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Flavor Flav wants to finish high school on Reality TV, at the age of 51. Flav dropped out of high school in the tenth grade and now see the value of a high school diploma. Unless he takes one of the acceleration programs, it will take him three years to finish. Some feel that Flav may cause interruptions at the high school but also admit that he is really very talented and very articulate and this move may be very encouraging for our youth as well as other highschool drop outs. At a luncheon Tuesday in Tallahassee at the Mansion, Governor Rick Scott caused some legislators to feel alienated. In discussing his own humble origins, Scott implied that all black lawmakers grew up poor. He said, I grew up probably in the same situation as you guys.Ž I started school in public housing. My dad had a sixth-grade education.Ž Many of the lawmakers said they tried to stay calm noting that the governor had failed to appoint any minorities to executive levels within his office or to lead state agencies. The lawmakers said they had made efforts to him regarding qualified candidates through an e-mail account. The lawmakers also raised the diversity issue and have set up an e-mail account to receive resumes from those interested in cabinet and executive level employment. The account is: www.imQualified@live.com. Others are very disturbed about Scotts job-destroying rejection of high-speed rail funding and Rep. Hazelle Rogers said, One year after Florida lawmakers took historic, bipartisan action to spur the states economy with a job-creating high-speed rail proposal, Governor Rick Scott is making a misguided, unilateral decision to overturn the will of the Republican-led Florida Legislature.Ž She further stated, Lets put Floridians to work, Mister Governor.Ž An SUV belonging to former Death Row Records kingpin, Marion SugeŽ Knight was seized by the Los Angeles Police Department. It appears that the LAPD suspected that Suge was riding with a problem, and he was. His drivers license had been suspended. His black SUV was hauled away. Suge then asked a female who watched the event to give him a ride. Suge is known for founding the record label in 1991 that brought fame to Snoop Dogg and Tupac Shakur. Knight is having financial troubles, according to sources. Jacksonville business man and community leader, Arnett Greene, who is also a retired LTC, U. S. Army, retired from his business as a State Farm Agency. After retiring from his insurance agency, he and his wife decided to take a long vacation outside of the United States. He soon learned that it was announced that he had passed. Mr. Greene said, I did not know I was dead.Ž The two-time retiree said he is still working. After really having the opportunity to review the economy while recognizing the financial problems of many, especially in the African American community, he has started a program where he is dedicating himself to the financial improvement of his community. Greene will hold seminars that will be announced soon that will lead to healthy personal finance. Hollywood superstar, Dwayne The Rock Johnson returned to his roots on Monday night when he made a surprise appearance on World Wrestling Entertainment to announce he will serve as host of WrestlelMania XXVII. WWEss Wrestle Mania XXVII will take place on Sunday, April 3,2011 at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta. The Rock is now 38-years of age and has appeared in many films. He wrestled from 1996 to 2004.. yyy0vjghnqtkfcuvct0eqo Nqqmkpi"hqt"ewuvqogtu"vq"rcvtqpk|g"{qwt dwukpguu"qt"wvknk|g"{qwt"ugtxkeguA"Kh"{qw cpuygtgf"[GU."vjgp"{qw"pggf"vq"rnceg"cp"cf kp"Vjg"Hnqtkfc"qt"Igqtikc"Uvct#""ECNN ;261988/::56"vq"rnceg"{qwt"cf"VQFC[## Check, Money Order, Or Credit Cards Accepted PQTVJGCUV"HNQTKFC‘U"QNFGUV."NCTIGUV."OQUV"TGCF"CHTKECP"COGTKECP"QYPGF"PGYURCRGT K P U K F G Editorial....................A-2 Church....................A-3 Lifestyle..................A-4 State-National..................A-5 Entertainment..............A-6 Prep Rap..................B-5 & 6 Local.....................B-1 Columns...................B-2 Sports....................B-4 Did You Hear?.............B-3 Classified & Business... B-7 Rtguqtvgf"Uvcpfctf W0U0"Rquvcig"Rckf Lcemuqpxknng."HN Rgtokv""Pq0"5839 HGDTWCT["3;/"HGDTWCT["47."4233 """""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""" XQN0"82"PQ0"65 """""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""72" EGPVU Cp"Cyctf Ykppkpi Rwdnkecvkqp. ugtxkpi"{qw ukpeg"3;730" Tcvgf"‰C“"d{ vjg"Dgvvgt Dwukpguu"Dwtgcw Ykuj"vq"ikxg"wu"c"Pgyu"Uvqt{A Ecnn"*;26+"988/::56"qt"Ugpf"kv"vq< kphqBvjghnqtkfcuvct0eqo Tgcf" Vjg"Hnqtkfc cpf"Igqtikc"Uvct Pgyurcrgtu0 Nkuvgp vq"KORCEV Tcfkq"Vcnm"Ujqy0YYY0vjghnqtkfcuvct0eqoStill the peoples choice, striving to make a difference. Cant Get to the Store Have The Star Delivered Vjg"Hnqtkfc"Uvct R0"Q0"Dqz"6284; Lcemuqpxknng."HN"54425 Vjg"Hnqtkfc"Uvct. Vjg""Igqtikc"Uvct# Korcev"Tcfkq 32705"("CO3582 *;26+"988/::56 Ect"cpf"Vtwem"Ujqy"/";26/988/::56 Hncxqt"Hncx"vq"Hkpkuj"Jkij"Uejqqn Lcz"Ngcfgt"Pqv"Fgcf Mkodgtn{"Fcpkgnu"cpf"Lcemuqpxknng HTGG"VKEMGVU Dncem"Jkuvqt{"Hcevu"kp"vjku"kuuwg Vjg"Tqem"Tgvwtpkpi"vq"YtguvnkpiA Uwig"Mpkijv"Jcu"Hkpcpekcn"RtqdngouA Uwig"Mpkijv The Florida Star received comments on the candidate for City Council, Kimberly Daniels. The many comments talked about her report that she is a past drug user and prostitute. In light of these facts that she shared her past in her own words, according to the comments, since the city of Jacksonville was recently declared as the 10th most religious city in the Country, we should not highlight her past. Jacksonville is also one of the cities that has a high tolerance for alternative life styles whether one agrees with it or not. With these known facts, according to the comments, it is important that we not only receive the recognition as the 10th most religious city in the country, but also that we exercise the recognition. The readers and callers mentioned that the city should be shouting for joy because one was lost has been found. This is what we should desire, said one reader, that people change for the better, to include felons and be given another chance to give back to society. One writer, according to a document received by The Star, is that they quoted from another media comment that it is better to find out before they are in office than to find out after they are office.Ž This should remind us, he said, of the great story behind the song, Amazing Grace. In this story, a ships captain who transported slaves from Africa to Jamaica, Brisbane, New York, and Boston and lived in horror for killing at least 20,000 men, women and children. He was converted into the ministry and upon his conversion and commitment to change, he eventually pinned the song Amazing Grace. This, the reader said, should remind us of the great story behind the song. He continued that we, especially a city like Jacksonville, with a reputation of being a very religious city, should forgive as God forgave us. If she win or lose the race in our eyes, he said, we should see a winner. Always remember, all have sinned and all have fallen short. You are included! he said. Is Jacksonville what it claims to be?Ž said the reader/writer. One thing we must all understand, WE MUST VOTE.Ž R Hncxqt"Hncx Iqxgtpqt"Ueqvv‘u"Fgekukqpu"cpf Uvcvgogpvu"ctg"pqv"Rngcukpi"Ocp{ Ctpgvv"Itggpg."cnkxg"cpf"ygnn Nkhv#"Fqp‘v"Ugrctcvg Dgvv{"Uvgkpgo"cpf"Fqtqvj{ Jwijgu."hqwpfgtu"ctg"cickp"lqkp/ kpi"jcpfu"hqt"Cogtkec"vq"tckug cyctgpguu0 Xqvkpi"Tgikuvtcvkqp"Fgcfnkpg" Supervisor of Elections Jerry Holland reminds citizens that Tuesday, February 22, 2011 is the last day to register to vote for new registrations for Jacksonvilles March 22nd First Consolidate Government Election. Applications must be completed and returned by the close of the day, or postmarked by February 22, 2011. Party affiliation changes are accepted by Election Day March 22, 2011. Ncfkgu"lqkpkpi"Dgvv{"cpf"Fqtqvj{"*Egpvgt+"kp"Nkhv#"Fqp‘v Ugrctcvg0 The Charles Junction Historic Preservation Society and the Gateway Bookstore is partnering with The Womens Center and other Jacksonville businesses and nonprofit partners to bring Gloria Steinem to speak in a forum with Dorothy Hughes, Lift! Dont Separate. The goal is to achieve full economic, social and political equality reaching across class, race, gender and sexual orientation, to build real equal opportunity, including planting an organic garden on Moncrief as a sample for others. Call 904-385-9703 for more information on attending the forums and joining the movement.

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Celebrate Floridas Black AchieversBy The Admin on February 16, 2011 U.S. Senator Bill NelsonWhen I read Dust Tracks on a Road: An Autobiography, by noted Florida author Zora Neale Hurston, I imagined a group of children laughing and leaping, hands outstretched toward the sun. Mama exhorted her children at every opportunity to jump at the sun,Ž Hurston wrote. We might not land on the sun, but at least we would get off the ground.Ž For such an image, a picture of hope and striving, I am thankful. Im thankful, too, that this famous writer from the first-half of the last century made tiny-little Eatonville, Florida, her beloved home. In fact, when Barack Obama was still just a junior senator, I took him there for a visit. Its been said recently that Zora Neale Hurston helped shape Americas racial heritage, that through her own wit and wisdom she educated Americas citizens about the richness of our diversity. Sometimes,Ž she once said, I feel discriminated against, but it does not make me angry. It merely astonishes me. How can any deny themselves the pleasure of my company?Ž Indeed, we cannot celebrate Black History Month without her … and without also acknowledging the contributions of so many other African-American Floridians. Some of these men and women were artists, educators, sculptors, writers, actors, musicians. Others were scientists and inventors. One gave us Lilies of the Field. Another, Famous Amos chocolate-chip cookies. Yes, Sidney Poitier was born in Miami; and, yes, Wally Amos is from Tallahassee, Florida. Thank you, both, for your sweet contributions to our cultural heritage. And thank you Mary McLeod Bethune, who founded one of our oldest and most prestigious black colleges, Bethune-Cookman, in Daytona Beach. Thank you also to Judge Joseph Woodrow Hatchett, who became the first African American elected to Floridas Supreme Court. And thank you James Weldon Johnson, who was a Jacksonville-born author and lyricist before becoming the first African-American executive director of the NAACP. Thank you to Timothy Thomas Fortune, who was born and raised in Marianna, Florida, before going on to become editor and publisher of a newspaper called the New York Age, a platform for defending the civil rights of African Americans. And thank you Asa Philip Randolph, who was born in Crescent City, Florida, and went on to found the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first union by and for African Americans. Thank you to Augusta Christine Savage, who was born in Green Cove Springs, Florida, and who later became the first director of the Harlem Community Arts Center. And thank you General Daniel ChappieŽ James Jr., of Pensacola, Florida, the first African-American four-star general who was one of the Tuskegee airmen. Thank you John Henry Lloyd, who was born in Palatka, Florida, and was a baseball player and manager in the Negro Leagues, and also was considered one of the greatest shortstops in the game. Besides Lloyd, more than a dozen former Negro League baseball players call Florida home. No doubt the fans still appreciate all their contributions to Americas favorite pastime. And no doubt our state has been enriched by the Florida Highwaymen, a group of African-American landscape painters who, like Hurston, are in the Florida Artists Hall of Fame. Clearly the fabric of Floridas history has been woven in part by many African Americans. But remembering these men and women … past, present and future … shouldnt be unique to February. We should remember and honor them every day. As we do this, we may not be reaching the sun, but we will be getting off the ground. PAGE A-2THE STAR FEBRUARY 19 2011 Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson First African American Inducted Into The Florida Press Hall Of Fame EDITORIAL --CLARA JACKSON McLAUGHLIN OWNER/PUBLISHER LONZIE LEATH, RINETTA M. FEFIE MANAGEMENT DENNIS WADE SALES & MARKETING MAY FORD, LAYOUT EDITOR JULIA BOWERS, CRIME & JUSTICE ALLEN PROCTOR DESIGN AND WEB SITE PARTNER BETTY DAVIS LIFESTYLE/ SOCIETY COLUMNISTInvestigative Reporter: Lonzie Leath, Features: Dementrious Lawrence Reporters/Photographers: Marsha Phelts, Carl Davis, Laurence Greene, F. M. Powell III, Michael Phelts, Richard McLaughlin, Andrea F. K. Ortiz, Angela Morrell, Joseph Lorentzon, Scott Jurrens, Cheryl Williams Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Ester Davis, Lucius Gantt, Deanna, Cynthia Ferrell, Delores Mainor Woods, Farris Long Distribution and Sales: Dan & Pat Randolph, Abeye Ayele, Cassie Williams, Angela Beans, Tony Beans, Herman Robinson, David Scott TEL: (904) 766-8834 FAX: (904) 765-1673 info@thefloridastar.com (912) 264-3137 Georgia Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Alachua, Flagler, Marion, McIntosh, Camden And Glynn CountyTheFloridaStar.comThe Florida and Georgia Star Newspapers are independent newspapers published weekly in Jacksonville, Florida SUBSCRIPTION RATES One Year-$35.00 Half Year-$20.00Send check or money order or call with VISA,AmEX,MASCD, DiSCOVER and subscription amount to: The Florida Star, The Georgia Star P.O. Box 40629 Jacksonville, Florida 32203 The Florida Star will not be responsible for the return of any solicited or unsolicited manuscripts or photos. Opinions expressed by columnists in this newspaper do not necessarily represent the policy of this paperMEMBERSHIPS: Florida Press Association National Newspaper Association National Newspaper Publishers Association Amalgamated Publisher, Inc. Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce First Coast African American Chamber of Commerce THE FLORIDA STAR THE GEORGIA STAR MIKE BONTS, SPORTS EDITOR RICKY McLAUGHLIN YOLANDA KNUCKLE, COLUMNS LIZ BILLINGSLEA OFFICE/ACCOUNTS MANAGER TIA AYELE, SPECIAL SECTIONS GEORGIA MARKETING ANGELA FAVORS MORRELL DISTRIBUTION HERMAN ROBINSON, DAVID SCOTT National Newspaper Publishers Association TUNE IN TO IMPACT LISTEN AND TALK Monday, FM 105.3 -WJSJ 5:30 P.M. Clar Tuesday, AM 1360 WCGL 8:30 P.M.Clara McLaughlin and IMPACTCall and Talk -Monday, 5:30 pm 904-854-8255; Listen on the Web: www.radiofreejax.com Tuesday, 8:30 pm 904-766-9285 Listen on the Web: www.WCGL1360 Claras guest this week Henry Smith Edward Waters College Serving since 1951 Vjg"Hnqtkfc"Uvct"/"Vjg"Igqtikc"Uvct"/"Vjg"Rgqrng‘u"Ejqkeg 7<52"r0o0/yyy0tcfkqhtgglcz0eqo :<52"r0o0/yyy0YEIN3582 Oqtg"dtcpf"pgy"nkxg"nqecn"vcnm vjcp"qp"qvjgt"tcfkq uvcvkqp#Ejgem"qwvYLUL"/"HO"32705""Pqtvj"Hnqtkfc"("Uqwvjgtp"IgqtikcSome of our nqecn"ujqyu include Cpf{ Lqjpuqp Dtqvjgt"Uvcp the Union Man, Vtwem EnctcOeNcwijnkp for The Florida and Georgia Star, Rtqitguukxg"Tqqvu K<"vjg"Kpf{"Owuke Ujqy# Some of our pcvkqpcn"ujqyu" include Gf"Uejwnv|."Vjqo"Jctvocpp"cpf Uvgrjcpkg"Oknngt EDU"Tcfkq"Pgyu"/"Gxgt{"jcnh/jqwtEcnn"kp"<""*;26+":76/VCNM Qpnkpg< yyy0tcfkqhtgglcz0eqo Rtqitguukxg"Vcnm"Tcfkq"/"46"jqwtu fckn{0""Cnn"rtqitcou"ctg"uvtgcogf qp"vjg"ygdYcpv"vq"CfxgtvkugA""Ecnn<""*;26+"647/5597

