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Florida star

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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:01083

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:01083

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news


This item is only available as the following downloads:


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PAGE 1

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HEALTHY LIVINGIs Modern Technology Hurting Your Eyes? (StatePoint) A world full of personal computers, hand-held video games, smartphones and e-readers is increasing the risk of eye-related problems in many Americans. This isnt surprising, as children and teenagers are now spending 7.5 hours a day consuming electronic media, according to a study by the Kaiser Family Foundation. Computer vision syndrome, or digital eye strain, is an increasingly common medical ailment and can affect learning and work productivity. It is now the number one computer-related complaint in the United States -ahead of carpal-tunnel syndrome. The eyes function best when looking at something about 20 feet away. Looking at something close-up, like a computer game, text message or e-reader requires more focus, and over time, can lead to blurry vision, eye strain and headaches,Ž explains Dr. Leanne Liddicoat, a VSP optometrist in California. And VSP Vision Care, the largest not-for-profit eyecare benefits providers in the United States, recently reported that nearly one-third of VSP patients suffer from symptoms of computer vision syndrome. However, there are easy steps parents and children can take to prevent these symptoms: € Get the right lighting. Keep bright lighting overhead to a minimum. Position your computer screen in a way that reduces reflections and glare from windows or overhead lights. € Stay back. The closer the eyes are to an object theyre looking at, the harder they have to work. A good rule is to apply the Harmon Distance (the distance between the elbow and first knuckle) when viewing anything on screen. If you or your children are holding digital devices closer than a Harmon Distance on a consistent basis, consult your eyecare provider. € Apply the 20/20/20 rule. To avoid fatigue and digital eye strain symptoms, eye doctors recommend stopping every 20 minutes to look at something 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds. Also, remember to blink frequently. € Monitor usage. Set time limits on the amount of screen timeŽ you and your children will have each day. For children over 2 years, limit screen time to less than two hours per day when possible. If older children need to use the computer and e-readers for homework, make sure they first give their eyes a rest after school by playing outside or engaging in other non-digital activities. Children under 2 years should have no screen time. € Get checked. It's important you have the best vision possible when using digital devices. This starts with a comprehensive examination by an eye doctor, who may prescribe corrective lenses or glasses specially designed for digital screens. To find an eyecare specialist near you, or to learn more about combating computer vision syndrome, visit www.vsp.com. As our reliance on digital devices increases, we must be mindful of our usage and take steps to relax and refresh our eyes to reduce eye strain. PAGE A-2 THESTAR NOVEMBER 19, 2011 OPINIONS CLARA JACKSON McLAUGHLIN OWNER/PUBLISHER LONZIE LEATH, RINETTA M. FEFIE MANAGEMENT SALES & MARKETING G. ABRAMS, DENNIS WADE, DAN EVANS MAY E. FORD LAYOUT EDITOR KEVIN KIM CRIME &JUSTICE ARTHIA NIXON CARIBBEAN NEWS ALLEN PROCTOR DESIGN AND WEB SITE PARTNER BETTY DAVIS LIFESTYLE/ SOCIETY COLUMNIST MIKE BONTS, SPORTS EDITORInvestigative Reporter: Lonzie Leath, Features:Dementrious Lawrence Reporters/Photographers: Marsha Phelts, Carl Davis, Laurence Greene, F. M. Powell III, Michael Phelts, Richard McLaughlin, Andrea F. K. Ortiz, Angela Morrell, Joseph Lorentzon, Scott Jurrens, Cheryl Williams Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Ester Davis, Lucius Gantt, Deanna, Cynthia Ferrell, Delores Mainor Woods, Farris Long Distribution and Sales: Dan & Pat Randolph, Abeye Ayele, Cassie Williams, Angela Beans, Tony Beans, Herman Robinson, David Scott TEL: (904) 766-8834 FAX: (904) 765-1673 info@thefloridastar.com (912) 264-3137 Georgia Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Alachua, Flagler, Marion, McIntosh, Camden And Glynn CountyTheFloridaStar.comThe Florida and Georgia Star Newspapers are independent newspapers published weekly in Jacksonville, Florida SUBSCRIPTIONRATES One Year-$40.00 Half Year-$22.00Send check or money order or call with VISA, AmEx, MC, DISCOVER and subscription amount to: The Florida Star, The Georgia Star P.O. Box 40629 Jacksonville, Florida 32203 The Florida Star will not be responsible for the return of any solicited or unsolicited manuscripts or photos. Opinions expressed by columnists in this newspaper do not necessarily represent the policy of this paper.MEMBERSHIPS: Florida Press Association National Newspaper Association National Newspaper Publishers Association Amalgamated Publisher, Inc. Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce First Coast African American Chamber of Commerce THEFLORIDA STAR THE GEORGIA STAR YOLANDA KNUCKLE, COLUMNS LIZ BILLINGSLEA OFFICE/ACCOUNTS MANAGER TIA AYELE, SPECIAL SECTIONS GEORGIA MARKETING ANGELA FAVORS MORRELL DISTRIBUTION HERMAN ROBINSON, DAVID SCOTT National Newspaper Publishers Association Why Wait?LET THE POST OFFICE DELIVER THE FLORIDA or GEORGIA STAR TO YOUI want a One Year Subscription to The Florida or Georgia Star!Please donate 10% of my paid Subscription to the non-profit organization listed below. Please send my Paid Subscription to: Name ___________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________ City ____________________________________________________________ State ____________ Zip Code _______________ Name of Organization for Donation: ________________________________________ _________________________________________ A TRADITION OF EXCELLENCE ()6 Months $22.00 ()One Year $40.00 ()2 Years -$70.00 SEND TO:The Florida/Georgia Star Post Office Box 40629 Jacksonville, FL32203-40629 www.thefloridastar.com Cash, Money Order, Check, PayPal, and/or Credit Card Accepted ***F A L L S P E C I A L***DOWNPAYMENT AS LOW AS $495 2003FordE-150 Work Van$1,000-Down 2002Chevy Astro Work Van $800-Down 1998Mazda Protege Low Miles $1,850CA$H 1999ChevyMalibu Nice Car$695-Down 1998 Mitsubishi Galant Gas Saver $595-DownCALL: 904-354-0405UNITED USED CARS, INC.1222 North Main St.(Plus tax, tag & fees)Everybody Rides We finance everybody SAVE $100.00 with this AD AUTOS FOR SALE Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson First African American Inducted Into The Florida Press Hall Of Fame REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL No. 12-05 COLOCATION SITE WITH METRO ETHERNET CONNECTIVITY FOR THE JACKSONVILLE PORT AUTHORITY Proposals will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority (JAXPORT) until 2:00 P.M. (EST) on Thursday, December 15, 2011 at which time they will be opened in the First Floor Conference Room, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32206. All proposals must be submitted in accordance with specifications No. 1205, which may be obtained after 8:00 AM on Thursday, November 10, 2011 from the bidding opportunities website: http://www.jaxport.com/about-jaxport/corporate-information/projects-for-bid Procurement Services Department P. O. Box 3005 Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (904) 357-3455 Happy Happy Thanksgiving! Thanksgiving! The Florida Star & Georgia Star Newspapers PUBLIC NOTICE

PAGE 3

JACKSONVILLE, FL ASAY, Ursula Norton, 51, died November 10, 2011. BADGER James K., died November 11, 2011. CAMBRIDGE Wanda, died November 9, 2011. CAMPBELL Scott W., died November 11, 2011. CODY, Damen S., 30, died November 11, 2011. EASTER Hap, 70, died November 8, 2011. FOREST Charlotte, 80, died November 7, 2011. GARDNER Donald E., died November 9, 2011. GAULDEN, Gardenia, 72, died November 7, 2011. GLEN Marvin L., 43, died November 1, 2011. GRANGER Florida, 90, died November 7, 2011. GROSSO, Marco, 22, died November 7, 2011. HAROLD Damon, died November 9, 2011. JACKSON Deborah Scott, died November 8, 2011. JAMES Elder Anthony, died November 7, 2011. JENKINS, Glenda Marie Register, 64, died November 12, 2011. JOHNSON Lizzie C., 96, died November 13, 2011. JOHNSON Robert, died November 10, 2011. JOHNSON William Clinton Bill, 68, died November 6, 2011. JONES Sandra, 47, died November 8, 2011. KELLY, Betty A., died November 11, 2011. LOCKHART, Roxie Lewis, died November 5, 2011. LOTT Ruth, died November 9, 2011. MARTIN Phillip Joseph, 41, died November 10, 2011. MORRISON Marie S., 77, died November 9, 2011. NEAL Anita Dionna, 48, died November 9, 2011. PARRISH, Charles Melvin, 52, died November 9, 2011. PITTMAN, Carolyn D., died November 9, 2011. SAUNDERS, Beverly Ann, 57, died November 6, 2011. SODERHOLM Arlene Ethel, 93, died November 11, 2011. SUMNER Cameron Kyle, 23, died November 9, 2011. THOMAS, Mary Lee, died November 6, 2011. WILLIAMS Marilyn, died November 10, 2011. ~*~GEORGIA DEATHS LECOUNT Alphonso, died November 2, 2011. MITCHELL Larry, died November 10, 2011. WINGREEN, Stephen, died October 18, 2011. WHITE, David E., Jr., 86, died October 13, 2011. Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church 201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475 Rev. Pearce Edwing, Sr. Sunday Worship Service . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m. Church School . . . . . . . . . 8:30 p.m. Wednesday Glory HourŽ Bible Study . . . . . . .10:00 a.m. Jehovah JirehŽ Bible Study . . . . . . 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Thursday Young at Heart Ministry . . .10:00 a.m. Friday Joy Explosion Ministry . . . . . . . 6:30 p.m. The Church DirectoryCome and Worship With UsŽ New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208Sunday School ƒ..............ƒƒƒƒƒƒ..9:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Intercessory Prayer...............ƒ..10:45 a.m. Morning Worship ......................11:00 a.m. Youth Church 2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary) Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m. Elder Arnitt Jones, Acting Pastor Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus (904) 764-5727 Church GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCHThe Church Where Everybody Is SomebodyŽBishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586Sunday School.......................................................................................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship.................................................................................11:00 a.m. Tuesday................................................Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m. Thursday...............................................................................Joy Night,7:00 p.m.Email: Gospell75@aol.com Website: Greaterelbethel.org Faith In Our CommunitySchedule of Events and ServicesPAGE A-3 THE STAR NOVEMBER 19, 2011 Tune In To WCGL AM RadioForIMPACT IMPACTTuesday and Thursday from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.AtWCGL1360.comThe Florida Star and Impact Striving To Make A Difference! Clara McLaughlin Host Yvonne Brooks Co-Host CHURCH DEATH NOTICES DEATH NOTICES Central Metropolitan C.M.E. Church4611 North Pearl St., Jacksonville, FL 32206 Ofc (904) 354-7426 Fax (904) 354-0934Rev. Marquise Hardrick, Pastor ~ Worship Service ~Sun Church School 9:30a.m. Sun Morning Worship -10:45 a.m. Tues Eve Bible Study 6:30 p.m. Wed Bible Study 12 Noon Wed Feeding Ministry 2:00 p.m. ANNOUNCEMENTS Lion of the Tribe of Judah Ministries, Inc. PASTOR Dr. Sirretta Williams (Temporary services held) 623 Beechwood St., Jacksonville, FL 32206 Sunday School.......10:00 a.m. ~ Sunday Worship .......11:00 a.m. Every 5th Sunday Friends and Family Day Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Direct Phone: 904.866.7047 Office Phone: 904.356.4226 Seeing Beyond The Lifestyle To Save A Life Website: www.lottojm.com ONE ACCORD MINISTRIES INTERNATIONAL, INC ., located at 2971 Waller St. in Jacksonville (I-10 and McDuff) is having their 6th Annual Convocation on November 16, 17, 18, 19, and 20, 2011. For more information, call (904) 389-7373 or 389-5895. You may also go to our website at www.jdgministries.org or email us at jdgministriesinc@yahoo.com Bishop Dr. Jan D. Goodman, Sr., Founder and Pastor. God is Good.Ž Come and be Blessed.! Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email submissions preferred. Send to: Info@TheFloridaStar.com Rev. Marquise & Mrs. Deedra Hardrick Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you; and, lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world. Amen.Ž Mathew 28:19-20 Complete Funeral ............................ $3,595.00(includes Service and Standard Casket)* Full Funeral w/Viewing Followed by Cremation .......................$2,195.00 Direct Cremation ................................ $795.00 We Offer Prearranged FuneralsPrices Subject to ChangeŽ==========================================================3031 Moncrief Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209 (904) 353-4434 (904) 354-6642 (904) 353-4437 Fax 877-4CLPAGE Tollfree www.CLPageMortuary.com C. L. Page Mortuary C. L. Page Mortuary Carla L. Page, L.F.D. Come join Bishop Dr. Lorenzo Hall Sr.every Wednesday and Thursday from 12:00 Noon to 1:00 PM for Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at The Greater ElBeth-El Divine Holiness Church, located at 723 W. 4th Street, Jacksonville, FL 32209. Ask Us About OurALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208 Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354 DIRECTORSDeborah West Alphonso West Jacqueline Y. Bartley If there had been a death in your family yesterday, what would you be doing today?FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED Since 1988Pre-Need ForeThought Funeral Planning ProgramIm sorry to have to tell you this...Ž 1st Annual Church & Pastors AnniversaryLife Center Restoration MinistriesPastor John & Gwendolyn Hansberry When: Sunday, November 20, 2011 Time: 4:00 p.m. Where: Life Center Restoration Ministries 5912 New Kings Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209 Speaker: Arch Bishop J.H. Wilson Contact: 904-213-7978 or 904-214-6649 We cordially invite all Pastors, Evangelist, Ministers, and Friends to join in this joyous occasion.But without faith it is impossible to please him: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him. Hebrews 11:6 K(KJV)We have come this far by FaithŽ DUNNS TEMPLEBISHOP EVERLENA DUNN Bishop Everlena Dun, noted religious leader and Founder of Dunns Temple When: November 20, 2011 Time: 3:00 pm Where: Mary L. Singleton Senior Center 150 East 1st Street, Jacksonville, FL An interesting program has been planned for your enjoyment. Bishop Larry Boston will be the speaker. ALL ARE INVITED "Like a bird singing in the rain, let grateful memories survive in time of sorrow." Is Your Child Ready for Kindergarten? Austin Christian Academy for the Development of Excellence and Leadership, Inc. Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten(VPK) 12th Grade Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (VPK) is a quality education program aimed to help your child enter school prepared and ready to learn. All children 4 years old on or before September 1, 2010 and eligible for kindergarten in the fall of 2011 will qualify! A Florida Drivers License and the childs Birth Certificate are required for enrollment. A Social Security number for the child is also preferred, if available. Offering : A Beka Program, Arts and Crafts, Music/Computer Lab, Tutoring, Teen Parent Service Center, Field Trips, Extended Day 6:30 a.m. 6:30 p.m., Alternative Education, Community Hours NOW ENROLLING When: Monday Friday (9a.m. 5 p.m.) Where: 6901 N. Main St. (Greater Israel Baptist Church located on the corner of 59th and Main St.) Audrey A. White, Principal 6901 N. Main St., Jacksonvillle, FL 32208 (904) 647-5065 (904) 333-4290 We are redefining the world in which children live!

