-Polly, Gammon and Spinach
        Page 38
    The beggars
        Page 39
    Little goody twoshoes
        Page 39
    Unlicensed victualler
        Page 40
    Little boy blue
        Page 40
    Baby bunting
        Page 40
    The Yankee Doodles
        Page 41
    Eccentric
        Page 41
    Beauty and the beast
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Tommy Tittlemouse, esq.
        Page 48
    Aunt Bantry
        Page 49
    Curly locks
        Page 49
    Blue Beard
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Hisksy, Dicksy, Daisy!
        Page 55
    Cock-a-doodle-do!
        Page 56
    A bird in hand
        Page 57
    The dog ticket
        Page 57
    Peter Prickett
        Page 58
    Simple Simon
        Page 58
    My mother and your mother
        Page 58
    I would tell you a story
        Page 59
    Dolly taken ill
        Page 59
    Michaelmas
        Page 60
    The old soldier
        Page 60
    Jack Sprat
        Page 60
    Billy Taylor
        Page 60
    The hedgehog
        Page 61
    Spot and Topsy
        Page 61
    Naughty puss
        Page 62
    When I was a bachelor
        Page 62
    Tom and the Tinker's son
        Page 62
    The Queen of Hearts
        Page 63
    Tippling John
        Page 63
    The little sour old maid
        Page 64
    Freddy Rickets
        Page 64
    The little man and gun
        Page 64
    Taffy the Welshman
        Page 65
    A bed
        Page 66
    Sing, Sing!
        Page 66
    Dance a baby, diddy
        Page 66
    Pussy-cat mew
        Page 66
    Pease pudding
        Page 67
    The little husband
        Page 67
    The babes in the wood
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Jacky Tweazles
        Page 70
    Polly Hopkins
        Page 71
    Baa baa, black sheep
        Page 71
    Needles and pins
        Page 71
    Who comes here?
        Page 71
    Nan Etticot
        Page 72
    Hide and seek
        Page 72
    Little Bo-Peep
        Page 73
    A man of words
        Page 73
    Puss in boots
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Stokey Jokey
        Page 83
    Rain, rain!
        Page 84
    The house that Jack built
        Page 84
    Tweedledum and Tweedledee
        Page 85
    The little bird
        Page 85
    The donkey ride
        Page 86
    Old chairs to mend
        Page 86
    Little Red Ridinghood
        Page 87
    The milking maid
        Page 88
    Three jolly sailors
        Page 89
    Polly, put the kettle on
        Page 89
    The owl
        Page 89
    Tell-tale tit
        Page 89
    Little Miss Muffet
        Page 90
    The accident
        Page 90
    Humpty Dumpty
        Page 91
    Multiplication
        Page 91
    Higgledy-piggledy
        Page 91
    Blow, wind, blow!
        Page 92
    Rumty-idy-idity
        Page 92
    Pigs in the wood
        Page 93
    A song of sixpence
        Page 94
    Hey, diddle diddle
        Page 95
    Charity Jones
        Page 95
    Old Mother Hubbard
        Page 96
    A was an archer
        Page 97
    Bow, wow, wow!
        Page 98
    Roaming puss
        Page 98
    Jack and the beanstalk
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
    Charlie
        Page 116
    Cinderella
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
    The three niggers
        Page 120
    Pretty maid
        Page 120
    Lady bird
        Page 121
    Pat a cake
        Page 121
    Ding, dong, bell
        Page 121
    To market, to buy a fat pig
        Page 122
    Doctor Foster
        Page 122
    Cross-Patch
        Page 123
    The racing stud
        Page 123
    The old woman in the shoe
        Page 123
    Three blind mice
        Page 124
    Polly Flinders
        Page 125
    Doctor Faustus
        Page 125
    Jumping Joan
        Page 126
    Bye, baby! Bye!
        Page 126
    The well
        Page 126
    Say, Sawyer Sack-o'-down
        Page 127
    Cuckoo on cherry-tree
        Page 127
    Henny Penny
        Page 127
    Come, shoe the young horse
        Page 127
    Birds of a feather
        Page 128
    Rats and mice
        Page 128
    Little Pussy
        Page 129
    Pretty Polly
        Page 129
    Cry, baby! Cry!
        Page 129
    Jack and Jill
        Page 130
    Ding dong darrow
        Page 130
    Little dolly dumps
        Page 130
    Jack the giant-killer
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
    No doubt
        Page 147
    Gee wo, Dobbin!
        Page 148
    Popsy Trotsy
        Page 148
    Samuel Morgan
        Page 148
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text










EXTRAORDINARY


NURSERY RHYMES AND TALES

NEW YET OLD,

) ",' *i n...,' f J i;'.r t 'mj -"J J 1- -, b

i '' J ',.JY J : ,

BY
ONITE WVO V WAS ONCE


A. C HIL D


-1I VI6: S E L mF.


aait) bi~rty 31tlutrationg.



LONDON:
PUBLISHED FOR THE AUTHOR BY
GRIFFITH AND FARRAN,
(SUCCESSORS TO NEWBERY AND HARRIS),
WEST CORNER OF ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD.
MDCCCLXXVI.
































THE CONTENTS.


Preface .
Lucy Locket
Pippin's Hill
The Lazy Scholar
The North Wind does blow
Tom Thumb
Nimble Jack
Rub-a-dub-dub !

John Smith (Blacksmith)
Goosey, Goosey Gander
The Cat up the Plum-tree


PAGE
5 A '' ... '..7 : :, r
7 The Ride .
8 The Lion and the Unicorn
8 Hlush-a-bye, Baby
8 Dickory Dock
9 Margery Daw

14 Old King Cole
15 Banbury Cross
16 For every Ill

17 Little Tom Tucker
17 The Aquarium .
A2


PAGE
* 17
18
18

19
S 19
. 19
20
21
22
22
22


I







ii


Wishes
Three Little Kittens .
The Three Bears
The Weakly Chicken.
Dame Wiggins of Lee
Little Jack Horner
Man and Wife.
Hark hark! .
The Snail .
Ice-sick-all
Peter Piper
Mary Contrary
The Little Cock-Sparrow
The Carrion Crow
Bad Companions
John Cook.
Molly
Idle 7enny
This Pig and that Pig
Toddlekins
Tommy Torment
Robin and Richard .
Rolly-Polly, Gammon and
The Beggars
Little Goody Twoshoes
Unlicensed Victualler
Little Boy Blue .


CONTENTS.


PAGE
S 23
S 23
S 24
27
28

S 30
S 30
S 30
S 31
S 31
32
S 32

S 33
S 33
S 35
S 36
S 36
S 36

S 37
S 37
S 38
S 38
Spinach 38

S 39
S 39
S 40
40


Baby Bunting .
The Yankee Doodles .
Eccentric .
Beauty and the Beast
Tommy Tittlemouse, Esq.
Aunt Bantry
Curly Locks
Blue Beard
Hicksy, Dicksy, Daisy !
Cock-a-doodle-do .
A Bird in Hand
The Dog Ticket
Peter Prickett .
Simple Simon .
My Mother and your Mother
I would tellyou a Story
Dolly taken ill .


The Old Soldier

Jack Sprat .
Billy Taylor
The Hedgehog .
Spot and Topsy .
Naughty Puss .
When I was a Bachelor
Tom the Tinker's Son
The Queen of Hearts


PAGE
40
41
41
42
48
49
50
50
55
56
57
57
58
58
58
59
59
60
6o
6o
60
61
61
62
62
62

63







CONTENTS.


PAGE
Tippling ohn 63
The Little Sour Old Maid 64
Freddy Rickets 64
The Little Man and Gun 64
Taffy the Welshman. 65
A Bed 66
Sing, Sing! 66
Dance a Baby, diddy 66
Pussy-Cat Mew 66
Pease Pudding 67
The Little Husband 67
The Babes in the Wood 68
Jack Tweazles 70
Polly Hopkins 71
Ba-a, ba-a, Black Sheep 71
Needles and Pins 71
Who comes here? 71
Nan Etticot 72
Hide and Seek 72
Little Bo-Peep 73
A Man of Words 73
Puss in Boots 74
Stoy key okey 83
Rain, Rain! 84
The House that Jack built 84
Tweedledum and Tweedledee 85
The Little Bird 85


The Donkey Ride
Old Chairs to mend
Little Red Ridinghood
The Milking Maid
Three Yolly Sailors
Polly, put the Kettle on
The Owl .
Tell-tale Tit
Little Miss Muffet
The Accident
Humpty Dumpty
Multiplication
Higgledy-Piggledy
Blow, Wind, Blow !
Rumty-idy-idity
Pigs in the Wood
Large A, little a
Handy Spandy .
A Song of Sixpence
Hey, diddle diddle
Charity Yones
Old Mother Hubbard
A was an Archer
Bow, wow, wow !
Roaming Puss .
yack andthe Beanstalk
Charlie


PAGE
86
86
S 87
88
S 89
S 89
89
. 89

. 90
S90
S 91
91
91
92
S 92

S 93
S 93
S 93
S 94
S 95
S 95
S 96

S 97
S 98
S 98

S 99
16









PAGE
7. 7
. 120
. 120
.121


Pat a Cake
Ding, dong, Bell
To Market, to buy a Fat Pig
Doctor Foster
Cross-Patch
The Racing Stud
The Old Woman in the Shoe
Three Blind Mice
Polly Flinders .
Doctor Faustus .

Jumping Joan .
Bye, Baby! Bye !
The Well .


121

S 121

S 122
. 22

S 123
S 123
S 123
S124
S 125

S 125
S 126
. 26

126


Cinderella .
The Three Niggers
Pretty Maid
Lady Bird


CONTENTS.


PAGE
Say, Sawyer Sack-o'-down 127
Cuckoo on Cherry-tree 127

Henny Penny 127

Come, Shoe the Young Horse 127
Birds of a Feather 128
Rats and Mice 128

Little Pussy 129

Pretty Polly 129

Cry, Baby Cry 129

7ack and ill 130
Ding Dong Darrow 130
Little Dolly Dumps 130

Jack the Giant-Killer 131
No Doubt 147

Gee, wo, Dobbin! 148
Popsy Trotsy 148
Samuel Morgan 148














P IEFACE,




HE children's rhymes of ancient times
S Were jingles without reason:
The present rhymes for modern times
Are rhymes, and also reason.
I've twisted and untwisted them
To suit the present season,
And given each a pleasant turn-
May none declare it treason!
Here each will find some dear old chum,
And smile, too, when he sees him;
To meet again the friends of youth
Grown up is sure to please him.
Fresh morals freely are dispensed,
So sweet, each cries 'Give me some!'
Whilst errors have been swept away
With a remorseless besom!















NURSERY i HYJES AND ALES.


r URSERY PIHYMES AND ALES.


Lucy Locket.

L UCY LOCKET lost her pocket,
Coming from the fair;
There was nothing in the pocket
But her new back-hair.
Kitty Fisher found the treasure-
Now, was it kind or fair
To flourish in this chignon,
And let her friend go bare ?


'''







( 8 )


Pippin's Hill.

ONE day I went up Pippin's Hill-
Pippin's Hill was dirty;
There I met a pretty maid,
Who, alas! seemed flirty.
She declared she'd missed her way
(Which was false, 'tis plain),
For with a grin she said, 'I'm in
Search now to find Love Lane.'
I showed the way, I must confess,
And now she is my wife you'll guess.


The Lazy Scholar.

COME, you late, lazy scholar,
I shall fine you a dollar,
Beating time as you howl forth a tune.
You may dance while I state
How you ever are late,
Whilst to-day you have slumbered till noon.


The North Wind does blow.
THE north wind does blow, and we shall have snow,
And what will the robin do then ? poor thing !
He will fly to the barn to keep himself warm,
And hide his head under his wing, poor thing!

But spring will come soon, and summer in June,
And what will the robin do then ? glad thing !
In the sun all the day, blithely singing away,
He'll forget all these cold winds and snow, glad thing!







( 8 )


Pippin's Hill.

ONE day I went up Pippin's Hill-
Pippin's Hill was dirty;
There I met a pretty maid,
Who, alas! seemed flirty.
She declared she'd missed her way
(Which was false, 'tis plain),
For with a grin she said, 'I'm in
Search now to find Love Lane.'
I showed the way, I must confess,
And now she is my wife you'll guess.


The Lazy Scholar.

COME, you late, lazy scholar,
I shall fine you a dollar,
Beating time as you howl forth a tune.
You may dance while I state
How you ever are late,
Whilst to-day you have slumbered till noon.


