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Brother Robert Allen Jackson Sr., the oldest son of eight children, was born April 27, 1941. He received his education in the Duval County Public Schools, baptized at Mr. Zion Missionary Baptist, graduated from Douglas Anderson and attended Edward Waters College. After returning from the U.S. Army, he began his career and became an entrepreneur. Jackson was known as the Premier Auto Detailing Service of Jacksonville. He was the first Black man to own and operate a full service automobile and RV detailing service. He died last week, leaving a wife, six children and a host of family and friends. Haitian authorities reported that they are moving toward trying Jean-Claude Duvalier for alleged corruption and embezzlement during his 15-year rule by opening an investigation against the former dictator who in an unexpected move, returned to the country. Baby Doc was questioned by judges for hours behind closed doors on Tuesday and the case is now in the hands of a judge who will decide if there is enough evidence to go to trial. Haitis system allows for pretrial detention, but Duvalier was allowed to remain free. However, he cannot leave the country. However, his longtime companion Veronique Roy said that when he left France where he has lived in exile, he advised that his trip would last for three days. The investigation process can take up to three months and Duvalier does not have a passport. There have been demonstrations for his support. Carlina Whites mother and father took her to the emergency room at a Harlem Hospital on August 4, 1987 because she had a high fever. After their baby was admitted they left. A female, dressed as a nurse, helped them but when they returned the next day, both the nurse and their daughter could not be found. No suspects were ever found and at that time, the hospital did not have surveillance video. Carlina, said she grew up in Bridgeport, Connecticut and assumed that the woman who raised her was her mother until she could never produce a birth certificate and there was no family resemblance. Therefore, Carlina did her own research and after having her daughter and moving to Atlanta, she did further research as she made contact with law enforcement and missing children. Carlina was right, after a DNA was done, it was confirmed that her parents were Joy White and ex-husband, Carl Tyson. Carlina knew herself as Nejdra Nance. At 23, she is again Carlina and with her real family. Three city workers of Spokane, Washington found a backpack with an improvised explosive device, a remote controlled bomb and two T-shirts in it. The device was on the parade route for children and old folks to celebrate Dr. Kings birthday and reminded many of the bomb that was placed in a church in 1963 that killed four little Black girls with 22 others being injured in the aftermath. For this 2011 incident, one FBI agent said that the device was the most potentially destructive improvised bomb he had ever seen. The area is known for white supremacist activity but no one has been identified with this apparently psychotic point of view. Because of the quick thinking of the city workers with God on their side and the people, the bag was found, the parade was rerouted and the bomb was defused. What is frightening is the fact that it was well made with the intention of seeing maximum carnage. HTGG"VKEMGVU yyy0vjghnqtkfcuvct0eqo Nqqmkpi"hqt"ewuvqogtu"vq"rcvtqpk|g"{qwt dwukpguu"qt"wvknk|g"{qwt"ugtxkeguA"Kh"{qw cpuygtgf"[GU."vjgp"{qw"pggf"vq"rnceg"cp"cf kp"Vjg"Hnqtkfc"qt"Igqtikc"Uvct#""ECNN ;261988/::56"vq"rnceg"{qwt"cf"VQFC[## Check, Money Order, Or Credit Cards Accepted cfBvjghnqtkfcuvct0eqo PQTVJGCUV"HNQTKFC‘U"QNFGUV."NCTIGUV."OQUV"TGCF"CHTKECP"COGTKECP"QYPGF"PGYURCRGT K P U K F G A1 C M Y K Editorial....................A-2 Church....................A-3 Lifestyle..................A-4 State-National..................A-5 Entertainment..............A-6 Prep Rap..................B-5 & 6 Local.....................B-1 Columns...................B-2 Sports....................B-4 Did You Hear?................B-3 Classified & Business... B-7 Rtguqtvgf"Uvcpfctf W0U0"RQUVCIG"RCKF Lcemuqpxknng."HN RGTOKV""PQ0"5839 LCPWCT[""44"/"LCPWCT["4:."4233 """""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""" XQN0"82"PQ0""5; """"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""72" EGPVU Cp"Cyctf Ykppkpi Rwdnkecvkqp. ugtxkpi"{qw ukpeg"3;730" Tcvgf"‰C“"d{ vjg"Dgvvgt Dwukpguu"Dwtgcw Ykuj"vq"ikxg"wu"c"Pgyu"Uvqt{A Ecnn"*;26+"988/::56"qt"Ugpf"kv"vq< kphqBvjghnqtkfcuvct0eqo Hktuv"Uvgnnct"Cyctf"hqt"Lcemuqpxknng Tgcf"Vjg"Hnqtkfc cpf"Igqtikc"Uvct Pgyurcrgtu0 Nkuvgp"vq"KORCEV Tcfkq"Vcnm"Ujqy0YYY0vjghnqtkfcuvct0eqoStill the peoples choice, striving to make a difference. Vjg"Hnqtkfc"Uvct. Vjg"Igqtikc"Uvct. Korcev"Tcfkq 32705"cpf"CO3582 *;26+"988/::56 See Prep Rap Section B See Crime & Justice Section A Ms. Deborah Maiden, owner and general manager of WCGL-AM1360 radio station, holds the Stellar Award certificate and trophy for 2011, awarded the station on January 15, 2011. WCGL (Where Christ Gets Lifted) won the award over other medium market stations in the United Stations while in Nashville, TN. WCGL is Jacksonvilles first station to receive this award. See complete story on B-3. Vjg"Hnqtkfc"Uvct R"Q"Dqz"6284; Lcemuqpxknng."HN"54425 Egpuwu"Tgrqtvu"Lcemuqpxknng jcu"Jkij"Tcvg"qh"Jqoqugzwcn Hcoknkgu"Tckukpi"Ejknftgp According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Jacksonville has one of the largest populations of gay parents in the United States. It is called a gayfriendlyŽ city. The publication, The AdvocateŽ released its top 15 gay friendly cities. Jacksonville did not make the top 15 list, but it did make the list. It has been learned that children of gay and lesbian couples do receive difficult times and are therefore counseled. Floridas Governor Scott said he is opposed to gay adoption but has not decided if he will try to revive a state law that banned homosexuals from adopting. He appointed David Wilkins as the new secretary of the Department of Children and Families. Uqwvjgtp"Yqogp"Ujqy"/"Ucxcppcj Ftwonkpg""//"Nkokvgf"Pwodgt *;26+"988/::56 Dqod"Rncpvgf"qp"ONM"Rctcfg"Tqwvg Lcemuqpxknng"Vggp Eqookvu"Uwkekfg Mkfpcrrgf"Kphcpv"Hkpfu Rctgpvu"45"[gctu"Ncvgt Vjg"Rtgukfgpv‘u"HktuvVyq"[gctu"kp"F0"E0 The challenges inherited by President Obama was immense but he has made an incredible amount of progress in an effort to build an economy for all Americans. What has he done in two year: Rebuilding our Economy Recovery Act; Wall Street Reform; Middle-Class Tax Cuts; Credit Card Reform; Building a Clean-Energy Economy; Rebuilding the American Auto Industry Education Reforming Student Lending; Spurring Innovation; New GI Bill Civil Rights Repealing Dont Ask, Dont TellŽ; Protecting Against Hate Crimes; Fair Pay for Women Historic Health Reform Affordable Care Act Childrens Health Insurance National Security Ending Combat Operations in Iraq; Toward a World Without Nuclear Weapons A New Strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan His Goal: To be the generation that makes future generations proud of what we did here.Ž David N. Githiiyu, 15, a 10th grade student at the Robert E. Lee High School in Jacksonville was dropped off by his mother at 7 a.m. Thursday to join those students who were going on a field trip to UCF in Orlando. His mother said they were running a little late but to Davids dismay, the bus driver would not open the door, even though his friends tried to tell the driver to let him on. David was looking forward to the trip and was very disappointed as an aspiring engineer. His mother said he broke down in tears as she apologized and asked him to go to his class. Because he was devastated, he just wanted to go home so that is where she took him. When she returned home two hours later, she found him hanging from a belt fastened on a door in the kitchen. He was pronounced dead immediately. No one knew if David was going through other things. Many donated funds for his funeral service as the family continues to moan his death, asking, why.? Dtqvjgt"Tqdgtv"C0"Lcemuqp"Ut0 qh"Dtwpuykem"cpf"Lcemuqpxknng Dcd{"Fqe"cpf"Jckvk‘u Hwvwtg"ykvj"jku"Tgvwtp Vjg"dcemrcem"ykvj"kortq/ xkugf"gzrnqukxg"fgxkeg0 Ft0"Mkpi"cpf"Rtgukfgpv Qdcoc"/"Vjg"Ftgco Fcxkf"Plqtqig"Ikvjkk{w. 37 Ectnkpc"Yjkvg."mkfpcrrgf"cv"3;"fc{u qnf."ujqyp"cv"tkijv."cv"45."tgwpkvgf"ykvj hcokn{0 Lgcp/Encwfg"Fwxcnkgt *Dcd{"Fqe+ Tqdgtv"C0"Lcemuqp"Ut0

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Saturday, January 15th, 2011 is actually Dr. Kings birthday and the 3rd Monday of January is designated by law as the day his birthday is celebrated. There will be many Breakfasts, Luncheons, Dinners, Parades and other programs to mark the celebration of his birth, and all of that is good, but I would like for us to also remember all of the work Dr. King did, and that he made the ultimate sacrifice, gave his life, all for Humanity, not for us just to have a reason to celebrate his birth, nor just for us t o give one day of service Attached is a copy Dr. Kings Letter From A Birmingham Jail.Ž The letter was written on toilet tissue because he had nothing else to use. Please take your time and read it. It is just as relevant today as it was in 1963 when it was written. As you c elebrate Dr. Kings birth this year, please dont forget to reflect back on his many, many contributions to humanity and remember if it were not for him, African Americans, as a people, would not be where we are today! We may not be where we want to be, but we definitely are not where we were! 16 April 1963 My Dear Fellow Clergymen: While confined here in the Birmingham city jail, I came across your recent statement calling my present activities "unwise and untimely." Seldom do I pause to answer criticism of my work and ideas. If I sought to answer all the criticisms that cross my d esk, my secretaries would have little time for anything other than such correspondence in the course of the day, and I would have no time for constructive work. But since I feel that you are men of genuine good will and that your criticisms are sincerely set f orth, I want to try to answer your statement in what I hope will be patient and reasonable terms. I think I should indicate why I am here in Birmingham, since you have been influenced by the view which argues against "outsiders coming in." I have the honor of serving as president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, an organization op erating in every southern state, with headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. We have some eighty five affiliated organizations across the South, and one of them is the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights. Frequently we share staff, educational and financial resources with our affiliates. Several months ago the affiliate here in Birmingham asked us to be on call to engage in a n onviolent direct action program if such were deemed necessary. We readily consented, and when the hour came we lived up to our promise. So I, along with several members of my staff, am here because I was invited here. I am here because I have organizational ties here. But more basically, I am in Birmingham because injustice is here. Just as the prophets of the eighth century B.C. left their vi llages and carried their "thus saith the Lord" far beyond the boundaries of their home towns, and just as the Apostle Paul left his vi llage of Tarsus and carried the gospel of Jesus Christ to the far corners of the Greco Roman world, so am I compelled to carry the go spel of freedom beyond my own home town. Like Paul, I must constantly respond to the Macedonian call for aid. Moreover, I am cognizant of the interrelatedness of all communities and states. I cannot sit idly by in Atlanta and not be conc erned about what happens in Birmingham. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. Never again can we af ford to live with the narrow, provincial "outside agitator" idea. Anyone who lives inside the United States can never be considered an outsider anywhere within its bounds. You deplore the demonstrations taking place in Birmingham. But your statement, I am sorry to say, fails to express a similar co ncern for the conditions that brought about the demonstrations. I am sure that none of you would want to rest content with the superficial kind of social analysis that deals merely with effects and does not grapple with underlying causes. It is unfortuna te that demonstrations are taking place in Birmingham, but it is even more unfortunate that the city's white power structure left the Negro community with no alternative. In any nonviolent campaign there are four basic steps: collection of the facts to determine whether injustices exist; negotiation; self purification; and direct action. We have gone through all these steps in Birmingham. There can be no gainsaying the fact that racial injustice engulfs this community. Birmingham is probably the most thoroughly segregated city in the United States. Its ugly record of brutality is widely known. Negroes have experienced grossly unjust treatment in the courts. There have been more unsolved bombings of Negro homes and churches in Birmingham than in any other city in the nation. These are the hard, brutal facts of the case. On the basis of these conditions, Negro leaders sought to negotiate with the city fathers. But the latter consistently refused to engage in good faith negotiation. Then, last September, came the opportunity to talk with leaders of Birmingham's economic community. In the course of the negotiations, certain promises were made by the merchants--for example, to remove the stores' humiliating racial signs. On the basis of these promises, the Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and the leaders of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights agreed to a moratorium on all demonstrations. As the weeks and months went by, we realized that we were the victims of a broken promise. A few signs, briefly removed, returned; the others remained. As in so many past experiences, our hopes had been blasted, and the shadow of deep disappointment settled upon us. We had no alternative except to prepare for direct action, whereby we would present our very bodies as a means of laying our case before the conscience of the local and the national community. Mindful of the difficulties involved, we decided to undertake a process of self purification. We began a series of workshops on nonviolence, and we repeatedly asked ourselves: "Are you able to accept blows without retaliating?" "Are you able to endure the ordeal of jail?" We decided to schedule our direct action program for the Easter season, realizing that except for Christmas, this is the main shopping period of the year. Knowing that a strong economic-withdrawal program would be the byproduct of direct action, we felt that this would be the best time to bring pressure to bear on the merchants for the needed change. Then it occurred to us that Birmingham's mayoral election was coming up in March, and we speedily decided to postpone action until after election day. When we discovered that the Commissioner of Public Safety, Eugene "Bull" Connor, had piled up enough votes to be in the run-off, we decided again to postpone action until the day after the run off so that the demonstrations could not be used to cloud the issues. Like many others, we waited to see Mr. Connor defeated, and to this end we endured postponement after postponement. Having aided in this community need, we felt that our direct action program could be delayed no longer. You may well ask: "Why direct action? Why sit ins, marches and so forth? Isn't negotiation a better path?" You are quite right in calling for negotiation. Indeed, this is the very purpose of direct action. Nonviolent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such a tension that a community which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue. It seeks so to dramatize the issue that it can no longer be ignored. My citing the creation of tension as part of the work of the nonviolent resister may sound rather shocking. But I must confess that I am not afraid of the word "tension." I have earnestly opposed violent tension, but there is a type of constructive, nonviolent tension which is necessary for growth. PAGE A-2THE STAR JANUARY 22, 2011 Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson First African American Inducted Into The Florida Press Hall Of Fame EDITORIAL CLARA JACKSON McLAUGHLIN OWNER/PUBLISHER LONZIE LEATH, RINETTA M. FEFIE MANAGEMENT ERIC A. LEE SALES & MARKETING DIRECTOR MAY FORD, LAYOUT EDITOR CRIME & JUSTICE, JULIA BOWLES ALLEN PROCTOR DESIGN AND WEB SITE PARTNER BETTY DAVIS LIFESTYLE/ SOCIETY COLUMNISTInvestigative Reporter: Lonzie Leath, Features: Dementrious Lawrence Reporters/Photographers: Marsha Phelts, Carl Davis, Laurence Greene, F. M. Powell III, Michael Phelts, Richard McLaughlin, Andrea F. K. Ortiz, Angela Morrell, Joseph Lorentzon, Scott Jurrens, Cheryl Williams Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Ester Davis, Lucius Gantt, Deanna, Cynthia Ferrell, Delores Mainor Woods, Farris Long Distribution and Sales: Dan & Pat Randolph, Abeye Ayele, Cassie Williams, Angela Beans, Tony Beans, Herman Robinson, David Scott TEL: (904) 766-8834 FAX: (904) 765-1673 info@thefloridastar.com (912) 264-3137 Georgia Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Alachua, Flagler, Marion, McIntosh, Camden And Glynn CountyTheFloridaStar.comThe Florida and Georgia Star Newspapers are independent newspapers published weekly in Jacksonville, Florida SUBSCRIPTION RATES One Year-$35.00 Half Year-$20.00Send check or money order or call with VISA,AmEX,MASCD, DiSCOVER and subscription amount to: The Florida Star, The Georgia Star P.O. Box 40629 Jacksonville, Florida 32203 The Florida Star will not be responsible for the return of any solicited or unsolicited manuscripts or photos. Opinions expressed by columnists in this newspaper do not necessarily represent the policy of this paperMEMBERSHIPS: Florida Press Association National Newspaper Association National Newspaper Publishers Association Amalgamated Publisher, Inc. Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce First Coast African American Chamber of Commerce THE FLORIDA STAR THE GEORGIA STAR MIKE BONTS, SPORTS EDITOR RICKY McLAUGHLIN, SPORTS YOLANDA KNUCKLE, COLUMNS LIZ BILLINGSLEA OFFICE/ACCOUNTS MANAGER TIA AYELE, SPECIAL SECTIONS GEORGIA MARKETING ANGELA FAVORS MORRELL DISTRIBUTION HERMAN ROBINSON/DAVID SCOTT National Newspaper Publishers Association MAKE TUESDAY YOUR DAY OF EXTRA KNOWLEDGE TUNE IN TO IMPACT LISTEN AND TALK FM 105.3 -WJSJ 5:30 P.M. AND 11:30 P.M. AM 1360 WCGL 8:30 P.M.Clara McLaughlin and IMPACT Call and Talk 5:30 pm 904-854-8255; 8:30 pm 904-766-9285 Listen on the Web: www.radiofreejax.com Serving since 1951 Vjg"Hnqtkfc"Uvct"/"Vjg"Igqtikc"Uvct"/"Vjg"Rgqrng‘u"Ejqkeg 7<52"r0o0"cpf"33<52"r0o0 32705/yyy0tcfkqhtgglcz0eqo :<52"r0o0/yyy0YEIN3582 Oqtg"dtcpf"pgy"nkxg"nqecn"vcnm vjcp"qp"qvjgt"tcfkq uvcvkqp#Ejgem"qwvYLUL"/"HO"32705""Pqtvj"Hnqtkfc"("Uqwvjgtp"IgqtikcSome of our nqecn"ujqyu include Cpf{ Lqjpuqp Dtqvjgt"Uvcp the Union Man, Vtwem EnctcOeNcwijnkp for The Florida and Georgia Star, Rtqitguukxg"Tqqvu K<"vjg"Kpf{"Owuke Ujqy# Some of our pcvkqpcn"ujqyu" include Gf"Uejwnv|."Vjqo"Jctvocpp"cpf Uvgrjcpkg"Oknngt EDU"Tcfkq"Pgyu"/"Gxgt{"jcnh/jqwtEcnn"kp"<""*;26+":76/VCNM Qpnkpg< yyy0tcfkqhtgglcz0eqo Rtqitguukxg"Vcnm"Tcfkq"/"46"jqwtu fckn{0""Cnn"rtqitcou"ctg"uvtgcogf qp"vjg"ygdYcpv"vq"CfxgtvkugA""Ecnn<""*;26+"647/5597 By: Florida State Senator Tony Hill PQV"LWUV"EGNGDTCVKPI"DWV"TGHNGEVKPI"DCEM"QP" FT0"OCTVKP"NWVJGT"MKPI."Lt0‘u"EQPVTKDWVKQPU"VQ JWOCPKV[ OPINION/EDITORIAL Editorial-Continued-A-5

