• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Tit, Tiny, and Tittens
 Three good friends
 Four footed friends
 Three little kittens
 Back Cover
 Spine














Title: Aunt Louisa's little treasures
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028395/00001
 Material Information
Title: Aunt Louisa's little treasures comprising Tit, Tiny and Tittens; Three good friends; Four footed friends; Three little kittens
Alternate Title: Tit, Tiny and Tittens
Three good friends
Four footed friends
Three little kittens
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Valentine, L ( Laura ), d. 1899
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Bros.,
McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: [1876?]
Copyright Date: 1876
 Subjects
Subject: Cats -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Kittens -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Obedience -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1876   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1876
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with twenty-four pages of illustrations pritned in colors.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028395
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - ALG2944
oclc - 61250505
alephbibnum - 002222698

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
    Tit, Tiny, and Tittens
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Three good friends
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Four footed friends
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Three little kittens
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Back Cover
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Spine
        Page 59
Full Text




The Baldwin Library
University of Florida







AUNT LOUISA'S



LITTLE TREASURES:


COMPRISING


Tit, Tiny and Tittens, Four Footed Friends.
Three Good Friends. Three Little Kittens.

WITH

TWENTY-FOUR PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


PRINTED IN COLORS.




McLOUGILIN BROS., NIEW YORK




TIT, TINY AND TITTENS.






TIT, TINY; AND TITTENS.

THE CROSS KITTEN.

T INY and Tittens were two little kittens,
As soft and white as the snow,
Who went to play, on a bright summer day,
Where ripe red cherries do grow,

The play was begun in mirth and in fun,
But Tittens soon tired of that;
The cross young rover knocked Tiny over,
And snarled like a tiger-cat.
How naughty was this, with a growl and a hiss
To spoil so happy a play!
With kittens or boys, 'tis temper destroys,
And takes all pleasure away.




















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Tit, Tiny, and Tzttens.




THE GREEDY KITTEN.

OH! why do you nibble away at the cake?
'Twas never intended for kitten to take.
"Beware," cried the cat,
How you meddle with that,
So scamper, scamper, scamper away.

Then Tiny obeyed her old mother the cat,
But Tittens, the rogue, was too greedy for that;
He liked the sweet crumbs,
With the raisins and plums,
So nibbled, nibbled, nibbled away!

But, oh! was he not in a terrible fright,.
When Susan, the kitchen-maid, came with a light!
And did not he wish
He'd ne'er tasted the dish,
When beaten, beaten, beaten away!







































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Tit, T-hy, and Tittens.



THE FOOLISH KITTEN.

OH! Tittens, he fancied to dine off the fish
That floated about in their elegant dish,
And often he eyed with a covetous wish
The prettiest one in the water,---
All skimming, swimming, sliding, gliding,
Little fins her movements guiding,
Upwards now, then downwards riding,---
Oh! if he could but have caught her!

So Tittens, one day, tried to catch at a fin,
When sudden the kitten went floundering in,
All struggling and kicking, and drenched to the skin,
His head and his shoulders right over!
Tail lashing, splashing, soaking, choking,
Was ever accident so provoking!
Till his mistress, laughing, joking,
Pulled out the poor little rover!

















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Tzt, Tiny, and ittiens.





THE DISAPPOINTED KITTEN.
"OFF! off!" cried the lady,
Off, off, and away!
Go search the house for rat or mouse,
My bird shall not be your prey!
"I heard a sudden fluttering,
I heard a sudden fall;
For little Tit's bound had knocked to the ground
Flower-pot, flower, and all!

"I flew to save my darling,
The dreaded foe in view,---
Oh! never fear, my birdie dear,
No kitten shall dine upon you!

"Off! off!" cried the lady,
"Off, off, and away!
Go search the house for rat or mouse,
My bird shall not be your prey!"


























































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Tit, Tiny, and 7ittens.




THE MERRY KITTEN.

TITTENS growled over a ducking he'd had;
"Tit he complained that the weather was bad;
Up started Tiny with, "Never be sad;
Let's have a see-saw together,
Together how merry we'll be!

"You in your corner, all shivering and wet,
The longer you stay there the more you will fret:
Jumping will warm you and make you forget;
Let's have a see-saw together,
Together how merry we'll be!

"Tit, though the shower may heavily fall,
We can be happy in spite of it all."
Tittens and Tit they sprang up at the call,
Gayly they gambolled together,
As merry as merry could be.
















































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T7t, T7tny, an(d 7 ttens.





