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When the New York Post staff person drew this cartoon which was published in their paper, many were upset and some attorneys said that a drawing such as this which alludes to shooting the president of the United States is a criminal violation. There is a law that prohibits a person from inciting a crime or violence. This drawing was published in February 2009. The complaint that many have is the fact that nothing was done about this incident. Therefore, a number of other such acts were committed and still the law enforcement officers and the people stood by, citing the right of free speech and the right to carry arms. Many of the right wing politicians and common citizens, some quietly and some very vocal appeared to be agreeing with this behavior. In fact, when those who did not agree but also did not go out to vote, it made it appear that most Americans agreed that this, called by some, criminal and disrespectful behavior was what most wanted. If there is no punishment for misbehavior, one would get comfortable and go even further. When so call American leaders, politicians and business persons say and do certain things publicly and the comments are aired through all of the many outlets, control is lost. You cant say if a person who commit such a crime as this past weekend is mentally ill or evil. Now we have political leaders resigning from their jobs or positions expressing fear of the tea party and/or the general public. President Obama made a very strong speech at the memorial service while others from his administration read scriptures. What many really wanted to hear was that law enforcement departments all over the country would begin immediately, enforcing the laws that are already in place that has gotten out of hand. Saturdays shootings caused death, pain and possibly permanent damage for those who were shot, for their family, friends, and ordinary people. Please, law enforcement officers, enforce the law. We dont need to see or hear about more of this. Otu0"Jgptkgvvc Jc{pgu Egngdtcvgu";2"[gctu0Ugg"Rcig"C/7 yyy0vjghnqtkfcuvct0eqo Nqqmkpi"hqt"ewuvqogtu"vq"rcvtqpk|g"{qwt dwukpguu"qt"wvknk|g"{qwt"ugtxkeguA"Kh"{qw cpuygtgf"[GU."vjgp"{qw"pggf"vq"rnceg"cp"cf kp"Vjg"Hnqtkfc"qt"Igqtikc"Uvct#""ECNN ;261988/::56"vq"rnceg"{qwt"cf"VQFC[## Check, Money Order, Or Credit Cards Accepted cfBvjghnqtkfcuvct0eqo PQTVJGCUV"HNQTKFC‘U"QNFGUV."NCTIGUV."OQUV"TGCF"CHTKECP"COGTKECP"QYPGF"PGYURCRGT K P U K F G A1 C M Y K Editorial....................A-2 Church....................A-3 Lifestyle..................A-4 State-National..................A-5 Entertainment..............A-6 Prep Rap..................B-5 & 6 Local.....................B-1 Columns...................B-2 Sports....................B-4 Did You Hear?................B-3 Classified & Business... B-7 Rtguqtvgf"Uvcpfctf W0U0"RQUVCIG"RCKF Lcemuqpxknng."HN RGTOKV""PQ0"5839 LCPWCT[""37"/"LCPWCT["43."4233 """""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""" XQN0"82"PQ0""5: """"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""72" EGPVU Cp"Cyctf Ykppkpi Rwdnkecvkqp. ugtxkpi"{qw ukpeg"3;730" Tcvgf"‰C“"d{ vjg"Dgvvgt Dwukpguu"Dwtgcw Dtgcmkpi"vjg"Ncy Ykuj"vq"ikxg"wu"c"Pgyu"Uvqt{A Ecnn"*;26+"988/::56"qt"Ugpf"kv"vq< kphqBvjghnqtkfcuvct0eqo Rgqrng"vq"Ycvej"kp"Hnqtkfc"("Igqtikc"/4233" Tgcf"Vjg"Hnqtkfc cpf"Igqtikc"Uvct Pgyurcrgtu0 Nkuvgp"vq"KORCEV Tcfkq"Vcnm"Ujqy0YYY0vjghnqtkfcuvct0eqoStill the peoples choice, striving to make a difference. The Florida Star, The Georgia Star, Impact Radio 105.3 and AM1360 (904) 766-8834 See Prep Rap B-5 and B-6 See Crime & Justice Insert A&B As the year ends we begin to think of what will happen in the next year regarding our life, the lives of our children, our families and our friends. We expect changes and work, hope and pray that all of the changes we experience will be positive, We know that we cant do it all alone and that there are people around us that may be of benefit to our daily lives such as politicians, doctors, preachers and lawyers, as well as our environment such as our stores, our living conditions. Below are people we can watch and call on for help, comfort and motivation. Rtgukfgpv Dctcem"Qdcoc Eqpi"Eqttkpg Dtqyp" Hn"Uvcvg"Ugp Vqp{"Jknn Tgr"Okc"Lqpgu."Dgvv{"Fcxku. LYP"(HNLcz."Tgr"Cwftg{ Ikduqp Inqtkqwu Lqjpuqp."Ekv{ Eqwpekn Fgpkeg"Ngg. Lcz"Ekv{ Eqwpekn Ft0"Lqjpp{ Ichhpg{."Lcz Ekv{"Eqwpekn Ycttgp Lqpgu."Lcz Ekv{" Tgiikg Dtqyp."Lcz Ekv{"Eqwpekn Lcogu"Dtqqmu Dtwpuykem Eqookuukqpg Tqucn{p Rjknnkru."EQL. Cfokp Kukcj"Twonkp. PCCER Eqtpgnn"Jctxg{. Dtwpuykem Eqookuukqpgt Gnfgt"Fqpcnf Hq{."OCF FCFU Tkejctf Fcphqtf Wtdcp"Ngciwg Tgx0"T0N0 Iwpf{. UENE LVC.Ejcktocp ("EGQ Okejcgn Dnc{nqem0 Dkujqr OeMkpng{ [qwpi."COG Fkuvtkev Fgdqtcj"Ockfgp." Igpgtcn"Ocpcigt. YEIN"Tcfkq Vqp{cc Ygcvjgtudgg. Gfkvqtkcn"Dqctf Vkogu"Wpkqp Ujgttk"Hkpg."HO";409. Uqwvj""Igqtikc Vgttcpeg"Rcvvgtuqp. Tkv|"Ejcodgt Rnc{gtu. Hqwpfgt"cpf"EGQ Fctt{n"Jcnn."Uvcig Cwtqtc Vjgcvtkecn"Eq0 Fktgevqt"("Hqwpfgt Fcxkf"Igttctf. Swctvgtdcem. Lcemuqpxknng Lciwctu Dknn""Nguvgt. PCUECT"Ftkxgt Lcemkg"Rgtt{. Ocpcigt Dgcxgt"Uvtggv Gpvgtrtkug Dgvv{"Dwtpg{ Fwxcn"Eqwpv{ Uejqqn"Df Ugpkqtu"Fc||nkpi"Fkcoqpf"Fcpegtu Vjg"Hnqtkfc"Uvct R"Q"Dqz"6284; Lcemuqpxknng."HN"54425 Lcemuqpxknng"jcu c"dcumgvdcnn"vgco. cpf"vjg{"ctg"%4"kp vjgkt"ngciwg0Ugg"Rcig"D/6 Eqpi"Cnngp Yguv Nv0"Iqx0"qh Hn0"Lgppkhgt Ecttqnn Kpvgtko"Ejkgh Vqdg"Itggp. Dtwpuykem Tgx0"Lcogu Ucoruqp. Rtgukfgpv. Hnqtkfc"Dcrvkuv Rcuvqt"Octm Dcmgt."Itgcvgt Yqtmu. Dtwpuykem NcXgtpg"Eqqrgt Fkt."Okpqtkv{ Qwvtgcej. Eqcuvcn"Igqtikc Eqnngig Cnxkp"Dtqyp. Yknnkg"Ict{ Hqwpfcvkqp. hqtogtn{"ykvj Rtgu0Enkpvqp Rcv"Nqemgvv/ Hgnfgt. Eqoowpkv{. Hqtogt"Ekv{ Eqwpekn Mgp"Lghhgtuqp. Tgvktgf"htqo LUQ. Eqoowpkv{ Yqtmgt LcEqd{ Rkvvocp/Rggng. Fkt0."Enctc Yjkvg"Okuukqp Pcv"Inqxgt."hqt/ ogt"ujgtkhh. Kpvgtko Rtgukfgpv."GYE Enctc"OeNcwijnkp Hnqtkfc"("Igqtikc"Uvct Pgyurcrgtu."Korcev Tcfkq"Ujqy Tgx0"Jctqnf"Jckt. Pgitq""Ngciwg Dcugdcnn Ot0"Dwtpg{"Dkxgpu. Cvvqtpg{"cpf"Hwpgtcn Fktgevqt FQP‘V"NGCXG"[QWT"ECT TWPPKPI"/"KV"KU"KNNGICN The Jacksonville Sheriffs Office issued a statement advising that the cold weather does not make it legal for you to leave your motor running, and keys in the ignition. Therefore, when the weather report advises that the temperature is going to be very low, and you wish to warm up your car before leaving put on a lot of warm clothing and stay with your vehicle. To leave it is not safe. You could get a ticket or the vehicle could get stolen. Be Safe! Lqkp"vjg"Tkv|"Ejcodgt"Rnc{gtu Ygfpgufc{"vq"Rtgugpv"Ectnc"Jcttku"vjg ONM"Cyctf Ft0"Ejctngu Oqtgncpf."Hktg Ejkgh. Lcemuqpxknng"HTF Cn"Fcpkgnu."qypu 8"Fqokpq‘u"kp Dtwpuykem. Carla Harris heads the Emerging Manager Platform at Morgan stanley, providing financial advice to corporations. She is Chairman of their Foundation and has received numerous awards nationwide. She has received business awards for many institutions, including Harvard. In her other life, she is a singer and has produced a gospel album,  Joy is Waiting,Ž featured on BET. Ectnc"Jcttku."cv Vkogu"Wpkqp Egpvgt."Lcpwct{ 3;"cv"9<52"r0o0

