• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Four Doll-Mammas
 Going to Bos-ton
 Old Win-ter
 Mam-Ma's Present
 Sweet Sis-ters
 In the Owl's House
 Mo-ses in the Ark
 Young (One)'s Night Thoughts
 Dol-ly's Wings
 Sol-dier Jack-y
 Ma-dame Mob-Cap
 Bird Flos-sy
 A Nice Ba-by
 Floy
 Back Cover






Title: Four doll-mammas, and other stories
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028379/00001
 Material Information
Title: Four doll-mammas, and other stories
Alternate Title: Four doll mammas
Physical Description: 64 p. : ill. ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop
Place of Publication: Boston (Franklin St. Corner of Hawley)
Publication Date: c1877
 Subjects
Subject: Readers (Elementary) -- 1870-1950   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1877   ( rbgenr )
Readers -- 1877   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1877
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Readers   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028379
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001566462
oclc - 22747437
notis - AHJ0227

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover 1
        Front cover 2
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
    Copyright
        Page 6
    Four Doll-Mammas
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11a
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Going to Bos-ton
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17a
    Old Win-ter
        Page 17
        Page 19
        Page 20a
    Mam-Ma's Present
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Sweet Sis-ters
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    In the Owl's House
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Mo-ses in the Ark
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Young (One)'s Night Thoughts
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Dol-ly's Wings
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Sol-dier Jack-y
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Ma-dame Mob-Cap
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Bird Flos-sy
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    A Nice Ba-by
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Floy
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Page 65
        Page 66
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FOUR DOLL-MAMMAS.


AND OTHER STORIES.


BOSTON:
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY,
FRANKLIN ST., CORNER OF lHA'WLEY.


110 s '






























Copyright by
D. LOTHROP & CO.
1877












FOUR DOLL-MAMMAS.


ROSE and Lil-y-they looked
more likeweeds than flow-ers,
were two lit-tle girls that lived
on a din-gy back street. Their
mam-ma had no pret-ty ba-by-
clothes, nor a pret-ty crib, so,
when they were born, she wept
o-ver her lit-tle twin ba-bies,
and gave them pret-ty names
-it was all she could do for
them.






FOUR DOLL-MAMMAS.


They were sweet as po-sies
to the heart of their moth-er,
and when they were five years
old she bought them each a
chi-na doll. Rose and Lil-y
wore old cal-i-co dress-es, but
they had white mus-lin for their
chil-dren,with pink sash-es, and
they named them af-ter two
beau-ti-ful girls who lived in a
brown-stone house on the cor-
ner, "An-na Fer-ris" and "Jen-
nie Fer-ris.
One day they con-clud-ed to
give their dar-lings a par-ty.
Said Rose, "I don't like my
An-na Fer-ris to 'so-ci-ate with
poor dolls."





FOUR DOLL-MAMMAS.

Said Lil-y, I don't like my
Jen-nie Fer-ris to, nei-ther."
Said Rose, I wish they
could 'so-ci-ate with wax dolls."
Said Lil-y, Less us ask
their dolls to our par-ty "
"Their" and them" al-ways
meant the love-ly girls in the
brown-stone house.
So the poor lit-tle weeds"
went down to the brown-stone
house on the cor-ner and rang
the bell. And what they said
was so fun-ny the ser-vant led
them in to see the young la-dies.
Two lit-tle dolls named
af-ter us cried the real An-
na Fer-ris, laugh-ing. Of
9





FOUR DOLL-MAMMAS.


course our dolls shall go to
their party."
"What a lark !" cried the
real Jen-nie Fer-ris.
The wax dolls that lived in
the brown-stone house had
some new lace dress-es and
kid gloves for the par-ty, and
the ser-vant took them o-ver to
the back street where the lit-tle
"weeds lived.
But first said the real An-
na Fer-ris to her doll, Now
you must be nic-er than if you
were go-ing to a rich par-ty."
Said the real Jen-nie Fer-
ris, "And you must pre-tend
not to see it is a bare floor.'
IO0

















































F-M-
;--- ---~~

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FOUR DOLL-MAMMAS.