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JACKSONVILLE, FL (AREA DEATHS)ATON, Rose Nell, 65, died January 17, 2011. BASSETT, Daryl Warren, 42, died January 16, 2011. BRAY Corene L., 85, died January 17, 2011. CARTER Nicholas J., died January 8, 2011. CASEY, Tommy V., 11, died January 16, 2011. COOK, Sandra Holloway, 66, died January 8, 2011. DURHAM, Betty Callahan, 69, died January 11, 2011. GILLIARD Horace, died January 17, 2011. GREEN Travis J., died January 15, 2011. HAYES Bessie, died January 18, 2011. HOWELL Tommie Lee, died January 15, 2011. JACKSON Robert Allen, Sr., died January 13, 2011. JONES, Larry Rowland, 57, died January 16, 2011. KEENE Mary S., 49, died January 14, 2011. LOVETT Ella S., died January 18, 2011. MILLER Elizabeth (Lane), 95, died January 16, 2011. MILLER Orlan Samuel, 82, died January 17, 2011. PIERCE Melissa Green, 52, died January 15, 2011. ROBERTS Samuel, 78, died January 17, 2011. WILLIAMS Walter Franklin, died January 17, 2011. WOODS, Frances, died January 16, 2011.~ ~GEORGIA DEATHS HOBBS, Terry, died January 11, 2011. JOHNSON Luenette, died January 11, 2011. SMITH Julia, 79, died January 14, 2011. STEPHENS Robert Lee Geetboy,Ž died January 6, 2011. STERLING Joseph West, died January 15, 2011. WORTHY Mary Bell, died January 11, 2011. Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church 201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475 Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor Sunday Worship Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m. Church School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:30 p.m. Wednesday Glory HourŽ Bible Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10:00 a.m. Jehovah JirehŽ Bible Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Thursday Young at Heart Ministry . . . . . .10:00 a.m. Friday Joy Explosion Ministry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 p.m. The Church DirectoryCome and Worship With UsŽ New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208Sunday School ƒ..............ƒƒƒƒƒƒ..9:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Intercessory Prayer...............ƒ..10:45 a.m. Morning Worship ......................11:00 a.m. Youth Church 2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary) Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m. Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus (904) 764-5727 Church GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCHThe Church Where Everybody Is SomebodyŽBishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586Sunday School.......................................................................................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship.................................................................................11:00 a.m. Tuesday................................................Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m. Thursday...............................................................................Joy Night,7:00 p.m.Email: Gospell75@aol.com Website: Greaterelbethel.org Faith In Our CommunitySchedule of Events and ServicesPAGE A-3 THE STAR JANUARY 22, 2011 Tune In To IMPACT IMPACTTuesday and Thursday from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.WCGL-AM 1360The Florida Star and Impact Striving To Make A Difference! Clara McLaughlin Host Yvonne Brooks Co-Host Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email submissions preferred. Send to: info@ thefloridastar.com Ask Us About OurALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208 Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354 DIRECTORSDeborah West Alphonso West Jacqueline Y. Bartley If there had been a death in your family yesterday, what would you be doing today?FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED Since 1988Pre-Need ForeThought Funeral Planning ProgramIm sorry to have to tell you this...Ž CHURCH Paynes Chapel A.M.E. Church2200 Albany Street, P.O. Box 759, Brunswick, GA 31520 (912) 261-9555 Rev. Richard Hutcherson, Pastor Worship Opportunities: Sunday Church School A Life Changing ExperienceŽ . . 9:15 10:55 a.m. Morning Worship Service . . . . . . 11:00 a.m. Church at Study (Weekly Bible Study) Monday Nights . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 8:30 p.m. Join Us as We Study the Word of God and Enrich Our Souls! DEATH NOTICES DEATH NOTICES INTRODUCE YOUR CHURCH HERECALL (904) 766-8834and ask for Liz ANNIVERSARIES Central Metropolitan C.M.E. Church4611 North Pearl St., Jacksonville, FL 32206 Ofc (904) 354-7426 Fax (904) 354-0934 Rev. Clarence Kelby Heath, PastorGo ye therefore, and teach all nations, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you; and, lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world. Amen.Ž Mathew 28:19-20 Sun Church School 9:30a.m. Sun Morning Worship -10:45 a.m. Tues Eve Bible Study-6:30 p.m. Wed Bible Study-12 Noon Wed Feeding Ministry 2:00 p.m. ~ Worship Service ~ EMANUEL MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 2407 S. L. Badger, Jr. Cir., E. Saturday, January 22, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. The Gospel Cavaliers, Christian Comedy Rev. Charles of Atlanta, GA, The Gospel Tones of Jacksonville, FL, Victor Speight & The Endtime Messengers of Kinston, NC, and more. For more information, call 904-234-6427 or 904-803-2178. GREATER NEW MOUNT MORIAH MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 1953 West 9th St., with Pastor Percy Jackson, Sr. invites you to join them January 23rd at 6:00 p.m. as they Praise God in Song.Ž Featured guests will be The Anointed Sisters of Praise, The Men of Praise, and The Scott Family Gospel Singers. For more information, call 904-475-0141 or 904-401-9003. WEST FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH Annual Homecoming will be observed during the month of January. Rev. Timothy L. Cole, Sr. is the Pastor. This years theme is: Dress Apparel.Ž 2nd Sunday, January 9, 2011 is Black & White; 3rd Sunday, January 16, 2011 will be Armed Forces Day; on January 23, 2011 Inside/Out, Mix Match; Sunday, January 30, 2011 is OldŽ shirts & uniforms day. 945 Carrie St. FELLOWSHIPS FRIENDSHIP PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH located at 1106 Pearce Street, will be celebrating the Friendship Male Chorus Anniversary Saturday, January 22, 2011 at 4:30 p.m. There will be many Male Chorus Groups around the city. If you have any questions, please contact the church at 904-353-7734. This event is open to the Public EL-BETH-EL COME TOGETHER DAY -we, the pastor officers and members wish to invite you to worship with us and be our special guest on our Come Together Day Celebration January 23rd at 3:00 P.M. A great program has been planned for this occasion. The guest speaker will be Attorney Seth Rothstein for this occasion. There will be several civic and political leaders to share with us and bring greetings for this occasion. If you have any questions, please contact our pastor Bishop Dr. Lorenzo Hall Sr. at 904-710-1586 or the office manager Miguel Zapata at 904-374-3940. Dinner will be served after service. CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD Sunday, January 30, 6 pm, Chamber Music Society of Good Shepherd presents Jacksonville University Chamber Singers Timothy Snyder, director; the inaugural concert of the 24 voice JU Chamber Singers' Winter Concert Tour. Program will include works by: Mozart, Palestrina, Victoria, Poulenc, Effinger, Snyder, others. Future concerts: Sunday, February 20, 6 pm, Worsham Hall-Jacksonville University Chamber Strings, Marguerite Richardson, conductor. Works by: Handel, Walton, Vivaldi, Kalinnikov, Britten; Sunday, March 20, 6 pm, Craig Hall-Shostakovich: Piano Quintet in G Minor, Op. 57 Wagner: Siegfried Idyll, Randy Tinnin, conductor. Free and open to the public.1100 Stockton Street at Park, Riverside. Jacksonville, FL 904-387-5691. ST. JOHN MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH MDG, FL. MUSICIAN NEEDED. PLEASE CALL: 904-272-5100 For Interview. REVIVAL......REVIVAL.....REVIVAL Holy Tabernacle ChurchWe are having a Holy Ghost Revival that you dont want to miss, as the word of God will come forth like never before. The speaker will be assistant pastor David Perry of New Life Evangelist Center of which Bishop A. C. Richardson is the pastor. Assistant Pastor Perry is a simple man, with a simple message, Repent the Kingdom of God is at hand.Ž On the 28th & 29th at 7:30 pm and on the 30th 9:45 am, with Bible School and Worship Service immediately following. Come hear the word of God from a man of God that wants men to be saved and serve the true and living God. Bishop Robert L. Jones and Pastor Paul R. Cardona, along with the Holy Tabernacle Church family cordially invite the public to fellowship with us as we worship the Lord in Spirit and in Truth. Located at 6416 Miriam St., Jacksonville. For more information call the church at (904) 764-3754 or Min. Horace Bell, Jr. at (904) 7085331. Asst. Pastor David Perry