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JACKSONVILLE, FL (AREA DEATHS)ANDREWS, Jean B., died February 13, 2011. CAPASSO, Emma F., 77, died February 12, 2011. GARRISON Allen, 57, February 11, 2011. GROOMS Margaret, died February 13, 2011. HALL Mello Delores, died February 8, 2011. HART Allan Glen, 54, died Februar 11, 2011. JUSTISS Charles, died February 14, 2011. MARAN August Anthony, died February 13, 2011. McCUE Michael Wayne, 42, died February 9, 2011. PATTERSON Robert Lee, died February 15, 2011. RABY Gertrude Altman, 87, died February 14, 2011. STRICKLAND Evelyn B., 97, died February 14, 2011. SWEAT, Carl L., 76, died February 15, 2011. WATTS Wendelyn, 50, died February 14, 2011. WEEKS Annabelle, died February 13, 2011. WILLIAMS, Ruth, died February 11, 2011.~ ~GEORGIA DEATHS AUSTELL, Michelle Y., died February 9, 2011. DILMAR, Lureava, died February 12, 2011. GRANT Sean Vernon, died February 9, 2011. THARPE Velma Taylor Hall, 91, died February 12, 2011. Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church 201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475 Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor Sunday Worship Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m. Church School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:30 p.m. Wednesday Glory HourŽ Bible Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10:00 a.m. Jehovah JirehŽ Bible Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Thursday Young at Heart Ministry . . . . . .10:00 a.m. Friday Joy Explosion Ministry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 p.m. The Church DirectoryCome and Worship With UsŽ New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208Sunday School ƒ..............ƒƒƒƒƒƒ..9:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Intercessory Prayer...............ƒ..10:45 a.m. Morning Worship ......................11:00 a.m. Youth Church 2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary) Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m. Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus (904) 764-5727 Church GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCHThe Church Where Everybody Is SomebodyŽBishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586Sunday School.......................................................................................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship.................................................................................11:00 a.m. Tuesday................................................Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m. Thursday...............................................................................Joy Night,7:00 p.m.Email: Gospell75@aol.com Website: Greaterelbethel.org Faith In Our CommunitySchedule of Events and ServicesPAGE A-3 THE STAR FEBRUARY 19, 2011 Tune In To IMPACT IMPACTTuesday and Thursday from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.WCGL-AM 1360The Florida Star and Impact Striving To Make A Difference! Clara McLaughlin Host Yvonne Brooks Co-Host Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email submissions preferred. Send to: info@thefloridastar.com Ask Us About OurALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208 Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354 DIRECTORSDeborah West Alphonso West Jacqueline Y. Bartley If there had been a death in your family yesterday, what would you be doing today?FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED Since 1988Pre-Need ForeThought Funeral Planning ProgramIm sorry to have to tell you this...Ž CHURCH Paynes Chapel A.M.E. Church2200 Albany Street, P.O. Box 759, Brunswick, GA 31520 (912) 261-9555 Rev. Richard Hutcherson, Pastor Worship Opportunities: Sunday Church School A Life Changing ExperienceŽ . . 9:15 10:55 a.m. Morning Worship Service . . . . . . 11:00 a.m. Church at Study (Weekly Bible Study) Monday Nights . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 8:30 p.m. Join Us as We Study the Word of God and Enrich Our Souls! DEATH NOTICES DEATH NOTICES MUSICALS ANNIVERSARIES Central Metropolitan C.M.E. Church4611 North Pearl St., Jacksonville, FL 32206 Ofc (904) 354-7426 Fax (904) 354-0934 Rev. Clarence Kelby Heath, PastorGo ye therefore, and teach all nations, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you; and, lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world. Amen.Ž Mathew 28:19-20 Sun Church School 9:30a.m. Sun Morning Worship -10:45 a.m. Tues Eve Bible Study-6:30 p.m. Wed Bible Study-12 Noon Wed Feeding Ministry 2:00 p.m. ~ Worship Service ~ GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH wish to invite you to worship with us and be our special guest at our Annual Black History Day Celebration February 27th at 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Our guest speaker for 11:00 a.m. will be State Attorney, The Honorable Angela Corey; and, our 3:00 p.m. speaker will be Pastor Anthony Mincey, Pastor of Fisher of Men International Harvest Center of Jacksonville. Music will be rendered by New Creation Gospel Singers of Jacksonville. For more information, call 904-359-0661. Dinner will be served after each service. SUPREME 7 ANNIVERSARY CONCERT CELEBRATION -Big Twiones Music and The Integrity Solution will present the 17th Anniversary Concert Celebration of Supreme 7, a Jacksonville based quarter group on Saturday, February 26, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. at New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church, 1824 Prospect St. Special Guests include: The Straughter Sisters of Valdosta, GA, Rev. JD Sapp & The Angelic Voices, The Voices of Faith of Montgomery, AL and The Brightside Gospel Singers of Tallassee, FL; the MC will be Bro. Freddie Rhodes of WCGL-AM 1360. For ticket information call Antwione Peterson at 904505-5750 or Eric Carter at 904-517-6629. WEST ST. MARK MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH, located at 1435 West State St., and Rev. Willie J. Jones, Sr., Pastor, invite you to share in our Churchs 53rd and Pastors 17th Anniversary and Retirement Celebration to held on Sunday, February 13th, 20th and 27th, 4:00 p.m. nightly. Rev. Willie J. Jones, Sr., the Pastor of West St. Mark Missionary Baptist Church is retiring after 17 years. Please come celebrate with us. THE ST. SIMON BAPTIST CHURCH Family of Orange Park, FL of which the Rev. W.H. Randall is the Founding Pastor, invites the public to their 20th year Church and Pastors Anniversary Celebration. This years theme is: Glorifying GOD Through Body BuildingŽ as found in 1st Peter Chapter 2: Verse 5 (Holy Bible KJV). The Following Special Sunday Services Will Be Observed During the Entire Month: €2nd Sunday, Feb. 13th … Red Ribbon Day … Dress in Red for (Life) The Blood of JESUS, and (Love) For GOD is Love €3rd Sunday, Feb. 20th … Grand Celebration Day … A Special 4:00p.m., 20th Year Church, Pastor and First Ladys Anniversary Celebration Worship Service €4th Sunday, Feb. 27th … Youth Day and Black History Celebration … Dress in African Heritage Attire. The Church is located at 1331 Miller St., Orange Park, FL. For further details, contact the Church Anniversary Committee at (904) 215-3300 or visit the Church website at www.stsimonbc.org FAITH GOSPEL SINGERS of Jacksonville Music Concert, Saturday, February 19th at 5:00 p.m. at the True Church of The Living God, 1405 W. State St. with Rev. Peterson, Pastor. Join us in a great celebration and True Worship experience as we Bless the name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ! Featuring: Faith Gospel Singers; The Gospel Cavaliers; and, Many Groups of the City. Call 904-355-0740 GODS TEMPLE OF LOVE, 358 Martin Luther King Blvd., Kingsland, GA and Pastor Marvin Young present THE 18TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE OUTREACH MINISTRY FOR JESUS CHRIST February 27, 2011 at 12:00 noon. The Overseer is Bro. Nathaniel Goosby. Special Guests are: Evg. Sandy Goosby, Evg. Mae Demps, Evg. Inda Lawson, Deacon Daniel Lawson, Minister David Scott, Youth Evg. Latisha Tucker, Prophet Sonny Singletary, Min. of Music Evg. Earnest Setzler, Gospel Artist Blacklite & Ladybug, along with our guest speaker Prophet Nathaniel Gardner of The Upper Room Ministry. ST. JOHN MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH MDG, FL. MUSICIAN NEEDED. PLEASE CALL: 904-272-5100 For Interview. Happy BirthdayŽ TYRONE EARL WILLIAMS (Tamberine Man) Sunrise: Feb 23, 1954 Sunset: Dec. 26, 2009 Your memory is our keepsake, with that well never part. God has you in his keeping, we have you in our hearts. With Love, Dad and Mom, Donald and Ora McQueen, other Relatives and Friends. Lion of the Tribe of Judah Ministries, Inc. PASTOR Dr. Sirretta Williams (Temporary services held) 623 Beechwood St., Jacksonville, FL 32206 Sunday School.......10:00 a.m. ~ Sunday Worship .......11:00 a.m. Every 5th Sunday Friends and Family Day Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Direct Phone: 904.866.7047 Office Phone: 904.356.4226 Seeing Beyond The Lifestyle To Save A Life Website: www.lottojm.com GREATER MACEDONIA BAPTIST CHURCH 35th ANNIVERSARY In Honor of Rev. Dr. Landon L. Williams, Sr., Pastor. Service Schedule and Speakers are as follows: Banquet, February 12, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. Rev. Kelly Brown of Mt. Vernon Baptist Church; Worship Service, February 20, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., Brian Campbell of Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church, 4:00 p.m. Workship Service, Dr. John E. Gunns, IV of St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church. The church is located at 1880 West Edgewood Ave. For more information, call 904-764-9257. Rev. Dr. Landon L. Williams, Sr.

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L L IFE IFE S S TYLE TYLE A4 C M Y K Socially SpeakingBy Betty Asque Davis / Photos by J. Carl Davis, Sr. Theres Always Something Happening On The First CoastŽ Theres Always Something Happening On The First CoastŽPAGE A-4THE STARFEBRUARY 19, 2011(Unless otherwise specified) Thank you for sharing your events and stories for the column each week! Because of you readers are there with you each week. Fo r column entries you may contact me directly at 904-571-1182, Toll Free Fax 866-488-6407 or by e-mail at: badavis@watsonrealtycorp.com SEE YOU IN THE PAPER SEE YOU IN THE PAPER ! Jacksonville’s Black History Month Calendar UnveilingKen Amaro of First Coast News WTLV-NBC12/WJXX-ABC-25 opened the 21st Unveiling of the Jacksonville Black History Calendar by stating, It seems like only yesterday that the creators of this wonderful gift to the Jacksonville community began their labor of love.Ž But, here we all are gathered to witness the first year of the 3rd decade of calendar presentations. As we anticipate the purpose of todays assembly, let us all be reminded that the Jacksonville Black History Calendars over the years have recorded the history of people and events in the greater Jacksonville community. These contributions have enhanced rich history of this community.Ž Dr. Brenda R. Simmons, Administrative Liaison and Co-Creator of the Jacksonville Black History Calendar introduced the Calendar Concept. To the assembly Dr. Simmons stated, The theme for the 2011 Jacksonville Black History Calendar is taken from the National African American History theme as registered by the Association for the Study of African American Life and History. The 2011 theme … African Americans and the Civil War … presented an unparalleled challenge to the team this year. We were tasked with presenting the most balanced view possible, reflecting one of the most unglamorous times in American history. The debate still rages on as to whether or not the Civil War was fought because of slavery alone or whether it was states rights. What remains is that the Civil War was fought, countless lives were lost and from the scourge of battle, these United States continued its history under one flag. The 2011 calendar captures the role that Jacksonville and the surrounding communities played in the war. The story begins with a statement about the Civil War in general and Florida in particular. The recounting continues with snapshots of African Americans who fought for the Union as well as the Confederacy. The pages of the calendar site landmarks and battles fought in and around the Jacksonville area, including the famous Battle of Olustee. The calendar mentions the famous Massachusetts 54th, the Union troop made famous in recent years by the movie, Glory, starring Denzel Washington. No coverage of African Americans and the Civil War would be complete without mentioning the Emancipation Proclamation, Juneteenth and the pervasively misunderstood Forty Acres and a Mule. The city of Jacksonville was attacked many times during the war because of its location and the value of the St. Johns River, used for importing and exporting supplies. The area of LaVilla was also strategic because of the railway that provided access to Jacksonville from the west. The pages of the calendar end with two persons who practice civil war re-enactments as their avocations … Mrs. Mary Fears and Dr. Clifford Pierce.Ž Civil War Re-enactor Dr. Pierce animated one of the pages of the calendar with a Civil War Re-enactment and a Special Presentation was made to Mrs. Camilla Thompson, Jacksonvilles Scientist of HistoryŽ, who wrote the Forward for the 2011 Black History Month Calendar. The enlarged and framed page of the calendar presented to Mrs. Thompson will be displayed during the month of February in the Jacksonville Public Librarys African American Collection on the 4th Floor in honor of you and your contribution to the rich history of African Americans in Jacksonville. The Closing Remarkswere given by Ms. Cassandra Blackmon, Operations Chair for the Black History Month Calendar Committee. The PMXperience provided the entertainment at the Reception following the Calendar Unveiling. Burger King Restaurants, Florida State College at Jacksonville, the Jacksonville Public Library and a limited number at First Coast News. These outlets are also sponsors of the Annual Calendar in addition to the James Weldon Johnson Branch of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History. Dr. Brenda Robinson Simmons Dr. Barbara Gubbin, Director Jacksonville Public Library The Pierces with an excited student! Mrs. Chatman with Civil War Re enactor Drs. Clifford Pierce with Graphic Artist Mrs .Nakita Powell and daughter Kenyona Burger King Managing Member Arthur Lee and Dr. Brenda Robinson Simmons Dr. Simmons, Mrs. Camilla Thompson and Ms. Blackmon The Pierces-Civil War Re-enactors join Black History Program Sponsors, Presenters and Staffers as Black History Month Calendar is Unveiled. Dr. Barbara Darby, President FSCJ North Campus Top: Dr. Simmons with Links GEMS of Butler Middle School Left: Ms. Cassandra Blackmon

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THE FIRST BLACK AMERICANS were the 20 blacks who arrived at Jamestown, VA about the latter end of August in 1619. Surviving evidence indicates that the first Black settlers were not slaves. It appears from the record that they were assigned the same status indentured servitude-as most of the first White immigrants. At the time of the first detailed census in 162425, the 23 Blacks in Virginia-11 males, 10 females, and 2 children-constituted some two percent of the total population of 1227. Among the Blacks identified by name were Angelo, Edward, Antonio, Mary and John Pedro. The First Black born in English America a boy named William, was delivered in 1623 or 1624. In an early edition of J.C. Hottens Lists of Emigrants to America, the first Black family is identified as Antoney Negro; Isabell Negro; and William their Child Baptised.Ž The First Settler In Chicago was Jean Baptiste Pointe DuSable a Black trader and trapper, who built the first house on the banks of the Chicago River in the 1770s. The First National Black Convention met at Philadelphias Bethal African Methodist Episcopal Church on September 15, 1830. There were 38 delegates from eight states. Richard Allen was elected President. The First Negro History Week was celebrated in the second week of February, 1926, Dr. Carter G. Woodson organized the celebration to include the birthday of Lincoln and the generally accepted birthday of Douglass.Ž The First Performance of Lift Evry Voice and Sing, widely regarded as the Black National Anthem, occurred on February 12, 1900 at a celebration of Abraham Lincolns birthday. The song was written especially for the occasion by James Weldon Johnson and his brother J. Rosamond Johnson. The anthem was sung for the first time by a chorus of 500 school children. The First Black Doctor was James Derham, who was born in slavery in 1767. Derham mastered the profession while assisting a physician master. In 1783 he sought his freedom and established a large practice among Blacks and Whites. By 1788 he was one of the leading physicians in New Orleans. The First Black To Graduate from a Medical Schoo l was James McCune Smith, who received a degree at the University of Glasgow in 1837. The First Black Admitted to a Medical Society was John V. DeGrasse who was inducted into the Massachusetts Medical Society in 1854. The First Black Lawyer was Macon B. Allen, who practiced in Maine in 1843 and 1844 and was formally admitted to the bar after he passed the examination at Worchester, Massachusetts, on May 3, 1845. The First Successful Operation on the Human Heart was performed at Chicagos Provident Hospital on July 9, 1893 by Dr. Daniel Hale Williams. The First Black Inventor to receive official recognition was Henry Blair of Maryland, who received a patent for a corn harvester on October 14, 1834. The First Black Insurance Company was the American Insurance Company of Philadelphia, established in 1810. The First Black Bank, the Capital Savings Bank of Washington, D.C., opened on October 17, 1888. The Savings Bank of the Order of True Reformers was chartered on March 2, 1888 and opened in Richmond on April 3, 1889. The First Black Woman Millionaire and one of the first major Black entrepreneurs was Madame C.J. Walker, who make a fortune with a line of beauty products in the first decades of the 20th century. She died on May 24, 1919. The First Black on the New York Stock Exchange was Joseph L. Searles, III, who began floor training on February 13, 1970, as a floor partner in the firm of Neburger, Loeb and Company. The First Black named to the Board of Directors of the New York Stock Exchange was Jerome H. Holland, who was elected on March 2, 1972. The First Black Cabinet Member was Robert C. Weaver who was named secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development by President Johnson. He was sworn in on January 18, 1966. FEBRUARY 19, 2011 THE STAR PAGE A-5 Areas Best, Most Fun, Most Heated, Most Prescient, Most Efficacious Talk Show!3:00 to 6:00 p.m.Week days onFM 105.3 WJSJagain from9:00 12:00 p.m. NE Florida and SE Georgias Best Talk StationAndy off-air: 904-568-0769On-air:(904) 854-TALKemail:downtobusinessandy@yahoo.com www.radiofreejax.com Why Wait?LET THE POST OFFICE DELIVER THE FLORIDA or GEORGIA STAR TO YOUI want a One Year Subscription to The Florida or Georgia Star!Please donate 10% of my paid Subscription to the non-profit organization listed below. Please send my Paid Subscription to: Name ___________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________ City ____________________________________________________________ State ____________ Zip Code _______________ Name of Organization for Donation: ________________________________________ _________________________________________ A TRADITION OF EXCELLENCE ()6 Months $22.00 ()One Year $40.00 ()2 Years -$70.00 SEND TO:The Florida/Georgia Star Post Office Box 40629 Jacksonville, FL32203-40629 www.thefloridastar.com D o w n to B u siness A nd y J o h nsonwith Cash, Money Order, Check, PayPal, and/or Credit Card Accepted APARTMENTS FOR RENT RENT-A-ROOM A/C, Very Clean and Quiet Cable Ready, Cooking Facility Ron (904) 307-4628 BLACK HISTORY: The First Black To...

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PAGE A-6THE STAR FEBRUARY 19, 2011 This program is made possible by a grant from the FINRA Investor Education Foundation through Smart investing@your library, a partnership with the American Library Association. d e n y a a y p r a t ili e m h T n e m e g a n a ey m n o M e s b e i r e e s l u d o m s 3 i h T c i v r e s s n a r e t e v o i t a c u d l e a i c n a n s a “ i o r f e m o e H h n t L o P J m e t s y s s t n e m e l t i t n d e s n la g p n i d n e p d s n t a n n i r e v co s s, c i s a e B h Th t i s w n i g m a r f i e h d t n a s r e b m e e m c c e p d s e n g i s e m d a r g o r n p o our y yo @ @y ing t s e v ve in t r a m S: t n o y g: n s e i l i r o y f l l a c “ i y r ry a r ra lib our Jacksonville, Florida 32202 State Street 601 W Room 103 e e C c r u o s e n R a b r J U C S F ) m 0 p 3 : 0 7 3 : 5 ( 0 2 4 2 & 2 y 2 r a u r b e F g a n i s d u n g a n i t c e l e S e l r a ci n a n e l b ila a v A Av gs S n i n r a d E n e a v a e L d e n y a a y p r a t ili e m h T l n a n o o i t a m r o f n i n a er t s i g e r e r p o T To n me om c e r n o i t a r t s i g e r e r P b u e p h t e r f e r a s p o h s k r o w l l AJacksonville, Florida 32202 State Street r e t n e 1 1 0 d d a n n a o i t u t i t s n l i a ci n a n g a d c n s a n o i t a t y s t u t d s a e c r u o s e ) S E L t ( n e m e t a t gs S m e t s y s s t n e m e l t i t n d e ps o h s k r o l w ge e r o m t g d n d e d n ly g n o r t s s i c i l o t en p o d n a e er o s i v d d n a m m o d c h t Jacksonville, Florida 32202 t i p w i h s r e n t r a a p n t o i t a d n u o n F o i t a c u d E o e p d a s m m i a r ra g o r ro s p i h T an t PL o t J u k o c e h d c n a r lib c li b u p x a j u o s e r e r o m d n aJacksonville, Florida 32202 ci o s s y A r ry a r b i n L a c i r e m e A h h tu o y yo @ @y g n ng i t ti s e v ve n t i r a m Sh g u o hr ro n t N I e F h m t o r ro t f n a r y a g e b by l b i s s o .t n o r f e m o e H h n t g r o y r a r t i s i v s e c r u psn o i t a y y r ry a r ra b r li ur o t s e v n A I R N Come save where making shopping a pleasure is part of the deal.Even when youre shopping on a budget, you dont have to give up the experience you deserve. At Publix, youll “ nd hundreds of items on sale every day, while you still enjoy the service you cant quite put a price on. Go to publix.com/save right now to make plans to save this week. to save here.

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€ On February 12, 2009, the NAACP marked its 100th anniversary. Spurred by growing racial violence in the early twentieth century, and particularly by race riots in Springfield Illinois in 1908, a group of African American leaders joined together to form a new permanent civil rights organization, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). February 12, 1909 was chosen because it was the centennial anniversary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln. € John Mercer Langston was the first black man to become a lawyer in Ohio when he passed the Bar in 1854. When he was elected to the post of Town Clerk for Brownhelm, Ohio in 1855 Langston became one of the first African Americans ever elected to public office in America. John Mercer Langston was also the great-uncle of Langston Hughes, famed poet of the Harlem Renaissance. € Thurgood Marshall was the first African American ever appointed to the United States Supreme Court. He was appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson, and served on the Supreme Court from 1967 to 1991. € George Washington Carver developed 300 derivative products from peanuts among them cheese, milk, coffee, flour, ink, dyes, plastics, wood stains, soap, linoleum, medicinal oils and cosmetics. € Hiram Rhodes Revels was the first African American ever elected to the United States Senate. He represented the state of Mississippi from February 1870 to March 1871. € Shirley Chisholm was the first African American woman elected to the House of Representatives. She was elected in 1968 and represented the state of New York. She broke ground again four years later in 1972 when she was the first major party AfricanAmerican candidate and the first female candidate for president of the United States. € In 1940, Hattie McDaniel was the first AfricanAmerican performer to win an Academy Award (the film industry`s highest honor) for her portrayal of a loyal slave governess in Gone With the Wind. € In 1992, Dr. Mae Jemison became the first African American woman to go into space aboard the space shuttle Endeavor. During her 8-day mission she worked with U.S. and Japanese researchers, and was a co-investigator on a bone cell experiment. € The black population of the United States in 1870 was 4.8 million; in 2007, the number of black residents of the United States, including those of more than one race, was 40.7 million. B1 C M Y KFEBRUARY 19, 2011 THESTAR LOCAL FLORIDA SECTION B Facts on the Annual Celebration and More 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom February 1, 2011 Internet NewsOne of the running good-natured jokes about Black History Month is that it just so happens to be celebrated in February -the shortest month of the year. How did February become Black History Month? Surge Desk presents the history of, ah, the history month. According to the Library of Congress, Black History Month has its roots in something called Negro History Week. In 1925, Dr. Carter G. Woodson an AfricanAmerican historian who founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, proposed Negro History Week as a way to encourage people to learn more about black history. He selected a week in February that included the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln and black abolitionist Frederick Douglass. The first Negro History Week was celebrated in February 1926. "The response was overwhelming," says the Library of Congress. "Black history clubs sprang up; teachers demanded materials to instruct their pupils; and progressive whites, not simply white scholars and philanthropists, stepped forward to endorse the effort." In the early 1970s, Negro History Week was rechristened Black History Week to reflect the changing language used to describe African-Americans. Then, in 1976, as America observed its bicentennial, Black History Week was expanded to the full month we celebrate today. Every February since 1976, the U.S. president issues a proclamation declaring the second month of the year Black History Month or National African American History Month.