The North Wind does blow.
THE north wind does blow, and we shall have snow,
And what will the robin do then ? poor thing !
He will fly to the barn to keep himself warm,
And hide his head under his wing, poor thing!

But spring will come soon, and summer in June,
And what will the robin do then ? glad thing !
In the sun all the day, blithely singing away,
He'll forget all these cold winds and snow, glad thing!







( 8 )


Pippin's Hill.

ONE day I went up Pippin's Hill-
Pippin's Hill was dirty;
There I met a pretty maid,
Who, alas! seemed flirty.
She declared she'd missed her way
(Which was false, 'tis plain),
For with a grin she said, 'I'm in
Search now to find Love Lane.'
I showed the way, I must confess,
And now she is my wife you'll guess.


The Lazy Scholar.

COME, you late, lazy scholar,
I shall fine you a dollar,
Beating time as you howl forth a tune.
You may dance while I state
How you ever are late,
Whilst to-day you have slumbered till noon.


The North Wind does blow.
THE north wind does blow, and we shall have snow,
And what will the robin do then ? poor thing !
He will fly to the barn to keep himself warm,
And hide his head under his wing, poor thing!

But spring will come soon, and summer in June,
And what will the robin do then ? glad thing !
In the sun all the day, blithely singing away,
He'll forget all these cold winds and snow, glad thing!







( 9 )


.. IV-


Tom Thumb.


Q UEER little baby,
Frolicsome child,
Gift of the fairies-
How the dame smiled !
He, but a day old,
Striving to walk,
Calling for breakfast -
Hear the mite talk !


Wife of the farmer,
Married for years,
Mourns 'cause she's childless,
Often in tears;
Watches at fairy-rings
(At night they come),
Wished for a babe, though
Small as her thumb.


Ij






( 10 )


Her request's granted-
Queer little boy!
Dad don't think him much,
Still he's ma's joy.
Up to funny tricks
All the day long,
Blithe as a cricket
Singing some song.
Dame made a pudding,
Suet and plum;
Into it tumbled
Little Tom Thumb.
Struggling in the cloth,
Frightened ma so:
'Surely it's bewitched !
Hi Pedler Joe !'
When on his shoulder
Out Tommy popped,
Alarmed the pedler,
Who pudding dropped.
Jack must secure prize
For own eating.
Cuts into dumplings,
For ease retreating.
Once tied to thistle,
To keep from harm,
The old cow ate him-
Oh, what alarm !
But her throat's tickled;
He strives to rise,
And with cough comes up-
Great their surprise !
Tom wore a small sword,
And the folks say


He was a biggish man
In his small way.
Once as he's digging-
Oh, how absurd !-
Raised by his trousers
In beak of bird;
Nice dainty morsel
To feed her brood.
But Tom's ire rises,
And fate withstood;
Fought like a tiger
When in the nest-
His new friends came off
But second-best.
One baby eagle
He killed outright,
Then dodged to 'scape from
The mother's spite;
Till, quick and sudden,
She has pounced down,
Drags him o'er water,
And drops to drown.
But a fish rising,
With open jaws,
Gives warm reception;-
Tom only roars.
Fish can't make him out,
And, deep in thought,
Soon in a cast-net
Finds himself caught.
King Arthur's cook bought
And cut up fish,
Tom makes his exit
And bows from dish.






( 11 )


Cook,.of course frightened,
Dropping his knife,
Upsets the table
And runs for life.
Tom then crept upstairs,
Sought out the King,
Told his adventures;
Who gave a ring,
Token of favour,
Dropped o'er his head:
'Brave little mortal,
Take that,' he said.
'I'll make new order,-
Band round the neck,
Collar of valour,
Heroes to deck.'
The Queen, delighted,
Said that he ought
Now to be knighted
And stay at Court.
Oft since by courage
Tom cleared the house,
Killing or catching
Ev'ry stray mouse.
Four mice he harnessed-
Wasn't it grand,
Riding and driving
His four-in-hand ?
Sometimes the monarch,
Guests to surprise,
Bade Tom crawl under
The paste of pies,
Till he gave signal;
Then, with a shout,


Tom raised the lid up
And thence jumped out!
Round Arthur's table
Swiftly he'd race,
O'er dishes leaping-
Grand steeplechase!
Once in a milk-pail
Very nigh drowned,
So he learned swimming
And got renowned.
The King had him drilled
And taught to fence;
Dressed as a soldier,
His joy's immense.
All whisker mixtures,
From ev'ry shop,
He gave a try-all
To raise a crop.
But vain all efforts!
Still a smooth cheek!
Till he resolves to
Fairies to speak.
Sought out the fairy-rings
(At night they come);
'Oh, give me whiskers!'
Cried out Tom Thumb.
Now his cheek itches,
And raising hand
Feels the hair rising-
Isn't it grand ?
He other children
Held in disdain,
Thought they were childish
Who cried at pain:







( 12 )


Just like a lion,
Hardy and bold,
Few folks would take him
For six months old.
'Talking of marriage,
I'll get a wife ;
Right I should settle,
My time of life.
Find me a sweetheart, Sir,'
He asked the King:
'Your girls are too big-
Some little thing.'
King Arthur promised
And advertised,
News matrimonial
Maidens advised
Girls of small stature,
And said they ought
To hear advantage
To come to Court.
Vast applications!
Numbers applied;
But there's none fitting
For Tom Thumb's bride,
All were much too big.
The hope of wealth
For the time made them
Think small of self.
The King arranged them
In two long rows,
Tom marched between them
There to propose.
Vain all attractions!
Tom shook his head:


'I must be master,
Dears, when I wed.'
And though each morning
Fresh hosts applied,
Tom's still unplighted-
Cannot decide.
Though the great darlings
Tried all their wiles,
He's too old a bird
To catch with smiles.
But all this caprice
Bad thoughts excites,
And they held meetings
'Bout woman's rights.
'I'll ask my fairy friends,'
Exclaimed Tom Thumb,
'Down at the mossy rings
(At night they come) ;
They are the ones who
Whiskers supplied,
They now shall aid me
To find a bride.'
That night he went out,
But grew so glum
After six hours
'Cause they don't come.
He left polite note
'Bout thing desired,
Stating the stature
Of girl required.
So in the morning
There came to call-
Twenty young maidens,
All of them small;







( 13 )


All very pretty ;
And, I've been told,
Each brought a plain ring
Of burnished gold;
Each had a soft and
Beautiful voice;
Each made quite certain
She'd be his choice;
Each was surprised, as
Rivals arise,
Up to the Palace door,
All of a size.
Tom was bewildered-
What could he do ?
All were so charming,
And strange, if true,
All are his juniors-
None a year old;
All are sweet-tempered,
Not one a scold.
The King and courtiers,
All much amused,
Saw this brave suitor
Grown quite confused.
First he kissed this one,
Then he kissed that;
Really he scarce knows
What he is at.
No decision made he,
And as time ran,
King Arthur hit on
This clever plan;-
All the sweet maidens
Form a large ring,


Tom then is blinded:
They have to sing.
He round is twisted,
Then, O what sport!
She will the bride be
Who is first caught.
Still undecided,
Tom turned and turned,
Till one rushed to arms
And the prize earned.
Oh, what a scene then !
All the rest drowned
In a tear ocean,
'Till kissed all around.
That day's the wedding,
Then came the feast,
All the girls bridemaids :
These last, though least,
Were made the most of,
For all were fair.
Some called them fairies,
So sweet they were.
With mirth and dancing
Passed the glad day;
Moon rose, then all fled,
'Cept one, away.
She proved a tender
And gentle wife,
So Tom was happy
To end of life.
But she had one fault,
Which cost Tom dear-
She had three babies
Twice ev'ry year.







( 14


First they were all girls,
Next each a boy.
(The happiest lives still
Have some alloy.)
But through Queen's bounty,
Introduced then,
Tom till he died was
Cheerfullest of men.


King Arthur lent the
Famed round table,
Hole in the middle,
Whence Tom's able
To fill all the mouths
Perched in a row.
Oh, 'twas a sight, that
Prize Baby Show!'


Nimble Jack.

JACK was nimble,
And Jack was quick,
And Jack jumped over the candlestick.
Jill she followed,
Overturned it quite,
And the tail of her night-dress set a-light.
MORAL.
A lesson for life have the little ones learnt,
For I'm sorry to say she was very much burnt.







( 15 )


Rub-a-dub-dub /

RUB-a-dub-dub!
Round a large foaming tub
In a yard stand three chatt'ring old women;
They regard not old saws,
Or would stay within doors
When they wash out their old dirty linen.


,..-i---I -.


I-' I '*


I, I


All are deaf, it appears,
For each word meets the ears
Of their neighbours; for loud they complain
In their spirited chat,
First of this thing, then that,
And how hubby got tipsy again.






( 16


7o/Zn Smizth (Bl3acksmizt).


H I, John Smith! can you fix a shoe?
Marry, just a few;
Here a nail and there a nail, tick-tack too.

Hi, John Smith! can you drive a bargain ?
Marry, on the nail; hold, I guess your tale :
Of the ready you don't own a farthing,
But you tack-tick here, tack-tick there,
Your tactics' to tack-tick too everywhere.







( 17 )


Goosey, Goosey Gander.

G OOSEY, Goosey Gander, where did you wander?
Upstairs and downstairs, and in the lady's chamber.
Upstairs he wandered, and there to eat found nothing;
Downstairs he wandered, and there he found sage stuffing.
Up again he wandered, but then 'twas in a dish,
As nicely dressed by our old cook as any one could wish.




The Cat up the Plum-tree.

R IDDLE-ME, riddle-me, rumty,
There's a black cat a-top of our plum-tree;
I'll bet you a crown that I'll soon fetch her down,
Riddle-me, riddle-me, rumty.

See, here is a stone; and now it is thrown,
Riddle-me, riddle-me, rumty.
Oh, it's just missed her head, smashed a window instead,
And the cat's still a-top of our plum-tree.




Nebuchadnezzar.

NEBUCHADNEZZAR, I find from the News,"
Has sold his young wife for a pair of old shoes:
Now, p'raps you'll consider the bargain dirt-cheap,
If you do, at conclusions you take a sad leap ;-
For I've learnt from the man who concluded the barter,
She was dear at the price, for he'd purchased a tartar.
The Matrimonial News, 3d. weekly.







( 17 )


Goosey, Goosey Gander.

G OOSEY, Goosey Gander, where did you wander?
Upstairs and downstairs, and in the lady's chamber.
Upstairs he wandered, and there to eat found nothing;
Downstairs he wandered, and there he found sage stuffing.
Up again he wandered, but then 'twas in a dish,
As nicely dressed by our old cook as any one could wish.




The Cat up the Plum-tree.

R IDDLE-ME, riddle-me, rumty,
There's a black cat a-top of our plum-tree;
I'll bet you a crown that I'll soon fetch her down,
Riddle-me, riddle-me, rumty.

See, here is a stone; and now it is thrown,
Riddle-me, riddle-me, rumty.
Oh, it's just missed her head, smashed a window instead,
And the cat's still a-top of our plum-tree.




Nebuchadnezzar.

NEBUCHADNEZZAR, I find from the News,"
Has sold his young wife for a pair of old shoes:
Now, p'raps you'll consider the bargain dirt-cheap,
If you do, at conclusions you take a sad leap ;-
For I've learnt from the man who concluded the barter,
She was dear at the price, for he'd purchased a tartar.
The Matrimonial News, 3d. weekly.







( 17 )


Goosey, Goosey Gander.

G OOSEY, Goosey Gander, where did you wander?
Upstairs and downstairs, and in the lady's chamber.
Upstairs he wandered, and there to eat found nothing;
Downstairs he wandered, and there he found sage stuffing.
Up again he wandered, but then 'twas in a dish,
As nicely dressed by our old cook as any one could wish.




The Cat up the Plum-tree.

R IDDLE-ME, riddle-me, rumty,
There's a black cat a-top of our plum-tree;
I'll bet you a crown that I'll soon fetch her down,
Riddle-me, riddle-me, rumty.

See, here is a stone; and now it is thrown,
Riddle-me, riddle-me, rumty.
Oh, it's just missed her head, smashed a window instead,
And the cat's still a-top of our plum-tree.




Nebuchadnezzar.

NEBUCHADNEZZAR, I find from the News,"
Has sold his young wife for a pair of old shoes:
Now, p'raps you'll consider the bargain dirt-cheap,
If you do, at conclusions you take a sad leap ;-
For I've learnt from the man who concluded the barter,
She was dear at the price, for he'd purchased a tartar.
The Matrimonial News, 3d. weekly.