And you must say the cake
is ver-y nice in-deed."
And you must stay a good
while, and play ev-e-ry-thing
the rest do, and not turn up
your lit-tle wax nos-es. Chi-
na dolls have feel-ings as well
as you. I should be a-skamed
of you if you made them feel
they were poor."
We won't," said the wax
dolls. And they did-n't. They
ate so much cake, and jumped
a-bout so on the bare floor,
that they were a-bed, all four
dolls to-geth-er, in the twins'
old wood-en cra-dle, when the






FOUR DOLL-MAMMAS.


Fer-ris ser-vant came to take
them home.
But the wax dolls liked it,
and oft-en teased to go a-gain,
un-til, at Christ-mas, An-na
Fer-ris said they might as well
go and stay.
So their clothes were packed,
ev-e-ry ruf-fle and rib-bon; and,
af-ter dark, Christ-mas eve,
they went o-ver, and the moth-
er of the "weeds let them in;
and, be-ing tired and cold, they
went straight and crept in-to
two lit-tle red stock-ings that
hung by the stove.
When Rose and Lil-y came
out in the morn-ing, they just
12





FOUR DOLL-MAMMAS.


stared, and then they screamed
with joy,-
Why, they're OURS!"
And they were as much
hap-pi-er with four chil-dren
in-stead of two as any moth-
ers would be.













GO-ING TO BOS-TON.


IT was a big folks' pic-nic.
Pa-pa and mam-ma were in-
vit-ed-not a sin-gle ba-by.
They did-'t want ba-bies
there. Do you like peo-ple
that" don't want ba-bies there ?"
So the five lit-tie folks stood at
the win-dow, and they barked
al-most like lit-tie dogs, when
you shut them up, as they saw
the car-riage drive off; and of
14





GO-ING TO BOS-TON.


course it was high-ly mu-si-cal.
Come," said Lucy sud-
den-ly. She stopped cry-ing
and smiled like any thing.
" We'll go some-where too."
Where ?" said Jack.
To Bos-ton."
"How?" said they all.
I'll show you."
She went down cel-lar, and
they all trot-ted af-ter. She
went straight to a big bas-ket
and climbed in.
This is it."
They knew it was, and they
climbed in after her. Chil-
dren al-ways know that a wash-
tub, or a bas-ket is in re-al-i-ty





GO-ING TO BOS-TON.


a car-riage or a rail-way car
made on pur-pose for them.
So they got in, and they rode
to Bos-ton all day. Of course
they were very much crowd-ed,
and Ba-by some-times fell out,
and they were all bumped
a-bout a good deal; but they
ex-pect-ed to be tired, for
every-body knows it is a long
jour-ney to Bos-ton, and es-
pe-cial-ly if you start in a
bas-ket.











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OLD WIN-TER.


HA! HA! HA! old Win-ter,
You have fun with your horn!
But-toned up in your coat
You come out every morn,
And blow like the north wind,
With a might-y wild noise,
And you hope that you fright-
en
My girls and my boys!
" I'll blow them cold toes-es!"





OLD WIN-TER.


He shrieks at my dears;
" I'll blow them red nos-es,
And I'll nip at their ears!"

The chil-dren stand smil-ing
Like a sum-mer day morn,
For a sweet lit-tie fel-low
Rides perched on the horn.
Through his fin-gers he whis-
tles:
" My name it is Spring,
And the fast-er he comes
The soon-er he'll bring
The birds and the ros-es;
Don't for-get, when he blows,
Spring rides on his shoul-der
Wher-ev-er he goes."













117







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MAM-MA'S PRES-ENT.

IT was a love-ly lit-tle joke
on mam-ma. Bon-ni-bel made
it. And this is the way Bon-
ni-bel made the joke.
In her lit-tle cap, her lit-tle
white furs, and her lit-tie scar-
let leg-gings she had gone to
the woods with Joe-y and Jim-
my to get green branch-es to
trim up the house for Christ-
mas. She was a ver-y lit-tie
20




























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MAM-MA S PRES-ENT.


girl in-deed, but she felt dread-
ful-ly this morn-ing, for she had
heard her mam-ma tell a neigh-
bor, "the child-ren will have
theirs, but I don't expect an-y
pres-ents my-self, John feels
poor this year."
Such a nice mam-ma, and
no Christ-mas pres-ents! The
child-ren talked a-bout it a
great deal.
"I don't like it," said Bon-
ni-bel, with a tear in her eye.
"0, she's got you," said
Joe-y.
But I ain't some-thing new,"
said Bon-ni-bel.
Well, you will be," said






MAM-MA S PRES-ENT.