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By: Farris Long LUV U No one, myself included, wants to feel like they are being tolerated. Whether it be in friendships, marital relationships, business relationships, or anything else. To be simply tolerated means that a person deals with you out of their frustration and aggravation and not out of appreciation or admiration. The strain created can be great because usually in those situations, they are either not honest enough to tell you why they feel the way they do or they are not strong enough to bring closure when things are obviously irreconcilable. It is ok to know when to hold em' and know when to fold em. Deception has a major role in the type of relationship above because the other party responds to you out of their frustrations. Then they try to act as if there was no driving force that preceded their actions and responses toward you. However the deception takes on a whole new dimension when it is U who is deceiving yourself. HUH????? I have discovered (even in my own life at times) we say we LUV the U in the mirror when in fact we simply tolerate him or her. Although this is not always the case, but so often I have seen women who change hair styles almost as much as they change their clothes. Most of the women that I have seen do this have actually been searching for themselves. Very often they are unhappy with their body, their relationships or their lives. I have seen both married men and married women who dress to impress just to go to the mall or the grocery store, not just because they like dressing nicely, but because they are subconsciously looking to get attention and compliments. (EVEN IF THEY ARE ALREADY GETTING THEM AT HOME) Very often they do it out of their personal insecurity and not from a place of personal settlement in their lives. These kinds of actions can create a downward spiral in their marriages because it too often, creates insecurities in their spouse, who is now left feeling like they are not good enough to satisfy the emotional need. And when that spouse begins to act on his or her insecurities, the fall out ensues. As you can see, not LUVING U can create major problems in all of our lives. It can make it absolutely impossible for us to love our neighbor as ourselves. OR perhaps we actually are loving our neighbor as ourselves... we just love ourselves so little that we pass that on to our neighbor. Either way, if you my friend, are to develop healthy relationships and live a much more fulfilling life, you must learn how to LUV U first which begins with loving God. Be sure to come back next month for the conclusion of this article and find out HOW to begin the process of LUVING U. After-all you only live once... so MAKE IT COUNT! PAGE B 2THE STAR FEBRUARY 19, 2011 D{<"Nwekwu"Icpvv """" Its 2011, a new year and politically speaking, Americas Black citizens are looking for new political answers. If you take a rudimentary glance at the governmental workings of any ethnic group compared to Blacks and you will see obvious differences in what is desired and what is accomplished by ethnic representatives. Jews in Congress, state legislatures and in local government commissions or councils demand that interest groups hire Jewish lobbyists, they demand government contracts for Jewish businesses, they rise, stand up and speak out about any issues that would reflect negatively on Jewish culture and historical events like the Holocaust. Cubans have the same demands for Cubans. Even Haitian elected officials do as much as they can for Americas Haitian residents and communities. Every racial group in office today other than our representatives realizes that elected officials main tasks are to divide up the money! Nothing is required of elected officials except they must pass appropriation bills that will allocate money to schools, law enforcement, environmental protection, health care and so forth. OK, while other ethnic groups can point to jobs, contracts, museums, stadiums, highways and things like that, what are our claims to governmental fame? Black elected officials love to campaign on symbolism! Dont get me wrong, there are a handful of health centers and other government entities that were created and funded by government but most office holders are proudest of basically nothing. Can I prove it? Yes! You tell me if youve heard something like the following, Vote for me. I voted for a Black holiday. Vote for me, I passed a Pants on the GroundŽ bill to arrest Black youth with saggy pants. Vote for me. I passed a bill that will place pictures of Black people acceptable to whites in a corner of the Capitol or in City Hall.Ž And, the biggest claim to fame of all is, Vote for me. I got the name of a street changedŽ. Well, its no secret, I do have brain damage, but it seems to me. Our community needs services, we need jobs and we need money! No matter what government calls our neighborhoods we make up our own names anyway. Anybody that has lived in Atlanta more than 40 years knows where Buttermilk Bottom is, or was. Miami natives know where Overtown is. LA residents can tell you where South Central is. We named Auburn Avenue Sweet AuburnŽ. We named Tobacco Road. When Jesus was in the wilderness, Satan offered Jesus the Kingdoms of the world. Jesus didn't need Kingdoms from Satan. The Kingdoms already belonged to the Father of Jesus! We don't need modern day devils to do something for us that we can do for ourselves. We dont need government to hand pick our community heroes so government can make sure no Muslims, Yorubas, Black Nationalists, freedom fighters or revolutionaries are recognized. We need the same things from government that other racial and ethnic groups get. We need some of the tax dollars that we pay to government to come back to Black communities in the form of jobs, contracts, better schools, accessible health care programs and the like. We will trade government symbolism for government money any day of the week. Instead of fighting for holidays, maybe one day our elected officials will fight for reparations so Black people can get paid for the way weve been treated for more than 400 years! (This Black History Month get a copy of Gantt's book "Beast Too: Dead Man Writing". Contact Lucius at www.allworldconsultants.net) Community Activities Make It Count (part 2) THE FEMALE DR. PHIL, ANDI K., MA IS A LEADING PROFESSIONAL IN SOCIAL EDUCATION AND CONSULTING. Please check out the latest video additions on YouTube://www.youtube.com/user/AndiKConsulting Her areas of expertise include, but are not limited to: image consulting, relationship/dating coaching, charm and etiquette, motivational speaking, and editing. Send your feedback to 972.591.3883 (Phone) or http://www.andikconsulting.com WAR ON POVERTY FLORIDA is offering workshop series on Credit, Banking and Budgeting with MoneySmart every Tuesday at 5:30p.m. (We are located inside the Gateway Mall at 5196-A Norwood Ave., Jacksonville, Florida 32208.) If you have any questions, please call 904-766-7275 or e-mail bbaham@waronpoverty.org or rjackson@waronpoverty.org to register. NORTHEAST FLORIDA COMMUNITY ACTION AGENCY (NFCAA), a non-profit organization board of directors meeting, Thursday, February 24, 2011, at 4:00 pm. … 4070 Boulevard Center Drive, 4500 Building, Suite 200, Jacksonville, Florida 32207. Information 398-7472 ext 224 REDDI-ARTS AND GALLERY 1037: JACKSONVILLE CONSORTIUM OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN ARTISTS. The exhibit will run until February 28th. Gallery hours are: Monday--Friday, 8:30am-6:00pm; Saturday 9:30am6:00pm, Sunday 1:00pm-5:00pm. For further information and any questions please contact Patty at (904) 398-3161 ext. 312. Gallery 1037 Located inside Reddi-Arts, 1037 Hendricks Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32207 THE AUNTIE ROZ PEANUT SHOWŽ will be in town for one week only, March 7-11, at the Coleman Auditorium of Shiloh Metropolitan Baptist Church. To learn more about The Auntie Roz Peanut ShowŽ visit auntieroz.com. PEACHES TO THE BEACHES : Vendors & Spenders Wanted 212-mile yard sale culminates in Golden Isles, March11-12, located at 1118 Beaver St. Performances begins at 10 a.m. For more information on Peaches to the Beaches contact Golden Isles Parkway Association at 912-375-5035 or visit www.peachestothebeaches.com. To become a designated vendor in Brunswick, contact GIAHA at (912) 262-6665 or info@goldenislesarts.org. ULYSSES W. WATKINS JR., M.D. NOISEExperts indicate that the noise level we live in today continues to increase at the same rate for the next thirty years, noise could become deadly. Subway trains produce 90 to 100 decibels (measure of sound intensity) of noise. A lathe produces 85 to 95 decibels; punch press 95 to 100 decibels; circular saw 100 to 110 decibels; sand blaster 118 decibels; and riveter 130 decibels. Exposure to 85 to 100 decibels can cause a hearing loss. A survey of two hundred work areas in forty different industrial companies in the United States found 50 percent of the machinery producing noise levels in excess of 90 decibels. High rates of hearing loss are found among factory workers and heavy equipment operators. It is estimated that six million workers in the United States are subjected to noise levels hazardous to hearing. Industrial management is aware of several ways to avoid noise-induced hearing loss. Often a silent machine may be substituted for a noisy one. At times welding can replace riveting, metal can be cleaned chemically rather than by highspeed polishing, and metal parts may be replaced by rubber or plastic. A welllubricated machine makes less noise than one that needs lubrication. Absorbent linings on machinery reduce noise. Management can rotate workers who must work at noisy machinery or place the workers on schedules broken into on-offŽ periods. Damage to the inner ear from loud noise results in hearing loss, and this damage is permanent. The degree of deafness is related not only to the length of exposure, but also to the extent and type of noise. Noise reduces the workers efficiency; it creates anxiety, irritability, and fatigue. Noise can be a causative factor in accidents. Adequate protection from noise exposure cannot be provided by cotton in the ears, but it can be reduced to a save level for the inner ear if a person wears ear protectors. The public needs to stimulate municipal governments to enforce antinoise ordinances and to compel industries to control noise conditions in their plants. In addition, noise hazards in industries could be reduced by federal legislation where the industries hold contracts with federal government or carry on interstate commerce. Severe noise hazards can develop with supersonic air transport, high speed rail transportation, and some new types of industries. Health Notes Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area. The Gantt Report

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Upon first impression, one can only draw conclusions from what they have encountered. In the case of Oscar winning film director Danny Boyle; one would be hard pressed to believe he is a man of so many impressive accomplishments by his meek and very humble demeanor. As a columnist, this is my second interview with Boyle and he was as cordial the second time as he was the first proving that true greatness doesnt have to be sold, exhibited or flaunted. Its presence speaks for its self! Boyles epic film Slumdog MillionaireŽ literally swept the 2008 Academy Awards with ten nominations, winning eight including Best Picture! Now his latest film 127 Hours for Fox Searchlight Pictures has garnered three 2011 Golden Globe nominations. Boyle and his co-writer Simon Beaufoy are up for a Best ScreenplayŽ Golden Globe. They are the same duo who wrote SlumdogŽ and won the Oscar for Best Screenplay. Also up for a Golden Globe for Best Original ScoreŽ for 127 Hours is A R Rahman who also won the Oscar for Best ScoreŽ for Slumdog.Ž So there is some truth that keeping good company helps you win! Boyle is a native of The U. K.. where he still lives and attended Thornliegh Salesian College. Upon leaving school, he began his television directing career for The BBC in Northern Ireland then segwayed into directing films. 127 HoursŽ is a true story of mountain climber Aron Ralston who slipped and fell into a deep canyon craves then had a heavy bolder fall and trap one of his arms. After five days of not being able to free him self, Ralston broke his arm and cut it off below the elbow to free himself. Then he scaled a 65 ft wall and hiked eight hours before he was finally rescued. The story made world wide headlines and soon after Ralston wrote a book titled Between A Rock And A Hard Place.Ž So how did Boyle become involved with the story and making it into a film? He looks back saying, I heard of the story in 2003 when it happened. I live in London and it was a world wide story. I read his book in 2006 and I had one of those experiences where you just know how to do it (direct). Its incredibly arrogant of course, because I mean nothing really over reacts in the book, but I certainly saw thats how you do it. I know exactly how to do it. You galvanize yourself. You go through the whole experience with him and when you come out, youll feel like youve been through it as well. And so I went to talk to Aron and when I see him he would say yes but he didnt. He didnt like that approach. He wanted to do it more as a documentary, more factual based and he wanted his boys to control the film. And I remember saying, facts will only take you so far. If you want the emotion that goes with that, it should be in a story line and youll need an actor to take you there.Ž The two disagreed but finally after some convening reassuring that Boyle and his team were decent film makers, Ralston switched gears and became more willing to trust Boyle to tell his story. Boyle continues, I basically said you have to let us tell the story Aron. There is a basic difference. Youve got to give us the voice of the film. It will be your story but it is James and Is telling of it that people will be watching. We will give you the story back at the end of the film. It will be factual but you will have the extra ingredient of an actor taking you some where. It is a safe bet that Boyle and his crew will be in the thick of the Oscar race with 127 Hours.Ž PAGE B-3 THE STAR FEBRUARY 19, 2011ENTERTAINMENT Happy B-Day: B-Day wishes of the happiest kind go out to actress Ashley Argota who arrived at year number 18 this past Sunday, Jan 9, 2011. Of course Ashley is a member of Rych McCains Youth Media Family. Comedy: Comic Ricky Del Rosario has come out of a ten year stage hiatus to return with a new DVD titled Ricky Del Rosario I Missed You.Ž Once dubbed by HBO as one of Americas Top Fifteen Urban Comics, Rosarios physical ability to manipulate his body and facial expressions combined with his vocal prowers are the features that set him apart from other comics. He will make his live return appearance at The VIP All-Star Weekend Party hosted by Lakers player Matt Barnes. AP Awards Coverage: The AP i.e., Associated Press, the largest new and information gathering source will be bringing live coverage of this years three major awards shows, namely The Golden Globes, The Grammys and The Oscars. Live broadcasts streaming from the red carpet will allow online viewers another view of the arrivals up close and personal. AP Live can be obtained at www.livestream.com/aplive or as a widget embeddable on any website. AP Live coverage also includes a multimedia interactive, on-demand video, reactions from nominees, fashion commentary and a behind-the-scenes look. Viewers can send in their questions through Facebook (www.facebook.com/aplive) and Twitter and an AP correspondent on the red carpet with hand held devices will relay the information directly to the celebrities. Music: This week Hip Hop Weekly announced The Shiekh Music 2010 Rip The MicŽ winners for Hip Hop and R&B. They are Dizzy D Flashy from Las Vegas (for Hip Hop) and Jon Doe from LA) for R&B. After their perspective wins, posters began going up in Shiekh stores from Cali to Texas. The event held in Burbank, CA., was sponsored by Reebok, Island Def Jam and Hip Hop Weekly Magazine. Dizzy D and Jon doe will be touring U.S. cities live. For highlights of the event go to http://lnk.ms/H8RXS. Movies: The Dilemma; Universal Pictures, Imagine Entertainment, Spy Glass Entertainment. Starring Vince Vaughn, Kevin James, Jennifer Connelly, Winonna Ryder Channing Tatum, Queen Latifah and Talulah Riley. Directed by Ron Howard. Produced by Brian Grazer and Vince Vaughn. With the Howard as director and Grazer as producer combination, you cant go too wrong. This may be the best film out so far for 2011! It is funny yet tackles the very serious questions of harboring secrets between best friends. This one is worth the ticket and popcorn. Hit me up at feedbackrych@sbcglobal.net Study, Observe and Win! Rych Danny Boyle, A Man About The Work, Not The Glory!By Rych McCain, feedbackrych@sbcglobal.net and Facebook Celebrity Interviews VOCAL EXPLORATION CLASS! The Jacksonville Children's Chorus is accepting registrations for the Vocal Exploration Program which is a non-auditioned music class for first through fourth grade singers. This ten week class meets weekly. Each lesson combines learning musical skills, group singing, and play-like activities/games that bring together learning experiences and fun in meaningful ways. The program is a great way for youngsters to explore their interest in music and singing-potentially preparing them for participation in JCC's performing choirs. Our goal is that development, knowledge and experience that students receive in this program will be applicable to other choral activities, including school and religious institution music programs. The Vocal Exploration class is focused on learning and vocal development, and there will be an opportunity for parents to observe the final class. This ten week program will meet on Mondays from 5:30 pm 6:30 pm at Friday Musicale, located at 645 Oak Street Jacksonville, FL. The cost of participation is $159 per singer. Classes will begin on February 28, 2011. Registration forms can be found on our website http://www.jaxchildrenschorus.com/ under the Vocal Exploration tab or by calling our office at 904-353-1636. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Sincerely yours, Darren Dailey Artistic and Executive Director Rych McCain’s Hollyhood Notes!By Rych McCain, feedbackrych@sbcglobal.net, Facebook Celeb Interviews Director Danny Boyle (L) and actor James Franco (R) Image by Chuck Zlotnick for Fox Searchlight Pictures

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€ Jack Johnson became the first AfricanAmerican man to hold the World Heavyweight Champion boxing title in 1908. He held on to the belt until 1915. Johnson's boxing style was very distinctive. He developed a more patient approach than was customary in that day: Playing defensively, waiting for a mistake, and then capitalizing on it. Johnson always began about cautiously, slowly building up over the rounds into a more aggressive fighter. He often fought to punish his opponents rather than knock them out, endlessly avoiding their blows and striking with swift counters. To the average man in the average American community, Jackie Robinson was just what the sports pages said he was, no more, no less. He was the first Negro to play baseball in the major leagues. Everybody knew that. . In remembering him, I tend to de-emphasize him as a ball player and emphasize him as an informal civil rights leader. That's the part that drops out, that people forget -Rachel Robinson Jack Roosevelt Robinson (1919-72), the first black man to "officially" play in the big leagues in the 20th century, possessed enormous physical talent and a fierce determination to succeed. In the course of a distinguished 10-year career beginning in 1947, Robinson led the Brooklyn Dodgers to six National League titles and one victorious World Series. Beyond his many and stellar baseball feats, Jackie Robinson went on to champion the cause of civil rights when he retired from the game. The National Archives and Records Administration holds numerous records relating to Jackie Robinson, many of which pertain to his period of civil rights advocacy. Several belonging to that time have been reproduced here for educators teaching courses that involve civil rights events and issues, character education, and effective citizenship skills. PAGE B-4 THESTAR FEBRUARY 19, 2011 SPORTS PAGE B4 C M Y K Black History In Sports Beyond the Playing Field Jackie Robinson, Civil Rights Advocate Jackie Robinson Comprised of the sons and grandsons of runaway American slaves, the league helped pioneer the sport of ice hockey changing this winter game from the primitive "gentleman's past-time" of the nineteenth century to the modern fast moving game of today. In an era when many believed blacks could not endure cold, possessed ankles too weak to effectively skate, and lacked the intelligence for organized sport, these men defied the defined myths. The Truth Shall Set Us Free. Today there are no monuments to the Colored Hockey League of the Maritimes. There is no reference to the league in any but a few books on hockey. There is no reference to Henry Sylvester Williams, James Johnston, James Kinney or the scores of players who wore the Colored League uniforms. There is no reference in the Hockey Hall of Fame of the impact that Blacks had in the development of the modern game of hockey. No reference to the Black origin of the slap shot. There is no reference to the Black origin of the offensive style of goal play exhibited by Franklyn. There is no reference to the Black origin of goalies going down on ice in order to stop the puck. There is no reference to the Black practice of entertaining the crowds with a half-time show. It is as if the league had never existed. For hockey is today a sport Whiter in history than a Canadian winter. The First Black signed by a National Basketball Association team was Charles (Chuck) Cooper, who joined the New York Knickerbockers in April of 1950. The Knickerbockers signed a second Black player, Nat (Sweetwater) Clifton later in the same year. WOMEN PIONEERS One of the first women's track teams in the United States began at the all-black Tuskegee Institute (now Tuskegee University) in 1929. Three years later, Louise Stokes Fraser and Tidye Pickett qualified for the 1932 Olympics in track and field, but were not allowed to participate in the event (held in Los Angeles) because of their race. In Berlin in 1936, Stokes and Pickett became the first African-American women to represent their country in the Olympics. Alice Coachman, a star track and field athlete at Tuskegee Institute, became the first black woman to win Olympic gold, setting records with her high jump at the 1948 Olympics in London. BLACK ICEThe Colored Hockey League of the Maritimes~ Formed in 1895 in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Stokes Pickett