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One evening I stood on a corner and watched a lot of young black males sell drugs while a caravan of cars pulled up to the same house as if they were placing orders at a fast food pickup window. Directly across the street I saw a Black Church. The members were in the parking lot greeting one another before they attended service. No one bothered to even look across the street. I dont think Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. would have turned his head to the negative activity in his backyard were he alive today. He probably would have walked across the street and talked to the black males and found out what kind of level they were on before trying to raise their conscienceness. I wouldnt have been surprised either if many of them stopped their activities to at least hear what he had to say. At the turn of the century, secular organizations The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People ( NAACP), The Garvey Movement, and the Nation of Islam became prominent proponents for the black cause. The Black Church was referred to as do-nothing institutions because its influence had waned. The civil rights movement sparked a resurgence in the Black Church. The movement was led by Dr. King, who transformed it from a passive institution to an instrument for social change. Dr. King preached and argued that religion has a social as well as a spiritual mission, and that it should be concerned with the whole person and not just the soul. Noted black scholar Eric Lincoln wrote in his analysis of the Black Church, The State of Black America, [t]he Black Church is alive, alert, addressed to the realities of our times.Ž A lot has waned in fourteen years. During the Jim Crow era the Black Church became the most important economic institution in the black community. It had to steel itself against the economic woes brought on by the Jim Crow laws. As a result, insurance companies, mutual associations, banks, and educational institutions were created. When the Civil War ended, the Black Church immediately stepped forth to construct educational institutions for the black community. The same impetus is needed now more than ever if the Black Church is to become a great institution producing programs and solutions for our ravishedand impoverished communities. Long before the government implemented social and welfare programs the Black Church was serving as a social institution, a social clearing house for the betterment of its people. It might benefit the black community to delve into the civil rights era and understand better the role the Black Church played socially in our communities. We could probably create more solutions to combat the social ills that fluctuate daily in our communities. After all, Dr. Kings dream wasnt only about civil rights or race; it was also targeted at the chaos in the black community. PAGE A-2THE STAR JANUARY 15, 2011 Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson First African American Inducted Into The Florida Press Hall Of Fame EDITORIAL CLARA JACKSON McLAUGHLIN OWNER/PUBLISHER LONZIE LEATH, RINETTA M. FEFIE MANAGEMENT ERIC A. LEE SALES & MARKETING DIRECTOR MAY FORD, LAYOUT EDITOR CRIME & JUSTICE, JULIA BOWLES ALLEN PROCTOR DESIGN AND WEB SITE PARTNER BETTY DAVIS LIFESTYLE/ SOCIETY COLUMNISTInvestigative Reporter: Lonzie Leath, Features: Dementrious Lawrence Reporters/Photographers: Marsha Phelts, Carl Davis, Laurence Greene, F. M. Powell III, Michael Phelts, Richard McLaughlin, Andrea F. K. Ortiz, Angela Morrell, Joseph Lorentzon, Scott Jurrens, Cheryl Williams Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Ester Davis, Lucius Gantt, Deanna, Cynthia Ferrell, Delores Mainor Woods, Farris Long Distribution and Sales: Dan & Pat Randolph, Abeye Ayele, Cassie Williams, Angela Beans, Tony Beans, Herman Robinson, David Scott TEL: (904) 766-8834 FAX: (904) 765-1673 info@thefloridastar.com (912) 264-3137 Georgia Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Alachua, Flagler, Marion, McIntosh, Camden And Glynn CountyTheFloridaStar.comThe Florida and Georgia Star Newspapers are independent newspapers published weekly in Jacksonville, Florida SUBSCRIPTION RATES One Year-$35.00 Half Year-$20.00Send check or money order or call with VISA,AmEX,MASCD, DiSCOVER and subscription amount to: The Florida Star, The Georgia Star P.O. Box 40629 Jacksonville, Florida 32203 The Florida Star will not be responsible for the return of any solicited or unsolicited manuscripts or photos. Opinions expressed by columnists in this newspaper do not necessarily represent the policy of this paperMEMBERSHIPS: Florida Press Association National Newspaper Association National Newspaper Publishers Association Amalgamated Publisher, Inc. Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce First Coast African American Chamber of Commerce THE FLORIDA STAR THE GEORGIA STAR MIKE BONTS, SPORTS EDITOR RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, SPORTS YOLANDA KNUCKLE, COLUMNS LIZ BILLINGSLEA OFFICE/ACCOUNTS MANAGER TIA AYELE, SPECIAL SECTIONS GEORGIA MARKETING ANGELA FAVORS MORRELL DISTRIBUTION HERMAN ROBINSON/DAVID SCOTT National Newspaper Publishers Association MAKE TUESDAY YOUR DAY OF EXTRA KNOWLEDGE TUNE IN TO IMPACT LISTEN AND TALK FM 105.3 -WJSJ 5:30 P.M. AND 11:30 P.M. AM 1360 WCGL 8:30 P.M.Clara McLaughlin and IMPACT Claras Guest for Tuesday, January 18, 2011 Dr. Teresa Hairston Publisher Gospel Today MagazineCall and Talk 5:30 pm 904-854-8255; 8:30 pm 904-766-9285 Listen on the Web: Serving since 1951 Vjg"Hnqtkfc"Uvct"/"Vjg"Igqtikc"Uvct"/"Vjg"Rgqrng‘u"Ejqkeg 7<52"r0o0"cpf"33<52"r0o0 32705/yyy0tcfkqhtgglcz0eqo :<52"r0o0/yyy0YEIN3582 Oqtg"dtcpf"pgy"nkxg"nqecn"vcnm vjcp"qp"qvjgt"tcfkq uvcvkqp#Ejgem"qwvYLUL"/"HO"32705""Pqtvj"Hnqtkfc"("Uqwvjgtp"IgqtikcSome of our nqecn"ujqyu include Cpf{ Lqjpuqp Dtqvjgt"Uvcp the Union Man, Vtwem EnctcOeNcwijnkp for The Florida and Georgia Star, Rtqitguukxg"Tqqvu K<"vjg"Kpf{"Owuke Ujqy# Some of our pcvkqpcn"ujqyu" include Gf"Uejwnv|."Vjqo"Jctvocpp"cpf Uvgrjcpkg"Oknngt EDU"Tcfkq"Pgyu"/"Gxgt{"jcnh/jqwtEcnn"kp"<""*;26+":76/VCNM Qpnkpg< yyy0tcfkqhtgglcz0eqo Rtqitguukxg"Vcnm"Tcfkq"/"46"jqwtu fckn{0""Cnn"rtqitcou"ctg"uvtgcogf qp"vjg"ygdYcpv"vq"CfxgtvkugA""Ecnn<""*;26+"647/5597 By: Bruce A. Davis C"ECNN"VQ" VJG"DNCEM"EJWTEJ