( 18 )


The Ride.
ONE day I went out riding, and had a jolly trot;
That day I had a hiding, but this I relished not.
Now where had I gone riding ? To this I answered not:
I shirked another hiding upon a tender spot.


The Lion and the Unicorn.


THE Lion and the Unicorn were fighting for the crown;
The Lion knocked the Unicorn twice upside down.
Some gave him white bread, and some gave him brown,
For they were sympathising folk in that small county-town.
'Now, really,' said the Unicorn, 'I've had so many rolls,
I'd rather get a jug of beer from you, kind, generous souls.'






( 18 )


The Ride.
ONE day I went out riding, and had a jolly trot;
That day I had a hiding, but this I relished not.
Now where had I gone riding ? To this I answered not:
I shirked another hiding upon a tender spot.


The Lion and the Unicorn.


THE Lion and the Unicorn were fighting for the crown;
The Lion knocked the Unicorn twice upside down.
Some gave him white bread, and some gave him brown,
For they were sympathising folk in that small county-town.
'Now, really,' said the Unicorn, 'I've had so many rolls,
I'd rather get a jug of beer from you, kind, generous souls.'






( 19 )


Hush-a-bye, Baby.

H USH-A-BYE, baby, on the tree-top;
When the wind blows the cradle will rock;
When the bough breaks the cradle will fall,
And down will come cradle, and baby, and all.
The dear little babe was a black little crow,
One of three, newly-hatched, lying all in a row,
In a snug little nest at the top of a tree ;
And the wind, let it blow, there no danger can be.
--t+<--

Dickory Dock.

D ICKORY, dickory, dock, the mouse ran up the clock;
The clock struck one, and down he run,
Dickory, dickory, dock.
But a little black kitten came strolling by, -
Dickory, dickory, dock;
And she snapped up the mouse and she glanced at the clock,
Dickory, dickory, dock.
'Ah, this is the time of day!' quoth she;
'It is dinner-time now both with you and for me.'

---,4--

Margery Daw.

SEE, saw! Margery Daw sold her bed and lay in the straw;
Wasn't she a dirty slut, to sell her bed and lie in the. dirt ?

MORAL.
From this very sad tale all young folks may relie on it,
As they make up their couch they are certain to lie on it,






( 19 )


Hush-a-bye, Baby.

H USH-A-BYE, baby, on the tree-top;
When the wind blows the cradle will rock;
When the bough breaks the cradle will fall,
And down will come cradle, and baby, and all.
The dear little babe was a black little crow,
One of three, newly-hatched, lying all in a row,
In a snug little nest at the top of a tree ;
And the wind, let it blow, there no danger can be.
--t+<--

Dickory Dock.

D ICKORY, dickory, dock, the mouse ran up the clock;
The clock struck one, and down he run,
Dickory, dickory, dock.
But a little black kitten came strolling by, -
Dickory, dickory, dock;
And she snapped up the mouse and she glanced at the clock,
Dickory, dickory, dock.
'Ah, this is the time of day!' quoth she;
'It is dinner-time now both with you and for me.'

---,4--

Margery Daw.

SEE, saw! Margery Daw sold her bed and lay in the straw;
Wasn't she a dirty slut, to sell her bed and lie in the. dirt ?

MORAL.
From this very sad tale all young folks may relie on it,
As they make up their couch they are certain to lie on it,






( 19 )


Hush-a-bye, Baby.

H USH-A-BYE, baby, on the tree-top;
When the wind blows the cradle will rock;
When the bough breaks the cradle will fall,
And down will come cradle, and baby, and all.
The dear little babe was a black little crow,
One of three, newly-hatched, lying all in a row,
In a snug little nest at the top of a tree ;
And the wind, let it blow, there no danger can be.
--t+<--

Dickory Dock.

D ICKORY, dickory, dock, the mouse ran up the clock;
The clock struck one, and down he run,
Dickory, dickory, dock.
But a little black kitten came strolling by, -
Dickory, dickory, dock;
And she snapped up the mouse and she glanced at the clock,
Dickory, dickory, dock.
'Ah, this is the time of day!' quoth she;
'It is dinner-time now both with you and for me.'

---,4--

Margery Daw.

SEE, saw! Margery Daw sold her bed and lay in the straw;
Wasn't she a dirty slut, to sell her bed and lie in the. dirt ?

MORAL.
From this very sad tale all young folks may relie on it,
As they make up their couch they are certain to lie on it,







( 20 )


Old King Cole.

O LD King Cole was a jolly old soul,
Yea, a merry old soul was he;
And he called for his pipe,
And he called for his glass,
And he called for his fiddlers three.

Old Queen Cole was a very queer soul,
And as grumpy as a soul could be;
For she quarrell'd with each maid
So got no attention paid,
Though she rang the bells from dinner-time to tea.







( 21 )


But Princess Cole was a darling little soul,
As an angel good and kind was she,
For she went from door to door
To relieve the needy poor,
And was happy as a girl can be.


-_ -'*: "-- ";'I '

-x ,l'i. j2 BANBURI 1 '
,I :- ILL "


















Banbury Cross.
R IDE a cock-horse
To Banbury Cross,
And go to the fair as a matter of course
For there's a grand circus, and many a show;
And the girls ring their fingers, tie bells to each toe,
Ride and dance, and make music wherever they go.
Ride and dance, and make music wherever they go.






( 22


For every II.

F OR ev'ry ill beneath the sun
There is some remedy, or none:
If there be one, then strive to find it;
If there be none, then never mind it.

The ill I mourn's a scolding wife,
The cure I've sought for half my life,
And while sfe breathes I shall not find it:
Talk of her tongue! I'm forced, to mind it.



Liffle Tom Tucker.

LITTLE Tom Tucker sings for his supper-
What does he long for, white bread and butter ?
How shall he cut it without e'er a knife ?
How shall he marry without e'er a wife ?

Supper now is ended, 'Mother, here's your knife:
Whilst I've got you, mother, I'll never want a wife;
Whilst I've bread and butter, and you love a song,
I will sing from lunch to tea-in fact, the whole day long.'



The Aquarium.

JANET and Marion bought an aquarium,
Full of tadpoles, and weeds, and small fishes;
But Grimalkin one day came out angling that way-
Smashed the globe, and brought grief to both misses,






( 22


For every II.

F OR ev'ry ill beneath the sun
There is some remedy, or none:
If there be one, then strive to find it;
If there be none, then never mind it.

The ill I mourn's a scolding wife,
The cure I've sought for half my life,
And while sfe breathes I shall not find it:
Talk of her tongue! I'm forced, to mind it.



Liffle Tom Tucker.

LITTLE Tom Tucker sings for his supper-
What does he long for, white bread and butter ?
How shall he cut it without e'er a knife ?
How shall he marry without e'er a wife ?

Supper now is ended, 'Mother, here's your knife:
Whilst I've got you, mother, I'll never want a wife;
Whilst I've bread and butter, and you love a song,
I will sing from lunch to tea-in fact, the whole day long.'



The Aquarium.

JANET and Marion bought an aquarium,
Full of tadpoles, and weeds, and small fishes;
But Grimalkin one day came out angling that way-
Smashed the globe, and brought grief to both misses,






( 22


For every II.

F OR ev'ry ill beneath the sun
There is some remedy, or none:
If there be one, then strive to find it;
If there be none, then never mind it.

The ill I mourn's a scolding wife,
The cure I've sought for half my life,
And while sfe breathes I shall not find it:
Talk of her tongue! I'm forced, to mind it.



Liffle Tom Tucker.

LITTLE Tom Tucker sings for his supper-
What does he long for, white bread and butter ?
How shall he cut it without e'er a knife ?
How shall he marry without e'er a wife ?

Supper now is ended, 'Mother, here's your knife:
Whilst I've got you, mother, I'll never want a wife;
Whilst I've bread and butter, and you love a song,
I will sing from lunch to tea-in fact, the whole day long.'



The Aquarium.

JANET and Marion bought an aquarium,
Full of tadpoles, and weeds, and small fishes;
But Grimalkin one day came out angling that way-
Smashed the globe, and brought grief to both misses,






( 23 )


Wishes.
IF wishes were horses, then beggars might ride;
If women were angels, I'd make one my bride;
But as some are quite t'other, 'tis hard to decide:
Oh, the woe with a vixen to be ever tied!


Three Little Kittens.


T HREE little kittens had washed their mittens,
And hung them up to dry,
When a dog, just for fun, stole every one,
And made all the pussy-cats cry.
As the three little kittens had lost their mittens,
Their mother, she gave them cuffs
On the side of each head-till away they all fled,
And rolled over like so many muffs.






( 23 )


Wishes.
IF wishes were horses, then beggars might ride;
If women were angels, I'd make one my bride;
But as some are quite t'other, 'tis hard to decide:
Oh, the woe with a vixen to be ever tied!


Three Little Kittens.


T HREE little kittens had washed their mittens,
And hung them up to dry,
When a dog, just for fun, stole every one,
And made all the pussy-cats cry.
As the three little kittens had lost their mittens,
Their mother, she gave them cuffs
On the side of each head-till away they all fled,
And rolled over like so many muffs.






( 24 )


The Three Bears.

F AIR little Silverlocks, beautiful child,
Abounding in spirits and p'raps rather wild,
Of her home she's the sunshine, the joy, and the life,
To the honest young farmer and his honoured wife.
Far away through the fields she delighted to ride-
Yea, mile after mile-no one else by her side.
Then away in the forest she'd ramble, in quest
Of a handful of nuts or a chaffinch's nest.
One day she rose early, the woods to explore,
And ventured still further than ever-before,
When she came to a castle of mud, sticks, and stones:
'Oh, I wonder,' thought she, 'who this funny place owns ?
It appears a new place, but is almost a ruin;
Oh, I see there's a name-he is called Mr. Bruin.
I will tap at the door, and may p'raps peep inside;
I can ask for some water, my real thoughts to hide.'
She knocked, and she knocked, and she pulled at the bell,
But as nobody came she the latch raised as well,
And walked into a parlour, where she found three chairs,
And a painting in oil of three comical bears.
The first chair was wood, and the next chair was leather;
But the third, made of cane, pleased her most altogether:
So she plumped herself down, but arose with a shout,
For her sudden descent had the bottom knocked out.
Then her eyes met the picture, and didn't they stare,
The large, and the little, and middling bear!
Then she strayed to the kitchen, and found, steaming hot,
Some savoury porridge just turned from the pot;
Which pleased her so much by its delicious smell,
That it soon was applied to her palate as well.
But of all the three basonsful, one, like a cup,
Was the coolest, and thus she soon gobbled it up.






( 25 )


In this room, too, a picture she found, I declare,
Of a large, and a little, and middling bear.
Then she ran up the stairs, as there's no one about
(The family must for the day have gone out),
When she came to a room with three beds in a row:
'Ah, the smallest is softest and snuggest, I know !
And as I am tired now, and hot, I just choose
To rest a few moments and have a sweet snooze.
Oh, how funny they've got, too, a picture up there,
Of a large, and a small, and a middling bear.'
In a very few minutes she fell fast asleep.
Had she been but awake it had made her heart leap
To hear the gate open, for who should be there
But a large, and a small, and a middling bear !
'There has some one been here !' cried a voice loud and gruff.
'There has some one been here!' said his wife, 'sure enough.'
'And they've left the door open, I really declare!'
Said their daughter, the youngest and littlest bear.
'Oh, I hope, if they're robbers, that they've taken nought,
But are still in the house, and may thus soon be caught.'
' Let us go to the parlour, and see if they're there.'
They enter, and Bruin walks up to his chair:
'There has some one been here, and has stood on my seat!'
'There has some one been here, too, with sad muddy feet!'
Dame Bruin exclaimed. 'If I knew who they were,
They should rue it for wiping their feet on my chair.'
Then Miss Bruin, in tears, cried, 'Oh, dear I've just found
That they've broken my new chair right down to the ground !'
'Let us look to our porridge-it now must be cool;'
And the dame leads the way. 'Who has knocked down the stool ?
Who has been at my bason ?' the old father cried.
'And has cleaned out my porridge ?' his daughter replied.
Then they went to the bed-room, to change their attire:-
'There has some one been here, too, and stirred up the fire!'