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A4 C M Y KPAGE A-4THE STARNOVEMBER 19, 2011 E kaabo (pronounced eh-kah-bow) Welcome. Kingsley Plantation Burial Site Discovered: Souls-a-gathered In Freedom I ask that the knowledge about this burial ground will one day come to further our understanding of the universal value of freedom.Ž … Dr. Johnetta Betsch Cole Ft. George Island, FL. So, the announcement were makingƒis that we have discovered, rediscovered, the location of the slave burialsƒin the Kingsley PlantationƒŽ So began the press conference announcement by Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve Superintendent, Barbara Goodman, of the discovery of a previously unknown burial ground believed to be a Kingsley-era slave cemetery. The event was attended by Kingsley family descendants, the media, and general public. Also in attendance were Bryant Rollins and Shirley Stetson of StetsonRollins Consulting, who designed a facilitated community discussion, coordinated with Shauna Allen, Chief of Resource Stewardship, National Park Service. In a moving speech at the press conference, Dr. Johnetta Betsch Cole asked that all acknowledge the Kingsley Plantation as sacred ground. Dr. Cole is a Jacksonville native and descendant of the Kingsley family. She traces her ancestry through her millionaire great-grandfather, A. L. Lewis, founder of American Beach and the AfroAmerican Life Insurance company, who married Mary Sammis, the great-granddaughter of Zephaniah Kingsley and his Senegalese-born wife and former slave, Anta Majigeen Njaay, later known as Anna Kingsley. Cole is also the sister of the late MaVynee Betsch, known as the Beach Lady, who valiantly fought to save American Beach from becoming a commercial center to surrounding resorts. She spoke of her sister as the revolutionary spirit who also charged the Kingsley Plantation with acknowledging the descendants in an event which has become the annual Kingsley Plantation Heritage Days festival. Dr. Cole, Director of the Smithsonian Institutions National Museum of African Art, compared the historical significance of the burial site to Sankofa, an Adinkra symbol of Ghana, West Africa, which is represented by a long-necked bird looking over its back. In her clear and measured way of speaking, Cole used a popular saying from AfricanAmerican culture to describe the principle of Sankofa, You cant know where youre going if you dont know where youve been.Ž The burial site was discovered in 2010, during archaeological field studies led by Dr. James Davidson of the University of Floridas Department of Anthropology. The field research, which focused on the slave population of Africans who lived on the plantation during the residence of the Kingsleys, was later expanded to look for the lost slave cemetery. In 2008, Dr. Davidson examined a large oak tree that reminded him of an account he read which referred to a black cemetery [which was] visible next to an oak tree along the dirt road that went from the [slave] quarters to the main house.Ž Testing adjacent to the oak tree began in 2009, without producing any results. In 2010, Dr. Davidson and the research team examined a site across the road from the oak tree. It was in this area that he found artifacts indicative of Kingsley-era burials, i.e. cut nails used to build and close coffins, a human tooth, lightening whelks, which are large seashells used to mark graves in that era, and, most telling, dark rectangular stains known as grave stains. The research team exposed five of the six grave stain areas that were found. These five graves contained coffins with the remains of three adults … two men, between 30 and 40 years of age, and an elderly woman … and two children, 2-3 years old and 4-5 years old. Davidson said visitors to the Plantation have long used the cabins as the emotional memory of the enslaved inhabitants. In his view, this discovery is significant because it allows those who experienced the trauma of slavery to be acknowledged at their final resting place. During her speech, Cole often referenced the principle of looking back to move forward Sankofa. In the museum, she is reminded daily that the first people, the first tools, the first art, the first language happened in Africa. As I like to quip, certainly at the National Museum of African Art, if white folk would just start to admit that theyre Africans too, we could get on with a better world.Ž Kingsley Plantation is a Timucuan Ecological and Historic National Preserve of the National Park Service. It is open seven days a week, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., except on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Years Day. Admission is free. For more information, visit www.nps.gov/timu/historyculture/kp.htm. Talk of the Town! Talk of the Town! by Frances Bradley Volume Burks, Photographer Dr. Johnetta Betsch Cole, Kingsley descendant Dr. James Davidson of the University of Floridas Department of Anthropology Descendants of Kingsley Family Oak tree marker of nearby burial sites A human tooth, lightening whelks, which are large seashells used to mark graves in that era.

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NOVEMBER 1, 2011 THE STAR PAGE A-5 We owe so much of our success to you.25 years ago, we set up shop in Georgetown, KY, and we havent stopped since. Today, Toyota operates ten plants throughout the U.S., including our newest one in Blue Springs, Mississippi. We know that none of this would be possible without you, our loyal customers. And wed like to thank you for standing by us, and making us feel so welcome in the communities we call home. Toyota.com/usa

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NOVEMBER 19, 2011 THESTAR LOCAL FLORIDASECTION B CSM (Ret) Sheila R. E. Williams, 2nd LT T. J. Coleman and Brown, Glo Scurry Smith Photos by Frank M. Powell, III of The Florida Star 2nd LT T. J. Coleman and Congresswoman Corrine Brown Veterans Day 2011 Mayor City of Jacksonville Alvin Brown, Armenia S. Green, Tuskegee Airmen John M. Gay, General Danel "Chappie" James, Jr. Chapter, Brown, and Delia P. Covington Elder Lee E. Harris George MaIvory, Alpha Gainous, Brigadier General William M. Faulkner, USMC, Congresswoman Corrine Brown, Ron Jackson and Ernest Ward Congresswoman Corrine Brown Sheila Sanders, Larry Williams, Lisa Rose, Dorene Hollins, Sabrina Williams, Ronald Jackson Jr, Ronald Jackson, Sr., Tammie Well, Renee Ward, and Ernest Ward George and Hazel Gillis, Alaina Sugar, Congresswoman Corrine Brown, Mary Adams, Frank M. Powell, III, Tori Robinson, and Alpha Gainous JSO Blount Island Command Marine Corps Support Facility Blount Island 236th Marine Corps Birthday Ball Sawgrass Marriott-Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida November 11, 2011 Major General James D. Tyre Asst. Ajutant General Army Florida National Guard, Rear Admiral John C. Scorby, Jr.,USN Commander U. S. Naval Region Southeast, Captain Douglas F. Cochrane, USN Commanding Officer Naval Station Mayport, Frank M. Powell, III, Vessel Examiner U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, Mayor City of Jacksonville Alvin Brown, Colonel Christopher J. Michelsen, USMC Commanding Officer USMC Blount Island Command, Captain Andy Blomme, USCG Commanding Officer USCG Sector Jacksonville, Rear Admiral Kurt Tidd, USN Commander U. S. Naval Forces Southern Command U.S. Fourth Fleet, Colonel Robert Wetzel Operation Group Commander 125th Fighter Wing Florida Air National Guard Jacksonville, and Captain Jeffrey D. McClay, USN Commanding Officer Naval Station Jacksonville JVille Ryders Jacksonville, Florida

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Jacksonville Symphony: MOZART "JUPITER" SYMPHONY on Saturday, November 19, 2011, at theTimes Union Center for Performing Arts 300 W. Water Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202. Call 904.633.6110 for more information. Jacksonville Women's Business Center JUMPSTART, Jacksonville Regional Chamber of Commerce on Monday November 21, 2011, at 3 Independent Drive W., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Contact 904.366.6600 for additional information. JACKSONVILLE WALKING TOUR, The Jacksonville Landing, this Tuesday, November 22, 2011, 2 Independent Dr. W., Tuesday November 22, 2011 Jacksonville, FL 32202. For additional information call 904.353.1188. MAC MILLER, Florida Theatre, on Wednesday, November 23, 2011, 128 E. Forsyth Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202. For more information call 904.355.2787. FRANKIE BEVERLY: Times Union Center for Performing Arts, Friday November 25, 2011, 300 W. Water Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 Call 904.633.6110 for additional information. 25TH ANNUAL TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY, at The Jacksonville Landing, Friday, November 25, 20112 Independent Dr. W., Jacksonville, FL 32202. For more information contact 904.353.1188. Community ActivitiesPAGE B 2THE STAR NOVEMBER 19, 2011 All of our veterans volunteered during the time of war to protect and serve our nation. Still serving by providing proper funeral honors for our comrades and their families. Gordon Armstrong Burney Bivens* (1964) U.S. Army (1971) U.S. Marines Licensed Funeral Director(1973) U.S. Navy Attorney At Law, Lic. Funeral Dir. Josh Jones (1966) U.S. Navy Attorney At Law, Funeral Serv. Assoc. Larry Lewis (1972) U.S. Navy Funeral Services Associate Aaron T. Bivens Licensed Funeral Director Operations Manager For a Life Worth Celebrating Aaron and Burney Bivens Funeral Home and Cremat ion Services 529 Kingsley Ave. ~ Orange Park ~ 904.264.1233 ~ www.BivensFuneralHome.com (XXXX) Year First Volunteered ~ *President, First Coast Morticians Association Teach Your Kids About Traffic Safety This Holiday Season (StatePoint) Keeping children safe is every parents first concern, which is why traffic safety is so important. During the holidays, when families are traveling and daylight ends sooner, parents need to pay extra attention to traffic hazards at home and on the road. Traffic accidents continue to be the leading cause of death for children ages 1 through 12 in the United States, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). To help keep families safe this holiday season and year round, NHTSA has teamed up with the animated, preschool television show ChuggingtonŽ to launch the national Think Safe, Ride Safe, Be Safe!Ž campaign. The program offers free resources to help parents and kids learn important safety lessons from engaging characters and take a safety pledge online to earn a traffic safety badge. Here are some traffic safety tips for you and your children to remember. Car Safety Everyone should use seat belts, and children should always be in a properly fitted car seat. Select a car seat based on your childs age and size that fits in your vehicle. Keep your child in the car seat as long as they are within the manufacturers height and weight requirements and in the back seat until age 12. While winter clothes keep your child warm, they can also interfere with the proper harness fit of your child in the car seat. Make sure to place blankets around your child after you fasten the harness. The holidays are a busy time at shopping malls -especially parking lots. Drivers should be on alert for small children when reversing out of a parking space. And dont leave children unattended near an open trunk, where they can get trapped. School Bus Safety During the holiday season, children may become more rambunctious on the way home from school. Parents should take the time to emphasize year-round rules, like facing forward and obeying the school bus driver. Children should always wait with an adult at the school bus stop. When disembarking, instruct children to take five giant steps away from the school bus. Then look left, right, and left again before crossing the street. Bike Safety Parents and children should always wear their properly fitted bike helmets. Helmets should sit low across the forehead with no more than two finger-widths above the eyebrow, and the chin strap should be buckled snugly. In low-light conditions, make sure that you and your children wear brightly colored clothing and reflective materials. Everyones bike should be equipped with a white front light and a red rear light. Children should ride with an adult on bike paths or on the sidewalk -never in the street. More tips and activities can be found at www.chuggington.com/safety. By engaging your children in safety activities and games, you give them the knowledge and lifelong tools to help them stay safe this holiday season and beyond. ***** ULYSSES W. WATKINS JR., MD HEALTH NOTES LIPOSUCTION (Suction Lipectomy) GENERAL INFORMATION DEFINITION: A surgical technique using suction equipment to permanently remove fat deposits. Surgery requires 1 to 2 hours. BODY PARTS INVOLVED: Thighs and hips; buttocks; fat cells of the abdominal wall; chin or other small areas. REASONS FOR SURGERY: Cosmetic improvement of fat areas that wont go away without extreme dieting that may leave the rest of the body too thin. SURGIAL RISK INCREASES WITH: Extreme obesity. *Smoking. *Chronic illness or disease, such as diabetes, *Excess alcohol consumption. *History of phlebitis. *Use of mind-altering drugs, including: narcotics; psychedelics; hallucino gens; marijuana; sedatives; hypnotics; or cocain. WHAT TO EXPECT WHO OPERATES: Plastic surgeon. WHERE PERFORMED: Outpatient surgical facility or hospital. DIAGNOSTIC TESTS: Before surgery: Blood and urine studies. *After surgery: Blood and urine studies. ANESTHESIA Local anesthesia and sedation for small areas. *General anesthesia by injection and inhalation with an airway tube placed in the windpipe. DESCRIPTION OF OPERATION: The plastic surgeon marks areas to be operated on. *Incisions (about 1-inch each) are made in suction areas. *A suction tube, with one end attached to suction equipment, is pushed through the incision into the excess fat and moved back and forth repeat edly (20 to 30 times at each site). *Eached incision is stiched. POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS Resuctioning in some areas may be necessary. *Phlebitis. *Surgical infection. *Excess bleeding; anemia. *Blotchy brown areas at surgical site. AVERAGE HOSPITAL ST: 0 to 2 days. PROBABLE OUTCOME: Improved appearance. POSTOPERATIVE CARE GENERAL MEASURES No smoking. *A hard ridge should form along the incision. As it heals, the ridge will recede gradually. *Dont be concerned about small amounts of blood oozing at the surgical sites. *Bathe and shower as usual. You may wash the incision gently with mild unscented soap. *Use an electric heating pad, a heat lamp or a warm compress to relieve incisional pain. MEDICATION: Your doctor may prescribe: Pain relievers. Dont take prescription pain medicine longer than 4 to 7 days. Use only as much as you need. Antibiotics to fight infection. *You may use non-prescription drugs, such as acetaminophen, for minor pain. *Avoid aspirin. ACTIVITY Resume driving 1 week after the surgical scar heals. *Avoid heavy lifting for 6 weeks after surgery. Learn proper body mechan ics to reduce strain. *Dont strain with bowel movements or urination. DIET No special diet required. *Vitamin and mineral supplements.(sometimes). CALL YOUR DOCTOR IF* Pain, swelling, redness, drainage or bleeding occurs in the surgical area. Your temperature rises to 101F (38.3C). You developsigns of infection: headache, muscles aches, dizziness, or a gener al ill feeling and fever. *You become constipated. *Leg becomes swollen or painful. New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects Health Notes Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area REAL LIFE STORIES