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JACKSONVILLE, FL (AREA DEATHS)BAKER, Mrs. Eddie Lee, died January 8, 2011. BUTLER, Dorothy Lee, died January 9, 2011. CHARLESTON Fetita died January 11, 2011. CHIEVES Cheryl E., funeral service was held January 14, 2011. JOHNSON Betty Clark, funeral service will be held January 15, 2011. COLEMAN Alphonso, died January 5, 2011. CONNOR Dianne A., 66, died January 10, 2011. COOPER Ruby Lee, died January 7, 2011. DIXON Ruth, 70, died January 11, 2011. FOY Annie I., died January 10, 2011. HOLZENDORF Quinn, died January 7, 2011. HRYCIW, John, 87, died January 10, 2011. IVEY Yvonne Louise, died January 9, 2011. JOHNSON Marcus R., 29, died January 7, 2011. LOGAN Alfred Francis Butch,ŽIII, 56, died January 8, 2011. LUGO, Dana C., 32, died January 9, 2011. MANN Shakaria, died January 8, 2011. McDANIEL Vernon D., Mack,Ž 79, died January 11, 2011. MEYER William Marvin, 84, died January 10, 2011. PETRICOLA Michael J., 91, died January 9, 2011. SKINNER Henry Earl, 76, died January 6, 2011. VAUGHAN James Comer, 52, died January 9, 2011. WATTS Diane Patrice, 55, died January 7, 2011. WILLIAMS Retha, died January 11, 2011.~ ~GEORGIA DEATHS CORNWELL, Sharon Ann, 48, died January 11, 2011. HAWKINS, Zemmie Lee, 85, died January 10, 2011. STEVENS Richard, died January 7, 2011. WORTHY Mary, died January 11, 2011. Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church 201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475 Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor Sunday Worship Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m. Church School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:30 p.m. Wednesday Glory HourŽ Bible Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10:00 a.m. Jehovah JirehŽ Bible Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Thursday Young at Heart Ministry . . . . . .10:00 a.m. Friday Joy Explosion Ministry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 p.m. The Church DirectoryCome and Worship With UsŽ New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208Sunday School ƒ..............ƒƒƒƒƒƒ..9:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Intercessory Prayer...............ƒ..10:45 a.m. Morning Worship ......................11:00 a.m. Youth Church 2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary) Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m. Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus (904) 764-5727 Church GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCHThe Church Where Everybody Is SomebodyŽBishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586Sunday School.......................................................................................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship.................................................................................11:00 a.m. Tuesday................................................Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m. Thursday...............................................................................Joy Night,7:00 p.m.Email: Gospell75@aol.com Website: Greaterelbethel.org Faith In Our CommunitySchedule of Events and ServicesPAGE A-3 THE STAR JANUARY 15, 2011 Tune In To IMPACT IMPACTTuesday and Thursday from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.WCGL-AM 1360The Florida Star and Impact Striving To Make A Difference! Clara McLaughlin Host Yvonne Brooks Co-Host Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email submissions preferred. Send to: info@ thefloridastar.com CHURCH Paynes Chapel A.M.E. Church2200 Albany Street, P.O. Box 759, Brunswick, GA 31520 (912) 261-9555 Rev. Richard Hutcherson, Pastor Worship Opportunities: Sunday Church School A Life Changing ExperienceŽ . . 9:15 10:55 a.m. Morning Worship Service . . . . . . 11:00 a.m. Church at Study (Weekly Bible Study) Monday Nights . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 8:30 p.m. Join Us as We Study the Word of God and Enrich Our Souls! ADVERTISING DEADLINE: ADVERTISING DEADLINE: For the Church Page For the Church Page Wednesdays @ 2:00 P.M. Wednesdays @ 2:00 P.M. Call: (904) 766-8834 ask for Liz Call: (904) 766-8834 ask for Liz or EMAIL: info@thefloridastar.com or EMAIL: info@thefloridastar.com DEATH NOTICES DEATH NOTICES INTRODUCE YOUR CHURCH HERECALL (904) 766-8834and ask for Liz BANQUETS Central Metropolitan C.M.E. Church4611 North Pearl St., Jacksonville, FL 32206 Ofc (904) 354-7426 Fax (904) 354-0934 Rev. Clarence Kelby Heath, PastorGo ye therefore, and teach all nations, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you; and, lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world. Amen.Ž Mathew 28:19-20 Sun Church School 9:30a.m. Sun Morning Worship -10:45 a.m. Tues Eve Bible Study-6:30 p.m. Wed Bible Study-12 Noon Wed Feeding Ministry 2:00 p.m. ~ Worship Service ~ EMANUEL MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 2407 S. L. Badger, Jr. Cir., E. Saturday, January 22, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. The Gospel Cavaliers, Christian Comedy Rev. Charles of Atlanta, GA, The Gospel Tones of Jacksonville, FL, Victor Speight & The Endtime Messengers of Kinston, NC, and more. For more information, call 904-234-6427 or 904-803-2178. RETIREMENT CELEBRATION for Pastor Willie J. Jones, to be held at West St. Mark, 1435 West State St., Sunday, January 16, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. Featuring Michael D. Walker Mass Choir. Deacon Curtis Staples, President, Sis. Genease Staples, Choir Director. Michael D. Walker, Pastor of Pleasant Grove Primitive Baptist Church. GREATER NEW MOUNT MORIAH MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 1953 West 9th St., with Pastor Percy Jackson, Sr. invites you to join them January 23rd at 6:00 p.m. as they Praise God in Song.Ž Featured guests will be The Anointed Sisters of Praise, The Men of Praise, and The Scott Family Gospel Singers. For more information, call 904-475-0141 or 904-401-9003. ST. PAUL A.M.E. CHURCH and The Rev. Dr. Marvin C. Zanders, II extend a warm welcome to friends, churches and the public to share in a special worship service. The Fresh Start Worship and Revival Service will be held on Tuesday, January 18, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. The preacher for the hour is Bishop Stephen B. Hall, the acclaimed pastor of Rhema Christian Fellowship, Atlanta, GA. St Paul is located at 6910 New Kings Rd. Please contact the church at 764-2755 for additional information. WEST FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH Annual Homecoming will be observed during the month of January. Rev. Timothy L. Cole, Sr. is the Pastor. This years theme is: Dress Apparel.Ž 2nd Sunday, January 9, 2011 is Black & White; 3rd Sunday, January 16, 2011 will be Armed Forces Day; on January 23, 2011 Inside/Out, Mix Match; Sunday, January 30, 2011 is OldŽ shirts & uniforms day. 945 Carrie St. FELLOWSHIPS Tillman Valentine Consistory to Celebrate the History of Prince Hall Scottish Rite Masonry in Jacksonville and its Past Leaders Past Commander-in-Chiefs to be Honored at Tillman Valentine Consistorys 38th Annual Election Banquet Jacksonville, FL, January 3,2011Arther J. Mincey, 33Commander in Chief of Tillman Valentine Consistory #22 announced today that the organization will honor all Past Commanders at their 38th. Annual Election Banquet to be held on January 15th, 2011, 7:30pm at the Wilbur Fernander Scottish Rite Center located at 29 West 6th. StreetJacksonville, Florida 32206. Tillman Valentine Consistory #22 is the local Scottish Rite Body of the Prince Hall Masonic Family, operating under the direction of The United Supreme Council of the Sovereign Grand Inspector General of the 33rd and Last Degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, Prince Hall Affiliation, Southern Jurisdiction of the United States of America. For more information regarding the Election Banquet & the History of Tillman Valentine Consistory #22, please contact Ill. Peer, Arther J. Mincey, 33, Commander-in-Chief at 904 813-5288. EL-BETH-EL COME TOGETHER DAY -we, the pastor officers and members wish to invite you to worship with us and be our special guest on our Come Together Day Celebration January 23rd at 3:00 P.M. A great program has been planned for this occasion. The guest speaker will be Attorney Seth Rothstein for this occasion. There will be several civic and political leaders to share with us and bring greetings for this occasion. If you have any questions, please contact our pastor Bishop Dr. Lorenzo Hall Sr. at 904-710-1586 or the office manager Miguel Zapata at 904-374-3940. Dinner will be served after service. REVIVALS FELLOWSHIPS (contd) ST. JOHN MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH MDG, FL. MUSICIAN NEEDED. PLEASE CALL: 904-272-5100 For Interview. Ill. Arther J. Mincey, Sr. 33, Commander In Chief; Ill. Ronald G. Williams, 32, 1st. Lt. Commander Ill. Melvin F. Wright, 33, Keeper of the Seal; Ill. Duane A. Richardson, 33, 2nd. Lt. Commander Ill. Jessie L. Wilcox, 33, Treasurer; Ill. James Douglas, 33, Overseer

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L LIFE IFES STYLE TYLE A4 C M Y K Socially SpeakingBy Betty Asque Davis / Photos by J. Carl Davis, Sr. Theres Always Something Happening On The First CoastŽ Theres Always Something Happening On The First CoastŽPAGE A-4THE STARJANUARY 15, 2011(Unless otherwise specified) Thank you for sharing your events and stories for the column each week! Because of you readers are there with you each week. Fo r column entries you may contact me directly at 904-571-1182, Toll Free Fax 866-488-6407 or by e-mail at: badavis@watsonrealtycorp.comSEE YOU IN THE PAPER SEE YOU IN THE PAPER ! The Jacksonville MOLES Induct Gloria Roache BeltonThe Jacksonville MOLES, the only chapter of The MOLES located in Florida, recently inducted Mrs. Gloria Roache Belton as its newest member. Mrs. Belton adds her splendor to the other members of The Jacksonville MOLES. Earning a Bachelor of Science in Home Economics and Early Childhood Education in 1970, Mrs. Beltons professional experience as an educator covers more than forty years. She has taught in the local schools of Duval County since 1976 and at Neptune Beach Elementary School since 1986. In addition to her dedication as a teacher she has served as Kindergarten Grade Level Chairperson. Her professional memberships include: The North East Florida and Sunshine State Chapters of English for Speakers of Other Languages, the Duval Reading Council and the Parent and Teachers Association. Mrs. Belton is active in numerous civic and service organizations that include: St Philips Episcopal Church, where she is a member of the Vestry and Cursillo. She is a past president of the Jacksonville Chapters of Links, Incorporated and Jack and Jill of America, Incorporated. An ardent Bridge Players she is active with the Les Finesses Bridge Club. Mrs. Belton is married to C. Ronald Belton and is very proud of her three adult children and three grandchildren. As she plans for her upcoming retirement international travel will become more frequent. Our congratulations to Mrs. Gloria Roache Belton. C. Ronald and Mrs. Gloria Belton. Mrs. Belton was inducted into The MOLES this past weekend. The Edgar L. Mathises, Sr. The T. C. Newmans. The John Darbys. The William 'Bill' Codys. The Henry Speightses. The Howard Taylors. Mesdames Madeline Scales-Taylor, Dr. Barbara Darby, J. Pamela Grant-Adams, Patricia Harley, Gail Cole Mathis, Tinye Dawkins, Janet Garrett Owens and Lydia Dwight Wooden, Co-Organizer, The Jacksonville MOLES. The Mark Singletons. The Orrin Mitchells. Mesdames Madeline Scales-Taylor, President, The Jacksonville MOLES and Patricia Hill Mitchell, VicePresident The Jacksonville MOLES The Warner Singletons. The Gregory Owenses. The Robert Porters. The Joseph Jacksons. The Wendell Holmeses. The Neil Finks. The Jacksonville MOLES The Jacksonville Mules The James 'Carl' Davises, Sr. Mrs. Davis is a co-organizer of The Jacksonville MOLES Chapter and National Financial Secretary of The MOLES National Organization. Mesdames Hilda Myers and Dr. 'Menia' Speights.