PAGE 4

L LIFE IFES STYLE TYLE A4 C M Y K Socially SpeakingBy Betty Asque Davis / Photos by J. Carl Davis, Sr. Theres Always Something Happening On The First CoastŽ Theres Always Something Happening On The First CoastŽPAGE A-4THE STARJANUARY 22, 2011(Unless otherwise specified) Thank you for sharing your events and stories for the column each week! Because of you readers are there with you each week. Fo r column entries you may contact me directly at 904-571-1182, Toll Free Fax 866-488-6407 or by e-mail at: badavis@watsonrealtycorp.comSEE YOU IN THE PAPER SEE YOU IN THE PAPER ! The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Celebrates Its 50thThe Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens kicked off its 50th Anniversary year celebrating the past, present and future. The newly renovated Tudor Room was unveiled. Members and guests at the kick off were able to preview The Cummer Legacy. This exhibition is the first ever exhibition that displays in one gallery the works of art that comprise the original bequest that formed the core of The Cummer Collection. At the opening guests enjoyed a lavish buffet, live music and a special theatrical presentation of the life of Mrs. Ninah Cummer by the Players by the Sea. It was quite an evening and everyone was having such a marvelous time. The museum was Jumping! The Cummer Museum has featured in their past exhibited collections: The Highwaymen Paintings, The Gees Bend Quilts, and the Walter O. Evans Collection of African American Art. My favorite exhibition item is Augusta Savages (1892 … 1962) The Diving Boy, c. 1939 is a bequest of Mrs. Ninah M.H. Cummer. Born in Green Cove Springs, Florida, Ms. Savage moved to Jacksonville, Florida at the age of 16 to earn a living sculpting portrait busts of prominent African Americans. In 1921, she moved to New York and received many fellowships and awards, allowing her to travel and study abroad. In 1932 Savage began a notable teaching career with the founding of the Savage School of Arts and Crafts in New York and became one of twentieth-century America's most prolific and influential sculptors. Because of her often-difficult financial situation, her plaster originals were frequently destroyed before she could afford to have them cast in bronze. Ms. Savage visited Mrs. Ninah Cummer at her Jacksonville home in 1939. The Diving Boy was originally placed at one end of a reflecting pond in Mrs. Cummer's Italian Garden, and is typical of Savage's interest in combining realistic details with psychologically penetrating expressiveness. Since its opening in 1961, the Cummer has stood as a beacon of manmade art and natural beauty to the Jacksonville Community. Fifty years after its dedication, The Cummer embarks on a renewed mission to engage and inspire through the arts, gardens and education.Ž School Board Member Ms. Martha Barrett with Ms. Glendia Cooper, Division Director. Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Ms. Michelle Ramsey, Kevin Smith, Mrs. Emma Murray, Kevin Smith and Mrs. Rena Smith. The Ray Riddicks Mses. Devlon Williams and Gabie Ruiz, Duval County Schools Mrs. Brenda Thomas Jones CelebratesOver 100 guests gathered at Maggiano's Little Italy in the St. Johns Town Center to celebrate the 65th birthday of Mrs. Brenda Thomas Jones. The party was hosted by her children: Bakari Jones, Sr. of Jacksonville, and Dr. Jabari Jones of Orange Park. Also in attendance were Mrs. Jones daughter, Mrs. Carol Jones-Stargell, and her brothers, Willie Thomas of Champaign, IL and Arthur Thomas of Jacksonville. The night was filled with an air of festivity as classmates from Florida Memorial University and sorority sisters of Zeta Phi Beta traveled from far and wide to help her celebrate this mile stone. Mrs. Jones is a native of Jacksonville, Florida and taught Social Studies for twenty (20) years at Joseph Stilwell Middle School. Happy Birthday Mrs. Jones! The J. Burnie Caines with James 'Carl' Davis, Sr. Clive Ricketts, Mesdames Shelley Zawatsky, Patty Yurewitch and Tunie Ricketts James 'Carl' Davis, Sr. with his students Emma Jean Livingston and Queenie Livingston from Bishop Kenny High School. Bakari Jones, Sr. ,Mrs. Brenda Thomas Jones, Dr. Jabari Jones, and Mrs. Carol Jones-Stragell MARK YOUR CALENDAR!!The Matthew W. Gilbert Junior/Senior High School Alumni Committee is proud to announce its 13th Annual Students/Teachers Grand Reunion Celebration January 28 and 29, 2011. Two exciting events will be held at the Hyatt Riverwalk Hotel. Tickets are now on sale. NO TICKETS WILL BE SOLD AT THE DOOR. For More information contact Class Leaders or Mrs. Lydia JacksonBell at 904 713-0973.

PAGE 5

JANUARY 22, 2011 THE STAR PAGE A-5 Ctgc‘u"Dguv."Oquv"Hwp."Oquv"Jgcvgf."Oquv Rtguekgpv."Oquv"Ghhkecekqwu"Vcnm"Ujqy#5<22"vq"8<22"r0o0Yggm"fc{u"qpHO"32705"YLULcickp"htqo;<22"/"34<22"r0o0"NE Florida and SE Georgias Best Talk StationCpf{"qhh/ckt<";26/78:/298;Qp/ckt<""*;26+":76/VCNMgockn
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

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University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
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UF00028362:01049

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Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:01049

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Bomb Planted on MLK Parade Route
Three city workers of Spokane,
EWashington found a backpack
with an improvised explosive
device, a remote controlled
bomb and two T-shirts in it.
The device was on the parade
route for children and old folks
to celebrate Dr. King's birthday
and reminded many of the
The backpack with impro- Dr. King and President bomb that was placed in a
vised explosive device. Obama The Dream church in 1963 that killed four
little Black girls with 22 others
being injured in the aftermath. For this 2011 incident, one FBI agent said that the
device was the most potentially destructive improvised bomb he had ever seen.
The area is known for white supremacist activity but no one has been identified
with this apparently psychotic point of view. Because of the quick thinking of the
city workers with God on their side and the people, the bag was found, the parade
was rerouted and the bomb was defused. What is frightening is the fact that it was
well made with the intention of seeing maximum carnage.


Jacksonville Teen

Commits Suicide
David N. Githiiyu, 15, a 10th
grade student at the Robert E.
Lee High School in
Jacksonville was dropped off
by his mother at 7 a.m.
Thursday to join those students
who were going on a field trip
to UCF in Orlando. His moth-
er said they were running a lit-
David Njoroge Githiiyu, tle late but to David's dismay,
15 the bus driver would not open
the door, even though his friends tried to tell the driver
to let him on.
David was looking forward to the trip and was very
disappointed as an aspiring engineer. His mother said
he broke down in tears as she apologized and asked
him to go to his class. Because he was devastated, he
just wanted to go home so that is where she took him.
When she returned home two hours later, she found
him hanging from a belt fastened on a door in the
kitchen. He was pronounced dead immediately.
No one knew if David was going through other things.
Many donated funds for his funeral service as the fam-
ily continues to moan his death, asking, 'why.?

Census Reports Jacksonville
has High Rate of Homosexual
Families Raising Children
According to the

ra "t tBureau,
U.S. Census

S. ..... Jacksonville has
one of the largest
I populations of
gay parents in the
United States. It
is called a "gay-
friendly" city.
The publication,
"The Advocate"
released its top
15 'gay friendly' cities. Jacksonville did not make the
top 15 list, but it did make the list.
It has been learned that children of gay and lesbian
couples do receive difficult times and are therefore
counseled.
Florida's Governor Scott said he is opposed to gay
adoption but has not decided if he will try to revive a
state law that banned homosexuals from adopting. He
appointed David Wilkins as the new secretary of the
Department of Children and Families.


First Stellar Award for Jacksonville


Kidnapped Infant Finds

Parents 23 Years Later
Carlina White's
mother and father
took her to the
emergency room
Sat a Harlem
Hospital on
@ August 4, 1987
Carlina White, kidnapped at 19 days because she had
old, shown at right, at 23, reunited with
family. a high fever.
After their baby
was admitted they left. A female, dressed as a nurse,
helped them but when they returned the next day, both
the nurse and their daughter could not be found. No
suspects were ever found and at that time, the hospital
did not have surveillance video.
Carlina, said she grew up in Bridgeport, Connecticut
and assumed that the woman who raised her was her
mother until she could never produce a birth certificate
and there was no family resemblance. Therefore,
Carlina did her own research and after having her
daughter and moving to Atlanta, she did further
research as she made contact with law enforcement
and missing children.
Carlina was right, after a DNA was done, it was con-
firmed that her parents were Joy White and ex-hus-
band, Carl Tyson. Carlina knew herself as Nejdra
Nance. At 23, she is again Carlina and with her real
family.

Baby Doc and Haiti's

Future with his Return

Haitian authorities reported
that they are moving toward
trying Jean-Claude Duvalier for
L. alleged corruption and embez-
zlement during his 15-year rule
by opening an investigation
against the former dictator who
Jean-Claude Duvalier in an unexpected move,
(Baby Doc) returned to the country.
Baby Doc was questioned by
judges for hours behind closed doors on Tuesday and
the case is now in the hands of a judge who will decide
if there is enough evidence to go to trial.
Haiti's system allows for pretrial detention, but
Duvalier was allowed to remain free. However, he can-
not leave the country. However, his longtime compan-
ion Veronique Roy said that when he left France where
he has lived in exile, he advised that his trip would last
for three days. The investigation process can take up to
three months and Duvalier does not have a passport.
There have been demonstrations for his support.


The Presider


Ms. Deborah Maiden,
owner and general man-
ager of WCGL-AM1360
radio station, holds the
Stellar Award certificate
and trophy for 2011,
awarded the station on
January 15, 2011.
WCGL (Where Christ
Gets Lifted) won the
award over other medium
market stations in the
United Stations while in
Nashville, TN.
WCGL is Jacksonville's
first station to receive this
award.
See complete story on
B-3.

it's First


Two Years in D. C.
The challenges inherited by President Obama was
immense but he has made an incredible amount of
progress in an effort to build an economy for all
Americans. What has he done in two year:

Rebuilding our Economy
Recovery Act;
Wall Street Reform;
Middle-Class Tax Cuts;
Credit Card Reform;
Building a Clean-Energy Economy;
Rebuilding the American Auto Industry

Education
Reforming Student Lending;
Spurring Innovation;
New GI Bill

Civil Rights
Repealing "Don't Ask, Don't Tell";
Protecting Against Hate Crimes;
Fair Pay for Women

Historic Health Reform
Affordable Care Act
Children's Health Insurance

National Security
Ending Combat Operations in Iraq;
Toward a World Without Nuclear Weapons
A New Strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan

His Goal: To "be the generation that makes future
generations proud of what we did here."

Brother Robert A. Jackson Sr.
of Brunswick and Jacksonville
Brother Robert Allen Jackson
Sr., the oldest son of eight chil-
dren, was born April 27, 1941.
SHe received his education in the
Duval County Public Schools,
baptized at Mr. Zion Missionary
Robert A. Jackson Sr. Baptist, graduated from
Douglas Anderson and attended
Edward Waters College. After returning from the U.S.
Army, he began his career and became an entrepreneur.
Jackson was known as the Premier Auto Detailing
Service of Jacksonville. He was the first Black man to
own and operate a full service automobile and RV
detailing service. He died last week, leaving a wife, six
children and a host of family and friends.


51110 11
151069 D0151


E editorial .................... A -2
C hurch .................... A -3
Lifestyle .................. A -4
State-National .................. A-5
Entertainment .............. A-6
Prep Rap .................. B-5 & 6
L o ca l ..................... B -1
Columns ................... B-2
D Sports .................... B-4
Did You Hear? ................ B-3
Classified & Business ... B-7


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THE STAR


JANUARY 22, 2011


ERIC A. LEE LIZ BILLINGSLEA
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NU I JUS I GhLt KRAl IN(3 BU I KRI-LG; I IN(3 BAtA K UN

DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, Jr.'s CONTRIBUTIONS TO

HUMANITY

By: Florida State Senator Tony Hill
OPINION/EDITORIAL

Saturday, January 15th, 2011 is actually Dr. King's birthday and the 3rd Monday of January is designated by law as the day his
birthday is celebrated. There will be many Breakfasts, Luncheons, Dinners, Parades and other programs to mark the celebration
of his birth, and all of that is good, but I would like for us to also remember all of the work Dr. King did, and that he made the
ultimate sacrifice, gave his life, all for Humanity, not for us just to have a reason to celebrate his birth, nor just for us to give one
day of service .
Attached is a copy Dr. King's "Letter From A Birmingham Jail." The letter was written on toilet tissue because he had nothing
else to use. Please take your time and read it. It is just as relevant today as it was in 1963 when it was written. As you celebrate
Dr. King's birth this year, please don't forget to reflect back on his many, many contributions to humanity and remember if it were
not for him, African Americans, as a people, would not be where we are today! We may not be where we want to be, but we def-
initely are not where we were!
16 April 1963
My Dear Fellow Clergymen:
While confined here in the Birmingham city jail, I came across your recent statement calling my present activities "unwise and
untimely." Seldom do I pause to answer criticism of my work and ideas. If I sought to answer all the criticisms that cross my desk,
my secretaries would have little time for anything other than such correspondence in the course of the day, and I would have no
time for constructive work. But since I feel that you are men of genuine good will and that your criticisms are sincerely set forth,
I want to try to answer your statement in what I hope will be patient and reasonable terms.
I think I should indicate why I am here in Birmingham, since you have been influenced by the view which argues against "out-
siders coming in." I have the honor of serving as president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, an organization oper-
ating in every southern state, with headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. We have some eighty five affiliated organizations across the
South, and one of them is the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights. Frequently we share staff, educational and finan-
cial resources with our affiliates. Several months ago the affiliate here in Birmingham asked us to be on call to engage in a non-
violent direct action program if such were deemed necessary. We readily consented, and when the hour came we lived up to our
promise. So I, along with several members of my staff, am here because I was invited here. I am here because I have organiza-
tional ties here.
But more basically, I am in Birmingham because injustice is here. Just as the prophets of the eighth century B.C. left their villages
and carried their "thus saith the Lord" far beyond the boundaries of their home towns, and just as the Apostle Paul left his village
of Tarsus and carried the gospel of Jesus Christ to the far comers of the Greco Roman world, so am I compelled to carry the gospel
of freedom beyond my own home town. Like Paul, I must constantly respond to the Macedonian call for aid.
Moreover, I am cognizant of the interrelatedness of all communities and states. I cannot sit idly by in Atlanta and not be concerned
about what happens in Birmingham. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network
of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. Never again can we afford to
live with the narrow, provincial "outside agitator" idea. Anyone who lives inside the United States can never be considered an
outsider anywhere within its bounds.
You deplore the demonstrations taking place in Birmingham. But your statement, I am sorry to say, fails to express a similar con-
cern for the conditions that brought about the demonstrations. I am sure that none of you would want to rest content with the
superficial kind of social analysis that deals merely with effects and does not grapple with underlying causes. It is unfortunate
that demonstrations are taking place in Birmingham, but it is even more unfortunate that the city's white power structure left the
Negro community with no alternative.
In any nonviolent campaign there are four basic steps: collection of the facts to determine whether
injustices exist; negotiation; self purification; and direct action. We have gone through all these
S a a steps in Birmingham. There can be no gainsaying the fact that racial injustice engulfs this com-
munity. Birmingham is probably the most thoroughly segregated city in the United States. Its ugly
record of brutality is widely known. Negroes have experienced grossly unjust treatment in the
gj courts. There have been more unsolved bombings of Negro homes and churches in Birmingham
than in any other city in the nation. These are the hard, brutal facts of the case. On the basis of
these conditions, Negro leaders sought to negotiate with the city fathers. But the latter consistently
refused to engage in good faith negotiation.
Then, last September, came the opportunity to talk with leaders of Birmingham's economic com-
munity. In the course of the negotiations, certain promises were made by the merchants--for exam-
ple, to remove the stores' humiliating racial signs. On the basis of these promises, the Reverend
Fred Shuttlesworth and the leaders of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights agreed
to a moratorium on all demonstrations. As the weeks and months went by, we realized that we
were the victims of a broken promise. A few signs, briefly removed, returned; the others remained.
As in so many past experiences, our hopes had been blasted, and the shadow of deep disappoint-
ment settled upon us. We had no alternative except to prepare for direct action, whereby we would
present our very bodies as a means of laying our case before the conscience of the local and the
e o i national community. Mindful of the difficulties involved, we decided to undertake a process of
self purification. We began a series of workshops on nonviolence, and we repeatedly asked our-
selves: "Are you able to accept blows without retaliating?" "Are you able to endure the ordeal of
jail?" We decided to schedule our direct action program for the Easter season, realizing that except
for Christmas, this is the main shopping period of the year. Knowing that a strong economic-with-
drawal program would be the by- product of direct action, we felt that this would be the best time
to bring pressure to bear on the merchants for the needed change.
Then it occurred to us that Birmingham's mayoral election was coming up in March, and we
Speedily decided to postpone action until after election day. When we discovered that the
SI Commissioner of Public Safety, Eugene "Bull" Connor, had piled up enough votes to be in the
run-off, we decided again to postpone action until the day after the run off so that the demonstra-
tions could not be used to cloud the issues. Like many others, we waited to see Mr. Connor defeat-
ed, and to this end we endured postponement after postponement. Having aided in this community
need, we felt that our direct action program could be delayed no longer.
l You may well ask: "Why direct action? Why sit ins, marches and so forth? Isn't negotiation a bet-
ter path?" You are quite right in calling for negotiation. Indeed, this is the very purpose of direct
*R^ *action. Nonviolent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such a tension that a com-
munity which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue. It seeks so to
dramatize the issue that it can no longer be ignored. My citing the creation of tension as part of
the work of the nonviolent resister may sound rather shocking. But I must confess that I am not
afraid of the word "tension." I have earnestly opposed violent tension, but there is a type of con-
s structive, nonviolent tension which is necessary for growth. Editorial-Continued-A-5