( 26


'There has some one been here, too, and turned down my quilt!'
'There has some one been here, for the water is spilt !'
'There has some one been here!' cried a voice sharp and shrill;
'There has some one been here, and is lying here still !'
Then Silverlocks, waking, encountered the stare
Of the large, and the little, and middling bear.
But she feigned fast asleep, just to have a short think,
For she felt of a mess she was close to the brink,


And considered how she from their presence might steal,
Ere her host and her hostess should have their next meal.
Now she knows very well she has no business there,
Yet would teach them the maxim of bear and forbear.
'Here she is, sure enough!' said large, middling, and small;
'And we'll have her for supper!' they cried, one and all.
'Now we'll go,' said the dame, 'just to make up the fire;
And, my dear, you must watch till your aid we require.
But as soon she will waken, I have little doubt,







( 27


I will lock you both in, so that she can't get out.'
Their footsteps descend, but they scarcely had gone
Ere Silverlocks rouses, and feigns a good yawn;
Then looks at Miss Bruin, and says, 'Oh, my dear,
What a beautiful mansion you've got, love, up here !'
Then Miss Bruin approached, just to give her a hug,
But Silverlocks' shoulders arose with a shrug :
'Oh, do not come near me I'm thinner than weasels,
And you would be certain to sicken with measles.
Oh, save your dear parents and drive me away;
I shall never be happy, I'm sure, from this day,
For I often have heard all our folks at home talk
Of the danger of eating off measly pork.
And should any ill from my visit betide,
I should never forgive myself-not till I died;
And should you now eat me, I plainly can see,
In the state I am in, I must sure disagree.'
'And have you got measles?' the little bear said;
'And you have been lying so long in my bed !
Oh, how shall I 'scape it? Oh, what shall I do ?
And my parents, alas! they may perhaps catch it too!'
Then Silverlocks sprang with a bound from the bed,
The coverlet tore into many a shred,
Made a rope from the window, and swiftly down slid,
And scampered for home like a one-year-old kid.




The Weakly Chicken.

H USH-A-BYE, chicky, the worst out of ten,
Thy daddy's a bantam, thy ma's a black hen;
Your brothers are crowing, and think they can sing;
Your aunt lays an egg for our baked rice-pudding.





( 28


Dame Wiggins of Lee.
DAME WIGGINS of Lee was a worthy old soul,
As e'er threaded a needle or washed in a bowl;
Who held mice and rats in such antipathy,
That seven fine cats kept Dame Wiggins of Lee,






( 29 )


Now, alas! the Dame died, and I've heard folks relate
How her friends were dispersed, and each met a sad fate:
But if cats won't, alas to their morals attend,
Of course we expect they will meet some bad end.

The first, turning poacher, was caught in a trap,
By one of the keepers, who gave her a rap;
Then hung her aloft, as a warning to be
To all other game-stirs who came nigh that tree.

The next went to sea- there's a wreck and no meat,
So poor pussy was cooked, and declared quite a treat.
The third it was killed for the sake of its skin,
To cover the muffs the girls put their hands in.

The fourth led a sad and a dissolute life,
And at length was destroyed for ill-treating his wife.
Whilst the fifth o'er the tiles went to take a short cut,
And slid down from a roof and was drowned in a butt.

The next in a street-fight was killed by a dog ;
He had supped with a friend, and had drunk too much grog.
The last, growing feeble (the Chronicler says),
Was knocked down by a horse and run o'er by the chaise.

So this was the end of the seven fine cats
Dame Wiggins had kept to preserve her from rats.
Oh! how happy they lived with the Dame down at Lee,
And how sad that each death was a cat-as-trophy!






( 30 )


Little Jack Homer.

LITTLE Jack Horner sat in a corner,
Eating a Christmas pie,
He put in his thumb, and pulled out a plum,
And said, 'What a good boy am I!'
Little Jack Horner crept out of his corner,
As soon as he'd finished the pie;
But his mother she spied him and gave him a hiding-
The reason young folks must guess why.



Man and Wife.

T HERE was a little man, and he had a little wife,
And she was both the pleasure and the worry of his life;
For she had a little temper, which she very often lost,
Which the poor unlucky fellow found as often to his cost.

--*%*--


Hark hark !

H ARK hark the dogs do bark,
The beggars they tramp the
town;
So to-night let them loose to protect
K m the hen-roost,
Or to-morrow our dame will frown!






( 30 )


Little Jack Homer.

LITTLE Jack Horner sat in a corner,
Eating a Christmas pie,
He put in his thumb, and pulled out a plum,
And said, 'What a good boy am I!'
Little Jack Horner crept out of his corner,
As soon as he'd finished the pie;
But his mother she spied him and gave him a hiding-
The reason young folks must guess why.



Man and Wife.

T HERE was a little man, and he had a little wife,
And she was both the pleasure and the worry of his life;
For she had a little temper, which she very often lost,
Which the poor unlucky fellow found as often to his cost.

--*%*--


Hark hark !

H ARK hark the dogs do bark,
The beggars they tramp the
town;
So to-night let them loose to protect
K m the hen-roost,
Or to-morrow our dame will frown!






( 30 )


Little Jack Homer.

LITTLE Jack Horner sat in a corner,
Eating a Christmas pie,
He put in his thumb, and pulled out a plum,
And said, 'What a good boy am I!'
Little Jack Horner crept out of his corner,
As soon as he'd finished the pie;
But his mother she spied him and gave him a hiding-
The reason young folks must guess why.



Man and Wife.

T HERE was a little man, and he had a little wife,
And she was both the pleasure and the worry of his life;
For she had a little temper, which she very often lost,
Which the poor unlucky fellow found as often to his cost.

--*%*--


Hark hark !

H ARK hark the dogs do bark,
The beggars they tramp the
town;
So to-night let them loose to protect
K m the hen-roost,
Or to-morrow our dame will frown!






( 31 )


The Snail.
LAZY old snail, come out of your shell;
To slumber at night is all very well:
But now the sun shines, and your face I would see,-
Come, your shutters unclose, or a slug-gard you'll be !


Ilf!j


Ice-sick-all.
T HREE children sliding on the ice,
S Upon a summer's day,
As it fell out they all fell in-
The rest they ran away.
Now, had these children been at home,
Or sliding on dry ground,
Ten thousand pounds to one penny
They had not all been drowned !
These three little children, as since I've been told,
From their duck in the river all caught a sad cold ;
But their toes in hot water, and gruel at night,
And a nice little whipping, soon cured them outright!






( 31 )


The Snail.
LAZY old snail, come out of your shell;
To slumber at night is all very well:
But now the sun shines, and your face I would see,-
Come, your shutters unclose, or a slug-gard you'll be !


Ilf!j


Ice-sick-all.
T HREE children sliding on the ice,
S Upon a summer's day,
As it fell out they all fell in-
The rest they ran away.
Now, had these children been at home,
Or sliding on dry ground,
Ten thousand pounds to one penny
They had not all been drowned !
These three little children, as since I've been told,
From their duck in the river all caught a sad cold ;
But their toes in hot water, and gruel at night,
And a nice little whipping, soon cured them outright!







( 32


Peter Pijer.

P ETER PIPER picked a penn'orth of pepper out of a pauper's pocket.
If Peter Piper picked a penn'orth of pepper out of a pauper's pocket,
Where's the produce of the pauper's pocket Peter Piper picked ?
And where's the Police ?


Mary Contrary.

S H, Mary, Mary, sweet little fairy,
How gaily your garden grows !
With its bright blue-bells, and its border of shells,
And the columbines planted in rows.
Oh, Mary, Mary,*why so contrary ?
Oh, wherefore say 'No, no, no !'
When I'd make you my wife, and as happy for life
As a child at the Lord Mayor's show?


--Y
^o \ ^ \
s -s *







( 32


Peter Pijer.

P ETER PIPER picked a penn'orth of pepper out of a pauper's pocket.
If Peter Piper picked a penn'orth of pepper out of a pauper's pocket,
Where's the produce of the pauper's pocket Peter Piper picked ?
And where's the Police ?


Mary Contrary.

S H, Mary, Mary, sweet little fairy,
How gaily your garden grows !
With its bright blue-bells, and its border of shells,
And the columbines planted in rows.
Oh, Mary, Mary,*why so contrary ?
Oh, wherefore say 'No, no, no !'
When I'd make you my wife, and as happy for life
As a child at the Lord Mayor's show?


--Y
^o \ ^ \
s -s *







(33 )


The Little Cock-Sparrow.

A LITTLE Cock-sparrow sat top of a tree,
And he whistled so merry, so happy was he;
Till a little boy came with his bow and his arrow,
And threatened to shoot at this little Cock-sparrow.
'Oh! your body will make me a nice little stew,
And your giblets will make me a little pie, too.'
Says the little Cock-sparrow, I'll be shot if I stay,
So I'm off, little sportsman, and wish you good day.'
MORAL.
Don't count up your chickens before they are hatched,
Or count on a dinner before it is catched.



The Carrion Crow.

T HERE was an old crow once sat upon an oak,
Watching a fat tailor cutting out a cloak:
'Heigho !' says the Carrion Crow,
'You of your trade, sir, very little know!'
'Wife!' cried the tailor, 'bring arrows and a bow,
And I'll harrow up the feelings of this wretched Carrion Crow!'
'Heigho!' said the Carrion Crow,
'Now mind you do not aim too high, and mind don't shoot too low.'
The tailor shot, but the cruel, treach'rous dart,
Flew far wide of the enemy, and pierced the old sow's heart.
'Heigho !' says the Carrion Crow,
'Passionate old tailor, I guessed it would be so !'
'Wife! run and fetch me some treacle in a spoon,
That I may try and put an end to our sow's swoon.'
' 'Tis useless!' cried his better-half, now weeping o'er the slain,
'She must be cured as bacon now-she'll never grunt again.'







(33 )


The Little Cock-Sparrow.

A LITTLE Cock-sparrow sat top of a tree,
And he whistled so merry, so happy was he;
Till a little boy came with his bow and his arrow,
And threatened to shoot at this little Cock-sparrow.
'Oh! your body will make me a nice little stew,
And your giblets will make me a little pie, too.'
Says the little Cock-sparrow, I'll be shot if I stay,
So I'm off, little sportsman, and wish you good day.'
MORAL.
Don't count up your chickens before they are hatched,
Or count on a dinner before it is catched.



The Carrion Crow.

T HERE was an old crow once sat upon an oak,
Watching a fat tailor cutting out a cloak:
'Heigho !' says the Carrion Crow,
'You of your trade, sir, very little know!'
'Wife!' cried the tailor, 'bring arrows and a bow,
And I'll harrow up the feelings of this wretched Carrion Crow!'
'Heigho!' said the Carrion Crow,
'Now mind you do not aim too high, and mind don't shoot too low.'
The tailor shot, but the cruel, treach'rous dart,
Flew far wide of the enemy, and pierced the old sow's heart.
'Heigho !' says the Carrion Crow,
'Passionate old tailor, I guessed it would be so !'
'Wife! run and fetch me some treacle in a spoon,
That I may try and put an end to our sow's swoon.'
' 'Tis useless!' cried his better-half, now weeping o'er the slain,
'She must be cured as bacon now-she'll never grunt again.'







( 34 )


The tailor then cast up a stone to strike the foeman dead;
But midway, lo to earth it fell, and cracked his old wife's head.
'Heigho!' cries the Carrion Crow,
'If I must speak, your aims are weak; pray who has felt that blow?'
The tailor now beside himself, his anger mounting higher,
Has brought some straw, some sticks, a torch, to set the tree on fire.


Heigho !' said the Carrion Crow,
'As now you're getting personal, I. deem it time to go.
The tree was dry, the wind was high, the flames with great despatch
Climb up the oak midst clouds of smoke, and reach the cottage thatch.
Heigho cries the Carrion Crow,
'Excuse me, Mr. Tailor, if over you I crow !'







( 35 )


That night there was a party, the poor old sow was there,
And five-and-twenty blackbirds-so I've heard folks declare.
Heigho !' sings the Carrion Crow,
Let's drink the funny tailor's health, my friends, before we go.'
MORAL.
Don't give way to temper, though 'tis much the fashion,
And if crows crow over you, don't get in a passion;
Never go out shooting, if only with a bow,
SWithout a glance on every side-above, behind, below.




Bad Companions.

SOME little mice sat in a hole to spin,
Puss came by and puss peeped in-
'May I come and help you to wind up your threads ?'
Oh, no, Mistress Pussy, you'd bite off our heads !'

'Now, surely, you're joking !' the Cat replied,
'On my word and my honour you may confide;
I never touch nothing but bread soaked in milk :
Oh, let me then come in to wind up your silk.'