Joe-y, "when you get back.
She has-n't seen you in an
hour."
Bon-ni-bel hopped up and
laughed. "Then put me in,
the bask-et, and car-ry me in
and say, I'm her Christ-mas
pres-ent."
And so they set her in, and
stuck green branch-es all a-
round her. It was a jol-ly
ride. Bon-ni-bel laughed and
laughed. And they set her
down on the door-step, and
went in and said, "There's a
Christ-mas pres-ent out there
for you, mam-ma."
Mam-ma went and looked,
23






MAM-MA S PRES-ENT.


and there in a bask-et of green
leaves sat her own lit-tle laugh-
ing girl.
Just the ver-y thing I
want-ed most," mam-ma said.
Then mam-ma," she said,
bound-ing out of her leaf-y
nest, "I think it would be
Christ-mas, or Thanks-giv-ing,
or some-thing, for mam-mas
all the time, for they see their
lit-tle girls ev-ry day."
And mam-ma said it was.









~9 #. .

'--*-.~


SWEET SIS-TERS.


THAT was the fun-ny name
they were known by,-" Sweet
Sis-ters." They were twin
ba-bies, with blue eyes and
soft yel-low curl-y hair, and
soft red mouths just a-like; and








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SWEET SIS-TERS.


when folks saw them in their
lit-tie white blan-kets, a-sleep
in one cra-dle they said, Sweet
Sis-ters." And the fam-i-ly said
so too. And they heard it so
much that when they be-gan to
lisp out lit-tie words they would
call af-ter each oth-er Sweet
Sis-sy." They have oth-er
names, Mi-na and Min-na, but
they are not for use yet. They
are still Sweet Sis-ters." If
one is sick the oth-er feeds her,
just like two birds.
How love-ly it will be if they
go through life like this!














IN THE OWLS' HOUSE.


IT was night. Lit-tle boys
and girls and their mam-mas
had gone to bed. All the
lights were put out. The
houses were still.
But Mrs. Owl and her ba-
bies were just get-ting up.
Mrs. Owl came to the door of
her house, in the hol-low tree,
and looked out. She saw the
28








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IN THE OWLS HOUSE.


moon and stars shin-ing a-bove,
and she said "Come, come,
dears, it is time to get up."
So her two lit-tle owls got
up. They had a break-fast of
cold chick-en. The moon
shone in, and they said How
nice and cool and dark it
is "
Af-ter break-fast the owl
mam-ma said "Now, I must
go to mar-ket. It is so pleas-
ant you may sit in the door,
but you must not go out to
play no mat-ter what lit-tie
owls come a-long."
And where do you think
Mam-ma Owl went to mar-
ket ?





IN THE OWLS HOUSE.


Why, she flew through a hen-
house door that a lit-tle boy
had for-got-ten to shut, and
stole a white chick-en. She
brought it back to her lit-tle
owls, and they had it for their
din-ner.
So they kept house and had
nice times all night; but when
the sun came up and lit-tle
boys and girls be-gan to wake,
then the Owl fam-i-ly went to
bed and slept all day in the
hol-low tree.
This is the way owls live.













MO-SES IN THE ARK.


This dear lit-tle ba-by took
this ride in a boat a long, long
time a-go. It is a sweet sto-ry.
Mam-ma has the sto-ry in a
Book. Ask her to read it to
you.
If she does not know wkich
sto-ry, tell her the ba-by's name
was Mo-ses. Then she will
know. -







































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all















YOUNG(ONE)'S NIGHT THOUGHTS.


" HI!" said the ba-by;
" Ho'!" said the ba-by;
" Ha!" said the ba-by,
I won't go to sleep
Naugh-ty old moth-er,
You make such a poth-er,
Just for to both-er
You, a-wake I will keep.
34





YOUNG(ONE)'S NIGHT THOUGHTS.


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YOUNG(ONE)'S NIGHT THOUGHTS.