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_ CHURCH A


Faith In Our Community

Schedule of Events and Services


FRIENDSHIP PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
located at 1106 Pearce Street, will be celebrating the
Friendship Male Chorus Anniversary Saturday,
January 22, 2011 at 4:30 p.m. There will be many Male
Chorus Groups around the city. If you have any ques-
tions, please contact the church at 904-353-7734. This
event is open to the Public


EMANUEL MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH -
2407 S. L. Badger, Jr. Cir., E. Saturday, January 22,
2011 at 5:00 p.m. The Gospel Cavaliers, Christian
Comedy Rev. Charles of Atlanta, GA, The Gospel
Tones of Jacksonville, FL, Victor Speight & The
Endtime Messengers of Kinston, NC, and more. For
more information, call 904-234-6427 or 904-803-2178.
GREATER NEW MOUNT MORIAH MISSION-
ARY BAPTIST CHURCH, 1953 West 9th St., with
Pastor Percy Jackson, Sr. invites you to join them
January 23rd at 6:00 p.m. as they "Praise God in Song."
Featured guests will be The Anointed Sisters of Praise,
The Men of Praise, and The Scott Family Gospel
Singers. For more information, call 904-475-0141 or
904-401-9003.
WEST FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH Annual
Homecoming will be observed during the month of
January. Rev. Timothy L. Cole, Sr. is the Pastor. This
year's theme is: "Dress Apparel." 2nd Sunday, January
9, 2011 is Black & White; 3rd Sunday, January 16, 2011
will be Armed Forces Day; on January 23, 2011
Inside/Out, Mix Match; Sunday, January 30, 2011 is
"Old" shirts & uniforms day. 945 Carrie St.
EL-BETH-EL COME TOGETHER DAY -we, the
pastor officers and members wish to invite you to wor-
ship with us and be our special guest on our Come
Together Day Celebration January 23rd at 3:00 P.M. A
great program has been planned for this occasion. The
guest speaker will be Attorney Seth Rothstein for this
occasion. There will be several civic and political lead-
ers to share with us and bring greetings for this occa-
sion. If you have any questions, please contact our pas-
tor Bishop Dr. Lorenzo Hall Sr. at 904-710-1586 or the
office manager Miguel Zapata at 904-374-3940.
Dinner will be served after service.

CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD, Sunday,
January 30, 6 pm, Chamber Music Society of Good
Shepherd presents Jacksonville University Chamber
Singers Timothy Snyder, director; the inaugural concert
of the 24 voice JU Chamber Singers' Winter Concert
Tour. Program will include works by: Mozart,
Palestrina, Victoria, Poulenc, Effinger, Snyder, others.
Future concerts: Sunday, February 20, 6 pm, Worsham
Hall-Jacksonville University Chamber Strings,
Marguerite Richardson, conductor. Works by:
Handel, Walton, Vivaldi, Kalinnikov, Britten; Sunday,
March 20, 6 pm, Craig Hall-Shostakovich: Piano
Quintet in G Minor, Op. 57 Wagner: Siegfried Idyll,
Randy Tinnin, conductor. Free and open to the pub-
lic.1100 Stockton Street at Park, Riverside.
Jacksonville, FL 904-387-5691.
Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue.
Email submissions preferred. Send to: info@
thefloridastar.com


Ask Us About Our


If there had been a death
in your family yesterday,
what would you be doing
today?


Pre-Need



T Fore-
[Thought


W .^ Funeral
Tc 5Dlanning

_ '- Program


FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED
Since 1988
ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4419 Sounel )Dr: .IJacikson ille. FL 322118
Tel: I9ll4) 766-9671 Fax: i9ll4) 766-2354
DIRECTORS


Dehoraih lest


AlphonoAedI


REVIVAL...... REVIVAL..... REVIVAL
Holy Tabernacle Church
We are having a Holy Ghost Revival that you don't
want to miss, as the word of
God will come forth like
never before. The speaker
will be assistant pastor
David Perry of New Life
Evangelist Center of which
SW Bishop A. C. Richardson is
the pastor.

Simple man, with a simple
message, "Repent the
Kingdom of God is at
hand." On the 28th & 29th
at 7:30 pm and on the 30th
Asst. Pastor DavidPerry 9:45 am, with Bible School
and Worship Service immediately following. Come hear
the word of God from a man of God that wants men to be
saved and serve the true and living God.
Bishop Robert L. Jones and Pastor Paul R. Cardona,
along with the Holy Tabernacle Church family cordially
invite the public to fellowship with us as we worship the
Lord in Spirit and in Truth. Located at 6416 Miriam St.,
Jacksonville. For more information call the church at
(904) 764-3754 or Min. Horace Bell, Jr. at (904) 708-
5331.

*ST. JOHN MISSIONARY BAPTIST*
* 0
:CHURCH MDG, FL. MUSICIAN NEED-:
:ED. PLEASE CALL: 904-272-5100 For:
:Interview.
* * * * *** *** *** *** *** **


DEATH NOTICES
Ilm i l ilj|


JACKSONVILLE. L
(AREA DEATHS)
ATON, Rose Nell, 65,
died January 17, 2011.
BASSETT, Daryl
Warren, 42, died January
16, 2011.
BRAY, Corene L., 85,
died January 17, 2011.
CARTER, Nicholas J.,
died January 8, 2011.
CASEY, Tommy V., 11,
died January 16, 2011.
COOK, Sandra
Holloway, 66, died
January 8, 2011.
DURHAM, Betty
Callahan, 69, died
January 11, 2011.
GILLIARD, Horace,
died January 17, 2011.
GREEN, Travis J., died
January 15, 2011.
HAYES, Bessie, died
January 18, 2011.
HOWELL, Tommie Lee,
died January 15, 2011.
JACKSON, Robert
Allen, Sr., died January
13, 2011.
JONES, Larry Rowland,
57, died January 16,
2011.
KEENE, Mary S., 49,
died January 14, 2011.
LOVETT, Ella S., died


January 18, 2011.
MILLER, Elizabeth
(Lane), 95, died January
16, 2011.
MILLER, Orlan Samuel,
82, died January 17,
2011.
PIERCE, Melissa Green,
52, died January 15,
2011.
ROBERTS, Samuel, 78,
died January 17, 2011.
WILLIAMS, Walter
Franklin, died January
17, 2011.
WOODS, Frances, died
January 16, 2011.




GEORGIA DEATHS

HOBBS, Terry, died
January 11, 2011.
JOHNSON, Luenette,
died January 11, 2011.
SMITH, Julia, 79, died
January 14, 2011.
STEPHENS, Robert Lee
"Geetboy," died January
6, 2011.
STERLING, Joseph
West, died January 15,
2011.
WORTHY, Mary Bell,
died January 11, 2011.


SThe Church Directory
"Come and Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School ..................................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning
Intercessory Prayer..................10:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ......................11:00 a.m.
Youth Church
2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary)
Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m.
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus
(904) 764-5727 Church .r,

Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service ............... .................. 10:00 a.m.
Church School ............... .................... 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday
"Glory Hour" Bible Study ............... .......... 10:00 a.m.
"Jehovah Jireh" Bible Study ............... .......... 6:30 p.m.
2nd & 4th Thursday "Young at Heart Ministry .......... .10:00 a.m.
Friday
Joy Explosion M ministry .............................. 6:30 p.m .
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School.................................. .................... 9:30 a.m .
M morning W orship..................................... ..................................11:00 a.m .
Tuesday........................................ Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday.... ............. ...................................................Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org

Payiwes ChapelA.M.E. Church
1iII \Ih.ili' Street, P.O. Bo'\ "'_5 Biiin.i ick i I 211i
.... (912 1 261 955?
IF ''A. v. Richard ll/ -hir.',i, [' ,..,
SWorship Opportunitites:
SSunday C inch'lII Sc'c l l It
SA Lie t l.i.,r, \| iI cl '" 15 III 5
...., I('" ine \\"'lb p .''l 1i'.- ? il jj M
i nc i .it Srud, I\\cckl'. Bilic SmJ'u,. I ; -
SMiniJ., Niirt. '" 'I1 8:30 p.m.
Join Us as We \i,,i i, I ,,IJ of God and Enrich Our Souls!


Tune In To


Clara McLaughlin
Host


Yvonne Brooks
Co-Host


IMPACT

Tuesday and Thursday

from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.



WCGL.AM 1360

The Florida Star and Impact
Striving To Make A Difference!


I Jacqueline Y. Bartle%


INTRODUCE YOUR

CHURCH

HERE

CALL (904) 766-8834
and ask for Liz


JAN UAR YV22.20117


THE STA R


PAGE A-3




A4 M K


THE STA R


JANUARY 222011


LIFESTYLE
Socially Speaking
By Betty Asque Davis / Photos by J. Carl Davis, Sr. (Unless otherwise specified)

S"There's Always Something Happening On The First Coast"


THE CUMMER MUSEUM OF

ART & GARDENS
CELEBRATES ITS 50TH

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens
kicked off its 50th Anniversary year celebrating the
past, present and future. The newly renovated
Tudor Room was unveiled. Members and guests
at the kick off were able to preview The Cummer
Legacy. This exhibition is the first ever exhibition
that displays in one gallery the works of art that
comprise the original bequest that formed the core
of The Cummer Collection.
At the opening guests enjoyed a lavish buf-
fet, live music and a special theatrical presenta-
tion of the life of Mrs. Ninah Cummer by the
Players by the Sea. It was quite an evening and
everyone was having such a marvelous time. The
museum was 'Jumping'!
The Cummer Museum has featured in their
past exhibited collections: The Highwaymen
Paintings, The Gee's Bend Quilts, and the Walter
O. Evans Collection of African American Art.
My favorite exhibition item is Augusta
Savage's (1892 1962) The Diving Boy, c. 1939
is a bequest of Mrs. Ninah M.H. Cummer. Born in
Green Cove Springs, Florida, Ms. Savage moved
to Jacksonville, Florida at the age of 16 to earn a
living sculpting portrait busts of prominent African
Americans. In 1921, she moved to New York and
received many fellowships and awards, allowing
her to travel and study abroad. In 1932 Savage
began a notable teaching career with the founding
of the Savage School of Arts and Crafts in New
York and became one of twentieth-century
America's most prolific and influential sculptors.
Because of her often-difficult financial situation,
her plaster originals were frequently destroyed
before she could afford to have them cast in
bronze.
Ms. Savage visited Mrs. Ninah Cummer at
her Jacksonville home in 1939. The Diving Boy
was originally placed at one end of a reflecting
pond in Mrs. Cummer's Italian Garden, and is typ-
ical of Savage's interest in combining realistic
details with psychologically penetrating expres-
siveness.
Since its opening in 1961, the Cummer has
stood as a beacon of manmade art and natural
beauty to the Jacksonville Community. Fifty years
after its dedication, The Cummer embarks on a
renewed mission to "engage and inspire through
the arts, gardens and education."

MARK YOUR

CALENDAR!!
The Matthew W. Gilbert
Junior/Senior High School Alumni
Committee is proud to announce its -:
13th Annual Students/Teachers ... a
Grand Reunion Celebration January
28 and 29, 2011. Two exciting events a.
will be held at the Hyatt Riverwalk
Hotel.
Tickets are now on sale. NO
TICKETS WILL BE SOLD AT THE
DOOR.
For More information contact
Class Leaders or Mrs. Lydia Jackson-
Bell at 904 713-0973.


School Board Member Ms. Martha r
Barrett with Ms. Glendia Cooper, James 'Carl' Davis, Sr. with his students
Division Director. Cummer Emma Jean Livingston and Queenie
Museum of Art & Gardens Livingston from Bishop Kenny High School.

a


The Ray Riddicks


Mses. Devlon Williams and
Gabie Ruiz, Duval County
Ms. Michelle Ramsey, Kevin Smith, Mrs. Emma Murray, Kevin Smith and Mrs. Rena Smith. Schools


Clive Ricketts, Mesdames Shelley Zawatsky, Patty Yurewitch
and Tunie Ricketts


The J. Burnie Caines with James 'Carl' Davis, Sr.