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PAGE B-5 THE STAR NOVEMBER 19, 2011 2011 March of Dimes Foundation working together for stronger, healthier babies Facebook.com/WorldPrematurityDayMarch of Dimes Northeast Florida Division thanks our community partners for support of World Prematurity Day SUPPORTWORLDPREMATURITY DAYNOVEMBER 17 Corporate Partner Supporting Sponsor Media Partner

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NOVEMBER 19, 2011 THESTAR PAGE B-7 CLASSIFIEDS Place Your Ad We also accept Cash and Money Orders Call Liz 904-766-8834To Advertise Order by Tuesday @ 4:00 p.m. Artwork in by Wednesday @ 4:00 p.m. FINANCIAL SERVICES THOMAS PLUMBING REPAIRS Low Rates. (904) 764-9852 HANDYMAN Minor Home Repairs, Painting interior/exterior, Pressure Washing, Exp. & Reasonable Rates Call: 904.768.7671 LIGHTEN YOUR LOAD with W & W Moving & Delivery Service An Experienced & Proud Moving Service Same Day Delivery to Any Local Point Low Hourly or Flat Rate *FREE ESTIMATES CALL TO SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT! (904) 563-5656 BANK ORDERED AUCTION 174 Bank Owned Assets AL, GA, NC & TN. December 6th, 7th & 8th Homes, Acreage, Residential Lots & Commercial Properties (800)323-8388 or RowellAuctions.com SERVICES EPIPHANY MANOR62+ Income eligible Studios & One Bedrooms386-767-2556TTY 1800-955-9771 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Need 13 Good Drivers Top 5% Pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Drivers: Run GA, AL, MS, TN & FL HOME WEEKENDS Earn Up to 39¢/mi, 1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. Call: SUNBELT TRANSPORT, LLC (800)5725489 ext. 227 Driver Refrigerated lanes with lots of miles, hometime choices daily pay and single source dispatch. Modern equipment! CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. (800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com EMPLOYMENT MISCELLANEOUS ANNOUNCEMENTS SCHOOLS & INSTRUCTION SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmillCut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com (800)578-1363 Ext.300N EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (877)206-5165 www.CenturaOnline.com AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)3143769 FREE S&H FLORIDA CITRUS: 20lb. Gift Pack Only $34.95 Navel Oranges or Ruby Reds. www.box-o-fruit.com Text "oranges" to 72727 to win! $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com HELP WANTED POSITIONS AVAILABLE AT The Florida Star Newspaper The Georgia Star Newspaper Sales, Marketing, Distribution, Layout, Reporter Call: (904) 766-8834 email: clara@thefloridastar.com Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)359-1690 Subscribe toThe Florida Star The Georgia StarNewspapersCall (904) 766-8834 www.TheFloridaStar.com AUTOS WANTED Affordable Apartment Homes(904) 381-4817 1-800-955-8771/711 TTY 3505 Corby Street, Jacksonville, FL 32205 *Income & Age Limits Apply FOR RENT LAND FOR SALE Change Your Life. Your Future.You have the power to change your future. And you can d o it right here at Florida State College at Jacksonville To learn about employment opportunities that are available, please visit our website at Jobs.FSCJ.edu CASH FOR CARS! Any Make, Model, or Year We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car or Truck TODAY. Free Towing! Instant Offer: (888)420-3807 Advertising that Works. Put your ad in Over 100 Papers throughout Florida for one LOW RATE! Call (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida-classi fieds.com INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY!! 1 waterfront & 4 lake access lots, $84,400. Gated lake community near Athens, GA. Excellent schools. Financing available. Call the Bank Direct. (888)308-6729. Pre-Grand Opening Sale! Sat. November 19th Only. 6.34 acres w/ direct lake frontage only $29,900! Brand new, never before offered! Gorgeous wooded setting with deep water frontage on spectacular lake. Paved rds, power, phone, much more. Unheard of prices excellent financing. Hurry out for 1st pick! Call now (866)952-5302, x 71 6 FIGURE INCOME 100,000 RX Discount Cards Placed in 80 Pharmacy Locations @.03 each. You earn $1.50 for each new prescription & $.75 for refills. Accumulating residual income. (877)308-7959 Ext.231 www.freerxadvantage.com EDUCATION ALLIED HEALTH career trainingAttend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com ROOM FOR RENT 1156 West 4th St. (AC / Cable / Kitchen / Very Clean) Contract: Mr. Ron 904-307-4628 or 904-508-8026 ROOMS FOR RENT (Large / AC / Cable / Kitchen / Very Clean) Contact: 904-725-4359 or 904-718-2825 REAL ESTATE ELDERLY or BABY CAREI will care for your elderly or babysit for you during the holidays Contact: 904-379-2191

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C&J1 C M Y K Crime and Justice Crime and JusticeA Publication of the Florida Star and Georgia Star NOVEMBER 19 2011THE STARC&J 1 As an African American newspaper, we basically report on offenses committed by African Americans. Please note that in our observations, weekly reports show that African Americans DO NOT commit the largest percentage of criminal offenses in this ar ea. Shootout Between Seafood Shop Employee and Robbers Leave One DeadAn attempted armed robbery at a seafood shack resulted in a shootout between an employee and two robbers leaving one of the robbers dead. Arrests were made on the surviving robber along with a woman. Oscar Coleman, 32, and his brother, Robert Coleman, 22, walked into the Golden Crab House both armed with guns. They attempted to rob the place and demanded money, but instead found themselves in a shootout with someone at the restaurant. Police said the other shooter was the store manager, but the store manager later told them it was one of the employees. The manager told police that last month on October 16, three men had walked into the same shop and robbed the place at gunpoint.The employee had armed himself since then. Police received a call shortly thereafter about someone getting shot and were led to a home. Rescue arrived with paramedics and Robert Coleman was found dead near the back door. Oscar and a 27-year-old woman, Sherri BethJones, showed up to the home a little after an hour and were arrested. Police say that the body was dragged out of the car and was left at the back of the house. Oscar Coleman and Jones faced armed robbery charges but they were later upgraded to murder charges. There were two customers present in the shootout, but nobody was hurt. The manager and other members are in the process of obtaining weapon permits due to the recent robberies. When asked, he said he was not sure who fired the first shot, but the lives of his employees were at risk.Man Crashes into BBQ Restaurant During High-Speed ChaseA man was arrested after crashing a stolen truck into the Jenkins Quality barbecue restaurant during a high-speed chase. An officer spotted a Ford truck on the road that was reported stolen. As the truck was being pulled over, a second police car pulled up in front of it. The truck reversed and rammed the cruiser twice before speeding off again. The driver went up to speeds of 100 mph in a 40 mph zone. The chase finally ended after the truck rammed into a parked car, which crashed into the front door of the barbecue restaurant. The driver got out of the vehicle and fled, but was found hiding behind a Taco Bell. William Earl Union Jr.,19, was arrested for two counts of aggravated battery against an officer and numerous traffic charges as well. Clerk of Courts Employee Accused of Fraud and Helping Suspended Drivers A Clerks of Courts employee was arrested after trying to profit and selling forms to those with a suspended license. Shayla Odol, 25, had been working as a clerk since 2004, but was suspected to have printed and selling over 20 copies of forms, which would help drivers to restore their suspended licenses from unpaid traffic fines. Records showed that she had even come in at night to print copies of these forms. Investigators found a list of names on her work computer of people she was preparing forms for. After examining the names with the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, the results showed that none of the licenses were reinstated and still remained suspended. Police say none may have gotten what they paid for at all and were all scammed. Odol was arrested at her job and was charged with bribery, falsifying official documents, organized fraud, and tampering with or fabricating evidence. She is being held on $200,000 bond. Oscar Coleman Sherri Beth Jones Williams Union Jr. Shayla Odol

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NOVEMBER 19 2011THE STARC&J 2 SSSHH! From Actual Police ReportsDid You Hear About?... Did You Hear About?... EDITORS NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law. The Sheriffs Office reports are a matter of public record. The Star seeks to educate in the hope of keeping our community safe. Thanksgiving Safety Tips Cooking Tips Unattended cooking is the leading cause of home fires and home fire injuries in the U.S. When cooking, remember to keep an eye on the range. € Never leave the cooking area unattended € If you have to leave the stove, microwave or other cooking appliance for any reason turn the appliance off. € Turn handles to the center of the stove to prevent spills and to prevent children grabbing hot pans. € Have a lid handy to smother a pan fire € Use approved pot holders, not aprons or towels € Clean appliances regularly. Watch for grease overflows that can start fires. € Don't place towels, napkins or other paper products around the stove surface € Don't wear loose clothing € Keep the kitchen off-limits to young children and adults that are not helping with food preparations. Most Importantly... Be Prepared for a Fire! One of the best ways to protect yourself and your family is to have a working smoke alarm that alerts you of a fire. A smoke alarm greatly reduces your chances of dying in a fire. €Make and practice a home fire escape plan and set a meeting place outside. €Make sure everyone in your family knows at least two escape routes from their bedrooms. € Call 911 after leaving your home to report a fire emergency. Your Safety Would you like to stay connected with your loved ones on lock down in jail, or prison? Anyone gone but not forgotten that you want to encourage ? Get connected and keep a CONNECTION through our new CONNECTION spot. Call, Write, Email, or Fax to us titled: CONNECTION $10 3 lines of text only (Total 18 words) With PICTURE included $25. Contact G @ 904-766-8834 or Email G@thefloridastar.com send all correspondence to P.O. Box 40629, Jacksonville, FL 32203 Police Shoots One of Two in Family Dollar Armed RobberyTwo Arrests were made during an armed robbery at a Family Dollar store leaving one shot by an officer. Just before 5 a.m., a delivery truck driver was behind the business unloading merchandise at the side door near the entrance. The driver saw two masked men, Edward J. Littleton, 22, and Frederick V. Jennings, 17, entering the back door of the store. Jennings was armed with a .32-caliber revolver and Littleton was armed with an AK-47 assault rifle. The two rounded up the employees inside, forced them to the floor, and demanded money from the safe. The safe was opened and the suspects took the money. As the robbery was taking place, the truck driver who saw the two suspects ran to a nearby Walgreens, where he came in contact with an offduty police officer. The officer called in assistance before going over to the Family Dollar store. When he spotted Littleton walk toward the front window of the store with his rifle, he shot him using his police-issued AR-15 assault rifle. He fired three shots and hit Littleton once in his left shoulder. The other suspect, Jennings, tried to run away, but was captured by police. Police say there have been a total of eight Family Dollar robberies in the last 90 days, but this arrest is said to not have any relations to them. Also the officer who shot Littleton will be on administrative leave, which is normal after a shooting so that a review of whether the shooting was justified can be conducted. Littleton has been previously arrested for knowingly operating a vehicle with drivers license cancelled or revoked. Jennings does not have any prior criminal history. Both will face felony charges for their recent arrests. Edward Littleton Frederick Jennings Littletons AK-47 Assault Rifle