" Dance!" said the ba-by,
" Prance!" said the ba-by;
" Per-chance," said the ba-by,
You think I'm a goose!
Vain-ly you're dream-ing
Of rest, and your schem-ing
To si-lence my scream-ing
Is all of no use!





YOUNG(ONE)'S NIGHT THOUGHTS.











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YOUNG(ONE)'S NIGHT THOUGHTS.


" Sing!" said the ba-by;
" Ring! said the ba-by;
" Bring," said the ba-by,
My rat-ties and toys.
Still I will weep, 0 !
A-wake I will keep, 0!
Won't go to sleep, 0 !
Will make a noise!





YOUNG(ONE) S NIGHT THOUGHTS.









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YOUNG(ONE)'S NIGHT THOUGHTS.


" Walk!" said the ba-py;
" Talk! said the ba-by;
" I'll balk," said the ba-by,
Your ef-forts one and all.
Then, towards the morn-ing,
When day is dawn-ing
With-out any warn-ing
A-sleep I will fall."






YOUNG(ONE)'S NIGHT THOUGHTS






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DOL-LY'S WINGS.

MAM-MA BID-DY, look up here.
See my dol-ly; ain't her dear ?
Loveyour chick-ies? So does I.
Wish my dol-ly'd learn to fly.
Mam-ma Bid-dy, how get
wings?
Buy 'em with the ped-dler
things ?
Guess I'se got free cents and
two ;
Mam-ma Bid-dy, won't that do ?

















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SOL-DIER JACK-Y.


NEV-ER was a sol-dier made
so quick as Ba-by Jack!
Big men need to go to sol-
dier schools a long time; but
mam-ma made her lit-tle Jack
in-to a sol-dier in just five min-
utes. All she had to do was
to twist a news-pa-per in-to a
cocked hat, with a toss ing
44


























































































































AV-






SOL-DIER JACK-Y.


plume of li-lac leaves, to hang
her satch-el a-round his neck
for a knap-sack, to give him
pa-pa's cane with Dick's boot
on it for a flag, a boot-jack for
a sword, and lo! her lit-tle boy
was read-y to go to war.
What shall I fight, mam-
ma ? he shout-ed.
"O! fight that fly," said
mam-ma. That fly is a spy.
There is an ar-my of flies back
some-where. Take him pris-
on-er, Jack-y!"
So Jack-y made war on the
fly. But the fly was a cute
sol-dier, and un-der-stood war.
Jack-y could-n't catch him !
46





SOL-DIER JACK-Y.


It was noon be-fore the great
bat-tie was end-ed. Then a
door was opened and the fly
flew out.
Now the whole ar-my will
come!" cried Jack-y.












MA-DAME MOB-CAP.

THIS is lit-tie Ro-sa-belle-
No! I beg her par-don,
This is Ma-dame Mob-cap,
Walk-ing in her gar-den.
What a fine cap it is!
What a wide bor-der!
Spec-ta-cles and walk-ing-stick,
And ev-er-y-thing in ot-der.
Hop, toads, clear the way!
Bees, hush your hum-ming !
48

























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MA-DAME MOB-CAP.


La-dy-birds and but-ter-flies,
Grand folks are com-ing!
Nev-er think she'll look at you,
Vi-o-lets and dai-sies !
You're quite too in-sig-nif-i-cant
For such a la-dy's prais-es.
She must have a king-cup,
And a prince's feath-er,
With a crown-im-pe-ri-al,
Tied up to-geth-er.
That will suit your Maj-es-ty,
Ma-dame Ro-sa-bel-la!
And here's a gold-en sun-flow-er
To make you an um-brel-la.
"Pooh !"says lit-tle Ro-sa-belle,
Pluck-ing some car-na-tions;






MA-DAME MOB-CAP.
" You may keep your sun-flow-
ers,
And all their rich re-la-tions.
"Give me a bunch of vi-o-lets,
And one of those white ros-es,
And takeyour crown-im-pe-ri-al
To folks that have no nos-es."














BIRD FLOS-SY.

COME, Char-lie, I want to
fly now! Let's you and I go
out, and I be a bird!"
Lit-tle fat Flos-sy, with her
sun-hat on, pulls at her big
broth-er's pa-per un-til he lays
it down and looks at her.
You a bird! You lit-tle
fat thing! You fly? You'd
fall plump down !"
52






BIRD FLOS-SY.