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Arlee Coley, Godfrey Jenkins, Karen Jenkins, Sharron Patterson, Karen Patterson, Bruce Haynes, Judith Miller, Bobbie Settles JANUARY 15, 2011 THESTAR PAGE A-5 PAGE A5 C M Y K Photos by Frank M. Powell, III of The Florida Sta r Over 100 family, friend and Churches from Georgia and New Jersey was in attendance to help celebrate Mrs. Henrietta A. Haynes-Wolfes 90th birthday at The Crowne Plaza Jacksonville Airport, 14670 Duval Road in Jacksonville January 8, 2011. Henrietta A. Haynes-Wolfe was born January 9, 1921, in Hazlehurst, Ga. to Henry and Carrie Magnolia Harris Haynes. She met the love of her life and married Irwin L. Wolfe on December 26, 1953 and moved to Havre Del Grace, Maryland. They later moved to Pleasantiville, N.J. After Her husband's death in 1986, she returned to Hazlehurst in 1988. She stayed there until 1998, then moved to Jacksonville, Florida. She attended elementary thru junior high in the St. Matthews community in Hazlehurst, Ga. and graduated from Old Stanton Senior High School in Jacksonville, Florida in 1945. She attended Edward Waters College in Jacksonville, Florida from 1945 -1947. Transferred to Morris Brown College in Atlanta, Ga. and graduated in 1951 with a B.S. degree in Home Economics. She took additional classes at Clark College in Atlanta, Ga. to obtain her teaching credentials. (SHE WORKED WHILE GOING TO SCHOOL AND PAID HER EXPENSES) Continuing education courses in Home Economics at Fort Valley State College in Fort Valley, Ga. She attended Morgan State College in Baltimore, Md. where she took courses in Dietary Sciences. Completed a three year dietary internship at Irvington General Hospital in Irvington, NJ to qualify for membership in the American Dietetic Association. Her first teaching assignment was in West Point, Ga, where she taught Home Economics for three years. Substitute teacher in Havre del Grace, Maryland; Food Service Supervisor, Veterans Hospital in Perry Point, Maryland; Therapeutic and Head Dietitian, Irvington General Hospital in Irvington, NJ.; Dietary Consultant, Our Lady's Residence, Pleasantville, N. J.; taught Home Economics at Lower Cape May Regional High School where she taught until her retirement in 1985. She was one of the only African American teachers at Lower Cape May. Professional Membership: American Dietetic Association; Religious Affliations: Attended St. Matthews AME Church, Hazlehurst, Ga.and Salem United Methodist Church. She was baptisted at Mt. Sinai Missionary Baptist Church in the early forties. EVENTS OF INTEREST EVENTS OF INTEREST Henrietta A. Haynes-Wolfe90th Birthday January 8, 2011 Neil Frink, Joyce Frink, Nicole Timley, Jose Robinson, Henrietta Wolfe, Roslyn Burroughs, Lynnett Powell Henrietta A. Haynes Wolfe 90th Birthday To the left: Alamarie Miller, Jeffery Miller, Jacquelyn Miller Jasmine Miller, Joann Buggs, and Atty. Harrel T. Buggs Paul Rex Haynes Ann Haynes, Zachary Rose Henrietta Wolfe, Stephanie Sellers, Carol James, Henry Sellers, Cynthia Upson, Sharon Sellers Louis P. Payne Jr., Janet R. Payne, Barbara R. Howard, Steve Haynes, Paul Haynes, Deborah Haynes Pastor R.L. Gundy, Walette Gundy, Catherine Wilcox, Leonard Wilcox Mt. Sinai Missionary Baptist Church Orlen Wilkerson, Joyce Cox, Alvene Starks, Sylvia Payne, Christine Dawson, Marian Simpkins, Prudence Williams Cynthia Baker, Frank M. Powell, III, Joe Upson, Dale Upson, Joseph Bruce Upson, Travis Willis Powell, Ann Willis Irwin Overton, Etha Overton, Italy Overton, Lynette Wolfe Collins, Rolise Broadray, Madison Elise Collins Virginia Washington, Darryl Hicks, Jeanette Dollar, Simon Brookins, Gwen Hagans, Jesse Hagans, Pauline Williams, Georgianna Kurtz

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Being fifteen can be a handful for the average girl, especially if the right ingredients are not present in the mix of her life such guiding supportive parents, good family, teachers and friends. On the for real side, however nice those things may be, they still dont guarantee a positive outcome. But when you add a teen with a dream who has the work ethic and determination to realistically achieve it, you definitely have a success story in the making. Caroline Sunshine is an actress who has discovered at a young age that a dream is just not something to fantasize about and when you do make it happen you must continue the hard work to keep it going. Sunshine became involved with the arts at age three taking ballet lessons and landing her first play lead as Goldilocks in Kindergarten. Sunshine was born in Atlanta, Georgia but reared in Southern California. In keeping with her training, she danced competitively with The South Coast Performance Arts Studio in Tustin, CA. and during her six grade year, she booked her first commercial for Amazing Allysen, The Talking Doll.Ž 2010 turned out to be a stellar year for Sunshine. She had her first feature movie released where she plays Barbara Winslow in last summers hit MarmadukeŽ for 20th Century Fox Pictures, based on the dog in the famous cartoon strip. She also is a regular cast member of the Disney TV Channel smash hit show Shake It UpŽ where she plays European exchange student Tinka Hessenheffer who has a twin brother Gunther played by Kenton Duty. What is the set like when her and Duty, who also has the right energy and fire, come together? Sunshine laughs, Its amazing! Oh my God! On the projects that I have worked on before Shake It Up,Ž they didnt have a lot of kids my own age so meeting Kenton was really awesome. He plays my bother on the show but we kind of have that same like relationship off the set. Its really been just a lot of fun. Thats how I kind of describe it I guess.Ž When doing a TV show an actor must always prepare for the unexpected particularly script lines which change many times during the week before the final draft is done. Sunshine sighs, Thats one of the challenges of working on a TV sitcom. The script is always changing. Were always trying to make it as funny as possible, put the best script forward. The funny thing is that we go to a table read in the morning and then we go to rehearse at two oclock and the script has already changed. Then we get home and the script has changed again. So its a lot of working on it and working on it, working at it to make it right. But when you get it right, and you get like oh thats exactly how I wanted that line to be and thats exactly how I wanted that scene to go, it feels incredible.Ž The way Sunshine describes her audition for this part actually details her work ethic and determination. She paints the picture, I always say that auditioning is the work and then getting the job is kind of like the icing on the cake. I went to the audition then went to a call back and then a final call back. On my first audition I was the only one there. On my final audition there were three other girls in the waiting room. Its always so interesting to be face to face with your competition. When I read the first sides for Tinka I just knew that I had to do this part. I wasnt going to have it any other way. I think of myself as a very determined person and when I read the sides I just thought this is an extraordinary character. I just saw so many unique traits and little quarks and I could picture her in my head. When I read sides for the first time I visualize the characters in my head and their mannerisms and how they would look on me and different things like that. I just felt so in click with the character so I decided to into the audition and put my best foot forward and now I get to live my dream of playing Tinka on Shake It UpŽ and its amazing!Ž PAGE A-6 THE STAR JANUARY 15, 2011ENTERTAINMENT Happy New Year! Another year has come and gone. I would personally like to thank the newspapers and websites that run my weekly column. Without you all this would not be possible. I also thank my readers. We do this for you! Hit me up via my e-mail feedbackrych@sbcglobal.net and let me know who and shat you want me to feature. Have a safe holiday weekend and a fruitful new year! Condolences: Kevin Ross Radio Facts Blog was the very first to break the news of singer Teena Marie making her transition on Sunday. According to Radiofacts.com, Marie suffered from grand ma seizures. The medication she was taking made her severely depressed and she stopped taking it. Our condolences go out to her family, friends and fans. She will be truly missed. Perhaps Teena and the late, super great Rick James can re-team again in heaven. Oscar Watch: For those of you who are into The Oscars, the ballots for The 83rd Academy Awards were mailed out last week and are due by mail to PricewaterhouseCoopers by 5 P.M. PT on Friday, Jan 14, 2011. The announcements for the final nominees will air live on Tuesday, Jan 25, 2011, at 5:30 AM PT from the academys Samuel Goldwyn Theater. Now its time for the Oscar politrickin and promo activities to start. Power Party: Publicist Bernadette Holder, owner of Quantum Public Relations in Beverly Hills, threw a fabulous private bash at her beautiful Hollywood Hills home last weekend for The All American Heavyweights Boxing Team which is owned by Michael King of World King Productions who launched Oprah. Mr. King and many industry power brokers were on hand to enjoy scrumptious food and drink after entering via a press lined red carpet. Comedy: Bay area native and funny lady comic Luenell will return home for a ripped, fuel laughing experience when she performs a New Years Eve show at the historic Bal Theatre in San Leandro, CA. The show is presented by Tommy Ts Comedy Steakhouse. Movies: I Will Follow. Forward Moving Films; Starring Salli Richardson-Whitfield, Blair Underwood, Omari Hardwick, Beverly Todd, Tracie Thoms, Dijon Talton, Michole White and Damone Roberts. Written, Directed and Produced by Ava DuVernay. The idea here is letting go when a close loved one passes. Salli RichardsonWhitfield plays a niece who was closer to her aunt than the aunts own daughter. When the aunt made her transition the two survivors clashed. The acting was first rate and the film was thought provoking. Kaboom. IFC Films, Why Not U.S. Productions. Starring Thomas Dekker, Haley Bennett, Roxane Mesquida, Juno Temple, Chris Zylka, Andy Fischer-Price, Nicole LaLiberte, Jason Olive, James Duval, Brennan Mejia and Nicole Lynch. Written and Directed by Gregg Araki. Produced by Gregg Araki and Andrea Sperling. If you are into cults, homosexuality, incest, gay sex with more gay sex and some straight sex that turns out to be incest (between a half brother and sister), his may be your cup of tea. A cult is planning to destroy the world and be the only ones left to rule earth. This flick has a slow start and is very weird in many places but almost makes sense by the end. This is one of those late night cant sleep specials. Save it for rental or cable. Hit me up at feedbackrych@sbcglobal.net. Study, Observe and Win! Rych Caroline Sunshine, Fun Teen Living Her Dream!By Rych McCain, feedbackrych@sbcglobal.net & facebook Rych McCain’s Hollyhood Notes!By Rych McCain, feedbackrych@sbcglobal.net, Facebook Celeb Interviews Caroline Sunshine Photo courtesy of SBPR