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Woman Shoots at Man for Criticizing her Driving Walterboro, SC31-year-old, Sharon Brabham, was being followed by a man named Thomas Mobley to a Walgreens parking lot. When she got out, she was confronted by Mobley for her reckless driving. Brabham responded by pulling out a .38 caliber pistol and fired at him, but she missed and hit another car instead. Police were called and Brabham was arrested. She admitted to shooting in the area of the victim. The handgun was found in her car along with a clip with four rounds in it. A spent cartridge was also found. She faces charges of attempted murder, possession of a firearm in commission of a violent crime, discharging a firearm in city limits and malicious damage to a vehicle. Man Accused of Beating Elderly and Sodomy of Caretaker St. Louis, MOTravon Jones, 19, had broken into a home, where he started yelling and demanding cash. Arteria King, 92, came out of his bedroom with a cane, which Jones took and started beating him with. King was with a 50-year-old caretaker, who started yelling. He started hitting her in the face and also King in the face, breaking his bones and his nose. He then forced the caretaker to perform oral sex on him before stealing the keys to her car, which he drove away with. He was pulled over the next day and was arrested on charges of forcible sodomy, burglary, theft, assault, resisting arrest and tampering with a motor vehicle. King did not survive from the injuries. NOVEMBER 19, 2011THE STARC&J 3Bizarre Crimes Bizarre Crimeswho, what, when...huh? Other Unusual Crimes Across the Nation Man Flees from Courthouse and Instead Suffers Trying to Swim Across a River A man was arrested after trying to flee from his court hearing and jumping into a river to escape, where he nearly drowned. Ryan McKenzie, 45, was at a hearing involving drug charges. When he overheard an agent asking if his case was on the docket, he slipped out of the room to make an escape. He ran out of the courthouse and jumped into a river. Making this mistake nearly cost him his life. Police noted that he was most likely going to drown and that he appeared to be in distressŽ when he could not get himself out of the water. Instead of a chase, this became a rescue mission to save McKenzies life. Police boats arrived with deputies onboard and an officer jumped in the water to pull McKenzie out of the river to safety. He was then taken to the hospital for evaluation and he is expected to be released into the custody of U.S. Border Patrol. According to records, McKenzie was arrested in August on charges cocaine possession and trafficking. Woman Calls 911 and Police Find Drugs and Weapons at her Home A woman had made an incomplete call to police, which led to her own arrest after drugs and weapons were found at her home. Marlene Annette Culver, 28, had called police saying that her boyfriend had hit her in the face. She hung up, but called back to let them know everything was fine. She did not follow through and did not stay on the line. Police responded to the incomplete call by going to Culvers home. When police arrived, Culver told them she was not the caller nor the homeowner and insisted that they leave as there were no problems. She did not allow entrance and consistently resisted. As a result she was arrested and she admit that she called she called 911 after an argument with family members. When police searched the residence, they found two guns, an electric bill counter, a grinder, a digital scale, and 1 pound of marijuana. Culver was arrested on charges of possessing marijuana with the intent to sell and possessing an altered firearm. Man Kills Woman and Uses Her Wedding Rings to Propose to Girlfriend Chicago, ILA neighbor drove by the house of Virginia Perillo, 73, and saw that the garage was open with her body on the ground. Police came and saw that she was beaten to death with her face smashed. A watch was left at the scene, which police found belonged to Raymond Harris, 36. DNA evidence led to his arrest and police found out Harris had stolen Perillos wedding and engagement rings after killing her, which he later used to propose to his girlfriend five days later. Records show that he was on parole after serving 14 years of his 30 year sentence on charges of attempted murder and aggravated arson. He is being charged with first-degree murder and is being held without bail. Student Meets Thief Who Tried to Sell Her Bike Online to Take it Back A 25-year-old student noticed that her bicycle had been missing when she returned home from a bar. She filed a police report and decided to go on Craigslist, an internet site for locally buying and exchanging goods, to see if she would come across somebody selling her bike. To her surprise, she found a photo of her bike with the same red handle bar tapes and water bottle holder. She set up an appointment with the seller to see the bike, so that she could test rideŽ it. When she met up with him, he let her ride it and she immediately knew it was hers. She then rode it down to her car, threw it in, and drove off. After taking possession of her bike again, she called the cops and gave them the address to the thief. Denzel ONeal Crawford, 18, was arrested and confessed to stealing the bike. He was released on bond. Ryan McKenzie Marlene Culver

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NOVEMBER 19, 2011THE STARC&J 4 PAGE B4 C M Y K Criminal Line-Up Criminal Line-Up Citizens with tips are encouraged to call Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS. You can remain anonymous and become eligible for a reward. ON THE LOOKOUT MISSING PERSONS Name: Keshauntay Denyse Cunningham Age: 15 Weight: 120 lbs Last seen: 11/04/11 Name: Devon Vennis Rogers Age: 17 Weight: 135 lbs Last seen: 10/21/11 Name: Willnesha Shakira Forman Age: 13 Weight: 120 lbs Last seen: 11/04/11 Name: Zakendra Antoinette Gary Age: 16 Weight: 100 lbs Last seen: 9/02/11 Name: Latoria Nechelle Loving Age: 15 Weight: 120 lbs Last seen: 10/30/11 Three Sought in RobberyPolice are looking for three suspects who were reported to have beat and robbed two people after they had left a nightclub. The two victims, Matthew Gordon and Jessica Henson, told police that as they were leaving the club, a man in a gold Impala asked Gordon if he smoked weed.Ž After replying with a no, he then was beaten in the head by two others and his wallet taken. Henson was also grabbed by the head and thrown to the ground before the robbers drove off with cash, two Visa cards, a Social Security card, a voters registration card, a food stamp card, and a cellphone. Gordon told police that one of the suspects had the word PhillyŽ tattooed on his forearm. Anybody with any information about the any of the three robbers is encouraged to call police. MOST WANTED Name: Bobby Lee Green Age: 48 Offense: Aggravated BAttery Intended Harm Name: Patricia Chandler Age: 31 Offense: Forgery Name: Kimberly Blunt Age: 31 Offense: Fraud use of Personal ID Name: Karneisha Lashawn Moultrie Age: 19 Offense: Traffic in Stolen Property Name: Christopher Herbert Age: 35 Offense: Resisting Officer w/Violence Name: Otis Lee Shepherd Jr. Age : 29 Offense: Aggravated Assault w/Weapon

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NOVEMBER 19, 2011THE STARPR 1 P P R R E E P P R R A A P P Y Y o o u u t t h h S S e e c c t t i i o o n n Robert E.Lee High School Home Coming November 10, 2011 Photos by F.M. Powell IIIRobert E.Lee High School 28, Andrew Jackson High School 6. Lee won homecoming game! All Senior and Family in Band Homecoming King Q

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NOVEMBER 19, 2011PREP RAP PR 2 Rapper, Author and Actor Common Scheduled to Speak at FAMUTALLAHASSEE, Fla. „ Florida A&M University (FAMU) alumnus and Grammy award-winning rapper Common will be a guest lecturer on Saturday, December 10 at 7:30 p.m. in Lee Hall Auditorium as part of the 2011-2012 Lyceum Series. Tickets will be available through the FAMU Ticket Office location in the Alfred Lawson Jr. Multipurpose Center and Teaching Gymnasium and ticketmaster.com for $20, $10 and $5, depending on the location of the seats. Tickets that were purchased previously for Commons lecture will be valid for this event. The lecture was originally planned for September 28. Known as the King of Conscious Hip Hop, Common will discuss his book titled One Day Itll All Make Sense, which explores his upbringing and family relationships. Common is considered one of musics most poetic and respected lyricists. His introspective lyrics have pushed boundaries with their biting social commentary. In 2007, he launched the Common Ground Foundation, which is dedicated to the empowerment and development of urban youth in the United States. Common also offers a younger generation a better understanding of self-respect and love, utilizing the cultural relevance of hip hop in the childrens books he has written. The first childrens book, titled The MIRROR and ME, teaches lessons of life, the human spirit and human nature. His follow-up book, I Like You But I Love Me, was recently nominated for an NAACP Image Award, and his third book, M.E. (Mixed Emotions), was released in 2008. In January 2007, the rapper crossed over into movies and made his acting debut in the movie Smokin Aces. Subsequently, he starred opposite Queen Latifah in Just Wright, and co-starred in movies, American Gangster, Street Kings, Wanted and others. Whether inspiring audiences through his music, his books, or his foundation, Common continues to break new ground, and remains one of hip hops most innovative and positive voices. The next Lyceum performances include the Dance Theatre of Harlem Ensemble scheduled for January 27, 2012 and the Moscow Festival Ballet on March 1, 2012. The Lyceum Series is an essential part of Florida A&M University,Ž said FAMU Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Cynthia Hughes Harris, who chairs the Lyceum Committee. It is the universitys way to teach the students beyond the classroom and expose them to the arts and culture. The Lyceum committee is looking forward to sharing these experiences with our faculty, staff, students, alumni and the Tallahassee community.Ž The FAMU Lyceum Series has been a part of the FAMU tradition since the universitys early beginnings. Throughout the history of the series, FAMU has enriched campus life and shared with the community the artists, performers and lecturers of the day. For more information about this years Lyceum Series, contact the FAMU Office of Communications at (850) 599-3413. Keep kids out of prison Promote Education Over Incarceration PROJECT R.E.A.C.H. INC. is focusing on keeping young people out of jail. The project is called "Education Over Incarceration". The campaign will explore the need for resources to keep youth in school and out of prison and show how socio-economic factors and race are part of the equation. Through networking, including Facebook, e-mailing and town-hall meetings and community workshops, we will address the many angered and frustrated parents as it relates to ongoing cuts in funding for public school education. We will encourage parents to join this most critical movement to promote education over incarceration for their children and to make education their number one priority. Across the country many are using the Occupy Wall Street protest to bring attention to the rich and great economic disparities. Our protest will act as a method to keep young people out of jail and in school. States and school districts have made billions in cuts to public education over the last several years and billions more expected across the United States next year and it must end. The side effects to incarceration over education: In the United States, youth of color caught in the crossfire of the war on drugs are frequently subject to persecution, incarcerated and denied access to educational opportunities. The irony is that the war on drugs is often defended as a necessary policy to protect the nation's young people. In reality, rather than protecting youth, the drug war has resulted in the institutionalized persecution of Black, Latino and Native American young people. Youth of color bear the brunt of harmful drug policies, from arrest, to prosecution, to detention in adult correctional facilities. Some states now have the distinction of having more Black and Latino young people in prison, than graduates from State Colleges or Universities. School Districts are taking hard looks at trimming its school budgets next year in the wake of states budget forecasts. It appears that some legislators are pulling back on education funding and refusing to put emphasis on education reform as an urgent priority. These types of budget forecasts speak to fundamentally flawed views regarding the importance of improving the Nation's education system and the futures of all children. Education, not incarceration, is needed and political and educational leaders must examined the interconnection between public education, the growing prison-industrial complex and its cost. We are further suggesting the urgent need for a national call to action on education and prison reform, and not just an exchange of ideas during this economic crisis, but a long term goal and mandate. Federal Title (I) legislation defines parent involvement as: The participation of parents in regular, two-way, meaningful communication, involving students' academic learning and other school activities. The involvement includes ensuring that parents play an integral role in assisting their child's learning; that parents are encouraged to be actively involved in their child's education at school; that parents are full partners in their child's education and are included, as appropriate, in decision making and on advisory committees to assist in the education of their child. Project Appleseed the national campaign for public school improvement is a wonderful site for parents and educators to visit as a guide to improving education, school, student and parent relations. http://www.projectappleseed.org/index.html

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NOVEMBER 19, 2011PREP RAPPR 3 newspaperfun.com

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NOVEMBER 19, 2011THE STARPR 4 P P R R E E P P R R A A P P Y Y o o u u t t h h S S e e c c t t i i o o n n Third Annual Tour de St. Johns Fun Ride Will Benefit Robert E. Lee High School WHAT: The third annual Tour de St. Johns Fun Ride will bring the community together for a scenic fall bicycle ride through the historic neighborhoods of Riverside, Avondale and Ortega, while directly benefiting the students of Robert E. Lee High School. The bike ride is designed to create awareness for the schools current needs, improve the student experience and performance, and enhance Lee Highs reputation throughout the community. Sponsorship, volunteer and participant opportunities are available through the events website. To register or view more information about the Tour de St. Johns Fun Ride, visit www.tourdestjohns.com WHEN: Saturday, November 19, 2011, 10 a.m. WHERE: Robert E. Lee High School, 1200 McDuff Ave. S., Jacksonville, FL 32205 Holiday Calendar Jacksonville, FL In observance of the upcoming holidays, all Duval County public schools will be closed Wednesday, November 23 through Monday, November 28. Duval County Public Schools (DCPS) administration offices will be closed Thursday, November 24 and Friday, November 25. For winter break, all Duval County public schools will be closed from Monday, December 19 through Monday, January 2. DCPS administration offices will be closed from Friday, December 23 through Monday, January 2. Both schools and administration offices will re-open on Tuesday, January 3. See below for printable version. November 2011 Date and Event / Meeting 23-28Thanksgiving (Schools Closed) 24-25 Thanksgiving (Administration Offices Closed) December 2011 January 2012 Date and Event / Meeting 12/19 1/2 Winter Holiday (Schools Closed) 12/23 1/2 Winter Holiday (Administration Offices Closed) Band Direction Donald Jenkins Robert E.Lee High School Home ComingNovember 10 2011