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FEBRUARY 19, 2011 THESTAR PAGE B-5 Subscribe to The Florida or Georgia Star NewspaperCall (904) 766-8834 CLASSIFIEDS Place Your Ad We also accept Cash and Money Orders Call Liz 904-766-8834To Advertise Order by Tuesday @ 4:00 p.m. Artwork in by Wednesday @ 4:00 p.m. MISCELLANEOUS FINANCIAL SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS FOR SALE ANNOUNCEMENTS CASH NOW! Cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866494-9115. Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. $500 Cash Loan, No Credit Check, 6 months to Repay, Payments $55 biweekly. $1000/month income and active checking account required. Call 24 hrs (760)569-6474 THOMAS PLUMBING REPAIRS Low Rates. 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CDL Traninnig Available.Great Benefits & Potential earnings of $750-800/wk!Call Today! 1-866-457-6236 PUBLIC NOTICES Own 20 Acres Only $129/mo. $13,900 near growing El Paso, Texas (safest city in America!) Low down, no credit checks, owner financing. Free map/pictures (866)485-4364 www.sunsetranches.com BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Famliy Reunion T-Shirts. New online ordering program.. promonorm@gmail.com 262-9155 REAL ESTATE WANTED INVITATION TO BID JPA PROJECT NO. 003.2044.173 JPA CONTRACT NO. MC-1342R PCOB CHILLER REPLACEMENT FOR THE JACKSONVILLE PORT AUTHORITY Proposals will be received b the Jacksonville Port Authority (JAXPORT) until 2:00 P.M. (EST) on Friday, March 18, 2011 at which time they will be opened in the First Floor Conference Room, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206. A MANDATORY pre-proposal conference will be held at 10:00 A.M. on Tuesday, March 1, 2011, First Floor Conference Room PCOB located at 2831 Talleyrand Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32206. All Proposals must be submitted in accordance with the Specifications of Contract No. MC-1342R, which may be obtained on Thursday, February 17, 2011 from our website: http://www.jaxport.com/about/projects.cfm Procurement & Contract Service Department 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (904) 357-3017 INVITATION TO BID JPA PR0JECT NO. B2010-04 JPA CONTRACT NO. MC-1336 FURNISH NEW 175-LB CRANE RAIL FOR THE JACKSONVILLE PORT AUTHORITY Proposals will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority (JAXPORT) until 2:00 P.M. (EST) on Thursday, March 10, 2011 at which time they will be opened in the First Floor Conference Room, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206. All Proposals must be submitted in accordance with the Specifications of Contract No. MC-1336 which may be obtained on Thursday, February 17, 2011 from our website: http//www.jaxport.com/about/projects.cfm Procurement & Contract Service Department 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (904) 357-3017 Dr. Black JackPROBLEM ELIMINATORWhat you read...is what you get. There is no problem so great that Black Jack cant solve. If you want Dr. Black Jack to work something good for you, then he will work something good for you. If you want him to work something dirty for you then he will work something dirty for you. Dr. Black Jack is one of the most powerful men in the world today. He is the man you need to see. All you need to do is contact Dr. Black Jack by phone or letter and let him know what you want to do. If you have children or loved ones in jail or prison, if you have someone on crack, PCP or any drugs at all, Dr. Black Jack can help you. 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PAGE B-6 THE STAR FEBRUARY 19, 2011 Vqr"42"Rnc{nkuv""/"Qevqdgt/Pqxgodgt""4232 Nkuvgp"vq"YEIN"CO"3582"NKXG"cv"yyy0yein35820eqo# 30""Pqdqf{"ItgcvgtXcUjcyp"Okvejgnn 40""Kv‘u"Cnn"IqfVjg"Uqwn"Uggmgtu """"""""""""""" Hgcv0"Octxkp"Ykpcpu 50""K"Yqp‘v"Ngv"[qw"HcnnJgngp"Oknngt"("Pgy"Cpqkpvkpi 60""Kv‘u"Cdqwv"Vkog"Hqt"C"Oktceng """""""""""""""Dgx gtn{"Etcyhqtf 70""K"Ycpv"Vq"Uc{"Vjcpm"[qwNkuc"Rcig"Dtqqmu 80""Ngcxg"Kv"Kp"Vjg"Jcpfu"qh"vjg"Nqtf """"""""Vjg" Uwrtgog"9 90""K"Ejqug"Vq"YqtujkrYguu"Oqticp :0""Qp"O{"Yc{"Dcem"Wr """""""""""""""""""""""""""" Lkoo{"Jkemu"("XQK" ;0""Jqnf"Qp """""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""Vjg" Dtqyp"Ukuvgtu 320""Lguwu"[qw"Ctg """""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""C rtkn"Pgxgnu 330"Nqtf"Fq"Kv """"Cnxkp" Fctnkpi 340""Pqdqf{"Nkmg"[qw """"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""" Htgf"Jcooqpf 350""K"Ikxg"O{ugnh"Cyc{ """"""""""""""""""""""""""""""Y knnkco"OeFqygnn 360"Vwtp"Kv"Qxgt"Vq"Lguwu"Vjg"Ugeqpf"Ejcrvgt 370"Lwuv"hqt"Og """"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""" Ujgmkpcj"Inqt{"Okpkuvt{""" 380""Nqtf"Yg"Rtckug"[qwRjqgpkz"Ocuu"Ejqkt 390"Gzrgev"Vjg"ItgcvLqpcvjcp"Pgnuqp 3:0"Nqtf"[qw‘tg"Okijv{[qwvjhwn"Rtckug"hgcv0"L0L0"Jcktuvqp 3;0""Jg"Ycpvu"Kv"Cnn"Hqtgxgt"Lqpgu 420""Lwuv"Uvcpf"Jqrg"Ejcrgn"Ocuu"Ejqkt TGCN"GUVCVG

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FEBRUARY 19, 2011THE STARPR 1 PREP RAP PREP RAP 1. Actor Sidney Poitier grew up on Cat Island in the Bahamas. How did he lose his West Indian accent?Poitier listened to the radio constantly and repeated everything he heard.2. Which Black actor said, "I made films when the only other Black on the lot was the shoeshine boy ."Sidney Poitier.3. What book inspired comedian Richard Pryor to focus on his own goals?Malcom X Speaks4. How old was Black entertainer Dorothy Dandridge when she died: 42, 52, or 72?Ms. Dandridge was 42 when she died on September 8, 1965.5. How long did it take Hugh Robertson, the first successful Black film editor, to earn his union card: 5, 10, or 11 years?11 years, Robertson went on to edit Midnight Cowboy and Shaft. In 1982 he was inducted into the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame.6. Who drew the tiger, "Shere Khan", and the python, "Kaa", for Disney's The Jungle Book?Black animator Floyd Norman. 1. What were work songs?Songs sung by Black slaves as they toiled.2. What was the purpose of "field hollers," in which a slave might suddenly call out a long, clear note, often evoking a response from other workers?Field hollers provided an emotional release, broke up the monotony of work, and often warned fellow slaves of the approach of an overseer.3. Which Black actor portrayed sunny "Cowboy Curtis" on the Peewee Herman Show and seething "Ike Turner" in the film What's Love Got to Do With it?Laurence Fishburne.4. Who was America's first African American scientist?Benjamin Banneker, an astronomer.5. Who was the first African American to earn a doctorate from an American University?Edward Bouchet received his Ph.D. in physics from Yale in 1876.6. What was the name of the first Black hospital opened in the United States?Provident Hospital, in Chicago, was started by Black surgeon Dr. Daniel Hale Williams and a Black nurse named Emma Reynolds. Did you know...? Did you know...? Black History Trivia Black History Trivia

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FEBRUARY 19, 2011THE STARPR 2 PREP RAP PREP RAPDid you know...? Black History Trivia 1. Which virtuoso trumpeter single-handedly changed jazz from an ensemble form of music to one showcasing solo turns by outstanding instrumentalists?Louis "Satchmo" Armstrong.2. Where was Louis Armstrong born?Armstrong spent his youth in New Orleans.3. Where did Louis Armstrong learn to play music?In the New Orleans Colored Waifs' Home, where he was placed at age 13.4. Who was jazz's first national and international star?Louis Armstrong.5. What was Duke Ellington's real name?Edward Kennedy Ellington.6. What was the theme song of Duke Ellington's band?Take the "A" Train, composed by band member Billy Strayhorn.1. The average life expectancy for a White male is 71.7 years. What is the average life expectancy of a Black male?65.4 years.2. The average life expectancy for a White female is 78.7 years. What is the average life expectancy for a Black female?73.6 years.3. Slave trading brought approximately 11 million Africans to North and South America, True or false?True. Slave trading caused one of the largest forced migrations in recorded history.4. Slave traders fanned the flames of African tribal conflicts, encouraging local rulers to take prisoners of war and sell them as slaves. True or false?True.5. Only wealthy landowners owned slaves. True or false?False. By the end of the 1600's more than three quarters of the families in Virginia owned slaves.6. The Northern states gradually eliminated slavery because it clashed with the ideals of freedom stated in the Constitution. True or false?False. The Northern states abandoned slavery largely because slavery was not suited to their trading and industrial economy.1. New York was the last Northern state to outlaw slavery. True or false?True. While Vermont abolished slavery in 1777, New York waited until 1857.2. What percentage of the population of the South was comprised of slaves?One-third. The total Southern population was about 12 million, including about 4 million Black slaves.3. Some free Blacks owned Black slaves. True or false?True. Some African-Americans purchased their relatives to lift them out of slavery, but a few owned slaves a apprentices, servants or workers. 4. What were the communities in the wilderness called that were formed be escaped slaves?Maroon communities.5. Decapitation was a frequent punishment for slave revolts. True or False?True.6. Most captive slaves came from inland Africa and were forced to march to the sea where they boarded slave ships. True or false?False. Most slaves came from the coast.1. What was Black actor Stepin Fetchit's real name?Lincoln Theodore Monroe Andrew Perry .2. Between 1926 and 1935 Stepin Fetchit appeared in how many films: 20, 26, or 36?He appeared in 26 films.3. Scholar, actor and performer Paul Robeson was an All-American football star, valedictorian of his class at Rutgers, and earned a law degree from Columbia University. True or false?True.4. Who sang Ol' Man River in the 1936 HOllywood musical Showboat?Paul Robeson.5. Why did Paul Robeson stop making movies after 1942?Robeson was sickened by the racist portrayals of Blacks in movies financed and produced by Whites.6. Who starred with Lena Horne in the 1943 allBlack Hollywood musical Stormy W eather? Dancer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson.

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FEBRUARY 19, 2011THE STARPR 3 PREP RAP PREP RAP Duval County School Board recognizes employees, a student and community partner during monthly meeting JACKSONVILLE, Fla. „ During the presentation portion of the monthly meeting of the Duval County School Board, Superintendent Ed Pratt-Dannals and Board members recognized employees, a student and a community partner for their outstanding accomplishments and contributions to Duval County Public Schools: Three Duval County Public Schools employees were recognized for their impact with counseling programs both inside and outside the schools: Nan Worsowicz, supervisor of guidance services, was recognized for receiving the Florida Supervisor Advocacy Award; Beverly Walker, principal at Chaffee Trail Elementary, was recognized for receiving the Laurel Kaden Anderson Administrator Award; and Mike Rady, counselor at Mayport Middle, was recognized for receiving the Lucille Crysell Award; Danielle Cogdell, a student at James Weldon Johnson, was recognized for winning the Governors Recognition Scholarship Essay Contest sponsored by the Florida Prepaid College Foundation; HandsOn Jacksonville was recognized for their numerous contributions to Duval County public schools through individual school and district-wide projects. Duval County Public Schools operates 172 schools and serves approximately 123,000 students. The school district is committed to providing high quality educational opportunities that will inspire all students to acquire and use the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in a global economy, and culturally diverse world.

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FEBRUARY 19, 2011THE STARPR 4 PREP RAP PREP RAP MEET THE MAYORAL CANDIDATES FORUM 20 OF JACKSONVILLES TOP COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS WILL HOST MAYORAL FORUM TO DISCUSS FACING THE REALITY OF RACE RELATIONS Jacksonville, FL … The Jacksonville Urban League in conjunction with the Jacksonville Chapter of the National Congress of Black Women (NCBW) and a broad coalition of Duval Countys major community partners will host a Mayoral Forum with candidates running for Mayor of Jacksonville to discuss Facing The Reality of Race Relations. The forum will be held on Monday, February 28, 2011 from 6:00p.m. … 8:00p.m. at The LaVilla School of the Arts located at 501 North Davis Street. For More Information Please Call (904) 366-3461. The community will have an opportunity to submit questions to the candidates regarding their plans to enhance race relations. The forum is offering the candidates the opportunity to speak directly to the community and to educate voters as to their vision of the office of the Mayor of Jacksonville with focus on race relations directly impacting the community. Mayoral candidates Alvin Brown, Warren Lee and Audrey Moran have accepted the forums invitation to participate. The organizers' goal for this forum is to educate the community on the candidates' positions and commitments for inclusion in City Policy. This forum is aimed to inform and educate the community and candidates on the reality of race relations in our communities, via issue questionnaires. If anyone in the community cannot make the forum and would like to submit a question, please send to sueruffin@comcast.net. This is the first time that such a broad coalition of organizations has come together to participate in the electoral process. PARTICIPATING ORGANIZATIONS ARE: 100 Black Men of Jacksonville, Inc., Alpha Kappa Alpha Fraternity, Inc., Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., Association for the Study of African-American Life and History, Council on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys, D.W. Perkins Bar Association, Inc., Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., Gamma Beta Boule of Sigma Pi Phi, Jacksonville Association of Black Journalists, Jacksonville Human Rights Commission, Jacksonville Urban League Young Professionals, Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., League of Women Voters, NAACP, National Congress of Black Women, Inc., Northeast Florida Community Action Agency, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., ONE Jax, Inc., Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. and Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.

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Child Gang Raped By ClassmatesThe community of Banning, CA is still in shock after three young teens admitted to attacking and sexually assaulting a female classmate. The 13-year-old girl, who has not been identified, reported to a school counselor and later to the local police that she had been walking through a playground less than a mile from the Nicolet Middle School she and her assailants attend when she came upon her three male classmates at dusk. They began to fondle her before grabbing her arms and pushing her down on the playgrounds asphalt. One of the males proceeded to rape her while the others kept her from escaping. The child identified her assailants and Banning investigators were able to find and question all three suspects last week. After confessing to the crime, all three were arrested and booked on suspicion of sexual assault into Riverside Juvenile Hall. Reportedly, one of the boys told police he was promised an iPod if he participated in the attack. C&J1 C M Y K Crime and Justice Crime and JusticeA Publication of the Florida Star and Georgia Star February 19, 2011THE STARVol. 1, No. 13 Man Convicted of Murdering Infant SonThe jury trial of a Jacksonville man ended early Thursday evening with a murder conviction. 43-year-old Marshall Dale Cole IV was found guilty of second-degree murder. It took the three-man, three-woman jury just over an hour to deliberate. Cole testified in his own defense and put the blame of the infants death squarely on the shoulders of the mother, his ex-wife. Cole denied shaking the child at all, which was determined to have contributed to the childs death. According to the Assistant State Attorney, Cole shook the baby so hard his spine hemorrhaged and the brain swelled against the skull until it lost the ability to tell the lungs to breathe. Authorities were called to Coles Volley Drive home on March 22, 2009. The baby died a few days later. Both Cole and his ex-wife reported that the baby had been spitting up but that there had been nothing else noticeably wrong before Cole was alone in the bedroom with the child for at least 30 minutes. Cole said he heard a noise and noticed Marcus wasnt breathing. Prosecutors told the trial judge that Cole had been lying about the case since the baby was first rushed to the hospital. Despite this, Cole maintained his innocence, telling the jury that although he admitted he could have been a better father, he would never hurt his child. Cole faces up to life in prison when sentenced. Lake City Man Locked Up For DrugsPolice in Columbia County arrested a man in his own home Monday on drug charges. Deputies found about 15 grams of cocaine, more than 100 grams of marijuana and two handguns in the home of 40-year-old Keith Walker in the 100 block of Northwest Canine Court. Walker is charged with a variety of possession charges for the illegal firearm, marijuana and cocaine and is currently being held with bail set at $101,000. As an African American newspaper, we basically report on offenses committed by African Americans. Please note that in our observations, weekly reports show that African Americans DO NOT commit the largest percentage of criminal offenses in this ar ea.Marshall Dale Cole IV Keith Walker

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C&J PAGE A-2 THE STAR February 19, 2011 Black Historys Wrongfully Convicted Black Historys Wrongfully Convicted Historic Justice Historic Justice Brothers Griffin, black farmers and landowners from Chester County, South Carolina, were convicted of murdering a white farmer and Confederate veteran in Blackstock, John Q. Lewis. The conviction was based on the accusations of John MonkŽ Stevenson, known to be a small-time thief who was found with the victims pistol. Although more than 100 people petitioned Governor Richard Manning to commute the brothers sentence, they were executed via electric chair in South Carolina in 1915. Nearly 100 years after their execution, in October 2009 brothers Griffin were pardoned, after nationally syndicated radio host Tom Joyner sought the pardons from state appeals court in Columbia, South Carolina. It was the first time ever that South Carolina has issued a posthumous pardon in a capital murder case. Radio Host Tom Joyner celebrating the pardoning of the Griffin Brothers. Boxing great Rubin ŽHurricaneŽ Carter.Rubin Carter, a former professional boxer, was arrested for a 1966 double murder that occured in the Lafayette Bar and Grill in New Jersey when two black men entered the bar and shot a bartender and a customer. A petty criminal named Alfred Bello, who had been near the Lafayette Bar to commit a burglary of a factory that night, came forward as an eyewitness. Despite support from the community and from celebrities such as Muhammad Ali and Bob Dylan, Hurricane and another man, John Artis, were tried twice and convicted for the murders. Almost a quarter century and several appeals to the courts later, a federal judge overturned the convictions in 1985. The State of New Jersey decided not to try the case for a third time and withdrew the indictments against them. Carter now lives in Toronto, Ontario, and was executive director of the Association in Defense of the Wrongly Convicted (AIDWYC) from 1993 until 2005. Carter's story inspired the Norman Jewison 1999 feature film The Hurricane starring Denzel Washington in the lead role.