Oh, no, thank you, Miss Puss, we've heard mother relate
How that she, through your aid, nearly met a sad fate;
And besides, from the books we have read for advice,
We have learnt there are cats who can feed upon mice '
MORAL.
Then all you young people from this beware,
Against all bad companions the door shut with care;
For had these mice trifled with what mother said,
They had all in a moment been dead-quite dead !






( 36


okhn Cook.
OHN COOK he had a little grey mare,
He, he, he, and haw, haw, haw;
Its body was thin and its back it was bare,
For he fed it on nothing but straw.
John Cook he went riding up Down-come-hill,
He, he, he, and haw, haw, haw;
When the mare she laid down, and she made her will,
And resolved not to work any more.
Now what were her legacies? what was her wealth?
He, he, he, and haw, haw, haw;
There's a rotten old bridle a-top of the shelf,
And a half truss of musty old straw.



Molly.

MOLLY my wife and I fell out,
And what do you think it was about ?
She had money and I had none,
This was how the row begun.

Molly my wife, when she goes out,
Spends twice as much as she ought, no doubt;
But declares 'tis her money has been expended,
So I hold my tongue, and the row is ended.


Idle Jenny.
ENNY, indeed, is come out to weed,
But is idle and don't please her master;
So to her he will pay but a penny a-day,
Because she don't work any faster.






( 36


okhn Cook.
OHN COOK he had a little grey mare,
He, he, he, and haw, haw, haw;
Its body was thin and its back it was bare,
For he fed it on nothing but straw.
John Cook he went riding up Down-come-hill,
He, he, he, and haw, haw, haw;
When the mare she laid down, and she made her will,
And resolved not to work any more.
Now what were her legacies? what was her wealth?
He, he, he, and haw, haw, haw;
There's a rotten old bridle a-top of the shelf,
And a half truss of musty old straw.



Molly.

MOLLY my wife and I fell out,
And what do you think it was about ?
She had money and I had none,
This was how the row begun.

Molly my wife, when she goes out,
Spends twice as much as she ought, no doubt;
But declares 'tis her money has been expended,
So I hold my tongue, and the row is ended.


Idle Jenny.
ENNY, indeed, is come out to weed,
But is idle and don't please her master;
So to her he will pay but a penny a-day,
Because she don't work any faster.






( 36


okhn Cook.
OHN COOK he had a little grey mare,
He, he, he, and haw, haw, haw;
Its body was thin and its back it was bare,
For he fed it on nothing but straw.
John Cook he went riding up Down-come-hill,
He, he, he, and haw, haw, haw;
When the mare she laid down, and she made her will,
And resolved not to work any more.
Now what were her legacies? what was her wealth?
He, he, he, and haw, haw, haw;
There's a rotten old bridle a-top of the shelf,
And a half truss of musty old straw.



Molly.

MOLLY my wife and I fell out,
And what do you think it was about ?
She had money and I had none,
This was how the row begun.

Molly my wife, when she goes out,
Spends twice as much as she ought, no doubt;
But declares 'tis her money has been expended,
So I hold my tongue, and the row is ended.


Idle Jenny.
ENNY, indeed, is come out to weed,
But is idle and don't please her master;
So to her he will pay but a penny a-day,
Because she don't work any faster.







( 37 )


This Pig and I/at Pig.
T HIS little pig went to market,
T. (And got sold.)
This little pig stayed at home,
(Got a cold.)
This little pig had roast beef,
(Was a thief.)
This little pig had none,
(Where's the fun ?)
And this t'other little pig went 'Weak weak weak !'
(For about a fortnight).


Toddlekins.


PRETTY little Toddlekins, stumbling about;
Funny little Toddlekins, turn your toes more out;
Pretty little Toddlekins, lay hold of the chair;
Funny little Toddlekins has tumbled, I declare.







( 37 )


This Pig and I/at Pig.
T HIS little pig went to market,
T. (And got sold.)
This little pig stayed at home,
(Got a cold.)
This little pig had roast beef,
(Was a thief.)
This little pig had none,
(Where's the fun ?)
And this t'other little pig went 'Weak weak weak !'
(For about a fortnight).


Toddlekins.


PRETTY little Toddlekins, stumbling about;
Funny little Toddlekins, turn your toes more out;
Pretty little Toddlekins, lay hold of the chair;
Funny little Toddlekins has tumbled, I declare.







( 38


Tommy Torment.

N AUGHTY Tommy Torment did very wicked things-
He used to catch blue-bottle flies and pull off legs and wings.
His mother, she grew angry, and sold him to a sweep,
So up the sooty chimneys with broom he had to creep:
But when he felt right sorry she bought him back again,
And never more, may you be sure, will he give insects pain.
He studies now their instincts, and finds to his surprise,
How clever are their habits-how cunning, and how wise.



Robin and Rickard.

ROBIN and Richard were two pretty men,
They laid in bed till the clock struck ten;
Then up starts Robin and looks at the sky-
'Oh, brother Richard, the sun's very high!
You run for water, and I for brush-bag,
For to be in time now we must race like a nag.'
They dressed and came downstairs, but found breakfast done,
And all cleared away-so of course they got none,
But starved all the morn, getting thinner and thinner,
Till, hungry as hunters, they're both in time for dinner.



Rolly-Polly, Gammon and Spinach.
T OLLY-polly jam-pudding I think very nice.
SHeigho for rolly !
Of gammon of bacon I'll just take a slice,
With a good help of spinach, a little boiled rice.
Are you certain there ain't any rolly ?







( 38


Tommy Torment.

N AUGHTY Tommy Torment did very wicked things-
He used to catch blue-bottle flies and pull off legs and wings.
His mother, she grew angry, and sold him to a sweep,
So up the sooty chimneys with broom he had to creep:
But when he felt right sorry she bought him back again,
And never more, may you be sure, will he give insects pain.
He studies now their instincts, and finds to his surprise,
How clever are their habits-how cunning, and how wise.



Robin and Rickard.

ROBIN and Richard were two pretty men,
They laid in bed till the clock struck ten;
Then up starts Robin and looks at the sky-
'Oh, brother Richard, the sun's very high!
You run for water, and I for brush-bag,
For to be in time now we must race like a nag.'
They dressed and came downstairs, but found breakfast done,
And all cleared away-so of course they got none,
But starved all the morn, getting thinner and thinner,
Till, hungry as hunters, they're both in time for dinner.



Rolly-Polly, Gammon and Spinach.
T OLLY-polly jam-pudding I think very nice.
SHeigho for rolly !
Of gammon of bacon I'll just take a slice,
With a good help of spinach, a little boiled rice.
Are you certain there ain't any rolly ?







( 38


Tommy Torment.

N AUGHTY Tommy Torment did very wicked things-
He used to catch blue-bottle flies and pull off legs and wings.
His mother, she grew angry, and sold him to a sweep,
So up the sooty chimneys with broom he had to creep:
But when he felt right sorry she bought him back again,
And never more, may you be sure, will he give insects pain.
He studies now their instincts, and finds to his surprise,
How clever are their habits-how cunning, and how wise.



Robin and Rickard.

ROBIN and Richard were two pretty men,
They laid in bed till the clock struck ten;
Then up starts Robin and looks at the sky-
'Oh, brother Richard, the sun's very high!
You run for water, and I for brush-bag,
For to be in time now we must race like a nag.'
They dressed and came downstairs, but found breakfast done,
And all cleared away-so of course they got none,
But starved all the morn, getting thinner and thinner,
Till, hungry as hunters, they're both in time for dinner.



Rolly-Polly, Gammon and Spinach.
T OLLY-polly jam-pudding I think very nice.
SHeigho for rolly !
Of gammon of bacon I'll just take a slice,
With a good help of spinach, a little boiled rice.
Are you certain there ain't any rolly ?






39 )


The Beggars.

H ERE comes a poor woman from Baby-land,
With three poor children in her hand;
They all can beg, and all can steal :
Had I but my wish, they a rod should feel!


V




j.7


Little Goody Twoshoes.

L ITTLE Goody Twoshoes went into the fair,
Little Goody Twoshoes went into a show,
Little Goody Twoshoes saw a dancing bear,
Little Goody Twoshoes she was frightened so;
Naughty Goody Twoshoes had no business there,
Mother she had told her not to go near the fair.






39 )


The Beggars.

H ERE comes a poor woman from Baby-land,
With three poor children in her hand;
They all can beg, and all can steal :
Had I but my wish, they a rod should feel!


V




j.7


Little Goody Twoshoes.

L ITTLE Goody Twoshoes went into the fair,
Little Goody Twoshoes went into a show,
Little Goody Twoshoes saw a dancing bear,
Little Goody Twoshoes she was frightened so;
Naughty Goody Twoshoes had no business there,
Mother she had told her not to go near the fair.






( 40

Unlicensed Victualler.

T HERE was an old woman, and what do you think ?
She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink;
But though victuals and drink were the chief of her diet,
This funny old lady would never be quiet.

At the reason I think we may give a shrewd guess,
For she ever was eating some horrible mess,-
Munching apples and nuts, and things out of the question,
For folks without teeth and an impaired digestion.

As to drink, though her liquors were quite the right sort,_
She for ever was taking far more than she ought;
So that now from her feelings, from drink and from diet,
The wonder had been if she could have kept quiet.



Little Boy Blue.

L ITTLE Boy Blue, come blow up your horn,
The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn.
Where's the little boy that looks after the sheep ?
He's under the haycock fast asleep.
The little boy blew till he bursted his horn,
But no sheep nor cow cared, for they're all in the corn.



Baby Bunting.
BABY Baby Bunting, father's gone a-hunting,
To catch a little rabbit-skin to put the baby bunting in.
When the rabbit-skin circled the sweet baby fair,
'Sure,' the father exclaimed, 'it is my son and heir !'






( 40

Unlicensed Victualler.

T HERE was an old woman, and what do you think ?
She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink;
But though victuals and drink were the chief of her diet,
This funny old lady would never be quiet.

At the reason I think we may give a shrewd guess,
For she ever was eating some horrible mess,-
Munching apples and nuts, and things out of the question,
For folks without teeth and an impaired digestion.

As to drink, though her liquors were quite the right sort,_
She for ever was taking far more than she ought;
So that now from her feelings, from drink and from diet,
The wonder had been if she could have kept quiet.



Little Boy Blue.

L ITTLE Boy Blue, come blow up your horn,
The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn.
Where's the little boy that looks after the sheep ?
He's under the haycock fast asleep.
The little boy blew till he bursted his horn,
But no sheep nor cow cared, for they're all in the corn.



Baby Bunting.
BABY Baby Bunting, father's gone a-hunting,
To catch a little rabbit-skin to put the baby bunting in.
When the rabbit-skin circled the sweet baby fair,
'Sure,' the father exclaimed, 'it is my son and heir !'






( 40

Unlicensed Victualler.

T HERE was an old woman, and what do you think ?
She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink;
But though victuals and drink were the chief of her diet,
This funny old lady would never be quiet.

At the reason I think we may give a shrewd guess,
For she ever was eating some horrible mess,-
Munching apples and nuts, and things out of the question,
For folks without teeth and an impaired digestion.

As to drink, though her liquors were quite the right sort,_
She for ever was taking far more than she ought;
So that now from her feelings, from drink and from diet,
The wonder had been if she could have kept quiet.



Little Boy Blue.

L ITTLE Boy Blue, come blow up your horn,
The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn.
Where's the little boy that looks after the sheep ?
He's under the haycock fast asleep.
The little boy blew till he bursted his horn,
But no sheep nor cow cared, for they're all in the corn.



Baby Bunting.
BABY Baby Bunting, father's gone a-hunting,
To catch a little rabbit-skin to put the baby bunting in.
When the rabbit-skin circled the sweet baby fair,
'Sure,' the father exclaimed, 'it is my son and heir !'






( 41 )


The Yankee Doodles.

THE Yankee Doodles came to town,
The public to befoodle;
Their proper name's Alonzo Brown,
There's none of them a noodle :
For he's a do and she's a do, and so is little Doodle-
He does his pa and does his ma, and also does the poodle.


. -II. -


Eccentric.

A FUNNY old lady, whose eggs didn't sell,
Returning from market (as I've heard tell),
Fell fast asleep on the road. No doubt
The weather was to blame, and that glass of stout.
Now, being one beside herself, how could she feel surprise ?
A short-coated old woman, what dog could recognize ?
(The Pedler had curtailed her crinoline.)