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JANUARY 15, 2011 THE STAR PAGE A-7 Ctgc‘u"Dguv."Oquv"Hwp."Oquv"Jgcvgf."Oquv Rtguekgpv."Oquv"Ghhkecekqwu"Vcnm"Ujqy#5<22"vq"8<22"r0o0Yggm"fc{u"qpHO"32705"YLULcickp"htqo;<22"/"34<22"r0o0"NE Florida and SE Georgias Best Talk StationCpf{"qhh/ckt<";26/78:/298;Qp/ckt<""*;26+":76/VCNMgockn
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PAGE A-8THE STAR JANUARY 15, 2011 Happy Birthday to a great man who poured his life into improving the lives of others. Publix Celebrates Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 2011 2011 Publix Asset Management Company

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B1 C M Y K By Marsha Dean Phelts When I awoke on Christmas morning I was over 4,000 miles from my home on American Beach. A few days earlier my niece, Ivory Jo Rosier and I had made our first pilgrimage to the land of our ancestors on the west coast of Africa. Departing from Dulles Airport in freezing temperatures, we were eager to be leaving behind snow and ice covered grounds. We had boarded South African Airways led with a crew of three African pilots and eight attendants for a seven-hour nonstop flight to the other side of the Atlantic. The 777 wide body jet landed moments before daybreak with the moon shinning brightly on the lovely seaport town of Dakar, the capitol of Senegal. Our coats, wool scarves and gloves were quickly shed as we rushed to bask in the 86 degree temperatures and warm sea waters on the western shores of the Atlantic Ocean. The city of Dakar is similar in many ways to the Florida First Coast. Our million mark populations are comparable, Dakar is a port city; the people were as warm and friendly as the people of Fernandina Beach/Amelia Island. The variety of couscous, rice, vegetable, chicken, lamb, fish, seafood, desserts, beverages and other dishes were most delicious and thus I felt quite at home. The invitation to attend a three week long 3rd World Festival of Black Arts and Cultures initiated from a tour and talk on American Beach that I had recently given to a 14 member delegation of politicians and journalists from West and Central Africa. As guests of Monsieur Moussa SY, Mayor of Parcelles Assainies, a Ville in Dakar and President du Groupe Liberal, we were thrilled to participate in the 2nd Edition Festival of Arts. The city of Parcelles Assainies showcased the talents of over 125 residents in the municipal stadium at the site of the Mayors office. The ribbon cutting ceremony with Mayor SY, and Madame Ndeye Khady Diop, Ministre d' Etat Ministre de le famille, launched the opening of the cultural festival and art market place where local artists sold their wares were among many highlights for local residents. We enjoyed several evenings of historical and cultural arts performances. My niece and I also were Mayor SYs VIP guests at the nations 3rd World Festival of Black Arts and Cultures. During the festivals we met quite a number of the 2,000 top cultural artists from more than 60 countries worldwide. International renowned performing artists included architects, actors and actresses, dancers, film makers, musicians, photographers, painters, scholars, writers and various other art disciplinarians. We were privileged to attend a Round Table Forum held in our hotel where the Honorable Abdoulaye Wade, President of the Republic of Senegal presided. Activities were held in several of the nineteen villes of Dakar including, Saint-Louis Island and Goree Island. Accessible only by boat, and once there the only means of getting around is pedestrian transportation, the 45-acre Gorre Island is most noted as the Holocaust from 1544-1848 where Africans were sold in the Atlantic slave trade. One glorious day after another we experienced amazing adventures, joys, marvels and wonders. Scheduled activities began at 9:00 a.m. with the last venue concerts or theatre ending long after midnight. Senegals 3rd Word Festival of Black Arts served as a gathering for thousands of African Diaspora attending from America, Belgium, Brazil, Bermuda, Canada, the Caribbean, Cuba, France, Germany, Haiti, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Venezuela, the Virgin Islands and other nations who made the Journey Home to talk and heal with our African kinsmen. These words of Nelson Mandella to Randall Robinson seemed the universal threads that have held the Diaspora together after centuries in exile and over countless miles. The blood that unites us is thicker than the water that divides us.Ž In Senegal we walked on the Red Carpet,Ž the Pageant RunwayŽ and experienced a Magic Carpet RideŽ of our lifetime. To Mother Africa, we shall return,ASAP. JANUARY 15, 2011 THESTAR LOCAL FLORIDA SECTION B ~ JOURNEY HOME~ Reenactment of the Forest People presented by Moustapha Diop Babacar Mbaye, Ivory Jo Rosier, Marsha Dean Phelts and Mayor Moussa Sy with other officials from Dakar. Above pic: Mayor Mussa SY, Minister of culture Modou Bousso Lye, Moustapha Diop and the MCs. Pape Malick Guete, Mamadou Mbaye Garmi and Ndye Thiam they are griots presenting the artists on stage. Line of people chained and taken to points of no return Bebe Manga a Cameroonian makossa singer voted one of the best African artists of all time whose recording of AmioŽ is an international hit. Ladies group New York artist, actor, keyboard musician Nick Rolfe with singer Maria de Barros of Senegal who now lives in Los Angeles. Moustapha Diop Director of the Festival Parcelles Arts, Ndeye Khady Diop Ministre d' Etat Ministre de le 20 famille, the man with the uniform is Alhousseynou, and the man in the black suit is the body guard of Ndye Khady, to the far right is Mayor Moussa Sy. Above pic: Marsha Dean Phelts with Miss Senegal and Miss Parcelles Assainies of Dakar To the right: Paul Dakobe journalist from Germany with Dr. Christine Glover-Walton from the Virgin Islands and Cameroon designer, Ngoua Jean Marcel at artist Village in Dakar. The world's tallest statute Monument of the African Renaissance. Unveiled April 3, 2010.

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MATTHEW W. GILBERT JR./SR. HIGH SCHOOL ALUMNI COMMITTEE is proud toannounce its 13th annual students/teachers grand reunion celebration on January 28 & 29, 2011. two exciting events will be held at the hyatt riverwalk hotel. tickets are sale now, no tickets sold at the door. for more information please contact class leaders or lydia jackson-bell at (904) 713-0973. The Jacksonville Children's Chorus presents the Second Annual Martin LutherKing, Jr. Day "Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing Concert, which will be held on Monday, January 17, 2010 at 6:30 p.m. in the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts, Jacksonville The Boylan-Haven Alumnae Association will hosts their 25th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Observation at the St. Gabriel's Episcopal Church located at 5235 Moncreief Road W. The celebration program will be begin at 11:00 A. M. on Monday, January 17, 2011 and is free and open to the public. Come Together Day Celebrationat The Greater El Beth-el Divine Holiness Church on January 23rd at 3:00 P.M. Dinner will be serving after service. If you have any questions please contact pastor Bishop Dr. Lorenzo Hall Sr. at 904-710-1586 or the office manager Miguel Zapata at 904-374-3940. Free Cholesterol & Diabetes Screening 12:00 pm 5:00 pm, on January 21 Phone: 800-713-3301.Location:Winn-Dixie Pharmacy 8775 Old Kings Road South, Jacksonville, FL PAGE B 2THE STAR JANUARY 15, 2011 By: Lucius Gantt Its 2011, a new year and politically speaking, Americas Black citizens are looking for new political answers. If you take a rudimentary glance at the governmental workings of any ethnic group compared to Blacks and you will see obvious differences in what is desired and what is accomplished by ethnic representatives. Jews in Congress, state legislatures and in local government commissions or councils demand that interest groups hire Jewish lobbyists, they demand government contracts for Jewish businesses, they rise, stand up and speak out about any issues that would reflect negatively on Jewish culture and historical events like the Holocaust. Cubans have the same demands for Cubans. Even Haitian elected officials do as much as they can for Americas Haitian residents and communities. Every racial group in office today other than our representatives realizes that elected officials main tasks are to divide up the money! Nothing is required of elected officials except they must pass appropriation bills that will allocate money to schools, law enforcement, environmental protection, health care and so forth. OK, while other ethnic groups can point to jobs, contracts, museums, stadiums, highways and things like that, what are our claims to governmental fame? Black elected officials love to campaign on symbolism! Dont get me wrong, there are a handful of health centers and other government entities that were created and funded by government but most office holders are proudest of basically nothing. Can I prove it? Yes! You tell me if youve heard something like the following, Vote for me. I voted for a Black holiday. Vote for me, I passed a Pants on the GroundŽ bill to arrest Black youth with saggy pants. Vote for me. I passed a bill that will place pictures of Black people acceptable to whites in a corner of the Capitol or in City Hall.Ž And, the biggest claim to fame of all is, Vote for me. I got the name of a street changedŽ. Well, its no secret, I do have brain damage, but it seems to me. Our community needs services, we need jobs and we need money! No matter what government calls our neighborhoods we make up our own names anyway. Anybody that has lived in Atlanta more than 40 years knows where Buttermilk Bottom is, or was. Miami natives know where Overtown is. LA residents can tell you where South Central is. We named Auburn Avenue Sweet AuburnŽ. We named Tobacco Road. When Jesus was in the wilderness, Satan offered Jesus the Kingdoms of the world. Jesus didn't need Kingdoms from Satan. The Kingdoms already belonged to the Father of Jesus! We don't need modern day devils to do something for us that we can do for ourselves. We dont need government to hand pick our community heroes so government can make sure no Muslims, Yorubas, Black Nationalists, freedom fighters or revolutionaries are recognized. We need the same things from government that other racial and ethnic groups get. We need some of the tax dollars that we pay to government to come back to Black communities in the form of jobs, contracts, better schools, accessible health care programs and the like. We will trade government symbolism for government money any day of the week. Instead of fighting for holidays, maybe one day our elected officials will fight for reparations so Black people can get paid for the way weve been treated for more than 400 years! (This Black History Month get a copy of Gantt's book "Beast Too: Dead Man Writing". Contact Lucius at www.allworldconsultants.net) What are my intentions for 2011? Community Activities By: Andi KHappy New Year! I want you to take a moment and ask yourself, "What are My intentions for 2011?" Before you answer that, I want you to keep in mind that intention is the difference between thought and action, planning and accomplishing, and failure versus success. As such, it is essential that You maintain a firm awareness of what your intentions are at all times. My personal theme for 2011 is "Elevation"; I plan to elevate each and every aspect of my life in an effort to live to my fullest potential. As your life coach, this means that I am committed to working with you to help you to achieve your personal goals this year. Let's begin! If you have not done so, take a moment to visit www.andikconsulting.com to see what's new, and if you are interested in learning more download and complete the intake forms. I look forward to our first session! Always Impeccable, Andrea K. Ortiz, MA CEO & Social Entreprenuer Andi K. Consulting, Inc. 972.591.3883 (Phone) http://www.andikconsulting.com ULYSSES W. WATKINS JR., M.D.CORN OR CALLUS GENERAL INFORMATION DEFINITION : *A corn is a thickening (bump) of the outer skin layer, usually over bony areas such as toe joints. *A callus is a painless thickening of skin caused by repeated pressure or irritation. BODY PARTS INVOLVED: *Corn: toe joints and skin between toes. *Callus: any part of the body, especially hands, feet or knees, that endures repeated pressure or irritation. SEX OR AGE MOST AFFECTED: All ages except infants. SIGNS & SYMPTOMS: *Corn: A small, tender and painful, raised bump on the side or over the joint of a toe. Corns are usually 3mm to 10mm in diameter and have a hard center. *Callus: A rough, thickened area of skin that appears after repeated pressure or irritation. CAUSES: Corns and calluses form to protect a skin area from injury caused by repeated irritation (rubbing or squeezing). Pressure cases cells in the irritated area to grow at a faster rate, leading to overgrowth. RISK INCREASES WITH: *Shoes that fit poorly. *Those with occupations that involve pressure on the hands or knees, such as carpenters, writers, guitar players or tile layers. HOW TO PREVENT: *Dont wear shoes that fit poorly. *Avoid activities that create constant pressure on specific skin areas. *When possible, wear protective gear, such as gloves or knee pads. WHAT TO EXPECT APPROPRIATE HEALTH CARE: *Self-care. *Doctors treatment. DIAGNOSTIC MEASURES : *Your own observation of symptoms. *Medical history and physical exam by a doctor of medicine or podia trist. PROBABLE OUTCOME: Usually curable if the underlying cause can be removed. Allow 3 weeks for recovery. Recurring is likely-even with treatmentif the cause is not removed. HOW TO TREAT GENERAL MEASURES: *If you have diabetes or poor circulation, consider consulting a podiatrist for treatment. *Remove the source of pressure, if possible. Discard ill fitting shoes. *Use corn and callus pads to reduce pressure on irritated areas. *Peel or rub the thickened area with a pumice stone to remove it. Dont cut it with a razor. Soak the area in warm water to soften it before peeling. *Ask the shoe repairman to sew a metatarsal bar onto your shoe to use while a corn is healing. *Avoid surgery. It does not remove the cause. Post-surgical scarring is painful and may complicate healing. MEDICATION: *After peeling the upper layers of the corn once or twice a day, apply ointment. Use a non-prescription 5% or 10% salicylic ointment. Cover with adhesive tape. *Your doctor may inject a corn or callus with cortisone medicine to suppress inflammation or pain. ACTIVITY : Resume your normal activities as soon as symptoms improve.DIET: No special diet. CALL YOUR DOCTOR IF: *You have corns or calluses that persist, despite self-treatment. *Any signs of infection, such as redness, swelling, pain, heat or tenderness, develop around a corn or callus. Heatlh Notes Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area. The Gantt Report