MRS. BRENDA THOMAS
JONES CELEBRATES

Over 100 guests gathered at
Maggiano's Little Italy in the St. Johns
Town Center to celebrate the 65th
birthday of Mrs. Brenda Thomas
Jones. The party was hosted by her
children: Bakari Jones, Sr. of
Jacksonville, and Dr. Jabari Jones of
Orange Park. Also in attendance were
Mrs. Jones' daughter, Mrs. Carol
Jones-Stargell, and her brothers,
Willie Thomas of Champaign, IL and
Arthur Thomas of Jacksonville.
The night was filled with an air
of festivity as classmates from Florida Bakari Jones, Sr.,Mrs. Brenda Thomas Jones, Dr. Jabari Jones, and Mrs.
Memorial University and sorority sis- Carol Jones-Stragell
ters of Zeta Phi Beta traveled from far and wide to help her celebrate this mile stone.
Mrs. Jones is a native of Jacksonville, Florida and taught Social Studies for twenty (20) years
at Joseph Stilwell Middle School.
Happy Birthday Mrs. Jones!


t
J-


r ___I__ __ __ __ _in. . . .
=hank yo!II u l 1Ifor sh Laring IIyour'events and stori e s forM( tU he clumn I]11111eachw eekB Beca'u seilk ofLNhyollu readers are there I w~fl'ithIIyoulleach w eekB For col u m n]11111entries M you~L
ma onat edrety t90-7-18, olFreFa 6648647orb emi a:baai* watonralycop cm EE OUIN .' 'E


PAGE A-d









JANUARY 22, 2011 THE STAR PAGE A-S


"Just as Socrates felt that it was necessary to create a tension in the mind so that individuals could rise
from the bondage of myths and half truths to the unfettered realm of creative analysis and objective
appraisal, so must we see the need for nonviolent gadflies to create the kind of tension in society that
will help men rise from the dark depths of prejudice and racism to the majestic heights of understand-
ing and brotherhood. The purpose of our direct action program is to create a situation so crisis packed
that it will inevitably open the door to negotiation. I therefore concur with you in your call for negoti-
ation. Too long has our beloved Southland been bogged down in a tragic effort to live in monologue
rather than dialogue.
One of the basic points in your statement is that the action that I and my associates have taken in
Birmingham is untimely. Some have asked: "Why didn't you give the new city administration time to
act?" The only answer that I can give to this query is that the new Birmingham administration must be
prodded about as much as the outgoing one, before it will act. We are sadly mistaken if we feel that the
election of Albert Boutwell as mayor will bring the millennium to Birmingham. While Mr. Boutwell is
a much more gentle person than Mr. Connor, they are both segregationists, dedicated to maintenance of
the status quo. I have hope that Mr. Boutwell will be reasonable enough to see the futility of massive
resistance to desegregation. But he will not see this without pressure from devotees of civil rights. My
friends, I must say to you that we have not made a single gain in civil rights without determined legal
and nonviolent pressure. Lamentably, it is an historical fact that privileged groups seldom give up their
privileges voluntarily. Individuals may see the moral light and voluntarily give up their unjust posture;
but, as Reinhold Niebuhr has reminded us, groups tend to be more immoral than individuals.
We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must
be demanded by the oppressed. Frankly, I have yet to engage in a direct action campaign that was "well
timed" in the view of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation. For years
now I have heard the word "Wait!" It rings in the ear of every Negro with piercing familiarity. This
"Wait" has almost always meant "Never." We must come to see, with one of our distinguished jurists,
that "justice too long delayed is justice denied."
We have waited for more than 340 years for our constitutional and God given rights. The nations of
Asia and Africa are moving with jet like speed toward gaining political independence, but we still creep
at horse and buggy pace toward gaining a cup of coffee at a lunch counter. Perhaps it is easy for those
who have never felt the stinging darts of segregation to say, "Wait." But when you have seen vicious
mobs lynch your mothers and fathers at will and drown your sisters and brothers at whim; when you
have seen hate filled policemen curse, kick and even kill your black brothers and sisters; when you see
the vast majority of your twenty million Negro brothers smothering in an airtight cage of poverty in the
midst of an affluent society; when you suddenly find your tongue twisted and your speech stammering
as you seek to explain to your six year old daughter why she can't go to the public amusement park that
has just been advertised on television, and see tears welling up in her eyes when she is told that
Funtown is closed to colored children, and see ominous clouds of inferiority beginning to form in her
little mental sky, and see her beginning to distort her personality by developing an unconscious bitter-
ness toward white people; when you have to concoct an answer for a five year old son who is asking:
"Daddy, why do white people treat colored people so mean?"; when you take a cross county drive and
find it necessary to sleep night after night in the uncomfortable covers of your automobile because no
motel will accept you; when you are humiliated day in and day out by nagging signs reading "white"
and "colored"; when your first name becomes "nigger," your middle name becomes "boy" (however old
you are) and your last name becomes "John," and your wife and mother are never given the respected
title "Mrs."; when you are harried by day and haunted by night by the fact that you are a Negro, living
constantly at tiptoe stance, never quite knowing what to expect next, and are plagued with inner fears
and outer resentments; when you are forever fighting a degenerating sense of "nobodiness"--then you
will understand why we find it difficult to wait. There comes a time when the cup of endurance runs
over, and men are no longer willing to be plunged into the abyss of despair. I hope, sirs, you can under-
stand our legitimate and unavoidable impatience. You express a great deal of anxiety over our willing-
ness to break laws. This is certainly a legitimate concern. Since we so diligently urge people to obey
the Supreme Court's decision of 1954 outlawing segregation in the public schools, at first glance it may
seem rather paradoxical for us consciously to break laws. One may well ask: "How can you advocate
breaking some laws and obeying others?" The answer lies in the fact that there are two types of laws:
just and unjust. I would be the first to advocate obeying just laws. One has not only a legal but a moral
responsibility to obey just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws. I
would agree with St. Augustine that "an unjust law is no law at all."
Now, what is the difference between the two? How does one determine whether a law is just or unjust?
A just law is a man made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a
code that is out of harmony with the moral law. To put it in the terms of St. Thomas Aquinas: An unjust
law is a human law that is not rooted in eternal law and natural law. Any law that uplifts human per-
sonality is just. Any law that degrades human personality is unjust. All segregation statutes are unjust
because segregation distorts the soul and damages the personality. It gives the segregator a false sense
of superiority and the segregated a false sense of inferiority. Segregation, to use the terminology of the
Jewish philosopher Martin Buber, substitutes an "I it" relationship for an "I thou" relationship and ends
up relegating persons to the status of things. Hence segregation is not only politically, economically and
sociologically unsound, it is morally wrong and sinful. Paul Tillich has said that sin is separation. Is not
segregation an existential expression of man's tragic separation, his awful estrangement, his terrible sin-
fulness? Thus it is that I can urge men to obey the 1954 decision of the Supreme Court, for it is moral-
ly right; and I can urge them to disobey segregation ordinances, for they are morally wrong.
Let us consider a more concrete example of just and unjust laws. An unjust law is a code that a numer-
ical or power majority group compels a minority group to obey but does not make binding on itself.
This is difference made legal. By the same token, a just law is a code that a majority compels a minor-
ity to follow and that it is willing to follow itself. This is sameness made legal. Let me give another
explanation. A law is unjust if it is inflicted on a minority that, as a result of being denied the right to
vote, had no part in enacting or devising the law. Who can say that the legislature of Alabama which
set up that state's segregation laws was democratically elected? Throughout Alabama all sorts of devi-
ous methods are used to prevent Negroes from becoming registered voters, and there are some coun-
ties in which, even though Negroes constitute a majority of the population, not a single Negro is regis-
tered. Can any law enacted under such circumstances be considered democratically structured?
Sometimes a law is just on its face and unjust in its application. For instance, I have been arrested on a
charge of parading without a permit. Now, there is nothing wrong in having an ordinance which
requires a permit for a parade. But such an ordinance becomes unjust when it is used to maintain seg-
regation and to deny citizens the First-Amendment privilege of peaceful assembly and protest.
I hope you are able to see the distinction I am trying to point out. In no sense do I advocate evading or
defying the law, as would the rabid segregationist. That would lead to anarchy. One who breaks an
unjust law must do so openly, lovingly, and with a willingness to accept the penalty. I submit that an
individual who breaks a law that conscience tells him is unjust, and who willingly accepts the penalty
of imprisonment in order to arouse the conscience of the community over its injustice, is in reality
expressing the highest respect for law.
Of course, there is nothing new about this kind of civil disobedience. It was evidenced sublimely in the
refusal of Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego to obey the laws of Nebuchadnezzar, on the ground that a
higher moral law was at stake. It was practiced superbly by the early Christians, who were willing to
face hungry lions and the excruciating pain of chopping blocks rather than submit to certain unjust laws
of the Roman Empire. To a degree, academic freedom is a reality today because Socrates practiced civil
disobedience. In our own nation, the Boston Tea Party represented a massive act of civil disobedience.
We should never forget that everything Adolf Hitler did in Germany was "legal" and everything the
Hungarian freedom fighters did in Hungary was "illegal." It was "illegal" to aid and comfort a Jew in
Hitler's Germany. Even so, I am sure that, had I lived in Germany at the time, I would have aided and
comforted my Jewish brothers. If today I lived in a Communist country where certain principles dear
to the Christian faith are suppressed, I would openly advocate disobeying that country's antireligious
laws.
I must make two honest confessions to you, my Christian and Jewish brothers. First, I must confess that
over the past few years I have been gravely disappointed with the white moderate. I have almost
reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro's great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom
is not the White Citizen's Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more
devoted to "order" than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a
positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: "I agree with you in the goal you
seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action"; who paternalistically believes he can set
the timetable for another man's freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constantly
advises the Negro to wait for a "more convenient season." Shallow understanding from people of good
will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will. Lukewarm acceptance


is much more bewildering than outright rejection.
I had hoped that the white moderate would understand that law and order exist for the purpose of estab-
lishing justice and that when they fail in this purpose they become the dangerously structured dams that
block the flow of social progress. I had hoped that the white moderate would understand that the pres-
ent tension in the South is a necessary phase of the transition from an obnoxious negative peace, in
which the Negro passively accepted his unjust plight, to a substantive and positive peace, in which all
men will respect the dignity and worth of human personality. Actually, we who engage in nonviolent
direct action are not the creators of tension. We merely bring to the surface the hidden tension that is
already alive. We bring it out in the open, where it can be seen and dealt with. Like a boil that can never
be cured so long as it is covered up but must be opened with all its ugliness to the natural medicines of
air and light, injustice must be exposed, with all the tension its exposure creates, to the light of human
conscience and the air of national opinion before it can be cured.
In your statement you assert that our actions, even though peaceful, must be condemned because they
precipitate violence. But is this a logical assertion? Isn't this like condemning a robbed man because


positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: "I agree with you in the goal you
seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action"; who paternalistically believes he can set
the timetable for another man's freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constant-
ly advises the Negro to wait for a "more convenient season." Shallow understanding from people of
good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will. Lukewarm
acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection.
I had hoped that the white moderate would understand that law and order exist for the purpose of
establishing justice and that when they fail in this purpose they become the dangerously structured
dams that block the flow of social progress. I had hoped that the white moderate would understand
that the present tension in the South is a necessary phase of the transition from an obnoxious negative
peace, in which the Negro passively accepted his unjust plight, to a substantive and positive peace, in
which all men will respect the dignity and worth of human personality. Actually, we who engage in
nonviolent direct action are not the creators of tension. We merely bring to the surface the hidden ten-
sion that is already alive. We bring it out in the open, where it can be seen and dealt with. Like a boil
that can never be cured so long as it is covered up but must be opened with all its ugliness to the nat-
ural medicines of air and light, injustice must be exposed, with all the tension its exposure creates, to
the light of human conscience and the air of national opinion before it can be cured.
In your statement you assert that our actions, even though peaceful, must be condemned because they
precipitate violence. But is this a logical assertion? Isn't this like condemning a robbed man because
his possession of money precipitated the evil act of robbery? Isn't this like condemning Socrates
because his unswerving commitment to truth and his philosophical inquiries precipitated the act by
the misguided populace in which they made him drink hemlock? Isn't this like condemning Jesus
because his unique God consciousness and never ceasing devotion to God's will precipitated the evil
act of crucifixion? We must come to see that, as the federal courts have consistently affirmed, it is
wrong to urge an individual to cease his efforts to gain his basic constitutional rights because the quest
may precipitate violence. Society must protect the robbed and punish the robber. I had also hoped that
the white moderate would reject the myth concerning time in relation to the struggle for freedom. I
have just received a letter from a white brother in Texas. He writes: "All Christians know that the col-
ored people will receive equal rights eventually, but it is possible that you are in too great a religious
hurry. It has taken Christianity almost two thousand years to accomplish what it has. The teachings of
Christ take time to come to earth." Such an attitude stems from a tragic misconception of time, from
the strangely irrational notion that there is something in the very flow of time that will inevitably cure
all ills. Actually, time itself is neutral; it can be used either destructively or constructively. More and
more I feel that the people of ill will have used time much more effectively than have the people of
good will. We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the hateful words and actions of
the bad people but for the appalling silence of the good people. Human progress never rolls in on
wheels of inevitability; it comes through the tireless efforts of men willing to be co workers with God,
and without this hard work, time itself becomes an ally of the forces of social stagnation. We must use
time creatively, in the knowledge that the time is always ripe to do right. Now is the time to make real
the promise of democracy and transform our pending national elegy into a creative psalm of brother-
hood. Now is the time to lift our national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock
of human dignity.


Even though Dr. King's holiday has passed, this particular letter is very appropriate
today. Limited space has prevented us from finishing it this week, but it will be con-
tinued in the next issue of The Florida Star and The Georgia Star.
Thank you for reading The Florida Star and The Georgia Star newspapers.


Down to Business


Andy Johnson
\E J~


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JANUARY 22, 2011


THE STAR


PAGE A-5






JANUARY 22, 2011


We've done the math for you.



We've made sure shopping at Publix can be as


economical as it is pleasant.


We put hundreds of


items on sale every week. Our easy-to-spot shelf

signs point out the deals and your register receipt

will tally up your savings for you. Go to publix.com

/save right now to make plans to save this week.









er,A to save here.