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HEALTHY LIVINGIs Modern Technology Hurting Your Eyes? (StatePoint) A world full of personal computers, hand-held video games, smartphones and e-readers is increasing the risk of eye-related problems in many Americans. This isnt surprising, as children and teenagers are now spending 7.5 hours a day consuming electronic media, according to a study by the Kaiser Family Foundation. Computer vision syndrome, or digital eye strain, is an increasingly common medical ailment and can affect learning and work productivity. It is now the number one computer-related complaint in the United States -ahead of carpal-tunnel syndrome. The eyes function best when looking at something about 20 feet away. Looking at something close-up, like a computer game, text message or e-reader requires more focus, and over time, can lead to blurry vision, eye strain and headaches, explains Dr. Leanne Liddicoat, a VSP optometrist in California. And VSP Vision Care, the largest not-for-profit eyecare benefits providers in the United States, recently reported that nearly one-third of VSP patients suffer from symptoms of computer vision syndrome. However, there are easy steps parents and children can take to prevent these symptoms: Get the right lighting. Keep bright lighting overhead to a minimum. Position your computer screen in a way that reduces reflections and glare from windows or overhead lights. Stay back. The closer the eyes are to an object theyre looking at, the harder they have to work. A good rule is to apply the Harmon Distance (the distance between the elbow and first knuckle) when viewing anything on screen. If you or your children are holding digital devices closer than a Harmon Distance on a consistent basis, consult your eyecare provider. Apply the 20/20/20 rule. To avoid fatigue and digital eye strain symptoms, eye doctors recommend stopping every 20 minutes to look at something 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds. Also, remember to blink frequently. Monitor usage. Set time limits on the amount of screen time you and your children will have each day. For children over 2 years, limit screen time to less than two hours per day when possible. If older children need to use the computer and e-readers for homework, make sure they first give their eyes a rest after school by playing outside or engaging in other non-digital activities. Children under 2 years should have no screen time. Get checked. It's important you have the best vision possible when using digital devices. This starts with a comprehensive examination by an eye doctor, who may prescribe corrective lenses or glasses specially designed for digital screens. To find an eyecare specialist near you, or to learn more about combating computer vision syndrome, visit www.vsp.com. As our reliance on digital devices increases, we must be mindful of our usage and take steps to relax and refresh our eyes to reduce eye strain. PAGE A-2 THESTAR NOVEMBER 19, 2011 OPINIONS CLARA JACKSON McLAUGHLIN OWNER/PUBLISHER LONZIE LEATH, RINETTA M. FEFIE MANAGEMENT SALES & MARKETING G. ABRAMS, DENNIS WADE, DAN EVANS MAY E. FORD LAYOUT EDITOR KEVIN KIM CRIME &JUSTICE ARTHIA NIXON CARIBBEAN NEWS ALLEN PROCTOR DESIGN AND WEB SITE PARTNER BETTY DAVIS LIFESTYLE/ SOCIETY COLUMNIST MIKE BONTS, SPORTS EDITORInvestigative Reporter: Lonzie Leath, Features:Dementrious Lawrence Reporters/Photographers: Marsha Phelts, Carl Davis, Laurence Greene, F. M. Powell III, Michael Phelts, Richard McLaughlin, Andrea F. K. Ortiz, Angela Morrell, Joseph Lorentzon, Scott Jurrens, Cheryl Williams Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Ester Davis, Lucius Gantt, Deanna, Cynthia Ferrell, Delores Mainor Woods, Farris Long Distribution and Sales: Dan & Pat Randolph, Abeye Ayele, Cassie Williams, Angela Beans, Tony Beans, Herman Robinson, David Scott TEL: (904) 766-8834 FAX: (904) 765-1673 info@thefloridastar.com (912) 264-3137 Georgia Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Alachua, Flagler, Marion, McIntosh, Camden And Glynn CountyTheFloridaStar.comThe Florida and Georgia Star Newspapers are independent newspapers published weekly in Jacksonville, Florida SUBSCRIPTIONRATES One Year-$40.00 Half Year-$22.00Send check or money order or call with VISA, AmEx, MC, DISCOVER and subscription amount to: The Florida Star, The Georgia Star P.O. Box 40629 Jacksonville, Florida 32203 The Florida Star will not be responsible for the return of any solicited or unsolicited manuscripts or photos. Opinions expressed by columnists in this newspaper do not necessarily represent the policy of this paper.MEMBERSHIPS: Florida Press Association National Newspaper Association National Newspaper Publishers Association Amalgamated Publisher, Inc. Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce First Coast African American Chamber of Commerce THEFLORIDA STAR THE GEORGIA STAR YOLANDA KNUCKLE, COLUMNS LIZ BILLINGSLEA OFFICE/ACCOUNTS MANAGER TIA AYELE, SPECIAL SECTIONS GEORGIA MARKETING ANGELA FAVORS MORRELL DISTRIBUTION HERMAN ROBINSON, DAVID SCOTT National Newspaper Publishers Association Why Wait?LET THE POST OFFICE DELIVER THE FLORIDA or GEORGIA STAR TO YOUI want a One Year Subscription to The Florida or Georgia Star!Please donate 10% of my paid Subscription to the non-profit organization listed below. Please send my Paid Subscription to: Name ___________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________ City ____________________________________________________________ State ____________ Zip Code _______________ Name of Organization for Donation: ________________________________________ __________________________________________ A TRADITION OF EXCELLENCE () Months $22.00 ()One Year $40.00 () Years -$70.00 SEND TO:The Florida/Georgia Star Post Office Box 40629 Jacksonville, FL-40629 www.thefloridastar.com Cash, Money Order, Check, PayPal, and/or Credit Card Accepted ***F A L L S P E C I A L***DOWNPAYMENT AS LOW AS $495 2003FordE-150 Work Van$1,000-Down 2002Chevy Astro Work Van $800-Down 1998Mazda Protege Low Miles $1,850-CA$H 1999ChevyMalibu Nice Car$695-Down 1998 Mitsubishi Galant Gas Saver $595-DownCALL: 904-354-0405UNITED USED CARS, INC.1222 North Main St.(Plus tax, tag & fees)Everybody Rides We finance everybody SAVE $100.00 with this AD AUTOS FOR SALE Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson First African American Inducted Into The Florida Press Hall Of Fame REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL No. 12-05 COLOCATION SITE WITH METRO ETHERNET CONNECTIVITY FOR THE JACKSONVILLE PORT AUTHORITY Proposals will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority (JAXPORT) until 2:00 P.M. (EST) on Thursday, December 15, 2011 at which time they will be opened in the First Floor Conference Room, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32206. All proposals must be submitted in accordance with specifications No. 1205, which may be obtained after 8:00 AM on Thursday, November 10, 2011 from the bidding opportunities website: http://www.jaxport.com/about-jaxport/corporate-information/projects-for-bid Procurement Services Department P. O. Box 3005 Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (904) 357-3455 Happy Happy Thanksgiving! Thanksgiving! The Florida Star & Georgia Star Newspapers PUBLIC NOTICE

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JACKSONVILLE, FL ASAY, Ursula Norton, 51, died November 10, 2011. BADGER, James K., died November 11, 2011. CAMBRIDGE Wanda, died November 9, 2011. CAMPBELL, Scott W., died November 11, 2011. CODY, Damen S., 30, died November 11, 2011. EASTER, Hap, 70, died November 8, 2011. FOREST, Charlotte, 80, died November 7, 2011. GARDNER Donald E., died November 9, 2011. GAULDEN, Gardenia, 72, died November 7, 2011. GLEN, Marvin L., 43, died November 1, 2011. GRANGER, Florida, 90, died November 7, 2011. GROSSO, Marco, 22, died November 7, 2011. HAROLD, Damon, died November 9, 2011. JACKSON, Deborah Scott, died November 8, 2011. JAMES, Elder Anthony, died November 7, 2011. JENKINS, Glenda Marie Register, 64, died November 12, 2011. JOHNSON, Lizzie C., 96, died November 13, 2011. JOHNSON, Robert, died November 10, 2011. JOHNSON, William Clinton Bill, 68, died November 6, 2011. JONES, Sandra, 47, died November 8, 2011. KELLY, Betty A., died November 11, 2011. LOCKHART, Roxie Lewis, died November 5, 2011. LOTT, Ruth, died November 9, 2011. MARTIN, Phillip Joseph, 41, died November 10, 2011. MORRISON, Marie S., 77, died November 9, 2011. NEAL, Anita Dionna, 48, died November 9, 2011. PARRISH, Charles Melvin, 52, died November 9, 2011. PITTMAN, Carolyn D., died November 9, 2011. SAUNDERS, Beverly Ann, 57, died November 6, 2011. SODERHOLM, Arlene Ethel, 93, died November 11, 2011. SUMNER, Cameron Kyle, 23, died November 9, 2011. THOMAS, Mary Lee, died November 6, 2011. WILLIAMS, Marilyn, died November 10, 2011. ~*~GEORGIA DEATHS LECOUNT, Alphonso, died November 2, 2011. MITCHELL, Larry, died November 10, 2011. WINGREEN, Stephen, died October 18, 2011. WHITE, David E., Jr., 86, died October 13, 2011. Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church 201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475 Rev. Pearce Edwing, Sr. Sunday Worship Service . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m. Church School . . . . . . . . . 8:30 p.m. Wednesday Glory Hour Bible Study . . . . . . .10:00 a.m. Jehovah Jireh Bible Study . . . . . . 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Thursday Young at Heart Ministry . . .10:00 a.m. Friday Joy Explosion Ministry . . . . . . . 6:30 p.m. The Church DirectoryCome and Worship With Us New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208Sunday School ................9:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Intercessory Prayer.................10:45 a.m. Morning Worship ......................11:00 a.m. Youth Church 2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary) Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m. Elder Arnitt Jones, Acting Pastor Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus (904) 764-5727 Church GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCHThe Church Where Everybody Is SomebodyBishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586Sunday School.......................................................................................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship.................................................................................11:00 a.m. Tuesday................................................Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m. Thursday...............................................................................Joy Night,7:00 p.m.Email: Gospell75@aol.com Website: Greaterelbethel.org Faith In Our CommunitySchedule of Events and ServicesPAGE A-3 THE STAR NOVEMBER 19, 2011 Tune In To WCGL AM RadioForIMPACT IMPACTTuesday and Thursday from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.AtWCGL1360.comThe Florida Star and Impact Striving To Make A Difference! Clara McLaughlin Host Yvonne Brooks Co-Host CHURCH DEATH NOTICES DEATH NOTICES Central Metropolitan C.M.E. Church4611 North Pearl St., Jacksonville, FL 32206 Ofc (904) 354-7426 Fax (904) 354-0934Rev. Marquise Hardrick, Pastor ~ Worship Service ~Sun Church School 9:30a.m. Sun Morning Worship -10:45 a.m. Tues Eve Bible Study 6:30 p.m. Wed Bible Study 12 Noon Wed Feeding Ministry 2:00 p.m. ANNOUNCEMENTS Lion of the Tribe of Judah Ministries, Inc. PASTOR Dr. Sirretta Williams (Temporary services held) 623 Beechwood St., Jacksonville, FL 32206 Sunday School.......10:00 a.m. ~ Sunday Worship .......11:00 a.m. Every 5th Sunday Friends and Family Day Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Direct Phone: 904.866.7047 Office Phone: 904.356.4226 Seeing Beyond The Lifestyle To Save A Life Website: www.lottojm.com ONE ACCORD MINISTRIES INTERNATIONAL, INC., located at 2971 Waller St. in Jacksonville (I-10 and McDuff) is having their 6th Annual Convocation on November 16, 17, 18, 19, and 20, 2011. For more information, call (904) 389-7373 or 389-5895. You may also go to our website at www.jdgministries.org or email us at jdgministriesinc@yahoo.com Bishop Dr. Jan D. Goodman, Sr., Founder and Pastor. God is Good. Come and be Blessed.! Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email submissions preferred. Send to: Info@TheFloridaStar.com Rev. Marquise & Mrs. Deedra Hardrick Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you; and, lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world. Amen. Mathew 28:19-20 Complete Funeral ............................ $3,595.00(includes Service and Standard Casket)* Full Funeral w/Viewing Followed by Cremation .......................$2,195.00 Direct Cremation ................................ $795.00 We Offer Prearranged FuneralsPrices Subject to Change==========================================================3031 Moncrief Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209 (904) 353-4434 (904) 354-6642 (904) 353-4437 Fax 877-4CLPAGE Tollfree www.CLPageMortuary.com C. L. Page Mortuary C. L. Page Mortuary Carla L. Page, L.F.D. Come join Bishop Dr. Lorenzo Hall Sr.every Wednesday and Thursday from 12:00 Noon to 1:00 PM for Prayer Meeting and Bible Study at The Greater ElBeth-El Divine Holiness Church, located at 723 W. 4th Street, Jacksonville, FL 32209. Ask Us About OurALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208 Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354 DIRECTORSDeborah West Alphonso West Jacqueline Y. Bartley If there had been a death in your family yesterday, what would you be doing today?FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED Since 1988Pre-Need ForeThought Funeral Planning ProgramIm sorry to have to tell you this... 1st Annual Church & Pastors AnniversaryLife Center Restoration MinistriesPastor John & Gwendolyn Hansberry When: Sunday, November 20, 2011 Time: 4:00 p.m. Where: Life Center Restoration Ministries 5912 New Kings Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32209 Speaker: Arch Bishop J.H. Wilson Contact:904-213-7978 or 904-214-6649 We cordially invite all Pastors, Evangelist, Ministers, and Friends to join in this joyous occasion.But without faith it is impossible to please him: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him. Hebrews 11:6 K(KJV)We have come this far by Faith DUNNS TEMPLEBISHOP EVERLENA DUNN Bishop Everlena Dun, noted religious leader and Founder of Dunns Temple When: November 20, 2011 Time: 3:00 pm Where: Mary L. Singleton Senior Center 150 East 1st Street, Jacksonville, FL An interesting program has been planned for your enjoyment. Bishop Larry Boston will be the speaker. ALL ARE INVITED "Like a bird singing in the rain, let grateful memories survive in time of sorrow." Is Your Child Ready for Kindergarten? Austin Christian Academy for the Development of Excellence and Leadership, Inc. Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten(VPK) 12th Grade Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (VPK) is a quality education program aimed to help your child enter school prepared and ready to learn. All children 4 years old on or before September 1, 2010 and eligible for kindergarten in the fall of 2011 will qualify! A Florida Drivers License and the childs Birth Certificate are required for enrollment. A Social Security number for the child is also preferred, if available. Offering : A Beka Program, Arts and Crafts, Music/Computer Lab, Tutoring, Teen Parent Service Center, Field Trips, Extended Day 6:30 a.m. 6:30 p.m., Alternative Education, Community Hours NOW ENROLLING When: Monday Friday (9a.m. 5 p.m.) Where: 6901 N. Main St. (Greater Israel Baptist Church located on the corner of 59th and Main St.) Audrey A. White, Principal 6901 N. Main St., Jacksonvillle, FL 32208 (904) 647-5065 (904) 333-4290 We are redefining the world in which children live!