PAGE 19

Man Rapes Girlfriend While Daughters Look OnA Camden County jury has decided that a Florida man did indeed rape his girlfriend in front of their three young daughters. Corey Bolden, 35, was convicted Wednesday of single counts of rape and kidnapping and four counts of cruelty to children for sexually assaulting his girlfriend of 14 years while their children looked on in helpless horror. It took only an hour and a half for the jury to return from their deliberations with a guilty verdict. Bolden was also found guilty of two counts of aggravated assault for threatening and jabbing his girlfriend with a knife and two counts of burglary for entering the home of his girlfriends mother to carry out the attack. Bolden was sentenced to two consecutive life sentences. Navy Chiefs Murderer Gets Life SentenceA Jacksonville man was found guilty of murdering a Navy chief in his own home. Despite two members of the jury being dismissed and replaced for searching the Internet during the trial, DeAngelo Thomas was in the end convicted of murdering Navy Chief Petty Officer David Gilbert. The incident took place last April, when Thomas shot and killed the 40-year-old officer, who came home to find Thomas burglarizing his apartment. Thomas later told police he was looking for marijuana and had ended up in the wrong apartment. Gilberts 3-year-old daughter was in the home at the time of the shooting and had to be carried out of the apartment over her fathers body when paramedics arrived. Thomas was also found guilty of armed burglary. C&J PAGE A-3 THE STAR February 19, 2011 In Your Neighborhood In Your Neighborhood Husband and Wife Charged in Fake Bomb RobberyGlynn County police arrested a 60-year-old Brunswick man and his wife who were found to have been behind the fake bomb robbery of the Southeastern Bank on Trade Street last week. The FBI became involved in the case by the end of the week and coordinated with local police on a manhunt for the robber, identified as James Ronnie McCormick. On Friday, investigators spotted McCormick getting into a camper trailer. After Glynn Countys SWAT team arrived and a flash grenade was thrown into the camper, McCormick was seized by authorities. McCormick was charged with armed robbery and parole violation. His wife, Anna McCormick, was charged with armed robbery and obstruction. Daycare Employee Charged with Child AbuseA Jacksonville woman has been charged with child abuse despite the state Department of Children and Families inability to substantiate the allegations. Chicquita Hampton, 50, had been involved in an incident with a 5-year-old child at Tutor Time on Lady Lake Road. According to the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office, there was not enough evidence uncovered to confirm the charges. Hampton had passed the initial background check for employment. The allegations that were put forth were in one parents complaint. The allegations were found to be unsubstantiated in the companys investigation. Hampton found that she had full support of the company but it is unclear whether or not she will be allowed to keep her job as an early education professional. Crime Watch Crime Watch Cory Bolden DeAngelo Thomas

PAGE 20

C&J4 C M Y K MISSING PERSONS MISSING PERSONS Criminal Line-Up Criminal Line-Up Name: DaWan Shaw-Gibson Age: 27Height: 56Ž Weight: 120lbs Last seen 09/13/04 in Hinesville, GA. Has tattoo of three footprintsŽ on right thigh. DUMBEST CRIMINALS DUMBEST CRIMINALS Name: Artdrunetta Hobbs Age: 27Height: 52Ž Weight: 125lbs Last seen 08/10/06 in Atlanta, GA. Has dreadlocks and tattoo of initials AHŽ on upper left arm. Name: Julius Howard Age: 16Height: 55Ž Weight: 165lbs Last seen 01/27/11 in Ft. Lauderdale, FL. May still be in local area. Name: Christian Hudson Age: 15Height: 56Ž Weight: 140lbs Last seen 11/27/10 in Miami, FL. Believed to be in local area. Has scar on nose/tattoos on forearms. Name: Marquell Green Age: 16Height: 56Ž Weight: 120lbs Last seen 05/21//10 from Palm Beach Gardens, FL. May now be in Riviera Beach, FL area. MOST WANTED MOST WANTED Slip and SlideAn annoyed prisoner apparently attempted to take his frustrations out on a Fort Lauderdale, FL courthouse by flooding it. The inmate damaged a sprinkler head significantly enough that the north wing of the building ultimately flooded. Police went on to say the inmate wasnt trying to escape; he just needed to let off some steam. World-Class MultitaskingDeputies arrested an Inglis, FL man on charges that he was cooking methŽ inside a speeding car. When police stopped Jerry McKay, 23, they looked inside the passenger-side window and saw a jug and a garbage bag with a twisted top. They also smelled a strong odor of ammonia emanating from the car. McKay was hauled off to jail immediately. PREDATOR ALERT PREDATOR ALERT Citizens with tips are encouraged to call Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS. You can remain anonymous and become eligible for a reward. Name: Raquel Townsend Age: 24 Offense: Burglary Name: Chris Murphy Age: 21 Offense: Burglary Name: Anthony Thomas Age: 39 Offense: Grand Theft Name: Elijah Brewington Age: 18 Offense: Battery Name: Sharonda VerdellAge: 18 Offense: Aggrav. Assault Name: Leonard Mosley Age: 31 Offense: Battery Name: Tommy AndersonOffense: Rape Name: Carl Boals Offense: Forgery Name: David Burns Offense: Rape Name: Wayne Arnold Offense: Molestation Name: Willie ArmourOffense: Molestation February 19, 2011THE STARC&J Page A-4 BACK ON THE STREET BACK ON THE STREET RECENT ARRESTS RECENT ARRESTS Name: Ernest Bynum Offense: Robbery


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:01053

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:01053

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news


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I OTEATF RDSOLET ARGESTSIMOST RADAFRICAN AMERIANONEDNE SPAPE


An Award
Winning
Publication,
serving you
since 1951.
Rated "A" by
the Better
Business Bureau


-A R THE _______



*FLORIDA -STAR


www.thefloridastar.com


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0
1 FEBRURY 19-FEBRUAR 25, 211VOL 60 -NO.350CENT


Jax Leader Not Dead
Jacksonville business man
and community leader, Arnett
Greene, who is also a retired
LTC, U. S. Army, retired from
his business as a State Farm
Agency. After retiring from his
insurance agency, he and his
wife decided to take a long
Vacation outside of the United
SStates. He soon learned that it
was announced that he had
passed. Mr. Greene said, "I did
not know I was dead."
The two-time retiree said he is
still working. After really hav-
A ing the opportunity to review
Arnett Greene, alive and well the economy while recognizing
the financial problems of many,
especially in the African American community, he has started a program where he is
dedicating himself to the financial improvement of his community. Greene will hold
seminars that will be announced soon that will lead to healthy personal finance.
Flavor Flav to Finish High School
Flavor Flay wants to finish high school on Reality
TV, at the age of 51.
Flav dropped out of high school in the tenth grade
and now see the value of a high school diploma.
SJ Unless he takes one of the acceleration programs, it

SSome feel that Flav may cause interruptions at the
high school but also admit that he is really very tal-
ented and very articulate and this move may be very
encouraging for our youth as well as other high-
Flavor Flav school drop outs.

Kimberly Daniels and Jacksonville

The Florida Star received comments on the candi-
,,- date for City Council, Kimberly Daniels. The many
comments talked about her report that she is a past
drug user and prostitute.
In light of these facts that she shared her past in her
own words, according to the comments, since the city
of Jacksonville was recently declared as the 10th most
religious city in the Country, we should not highlight
her past. Jacksonville is also one of the cities that has
a high tolerance for alternative life styles whether one
agrees with it or not. With these known facts, accord-
ing to the comments, it is important that we not only receive the recognition as the
10th most religious city in the country, but also that we exercise the recognition.
The readers and callers mentioned that the city should be shouting for joy because
one was lost has been found. This is what we should desire, said one reader, that
people change for the better, to include felons and be given another chance to give
back to society. One writer, according to a document received by The Star, is that
they quoted from another media comment that "it is better to find out before they are
in office than to find out after they are office." This should remind us, he said, of the
great story behind the song, 'Amazing Grace.' In this story, a ship's captain who
transported slaves from Africa to Jamaica, Brisbane, New York, and Boston and
lived in horror for killing at least 20,000 men, women and children. He was convert-
ed into the ministry and upon his conversion and commitment to change, he eventu-
ally pinned the song 'Amazing Grace.' This, the reader said, should remind us of the
great story behind the song. He continued that we, especially a city like Jacksonville,
with a reputation of being a very religious city, should forgive as God forgave us. If
she win or lose the race in our eyes, he said, we should see a winner. "Always
remember, all have sinned and all have fallen short. You are included! he said. Is
Jacksonville what it claims to be?" said the reader/writer.
One thing we must all understand, "WE MUST VOTE."

Voting Registration Deadline
Supervisor of Elections Jerry Holland reminds citizens that Tuesday, February 22,
2011 is the last day to register to vote for new registrations for Jacksonville's March
22nd First Consolidate Government Election. Applications must be completed and
returned by the close of the day, or postmarked by February 22, 2011.
Party affiliation changes are accepted by Election Day March 22, 2011.


Lift! Don't Separate









-


SBetty Steinem and Dorothy
,, Hughes, founders are again join-
t ing hands for America to raise
Ladies joining Betty and Dorothy (Center) in Lift! Don't awareness.
Separate.
The Charles Junction Historic Preservation Society and the Gateway Bookstore is
partnering with The Women's Center and other Jacksonville businesses and non-
profit partners to bring Gloria Steinem to speak in a forum with Dorothy Hughes,
Lift! Don't Separate. The goal is to achieve full economic, social and political equal-
ity reaching across class, race, gender and sexual orientation, to build real equal
opportunity, including planting an organic garden on Moncrief as a sample for oth-
ers. Call 904-385-9703 for more information on attending the forums and joining
the movement.
The Rock Returning to Wrestling?


Hollywood superstar, Dwayne 'The
Rock' Johnson returned to his roots on
Monday night when he made a surprise
appearance on World Wrestling
Entertainment to announce he will
serve as host of WrestlelMania XXVII.
WWE'ss "Wrestle Mania XXVII will
take place on Sunday, April 3,2011 at
the Georgia Dome in Atlanta.
The Rock is now 38-years of age and
has appeared in many films. He wres-
tled from 1996 to 2004..


Suge Knight Has Financial Problems?
An SUV belonging to former Death Row Records kingpin,
Marion "Suge" Knight was seized by the Los Angeles Police
Department. It appears that the LAPD suspected that Suge
'was riding with a problem, and he was. His drivers license
had been suspended.
His black SUV was hauled away. Suge then asked a female
who watched the event to give him a ride.
Suge is known for founding the record label in 1991 that
A brought fame to Snoop Dogg and Tupac Shakur.
Suge Knight Knight is having financial troubles, according to sources.


Governor Scott's Decisions and

Statements are not Pleasing Many

At a luncheon Tuesday in Tallahassee at the Mansion, Governor Rick Scott caused
some legislators to feel alienated. In discussing his own humble origins, Scott
implied that all black lawmakers grew up poor. He said, "I grew up probably in the
same situation as you guys." "I started school in public housing. My dad had a
sixth-grade education."
Many of the lawmakers said they tried to stay calm noting that the governor had
failed to appoint any minorities to executive levels within his office or to lead state
agencies. The lawmakers said they had made efforts to him regarding qualified can-
didates through an e-mail account.
The lawmakers also raised the diversity issue and have set up an e-mail account
to receive resumes from those interested in cabinet and executive level employment.
The account is: www.imQualified@live.com.
Others are very disturbed about Scott's job-destroying rejection of high-speed rail
funding and Rep. Hazelle Rogers said, "One year after Florida lawmakers took his-
toric, bipartisan action to spur the state's economy with a job-creating high-speed rail
proposal, Governor Rick Scott is making a misguided, unilateral decision to overturn
the will of the Republican-led Florida Legislature."
She further stated, "Let's put Floridians to work, Mister Governor."


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Read The Florida
and Georgia Star
Newspapers.
Listen to IMPACT
Radio Talk Show.
WWW.thefloridastar.com
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i--


5










PAGE A-2 THE STAR FEBRUARY 19, 2011


OWNER/PUBLISHER RICKY McLAUGHLIN
LONZIE LEATH, RINETTA M. FEFIE
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Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Ester Davis, Lucius Gantt,
Deanna, Cynthia Ferrell, Delores Mainor Woods, Farris Long
Distribution and Sales: Dan & Pat Randolph, Abeye Ayele, Cassie
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TEL: (904) 766-8834
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MEMBERSHIPS:
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SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


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Publishers Association


Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of FameI


UelebraIe r ioria's ilacK Acnievers


By The Admin on February 16, 2011
U.S. Senator Bill Nelson
- When I read Dust Tracks on a Road: An Autobiography, by noted Florida author Zora Neale Hurston, I imag-
ined a group of children laughing and leaping, hands outstretched toward the sun.

"Mama exhorted her children at every opportunity to jump at the sun," Hurston wrote. "We might not land on the
sun, but at least we would get off the ground."

For such an image, a picture of hope and striving, I am thankful.

I'm thankful, too, that this famous writer from the first-half of the last century made tiny-little Eatonville, Florida,
her beloved home.

In fact, when Barack Obama was still just a junior senator, I took him there for a visit.

It's been said recently that Zora Neale Hurston helped shape America's racial heritage, that through her own wit
and wisdom she educated America's citizens about the richness of our diversity.

"Sometimes," she once said, "I feel discriminated against, but it does not make me angry. It merely astonishes
me.

"How can any deny themselves the pleasure of my company?"

Indeed, we cannot celebrate Black History Month without her and without also acknowledging the contribu-
tions of so many other African-American Floridians.

Some of these men and women were artists, educators, sculptors, writers, actors, musicians. Others were scien-
tists and inventors. One gave us Lilies of the Field. Another, Famous Amos chocolate-chip cookies. Yes, Sidney
Poitier was born in Miami; and, yes, Wally Amos is from Tallahassee, Florida.

Thank you, both, for your sweet contributions to our cultural heritage.

And thank you Mary McLeod Bethune, who founded one of our oldest and most prestigious black colleges,
Bethune-Cookman, in Daytona Beach.

Thank you also to Judge Joseph Woodrow Hatchett, who became the first African American elected to Florida's
Supreme Court.

And thank you James Weldon Johnson, who was a Jacksonville-born author and lyricist before becoming the first
African-American executive director of the NAACP.

Thank you to Timothy Thomas Fortune, who was born and raised in Marianna, Florida, before going on to
become editor and publisher of a newspaper called the New York Age, a platform for defending the civil rights
of African Americans.

And thank you Asa Philip Randolph, who was born in Crescent City, Florida, and went on to found the
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first union by and for African Americans.

Thank you to Augusta Christine Savage, who was born in Green Cove Springs, Florida, and who later became
the first director of the Harlem Community Arts Center.

And thank you General Daniel "Chappie" James Jr., of Pensacola, Florida, the first African-American four-star
general who was one of the Tuskegee airmen.

Thank you John Henry Lloyd, who was born in Palatka, Florida, and was a baseball
player and manager in the Negro Leagues, and also was considered one of the great-
l* l est shortstops in the game.

Besides Lloyd, more than a dozen former Negro League baseball players call Florida
home. No doubt the fans still appreciate all their contributions to America's favorite
pastime.

And no doubt our state has been enriched by the Florida Highwaymen, a group of
African-American landscape painters who, like Hurston, are in the Florida Artists
Hall of Fame.

Clearly the fabric of Florida's history has been woven in part by many African
Americans. But remembering these men and women past, present and future -
shouldn't be unique to February. We should remember and honor them every day.

As we do this, we may not be reaching the sun, but we will be getting off the ground.


TUNE IN TO IMPACT LISTEN AND TALK
Monday, FM 105.3 -WJSJ 5:30 P.M. Clar

Tuesday, AM 1360 WCGL 8:30 P.M.

Clara McLaughlin and IMPACT

Call and Talk -Monday, 5:30 pm 904-854-8255;
Listen on the Web: www.radiofreejax.com


Tuesday, 8:30 pm 904-766-9285
Listen on the Web: www.WCGL1360
Clara's guest this week
Henry Smith Edward Waters College


5:30 p.m.-www.radiofreejax.com
8:30 p.m.-www.WCGL1360
The Florida Star The Georgia Star The People's Choice
Serving since 1951


North Florda & Southrn Georgi







Some of our local shows include And

Johnson, Brother Stan the Union Man, TruckI I I; II I





Clr c~uhinfrTh lriaad eri






StrPrgrssveRots 1 te nd Msi

Show!LI


FEBRUARY 19, 2011


PAGE A-2


THE STAR

















Faith In Our Community

Schedule of Events and Services


SUPREME 7 ANNIVERSARY CONCERT CELE-
BRATION -Big Twiones Music and The Integrity
Solution will present the 17th Anniversary Concert
Celebration of Supreme 7, a Jacksonville based quarter
group on Saturday, February 26, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. at
New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church, 1824
Prospect St. Special Guests include: The Straughter
Sisters of Valdosta, GA, Rev. JD Sapp & The Angelic
Voices, The Voices of Faith of Montgomery, AL and
The Brightside Gospel Singers of Tallassee, FL; the
MC will be Bro. Freddie Rhodes of WCGL-AM 1360.
For ticket information call Antwione Peterson at 904-
505-5750 or Eric Carter at 904-517-6629.
THE ST. SIMON BAPTIST CHURCH Family of
Orange Park, FL of which the Rev. W.H. Randall is the
Founding Pastor, invites the public to their 20th year
Church and Pastor's Anniversary Celebration. This
year's theme is: "Glorifying GOD Through Body
Building" as found in 1st Peter Chapter 2: Verse 5
(Holy Bible KJV). The Following Special Sunday
Services Will Be Observed During the Entire Month:
*2nd Sunday, Feb. 13th Red Ribbon Day Dress in
Red for (Life) The Blood of JESUS, and (Love) For
GOD is Love *3rd Sunday, Feb. 20th Grand
Celebration Day A Special 4:00p.m., 20th Year
Church, Pastor and First Lady's Anniversary
Celebration Worship Service *4th Sunday, Feb. 27th -
Youth Day and Black History Celebration Dress in
African Heritage Attire. The Church is located at 1331
Miller St., Orange Park, FL. For further details, contact
the Church Anniversary Committee at (904) 215-3300
or visit the Church website at www.stsimonbc.org
GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS
CHURCH wish to invite you to worship with us and be
our special guest at our Annual Black History Day
Celebration February 27th at 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
Our guest speaker for 11:00 a.m. will be State Attorney,
The Honorable Angela Corey; and, our 3:00 p.m. speaker
will be Pastor Anthony Mincey, Pastor of Fisher of Men
International Harvest Center of Jacksonville. Music will be
rendered by New Creation Gospel Singers of Jacksonville.
For more information, call 904-359-0661. Dinner will be
served after each service.
WEST ST. MARK MISSIONARY BAPTIST
CHURCH, located at 1435 West State St., and Rev.
Willie J. Jones, Sr., Pastor, invite you to share in our
Church's 53rd and Pastor's 17th Anniversary and
Retirement Celebration to held on Sunday, February
13th, 20th and 27th, 4:00 p.m. nightly. Rev. Willie J.
Jones, Sr., the Pastor of West St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church is retiring after 17 years. Please come
celebrate with us.

Listings are due the Tuesday before the next
issue. Email submissions preferred. Send to:
info@thefloridastar.com


:ST. JOHN MISSIONARY BAPTIST:
:CHURCH MDG, FL. MUSICIAN NEED-:
:ED. PLEASE CALL: 904-272-5100 For:
:Interview.

II 1


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FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED
Since 1988
ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
44119 Sounel Dr. : lJackson ille. FL 322118
Tel: I9114) 766-9671 Fa\: (9114) 766-2354
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I Jacqueline Y. Bartle%


"Happy Birthday"
TYRONE EARL
WILLIAMS
(Tamberine Man)


MJ Sunrise: Feb 23, 1954
Sunset: Dec. 26, 2009

Your memory is our keep-
LB sake, with that we'll never
part. God has you in his keeping, we have you in our
hearts. With Love, Dad and Mom, Donald and Ora
McQueen, other Relatives and Friends.


FAITH GOSPEL SINGERS of Jacksonville Music
Concert, Saturday, February 19th at 5:00 p.m. at the
True Church of The Living God, 1405 W. State St.
with Rev. Peterson, Pastor. Join us in a great celebra-
tion and True Worship experience as we Bless the
name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ! Featuring:
Faith Gospel Singers; The Gospel Cavaliers; and,
Many Groups of the City. Call 904-355-0740
GOD'S TEMPLE OF LOVE, 358 Martin Luther
King Blvd., Kingsland, GA and Pastor Marvin Young
present THE 18TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE OUT-
REACH MINISTRY FOR JESUS CHRIST
February 27, 2011 at 12:00 noon. The Overseer is Bro.
Nathaniel Goosby. Special Guests are: Evg. Sandy
Goosby, Evg. Mae Demps, Evg. Inda Lawson, Deacon
Daniel Lawson, Minister David Scott, Youth Evg.
Latisha Tucker, Prophet Sonny Singletary, Min. of
Music Evg. Earnest Setzler, Gospel Artist Blacklite &
Ladybug, along with our guest speaker Prophet
Nathaniel Gardner of The Upper Room Ministry.
GREATER MACEDONIA BAPTIST CHURCH
35th ANNIVERSARY
In Honor of Rev. Dr.
Landon L. Williams, Sr.,
Pastor. Service Schedule
and Speakers are as fol-
lows: Banquet, February
12, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. Rev.
Kelly Brown of Mt.
Vernon Baptist Church;
Worship Service,
February 20, 2011, at
11:00 a.m., Brian
Campbell of Jerusalem
Rev. Dr. Landon L. Missionary Baptist
Williams, Sr. Church, 4:00 p.m.
Workship Service, Dr. John E. Gunns, IV of St. Paul
Missionary Baptist Church. The church is located at
1880 West Edgewood Ave. For more information, call
904-764-9257.