February 4-6
Savannah International Trade & Convention Center


Food I
Health I


SOUTHERN
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PAGE A-6


THE STAR


Models on the Move


i Fashions Provided by

Models and Fashions Directed by
l UKaren Washington & Company
at
BM NI Southern Women's Shows
Saturday, February 5; Sunday, February 6 at
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THE GE IA STAR.
Booth 246 Across from Stage
www. TheGeorgiaStar. corn
The Florida Star-The Georgia Star and Impact Radio Show-WJSJ-FM 105.3
and WCGL-AM 1360, "Striving to Make A Difference."


WRCLEARCHANNEI





B1 M K


JANUARY22, 2011 THE STAR


LOCAL

SECTION B


Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr's Day Breakfast
Pictures taken by Frank M. Powell, III andAngela Morrell, both
of the FL/GA Star


Sain Nir ~ 1-,. Ken('vn C t on11'I.I. II'Ib' )EII-iHo rale 'Jia,.Itlone. P'lhi, i
11irgIIL'I Eri, R. II iIliamsI


Action News-Adrian West, Mark Spain, Jim Zerwekh, Mike
McCormick, Jack Potter, Dawn Lopez, Queenie Holmes, and
Melanie Fisher


To the left: Rev. Eric Lee, I
Sales Diretior. Florida Dan Evants. Florida S r.: Ken .le.lersonI. taudidatle. or Sherli/.f
lr.: iin Ili n IIi f' i IfI! ill I illiiIIs


PR q








PAGE B-2 THE


By: Lucius Gantt

This week's column is a Special Report written by Shirley
Meckley:


Jawaher Abu Rahme and Basem Abu Rahme are sister
and brother. They lived in the West Bank. In Palestine.
They are Palestinian. Jawaher was killed on New Year's
Eve 2010 and Basem was killed in April 2009. Both were
killed by the actions of the Israeli Defense Force at the site
of the separation wall in their small rural town of Bi'lin.
While non-violently protesting this wall, which separates
the farmers of this village from their farmland, Basem was killed by a tear-gas can-
nister fired point blank at his chest and Jawaher was killed by inhaling the exces-
sively toxic tear gas aimed at the protesters.
I visited Bi'lin shortly after Basem was killed. I stayed in the home of one of the vil-
lage families and enjoyed their marvelous hospitality, the wonderful food prepared
by the women, and the comraderie of sharing a cup of Turkish coffee around a cir-
cle. The children were anxious to show me their goats, bee hives, and pigeons.
These villagers asked only that we, the 15 members of the Interfaith Peace-
Builders delegation, tell their story when we returned home to the USA. America
needs to know their stories.
Ever since 1948 when 750,000 Palestinians were displaced after the establish-
ment of the State of Israel, the land that is called Palestine has gotten smaller and
smaller. A UN partition plan after WWII and the 1949 Armistice (the Green Line)
started the disintegration but the war of 1967 resulted in Israel occupying Gaza,
the West Bank, the Sinai Peninsula, East Jerusalem and the Golan Heights. And
since that time, in gross violation of international law, Israel has built separation
walls, check points, Jewish settlements, gates, towers, and Israeli-only roads.
They have also demolished Palestinian houses and put thousands of Palestinians
in jail under the title of Administrative Detention, meaning without due process. All
of this combined with the military occupation of Palestine has affected the daily
lives of Palestinians in ways that we Americans cannot imagine.
As a result of Israeli hasbora, (a euphemism for propaganda), all of this has been
done by Israel in the name of security and many people believe it is a religious
conflict which has gone on for thousands of years. It is neither. The facts on the
ground are clear. It is about land, water, resources and control. As one Israeli
peace activist said, "if the issue is security, why are they building houses right in
the middle of where the enemy lives?" Israel has even paid their citizens to move
to the so-called "settlements".
There are brave Israeli peace activists who are standing beside the Palestinians in
their non-violent protestations against this oppression. They lose friends and fam-
ily because of it and are frequently ostracized. We talked with some who live in
kibbutzim which have received Quassom rockets fired from Gaza. Still they say
"they are not our enemies, they are our neighbors" and they are ready to pay the
price of social isolation, but not ready to pay the price of fear.
And we, the American taxpayer, are complicit in this brutality and oppression. The
US has been aiding Israel since 1948 and the amount has steadily increased over
the years. Even though the World Bank has placed Israel among the top 50 rich-
est nations in terms of per capital income, Israel receives 1/3 of ALL US foreign aid
- the largest recipient of all countries in the world! From 1971 to 2008 US aid to
Israel has averaged over 2.6 billion per year. That money is financing the building
of the separation wall, the demolishing of the homes, and even the killing of
Jawaher and Basem.
Not a day goes by that I don't think of the Palestinian people I met. They need us
to join them so they can see that the world is not all against them that they are
not all terrorists. They need us to join their struggle for human rights and
freedom. We can start by writing our Congress men and women and ask-
ing them to support withholding aid money to Israel. We can also educate
ourselves about the truth of the matter rather than just accepting the
American media's version.

The writer of this column and the report submitted are independent of The Florida
and The Georgia Star Newspapers.




By: Justin Mabrie, MBA

An Argument Today is a Question for Tomorrow

There is often an intrinsic need to handle issues as they may
arise. Many argue that the more time an issue remains unset-
tled, the increased probability that the issue will fester and
worsen.
If there is doubt in your response, uneasiness with your
thoughts, or apprehension of your intent for disagreement then
your thoughts should remain unto yourself. You do not want to
allow opportunity for misinterpretation or be responsible for
adding insipid thoughts that distract from the issue of concern. Clarity and honest repre-
sentation should be the goals when presenting your train of thinking. Not only is it unfair
to you to misrepresent your thoughts but it is unfair to burden your partner with multiple
explanations and unpleasant conversations solely because you decided to haphazardly
discuss your thoughts before you truly understood your stance and feelings surrounding
them. It is appropriate to take a minimum of a night's rest to collect your thoughts on the
subject at hand.
It may initially appear that you are avoiding addressing the issue, but you must allow your
intuition to guide you to the right time for discussion. If an explanation of your 'conver-
sation prevention' is necessary then allow your partner the courtesy because your purpose
is not to confuse them but rather your final goal is to provide him or her with honest
thoughts worth addressing.
By removing yourself from imbalanced thoughts & feelings and placing yourself in a
peaceful mindset, you prevent further damage that could be had in the initial moment
through the exchange of defensive speech and negative energy. Once you have regrouped,
each of you will have a greater appreciation for the content of the message you want to
share. More value will be added to each person's thought because you are now both cred-
ited with having time to truly decipher how you want to present your side of the dispari-
ty. Disagreements are usually heightened due to the selfish desire to win the debate.
After moments away from each other, you each have a greater goal to your message that
will still be true to your thoughts but it will lighten the aggressive defensive tone and ver-
biage.
Keep in mind that all thoughts are not worth addressing if they are not related to the cur-
rent topic / issue. It will only confuse interpretations to provide an abundance of unrelat-
ed thoughts. Such thoughts can be discussed at a later time; now your responsibility is to
bring closure to unanswered positions on the discussion at hand.


Remember: Time has potential to provide worth. Don't discredit valued thoughts.


I4VIT4RV2 -f201


DEFINITION( Somn people \\ho might l ahle lo beneflil o
Iliom exrcice a, an ahltcrnali\ c to dieting (or combined \ ithI
ill may be passing it up because he\ Iunqucst inning accept
certain popular belief about exercise. For example. some people fal cel bhelice\
that exercise has little e' ect on \\ eight. This fact would d he strange if it w\ere true.
since one of the main jobs that calories do is pro\ ide energy for use in physical
acti\ it. The claim is made that people must exercise a tremendous amount to lose
I pound. one mmust nlk iles, bl.ut it is mi leading lo assilme that you ha\e to
trudge each and \ceR one olf hose mile in a single da\. WalkinI I mile u eii up
about i(10) calories. A pIeron \ho walks 1 mile e\eri da\ Ior \\o \ carIs \\ill
expend -"3.0(00 calories. the ecqui\alent of IN.3 pounds ofl hod fait.

MIISTAKEN IDEA Probably the mos w\idehl accepted mistaken idea ahtoul
exercise is that an\ \\eight lo ithe exercise achie\es is ofTet b\ an increase in
appetite (and in calorie con umption Studies with experimental animals show
that thi idea has no \alidity. When sedenIar\ animals were required to perform
moderate amounts of exercise regular y their consumption of feed decreased. and
so did their \\eight. Onh stirenuou regular exercise causes people to cal more.
which is appropriate to the increased energy\ expenditure. The additional food
intake does not cause a \\eight gain. ho\\e\er: it does not e\en make up C weigCht
that is lost because of expenditures.

OCCASIONAL EXERCISING Exercisin- once in a while is no more efl'ecti\e
than dieting once in a w while. A good exercise program lfor eightgt l osNs \\ill not
produce spectacular results overnight. but itf the program is followed faithfullI
o\ir a long period of time it \\ ill hae a cacumulati\e el'l'ci The total amount ol
w\ eight lost \\ ill be reasonable large. For losing w eight. the amount of exercise is
w hat count, not the intlensitNl. Nlost people burn 10 calories in tla\ clingl a mile
on fioot whether lhe w\\alk it in 20 miinulte or run it in 1.

OVERCOMING OBESITY It is possible to overcome obesilt. This statement
does not mean that it is easy. People must he w\\illing to commit themsel\es to a
moderate calorie reduction program or a sensible exercise program o\er a long
period of time. A combination of exercise and dieting w\\ill produce somC\ew\hat
quicker results than either approach alone, but any one \\11o expects o\ night suc-
cess \\ill be sadIh disappointed.


Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.

The Highwaymen newest temporary exhibit: The museum and the residents
of American Beach Community Center invite you to have coffee with Mr. Gibson
on January 22nd at 10 a.m. The community center is located at 1600 Julia Street
in historic American Beach. This event is free and open to the public. For more
information please contact Alex at the museum at 904-261-7378 ext. 102 or
alexbuell@ameliamuseum.org

Free Diabetes Screening!!! 10:00 am 3:00 pm- January 26, Kmart 1501
Normandy Village Parkway, Jacksonville, FL, Phone: 800-713-3301

Best of Jacksonville: A MOCA Benefit. Experience Jacksonville's best party of
the year with amazing food, fun people, great drinks, exciting prizes and more.
January27 at 7 p.m.MOCA 333 N. Laura St. Jacksonville, FL 32202
For more information contact 904.366.6911

Golden Isles Arts and Humanities Association presents The Idiat and the
Odd-yssey: The Adventures of Odyfferus through International Georgia
Exhibit by St. Simons photographer Harlan Hambright through January 29, 2011,
The Historic Ritz Theatre, Downtown BrunswickGIAHA: 262-6934, goldenisle-
sarts.org

MATTHEW W. GILBERT JR./SR. HIGH SCHOOL ALUMNI COMMIT-
TEE is proud to announce its 13th annual students/teachers grand reunion cele-
bration on January 28 & 29, 2011. two exciting events will be held at the hyatt
riverwalk hotel. tickets are sale now, no tickets sold at the door. for more infor-
mation please contact class leaders or lydiajackson-bell at (904) 713-0973.

Free Cholesterol & Diabetes Screening at 12:00 pm 5:00 pm on February 2
Location: Winn-Dixie Pharmacy 2720 Blanding Blvd., Middleburg, FL- contact
800-713-3301

Philadelphia Baptist Church 5577 Moncrief Road on Sunday, February 13,
2011, 6 o'clock PM Hosting a night of fine arts at its best, various singers,
dancers and poets of the city will be featured. For more information or to donate,
contact Brother Harold LeGree at 904/534.3467 or contact the Philadelphia
Baptist Church at 904/768.0161.

Reddi-Arts and Gallery 1037: Jacksonville Consortium of African-American
Artists. The exhibit will run until February 28th. Gallery hours are: Monday- -
Friday 8:30am-6:00pm Saturday 9:30am-6:00pm Sunday 1:00pm-5:00pm For
further information and any questions please contact Patty at (904) 398-3161 ext.
312. Gallery 1037 Located inside Reddi-Arts 1037 Hendricks Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida 32207






PAGEB3 CMYK


nAr1'r n 2


AREA


NEWS


S1W SER


For The Florida Star

This is a first for the city of Jacksonville! And this
year, WCGL was the only Florida station nominated for
Station of the Year! WCGL was selected the winner
over its other medium market nominees: KPZK-FM
102.5-Little Rock, AR; WJYD 106.3 FM-Columbus,
OH; and WRJD 1410 AM -Durham, NC!
The win took place during the 26h Annual Stellar
Awards weekend, Saturday, January 15th at the Radio
Station of the Year Ceremony at the Gaylord Opryland
Resort & Convention Center in Nashville, TN.
The event consisted of musical performances by
Veronica Petrucci (formerly of the 90's duo Angelo &
Veronica); Canton Jones, gospel music newcomer,
Monica Lisa Stevenson; rap artist LaCrae; Rev.
Norman Hutchins; and, Tim Rogers & The Fellas.
Also awarded were Station of the Year in the Small,
Large, and Major Market categories as well. Plus, event
sponsor Central South Distribution saluted several
announcers with their Reach Awards.
Along with WCGL general manager Deborah
Maiden, staffers Kelvin Postell, Operations Manager,
Karen Jones, Senior Account Executive, and on-air per-
sonality Wanda "Wanda P" Patterson were present at
event.
Once the station's name was announced the winner,
thunderous cheers and applause came from some of
Jacksonville's own who were in the audience also: Troy
& Emil Sneed of Emtro Records; show host Candice
Jones & her husband William, artist Jermaine Taylor,
DJ Will, WCGL listener and loyal fan Violin
Henderson, singers Emma Holmes and, Ann Reynolds.
The Radio Station of the Year Ceremony was part of
The Stellar Awards Weekend, Jan. 13-15, 2011 in
Nashville, TN. The weekend's events included the
'Verizon Wireless-How Sweet The Sound Choir Boot
Camp'; Stellar Awards Pre-Show, all culminating with
the main event, The 26th Annual Stellar Awards, host-
ed by Donnie McClurkin and produced by Central City
Productions.
The 26th Annual Stellar Awards will air in National
Syndication from Jan. 22 thru March 13, 2011. Locally,
the show is set to air on Saturday, February 5, at 3pm
on WAWS 30.