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A4 C M Y KPAGE A-4 THE STAR NOVEMBER 19, 2011 E kaabo (pronounced eh-kah-bow). Welcome. Kingsley Plantation Burial Site Discovered: Souls-a-gathered In Freedom I ask that the knowledge about this burial ground will one day come to further our understanding of the universal value of freedom. Dr. Johnetta Betsch Cole Ft. George Island, FL. So, the announcement were makingis that we have discovered, rediscovered, the location of the slave burialsin the Kingsley Plantation So began the press conference announcement by Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve Superintendent, Barbara Goodman, of the discovery of a previously unknown burial ground believed to be a Kingsley-era slave cemetery. The event was attended by Kingsley family descendants, the media, and general public. Also in attendance were Bryant Rollins and Shirley Stetson of StetsonRollins Consulting, who designed a facilitated community discussion, coordinated with Shauna Allen, Chief of Resource Stewardship, National Park Service. In a moving speech at the press conference, Dr. Johnetta Betsch Cole asked that all acknowledge the Kingsley Plantation as sacred ground. Dr Cole is a Jacksonville native and descendant of the Kingsley family. She traces her ancestry through her millionaire great-grandfather, A. L. Lewis, founder of American Beach and the AfroAmerican Life Insurance company, who married Mary Sammis, the great-granddaughter of Zephaniah Kingsley and his Senegalese-born wife and former slave, Anta Majigeen Njaay, later known as Anna Kingsley. Cole is also the sister of the late MaVynee Betsch, known as the Beach Lady, who valiantly fought to save American Beach from becoming a commercial center to surrounding resorts. She spoke of her sister as the revolutionary spirit who also charged the Kingsley Plantation with acknowledging the descendants in an event which has become the annual Kingsley Plantation Heritage Days festival. Dr. Cole, Director of the Smithsonian Institutions National Museum of African Art, compared the historical significance of the burial site to Sankofa, an Adinkra symbol of Ghana, West Africa, which is represented by a long-necked bird looking over its back. In her clear and measured way of speaking, Cole used a popular saying from AfricanAmerican culture to describe the principle of Sankofa, You cant know where youre going if you dont know where youve been. The burial site was discovered in 2010, during archaeological field studies led by Dr. James Davidson of the University of Florida s Department of Anthropology. The field research, which focused on the slave population of Africans who lived on the plantation during the residence of the Kingsleys, was later expanded to look for the lost slave cemetery. In 2008, Dr. Davidson examined a large oak tree that reminded him of an account he read which referred to a black cemetery [which was] visible next to an oak tree along the dirt road that went from the [slave] quarters to the main house. Testing adjacent to the oak tree began in 2009, without producing any results. In 2010, Dr. Davidson and the research team examined a site across the road from the oak tree. It was in this area that he found artifacts indicative of Kingsley-era burials, i.e. cut nails used to build and close coffins, a human tooth, lightening whelks, which are large seashells used to mark graves in that era, and, most telling, dark rectangular stains known as grave stains. The research team exposed five of the six grave stain areas that were found. These five graves contained coffins with the remains of three adults two men, between 30 and 40 years of age, and an elderly woman and two children, 2-3 years old and 4-5 years old. Davidson said visitors to the Plantation have long used the cabins as the emotional memory of the enslaved inhabitants. In his view, this discovery is significant because it allows those who experienced the trauma of slavery to be acknowledged at their final resting place. During her speech, Cole often referenced the principle of looking back to move forward Sankofa. In the museum, she is reminded daily that the first people, the first tools, the first art, the first language happened in Africa. As I like to quip, certainly at the National Museum of African Art, if white folk would just start to admit that theyre Africans too, we could get on with a better world. Kingsley Plantation is a Timucuan Ecological and Historic National Preserve of the National Park Service. It is open seven days a week, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., except on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Years Day. Admission is free. For more information, visit www.nps.gov/timu/historyculture/kp.htm. Talk of the Town! Talk of the Town! by Frances Bradley Volume Burks, Photographer Dr. Johnetta Betsch Cole, Kingsley descendant Dr. James Davidson of the University of Floridas Department of Anthropology Descendants of Kingsley Family Oak tree marker of nearby burial sites A human tooth, lightening whelks, which are large seashells used to mark graves in that era.

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NOVEMBER 1, 2011 THE STAR PAGE A-5 We owe so much of our success to you.25 years ago, we set up shop in Georgetown, KY, and we havent stopped since. Today, Toyota operates ten plants throughout the U.S., including our newest one in Blue Springs, Mississippi. We know that none of this would be possible without you, our loyal customers. And wed like to thank you for standing by us, and making us feel so welcome in the communities we call home. Toyota.com/usa

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NOVEMBER 19, 2011 THESTAR LOCAL FLORIDASECTION B CSM (Ret) Sheila R. E. Williams, 2nd LT T. J. Coleman and Brown, Glo Scurry Smith Photos by Frank M. Powell, III of The Florida Star 2nd LT T. J. Coleman and Congresswoman Corrine Brown Veterans Day 2011 Mayor City of Jacksonville Alvin Brown, Armenia S. Green, Tuskegee Airmen John M. Gay, General Danel "Chappie" James, Jr. Chapter, Brown, and Delia P. Covington Elder Lee E. Harris George MaIvory, Alpha Gainous, Brigadier General William M. Faulkner, USMC, Congresswoman Corrine Brown, Ron Jackson and Ernest Ward Congresswoman Corrine Brown Sheila Sanders, Larry Williams, Lisa Rose, Dorene Hollins, Sabrina Williams, Ronald Jackson Jr, Ronald Jackson, Sr., Tammie Well, Renee Ward, and Ernest Ward George and Hazel Gillis, Alaina Sugar, Congresswoman Corrine Brown, Mary Adams, Frank M. Powell, III, Tori Robinson, and Alpha Gainous JSO Blount Island Command Marine Corps Support Facility Blount Island 236th Marine Corps Birthday Ball Sawgrass Marriott-Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida November 11, 2011 Major General James D. Tyre Asst. Ajutant General Army Florida National Guard, Rear Admiral John C. Scorby, Jr.,USN Commander U. S. Naval Region Southeast, Captain Douglas F. Cochrane, USN Commanding Officer Naval Station Mayport, Frank M. Powell, III, Vessel Examiner U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, Mayor City of Jacksonville Alvin Brown, Colonel Christopher J. Michelsen, USMC Commanding Officer USMC Blount Island Command, Captain Andy Blomme, USCG Commanding Officer USCG Sector Jacksonville, Rear Admiral Kurt Tidd, USN Commander U. S. Naval Forces Southern Command U.S. Fourth Fleet, Colonel Robert Wetzel Operation Group Commander 125th Fighter Wing Florida Air National Guard Jacksonville, and Captain Jeffrey D. McClay, USN Commanding Officer Naval Station Jacksonville JVille Ryders Jacksonville, Florida

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Jacksonville Symphony: MOZART "JUPITER" SYMPHONY on Saturday, November 19, 2011, at theTimes Union Center for Performing Arts 300 W. Water Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202. Call 904.633.6110 for more information. Jacksonville Women's Business Center JUMPSTART, Jacksonville Regional Chamber of Commerce on Monday November 21, 2011, at 3 Independent Drive W., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Contact 904.366.6600 for additional information. JACKSONVILLE WALKING TOUR, The Jacksonville Landing, this Tuesday, November 22, 2011, 2 Independent Dr. W., Tuesday November 22, 2011 Jacksonville, FL 32202. For additional information call 904.353.1188. MAC MILLER, Florida Theatre, on Wednesday, November 23, 2011, 128 E. Forsyth Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202. For more information call 904.355.2787. FRANKIE BEVERLY: Times Union Center for Performing Arts, Friday November 25, 2011, 300 W. Water Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202 Call 904.633.6110 for additional information. 25TH ANNUAL TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY, at The Jacksonville Landing, Friday, November 25, 20112 Independent Dr. W., Jacksonville, FL 32202. For more information contact 904.353.1188. Community ActivitiesPAGE B 2 THE STAR NOVEMBER 19, 2011 All of our veterans volunteered during the time of war to protect and serve our nation. Still serving by providing proper funeral honors for our comrades and their families. Gordon Armstrong Burney Bivens* (1964) U.S. Army (1971) U.S. Marines Licensed Funeral Director(1973) U.S. Navy Attorney At Law, Lic. Funeral Dir. Josh Jones (1966) U.S. Navy Attorney At Law, Funeral Serv. Assoc. Larry Lewis (1972) U.S. Navy Funeral Services Associate Aaron T. Bivens Licensed Funeral Director Operations Manager For a Life Worth Celebrating Aaron and Burney Bivens Funeral Home and Cremat ion Services 529 Kingsley Ave. ~ Orange Park ~ 904.264.1233 ~ www.BivensFuneralHome.com (XXXX) Year First Volunteered ~ *President, First Coast Morticians Association Teach Your Kids About Traffic Safety This Holiday Season (StatePoint) Keeping children safe is every parents first concern, which is why traffic safety is so important. During the holidays, when families are traveling and daylight ends sooner, parents need to pay extra attention to traffic hazards at home and on the road. Traffic accidents continue to be the leading cause of death for children ages 1 through 12 in the United States, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). To help keep families safe this holiday season and year round, NHTSA has teamed up with the animated, preschool television show Chuggington to launch the national Think Safe, Ride Safe, Be Safe! campaign. The program offers free resources to help parents and kids learn important safety lessons from engaging characters and take a safety pledge online to earn a traffic safety badge. Here are some traffic safety tips for you and your children to remember. Car Safety Everyone should use seat belts, and children should always be in a properly fitted car seat. Select a car seat based on your childs age and size that fits in your vehicle. Keep your child in the car seat as long as they are within the manufacturers height and weight requirements and in the back seat until age 12. While winter clothes keep your child warm, they can also interfere with the proper harness fit of your child in the car seat. Make sure to place blankets around your child after you fasten the harness. The holidays are a busy time at shopping malls -especially parking lots. Drivers should be on alert for small children when reversing out of a parking space. And dont leave children unattended near an open trunk, where they can get trapped. School Bus Safety During the holiday season, children may become more rambunctious on the way home from school. Parents should take the time to emphasize year-round rules, like facing forward and obeying the school bus driver. Children should always wait with an adult at the school bus stop. When disembarking, instruct children to take five giant steps away from the school bus. Then look left, right, and left again before crossing the street. Bike Safety Parents and children should always wear their properly fitted bike helmets. Helmets should sit low across the forehead with no more than two finger-widths above the eyebrow, and the chin strap should be buckled snugly. In low-light conditions, make sure that you and your children wear brightly colored clothing and reflective materials. Everyones bike should be equipped with a white front light and a red rear light. Children should ride with an adult on bike paths or on the sidewalk -never in the street. More tips and activities can be found at www.chuggington.com/safety. By engaging your children in safety activities and games, you give them the knowledge and lifelong tools to help them stay safe this holiday season and beyond. ***** ULYSSES W. WATKINS JR., MD HEALTH NOTES LIPOSUCTION (Suction Lipectomy) GENERAL INFORMATION DEFINITION: A surgical technique using suction equipment to permanently remove fat deposits. Surgery requires 1 to 2 hours. BODY PARTS INVOLVED: Thighs and hips; buttocks; fat cells of the abdominal wall; chin or other small areas. REASONS FOR SURGERY: Cosmetic improvement of fat areas that wont go away without extreme dieting that may leave the rest of the body too thin. SURGIAL RISK INCREASES WITH: Extreme obesity. *Smoking. *Chronic illness or disease, such as diabetes, *Excess alcohol consumption. *History of phlebitis. *Use of mind-altering drugs, including: narcotics; psychedelics; hallucino gens; marijuana; sedatives; hypnotics; or cocain. WHAT TO EXPECT WHO OPERATES: Plastic surgeon. WHERE PERFORMED: Outpatient surgical facility or hospital. DIAGNOSTIC TESTS: Before surgery: Blood and urine studies. *After surgery: Blood and urine studies. ANESTHESIA Local anesthesia and sedation for small areas. *General anesthesia by injection and inhalation with an airway tube placed in the windpipe. DESCRIPTION OF OPERATION: The plastic surgeon marks areas to be operated on. *Incisions (about 1-inch each) are made in suction areas. *A suction tube, with one end attached to suction equipment, is pushed through the incision into the excess fat and moved back and forth repeat edly (20 to 30 times at each site). *Eached incision is stiched. POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS Resuctioning in some areas may be necessary. *Phlebitis. *Surgical infection. *Excess bleeding; anemia. *Blotchy brown areas at surgical site. AVERAGE HOSPITAL ST: 0 to 2 days. PROBABLE OUTCOME: Improved appearance. POSTOPERATIVE CARE GENERAL MEASURES No smoking. *A hard ridge should form along the incision. As it heals, the ridge will recede gradually. *Dont be concerned about small amounts of blood oozing at the surgical sites. *Bathe and shower as usual. You may wash the incision gently with mild unscented soap. *Use an electric heating pad, a heat lamp or a warm compress to relieve incisional pain. MEDICATION: Your doctor may prescribe: Pain relievers. Dont take prescription pain medicine longer than 4 to 7 days. Use only as much as you need. Antibiotics to fight infection. *You may use non-prescription drugs, such as acetaminophen, for minor pain. *Avoid aspirin. ACTIVITY Resume driving 1 week after the surgical scar heals. *Avoid heavy lifting for 6 weeks after surgery. Learn proper body mechan ics to reduce strain. *Dont strain with bowel movements or urination. DIET No special diet required. *Vitamin and mineral supplements.(sometimes). CALL YOUR DOCTOR IF* Pain, swelling, redness, drainage or bleeding occurs in the surgical area. Your temperature rises to 101F (38.3C). You developsigns of infection: headache, muscles aches, dizziness, or a gener al ill feeling and fever. *You become constipated. *Leg becomes swollen or painful. New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects Health Notes Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area REAL LIFE STORIES