Flos-sy pouts. "You're not
nice," she says.
Well, you are, nice and
sweet, and a bird, too-a
plump lit-tle Rob-in Red-
breast. You hop a-bout just
like one."
Then let me go and fly, if
I am," says Flos-sy, strug-gling
a-way from his kiss-es.
Out in the gar-den they go,
down un-der the tall cher-ry
trees,/to the swing. The lit-tle
blue vel-vet nest of a seat seems
wait-ing for its bird. Flos-sy
hops in, and smooths her scar-
let skirts about her.
Now,fy, bird!" says Char-
lie, send-ing her smooth-ly up
53









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BIRD FLOS-SY.


in the air. For-ward, up she
goes! up, back-ward she goes!
in and out a-mong the green
trees!
Fly high! she cries, high
as the tops of the hous-es "
Fly high high as the
clouds!"
High, fly high as the stars,
and the moon, and the sun! "
Char-lie laughs, and flies the
lit-tle red bird so high that she
is glad to cling to the rope, and
call out, Now, let the old cat
die! "
Char-lie laughs and swings
her slow and low un-til she
hops out, and sits down in the





BIRD FLOS-SY.
grass at his feet; just ex-act-
ly like a lit-tle Rob-in Red-
breast.
Ex-act-ly; for in a mo-ment
she gives a start and a hop,
and poun-ces on a great green
grass-hop-per.
Mo-las-ses," she says, "give
me some mo-las-ses and you
may go !" And Mr. Grass-
hop-per bows and obeys.












A NICE BA-BY

BA-BY was good and sweet,
so sweet, his soft lit-tle heart
was sor-ry a-bout a great man-y
things which his big blue eyes
saw. Ba-by was so sor-ry
when Dog Ro-ver was roused
from a nice nap and told to lie
some-where else. Ba-by knew
how hard it was for the lit-tle
cat to wait un-til ev-er-y-bod-y
else had had break-fast. Why
57





A NICE BA-BY.


should the lit-tle cat wait ?
Why should she have on-ly
crumbs and piec-es ?
"Come, Kit-ty," said Ba-by,
" come to my ta-ble. ,Come,
Kit-ty."
The lit-tle cat was wil-ling.
She made a jump with her four,
soft, white feet, and there she
was on Ba-by's ta-ble, her
white nose right o-ver Ba-by's
sil-ver bowl of bread and milk.
Eat," said Ba-by. Eat
with me."
The lit-tle cat now put her
nose in the sil-ver bowl. She
made a wee spoon of her ti-ny
pink tongue, and with it she
58


















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A NICE BA-BY.


dipped the milk up in-to her
hung-ry mouth.
Ba-by ate, too, with the big
sil-ver spoon, but he left plen-
ty for his cat. "You shall eat
with me al-ways, poor cat-ty,"
he said, taking his pet in his
chub-by arms. He did not
pull the sil-ky ears, nor pinch
the fur-ry tail, and the lit-tle cat
purred her-self to sleep.
Ba-by said "Sh sh! sh!"
to ev-er-y-bod-y, not to make a
noise while his cat took her
nap. And cat and Ba-by both
were so still, that mam-ma had
time to do all her work, and
she said, It makes my Ba-by






A NICE BA-BY.


good to do good. He must
have a dog, and a bird, and a
squir-rel, to keep him kind.
I don't know a bet-ter way to
make him gen-tle than to give
him pets."













FLOY.

"I wish my dol-ly did-n't
smile all day, three, four, ten
times, al-ways."
Floy had been watch-ing her
ba-by sis-ter on mam-ma's lap;
its frowns and gasps and sighs
were so fun-ny.
Hit her! She won't smile
then; she'll cry," said naught-y
Jack-y." "Will she?" said
Floy. "You hit her, and see."
62












































N






FLOY.


Floy laid dol-ly on the has-
sock and hit her with a drum-
stick. Dol-ly flew in-to for-ty
piec-es, but she did-n't cry.
No, a bit of chi-na with the
pink paint-ed smile that had
been dol-ly's lips fell at Floy's
feet, smil-ing still. It was Floy
that cried.





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