DEATH NOTICES


JACKSONVILLE, FL
(AREA DEATHS)
ANDREWS, Jean B.,
died February 13, 2011.
CAPASSO, Emma F., 77,
died February 12, 2011.
GARRISON, Allen, 57,
February 11, 2011.
GROOMS, Margaret,
died February 13, 2011.
HALL, Mello Delores,
died February 8, 2011.
HART, Allan Glen, 54,
died Februar 11, 2011.
JUSTISS, Charles, died
February 14, 2011.
MARAN, August
Anthony, died February
13, 2011.
McCUE, Michael
Wayne, 42, died February
9, 2011.
PATTERSON, Robert
Lee, died February 15,
2011.


RABY, Gertrude Altman,
87, died February 14,
2011.
STRICKLAND, Evelyn
B., 97, died February 14,
2011.
SWEAT, Carl L., 76,
died February 15, 2011.
WATTS, Wendelyn, 50,
died February 14, 2011.
WEEKS, Annabelle,
died February 13, 2011.
WILLIAMS, Ruth, died
February 11, 2011.


GEORGIA DEATHS
AUSTELL, Michelle Y,
died February 9, 2011.
DILMAR, Lureava, died
February 12, 2011.
GRANT, Sean Vernon,
died February 9, 2011.
THARPE, Velma Taylor
Hall, 91, died February
12, 2011.


SThe Church Directory
"Come and Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School ...................................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning
Intercessory Prayer....................10:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ......................11:00 a.m.
Youth Church
2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary)
Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ............... 7:00 p.m.
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus
(904) 764-5727 Church .r. ,

Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
W orship Service .............. ................. 10:00 a.m .
Church School .................................... 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday
"Glory Hour" Bible Study ..........................10:00 a.m.
"Jehovah Jireh" Bible Study .......................... 6:30 p.m.
2nd & 4th Thursday "Young at Heart Ministry .......... .10:00 a.m.
Friday
Joy Explosion M ministry ........................... 6:30 p.m .
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School................................................. 9:30 a.m .
Morning Worship................................. 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday...............................................Prayer M meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday................. .................................................Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org

Pa rles ChapelA.M.E. Church
S 22u .ii\.I'I'. Street, P.O. B '.\ "'5D Biiin.i\ ik i .I 521i
t i-.... *(9121 2(6 1 551 9
I, A. R~~. Richard llii br,;'i ,.. [tm,
SWorship Opportuntities:
SSundayv (I'mI SC Ichi., Ii
."A L ite lI i- \|I C i ci i '" 49 15 III 55!l
...1 "Ii'll', \\n i ,lnp l', l. iei- 1 ? !!*nil j.j "'"
SC (linl .l.t SruJ, i d \\cckl'. Bilic SNtudJ',. i"-e
SiMndJ,.i Niit. 'II 8:30 p.m.
Join Us as We i,,mi ih, I.., J of God and Enrich Our Souls!


(Temporary services held)
623 Beechwood St., Jacksonville, FL 32206
Sunday School.......10:00 a.m. ~ Sunday Worship .......11:00 a.m.
Every 5th Sunday Friends and Family Day
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
Direct Phone: 904.866.7047 Officehone: 904.356.4226
Seeing Beyond The Lifestyle To Save A Life


Tune In To


Clara McLaughlin
Host


Yvonne Brooks
Co-Host


IMPACT

Tuesday and Thursday

from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.



WCGL.AM 1360

The Florida Star and Impact
Striving To Make A Difference!


A CHURCH





A4 M K


THE STA R


FEBRUARY 192011


LIFESTYLE *

Socially Speaking
By Betty Asque Davis / Photos by J. Carl Davis, Sr. (Unlessotherwisespecified)

S"There's Always Something Happening On The First Coast"


I ofv-


I
* -


Drs. Clifford Pierce with Graphic Artist Mrs .Nakita
Powell and daughter Kenyona
-1


WIIIIl\ -v-
Burger King Managing Member Arthur Lee and Dr.
Brenda Robinson Simmons


Dr. Brenda Robinson Simmons
Dr. Brenda Robinson Simmons


Dr. Simmons, Mrs. Camilla Thompson and Ms.
Blackmon


TIe r eres-CilV vvar /re-e/actors Jun lacmn IHisory program
Sponsors, Presenters and Staffers as Black History Month Calendar Dr. Barbara Gubbin, Director
is Unveiled. Jacksonville Public Library


Dr. Barbara Darby, President
Campus


FSCJ North


Mrs. Chatman with Civil War Re enaclor


1*


JACKSONVILLE'S BLACK HISTORY MONTH
CALENDAR UNVEILING

Ken Amaro of First Coast News WTLV-NBC12/WJXX-ABC-25 opened the 21st
Unveiling of the Jacksonville Black History Calendar by stating, "It seems like only yes-
terday that the creators of this wonderful gift to the Jacksonville community began their
"labor of love." But, here we all are gathered to witness the first year of the 3rd decade of
calendar presentations. As we anticipate the purpose of today's assembly, let us all be
reminded that the Jacksonville Black History Calendars over the years have recorded the
history of people and events in the greater Jacksonville community. These contributions
have enhanced rich history of this community."
Dr. Brenda R. Simmons, Administrative Liaison and Co-Creator of the
Jacksonville Black History Calendar introduced the Calendar Concept. To the assembly Dr.
S Simmons stated, "The theme for the 2011 Jacksonville Black History Calendar is taken
from the National African American History theme as registered by the Association for the
Study of African American Life and History. The 2011 theme African Americans and the
Civil War presented an unparalleled challenge to the team this year. We were tasked with
presenting the most balanced view possible, reflecting one of the most unglamorous times
in American history. The debate still rages on as to whether or not the Civil War was fought
because of slavery alone or whether it was states rights. What remains is that the Civil War
was fought, countless lives were lost and from the scourge of battle, these United States
continued its history under one flag.
The 2011 calendar captures the role that Jacksonville and the surrounding commu-
nities played in the war. The story begins with a statement about the Civil War in general
and Florida in particular. The recounting continues with snapshots of African Americans
who fought for the Union as well as the Confederacy. The pages of the calendar site land-
marks and battles fought in and around the Jacksonville area, including the famous Battle
of Olustee. The calendar mentions the famous Massachusetts 54th, the Union troop made
famous in recent years by the movie, Glory, starring Denzel Washington.
No coverage of African Americans and the Civil War would be complete without
mentioning the Emancipation Proclamation, Juneteenth and the pervasively misunderstood
'Forty Acres and a Mule.'
The city of Jacksonville was attacked many times during the war because of its
location and the value of the St. Johns River, used for importing and exporting supplies.
The area of LaVilla was also strategic because of the railway that provided access to
Jacksonville from the west.
The pages of the calendar end with two persons who practice civil war re-enact-
ments as their avocations Mrs. Mary Fears and Dr. Clifford Pierce."
Civil War Re-enactor Dr. Pierce animated one of the pages of the calendar with a
Civil War Re-enactment and a Special Presentation was made to Mrs. Camilla Thompson,
Jacksonville's "Scientist of History", who wrote the Forward for the 2011 Black History
Month Calendar. The enlarged and framed page of the calendar presented to Mrs.
Thompson will be displayed during the month of February in the Jacksonville Public
Library's African American Collection on the 4th Floor in honor of you and your contribu-
tion to the rich history of African Americans in Jacksonville.
The Closing Remarks were given by Ms. Cassandra Blackmon, Operations
Chair for the Black History Month Calendar Committee.
The PMXperience provided the entertainment at the Reception following the
Calendar Unveiling. Burger King Restaurants, Florida State College at Jacksonville, the
Jacksonville Public Library and a limited number at First Coast News. These outlets are
also sponsors of the Annual Calendar in addition to the James Weldon Johnson Branch of
the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.

gxo Shool
S- .,.
.. ,, c -,OI ,


Your discovery starts today.:




SUBMIT
YOUR MAGNETPROGRAM

APPLICATION


by February 28, 2011
. ... .. ..
' -le l u ~ i l


The Pierces with an excited student!


*EIFhll kLIyou for shaing your eventsII and storI'UiI i es forM( tUhe clumn I]11111eachweekB!L.BecauselkiII ofK yolu readers are there I flki IIwith yo eachweekBi.V For lcolumn]11111entries M you~L
ma onat edietl t 0-51112 Tl Fe Fx86-88607o b -mi a:baai* watsonrealycorp cmSEE YOU I


PAGE A-d











IBRARY 19,T2011TTHEistBaR kPAGE.A-


THE FIRST BLACK AMERICANS were the 20
blacks who arrived at Jamestown, VA about the latter
end of August in 1619. Surviving evidence indicates
that the first Black settlers were not slaves. It appears
from the record that they were assigned the same status
- indentured servitude-as most of the first White immi-
grants. At the time of the first detailed census in 1624-
25, the 23 Blacks in Virginia-11 males, 10 females, and
2 children-constituted some two percent of the total
population of 1227. Among the Blacks identified by
name were Angelo, Edward, Antonio, Mary and John
Pedro.

The First Black born in English America, a boy
named William, was delivered in 1623 or 1624. In an
early edition of J.C. Hotten's Lists of Emigrants to
America, the first Black family is identified as
"Antoney Negro; Isabell Negro; and William their
Child Baptised."

The First Settler In Chicago was Jean Baptiste
Pointe DuSable, a Black trader and trapper, who built
the first house on the banks of the Chicago River in the
1770's.

The First National Black Convention met at
Philadelphia's Bethal African Methodist Episcopal
Church on September 15, 1830. There were 38 dele-
gates from eight states. Richard Allen was elected
President.

The First Negro History Week was celebrated in the
second week of February, 1926, Dr. Carter G. Woodson
organized the celebration "to include the birthday of
Lincoln and the generally accepted birthday of
Douglass."

The First Performance of Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing,
widely regarded as the Black National Anthem,
occurred on February 12, 1900 at a celebration of
Abraham Lincoln's birthday. The song was written
especially for the occasion by James Weldon Johnson
and his brother J. Rosamond Johnson. The anthem was


sung for the first time by a
chorus of 500 school chil-
dren.

The First Black Doctor
was James Derham, who
was born in slavery in
1767. Derham mastered
the profession while
assisting a physician mas-
ter. In 1783 he sought his
freedom and established a
large practice among
Blacks and Whites. By
1788 he was one of the
leading physicians in New
Orleans.


S'2.- "The First Black To
Graduate from a
*Medical School was
James McCune Smith,
who received a degree at the University of Glasgow in
1837.

The First Black Admitted to a Medical Society was
John V. DeGrasse who was inducted into the
Massachusetts Medical Society in 1854.

The First Black Lawyer was Macon B. Allen, who
practiced in Maine in 1843 and 1844 and was formally
admitted to the bar after he passed the examination at
Worchester, Massachusetts, on May 3, 1845.
The First Successful Operation on the Human Heart
was performed at Chicago's Provident Hospital on July
9, 1893 by Dr. Daniel Hale Williams.

The First Black Inventor to receive official recogni-
tion was Henry Blair of


make a fortune with a line of beauty products in the first
decades of the 20th century. She died on May 24, 1919.

The First Black on the New York Stock Exchange
was Joseph L. Searles, III, who began floor training on
February 13, 1970, as a floor partner in the firm of
Neburger, Loeb and Company.

The First Black named to the Board of Directors of
the New York Stock Exchange was Jerome H.
Holland, who was elected on March 2, 1972.

The First Black Cabinet Member was Robert C.
Weaver who was named secretary of the Department of
Housing and Urban Development by President Johnson.
He was sworn in on January 18, 1966.


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Maryland, who received a
patent for a corn harvester
on October 14, 1834.

The First Black
Insurance Company was
the American Insurance
Company of Philadelphia,
established in 1810.

The First Black Bank,
the Capital Savings Bank
of Washington, D.C.,
opened on October 17,
1888. The Savings Bank
of the Order of True
Reformers was chartered
on March 2, 1888 and
opened in Richmond on
April 3, 1889.

The First Black Woman
Millionaire and one of
the first major Black
entrepreneurs was
Madame C.J. Walker, who


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FEBR UAR Y19, 2 Oll


THE STAR


PAGE A-5






PAGE A-6 THE STAR FEBRUARY 19, 2011


Come


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where making shopping


a pleasure is part of the deal.



Even when you're shopping on a budget, you don't

have to give up the experience you deserve. At
Publix, you'll find hundreds of items on sale every

day, while you still enjoy the service you can't quite
put a price on. Go to publix.com/save right now

to make plans to save this week.







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ConnectMe provides (at no cost):
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with experienced physicians


To see if your child qualifies, or to learn more, visit or call:
www.ConnectMeClinicalTrial.com


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1579 The Greens Way Suite 18
Jacksonville Beach, FL 32250


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JPL on the Homefront: Smart investing@your library'
is a financial education program designed specifically for
veterans, service members, and their families.
This 3-module series begins with The Basics, covering:
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The military pay and entitlements system
Leave and Earnings Statement (LES)
Available financial resources at duty stations and command
Selecting and using a financial institution and advisor

February 22 & 24, 2011 All workshops are free and open to
(5:30 7:30 p.m.) the public.
Pre-registration is strongly
FSCJ Urban Resource Center recommended.
Room 103
601 W State Street To pre-register and get more
k601 W. State Street information on all workshops
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PAGE A-6


THE STAR


FEBRUARY 19, 2011





B1 M K


FEBRUARY 19. 2011


THE STAR


February 1, 2011
Internet News
One of the running good-natured jokes about Black
History Month is lt i it just so happens to be celebrated
in February -- the shortest month of the year. How did
February become Black History Month? Surge Desk
presents the history of ah, the history month.
According to the Library of Congress, Black History
Month has its roots in something called Negro History
Week. In 1925, Dr. Carter G Woodson, an African-
American historian who founded the Association for the
Study of Negro Life and History, proposed Negro History
Week as a way to encourage people to learn more about
black history. He selected a week in February 1iat includ-
ed the bi ii Ilia of both Abraham Lincoln and black abo-
litionist Frederick Douglass.
The first Negro History Week was celebrated in
February 1926. "The response was overwhelming," says
the Library of Congress. "Black history clubs sprang up;
teachers demanded materials to instruct their pupils; and
progressive whites, not simply white scholars and philan-
lJ ,pi'it, stepped forward to endorse the effort."
In the early 1970s, Negro History Week was rechris-
tened Black History Week to reflect the changing lan-
guage used to describe African-Americans. Then, in
1976, as America observed its bicentennial, Black
History Week was expanded to the full month we cele-
brate today.
Every February since 1976, the U.S. president issues
a proclamation declaring the second month of the year
Black History Month or National African American
History Month.


I..


Your discovery starts today.-




SUBMIT
YOUR MAGNET PROGRAM

APPLICATION


by February28, 2011
.......................I....................... ...............


* On February 12, 2009, the NAACP marked its 100th anniversary.
Spurred by growing racial violence in the early twentieth century, and
particularly by race riots in Springfield Illinois in 1908, a group of
African American leaders joined together to form a new permanent civil
rights organization, the National Association for the Advancement of
Colored People (NAACP). February 12, 1909 was chosen because it was
the centennial anniversary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln.


E I f i 'a"~_ r* John Mercer Langston was the first black
.man to become a lawyer in Ohio when he
Passed the Bar in 1854. When he was elected
to the post of Town Clerk for Brownhelm, Ohio in 1855 Langston became one of the
first African Americans ever elected to public office in America. John Mercer Langston
was also the great-uncle of Langston Hughes, famed poet of the Harlem Renaissance.
Thurgood Marshall was the first African American ever
appointed to the United States Supreme Court. He was
So appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson, and served on
the Supreme Court from 1967 to 1991.

George Washington Carver developed 300 deriva-
tive products from peanuts among them cheese, milk,
coffee, flour, ink, dyes, plastics, wood stains, soap,
linoleum, medicinal oils and cosmetics.

Hiram Rhodes Revels was the first African
American ever elected to the United States Senate.
He represented the state of Mississippi from February
1870 to March 1871.

Shirley Chisholm was the first African American
woman elected to the House of Representatives. She
was elected in 1968 and represented the state of New
York. She broke ground again four years later in
1972 when she was the first major party African-
American candidate and the first female candidate
for president of the United States.


In 1940, Hattie
/ MMcDaniel was the ATT
first African-TTIE
American performer to win an Academy Award
(the film industry's highest honor) for her portray- -
al of a loyal slave governess in Gone With the
Wind.






the space shuttle Endeavor. During her 8-day mission
she worked with U.S. and Japanese researchers, and
was a co-investigator on a bone cell experiment.





The black population of the United States in 1870 was 4.8 million; in 2007, the
number of black residents of the United States, including those of more than one race,
was 40.7 million.


1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom


LOCAL

SECTION B


I


I FLORI A I













By: Lucius Gantt
Its 2011, a new year and politically speaking, America's
Black citizens are looking for new political answers.
If you take a rudimentary glance at the governmental
workings of any ethnic group compared to Blacks and you
will see obvious differences in what is desired and what is
accomplished by ethnic representatives.
Jews in Congress, state legislatures and in local govern-
ment commissions or councils demand that interest groups
hire Jewish lobbyists, they demand government contracts
for Jewish businesses, they rise, stand up and speak out
about any issues that would reflect negatively on Jewish
culture and historical events like the Holocaust.
Cubans have the same demands for Cubans. Even Haitian elected officials do as
much as they can for America's Haitian residents and communities.
Every racial group in office today other than our representatives realizes that
elected officials main tasks are to divide up the money! Nothing is required o
elected officials except they must pass appropriation bills that will allocate money
to schools, law enforcement, environmental protection, health care and so forth.
OK, while other ethnic groups can point to jobs, contracts, museums, stadiums,
highways and things like that, what are our claims to governmental fame?
Black elected officials love to campaign on symbolism!
Don't get me wrong, there are a handful of health centers and other government
entities that were created and funded by government but most office holders are
proudest of basically nothing.
Can I prove it? Yes!
You tell me if you've heard something like the following, "Vote for me. I voted
for a Black holiday. Vote for me, I passed a "Pants on the Ground" bill to arrest
Black youth with saggy pants. Vote for me. I passed a bill that will place pictures
of Black people acceptable to whites in a comer of the Capitol or in City Hall."
And, the biggest claim to fame of all is, "Vote for me. I got the name of a street
changed".
Well, it's no secret, I do have brain damage, but it seems to me. Our communi-
ty needs services, we need jobs and we need money!
No matter what government calls our neighborhoods we make up our own names
anyway. Anybody that has lived in Atlanta more than 40 years knows where
Buttermilk Bottom is, or was. Miami natives know where Overtown is. LA resi-
dents can tell you where South Central is. We named Auburn Avenue "Sweet
Auburn". We named Tobacco Road.
When Jesus was in the wilderness, Satan offered Jesus the Kingdoms of the
world. Jesus didn't need Kingdoms from Satan. The Kingdoms already belonged to
the Father of Jesus! We don't need modem day devils to do something for us that
we can do for ourselves.
We don't need government to hand pick our community heroes so government
can make sure no Muslims, Yorubas, Black Nationalists, freedom fighters or revo-
lutionaries are recognized.
We need the same things from government that other racial and ethnic groups
get. We need some of the tax dollars that we pay to government to come back to
Black communities in the form of jobs, contracts, better schools, accessible health
care programs and the like.
We will trade government symbolism for government money any day of the
week.
Instead of fighting for holidays, maybe one day our elected officials will fight
for reparations so Black people can get paid for the way we've been treated for
more than 400 years!