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PAGE B-3 JANUARY 15, 2011COMMUNITY COMMUNITY THE STAR Ministers for Excellent Communities/Government and Excellent Schools Sponsored the 2011 Emancipation Proclamation Observance Day which was held at noon, Saturday, January 1 at Johnson Temple First Born Church in Brunswick, GeorgiaElder Malissia Johnson, Pastor. Saturdays presentation marked the 149th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. On September 22, 1862, President Lincoln announced that he would issue a formal emancipation of all slaves in any state of the Confederate States of America that did not return to Union control by January 1, 1863. The actual order was signed and issued Jan. 1, 1863. Abolitionists and slaves reportedly gathered together on what was called "Freedom's Eve" to await and watch what the new year would bring. This act would eventually become known as Watch Night. Many black churches continue the tradition of reading the Emancipation Proclamation during this church service and then gather on New Years Day for the Emancipation Proclamation Observance. Joining in support of the goal of improving reading skills, as part of some broader efforts by the Ministers for Excellent Communities/Government and Excellent Schools the coalition is throwing its support to highlight this year's effort to award college scholarships to African American Students in Glynn County. Bishop Vincent Williams, Pastor of Word of Faith Church, Brunswick, delivered the Sermon and Ms. Venus Holmes presented the Emancipation Proclamation Speech. The congregation gave way to the spirit as they worshiped to soul-stirring selections by The Golden Isles Elite Singers and The Bethel Evangel Choir, Brunswick, Rev. Paul McKenzie, Pastor ministered to the hearts and soul and has established themselves as one of Southeast Georgias premier choir. In addition to great singing, and the inspiring message, The Battle of the Gospel Groups was held at 6:00PM at Shiloh Baptist ChurchBrunswick, Rev. Tod Rhodes, Pastor. This Service showcased rousing performances by the 1st Place Winner -The Sons of The Temple, of Holy Band of Inspiration Church, Brunswick and 2nd Place Winners The "Heirs," an Acapella Gospel Singing Group, of Camden County. The Judges were Mr. Danny Clay and Deacon Dennis Wiley. 23 African American Churches in Glynn County Contributed A Cash Donation to the American Red Cross which was presented to Kathie Perkins by Venus Holmes, founder of the Ministers for Excellent Communities and Excellent School. Ms. Holmes may be contacted at e-mail address, venus.holmes321@comcast.net Ministers for Excellent Communities/Government and Excellent Schools Observe 149th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation Sis. Bridgett WIliams, Bishop Williams, Elder Malissia Johnson, Bishop W.L. Johnson, Rev. Todd Rhodes, Sr. Front: Minister Juanita Campbell, Elder Malissia Johnson, Rev. Leonard Jackson, Rev. James BrooksCity Commissioner, Back: Rev. Craig Campbell, Rev. Michael Alston, Rev. Kenneth Adkins, Rev. Todd Rhodes, Bishop Vincent WIlliams Kathie PerkinsRed Cross, Venus Holmes Ms. Venus E. Holmes, Bishop Vincent Williams, Elder Malissia Johnson 1st Place WInner of Battle of the Gospel GroupsBuddy WIliams and the Sons of the Temple Dennis Wiley(Judge), Starlette Reeder, Fredrick Myers, Jackie Wade, Danny Clay(Judge) Pastor Paul S. McKenzie, Sr., and The Bethel Evangel Christian Church Choir Teaching Tolerance in Our SchoolsBy: Maureen Costello Sometimes the most important lessons learned at school dont come from a classroom. They come from how a school reacts to ugly incidents of bias and prejudice. When a principal learns that nasty slurs are being used in the school or that students are being bullied because of their race or ethnicity, it can be tempting to deny it. It can be tempting to resort to the old refrain, That doesnt happen at our school.Ž But it does. And when it happens, it must be addressed. Recently, a principal in the metro Atlanta area had to address bias on campus. Where other school leaders might have denied or minimized the incidents, this one set a positive example by confronting the situation head-on. And it wasnt a pretty situation: A teacher was accused of referring to Latino students as beaners.Ž At the same school, which will not be named here due to the nature of these allegations, a student was being bullied because she is Latina. Its enough to upset any parent. Not surprisingly, a parent met with the principal about it. She was accompanied by Jerry Gonzalez, executive director of the Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials. The principal and teacher profusely apologized. The teacher said she didnt realize the term she used was derogatory, noting that she picked it up from the students. It was a remarkable example of how an intolerant atmosphere can grow within a school, even among adults when they dont recognize a term as hurtful and offensive. The teacher pledged to stop using the term and the principal agreed to add it to the list of curse words students cant use at the school. These actions send a clear message to students that such language is not acceptable. The principal also pledged to investigate the behavior of some students to get to the bottom of the bullying issue. He even indicated that hes willing to taking additional steps to curb future incidents. The Southern Poverty Law Centers Teaching Tolerance program has offered free diversity training to the staff as a result. The schools quick, no-nonsense response is commendable. The principal recognized a key responsibility for educators -ensuring all students feel safe and welcome at school. This includes recognizing hurtful language that singles out students because of their race, ethnicity, religion or sexual orientation. If adults dont stop intolerant behavior, students will assume its acceptable and engage in it. All too often, bullying begins with name-calling and the casual use of slurs. Thats not to say addressing this issue isnt difficult. Race and ethnicity are sensitive subjects for people. No one wants to bring negative attention to their school. But children learn -and learn to use wisely -vocabulary through instruction. Without direction, these incidents can occur in any school. Thats why it is so important for educators to be prepared to address them. The greater offense is for a school to deny that theres a problem and allow an atmosphere of intolerance to take root. Thats something that shouldnt happen in any school.GEORGIA FORUM