-^>>-< ^ __ II-






( 41 )


The Yankee Doodles.

THE Yankee Doodles came to town,
The public to befoodle;
Their proper name's Alonzo Brown,
There's none of them a noodle :
For he's a do and she's a do, and so is little Doodle-
He does his pa and does his ma, and also does the poodle.


. -II. -


Eccentric.

A FUNNY old lady, whose eggs didn't sell,
Returning from market (as I've heard tell),
Fell fast asleep on the road. No doubt
The weather was to blame, and that glass of stout.
Now, being one beside herself, how could she feel surprise ?
A short-coated old woman, what dog could recognize ?
(The Pedler had curtailed her crinoline.)


-^>>-< ^ __ II-







( 42 )


Beauty and the Beast.

O H wasn't she a beauty a little charming beauty !
And wasn't he an ugly, a large atrocious beast ?
How could she ever fancy (but women take such fancies);
For he was most forbidding, just to say the very least ?


She met him out a-walking,
And somehow they got talking,
I cannot tell you where.
At first she quite forsook him,
For she by chance mistook him,
For some stray dancing bear.
She found him gay and sprightly,
And with him tripped on lightly-
This was enough for one day.
But he followed to her cottage,
And they lunched off treacle-pottage,
And appointments made for
Sunday.
This day they crossed the bean-fieldl
To go to Doctor Greenfield,
And made love all the way.
She found him most engaging,
His fervour there's no caging:
Says he, 'Let's name the day,
For earnest is my passion,
Love at first sight's my fashion.
Be mine, you little duck !
For if you me deride, miss,
I'll fly to suicide, miss.
Oh, say that I'm in luck !'
Then drooping dropped her eyelids,
Those soft yet dark-fringed shy lids:
'I think I'll ask mamma.


But you'll promise not to beat me,
And never never eat me,
If I persuade papa ?'
'No, dear, I'll never tease thee,
If you will strive to please me,
And won't say "Nasty beast!"'
'Then I your lot will share, dear;
Will bear, yes and forbear, dear;
Nor doubt you in the least.'
'Now, darling, I am happy!'
Cried Bruin, and a tap he
Made on his bounding heart.
'One hug in my embrace, love,
A warm and snuggish place, love,
From which you ne'er shall part.'
A grand salute he gave her;
She wished he'd been a shaver,
His bristles tickled so.
But the Fates are not propitious,
And Dame Fortune seems grown
vicious-
Her parents bid them part.
But how can site endure it ?
Her anguish, what can cure it?
The bear will keep her heart.
Then expired her last fond hope,
When she's tempted to elope
In most unpropitious weather.







( 43 )


For they scarcely left the door
Ere the clouds a deluge pour,
And they are drenched together.
Special license soon for life
Has declared them bear and wife,
But where can be his house?
Now through the backwoods dreary
He drags his dripping deary,
His poor diluted spouse.
Her ardour now has cooled,
She feels like one befooled,
As they traverse through the mire,
Till they reached a lowly shed.
'Here, love, is our home,' he said.
Then her cheeks turned red as fire.
The walls are dark and bare,
No furniture is there-
It looks a beastly place.
There's but straw for a seat,
The coarsest food to eat-
No comforts can she trace.
I here would make a pause;
I'll tell you why-because
I fain would point a moral.
A disappointed bride
In this place might have cried,
And p'raps have picked a quarrel,
Though all the fault's her own,
Herself to blame alone,
For having made the stroke;
For if you close your eye
When you your cattle buy,
You'll buy pigs in a poke.


The bridegroom tries to cheer:
' You're welcome, darling, here,
And all you see is mine.
I'll make you happy yet;
I'm sorry you got wet,
But soon the sun will shine.
I know you comforts leave,
Yet feel you will not grieve,
As they are trifles merely.'
Then anger rose, and pride,
But Love bade all subside,
For she had loved him dearly.
'Oh, Bruin for your sake
A sacrifice I'd make
Of all earth's fleeting treasure;
Now you are really mine,
Don't think I shall repine,
Your smile's my choicest pleasure.'
And wasn't she bewitching,
As she said, 'Love,where's the kitchen ?
Come, show me o'er our dwelling.
I've learnt a little cooking
Since we took Beeton's book in,
And pastry I'm up well in.'
'I will,' the bear said, rising;
And now a sight surprising-
He stripped him of his bear-skin
(That overcoat so shaggy),
And cried, 'My dearest Maggy !
Like you I have a fair skin.
One kiss, my little ducky!
Now I'm supremely lucky
(My beard no more will tickle).







( 44 )


Oh, joyful, happy day!
Now I will show the way
How I got in this pickle.
I was not born dark and hairy,
But got done brown by a fairy-
A little jealous creature,
Who wanted me to marry,
But I her charms did parry;
Revenge was her strong feature.
I'd seen you, Maggy darling,
And, spite of all her snarling,
I felt resolved to win you.
She turned me to a bear, dear;
I sought you everywhere, dear,
And strained each nerve and sinew,
For tauntingly she said,
"When you that maiden wed,
Then you may drop your bear-skin.
But you must win her truly,
And use no force unduly,
Or for life you'lldon that rare skin."'
His words were sweet as honey;
His form was young and bonny;
The young wife smiled and wept.
'Now I will show the kitchen'
(For this he'd long been itching);
'I've had it nicely swept.'
He pushed a rugged door,
And what a sight she saw !
A long and lofty greenhouse,
With bright flowers overhead,
Which round sweet fragrance shed.
No more is she a mean spouse.


A genial warmth arose,
Which soon dried all her clothes;
He culled a tempting posy.
'My kitchen, love, is near,
But first I dropped in here
To make your cheeks more rosy.'
They gently strayed along,
And music soft and song
Salute her raptured ear.
Now falls like rain sweet flowers,
As from enchanted bowers :
They're watered with a tear.
Now golden fountains play,
Diffusing perfumed spray;
And birds of plumage rare
Descend on flower and tree,
And, with soft notes of glee,
Their music fills the air.
'And are these all our own ?
These flowers, so richly grown ?
This sweet, enchanting place ?'
Her eye with rapture glows,
Her cheek outvies the rose;
She clings to his embrace.
'Ah 'tis your love alone
Restores me all my own :
The fairy so decreed.
Had you but cherished ire,
I still in brute attire
That shed for home would need.
Two years I've been all shaggy;
But you, my dearest Maggy,
Have broken down the spell.






( 45 )


My foe can no more tease us-
Has promised e'en to please us;
So now all will be well.'
A spring, touched on the floor,
Opens a hidden door.
They enter now the dwelling-
A small, yet gorgeous room,
Illumined from the dome
By light subdued, yet telling.
All round are deep recesses,
Filled with the richest dresses
Her fancy could conceive.
'Go, love, behind a curtain :
They're yours, I feel quite certain,
And fit well, I believe.'
In all, a dozen niches,
Containing wondrous riches,
Attract her dazzled gaze.
Here silk and golden tissue
From a recess out issue,
A princess might amaze.
Here silvered velvet dresses,
Which called forth many guesses
When such things could be worn.
Here lace-embroidered satin,
Edged with a wondrous tatting
A zephyr might adorn.
' Look! here are furs, I do declare,
Would make me like a lovely bear !'
Her hands clapped like a child.
'Oh, they will be my favoured dress!
Though now, alas I must confess,
The weather is too mild.'


''Tis hard, 'tis hard to choose, dear,-
All seem too grand to use, dear.
Which one do you prefer?'
'What think you of this shot-silk, love,
Like feathers of a cooing dove ?'
'With that I should not err.'
Behind the curtain in a trice
She glides, and soon returns so nice,
And not at all too smart.
Her bosom heaves; too full for words,
She flutters like descending birds,
And flies into his heart.
'It fits me to a T,' she saith,
As soon as she recovered breath.
How did you get the measure ?'
'By twining oft my arm around
Your waist, my love, the size I found
Of you, my dearest treasure !
But let us onward further go ;
There's much to you I want to show.'
A hidden door receding,
Reveals a scene of dazzling light:
The sun starts back from lustre bright,
Of radiance exceeding.
They enter now a jewelled bower:
A precious stone is every flower,
Set in the purest gold.
Festoons of chains reclining there,
Necklets and gems to grace her hair,
Her ravished eyes behold.
A chain he clasps around her neck,
Bracelets of pearls her arms bedeck :
Her eyes like diamonds shine.






( 46 )


A diadem he raises now,
And lowers on her burning brow.
'These stones came from my mine.
Now longer here we must not stay;
We'll wander back some other day,
And linger then an hour or two.
I then will show you gems as rare
As queens or princes ever wear.
I've sought them as a dower for you.
I thought their varied hues might
please,
And gathered them, by slow degrees,
In many a foreign city.
But you, my love, must fainting be:
The time flies fast when near to thee.
To starve you were a pity.'
They enter now a niche in,
Which leads unto the kitchen,
Through buttery and dairy.
'What splendid cream and cheese !
What wondrous stores are these ?
Your treasures, how they vary!'
The larder next appears;
And, hanging tier on tiers,
Are mutton, beef, and ven'son ;
Turkeys and geese by scores,
Of game and poultry stores-
Too numerous to mention.
Some stairs, glanced down by stealth,
Reveal a mine of wealth
In a capacious cellar. /
Hogsheads of choicest wine
At intervals recline:
Their age he cannot tell her.


The kitchen now they enter;
She hesitates to venture,
For steam the vast spit rolls;
Whilst mountain-heaps of fire
The grates may well require
To roast six oxen whole.
Deep ovens at each side,
With pastry well supplied,
Enough to feed an army;
And steaming copper wells,
Emitting savory smells,
Have made the air quite balmy.
'But where are all the men, dear ?
It must take many cooks here,
So much meat to be dressed !'
'To dress themselves they've gone,
dear,
Worthy of this bless'd morn, dear.
If truth must be confessed,
Machines prevent all toiling;
They just see nothing's spoiling-
That's all they have to do.
Their billiard-room is near,
With books, and pipes, and beer;
Their number is but few.
But come, our friends, awaiting,
May think we're rather late in
This our first morning call.'
They cross the oaken floor,
Pass through a corridor,
And reach a marble hall;
A high dome sheds its light,
All coloured in its flight,
Tinting the sculpture packed round.






( 47 )


Now all is golden hue,
Now all seems rose, then blue,
'Gainst crimson-velvet background.
Now joyful sounds they hear,
Of music, soft and clear,
First low, but soon increasing-
A lively wedding march :
They pause before an arch,
To catch those notes so pleasing.
'Oh! welcome home once more,
dear;
Here friends you never saw, dear,
All long to see your face.
I've told them of your beauty ;
But all your love and duty
'Twould take a life to trace.'
The arch appears to tremble,
A painting did dissemble ;
And now it upward rises,
And to her startled gaze
Magnificence displays,
Which even her surprises.
About a thousand guests,
In richest costume dressed,
Line each side of the great hall.
A loud and hearty cheer,
And cries of 'Welcome here!'
To her repose is fatal.
She clings unto her lord-
Can utter not a word,
Until he said, 'Look here, love!
Here are some friends you know,
With them some moments go;
Your parents both are near, love.'


' And can this be our child ?'
The father cried (half wild);
'The Princess of Golconda!'
With arms flung round her neck,
Whilst tears her eyes bedeck,
What mother could be fonder ?
The hall which now they chat in
Is draped with azure satin,
And garlanded with flowers.
And, oh! it was a sight,
When neathh a dazzling light
They danced at later hours.
Once more a jocund strain,
The wedding march again,
The guests are all retreating.
Marshalled by usher's call
Into the banquet-hall,
At tables they are seating.
Bridegroom and Bride at last
The sculptured arch have passed
(With just a chosen few),
And mount a lofty daYs,
The centre of the place,
For thousand guests to view.
The tables groan with massive plate,
Footmen in scarlet liv'ry wait,
And now the feast commences.
I cannot give a bill of fare,
'Twould make a gourmand rend his
hair,
Or take away his senses :
The wine in silver fountain plays,
Iced first below; the surplus strays
Through channels to the grounds near,







( 48


Where tenants without number dine,
And stow away no end of wine,
For everything abounds here.
Their dinner has been cooked outside,
Attracting all the country wide
To view the monstrous fire.
A flock of sheep, of pigs fourscore,
Of oxen just as many more,
Their appetites require.
The usual toasts proposed and drank,
The Bridegroom rises up to thank
The guests assembled here :
Again the ancient hall resounds-
Pleasure and mirth have burst all
bounds-
Another deafening cheer!
The tenants fill their cups without,
And echo back a louder shout,

MO
Young ladies all, beware !
First, never wed a bear;
If you do, don't bear malice.