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PAGE B-5 THE STAR NOVEMBER 19, 2011 2011 March of Dimes Foundation working together for stronger, healthier babies Facebook.com/WorldPrematurityDayMarch of Dimes Northeast Florida Division thanks our community partners for support of World Prematurity Day SUPPORTWORLDPREMATURITY DAYNOVEMBER 17 Corporate Partner Supporting Sponsor Media Partner

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NOVEMBER 19, 2011 THESTAR PAGE B-7 CLASSIFIEDS Place Your Ad We also accept Cash and Money Orders Call Liz 904-766-8834To Advertise Order by Tuesday @ 4:00 p.m. Artwork in by Wednesday @ 4:00 p.m. FINANCIAL SERVICES THOMAS PLUMBING REPAIRS Low Rates. (904) 764-9852 HANDYMAN Minor Home Repairs, Painting interior/exterior, Pressure Washing, Exp. & Reasonable Rates Call: 904.768.7671 LIGHTEN YOUR LOAD with W & W Moving & Delivery Service An Experienced & Proud Moving Service Same Day Delivery to Any Local Point Low Hourly or Flat Rate *FREE ESTIMATES CALL TO SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT! (904) 563-5656 BANK ORDERED AUCTION 174 Bank Owned Assets AL, GA, NC & TN. December 6th, 7th & 8th Homes, Acreage, Residential Lots & Commercial Properties (800)323-8388 or RowellAuctions.com SERVICES EPIPHANY MANOR62+ Income eligible Studios & One Bedrooms386-767-2556TTY 1800-955-9771 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Need 13 Good Drivers Top 5% Pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Drivers: Run GA, AL, MS, TN & FL HOME WEEKENDS, Earn Up to 39/mi, 1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. Call: SUNBELT TRANSPORT, LLC (800)5725489 ext. 227 Driver Refrigerated lanes with lots of miles, hometime choices, daily pay and single source dispatch. Modern equipment! CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. (800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com EMPLOYMENT MISCELLANEOUS ANNOUNCEMENTS SCHOOLS & INSTRUCTION SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmillCut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com (800)578-1363 Ext.300N EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (877)206-5165 www.CenturaOnline.com AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)3143769 FREE S&H FLORIDA CITRUS: 20lb. Gift Pack Only $34.95. Navel Oranges or Ruby Reds. www.box-o-fruit.com Text "oranges" to 72727 to win! $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com HELP WANTED POSITIONS AVAILABLE AT The Florida Star Newspaper The Georgia Star Newspaper Sales, Marketing, Distribution, Layout, Reporter Call: (904) 766-8834 email: clara@thefloridastar.com Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)359-1690 Subscribe toThe Florida Star The Georgia StarNewspapersCall (904) 766-8834 www.TheFloridaStar.com AUTOS WANTED Affordable Apartment Homes(904) 381-4817 1-800-955-8771/711 TTY 3505 Corby Street, Jacksonville, FL 32205 *Income & Age Limits Apply FOR RENT LAND FOR SALE Change Your Life. Your Future.You have the power to change your future. And you can d o it right here at Florida State College at Jacksonville To learn about employment opportunities that are available, please visit our website at Jobs.FSCJ.edu CASH FOR CARS! Any Make, Model, or Year. We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car or Truck TODAY. Free Towing! Instant Offer: (888)420-3807 Advertising that Works. Put your ad in Over 100 Papers throughout Florida for one LOW RATE! Call (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida-classi fieds.com INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY!! 1 waterfront & 4 lake access lots, $84,400. Gated lake community near Athens, GA. Excellent schools. Financing available. Call the Bank Direct. (888)308-6729. Pre-Grand Opening Sale! Sat. November 19th Only. 6.34 acres w/ direct lake frontage only $29,900! Brand new, never before offered! Gorgeous wooded setting with deep water frontage on spectacular lake. Paved rds, power, phone, much more. Unheard of prices excellent financing. Hurry out for 1st pick! Call now (866)952-5302, x 71 6 FIGURE INCOME 100,000 RX Discount Cards Placed in 80 Pharmacy Locations @.03 each. You earn $1.50 for each new prescription & $.75 for refills. Accumulating residual income. (877)308-7959 Ext.231 www.freerxadvantage.com EDUCATION ALLIED HEALTH career trainingAttend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com ROOM FOR RENT 1156 West 4th St. (AC / Cable / Kitchen / Very Clean) Contract: Mr. Ron 904-307-4628 or 904-508-8026 ROOMS FOR RENT (Large / AC / Cable / Kitchen / Very Clean) Contact: 904-725-4359 or 904-718-2825 REAL ESTATE ELDERLY or BABY CAREI will care for your elderly or babysit for you during the holidays Contact: 904-379-2191

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C&J1 C M Y K Crime and Justice Crime and JusticeA Publication of the Florida Star and Georgia StarNOVEMBER 19 2011 THE STAR C&J 1 As an African American newspaper, we basically report on offenses committed by African Americans. Please note that in our observations, weekly reports show that African Americans DO NOT commit the largest percentage of criminal offenses in this area. Shootout Between Seafood Shop Employee and Robbers Leave One DeadAn attempted armed robbery at a seafood shack resulted in a shootout between an employee and two robbers leaving one of the robbers dead. Arrests were made on the surviving robber along with a woman. Oscar Coleman, 32, and his brother, Robert Coleman, 22, walked into the Golden Crab House both armed with guns. They attempted to rob the place and demanded money, but instead found themselves in a shootout with someone at the restaurant. Police said the other shooter was the store manager, but the store manager later told them it was one of the employees. The manager told police that last month on October 16, three men had walked into the same shop and robbed the place at gunpoint.The employee had armed himself since then. Police received a call shortly thereafter about someone getting shot and were led to a home. Rescue arrived with paramedics and Robert Coleman was found dead near the back door. Oscar and a 27-year-old woman, Sherri BethJones, showed up to the home a little after an hour and were arrested. Police say that the body was dragged out of the car and was left at the back of the house. Oscar Coleman and Jones faced armed robbery charges but they were later upgraded to murder charges. There were two customers present in the shootout, but nobody was hurt. The manager and other members are in the process of obtaining weapon permits due to the recent robberies. When asked, he said he was not sure who fired the first shot, but the lives of his employees were at risk.Man Crashes into BBQ Restaurant During High-Speed ChaseA man was arrested after crashing a stolen truck into the Jenkins Quality barbecue restaurant during a high-speed chase. An officer spotted a Ford truck on the road that was reported stolen. As the truck was being pulled over, a second police car pulled up in front of it. The truck reversed and rammed the cruiser twice before speeding off again. The driver went up to speeds of 100 mph in a 40 mph zone. The chase finally ended after the truck rammed into a parked car, which crashed into the front door of the barbecue restaurant. The driver got out of the vehicle and fled, but was found hiding behind a Taco Bell. William Earl Union Jr.,19, was arrested for two counts of aggravated battery against an officer and numerous traffic charges as well. Clerk of Courts Employee Accused of Fraud and Helping Suspended Drivers A Clerks of Courts employee was arrested after trying to profit and selling forms to those with a suspended license. Shayla Odol, 25, had been working as a clerk since 2004, but was suspected to have printed and selling over 20 copies of forms, which would help drivers to restore their suspended licenses from unpaid traffic fines. Records showed that she had even come in at night to print copies of these forms. Investigators found a list of names on her work computer of people she was preparing forms for. After examining the names with the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, the results showed that none of the licenses were reinstated and still remained suspended. Police say none may have gotten what they paid for at all and were all scammed. Odol was arrested at her job and was charged with bribery, falsifying official documents, organized fraud, and tampering with or fabricating evidence. She is being held on $200,000 bond. Oscar Coleman Sherri Beth Jones Williams Union Jr. Shayla Odol

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NOVEMBER 19 2011 THE STAR C&J 2 SSSHH! From Actual Police ReportsDid You Hear About?... Did You Hear About?... EDITORS NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law. The Sheriffs Office reports are a matter of public record. The Star seeks to educate in the hope of keeping our community safe. Thanksgiving Safety Tips Cooking Tips Unattended cooking is the leading cause of home fires and home fire injuries in the U.S. When cooking, remember to keep an eye on the range. Never leave the cooking area unattended If you have to leave the stove, microwave or other cooking appliance for any reason turn the appliance off. Turn handles to the center of the stove to prevent spills and to prevent children grabbing hot pans. Have a lid handy to smother a pan fire Use approved pot holders, not aprons or towels Clean appliances regularly. Watch for grease overflows that can start fires. Don't place towels, napkins or other paper products around the stove surface Don't wear loose clothing Keep the kitchen off-limits to young children and adults that are not helping with food preparations. Most Importantly... Be Prepared for a Fire! One of the best ways to protect yourself and your family is to have a working smoke alarm that alerts you of a fire. A smoke alarm greatly reduces your chances of dying in a fire. Make and practice a home fire escape plan and set a meeting place outside. Make sure everyone in your family knows at least two escape routes from their bedrooms. Call 911 after leaving your home to report a fire emergency. Your Safety Would you like to stay connected with your loved ones on lock down in jail, or prison? Anyone gone but not forgotten that you want to encourage? Get connected and keep a CONNECTION through our new CONNECTION spot. Call, Write, Email, or Fax to us titled: CONNECTION $10 3 lines of text only (Total 18 words) With PICTURE included $25. Contact G @ 904-766-8834 or Email G@thefloridastar.com send all correspondence to P.O. Box 40629, Jacksonville, FL 32203 Police Shoots One of Two in Family Dollar Armed RobberyTwo Arrests were made during an armed robbery at a Family Dollar store leaving one shot by an officer. Just before 5 a.m., a delivery truck driver was behind the business unloading merchandise at the side door near the entrance. The driver saw two masked men, Edward J. Littleton, 22, and Frederick V. Jennings, 17, entering the back door of the store. Jennings was armed with a .32-caliber revolver and Littleton was armed with an AK-47 assault rifle. The two rounded up the employees inside, forced them to the floor, and demanded money from the safe. The safe was opened and the suspects took the money. As the robbery was taking place, the truck driver who saw the two suspects ran to a nearby Walgreens, where he came in contact with an offduty police officer. The officer called in assistance before going over to the Family Dollar store. When he spotted Littleton walk toward the front window of the store with his rifle, he shot him using his police-issued AR-15 assault rifle. He fired three shots and hit Littleton once in his left shoulder. The other suspect, Jennings, tried to run away, but was captured by police. Police say there have been a total of eight Family Dollar robberies in the last 90 days, but this arrest is said to not have any relations to them. Also the officer who shot Littleton will be on administrative leave, which is normal after a shooting so that a review of whether the shooting was justified can be conducted. Littleton has been previously arrested for knowingly operating a vehicle with drivers license cancelled or revoked. Jennings does not have any prior criminal history. Both will face felony charges for their recent arrests. Edward Littleton Frederick Jennings Littletons AK-47 Assault Rifle