THE FRIGHTENED KITTENS.

" DEAR! oh, dear! a dog is near!"
Cried Tittens, ready to die with fear;
"One scratch of his claw, one gripe of his paw,
Would finish us off in a minute!"
Then Tit he trembled, and Tiny too,
As if a lion had come in view,
When a mastiff tall entered the hall,
And looked around like the lord of all.
"Oh! will not he bite?" cried she,---
"Oh! will not he fight ?" cried he.
"If fight must be," said Tiny, "we
Will not be the first to begin it!"
But the noble mastiff, brave and strong,
Would not do a feeble kitten wrong.
'Tis cowards that seek to hurt the weak;
He would not have worried a linnet!












THREE GOOD FRIENDS.










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LIULY CARR F LOSS
WE two, with babies nice and clean,--
By babies our two dolls I mean,-
My baby could not keep awake,
Behind my seat no harm she'll take;-
Well, we and babes and puss make five,
All going for a carriage drive.
Now Floss, don't bark! It isn't right.
You'll make the horses both take fright.
And if they do, they'll run so fast
That you'll be left behind at last!
Mamma is coming here, I see,-
Look, Floss! she nods her head to me I





































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HERE we are with our babes-are they not
pretty dears?
They are both made to cry, but they never
shed tears;
They have fine rosy lips with some hard
stuff beneath,
And mamma thinks they never will
have any teeth!
Their frocks get so dirty, and we cannot
tell how;
They were quite clean this morning, and
look at them now!
Then their faces get dirty, and dirt sticks
so fast!
Meg has been in a bath since the night
before last.
1 am sure we take pains to teach babies to
walk;
"We lead them, we jump them, and we coax
them to talk;
We have tried too to teach them a nur-
sery rhyme,
But still dolls will be dolls to the end
of all time!




























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IF you please, Mrs. Murphy, I have called
in to say,
We want some potatoes for dinner to day.
Our cook does not like them with too
many eyes;
She says that they stare at her jellies
and pies.
I don't like old potatoes, and I won't have
the new;
And now I must tell you your scales are
not true.
Just look at them now !-it is useless to
frown-
See if one scale goes up, the other goes
down 1
It is of no use you frowning and pouting
your lips,
Why can't you sell apples without apple
pips?
We must deal with John Grubb or
Adelaide Jones,
If you won't send cherries without cher-
ry stones.































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WE are pretty well, thank you; and pray
how are you?
And why do you laugh at our house? It
is new,
For we built it to-day; and I'm sure it
is grand,
Though uncle can carry it off in one
hand.
It is open and pleasant, and it is not too
small,
And our carpet is made out of Mary's wool
shawl;
She want's not a shawl whilst she is
having her tea,
And her shawl does well where it is,
as you see.
At Umbrella Cottage we merrily live,
And to friends, when they call, some nice
apple we give.






























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'TIS washing day, we're at the tub;
Dolls' clothes are very hard to rub;
The more we try to make them wet,
I'm sure the dirtier they get!
"We ought, you know, to have some soap;
Onion will do as well, we hope.

But though it may do quite as well,
We neither of us like the smell.
And then the more to rub I try,
The more the onion hurts my eye!
"We want more water, too, I think,
For what we have, our Floss could drink.


















































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WE'RE singing Floss, be quiet now,
Your song is only bow-wow-wow I
You don't keep time-you cannot speak;
We told you so one day last week.
Just wag your tail and hold your tongue
Until our pretty song is sung.


Now do see Floss! How sly he looks!
Floss, ours are not real music-books.
Ma's album and Pa's book of maps
"Will do as well for us, perhaps,
Because we have such little throats,
And have not learnt to sing from notes.












FOUR FOOTED FRIENDS.















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OUR dog is named Nep, and a fine dog is he,
Five miles I would ride such a fine dog to see;
One better than he surely no one could wish,
He runs like a hare, and he swims like a fish.
Throw a stick in the lake-he'll soon fetch it out;
As a watch-dog, his worth no school-boy can doubt.
O'er broadest of rivers we think he could swim ;-
A plunge in the sea would be nothing to him.
"We should tire you all, and astonish you too,
If we told you of all that our favorite can do.
The short word for Neptune is Nep, as you know,
And we knew it first about two years ago.
To like those he dislikes, Nep never pretends,
For dogs are the truest of
FOUR FOOTED FRIENDS



























