Which rends the very air !
'Thanks for this rich and sumptuous
board !
Health to our good and noble lord,
And to his lady fair!'
The banquet o'er, the ladies stray
Through orange-groves and flow'ry
To sail upon the lake; [way,
The tenants seek their rural games,
Or neathh the oak-shade with their
dames
Rest after toiling take.
At eve's the ball, where all unite;
Without vast bonfires rouse the night,
And close the happy day;
Whilst rockets from the castle height,
Like meteors, make the country light,
To guide the homeward way.

RAL.
For love can smooth the shaggy hair
Of e'en the biggest, roughest bear,
And make a shed a palace.


Tommy Tittlemouse, Esq.

LITTLE Tommy Tittlemouse
Lives in a little house,
Happy with his little spouse.
He is an angler and catches little fishes,
She is a good cook and makes them savoury dishes:
So little Tommy has granted all his wishes,






( 49 )


A4unt Bantry.

O RUN and come, Aunt Bantry !
The cat's been in the pantry,
And all our dinner's gone !
See how she's clawed it!
How she's gnawed it!
And left us but a bone !
------ I ec- I

Curly Locks.

C URLY Locks, Curly Locks, will you be mine?
You shall ne'er wash the dishes or ever feed swine;
But shall sit on silk cushions, and sew up a seam,
And shall feed upon strawberries, sugar, and cream.
Curly Locks, Curly Locks, she will be thine;
For she never washed dishes, and cannot feed swine.
She can work a silk cushion, embroider a seam;
And don't she like strawberries, sugar, and cream!
MORAL.
Beware of frail beauty and fancy-work misses;
From a wife man wants real help as well as sweet kisses.






( 49 )


A4unt Bantry.

O RUN and come, Aunt Bantry !
The cat's been in the pantry,
And all our dinner's gone !
See how she's clawed it!
How she's gnawed it!
And left us but a bone !
------ I ec- I

Curly Locks.

C URLY Locks, Curly Locks, will you be mine?
You shall ne'er wash the dishes or ever feed swine;
But shall sit on silk cushions, and sew up a seam,
And shall feed upon strawberries, sugar, and cream.
Curly Locks, Curly Locks, she will be thine;
For she never washed dishes, and cannot feed swine.
She can work a silk cushion, embroider a seam;
And don't she like strawberries, sugar, and cream!
MORAL.
Beware of frail beauty and fancy-work misses;
From a wife man wants real help as well as sweet kisses.





( 50 )



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( 51 )


Blue Beard.

NOW mind what I have told you, dear, or else you'll have to rue it;
I'm not the man to say a thing, and then to never do it.
The worst of fancies in the world is that of being curious;
I have no patience with such things, the bare thought makes me furious !
Don't wait at dinner or at tea, I shan't be home till supper ;
Now go and read some learned book-try Shakespeare's Plays, or Tupper.'
Then mighty Blue Beard mounts his steed, a charger large and handsome,
One he had taken in exchange (I think, for a king's ransom).
Away he rides, his giant size as he departs grows smaller.
'Oh, where can sister Annie be ? Here, Laura, go and call her.'
Fair Fatima had been a bride about a week, or thereabouts,
And had not seen the castle through; yea, scarcely knew her whereabouts.
She lowers down a bunch of keys-oh, dear, there are so many!-
Resolving now to see it all to its remotest cranny
(Except, of course, the room forbid, the master's lab'ratory--
His dark room with the chemicals, upon the second story).
So, though reading she delights in, her studies she defers,
Till mid-day's heat a ramble now she very much prefers;
And with her sister Annie starts on her way erratic,
Climbing the weary northern stairs to gain the top back-attic.
This reached, at length they are repaid for panting and much puffing,
By sight of dirty dismal rooms containing next to nothing.
But vast the prospect from that height, and truly worth the viewing,
Of hill and dale o'er many a mile-a country they're both new in.
They visit then the lower rooms, and these are filled with lumber,
Furniture rare but out of date, and pictures without number.
Descending then to early dine, they pass the laboratory,
A green-baize door with studded nails upon the second story.
'I wonder what can be in here ?' and Annie paused to enter,
But Fatima rushed in between with some force to prevent her.
'That room is private-Blue Beard's, dear-to go there I'm forbidden;
So early in my married life I don't mean to be chidden.'







52


Descending then they take their meal, these loving ones, together,
And chat about all kinds of things-of politics, of weather.
And now again their thoughts revert unto the room forbidden:
' I'm sure,' said Annie, 'all ain't right; there's something wrong there hidden.
If I was you I'd let him know I was not wanting spirit;
He confidence should give to gain, if he my love would merit.
A husband's duty to a wife is ever to be trusting.
No doubt the rooms are in a mess, and only want a dusting;
He means to have them set to rights before he takes you in, dear.
Suppose we tidy them ourselves, and thus his thanks may win, dear!
And should you chance to vex him thus-you, darling, with a smile
Shall pop your arm around his neck, and anger thus beguile.'
But Fatima she shook her head, his accents stern she's minding;
'Gainst his dark looks and threatening words there really is no blinding.
But soon her scruples are o'ercome ; they seek the second story,
And pause before the green-baize door whose nails spell Lab'ratory.'
A gentle touch-it open glides-and just as softly closes.
There's nothing to remark inside except a smell of roses.
His arms and coats of mail are there, all ready bright for wearing;
The ladies find no buttons loose, but think they may want airing.
But Annie lifts a curtain now, and reckless she proceeds,
Though on the door in Bluebeard's hand she 'Strictly Private' reads.
'And now we've found the fellow out-his chemicals forsooth !-
This is his renovating room, if I must speak the truth :
Here is a wig of just the style in which he has appeared,
And, I declare, here is the dye with which he stains his beard !
And look here, Fatima, my love, I never did suppose-
Have you had reason, dear, to think he wore a made-up nose?'
Poor Fatima nigh fainted here, but she deserved her fate :
'Oh, sister Ann, I must confess he waxy looked of late.'
'And here's a bottle full of eyes I'm sure he's lost a left one.
And here's his other set of teeth -now isn't he a deft one ?'
'Oh, Annie dear, I've marked his eye fix'd with a kind of stare,
But, really me, I only read his admiration there.'







( 53 )


'Oh, dreadful! dreadful oh, dear me! what can my grief assuage ?
Look there's his birth's certificate, and we shall learn his age !'
The bride was frightened, and would fly, but Annie she enjoyed it;
Had he but been her husband, too, perchance she'd been annoyed at it.
She rummaged all the chamber through-'These things, love, I'll bet few see'em.'
And now she's found another door, 'tis lettered 'Bluebeard's Museum.'
In for a penny, in for a pound you won't find her back creep;
When she is hung, 'twon't be for lamb, but for a full-grown sheep.
The door is heavy, and but moves by their united strength,
Till open half, then yields at once, and they fall down full length.
The door then closes with a bang, and leaves them in the dark.
They grope about-a shutter lift, and hear the watchdog bark.
Bluebeard is back what shall they do ? In vain the door is tried ;
It seems a mass of iron plate, no handle placed inside!
They both are caught as in a trap, and no escape seems certain.
Annie but little seems to care, and raises up a curtain,
When she is staggered by the sight in half-a-dozen bottles-
Six females have been pickled there, suspended by their throttles!
On each a label marks the day in which she took to spirits,
With just a word placed underneath which stated her demerits.
Above was written, These are wives of Old Blue Beard the Furious,
Who had the varments bottled off as soon as they grew curious.'
An empty bottle in the row poor Fatima perceived now,
And truly for her naughtiness the poor young creature grieved now.
But Annie soon recovered breath, and stooping gently kissed her;
'How glad I am the Act ain't passed about deceased wife's sister!
Let's barricade the room, my dear; come, help me shove these mummies,
They are the only guards we've left, but they shall act as dummies.'
They placed a wedge beneath the door, then moved the six young women :
'Twas hard work to secure their help, though they're with spirits brimming,
They scarcely had fulfilled their task, sustained by desperation,
When, lo they hear to raise the siege there's signs of preparation.
Blue Beard is in the outer room, and some ill must intend her,
For in the loudest angry tones he calls them to surrender.







( 54 )


But no, they never mean to yield, and Annie seeks the casement.
The castle there o'erhangs the lake, she finds to her amazement!
'Oh, look! oh, look dear sister Ann is any one a-coming ?
'I can but see the shepherd lad, and hear his distant humming.'
Then Blue Beard calls, 'Come, open, dear! I've something here to show you !'
But Annie speaks for Fatima, You vile old wretch, we know you !
Go, change your wig and dye your beard, disgust we cannot smother.
You've bottled off no end of wives, and now would cook another.'
Then Blue Beard's rage grew hot and fierce-yea, it indeed was furious;
His tender tones were all a sham, his anger is not spurious,
When Fatima in tears exclaimed-' Is any one a-coming ?'
'I can but see an organ-man, and hear his distant strumming.'
Then Blue Beard cried, 'I've formed my plans-they'll answer, I've no doubt,
Long as you like pray stay in here, and then I'll starve you out;
I now shall go to dinner, and wish you both good night.
Is there anything that I can bring ?-perhaps you'll want a light.'
' Oh, look once more, dear sister Ann is any one a-coming ?
The sickness-which I feel at heart is all my frame benumbing !'
' I see, I see a distant speck upon the far horizon.
I wonder how he killed his wives, by strangling or by poison ?'
'Oh, don't!' cried Fatima; 'oh, don't! I feel all in a tremble!
I never dreamt to meet me here such guests he would assemble.
They all are in a bridal dress, and all seem young and pretty!
And must my charms be stoppered, too ? oh, dreadful, dreadful pity!'
'The speck increases, Fatima; it is a man well mounted;
He seems to ride at such a pace, and guessed our hours were counted.
But pray don't count on him yourself, for I'm of this opinion,
He only comes to bring the post,-or is this Bluebeard's minion ?'
They watch, they watch, some moments more, then both kissed one another.
The rider is young Abousqueers, their own now darling brother !
They wait, they wait,-how long they wait, till he the castle reaches !
Then they across the narrow lake send forth their anguished speeches.
Of course they now speak both at once, and he is sorely puzzled
To think what they on earth can mean, that 'Bluebeard must be muzzled.'






( 55 )


At length the truth he fathoms out and feels his courage rise.
'To save you from this wretch's power, I'll take him by surprise.
Now try if it be possible for each to hold her tongue,
For should he hear, there is a fear that I should be bow-strung.'
He's scarcely gone when lo, a noise they can't at first define,
'Tis Bluebeard butting againstt the door the worse from too much wine.
The door it yields-the females scream, and there are many crashes:
The wretch is so impetuous that half his wives he smashes.
Of course I mean each glassy case-there's scarcely one now left intact ;
The greater part are smithereens, the rest severely cracked.
A stream of extract floods the floor (the essences of beauty).
His loss enrages Bluebeard more, he now will do his duty.
His wife he seizes by the hair ; with fear she nearly died;
Her chignon left within his grasp, he feels like one defied,
And raises up his sword to slay, but one is on his track.
Young Abousqueers, the dauntless, has pierced him through the back!
He turns in bitter anguish, but 'tis too late to fly;
So, finding all is over, he lays him down to die.

His widow soon got married unto a nice young man;
But still in single-blessedness resides her sister Ann.

-----^Sf-----

Hicksy, Dicksy, Daisy/

H ICKSY, Dicksy, Daisy!
Surely the girl's gone crazy,
Her best togs to be sporting,
As if she were a-courting !

Ah there's that soldier feller,
A waiting for our Bella;
One who, like very many,
Is scarcely worth a penny.







( 56 )


Cock-a-doodle-do I


C OCK-A-DOODLE-DO!
My dame has lost her shoe:
I do not care a fiddlestick-
She don't know what to do.
Cock-a-doodle-do!
Who can have stole her shoe ?
She worries me to fiddlestrings-
I don't know what to do.

Cock-a-doodle-do!
My dame has found her shoe:
Her head ain't worth a fiddlestick,
On one foot she put two.






( 57 )


A Bird in Hand.
A BIRD in hand is better far
Than two which in the bushes are.
A glass of ale to drink's as nice
As any champagne kept in ice.
So men, content with what they hold,
Are rich as misers with their gold.
Would you be happy, this I'd teach:-
Don't aim at things beyond your reach.


The Dog Ticket.