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PAGE B-4 THE STAR JANUARY 15, 2011 URQTVU RCIG"D6""E"O"["M PDC)U"OCIKE"OCMG"VJGKT"OCTM Kpvgtpcn"Cwvqitcrj"Uguukqp"Tckugu"Vjqwucpfu"hqt"Qticpk|cvkqpu By MIKE BONTS Sports EditorJacksonville's Williams Family YMCA has received a $1,000 grant for 10-and-Under Tennis equipment from the United States Tennis Association-Florida's (USTA Florida) "Share the Love" grant initiative to grow the game with beginning children. "In the past there has been a high demand for our beginner junior tennis programs," said Tennis Director John Dister. "We want to meet the needs of the community by offering programs that incorporate the 10-and-Under Tennis format. Once small children start lessons they can quickly lose interest in tennis. This is often because younger children are unable to learn and enjoy tennis from the beginning when standard-sized equipment and courts are being used." The 10-and-under Tennis play format is designed for children featuring smaller court sizes, racquet sizes, foam and decompresse d balls, a simple scoring system, and net heights adjusted to ease kids into the sport. Similar mini-tennis formats have long been popular in Europe, where current stars such as Roger Federer, Justine Henin and Kim Clijsters first learned the game with age-adjusted racquets, balls and court sizes. To see a video of the 10-and-under Tennis p lay format in action go to: http://10andundertennis.usta.com. "The 10-and-Under Tennis program will allow the YMCA to scale the game down to the children's sizes," Dister said. "Also, the p rogram will allow young children to enjoy and be successful in tennis from the beginning." USTA Florida annually directs 90% of member dollars back into the community to support tennis programs and projects throughout Florida. USTA Florida's Share the Love grant program helps fund tennis programs and projects throughout Florida communities during challenging economic times. Funding priorities include 10-and-under Tennis and Jr. Team Tennis (coordinator training, start-up, etc.), public facility funding (schools, parks, conversion to permanent 10 -and-under play format courts, etc.), community tennis awareness (innovative pro-active start-ups, program expansion), school programs and senior tennis programs/projects. "We look forward to hearing of the further success of this program," said USTA Florida Director of Community Tennis Linda Curti s. "It is with USTA membership dollars that we are able to offer program grants to communities like these." Yknnkcou"[OEC"tgegkxgu"WUVC"Hnqtkfc"Itcpv"vq"gzrcpf"32/wpfgt"vgppku On Tuesday, Jan, 4, at the Amway Center, Orlando Magic players and coaches participated in an internal autograph session for items to be distributed to non-profit organizations, schools and charity events throughout Central Florida. Each year the autographed items impact more than 1,000 local organizations and raises an estimated $100,000 for area charitable activities. Orlando's NBA franchise since 1989, the Magic's mission is to be world champions on and off the court, delivering legendary moments every step of the way. On the court, Orlando has won five division championships (1995, 1996, 2008, 2009, 2010), had six 50-plus win seasons, and won the Eastern Conference title in 1995 and 2009. Off the court, on an annual basis, the Orlando Magic gives more than $2 million to the local community by way of sponsorships of events, donated tickets, autographed merchandise, scholarships and grants. Orlando Magic community relations programs impact an estimated 75,000 kids each year, while a Magic staff-wide initiative provides more than 6,000 volunteer hours annually. In addition, over the last 21 years nearly $16 million has been distributed to local non-profit community organizations via the Orlando Magic Youth Fund (OMYF-MFF), a McCormick Foundation Fund since 1994, which serves at-risk youth. Ticket highlights in the new Amway Center include: 2,500 seats priced $15 or less, 7,000 seats priced $25 or less, and for the first time ever a $5 per game ticket while supplies last. For ticket information log on to www.orlandomagic.com or call 407-89MAGIC. Through the National Basketball Associations NBA Cares program, the league, players and teams have donated more than $145 million to charity, provided more than 1.4 million hours of hands-on service to communities around the world, and created more than 525 places where kids and families can live, learn, or play. The NBA is broadcast in 215 countries and territories in 41 languages. Lcemuqpxknng"jcu"vjg"Ikcpvu Jacksonville may be a little disappointed because the Jaguars did not make the playoff, but the city still has other reasons to feel proud in the area of sports. Of course, we still love the Jags. The Jacksonville Suns is getting a new coach and now the city has acquired an ABA team. It is not the NBA but with the way the team is playing, maybe even it can become a NBA team. The Jacksonville Giants played their first game on December 1 and will be playing their eleventh game at home on January 15 and another on January 16. If they can keep the same momentum of having not lost a game yet, we are on our way. The Giants are (10-0) and are number two in the American Basketball Association. The fan base is growing. All home games will be at Veterans Memorial Arena here in Jacksonville. Go Giants!

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PAGE B-5 JANUARY 15, 2011PREP RAP PREP RAP THE STAR In addition to the concert, the Jacksonville Children's Chorus will be hosting a pre-concert dinner at the Times Union Center from 3:30 to 6:00 p.m., provided by Ruby Tuesday. Tickets for the dinner are $12 for Adults and $8 for Children 12 and under and must be purchased in advance by January 14th, 2011. Fourth Grade Students Participate in Writing WorkshopWhat: The fourth-grade students at Louis Sheffield Elementary will participate in a writing workshop with local author Jane Wood as part of the schools Author Writing program. Ms. Wood will discuss the process of publishing a book and will work with the students in composing their own class book. When: Tuesday, January 18, 2011, from 9 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. Wednesday, January 19, 2011, from 9 to 11 a.m. Where: Louis Sheffield Elementary, 13333 Lanier Rd., Jacksonville, FL 32226 DRUMLine Live Brings Marching Band Tradition to Moran Theater Stage Marching band theatrical parades in to Jacksonville on January 22 DRUMLine Live, the show-stopping attraction created by the music team behind 20th Century Fox's hit movie Drumline, will parade on to the Times-Union Center Moran Theater stage on January 22 at 8 p.m. Complete with dazzling choreography and explosive percussion, DRUMLine Live is a thrilling spectacle that pays homage to the show-style marching popularized at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). With riveting rhythms, bold beats and ear-grabbing energy, the staged show is a synchronized musical showcase of the HBCU experience. Weve taken the excitement of an HBCU football game halftime show, increased the intensity by a thousand watts, and created a musical journey that will touch every emotion,Ž says Don P. Roberts, DRUMLine Lives creator and director. DRUMLine Live is a highoctane musical roller coaster ride that will keep the entire family cheering for more.Ž The legendary HBCU band experience comes alive with DRUMLine Lives world-class cast of percussionists, musicians and dancers. The 39-member cast of performers honed its unrivaled talent with years of training in marching band programs across the United States such as Florida A&M, Tennessee State, and Clark Atlanta University, just to name a few. Incorporating original compositions and soul-infused interpretations of top 40 hits, DRUMLines musical journey infuses colorful, choreographed routines with vibrant costumes and heavy doses of drum riffs and cadences. Audiences across the globe have been brought to their feet by the stirring sound of trumpets and incredible feats of athleticism; and have been astonished by the precision, creativity, and pulsing force in the climatic percussion battle. With musical highlights from hip-hop, American soul, gospel, jazz and other music genres, DRUMLine Live brings a unique style of drumming, mesmerizing musicianship, and lively choreography never seen on stage before. Roberts was inspired to create DRUMLine Live after serving as executive band consultant for the 2002 movie Drumline starring Nick Cannon. Drumline was one of the first major motion pictures to capture the electricity of the black college marching band experience. DRUMLine Live had a successful 70-performance international tour in 2008-2009 with sold-out shows throughout Asia. For those who attended HBCUs, and for those who have never had a chance to catch black college football games, the energy and the talent in DRUMLine Live are simply going to blow you away." DRUMLine Live is co-produced by Halftime Live, LLC, and Columbia Artists Management, Inc (CAMI). CAMI is an internationally producer of live entertainment including many award winning Broadway and OffBroadway productions such as FELA, Chicago and Blue Man Group. Tickets for DRUMLine Live at the Times-Union Center Moran Theater are on sale now and can be purchased online at www.artistseriesjax.org or www.ticketmaster.com.

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PAGE B-6 JANUARY 15, 2011PREP RAP PREP RAP THE STAR