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HERE are three of our friends; they look sheepish
we know,
And lambs look more sheepish the older they grow;
Yet lambs are such gentle and innocent creatures,
We care more for their ways than we do for their
features.
They are pleasant to look at; we wish they were
bolder,
And would live long and yet not get bigger or older;
We would keep them young always if we had the
power,
But lambs, like ourselves, all grow older each hour.
As lambkins get older, less playful are they,
And children should strive to get wiser each day.
The boy who cares more for his play than his book,
The older he grows the more sheepish will look,
And for sheepishness, innocence can't make amends,
As it does in the case of our
FOUR-FOOTED FRIENDS.


















































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SEE our Tabby T There she sits
With nearly half-a-dozen kits!
Pretty little kittens! they
Do but little else than play.
One, you see, is lapping milk;
One unwinds a reel of silk;
One a riband drags along,
To show that she is getting strong.
The other white one wants to steal
Her jet black brother's pretty reel.
And kitten number five-well, she
"With Mother Tabby's tail makes free.
So now, good folks, our rhyming ends
About our six FOUR-FOOTED FRIENDS






















































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FRISKY and frolicksome, furry and funny,
Every one is a favorite bunny,
Even the little ones come when we call them,
The tricks that we play them do not appal them;
But if strangers attempt with our rabbits to play,
They are timid and shy, and scamper away,
Over each other they scramble and tumble,
Of food and litter they make a sad jumble.
Rabbits, as all the world knows, will be rabbits;
Ours are the best of their kind in their habits,
We know they don't sing, and they're desperate
feeders,
But our does are so plump, and such capital breed-
ers
That carrots, and turnips, and green odds and ends,
Ve never can grudge to our
FOUR-FOOTED FRIENDS.










































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Our pretty goat was born in Wales,
She and her kids have little tails-
Their ears are large enough, no doubt-
Quite large enough to whisk about.
Their hair is long and soft as wool;
Their eyes are brilliant, soft, and full.
We know that many goats can leap
From crag to crag, however steep;
We wonder that they do not fall,
Yet think our Nan would beat them all;
For once or twice we saw her jump
Three times the height of yonder pump;
And see how well her kids she tends!-
"We like our Welsh
FOUR-FOOTED FRIENDS.















































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WITH his fine bushy tail, and his merry bright eyes,
To show he is happy our pet Squirrel tries;
Such a good-tempered fellow, so brimful of glee,
He plays in his cage just as though he were free.
If he were a wild one, we know that his tail
He would in his bark-boat use as a sail;
He would, too, in autumn, for winter provide
Acorns and nuts he would carefully hide.
Up the oak in our garden he merrily goes,
And there plainly his fondness for acorns he shows,
On his hind legs he sits, or as some say, he stands,
And his fore-paws he cleverly uses like hands!
He munches his acorns although the bough bends;
He deserves to be classed with our
FOUR-FOOTED FRIENDS.












THREE LITTLE KITTENS.





















T HREE little kittens,
They lost their mittens,
And they began to cry,
"Oh! mammy dear, we sadly fear,
Our mittens we have lost!"
"What! lost your mittens,
You naughty kittens!
Then you shall have no pie."
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.




















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The Three Little Kittens.





The three little kittens
Had need of mittens;
The winter now was nigh.
"Oh'! mammy dear, we fear, we fear,
Our mittens we shall need."
"Go, seek your mittens,
You silly kittens!
There's tempest in the sky."
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.



































































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The three little kittens,
In seeking their mittens,
Upset the table high.
"Oh! mammy dear, we doubt and fear,
The house is tumbling down."
"You foolish kittens!
Go, find your mittens,
And do not make things fly."
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.






























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The Three Little Kittens.





The three little kittens,
They found their mittens,
And they began to cry,
"Oh! mammy dear, see here, see here,
Our mittens we have found."
"What! found your mittens,
You little kittens,
Then you shall have some pie."

Purr, purr, purr, purr,
Purr, purr, purr, purr.



























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The Three Litile Ktllens.





The three little kittens,
Put on their mittens,
And soon ate up the pie!
"Oh! mammy dear, we greatly fear,
Our mittens we have soiled."
"What! soiled your mittens,
Vou naughty kittens!"
Then they began to sigh,
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.


































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The Three Litle Kitlens.






The three little kittens,
They washed their mittens,
And hung them up to dry.
"Oh! mammy dear, look here, look here,
Our mittens we have washed."
"What! washed your mittens,
You darling kittens!
But I smell a rat close by!
Hush! hush!" Miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.














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