(This Black History Month get a copy of Gantt's book "Beast Too: Dead Man
Writing". Contact Lucius at www.allworldconsultants.net)


Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.

THE FEMALE DR. PHIL, ANDI K., MA IS A LEADING PROFESSIONAL
IN SOCIAL EDUCATION AND CONSULTING. Please check out the latest
video additions on YouTube://www.youtube.com/user/AndiKConsulting. Her
areas of expertise include, but are not limited to: image consulting,
relationship/dating coaching, charm and etiquette, motivational speaking, and
editing. Send your feedback to 972.591.3883 (Phone) or
http://www.andikconsulting.com
WAR ON POVERTY FLORIDA is offering workshop series on Credit, Banking
and Budgeting with MoneySmart every Tuesday at 5:30p.m. (We are located
inside the Gateway Mall at 5196-A Norwood Ave., Jacksonville, Florida 32208.)
If you have any questions, please call 904-766-7275 or e-mail bbaham@waron-
poverty.org or rjackson@waronpoverty.org to register.
NORTHEAST FLORIDA COMMUNITY ACTION AGENCY (NFCAA), a
non-profit organization board of directors meeting, Thursday, February 24, 2011,
at 4:00 pm. 4070 Boulevard Center Drive, 4500 Building, Suite 200,
Jacksonville, Florida 32207. Information 398-7472 ext 224
REDDI-ARTS AND GALLERY 1037: JACKSONVILLE CONSORTIUM
OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN ARTISTS. The exhibit will run until February
28th. Gallery hours are: Monday--Friday, 8:30am-6:00pm; Saturday 9:30am-
6:00pm, Sunday 1:00pm-5:00pm. For further information and any questions
please contact Patty at (904) 398-3161 ext. 312. Gallery 1037 Located inside
Reddi-Arts, 1037 Hendricks Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32207
THE "AUNTIE ROZ PEANUT SHOW" will be in town for one week only,
March 7-11, at the Coleman Auditorium of Shiloh Metropolitan Baptist Church.
To learn more about "The Auntie Roz Peanut Show" visit auntieroz.com.
PEACHES TO THE BEACHES: Vendors & Spenders Wanted 212-mile yard
sale culminates in Golden Isles, Marchll-12, located at 1118 Beaver St.
Performances begins at 10 a.m. For more information on Peaches to the Beaches
contact Golden Isles Parkway Association at 912-375-5035 or visit
www.peachestothebeaches.com. To become a designated vendor in Brunswick,
contact GIAHA at (912) 262-6665 or info@goldenislesarts.org.


ULYSSES NN. NNATKINS.J., NI.D.

NOISE


Experts indicate that the noie lc\l \\ li\cn in toda\ contin-1 l l
ncs to increase at the same rate rI'( the next thiril years. noise
could become deadl\. Subia\ train, produce 90 to 1()0 deci-
hbcl ( mcaiurc of 0' sound initensit\ ) of noJe.is. A lathc proidulcc',
85 to 95 decihels: punch press 9'5 to 100 deciels: circular a ,a\\10 to 110 deci-
hbe: sand IlaIter 1I S decibel: and ri\eter 130 decibel. Exposure to N5 to I00
decielck can cause a hearin- loss.

.A ur\ ie of t\\o hundred \\ork areas in lorlt diflT'eent indui trial companies in the
United Statce Itound 5(1 percent ofli h machinery\ producing noie le\ el in exce,
0of1l decibels. High rate, of h'earin-, los arie found amoni factor\ workerss and
heia\ equipment operators. Ilt i, estimated that ,ix million workers in the United
State, are ,uljected to noie lex els hazardous to hlearin'2.

Industrial manaIIemeni is a\\are of ce\'eral \a\,a to a\ oid noie-induced hearing
los. Often a sileni machine ma\ be substituted loir a noi,\ one. .At times \\eld-
inC can replace ri\etini. meLtal can be cleaned chemically rather than bl high-
speed polihing. and metal parts ma\ be replaced h ruhbber or pla-tic. A well-
luhricated machine makes le noise than one that needs luhrication. .Ah.-orlben
linin-, onl machinery reduce noise. Management can rotate workers \\ho must
\\ork at nois mnachiner0 or place thel \\ orker on schedule broken into "on-off"
periods.

Damage to the inner eai from loud noise results in hearing loss. and this damage
is permanent. The degree of deafness is related not onlh to the length of exposure.
but alo to the extent and l pe of noise. Noise reduces the w\ orkerl ellcienci: it
creates an\iet\. irritabililt and fatigue. Noise can be a causati\e factor in acci-
dents. Adequate protection roman noise eposuire cannot be pro\ ided b cotton in
the ears. but it can be reduced to a sa\e le\ el for the inner car if a person \\cars
car protectors.

The public nccds to stinulatc municipal o\Xernmenllt to enforce antinoise ordi-
nances and to compel industrie- to control noise conditions in their plants. In
addition. noise hazards in industries could be reduced hb federal le-islation \\here
the industries hold contracts \\ ith federal o\ernment or canr\ on interstate com-
merce. Se\ ere noie hazards can de\ clop \\ ith supiersonic air transport, high speed
rail transportation, and some ne\\ t pes of industries.


MaeIt out(prt2


By: Farris Long


LUV U


No one, myself included, wants to feel like they are being
tolerated. Whether it be in friendships, marital relationships,
business relationships, or anything else. To be simply tolerat-
ed means that a person deals with you out of their frustration
and aggravation and not out of appreciation or admiration. The strain created can
be great because usually in those situations, they are either not honest enough to
tell you why they feel the way they do or they are not strong enough to bring clo-
sure when things are obviously irreconcilable. It is ok to know when to hold em'
and know when to fold em.

Deception has a major role in the type of relationship above because the other
party responds to you out of their frustrations. Then they try to act as if there was
no driving force that preceded their actions and responses toward you. However
the deception takes on a whole new dimension when it is U who is deceiving
yourself. HUH????? I have discovered (even in my own life at times) we say we
LUV the U in the mirror when in fact we simply tolerate him or her. Although this
is not always the case, but so often I have seen women who change hair styles
almost as much as they change their clothes. Most of the women that I have seen
do this have actually been searching for themselves. Very often they are unhappy
with their body, their relationships or their lives.

I have seen both married men and married women who dress to impress just
to go to the mall or the grocery store, not just because they like dressing nicely,
but because they are subconsciously looking to get attention and compliments.
(EVEN IF THEY ARE ALREADY GETTING THEM AT HOME) Very often
they do it out of their personal insecurity and not from a place of personal settle-
ment in their lives. These kinds of actions can create a downward spiral in their
marriages because it too often, creates insecurities in their spouse, who is now left
feeling like they are not good enough to satisfy the emotional need. And when that
spouse begins to act on his or her insecurities, the fall out ensues.

As you can see, not LUVING U can create major problems in all of our lives.
It can make it absolutely impossible for us to love our neighbor as ourselves. OR
perhaps we actually are loving our neighbor as ourselves... we just love ourselves
so little that we pass that on to our neighbor. Either way, if you my friend, are to
develop healthy relationships and live a much more fulfilling life, you must learn
how to LUV U first which begins with loving God.

Be sure to come back next month for the conclusion of this article and find out
HOW to begin the process of LUVING U. After-all you only live once... so
MAKE IT COUNT!


AIYVO 2a01


PAGE B 2


THE









PAGE B-3 THE STAR FEBRUARY 19. 2011^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^_^


DANNY BOYLE,

A MAN ABOUT THE WORK, NOT
By Rych McCain, feedbackrych@sbcglobal.net and Facebook


THE GLORY!
Celebrity Interviews


Director Danny Boyle (L) and actor James
Franco (R) Image by Chuck Zlotnick for Fox
Searchlight Pictures

Upon first impression, one can only draw con-
clusions from what they have encountered. In the case
of Oscar winning film director Danny Boyle; one
would be hard pressed to believe he is a man of so


many impressive accomplishments by his meek and
very humble demeanor. As a columnist, this is my sec-
ond interview with Boyle and he was as cordial the sec-
ond time as he was the first proving that true greatness
doesn't have to be sold, exhibited or flaunted. Its pres-
ence speaks for its self! Boyle's epic film "Slumdog
Millionaire" literally swept the 2008 Academy
Awards with ten nominations, winning eight includ-
ing Best Picture! Now his latest film 127 Hours for Fox
Searchlight Pictures has garnered three 2011 Golden
Globe nominations. Boyle and his co-writer Simon
Beaufoy are up for a "Best Screenplay" Golden Globe.
They are the same duo who wrote "Slumdog" and won
the Oscar for Best Screenplay. Also up for a Golden
Globe for "Best Original Score" for 127 Hours is A R
Rahman who also won the Oscar for "Best Score" for
"Slumdog." So there is some truth that keeping good
company helps you win!
Boyle is a native of The U. K.. where he still
lives and attended Thomliegh Salesian College. Upon
leaving school, he began his television directing career
for The BBC in Northern Ireland then segwayed into
directing films. "127 Hours" is a true story of mountain
climber Aron Ralston who slipped and fell into a deep
canyon craves then had a heavy bolder fall and trap one
of his arms. After five days of not being able to free him
self, Ralston broke his arm and cut it off below the
elbow to free himself. Then he scaled a 65 ft wall and
hiked eight hours before he was finally rescued. The
story made world wide headlines and soon after
Ralston wrote a book titled "Between A Rock And A
Hard Place."


So how did Boyle become involved with the
story and making it into a film? He looks back saying,
"I heard of the story in 2003 when it happened. I live in
London and it was a world wide story. I read his book
in 2006 and I had one of those experiences where you
just know how to do it (direct). It's incredibly arrogant
of course, because I mean nothing really over reacts in
the book, but I certainly saw that's how you do it. I
know exactly how to do it. You galvanize yourself. You
go through the whole experience with him and when
you come out, you'll feel like you've been through it as
well. And so I went to talk to Aron and when I see him
he would say yes but he didn't. He didn't like that
approach. He wanted to do it more as a documentary,
more factual based and he wanted his boys to control
the film. And I remember saying, facts will only take
you so far. If you want the emotion that goes with that,
it should be in a story line and you'll need an actor to
take you there."
The two disagreed but finally after some con-
vening reassuring that Boyle and his team were decent
film makers, Ralston switched gears and became more
willing to trust Boyle to tell his story. Boyle continues,
"I basically said you have to let us tell the story Aron.
There is a basic difference. You've got to give us the
voice of the film. It will be your story but it is James
and I's telling of it that people will be watching. We
will give you the story back at the end of the film. It
will be factual but you will have the extra ingredient of
an actor taking you some where. It is a safe bet that
Boyle and his crew will be in the thick of the Oscar
race with "127 Hours."


RYCH MCCAIN'S HOLLYHOOD NOTES!
By Rych McCain, feedbackrych@sbcglobal.net, Facebook Celeb Interviews


Havpy B-Day:
B-Day wishes of the happiest
kind go out to actress Ashley Argota
who arrived at year number 18 this past
Sunday, Jan 9, 2011. Of course Ashley
is a member of Rych McCain's Youth
Media Family.
Comedy:
Comic Ricky Del Rosario has
come out of a ten year stage hiatus to
return with a new DVD titled Ricky Del
Rosario "I Missed You." Once dubbed
by HBO as one of America's Top Fifteen
Urban Comics, Rosario's physical abili-
ty to manipulate his body and facial
expressions combined with his vocal
powers are the features that set him
apart from other comics. He will make
his live return appearance at The VIP
All-Star Weekend Party hosted by
Lakers player Matt Barnes.
AP Awards Coverage:
The AP i.e., Associated Press,
the largest new and information gather-
ing source will be bringing live coverage
of this year's three major awards shows,
namely The Golden Globes, The
Grammys and The Oscars. Live
broadcasts streaming from the red car-
pet will allow online viewers another
view of the arrivals up close and person-
al. AP Live can be obtained at
www.livestream.com/aplive or as a
widget embeddable on any website. AP
Live coverage also includes a multi-
media interactive, on-demand video,
reactions from nominees, fashion com-
mentary and a behind-the-scenes look.
Viewers can send in their questions
through Facebook
(www.facebook.com/aplive)
and Twitter and an AP correspondent on


the red carpet with hand held devices
will relay the information directly to the
celebrities.
Music:
This week Hip Hop Weekly
announced The Shiekh Music 2010 "Rip
The Mic" winners for Hip Hop and R&B.
They are Dizzy D Flashy from Las
Vegas (for Hip Hop) and Jon Doe from
LA) for R&B. After their perspective
wins, posters began going up in Shiekh
stores from Cali to Texas. The event
held in Burbank, CA., was sponsored by
Reebok, Island Def Jam and Hip Hop
Weekly Magazine. Dizzy D and Jon doe
will be touring U.S. cities live. For high-


lights


of the event go


http://Ink.ms/H8RXS.
Movies:
The Dilemma;


Universal


Pictures, Imagine Entertainment, Spy
Glass Entertainment. Starring Vince
Vaughn, Kevin James, Jennifer
Connelly, Winonna Ryder Channing
Tatum, Queen Latifah and Talulah Riley.
Directed by Ron Howard. Produced by
Brian Grazer and Vince Vaughn. With
the Howard as director and Grazer as
producer combination, you can't go too
wrong. This may be the best film out so
far for 2011! It is funny yet tackles the
very serious questions of harboring
secrets between best friends. This one
is worth the ticket and popcorn. Hit me
up at feedbackrych@sbcglobal.net
Study, Observe and Win!
Rych


*22-elEXPLORATION I---M


VOCAL EXPLORATION CLASS!

The Jacksonville Children's Chorus is accepting registrations
for the Vocal Exploration Program which is a non-auditioned music
class for first through fourth grade singers. This ten week class
meets weekly. Each lesson combines learning musical skills, group
singing, and play-like activities/games that bring together learning
experiences and fun in meaningful ways.
The program is a great way for youngsters to explore their
interest in music and singing-potentially preparing them for partici-
pation in JCC's performing choirs. Our goal is that development,
knowledge and experience that students receive in this program will
be applicable to other choral activities, including school and reli-
gious institution music programs. The Vocal Exploration class is
focused on learning and vocal development, and there will be an
opportunity for parents to observe the final class.
This ten week program will meet on Mondays from 5:30 pm
- 6:30 pm at Friday Musicale, located at 645 Oak Street
Jacksonville, FL. The cost of participation is $159 per singer.
Classes will begin on February 28, 2011. Registration forms can be
found on our website http://www.jaxchildrenschorus.com/ under the
Vocal Exploration tab or by calling our office at 904-353-1636.
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me.




Sincerely yours,

Darren Dailey

Artistic and Executive Director


PAGE B-3


THE STAR


FEBRUARYIB9 2011






PAGEB4 CMYK


PAGE B-4


THE STAR


BLACK ICE
The Colored Hockey League of the Maritimes
Formed in 1895 in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

Comprised of the sons
and grandsons of run-
away American slaves, the
league helped pioneer the
sport of ice hockey chang-
ing this winter game from
the primitive "gentleman's
past-time" of the nine-
teenth century to the mod- -
em fast moving game of
today. In an era when many
believed blacks could not
endure cold, possessed .
ankles too weak to effec-
tively skate, and lacked the
intelligence for organized sport, these men defied the defined myths.

The Truth Shall Set Us Free. Today there are no monuments to the Colored Hockey
League of the Maritimes. There is no reference to the league in any but a few books on
hockey. There is no reference to Henry Sylvester Williams, James Johnston, James
Kinney or the scores of players who wore the Colored League uniforms. There is no ref-
erence in the Hockey Hall of Fame of the impact that Blacks had in the development of
the modem game of hockey. No ref-
.p. erence to the Black origin of the
slap shot. There is no reference to
the Black origin of the offensive
style of goal play exhibited by
Franklyn. There is no reference to
the Black origin of goalies going
down on ice in order to stop the
puck. There is no reference to the
Black practice of entertaining the
crowds with a half-time show. It is
as if the league had never existed.
For hockey is today a sport Whiter
in history than a Canadian winter.


11


FEBRUARY19. 2011


Beyond the Playing Field -

Jackie Robinson, Civil Rights Advocate
- -


To the average man in the average American
community, Jackie Robinson was just what the
sports pages said he was, no more, no less. He
was the first Negro to play baseball in the
major leagues. Everybody knew that. . In
remembering him, I tend to de-emphasize him
as a ballplayer and emphasize him as an infor-
mal civil rights leader. That's the part that
drops out, that people forget. -Rachel
Robinson


A A



Ja e




Jackie Robinson


Jack Roosevelt Robinson (1919-72), the first black man to "officially" play in the
big leagues in the 20th century, possessed enormous physical talent and a fierce
determination to succeed. In the course of a distinguished 10-year career beginning
in 1947, Robinson led the Brooklyn Dodgers to six National League titles and one
victorious World Series. Beyond his many and stellar baseball feats, Jackie Robinson
went on to champion the cause of civil rights when he retired from the game.
The National Archives and Records Administration holds numerous records
relating to Jackie Robinson, many of which pertain to his period of civil rights advo-
cacy. Several belonging to that time have been reproduced here for educators teach-
ing courses that involve civil rights events and issues, character education, and effec-
tive citizenship skills.

Jack Johnson became the first African-
.1 meAmerican man to hold the World
Heavyweight Champion boxing title in 1908.
He held on to the belt until 1915.
Johnson's boxing style was very distinctive.
He developed a more patient approach than
was customary in that day: Playing defensive-
ly, waiting for a mistake, and then capitalizing
on it. Johnson always began about cautiously,
slowly building up over the rounds into a more
aggressive fighter. He often fought to punish
his opponents rather than knock them out,
endlessly avoiding their blows and striking
with swift counters.


WOMEN PIONEERS I I


One of the first women's track teams in
the United States began at the all-black
Tuskegee Institute (now Tuskegee
University) in 1929. Three years later,
Louise Stokes Fraser and Tidye Pickett
qualified for the 1932 Olympics in
track and field, but were not allowed to
participate in the event (held in Los
Angeles) because of their race.


Stokes

In Berlin in 1936, Stokes and Pickett became
the first African-American women to represent
their country in the Olympics. Alice
Coachman, a star track and field athlete at
Tuskegee Institute, became the first black
woman to win Olympic gold, setting records
with her high jump at the 1948 Olympics in
London.

Pickett


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PAGEF R-5


THE STAR


-mw


Sd








PAGE B-6 THE STAR FEBRUARY 19, 2011


BE AT PEACE
with
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Honoring the life of your loved one means you value the
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Top 20 Playlist October-November 2010
Listen to WCGL AM 1360 LIVE at www.wcgll360.com!
1. Nobody Greater VaShawn Mitchell
2. It's All God The Soul Seekers Feat. Marvin Winans
3. I Won't Let You Fall Helen Miller & New Anointing
4. It's About Time For A Miracle Beverly Crawford
5. I Want To Say Thank You Lisa Page Brooks
6. Leave It In The Hands of the Lord The Supreme 7
7. I Chose To Worship Wess Morgan
8. On My Way Back Up Jimmy Hicks & VOI
9. Hold On The Brown Sisters
10. Jesus You Are April Nevels
11. Lord Do It Alvin Darling
12. Nobody Like You Fred Hammond
13. I Give Myself Away William McDowell
14. Turn It Over To Jesus The Second Chapter
15. Just for Me Shekinah Glory Ministry
16. Lord We Praise You Phoenix Mass Choir
17. Expect The Great Jonathan Nelson
18. Lord You're Mighty Youthful Praise feat. J.J. Hairston
19. He Wants It All Forever Jones
20. Just Stand Hope Chapel Mass Choir


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THE STAR


PAGE B-6


FEBRUARY19, 2011


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FEBRUARY 19, 2011 THE STAR PR-I


RE


P


RA


DID YOU


KNOW...