LEG over leg,
As the dog went to Dover;
When he came to a stile,
He vaulted over.
When he came to a stream,
Through in a minute.


When he came to a ditch,
There he stuck in it.
Grown rich, he rides by train,
Blithe as a cricket.
Cabs it to station,
And takes a dog's ticket.
H


I






( 57 )


A Bird in Hand.
A BIRD in hand is better far
Than two which in the bushes are.
A glass of ale to drink's as nice
As any champagne kept in ice.
So men, content with what they hold,
Are rich as misers with their gold.
Would you be happy, this I'd teach:-
Don't aim at things beyond your reach.


The Dog Ticket.


LEG over leg,
As the dog went to Dover;
When he came to a stile,
He vaulted over.
When he came to a stream,
Through in a minute.


When he came to a ditch,
There he stuck in it.
Grown rich, he rides by train,
Blithe as a cricket.
Cabs it to station,
And takes a dog's ticket.
H


I






( 58 )


Peter Prickett.
LITTLE Peter Prickett, didn't he love cricket!
Wasn't he a bowler wasn't he a batter!
He could hold a wicket,-he could stop a ball;
Wasn't he a famous chap, the champion of us all!



Simple Simon.

SIMPLE Simon met a pieman
Going to the fair.
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
'Let me taste your ware.'
Says the pieman to Simple Simon,
'Show me first your penny.'
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
'Indeed I've not got any.'
Simple Simon caught the pieman
Coming from the fair.
Simple Simon hails the pieman,-
'I would taste your ware.'
'But,' says the pieman to Simple Simon,
'Pies I've not got any.
'Oh, bad luck !' says Simple Simon,
''Cause I've found a penny.'



My Mother and your Mother.
M Y mother and your mother went over the way;
Says my mother to your mother, 'It's chop-o'-nose day!'
I since have discovered the cause of the fray,-
They both went to 'the public' with nothing to pay.






( 58 )


Peter Prickett.
LITTLE Peter Prickett, didn't he love cricket!
Wasn't he a bowler wasn't he a batter!
He could hold a wicket,-he could stop a ball;
Wasn't he a famous chap, the champion of us all!



Simple Simon.

SIMPLE Simon met a pieman
Going to the fair.
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
'Let me taste your ware.'
Says the pieman to Simple Simon,
'Show me first your penny.'
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
'Indeed I've not got any.'
Simple Simon caught the pieman
Coming from the fair.
Simple Simon hails the pieman,-
'I would taste your ware.'
'But,' says the pieman to Simple Simon,
'Pies I've not got any.
'Oh, bad luck !' says Simple Simon,
''Cause I've found a penny.'



My Mother and your Mother.
M Y mother and your mother went over the way;
Says my mother to your mother, 'It's chop-o'-nose day!'
I since have discovered the cause of the fray,-
They both went to 'the public' with nothing to pay.






( 58 )


Peter Prickett.
LITTLE Peter Prickett, didn't he love cricket!
Wasn't he a bowler wasn't he a batter!
He could hold a wicket,-he could stop a ball;
Wasn't he a famous chap, the champion of us all!



Simple Simon.

SIMPLE Simon met a pieman
Going to the fair.
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
'Let me taste your ware.'
Says the pieman to Simple Simon,
'Show me first your penny.'
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
'Indeed I've not got any.'
Simple Simon caught the pieman
Coming from the fair.
Simple Simon hails the pieman,-
'I would taste your ware.'
'But,' says the pieman to Simple Simon,
'Pies I've not got any.
'Oh, bad luck !' says Simple Simon,
''Cause I've found a penny.'



My Mother and your Mother.
M Y mother and your mother went over the way;
Says my mother to your mother, 'It's chop-o'-nose day!'
I since have discovered the cause of the fray,-
They both went to 'the public' with nothing to pay.







( 59


I would tell you a Story.

I WOULD tell you a story
Of old Nelson's glory,
Of the many sea-battles he won ;
But his glory is past,
For a bullet at last
Laid him low from an enemy's gun.


Dolly taken ill.


H USH! and don't make a noise, poor Dolly's ill;
Send for a lawyer, for she would make her will.
Hush! and don't make a noise, poor Dolly's ill;
Send for a doctor, and let him make a pill.
Hush and don't make a noise, dear Dolly's better;
Send for the cook now to make an apple fritter.


i 1
i '
ii
rlll i,
~,~F;. /"1~'' '''







( 59


I would tell you a Story.

I WOULD tell you a story
Of old Nelson's glory,
Of the many sea-battles he won ;
But his glory is past,
For a bullet at last
Laid him low from an enemy's gun.


Dolly taken ill.


H USH! and don't make a noise, poor Dolly's ill;
Send for a lawyer, for she would make her will.
Hush! and don't make a noise, poor Dolly's ill;
Send for a doctor, and let him make a pill.
Hush and don't make a noise, dear Dolly's better;
Send for the cook now to make an apple fritter.


i 1
i '
ii
rlll i,
~,~F;. /"1~'' '''






( 60 )

Michaelmas.

M IND you remember,
Tow'rds the end of September,
To buy some fat geese, and to stuff 'em;
For when they're in season
'Tis almost high treason
To shun goose-if 'tisn't a tough 'un.



The Old Soldier.
I'M an old soldier, miss, yet forced to beg;
I've but one arm, miss, I've but one leg;
I've very few teeth, miss, and feel their loss at dinner.
I was stout and hearty once, now I can't be thinner,
Pray bestow your alms, miss, on a poor old soldier man :
We fight for home and beauty, miss, as long as e'er we can.
----35<----

.7ack Sprat.
JACK SPRAT could eat no fat, his wife could eat no lean;
But, somehow or other, betwixt the two the platter's polished clean.
Jack Sprat was tall and fat, his wife was small and mean :
'Twas laughing that had made him fat; 'twas scolding kept her lean!


Billy Taylor.
L ITTLE Billy Taylor's
Gone to be a sailor-
His ship 's for China bound,
Won't the sea perplex him !
Won't its rolling vex him !
I hope he won't get drowned.






( 60 )

Michaelmas.

M IND you remember,
Tow'rds the end of September,
To buy some fat geese, and to stuff 'em;
For when they're in season
'Tis almost high treason
To shun goose-if 'tisn't a tough 'un.



The Old Soldier.
I'M an old soldier, miss, yet forced to beg;
I've but one arm, miss, I've but one leg;
I've very few teeth, miss, and feel their loss at dinner.
I was stout and hearty once, now I can't be thinner,
Pray bestow your alms, miss, on a poor old soldier man :
We fight for home and beauty, miss, as long as e'er we can.
----35<----

.7ack Sprat.
JACK SPRAT could eat no fat, his wife could eat no lean;
But, somehow or other, betwixt the two the platter's polished clean.
Jack Sprat was tall and fat, his wife was small and mean :
'Twas laughing that had made him fat; 'twas scolding kept her lean!


Billy Taylor.
L ITTLE Billy Taylor's
Gone to be a sailor-
His ship 's for China bound,
Won't the sea perplex him !
Won't its rolling vex him !
I hope he won't get drowned.






( 60 )

Michaelmas.

M IND you remember,
Tow'rds the end of September,
To buy some fat geese, and to stuff 'em;
For when they're in season
'Tis almost high treason
To shun goose-if 'tisn't a tough 'un.



The Old Soldier.
I'M an old soldier, miss, yet forced to beg;
I've but one arm, miss, I've but one leg;
I've very few teeth, miss, and feel their loss at dinner.
I was stout and hearty once, now I can't be thinner,
Pray bestow your alms, miss, on a poor old soldier man :
We fight for home and beauty, miss, as long as e'er we can.
----35<----

.7ack Sprat.
JACK SPRAT could eat no fat, his wife could eat no lean;
But, somehow or other, betwixt the two the platter's polished clean.
Jack Sprat was tall and fat, his wife was small and mean :
'Twas laughing that had made him fat; 'twas scolding kept her lean!


Billy Taylor.
L ITTLE Billy Taylor's
Gone to be a sailor-
His ship 's for China bound,
Won't the sea perplex him !
Won't its rolling vex him !
I hope he won't get drowned.






( 60 )

Michaelmas.

M IND you remember,
Tow'rds the end of September,
To buy some fat geese, and to stuff 'em;
For when they're in season
'Tis almost high treason
To shun goose-if 'tisn't a tough 'un.



The Old Soldier.
I'M an old soldier, miss, yet forced to beg;
I've but one arm, miss, I've but one leg;
I've very few teeth, miss, and feel their loss at dinner.
I was stout and hearty once, now I can't be thinner,
Pray bestow your alms, miss, on a poor old soldier man :
We fight for home and beauty, miss, as long as e'er we can.
----35<----

.7ack Sprat.
JACK SPRAT could eat no fat, his wife could eat no lean;
But, somehow or other, betwixt the two the platter's polished clean.
Jack Sprat was tall and fat, his wife was small and mean :
'Twas laughing that had made him fat; 'twas scolding kept her lean!


Billy Taylor.
L ITTLE Billy Taylor's
Gone to be a sailor-
His ship 's for China bound,
Won't the sea perplex him !
Won't its rolling vex him !
I hope he won't get drowned.







( 61


The Hedgehog.

LITTLE Neddy Nichols caught a hedgehog full of prickles,
That curled itself into a funny ball ;
But he dropped it in a pail, when out came its head and tail,
And it swam around, and tried thereout to crawl.


Sfo/ anid Tofisy.


P USSY sits before the fire
(She's a ratter rare);
Doggy Spot calls to inquire,
Topsy, are you there ?
List to me, now pussy dear,
I have found some meat;


Come into the pantry, near,
And you shall have a treat.'
But Topsy said, 'But where's the cook?
For I some scruples feel.'
'She's for the p'liceman gone to look,
And won't disturb our meal.'


~::
~I
II ~







( 61


The Hedgehog.

LITTLE Neddy Nichols caught a hedgehog full of prickles,
That curled itself into a funny ball ;
But he dropped it in a pail, when out came its head and tail,
And it swam around, and tried thereout to crawl.


Sfo/ anid Tofisy.


P USSY sits before the fire
(She's a ratter rare);
Doggy Spot calls to inquire,
Topsy, are you there ?
List to me, now pussy dear,
I have found some meat;


Come into the pantry, near,
And you shall have a treat.'
But Topsy said, 'But where's the cook?
For I some scruples feel.'
'She's for the p'liceman gone to look,
And won't disturb our meal.'


~::
~I
II ~







( 62 )


Naughty Puss.

G O, naughty puss go far from me,
Or I shall catch another flea:
For nurse declares, and 'tis no jest,
That vermin often cats infest.



When I was a Bachelor.

W HEN I was a bachelor-a poor, unlucky elf-
All my strings and buttons I just stitched on for myself,
Till my landlady and her small fry they led me such a life,
I was forced to go. to London to bring me back a wife.
When the roads were all so slippery from frost and trodden snow,
My wife her head discovered where she just had placed her toe;
And was so shook her very look did all my feelings harrow :
'Twas vain to talk, she could not walk, so was wheeled home in a barrow.



Tom the Tinker's Son.
TOM, Tom, the tinker's son,
Stole a pig and away he run ;
The pig they did eat and Tom they did beat,
Till he went roaring down the street.
Tom, Tom, the tinker's son,
Stole a pie and away he run;
The pie he ate and his mother did fret,
For Tom in the lock-house a month did get.
MORAL.
For a boy who can purloin what isn't his own,
Should first be well whipped and then sent to prison.







( 62 )


Naughty Puss.

G O, naughty puss go far from me,
Or I shall catch another flea:
For nurse declares, and 'tis no jest,
That vermin often cats infest.



When I was a Bachelor.

W HEN I was a bachelor-a poor, unlucky elf-
All my strings and buttons I just stitched on for myself,
Till my landlady and her small fry they led me such a life,
I was forced to go. to London to bring me back a wife.
When the roads were all so slippery from frost and trodden snow,
My wife her head discovered where she just had placed her toe;
And was so shook her very look did all my feelings harrow :
'Twas vain to talk, she could not walk, so was wheeled home in a barrow.



Tom the Tinker's Son.
TOM, Tom, the tinker's son,
Stole a pig and away he run ;
The pig they did eat and Tom they did beat,
Till he went roaring down the street.
Tom, Tom, the tinker's son,
Stole a pie and away he run;
The pie he ate and his mother did fret,
For Tom in the lock-house a month did get.
MORAL.
For a boy who can purloin what isn't his own,
Should first be well whipped and then sent to prison.




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