Mr















J

9


Ms. Deborah Maiden & WCGL win STATION OF THE
YEAR Medium Market. Award presented byjournalist &
publisher of The Belle Report, Sheila Belle (r).


Ms. Deborah Maiden (4th) along w/the other Medium
Market nominees


MLK PARADE IN BRUNSWICK

Photos by Angela
Morrell of The GA Star "


january 22nd

a.m.- 1 .am.


Th event ifeaurgragiewywsoe speaker, free rakatn
more To akethisevet a uccss, e ned Y UR hlp.Yourcloat~in o anysiz
willhel usmak a osite dffeenc inthei lies.Thak yu inadvnceforyou
supprt. or mre iforaboncallNicky Asley@ 90-657033
To mke ourdonaion siply isi ww~impct~illoumaeitoun~co


Grand Marshall was Ms. Marie Brogsdale, shown
with Commissioner Brook.


Brunswick's Mayor, Grand
Marshall Ms. Marie
Brogsdale, and Rev. Craig Campbell.


DJ Cherrie So Fine in station's car.


TA ATTTA DV '1 '7111


IrYTJ VlrA 7






PAGEB4 CMYK


PAGE B-4 THE STAR JANUARY22, 2011




SPORTS *

Game could be first that two black head coaches reach

multiple Super Bowls
By MIKE BONTS
Sports Editor
Coach Mike Tomlin of the Pittsburgh Steelers and coach Lovie Smith of the Chicago Bears are on the
verge of making Super Bowl history.
Tomlin and Smith both led their teams to victories in the second round of the NFL playoffs. The Pittsburgh
Steelers edged out the Baltimore Ravens by a score of 31-24 to advance to the AFC Championship game.
And the Chicago Bears reached the NFC Championship game after defeating the Seattle Seahawks 35-
24.
If the Steelers and the Bears defeat the New York Jets and the Green Bay Packers respectively, Tomlin
and Smith will become the first two black coaches to reach multiple Super Bowls.
The NFL's first black coach was Fritz Pollard. Pollard was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in
Canton, Ohio.
The Chicago native served in World War I and in 1919 he joined the Akron Pros of the American
Professional Football League, which was renamed the American Professional Football Association the next
year. He led Akron to the championship in 1920 and became the first black coach in NFL history when he
Mike Tomlin, Coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers played and served as co-coach in 1921. The APFA was renamed the NFL in 1922.
Smith's Bears were defeated by Tony Dungy's Colts in the 2007 Super Bowl. And in 2008, Tomlin's
Steelers defeated the Arizona Cardinals in the Super Bowl.
By reaching the Super Bowl again, the success of both coaches should encourage NFL owners to give
more black coaches and general mangers an opportunity. Currently, there are only six black coaches in the
NFL.
Over the past year we have also seen the youngest coach in the NFL, and another Dungy prodigy hire
(Raheem Morris), bring the total number of African American coaches to six.
Out of those five, four coached for Dungy. (Only ex-49er had coach Mike Singletary did not get his tute-
lage from Dungy) Think about it, three out of the last four years Tony Dungy or one of his understudies
have been the head coach in a Super Bowl.
Hue Jackson has been formally be introduced as Head Coach of The Oakland Raiders tomorrow.
Jackson has 25 years of coaching experience in college and professional football and has beenan offen-
sive coordinator at both levels.
Fritz Pollard in this 1975 file photo Lovie Smith, Coach of the Oakland Raiders Owner Al Davis spoke about the dynamic 45-year-old Jackson: "The fire in Hue will set
was a player-coach in the early Chicago Bears. a flame that will bum for a long time in the hearts and minds of the Raider football team and the Raider
1920s. Nation."


JACKSONVILLE, FL Coming off Back-2-Back Southern
League Championships in 2009 and 2010, the Jacksonville
Suns have announced that Andrew Barkett will join the Florida
Marlins organization to manage the Suns in 2011. Returning to
the Suns are Hitting Coach Corey Hart and Pitching Coach
John Duffy along with Athletic Trainer Dustin Luepker.
Barkett enters his fifth season as a Minor League manager,
and first season in the Marlins organization. Since 2008 he managed the Lakeland
Flying Tigers, the Detroit Tigers' Advanced-A affiliate in the Florida State League
and posted an overall record of 193-212. His managing debut in professional base-
ball was in 2007 with the Oneonta Tigers in the New York Penn League where the
team reached the League Semi-Finals with a record of 44-32.
Upon being named the Suns Manager in 2011, Barkett stated, "I'm very excited
about joining the Suns family and the Marlins organization. Being from Miami it's
a thrill to be able to work for the hometown team and join their Back to Back
Championship-winning affiliate. I'm also looking forward to following in the foot-
steps of great managers Tim Leiper and Brandon Hyde."
A former first baseman and outfielder, Barkett spent 11 years in professional base-
ball with the Rangers, Braves, Pirates, Devil Rays, Tigers, and Mariners organiza-
tions. He saw 17 games in the Majors with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 2001 and
amassed 14 hits including one homerun and three RBI's in 46 at-bats.
Barkett is a native of Miami, FL and attended North Carolina State University. He
resides in Oviedo, FL with his wife Brandy and their three children Jade, Isiah and
Emma.
The Jacksonville Suns open defense of their Back-2-Back Southern League
Championships at the Baseball Grounds on Thursday April 7. The Suns are the
Double-A Affiliate of the Florida Marlins and are proud members of the Southern
League of Professional Baseball Clubs. Season tickets, sponsorships and group
events are currently on sale for the 2011 season by calling the Suns front office at
(904) 358-2846.




Florida A&M University
S i(FAMU) women's flag football
team, Simply Marvelous, has
recently won two national
Championships tallying six
.. fr te national championship wins
within four years. Simply
Marvelous most recent titled
game, the National Intramural-
Recreational Sports
Association (NIRSA) National
Campus Championship Series
(NCCS) National Championship, is scheduled to air Saturday, January 29 at 10 p.m.
on CBS Sports Network.
Simply Marvelous is scheduled to play in ESPN's Weekend Women's Flag Football
Tournament in Orlando, Fla. Friday, March 4 through Sunday, March 6 at the Disney
Wide World of Sports Complex.
Simply Marvelous first with a season record 11-0 before traveling to Texas A&M
University for the NIRSA NCCS National Championship.
Just days before being named NIRSA NCCS National Champions, Simply
Marvelous were the American Collegiate Intramural Sports (ACIS) winners during
the 31st Annual National Flag Football Tournament in New Orleans, La. where they
trounced more than 40 teams.















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JANUARY 22, 2011


PA-GE R-5


THE STAR


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Watsoi RvdIy Ponte Vrdra Baewh Office

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United Negro College Fund Telethon
Saturday, January 29, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. FOX WAWS
My TVJax at 10:00 p.m.


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Top 20 Playlist October-November 2010
Listen to WCGL AM 1360 LIVE at www.wcgll360.com!
1. Nobody Greater VaShawn Mitchell
2. It's All God The Soul Seekers Feat. Marvin Winans
3. I Won't Let You Fall Helen Miller & New Anointing
4. It's About Time For A Miracle Beverly Crawford
5. I Want To Say Thank You Lisa Page Brooks
6. Leave It In The Hands of the Lord The Supreme 7
7. I Chose To Worship Wess Morgan
8. On My Way Back Up Jimmy Hicks & VOI
9. Hold On The Brown Sisters
10. Jesus You Are April Nevels
11. Lord Do It Alvin Darling
12. Nobody Like You Fred Hammond
13. I Give Myself Away William McDowell
14. Turn It Over To Jesus The Second Chapter
15. Just for Me Shekinah Glory Ministry
16. Lord We Praise You Phoenix Mass Choir
17. Expect The Great Jonathan Nelson
18. Lord You're Mighty Youthful Praise feat. J.J. Hairston
19. He Wants It All Forever Jones
20. Just Stand Hope Chapel Mass Choir


THE STAR


PAGE B-6


JANUARY22, 2011


h!) Jf):-VNLj i), bM






JANUARY 22, 2011


Tomorrow's
Leaders

The 2011 Tomor-
row's Leaders were se-
lected by community
organizations throughout
Jacksonville. Students
must demonstrate excel-
lence in community serv-
ice and exhibit the
principles of Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. Join us as
we recognize the following
students for their achieve-
ments:

Ms. Katie Bauman
Episcopal High School
Nomination: Episcopal High
School

Ms. Breanna Brown
Sandlewood High School
Nomination: The Bridge of
Northeast Florida

Ms. Chelsea Carter
Ribault High School
Nomination: Duval County
Public Schools

Ms. Kayla Cobb
Stanton College Prep
Nomination: NAACP- Jack-
sonville Chapter

Mr. Cameron Coleman
LaVilla School of the Arts
Nomination: Duval County
Public Schools

Mr. Antonio Figueroa
Temple Christian Academy
Nomination: Boy Scouts of
America

Ms. Ashlae Guilliames


stanton college Frep
Nomination: First Coast His-
panic Chamber

Ms. Madison Hughes
Episcopal High School
Nomination: Episcopal High
School

Mr. Jesse Hughes
Fletcher High School
Nomination: Duval County
Public Schools

Ms. Ashley Irven
Bolles School
Nomination: OneJax

Mr. Dwight James
DuPont Middle School
Nomination: The Bridge of
Northeast Florida

Ms. Roderica Johnson
Englewood High School
Nomination: Jacksonville
Housing Authority

Mr. Daniel Josol, Jr.
Stanton College Prep
Nomination: Filipino Ameri-
can Council

LEADERS continues on
page PR 2

The Occasion

When Martin Luther
King, Jr. Day was first estab-
lished as a national holiday in
1986, most government and
business entities did not close
in observance of the occasion.
In January 1987, then Jack-
sonville Chamber of Com-
merce Chair Bill Bond and
his wife Sandy attended the
only Martin Luther King, Jr.
event in Jacksonville, which


was sponsored oy a local
chapter of the Morehouse
College Alumni Association.
Mr. Bond recog-
nized the need to foster ac-
ceptance of the holiday in
Jacksonville and to give the
community a chance to come
together to honor Dr. King
and his legacy. Bond ap-
pointed Luke Sadler, the
Chamber's general counsel,
and Ronnie Ferguson, Cham-
ber board member and presi-
dent of the Jacksonville
Urban League, to develop a
concept for Jacksonville's cit-
izens to join together to honor
Dr. King and demonstrate
brotherhood and racial har-
mony. The first Martin Luther
King, Jr. Breakfast was born.
Mr. Ferguson in-
vited Willye Dennis, then
president of the local chapter
of the NAACP, to join the
Chamber and the Jacksonville
Urban League as co-hosts of
the event. The City of Jack-
sonville, represented by
newly elected Mayor Tommy
Hazouri, also embraced the
breakfast and holiday by be-
coming the fourth co-host. At
the first breakfast in January
1988, more than 800 people
came to hear Dr. Benjamin L.
Hooks, then president of the
national NAACP, speak on
how Dr. King impacted his
life.
Over the ensuing
years, the attendance has
risen to as many as 2,500 peo-
ple, and has benefited from a
variety of excellent speakers.
Now virtually all public enti-
ties and private businesses
celebrate the occasion.


THE STAR


PR- 1












PREP RAP


Leaders
continued from page PR 1


Ms. Weenie Labossiere
Jefferson Davis Middle School
Nomination: Duval County Public
Schools

Mr. Alex Maillis
Creekside High School
Nomination: St. John the Divine
Greek Orthodox Church

Ms. Ebonee Maxey
Ribault Middle School
Nomination: Duval County Public
Schools

Ms. Trayvonna Miller
Andrew Jackson High School
Nomination: The Bridge of North-
east Florida

Ms. Hannah Mizrahi
Mandarin High School
Nomination: Jewish Federation of
Jacksonville

Ms. Morgan Monroe
Episcopal High School
Nomination: Episcopal High School

Ms. Irvante Moore
Mandarin High School
Nomination: JUL NULITES

Ms. Amy Nicotra
Fleming Island High
Nomination: OneJax/Jewish Federa-
tion of Jacksonville

Mr. Maclovio Orozco
A. Philip Randolph High School
Nomination: JUL NULITES

Ms. Elisha Parris
Jackson High School
Nomination: Duval County Public
Schools


Mr. Ray Robinson
Andrew Jackson High School
Nomination: NAACP- Jacksonville
Chapter

Ms. Lotsy Simon
Ft. Caroline Middle School
Nomination: Communities In
Schools of Jacksonville

Ms. Juresha Snodey
Arlington Middle School
Nomination: The Bridge of North-
east Florida

Ms. Christy Soares
Stanton College Prep
Nomination: OneJax

Mr. William Sweet, III
Kirby Smith Middle School
Nomination: Duval County Public
Schools

Ms. Chloe Turnage
Lee High School
Nomination: Tots N Teens Theater

Mr. Emmanuel Walton
Episcopal High School
Nomination: Episcopal High School

Mr. William Westbrook
Northwestern Middle School
Nomination: Duval County Public
Schools

Ms. Alondria Williams
First Coast High School
Nomination: Girl Scouts of Gate-
way

Mr. Jarrett Williams
Raines High School
Nomination: Duval County Public
Schools

Congratulations to the 2011
Tomorrow's Leaders!


Free Parent Workshops Offered

What: Parents and care-givers are invited
to attend Duval County Public Schools' Title
I Parent University Winter 2011. Parent Uni-
versity offers a series of workshops designed
to provide helpful information for parents so
that they may better assist their child to be
successful in school.
The event is free and registration
begins December 10.

Workshop topics will include:
FCAT reading, math and science;


Navigating the DCPS system;
Riverdeep Destination Success and
Compass Odyssey;
Family literacy;
Bullying; and
Preparing your child for college
Parent University will also highlight the Su-
perintendent's Reading Initiative featuring
district and community literacy experts.

When: Saturday, January 29, 2011, from
8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Where: Florida State College of Jack-
sonville, North Campus, 4501 Capper Rd.,
Jacksonville, FL 32218


JANUARY 22, 2011


THE STAR


PR 2






JANUARY 22, 2011


THE STAR


PREP RAP


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REGISTRATION EVENT FOR FREE VOLUNTARY
PRE-KINDERGARTEN

Early Learning Coalition of Duval will have the 7th annual Voluntary
Pre-Kindergarten (VPK) Kick-Off on Saturday, Jan. 29, at three locations
around Jacksonville- FSCJ (Advanced Tech Center @ the Downtown Cam-
pus), Fletcher High School and Ed White High School. Each location will
enroll eligible 4-year-olds into Florida's FREE VPK program from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m.
To be eligible for VPK, children must turn 4 years old on, or before,
Sept. 1, and they must live in Florida. Parents will need to bring 1 proof of
child's age and 1 proof of Florida residency. Typical examples for each are:

For proof of age: (Child must be bor between 9/2/2006 and 9/1/2007.)
Birth Certificate, Blue shot records signed by doctor, Passport or Military ID.