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Woman Shoots at Man for Criticizing her Driving Walterboro, SC31-year-old, Sharon Brabham, was being followed by a man named Thomas Mobley to a Walgreens parking lot. When she got out, she was confronted by Mobley for her reckless driving. Brabham responded by pulling out a .38 caliber pistol and fired at him, but she missed and hit another car instead. Police were called and Brabham was arrested. She admitted to shooting in the area of the victim. The handgun was found in her car along with a clip with four rounds in it. A spent cartridge was also found. She faces charges of attempted murder, possession of a firearm in commission of a violent crime, discharging a firearm in city limits and malicious damage to a vehicle. Man Accused of Beating Elderly and Sodomy of Caretaker St. Louis, MOTravon Jones, 19, had broken into a home, where he started yelling and demanding cash. Arteria King, 92, came out of his bedroom with a cane, which Jones took and started beating him with. King was with a 50-year-old caretaker, who started yelling. He started hitting her in the face and also King in the face, breaking his bones and his nose. He then forced the caretaker to perform oral sex on him before stealing the keys to her car, which he drove away with. He was pulled over the next day and was arrested on charges of forcible sodomy, burglary, theft, assault, resisting arrest and tampering with a motor vehicle. King did not survive from the injuries. NOVEMBER 19, 2011 THE STAR C&J 3Bizarre Crimes Bizarre Crimeswho, what, when...huh? Other Unusual Crimes Across the Nation Man Flees from Courthouse and Instead Suffers Trying to Swim Across a River A man was arrested after trying to flee from his court hearing and jumping into a river to escape, where he nearly drowned. Ryan McKenzie, 45, was at a hearing involving drug charges. When he overheard an agent asking if his case was on the docket, he slipped out of the room to make an escape. He ran out of the courthouse and jumped into a river. Making this mistake nearly cost him his life. Police noted that he was most likely going to drown and that he appeared to be in distress when he could not get himself out of the water. Instead of a chase, this became a rescue mission to save McKenzies life. Police boats arrived with deputies onboard and an officer jumped in the water to pull McKenzie out of the river to safety. He was then taken to the hospital for evaluation and he is expected to be released into the custody of U.S. Border Patrol. According to records, McKenzie was arrested in August on charges cocaine possession and trafficking. Woman Calls 911 and Police Find Drugs and Weapons at her Home A woman had made an incomplete call to police, which led to her own arrest after drugs and weapons were found at her home. Marlene Annette Culver, 28, had called police saying that her boyfriend had hit her in the face. She hung up, but called back to let them know everything was fine. She did not follow through and did not stay on the line. Police responded to the incomplete call by going to Culvers home. When police arrived, Culver told them she was not the caller nor the homeowner and insisted that they leave as there were no problems. She did not allow entrance and consistently resisted. As a result she was arrested and she admit that she called she called 911 after an argument with family members. When police searched the residence, they found two guns, an electric bill counter, a grinder, a digital scale, and 1 pound of marijuana. Culver was arrested on charges of possessing marijuana with the intent to sell and possessing an altered firearm. Man Kills Woman and Uses Her Wedding Rings to Propose to Girlfriend Chicago, ILA neighbor drove by the house of Virginia Perillo, 73, and saw that the garage was open with her body on the ground. Police came and saw that she was beaten to death with her face smashed. A watch was left at the scene, which police found belonged to Raymond Harris, 36. DNA evidence led to his arrest and police found out Harris had stolen Perillos wedding and engagement rings after killing her, which he later used to propose to his girlfriend five days later. Records show that he was on parole after serving 14 years of his 30 year sentence on charges of attempted murder and aggravated arson. He is being charged with first-degree murder and is being held without bail. Student Meets Thief Who Tried to Sell Her Bike Online to Take it Back A 25-year-old student noticed that her bicycle had been missing when she returned home from a bar. She filed a police report and decided to go on Craigslist, an internet site for locally buying and exchanging goods, to see if she would come across somebody selling her bike. To her surprise, she found a photo of her bike with the same red handle bar tapes and water bottle holder. She set up an appointment with the seller to see the bike, so that she could test ride it. When she met up with him, he let her ride it and she immediately knew it was hers. She then rode it down to her car, threw it in, and drove off. After taking possession of her bike again, she called the cops and gave them the address to the thief. Denzel ONeal Crawford, 18, was arrested and confessed to stealing the bike. He was released on bond. Ryan McKenzie Marlene Culver

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NOVEMBER 19, 2011 THE STAR C&J 4 PAGE B4 C M Y K Criminal Line-Up Criminal Line-Up Citizens with tips are encouraged to call Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS. You can remain anonymous and become eligible for a reward. ON THE LOOKOUT MISSING PERSONS Name: Keshauntay Denyse Cunningham Age: 15 Weight: 120 lbs Last seen: 11/04/11 Name: Devon Vennis Rogers Age: 17 Weight: 135 lbs Last seen: 10/21/11 Name: Willnesha Shakira Forman Age: 13 Weight: 120 lbs Last seen: 11/04/11 Name: Zakendra Antoinette Gary Age: 16 Weight: 100 lbs Last seen: 9/02/11 Name: Latoria Nechelle Loving Age: 15 Weight: 120 lbs Last seen: 10/30/11 Three Sought in RobberyPolice are looking for three suspects who were reported to have beat and robbed two people after they had left a nightclub. The two victims, Matthew Gordon and Jessica Henson, told police that as they were leaving the club, a man in a gold Impala asked Gordon if he smoked weed. After replying with a no, he then was beaten in the head by two others and his wallet taken. Henson was also grabbed by the head and thrown to the ground before the robbers drove off with cash, two Visa cards, a Social Security card, a voters registration card, a food stamp card, and a cellphone. Gordon told police that one of the suspects had the word Philly tattooed on his forearm. Anybody with any information about the any of the three robbers is encouraged to call police. MOST WANTED Name: Bobby Lee Green Age:48 Offense: Aggravated BAttery Intended Harm Name: Patricia Chandler Age:31 Offense: Forgery Name: Kimberly Blunt Age: 31 Offense: Fraud use of Personal ID Name: Karneisha Lashawn Moultrie Age: 19 Offense: Traffic in Stolen Property Name: Christopher Herbert Age: 35 Offense: Resisting Officer w/Violence Name: Otis Lee Shepherd Jr. Age: 29 Offense: Aggravated Assault w/Weapon

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NOVEMBER 19, 2011 THE STAR PR 1 P P R R E E P P R R A A P P Y Y o o u u t t h h S S e e c c t t i i o o n n Robert E.Lee High School Home Coming November 10, 2011 Photos by F.M. Powell IIIRobert E.Lee High School 28, Andrew Jackson High School 6. Lee won homecoming game! All Senior and Family in Band Homecoming King Q

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NOVEMBER 19, 2011 PREP RAP PR 2 Rapper, Author and Actor Common Scheduled to Speak at FAMUTALLAHASSEE, Fla. Florida A&M University (FAMU) alumnus and Grammy award-winning rapper Common will be a guest lecturer on Saturday, December 10 at 7:30 p.m. in Lee Hall Auditorium as part of the 2011-2012 Lyceum Series. Tickets will be available through the FAMU Ticket Office location in the Alfred Lawson Jr. Multipurpose Center and Teaching Gymnasium and ticketmaster.com for $20, $10 and $5, depending on the location of the seats. Tickets that were purchased previously for Commons lecture will be valid for this event. The lecture was originally planned for September 28. Known as the King of Conscious Hip Hop, Common will discuss his book titled One Day Itll All Make Sense, which explores his upbringing and family relationships. Common is considered one of musics most poetic and respected lyricists. His introspective lyrics have pushed boundaries with their biting social commentary. In 2007, he launched the Common Ground Foundation, which is dedicated to the empowerment and development of urban youth in the United States. Common also offers a younger generation a better understanding of self-respect and love, utilizing the cultural relevance of hip hop in the childrens books he has written. The first childrens book, titled The MIRROR and ME, teaches lessons of life, the human spirit and human nature. His follow-up book, I Like You But I Love Me, was recently nominated for an NAACP Image Award, and his third book, M.E. (Mixed Emotions), was released in 2008. In January 2007, the rapper crossed over into movies and made his acting debut in the movie Smokin Aces. Subsequently, he starred opposite Queen Latifah in Just Wright, and co-starred in movies, American Gangster, Street Kings, Wanted and others. Whether inspiring audiences through his music, his books, or his foundation, Common continues to break new ground, and remains one of hip hops most innovative and positive voices. The next Lyceum performances include the Dance Theatre of Harlem Ensemble scheduled for January 27, 2012 and the Moscow Festival Ballet on March 1, 2012. The Lyceum Series is an essential part of Florida A&M University, said FAMU Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Cynthia Hughes Harris, who chairs the Lyceum Committee. It is the universitys way to teach the students beyond the classroom and expose them to the arts and culture. The Lyceum committee is looking forward to sharing these experiences with our faculty, staff, students, alumni and the Tallahassee community. The FAMU Lyceum Series has been a part of the FAMU tradition since the universitys early beginnings. Throughout the history of the series, FAMU has enriched campus life and shared with the community the artists, performers and lecturers of the day. For more information about this years Lyceum Series, contact the FAMU Office of Communications at (850) 599-3413. Keep kids out of prison Promote Education Over Incarceration PROJECT R.E.A.C.H. INC. is focusing on keeping young people out of jail. The project is called "Education Over Incarceration". The campaign will explore the need for resources to keep youth in school and out of prison and show how socio-economic factors and race are part of the equation. Through networking, including Facebook, e-mailing and town-hall meetings and community workshops, we will address the many angered and frustrated parents as it relates to ongoing cuts in funding for public school education. We will encourage parents to join this most critical movement to promote education over incarceration for their children and to make education their number one priority. Across the country many are using the Occupy Wall Street protest to bring attention to the rich and great economic disparities. Our protest will act as a method to keep young people out of jail and in school. States and school districts have made billions in cuts to public education over the last several years and billions more expected across the United States next year and it must end. The side effects to incarceration over education: In the United States, youth of color caught in the crossfire of the war on drugs are frequently subject to persecution, incarcerated and denied access to educational opportunities. The irony is that the war on drugs is often defended as a necessary policy to protect the nation's young people. In reality, rather than protecting youth, the drug war has resulted in the institutionalized persecution of Black, Latino and Native American young people. Youth of color bear the brunt of harmful drug policies, from arrest, to prosecution, to detention in adult correctional facilities. Some states now have the distinction of having more Black and Latino young people in prison, than graduates from State Colleges or Universities. School Districts are taking hard looks at trimming its school budgets next year in the wake of states budget forecasts. It appears that some legislators are pulling back on education funding and refusing to put emphasis on education reform as an urgent priority. These types of budget forecasts speak to fundamentally flawed views regarding the importance of improving the Nation's education system and the futures of all children. Education, not incarceration, is needed and political and educational leaders must examined the interconnection between public education, the growing prison-industrial complex and its cost. We are further suggesting the urgent need for a national call to action on education and prison reform, and not just an exchange of ideas during this economic crisis, but a long term goal and mandate. Federal Title (I) legislation defines parent involvement as: The participation of parents in regular, two-way, meaningful communication, involving students' academic learning and other school activities. The involvement includes ensuring that parents play an integral role in assisting their child's learning; that parents are encouraged to be actively involved in their child's education at school; that parents are full partners in their child's education and are included, as appropriate, in decision making and on advisory committees to assist in the education of their child. Project Appleseed the national campaign for public school improvement is a wonderful site for parents and educators to visit as a guide to improving education, school, student and parent relations. http://www.projectappleseed.org/index.html

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NOVEMBER 19, 2011 PREP RAP PR 3 newspaperfun.com

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NOVEMBER 19, 2011 THE STAR PR 4 P P R R E E P P R R A A P P Y Y o o u u t t h h S S e e c c t t i i o o n n Third Annual Tour de St. Johns Fun Ride Will Benefit Robert E. Lee High School WHAT: The third annual Tour de St. Johns Fun Ride will bring the community together for a scenic fall bicycle ride through the historic neighborhoods of Riverside, Avondale and Ortega, while directly benefiting the students of Robert E. Lee High School. The bike ride is designed to create awareness for the schools current needs, improve the student experience and performance, and enhance Lee Highs reputation throughout the community. Sponsorship, volunteer and participant opportunities are available through the events website. To register or view more information about the Tour de St. Johns Fun Ride, visit www.tourdestjohns.com WHEN:Saturday, November 19, 2011, 10 a.m. WHERE:Robert E. Lee High School, 1200 McDuff Ave. S., Jacksonville, FL 32205 Holiday Calendar Jacksonville, FL In observance of the upcoming holidays, all Duval County public schools will be closed Wednesday, November 23 through Monday, November 28. Duval County Public Schools (DCPS) administration offices will be closed Thursday, November 24 and Friday, November 25. For winter break, all Duval County public schools will be closed from Monday, December 19 through Monday, January 2. DCPS administration offices will be closed from Friday, December 23 through Monday, January 2. Both schools and administration offices will re-open on Tuesday, January 3. See below for printable version. November 2011 Date and Event / Meeting 23-28Thanksgiving (Schools Closed) 24-25 Thanksgiving (Administration Offices Closed) December 2011 January 2012 Date and Event / Meeting 12/19 1/2 Winter Holiday (Schools Closed) 12/23 1/2 Winter Holiday (Administration Offices Closed) Band Direction Donald Jenkins Robert E.Lee High School Home ComingNovember 10 2011