Black History


Trivia


1. Actor Sidney Poitier grew up on Cat Is-
land in the Bahamas. How did he lose his
West Indian accent?
Poitier listened to the radio constantly and repeated
everything he heard.
2. Which Black actor said, "I made films
when the only other Black on the lot was
the shoeshine boy."
Sidney Poitier;
3. What book inspired comedian Richard
Pryor to focus on his own goals?
Malcom X Speaks
4. How old was Black entertainer Dorothy
Dandridge when she died: 42, 52, or 72?
Ms. Dandridge was 42 when she died on September 8,
1965.
5. How long did it take Hugh Robertson,
the first successful Black film editor, to
earn his union card: 5, 10, or 11 years?
11 years, Robertson went on to edit Midnight Cowboy
and Shaft. In 1982 he was inducted into the Black Film-
makers Hall ofFame.
6. Who drew the tiger, "Shere Khan", and
the python, "Kaa", for Disney's The Jungle
Book?


Black animator Floyd Norman.


1. What were work songs?
Songs sung by Black slaves as they toiled.
2. What was the purpose of "field
hollers," in which a slave might
suddenly call out a long, clear note,
often evoking a response from
other workers?
Field hollers provided an emotional release,
broke up the monotony of work, and often
warned fellow slaves of the approach of an
overseer.
3. Which Black actor portrayed sunny "Cowboy
Curtis" on the Peewee Herman Show and
seething "Ike Turner" in the film What's Love Got
to Do With it?
Laurence Fishburne.
4. Who was America's first African American
scientist?
Benjamin Banneker, an astronomer
5. Who was the first African American
to earn a doctorate from an American
University?
Edward Bouchet received his Ph.D. in physics
from Yale in 1876.
6. What was the name of the first Black
hospital opened in the United States?
Provident Hospital, in Chicago, was started by
Black surgeon Dr. Daniel Hale Williams and a
Black nurse named Emma Reynolds.


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FEBRUARY 19, 2011


THE STAR


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FEBRUARY 19, 2011 THE STAR PR-2


3


Did you know...?
Black History Trivia

1. Which virtuoso trumpeter single-handedly
changed jazz from an ensemble form of music to
one showcasing solo turns by outstanding instru-
mentalists?

Louis "Satchmo"Armstrong.

2. Where was Louis Armstrong born?

Armstrong spent his youth in New Orleans.

3. Where did Louis Armstrong learn to play
music?

In the New Orleans Colored Waifs'Home, where he was placed
at age 13.

4. Who was jazz's first national and international
star?

Louis Armstrong.

5. What was Duke Ellington's real name?

Edward Kennedy Ellington.

6. What was the theme song of Duke Ellington's
band?

Take the "A Train, composedby band member Billy Strayhorn.

1. The average life expectancy for a White male is
71.7 years. What is the average life expectancy of
a Black male?

65.4 years.

2. The average life expectancy for a White female
is 78.7 years. What is the average life expectancy
for a Black female?

73.6years.

3. Slave trading brought approximately 11 million


Africans to North and South America, True or
false?

True. Slave trading caused one ofthe largest forced migrations
in recorded history

4. Slave traders fanned the flames ofAfrican tribal
conflicts, encouraging local rulers to take prison-
ers of war and sell them as slaves. True or false?

True.

5. Only wealthy landowners owned slaves. True
or false?

False. By the end of the 1600's more than three quarters of the
families in Virginia owned slaves.

6. The Northern states gradually eliminated slav-
ery because it clashed with the ideals of freedom
stated in the Constitution. True or false?

False. The Northern states abandoned slavery largely because
slavery was not suited to their trading and industrial economy.

1. New York was the last Northern state to outlaw
slavery. True or false?

True. While Vermontabolishedslavery in 1777, New Yorkwaited
until 1857.

2. What percentage of the population of the South
was comprised of slaves?

One-third. The total Southern population was about 12 million,
including about 4 million Black slaves.

3. Some free Blacks owned Black slaves. True or
false?

True. Some African-Americans purchased their relatives to lift
them out ofslavery, but afew owned slaves a apprentices, ser-
vants or workers.

4. What were the communities in the wilderness
called that were formed be escaped slaves?


5. Decapitation was a frequent punishment for
slave revolts. True or False?

True.

6. Most captive slaves came from inland Africa
and were forced to march to the sea where they
boarded slave ships. True or false?

False. Most slaves came from the coast.


1. What was Black actor Stepin
name?


Fetchit's real


Lincoln Theodore Monroe Andrew Perry.

2. Between 1926 and 1935 Stepin Fetchit appeared
in how many films: 20,26, or 36?

He appeared in 26films.

3. Scholar, actor and performer Paul Robeson was
an All-American football star, valedictorian of his
class at Rutgers, and earned a law degree from
Columbia University. True or false?

True.

4. Who sang 01' Man River in the 1936 HOlly-
wood musical Showboat?

Paul Robeson.

5. Why did Paul Robeson stop making movies
after 1942?

Robeson was sickened by the racist portrayals of Blacks in
movies financedandproduced by Whites.

6. Who starred with Lena Home in the 1943 all-
Black Hollywood musical Stormy Weather?


Maroon communities. Dancer Bill 'Bo/angles" Robinson.


FEBRUARY 19, 2011


THE STAR


PR 2


Dancer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson.


Maroon communities.





FEBRUARY 19, 2011


Parties, poems, cards, flowers, candy and
kind words are all part of St. Valentine's Day.
This is a special day to share feelings of love
or friendship. Hopefully, people show that
they care every day of the year.
SAINT


Through Wind,

Snow ofr aM!
Mr. Turtle is the mailman
in his neighborhood. He
delivers the mail through
all kinds of weather!


Slow and steady I deliver cards and Valentines.
Some have funny poems. Some have just a line:


? L 1Ao


A B
O D


J K L M N O P Q R


EJ)


DAY!
HEARTS PINK CANDY FLOWERS
RED CUPID PARTY LOVE POEM

Duval County School Board
recognizes employees, a student and
community partner during monthly
meeting

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. During the
presentation portion of the monthly meet-
ing of the Duval County School Board, Su-
perintendent Ed Pratt-Dannals and Board
members recognized employees, a stu-
dent and a community partner for their out-
standing accomplishments and
contributions to Duval County Public
Schools:
Three Duval County Public Schools'
employees were recognized for their im-


Can you fill the blanks with letters
that match the code? Then you will
know what some cards say!


pact with counseling programs both inside
and outside the schools:
Nan Worsowicz, supervisor of guid-
ance services, was recognized for receiv-
ing the Florida Supervisor Advocacy
Award;
Beverly Walker, principal at Chaffee
Trail Elementary, was recognized for re-
ceiving the Laurel Kaden Anderson Ad-
ministrator Award; and
Mike Rady, counselor at Mayport
Middle, was recognized for receiving the
Lucille Crysell Award;
Danielle Cogdell, a student at James
Weldon Johnson, was recognized for win-
ning the Governor's Recognition Scholar-


V
a


x
C


ship Essay Contest sponsored by the
Florida Prepaid College Foundation;
HandsOn Jacksonville was recog-
nized for their numerous contributions to
Duval County public schools through indi-
vidual school and district-wide projects.
Duval County Public Schools oper-
ates 172 schools and serves approxi-
mately 123,000 students. The school
district is committed to providing high qual-
ity educational opportunities that will in-
spire all students to acquire and use the
knowledge and skills needed to succeed
in a global economy, and culturally diverse
world.


THE STAR


PR 3


x~n


I' -o ?


W~no


0





FEBRUARY 19, 2011 THE STAR PR-4


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MEET THE MAYORAL CANDIDATES FORUM
20 OF JACKSONVILLE'S TOP COMMUNITY ORGANIZA-
TIONS WILL HOST MAYORAL FORUM TO DISCUSS "FACING
THE REALITY OF RACE RELATIONS


Jacksonville, FL The Jacksonville Urban League in conjunc-
tion with the Jacksonville Chapter of the National Congress of Black
Women (NCBW) and a broad coalition of Duval County's major commu-
nity partners will host a Mayoral Forum with candidates running for Mayor
of Jacksonville to discuss Facing The Reality of Race Relations. The
forum will be held on Monday, February 28, 2011 from 6:00p.m. -
8:00p.m. at The LaVilla School of the Arts located at 501 North Davis
Street. For More Information Please Call (904) 366-3461. The community
will have an opportunity to submit questions to the candidates regarding
their plans to enhance race relations.
The forum is offering the candidates the opportunity to speak di-
rectly to the community and to educate voters as to their vision of the of-
fice of the Mayor of Jacksonville with focus on race relations directly
impacting the community. Mayoral candidates Alvin Brown, Warren Lee
and Audrey Moran have accepted the forum's invitation to participate.
The organizers' goal for this forum is to educate the community on
the candidates' positions and commitments for inclusion in City Policy.
This forum is aimed to inform and educate the community and candidates
on the reality of race relations in our communities, via issue questionnaires.
If anyone in the community cannot make the forum and would like to sub-
mit a question, please send to sueruffin@comcast.net. This is the first time
that such a broad coalition of organizations has come together to participate
in the electoral process.
PARTICIPATING ORGANIZATIONS ARE: 100 Black Men of
Jacksonville, Inc., Alpha Kappa Alpha Fraternity, Inc., Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority, Inc., Association for the Study of African-American Life and His-
tory, Council on the Social Status of Black Men and Boys, D.W. Perkins
Bar Association, Inc., Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., Gamma Beta Boule
of Sigma Pi Phi, Jacksonville Association of Black Journalists, Jacksonville
Human Rights Commission, Jacksonville Urban League Young Profes-
sionals, Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., League of Women Voters,
NAACP, National Congress of Black Women, Inc., Northeast Florida Com-
munity Action Agency, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., ONE Jax, Inc., Phi
Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. and Zeta Phi *F ana
Beta Sorority, Inc.


MAvORAL
1
FACING TIIEREALIT


P


P


*ORU

OF RAEREAIOSI
A forim ihte/niac
,5 akovil o lto fJicsn/l
0rban Leagu


~il~'"""""""""""' ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;


FEBRUARY 19, 2011


THE STAR


PR-4


ormation please call (904) 366-3461




C&J1 CM K


February 19, 2011


THE STAR


Vol. 1, No. 13


II 0
A',m an jusic

A Pbi cti o ir ofI


Man Convicted of
Murdering Infant Son


The jury trial of a Jacksonville man
ended early Thursday evening with a mur-
der conviction.
S43-year-old Marshall Dale Cole IV was
found guilty of second-degree murder. It
took the three-man, three-woman jury just
over an hour to deliberate.
Cole testified in his own defense and put
the blame of the infant's death squarely on
the shoulders of the mother, his ex-wife.
Cole denied shaking the child at all, which
was determined to have contributed to the
child's death.
Marshall Dale Cole IV According to the Assistant State Attor-
ney, Cole shook the baby so hard his spine
hemorrhaged and the brain swelled against the skull until it lost the ability to tell the
lungs to breathe. Authorities were called to Cole's Volley Drive home on March 22,
2009. The baby died a few days later.
Both Cole and his ex-wife reported that the baby had been spitting up but that there
had been nothing else noticeably wrong before Cole was alone in the bedroom with the
child for at least 30 minutes. Cole said he heard a noise and noticed Marcus wasn't
breathing.
Prosecutors told the trial judge that Cole had been lying about the case since the
baby was first rushed to the hospital. Despite this, Cole maintained his innocence, telling
the jury that although he admitted he could have been a better father, he would never hurt
his child.
Cole faces up to life in prison when sentenced.

Lake City Man Locked Up For
Drugs

Police in Columbia County arrested a man in his own
home Monday on drug charges.
Deputies found about 15 grams of cocaine, more than
100 grams of marijuana and two handguns in the home of
40-year-old Keith Walker in the 100 block of Northwest Ca-
nine Court.
Keith Walker Walker is charged with a variety of possession charges
for the illegal firearm, marijuana and cocaine and is currently
being held with bail set at $101,000.


The community of Banning, CA is still in shock after
three young teens admitted to attacking and sexually as-
saulting a female classmate.
The 13-year-old girl, who has not been identified, re-
ported to a school counselor and later to the local police
that she had been walking through a playground less than
a mile from the Nicolet Middle School she and her as-
sailants attend when she came upon her three male class-
mates at dusk.
They began to fondle her before grabbing her arms
and pushing her down on the playground's asphalt. One of
the males proceeded to rape her while the others kept her
from escaping.
The child identified her assailants and Banning in-
vestigators were able to find and question all three sus-
pects last week. After confessing to the crime, all three
were arrested and booked on suspicion of sexual assault
into Riverside Juvenile Hall.
Reportedly, one of the boys told police he was prom-
ised an iPod if he participated in the attack.





AC&JPAGEA-2


Blac Hitr'/rnful ovce
I AI


Brothers Griffin, black farmers and landowners from Chester County, South Car-
olina, were convicted of murdering a white farmer and Confederate veteran in Black-
stock, John Q. Lewis.
The conviction was based on the accusations of John "Monk" Stevenson, known
to be a small-time thief who was found with the victim's pistol.
Although more than 100 people petitioned Governor Richard Manning to com-
mute the brother's sentence, they were executed via electric chair in South Carolina
in 1915.
Nearly 100 years after their execution, in October 2009 brothers Griffin were
pardoned, after nationally syndicated radio host Tom Joyner sought the pardons from
state appeals court in Columbia, South Carolina.
It was the first time ever that South Carolina has issued a posthumous pardon in
a capital murder case.


Radio Host Tom Joyner celebrating the pardoning of
the Griffin Brothers.


L_


Boxing great Rubin "Hurricane" Carter.


Rubin Carter, a former professional boxer, was arrested for a 1966 double mur-
der that occurred in the Lafayette Bar and Grill in New Jersey when two black men
entered the bar and shot a bartender and a customer.
A petty criminal named Alfred Bello, who had been near the Lafayette Bar to
commit a burglary of a factory that night, came forward as an eyewitness. Despite
support from the community and from celebrities such as Muhammad Ali and Bob
Dylan, Hurricane and another man, John Artis, were tried twice and convicted for
the murders.
Almost a quarter century and several appeals to the courts later, a federal judge
overturned the convictions in 1985. The State of New Jersey decided not to try the
case for a third time and withdrew the indictments against them.
Carter now lives in Toronto, Ontario, and was executive director of the Associ-
ation in Defense of the Wrongly Convicted (AIDWYC) from 1993 until 2005.
Carter's story inspired the Norman Jewison 1999 feature film The Hurricane, star-
ring Denzel Washington in the lead role.


Historic Justice


~L I;


February 19, 2011


THE STAR


C&J PA GE A-2


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ci~i~P


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FebruaIn 19,r 2011 THE STAR C&JPAGE-3


Man Rapes Girlfriend While Daughters

Look On

A Camden County jury has decided that a
i "Florida man did indeed rape his girlfriend in front
of their three young daughters.
Corey Bolden, 35, was convicted Wednes-
day of single counts of rape and kidnapping and
four counts of cruelty to children for sexually as-
S saulting his girlfriend of 14 years while their chil-
So .. B w dren looked on in helpless horror.
:..' /It took only an hour and a half for the jury
to return from their deliberations with a guilty ver-
dict. Bolden was also found guilty of two counts of
aggravated assault for threatening and jabbing his
girlfriend with a knife and two counts of burglary
Cory Bolden for entering the home of his girlfriend's mother to
carry out the attack. Bolden was sentenced to two consecutive life sentences.


Husband and Wife Charged

in Fake Bomb Robbery

Glynn County police arrested a 60-year-old
Brunswick man and his wife who were found to have
been behind the fake bomb robbery of the Southeastern
Bank on Trade Street last week.
The FBI became involved in the case by the end
of the week and coordinated with local police on a man-
hunt for the robber, identified as James Ronnie Mc-
Cormick.
On Friday, investigators spotted McCormick get-
ting into a camper trailer. After Glynn County's SWAT
team arrived and a flash grenade was thrown into the
camper, McCormick was seized by authorities.
McCormick was charged with armed robbery and
parole violation. His wife, Anna McCormick, was
charged with armed robbery and obstruction.


Navy Chief's Murderer Gets

Life Sentence

A Jacksonville man was found guilty of
murdering a Navy chief in his own home.
Despite two members of the jury being
dismissed and replaced for searching the Internet
during the trial, DeAngelo Thomas was in the end
convicted of murdering Navy Chief Petty Officer
David Gilbert.
The incident took place last April, when
Thomas shot and killed the 40-year-old officer,
who came home to find Thomas burglarizing his
apartment. Thomas later told police he was looking
/"" for marijuana and had ended up in the wrong apart-
ment.


DeAngelo Thomas Gilbert's 3-year-old daughter was in the
home at the time of the shooting and had to be car-
ried out of the apartment over her father's body when paramedics arrived.
Thomas was also found guilty of armed burglary.


CrMime Watch


Daycare Employee Charged

with Child Abuse

A Jacksonville woman has been charged with
child abuse despite the state Department of Children and
Families' inability to substantiate the allegations.
Chicquita Hampton, 50, had been involved in an
incident with a 5-year-old child at Tutor Time on Lady
Lake Road.
According to the Jacksonville Sheriffs Office,
there was not enough evidence uncovered to confirm the
charges. Hampton had passed the initial background
check for employment. The allegations that were put forth
were in one parent's complaint. The allegations were
found to be unsubstantiated in the company's investiga-
tion.
Hampton found that she had full support of the
company but it is unclear whether or not she will be al-
lowed to keep her job as an early education professional.


J


February 19, 2011


THE STAR


C&J PA GEA-3




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February 19, 2011


THE STAR


C&JPageA-4


CriminalLinen U
MISN ESN


Name: Da'Wan Shaw-Gibson
Age: 27 Height: 5'6"
Weight: 1201bs
Last seen 09/13/04 in Hinesville,
GA. Has tattoo of three "foot-
prints" on right thigh.


Name: Artdrunetta Hobbs
Age: 27 Height: 5'2"
Weight: 1251bs
Last seen 08/10/06 in Atlanta,
GA. Has dreadlocks and tattoo of
initials "AH" on upper left arm.


Name: Julius Howard
Age: 16 Height: 5'5"
Weight: 1651bs
Last seen 01/27/11 in Ft. Laud-
erdale, FL. May still be in local
area.


Name: Christian Hudson
Age: 15 Height: 5'6"
Weight: 1401bs
Last seen 11/27/10 in Miami, FL.
Believed to be in local area. Has
scar on nose/tattoos on forearms.


Name: Marquell Green
Age: 16 Height: 5'6"
Weight: 1201bs
Last seen 05/21//10 from Palm
Beach Gardens, FL. May now be
in Riviera Beach, FL area.


IU E CI N S


An annoyed prisoner apparently attempted to take
his frustrations out on a Fort Lauderdale, FL courthouse
by flooding it.
The inmate damaged a sprinkler head significantly
enough that the north wing of the building ultimately
flooded. Police went on to say the inmate wasn't trying
to escape; he just needed to let off some steam.


Deputies arrested an Inglis, FL man on charges that
he was "cooking meth" inside a speeding car.
When police stopped Jerry McKay, 23, they looked
inside the passenger-side window and saw a jug and a
garbage bag with a twisted top. They also smelled a
strong odor of ammonia emanating from the car.
McKay was hauled off to jail immediately.


lalllll,. ixaquc l I
Age: 24
Offense: Burelarv


lmalelt; 111 s inuIMI
Age: 21
Offense: Riiryarv


Name: Anthony Thoi
Age: 39
Offense: Grand Theft


Name: Leonard Mosley Name: Sharonda Verdell Name: Elijah Br
Age: 31 Age: 18 Age: 18
Offense: Batterv Offense: Aoorav Ananilt Offense: Battery


Name: Tommy Anderson
Offense: Rape


Name: Wayne Arnold
Offense: Molestation


Name: Ernest Bynum Name: David I
Offense: Robbery Offense: Rape


Name: Carl Boals
Offense: Forgery


wihipaencurgetcllCrmeStp s at I Yu cn r n a