For proof of residency:
THE ADDRESS MUST MATCH THE APPLICATION.
Driver's License, Utility bill, Lease Agreement, FL Vehicle Registration Card
or Pay stub
* We are also asking parents to provide their child's Social Security number.


Wachovia, A Wells-Fargo Company, is sponsoring the Kick-Off and other
community events throughout the Spring. Eligible children will receive a free
book when they enroll in VPK.

WHEN: Saturday, January 29
9 a.m. 1 p.m.

WHERE: 3 locations:

Ed White High School, 1700 Old Middleburg Road-Auditorium
Fletcher High School, 700 Seagate Avenue-Media Center
FSCJ- Downtown, Advanced Technology Center, Comer of State St. and
Pearl St.-T140&T141

WHO: Early Learning Coalition of Duval

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF SUPPORT: Wachovia, A Wells Fargo Company
Families may also enroll in VPK at Ribault High School on Tuesday, Feb.
8, 2011 from 6:00 to 7:30 pm.
To find more information about VPK, or to find an enrollment in your area,
call 904-208-2044 or visit www.ChooseQualityChildCare.org. Year-round registra-
tion is also available at the Early Learning Coalition of Duval office after Jan.
31.


t





JANUARY 22, 2011


RELEASE THE STAR IN YOUR

CHILD!
AUNTIE ROZ CHILDREN'S WORKSHOP ANNOUNCES AUDI-
TIONS FOR TALENTED CHILDREN AND TEENS INTERESTED IN
ACTING

Auntie Roz Children's Workshop, the place young talent goes
to grow, is pleased to announce auditions for an innovative, hands-on,
customized program aimed at developing the acting talents of children
and teens.
Auditions were held Dec. 29-30 and Jan. 5-6, from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. on all four days, at the Museum of Contemporary
Art/Jacksonville, located at 333 North Laura Street.
The program is a "sensible, step-by-step guide for newcomers
to the acting business," says noted teacher and performing artist Roslyn
"Auntie Roz" Burrough, who heads the workshop and will direct the
program, which will be housed at the museum.
"There are young people who have a lot of talent and potential.
With support and encouragement from home and the education we will
provide in our eight-week course of study, they will be well on their
way," she said.
From Jan. 15 to March 6, 2011, talented youngsters who make
the audition cut will attend intensive once-a-week sessions on Satur-
days in which they will learn different skills related to acting. They
will be divided into two groups-one for children ages 5 to 10, and
the other for teenagers 11 to 17 years old.
Auditioning is "a piece of cake for talented young people,"
says Burrough. "We expect them to confidently introduce themselves,
tell us the name of their school and the grade they're in, recite a nurs-
ery rhyme or short poem, and then wow us in a personal interview."
Burrough's 40 years of professional experience weaves per-
formance art into carefully crafted instruction that promotes self-es-
teem, personal growth and responsibility.
Tuition for the program is $250 per participant. A nonrefund-
able deposit of $100 is required upon registration, which is on a first-
come, first-served basis. The balance must be paid in full by the third
session.
Tuition covers instruction, a company logo shirt, and all ma-
terials-and, Burrough promises, a humdinger of a culminating per-
formance by the newly minted stars.
To schedule an audition appointment, call (904) 713-0885. For
more information on the program, please visit www.auntieroz.com.


THE STAR


PR-4




C&J1 CM K


January 22, 2011


THE STAR


Vol. 1, No. 9


ii








Man Accused of Raping 20-Year-Old Found Guilty in
Toddler in Dollar Store Murder of Chicago Teen

Screams rang out at a Dollar Tree store
in Union City as a woman was seen clutch- It took thejury less than a day to make a conviction o
ing a young child and a burly man tried to first-degree murder in the 2009 beating death of Chicago
run out of the store. honor student Derrion Albert.
Two bystanders soon tackled the man, 20-year-old Silvonus Shannon is one of four young
who was identified as 36-year-old Eugene men charged in Albert's horrendous death, an incident that
Melendres Ramos, a registered sex offender.
Ramos is accused of sexually assaulting a e shockwaves across the Inteet when cell phon
2-year-old girl in an aisle at the busy Dollar video of the beating went viral.
Tree at 1720 Decoto Road. Shannon faces up to 60 years in prison for his in-
According to police, the toddler was at volvement.
the store with her aunt and grandmother and Shannon, who testified on his own behalf, maintained
had wandered awav for a less than a minute


to return a ribbon to the Christmas section.
When the grandmother came to check on the child moments later, she found Ramos
with the child pinned to the floor, her pants and diaper removed. Ramos' pants and un-
derwear were down.
Now found out, Ramos tried to flee the scene but was prevented by the concerned
bystanders and handed over to police.
Ramos was booked for kidnapping, rape, sexual acts with a child, and false im-
prisonment.
This was not Ramos' first time committing such a despicable act according to the
state sex offender registry, Ramos has a prior conviction for sexually assaulting a 7-
year-old Hayward girl in 2003 with "intent to commit rape."
He is being held at the Santa Rita Jail on $350,000 bail and will be arraigned next
week.


Woman Hides Stolen Mink Coat in
Her Panties

Another woman discovered the upside of obesity earlier
this month when she was able to spirit away a $6500 mink
coat in her underwear.
.. Stephanie Moreland was arrested earlier this month by
Bloomington police after a local furrier reported a short
Smink coat stolen and employees noticed her suspicious be-
Stephanie Moreland havior in the store.
Three days later, while interviewing with police, Moreland
produced the coat from her underwear at the threat of being transferred to another jail.


that he was a victim and was fighting for his own life as
a mob, including Albert, descended on him. He initially
denied kicking or stomping on Albert's head but later told
police that he kicked Albert three times before apologiz-
ing.
This admission was a key factor in Shannon's con-
viction, as a head injury had been directly linked to Al-
bert's cause of death.
Shannon was apologetic during the fast-moving two-
day trial that began last Monday. Despite this, jurors took
less than four hours to deliver a guilty verdict.
Shannon will be sentenced on February 14.


~~i) 2~Y)


I:


Silvonus Shannon, pictured left.








ssSHH! From Actual Police Reports

Did You Hear About?...

EDITOR'S N
Al upcsaedee noetulspoe ult nacuto a.TeSeifsOfc eot
I,, 'I I' ,', ''I-'


STOLEN AND RECOVERED -
A police officer was dispatched to
3025 Imperial St. with a report of a
residential burglary.

Upon the arrival of the offi-
cer, the distraught homeowner, Ms.
Robinson, came outside to speak
with the officer about the incident.

According to the victim,
she left her home earlier that after-
noon to commute to her workplace.
She then stated that she returned a few hours later to find the sliding
glass door of her house shattered and all of the rooms ransacked.

She told police that she made sure her residence was inaccesi-
ble through the fences, as she locks them every time she leaves home.
The only way to enter the home through the sliding glass door would be
to jump over the fences.

The suspects stole two televisions,
two cable boxes, a Playstation 3
video game system and $400 in
cash that the victim had saved up
from tips.

Ms. Robinson guided the officer
through her home to observe the
damage. As they went into the back
yard they found DVD cases that the
suspect or suspects had left beside a
fence of the west side of the vic-
tim's residence.

The victim advised the officer that the house next door was va-
cant and neighborhood kids were known to hang out there. Upon search-
ing the residence, police were able to recover a tube television and two
cable boxes. The partially relieved victim signed for the recovered
items.


A sexual assault is about power, anger, and control.
It is an act of violence and an attempt to degrade someone using sex as a
weapon. Above all, sexual assault is a crime.

How You Can Protect Yourself

* BE ALERT! Walk with confidence and purpose.

* BE AWARE of your surroundings -know who's out there and what's
going on.

* DON'T let alcohol or other drugs cloud your judgment.

* TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS! If a situation or place makes you feel un-
comfortable or uneasy, LEAVE!

When You're Indoors

* Make sure all doors (don't forget sliding glass doors) and windows have
sturdy, well-installed locks, and use them! Install a wide-angle peephole
in the door. Keep entrances well-lit.

* NEVER open your door to strangers. Offer to make an emergency call
while someone waits outside. Check the identification of sales or
service people before letting them in. DON'T be embarrassed to phone for
verification.

* BE WARY of isolated spots
apartment laundry rooms, underground garages, parking lots, offices after
business hours. Walk with a friend, co-worker, or security guard, particu-
larly at night.

* KNOW your neighbors, so you have someone to call or go to if you're un-
comfortable or frightened.

* If you come home and see a door or window open, or broken, DON'T GO
IN. Call the police from a cell phone, public phone or a neighbor's phone.


January 22. 2011


THE STAR


C&J PA GE A-2






Jan^In Your 22, 2011 THE STAR C&JPAG3


Child Shoots

Herself with

Father's Gun
Neighbors were shocked when a
6-year-old girl was discovered shot Sun-
day after being left unattended in her
Jacksonville home located in the 7100
block of Nelms Street.
According to police, Donesha Bur-
ney was rushed to nearby Shands Hospi-
tal with a gunshot wound to the chest.
The girl's father, who had been in another room inside the home at the time of the
shooting, told police that he heard a popping sound and immediately rushed to find his daugh-
ter. Police are unsure where the father got the handgun and are investigating whether he pos-
sessed it legally. Police will continue the investigation and consult with the State Attorney's
Office before deciding whether any charges will be filed.
Despite the severity of her injuries, the girl is expected to recover.


Man Charged in

Jealousy Killing

Police report that a Jacksonville man has been
charged with murder and that his motive was jealousy
after seeing the mother of his child walking with another
man.
Isaiah Alexander Boston Jr., 20, of the 1600 block
of North Moncrief Village Street, spotted Travis Jamaal
Green, 21, of the 9700 block of Sibbald Road on Satur-
day. The man was walking with the mother of Boston's
child early Saturday afternoon.
Apparently consumed by rage, Boston produced a
firearm and shot Green before fleeing the scene. Green
later died in the street.
Boston was identified by a witness of the shooting
and found with the murder weapon.


Janitor Caught Cashing In Stolen Lottery

Tickets
SA janitor's luck ran out Tuesday when a batch of
S, sscratch-off lottery tickets that had been stolen from
the promotion office at First Coast News was
Traced by Jacksonville police.
S 27-year-old Yesica Acosta Ferrara's stolen tick-
ets had received nearly $1,000 in winnings but she
could not enjoy it for long. She was arrested on a
: i -charge of grand theft after being found to be a part
Sof the larger theft of 300 lottery tickets and some
promotional items that were stolen from the televi-
sion station.
According to police, someone used a pass key
given to the station's private cleaning company to get into the creative services direc-
tor's office and steal the tickets. Soon after, a man cashed in some of the pilfered tick-
ets at a convenience store and the transactions were caught on surveillance tape.
Ferrara was seen on the tapes accompanying the man and was identified by
police. According to the arrest report, Ferrara used the money to buy Christmas pres-
ents for her children and for rent.


pr Crime Watch I'm(


Former St. Johns Official

Charged With Illegal

Eavesdropping

County sheriffs arrested Former Assistant County
Attorney Paras Desai on Monday afternoon after he was
charged with eavesdropping and eight counts of illegal
interception of communication, all third-degree felonies.
According to police records, Desai turned himself
in Monday after a warrant was issued for his arrest. The
warrant read that Desai had secretly recorded the phone
conversations of several high profile victims without
consent, including Environmental Division Director Jan
Brewer, Assistant County Attorney James Whitehouse,
Assistant Personnel Director Lisa Roe, and Assistant
County Attorney Diane Lehmann.
Desai, 35, of St. Augustine has since been released
on bail.


January 22. 2011


THE STAR


C&J PA GEA-3




C&J4 M K


January 22, 2011


THE STAR


C&JPage A-4


CriminalLinen U
MISN ESN


Name: Jarkeius Adside
Age: 10 Height: 2'0"
Weight: 301bs
Was abducted by three males
10/18/01. May respond to nick-
name "Kisha".


Name: Kethia Alexis
Age: 15 Height: 5'2"
Weight: 1201bs
Last seen 11/06/10. May go by the
first name alias "Katia".


Name: Samantha Brown
Age: 17 Height: 5'2"
Weight: 1201bs
Last seen 09/20/10. Has a tattoo
on her left arm.


Name: Lilliana Chachere
Age: 15 Height: 5'0"
Weight: 1451bs
Last seen 01/02/11. Has a tattoo
on her back.


Name: Adji Desir
Age: 8 Height: 3'0"
Weight: 451bs
Last seen 01/10/09. Last seen in
blue and yellow t-shirt and
shorts, black and gray sneakers.


IU E CI N S


A group of Texas men tried to take matters into their
own hands, attempting to extinguish the flames con-
suming their house with a garden hose and shooing
away the firefighters that rushed to the scene of the
inferno. Turns out there was a reason for keeping the
firefighters away they eventually went inside the
locked house and found over 100 marijuana plants.


An undercover Hartford police officer wasn't happy
to be pulled over on his time off. The cop quickly be-
came suspicious, however, of the "cop" car's nonstan-
dard red flashing lights. He called for backup and the
man attempting to arrest him was arrested for imper-
sonating a police officer.


Name: Elysian Roberts Name: Derian Jelks
Age: 24 Age: 29
Offense: Stalking/Tresnass Offens: Prnhntinn Vinlntinn


Name: Robert Barber
Age: 33
Offense: Child Molestation


Name: AndrewBethay
Age: 47
Offense: OOC Warrant


Name: Alan Jackson
Age: 33
Offense: Rhhbbrv


Name: Richard Wright
Age: 36
Offense: Cocaine Possession


Name: Derrick Adams
Offense: Sex Battery


Name: Chernan Albert
Offense: Sex w/Minor


name: l.nalu iuaims
Offense: Molestation


Name: Domonic Ates
Offense: Cocaine Poss.


I W]
Name: Vaudy Young
Offense: Terrorist Threat


Name: Aric Wooten
Offense: Sale of Cocaine


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