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JANUARY 15, 2011 THESTAR PAGE B-7 Subscribe to The Florida or Georgia Star Newspaper Call (904) 766-8834 CLASSIFIEDS Place Your Ad We also accept Cash and Money Orders Call Liz 904-766-8834To Advertise Order by Tuesday @ 4:00 p.m. Artwork in by Wednesday @ 4:00 p.m. MISCELLANEOUS FINANCIAL SERVICES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS CASH NOW! Cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866SETTLEMENT (1-866-738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com $500 CASH LOAN, No Credit Check 6 Months Repay, Payments $55 Biweekly. Active checking account and $1,000/month min income required. Call 24 hrs (760)569-6474 THOMAS PLUMBING REPAIRS Low Rates. (904) 764-9852 HANDYMAN Minor Home Repairs, Painting interior/exterior, Pressure Washing, Exp. & Reasonable Rates Call: 904.768.7671 Are you pregnant?A childless, successful, single woman seeks to adopt. Will be HANDSON mom w/flexible work schedule. Financially secure. Ellen. (888)868-8778. ellen@eeadop tion.com FL Bar#0150789 LIGHTEN YOUR LOAD with W & W Moving & Delivery Service An Experienced & Proud Moving Service Same Day Delivery to Any Local Point Low Hourly or Flat Rate *FREE ESTIMATES CALL TO SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT! (904) 563-5656 LAND FOR SALE INCREASE YOUR BUSINESS Advertise In The Florida and Georgia Star (904) 766-8834 -ad@thefloridastar.com Advertise in Over 100 Papers throughout Florida. Advertising Networks of Florida. Put us to work for You! (866)742-1373 www.florida-classifieds.com HELP WANTED Between High School and College? Over 18? Drop that entry level position. Earn what you're worth!!!. Travel w/Successful Young Business Group. Paid Training. Transportation, Lodging Provided. (877)646-5050. Regional Opportunity 100% Owner Operator Reefer Company $1,000.00 SIGN ON BONUS! Home weekly. Call (800)237-8288 or visit www.suncocarriers.com Colonial Life is expanding and looking to fill 2 positions by January 17 an account manager and sales manager. Submit resume to Meredith.Brewer@coloniallife.com or call (904)424-5697 17 DRIVERS NEEDED! Top 5% Pay! Excellent Benefits New Trucks Ordered! Need CDL-A & 3 mos recent OTR. (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Drivers FOOD TANKER DRIVERS NEEDED OTR positions available NOW! CDL-A w/ Tanker REQ'D. Outstanding pay & Benefits! Call a recruiter TODAY! (877)882-6537 www.oakleytransport.com DriverDrive KNIGHT in 2011! Daily or Weekly Pay, Top Equipment, 27 Service Centers, Van and Refrigerated. CDL-A with 3 mos OTR experience. (800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com SERVICES HEALTH SCHOOLS & EDUCATION BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)994-9904 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Crimiinal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (877)206-5165, www.Centura.us.com DO YOU EARN $800.00 IN A DAY? Your Own Local Candy Route 25 Machines and Candy All for $9995.00 All Major Credit Cards Accepted (877)915-8222 AINB02653 DIVORCE with or without Children $125.00 With FREE name change documents and marital settlement agreement Fast and easy. Call us 24hrs./7days: (888)789-0198; www.CourtDivorceService.com GAIN MALE SIZE FDA Medical Vacuum Pumps Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently. Testosterone, Viagra, Cialis FREE PILLS! (619)294-7777 Code FL www.drjoelkaplan.com (Discounts Available) NC MOUNTAINS CLOSEOUT SALE! Cabin Shell, 2+ acres with great view, very private, big trees, waterfalls & large public lake nearby, $99,500 Bank financing (866)275-0442 HOUSING EMPLOYMENT Change Your Life. Your Future. You have the power to change your future. And you can do it right here at Florida State College at Jacksonville To learn about employment opportunities that are available, please visit our website at Jobs.FSCJ.edu. NOTICE OF POSITIONS AVAILABLE The Florida Star News Paper The Georgia Star Newspaper Sales, Marketing, Distribution, Layout, Reporter Jacksonville, Starke, Waldo, Gainesville, Archer, Alachua, St. Augustine, Palatka, Palm Coast, Savannah, Hinesville, Darien, Brunswick/Kingsland Call: (904) 766-8834 email: clara@thefloridastar.com INCOME OPPORTUNITY DRIVERS: WERNER NEEDS YOU! IMMEDIATELY! Opportunities! No CDL, No problem! CDL Traninnig Available, Great Benefits Start earning $750-800/wk! Call Today! 866-457-6236 EPIPHANY MANOR62+ Income eligible Studios & One bedrooms 386-767-2556 TTY 1800-955-9771

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Jacksonville Church Members Arrested for Child MolestationThe congregation of Greater Refuge Temple in Northwest Jacksonville was rocked by the accusations that their pastors son and his brother-in-law committed sex crimes against teenage members of their own church. Paul Groover and his brother-in-law Darrell Moore have been accused of molestation and sexual battery that according to court documents had been going on for a decade. Groover is not only the son of the church's pastor, but also the long-time custodian at the church. One victim told authorities Moore sexually assaulted her while holding a knife and then threatened to kill her if she spoke a word to anyone. Moore is also accused of "inappropriately hugging" church members several different times, including during prayer. Groover is charged with three counts of custodial sexual battery after police said he molested a 13-year-old boy. Groover admitted to having had at least 20 different sexual encounters with the boy inside the church and sent nude photos of himself to the victim. He told police that he had a relationship with the young teen. According to prosecutors, it was not the victims who came forward in the case but an anonymous whistleblower. Both men have pleaded not guilty to the charges. C&J1 C M Y K Crime and Justice Crime and JusticeA Publication of the Florida Star and Georgia Star January 15, 2011THE STARVol. 1, No. 8 Teen Kills High School Principal In Revenge The motive was initially unclear in the aftermath of a teens murderous rampage at Millard South High School in Omaha, Nebraska on Wednesday. It was later revealed, however, that it may have been revenge that caused Robert Butler, a transfer student, to murder the vice-principal in cold blood and critically wound the principal. The 17-year-old shooter was considered normalŽ by students and teachers alike and had been well-liked and popular. Since the shooting, police have discovered that Butler had been suspended from school by the principal, after driving his car on the school's football field and track New Year's Day. After calmly accepting the suspension, the troubled teen went home to speak with his father and friends. After his father, a detective with the Omaha Police Department, left home, Butler stole his .40-caliber semi-automatic pistol and went back to the school. Butler then got in his car and posted an advance apology on Facebook for what he was about to do. He signed in at the assistant principals office normally, and once inside the office with the door closed, he shot her before walking across the hall and shooting the principal. Butler fled the scene, and police later found him in his car, dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. Butler was said to have had disciplinary problems when he lived with his remarried mother in Lincoln, Nebraska. Screaming Bank Robbery Suspect Turns On Heist Crew25-year-old Jerrica Duncan recently turned her accomplices in to police after she was arrested for the armed robbery of a Synovus Bank. Witnesses told police that a woman stormed into the bank and began screaming at the top of her lungs that she wanted money before firing three shots from her gun into the ceiling. She then fled the scene with the money. Police stopped her the following day, when she implicated two others who were involved in several other robberies. All parties were arrested. Jerrica DuncanAs an African American newspaper, we basically report on offenses committed by African Americans. Please note that in our observations, weekly reports show that African Americans DO NOT commit the largest percentage of criminal offenses in this ar ea.

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Dont share your credit with thieves. As our lives become more integrated with technology, keeping our private information confidential becomes more and more difficult. Electronic transactions can leave you vulnerable to fraud and other crimes. What About Those Passwords? Whether on the Internet or using an online banking program, you are often required to use a password. The WORST ones to use are the ones that you think of first„your own or your spouses name, maiden name, pets and childrens names, etc. The BEST passwords mix numbers with upper and lowercase letters. A password not found in the dictionary is even better. There are programs that will try every word in the dictionary in an effort to crack your security. Avoid breaks in your security by doing the following: € Change your password regularly. € Memorize your password. If you have several, develop a system for remembering them. If you do write down the password, keep it at home or hidden at work. Dont write your password on a post-it note and stick it on your monitor or hard drive. € Set up a special account or set aside a different computer at work for temporary help and other unauthorized users. € If you have the option of letting your computer or a web site remember a password for you, DONT USE IT! Anyone who uses your machine will have automatic access to information that is password protected. € WEAR reflective material so motorists can see you more easily. Using ATMs and Long Distance Phone Cards It is extremely important for you to protect your Personal Identification Number (PIN). A PIN is a confidential code that is issued to the cardholder to permit access to that account. Your PIN should be memorized, secured and not given out to anyone„even family members or bank employees. The fewer people who have access to your PIN, the better. € NEVER write your PIN on ATM or long-distance calling cards. € DONT write your PIN on a piece of paper and place it in your wallet. If your wallet and card are lost or stolen, someone will have everything they need to remove funds from your account, make unauthorized debit purchases, or run up your long-distance phone bill. € BE SURE to take your ATM receipt to record transactions and match them against monthly statements. Dishonest people can use your receipt to get your account number. € NEVER leave the ATM receipt at the site. When You Shop in Cyberspace You can prevent problems BEFORE they occur by: € Doing business with companies you know and trust. If you havent heard of the company, research it or ask for a paper catalog before you decide to order electronically. Check with your state consumer protection agency on whether the company is licensed or registered. Fraudulent companies can appear and disappear very quickly in cyberspace. € Check to see if your computer connection is secure. In Internet Explorer, for example, you should see a small yellow lock in the lower right corner of the screen. In Netscape, a secure connection is shown by a small lock highlighted in yellow in the lower left corner of the screen. € Using a secure internet browser that will encrypt or scramble purchase information. If there is no encryption software, consider calling the companys 800 number, faxing your order, or paying with a check. € Never give a bank account or credit card number or other personal information such as your Social Security number and date of birth to anyone you dont know or havent checked out. And DONT provide information that is unnecessary to make a purchase. Even with partial information, con artists can make unauthorized charges or take money from your account. If you have an even choice between using your credit card and mailing cash, check or money order, use a credit card. You can always dispute fraudulent credit card charges, but you cant get cash back. January 15, 2011 THE STAR C&J PAGE A-2 Your Safety Your Safety

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C&J PAGE A-3 THE STAR January 15, 2011 MAKING THREATS Police were dispatched to 1131 Maynard St. in response to reports of a domestic dispute. The complainant, an older woman, wanted her adult son, the defendant, to leave her home immediately. She told police that because her son did not contribute monetarily to the household and was therefore not an official resident, she wanted him out of her house. The defendant was extremely hostile toward the officer and remained so even after he agreed to leave the premises and removed his property from the house. This behavior continued to the point that the officer asked the woman if she wanted her son physically removed from the premises, to which she agreed. As the defendant stood near the officer and spoke on the phone with his sister, the officer overheard him make what the officer took as a threat to his person: if this officer gets slick with me one more time, Im going to let him have it.Ž The officer immediately placed the defendant into custody. The defendant began to scream for his mother as he was taken to the patrol car. The officer advised him to stop and get inside and when he would not, the officer forcibly placed the man in the back seat. The defendant requested that his property be released to sister, who arrived on the scene a short time later. The defendant was transported and booked into the PTDF. From Actual Police Reports From Actual Police ReportsDid You Hear About?... Did You Hear About?... SSSHH! EDITORS NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law. The Sheriffs Office reports are a matter of public record. The Star seeks to educate in the hope of keeping our community safe. JACKSONVILLE SHERIFFS OFFICE NEWS RELEASES Case number 2011-22454 6650 103rd Street #902 Homicide Victim: Sulamin Allah-Muhammad Murray Black Male 10/23/1982 Last known address: 6650 103rd Street #902 On January 9, 2011 the listed victim found with an apparent gunshot wound at 6650 103rd Street. The victim was pronounced deceased at the scene. This is an active investigation and there is no more information available. Case number 1019450 422 Nixon Street Homicide Victim: Carlton Yarbrough BM 07/17/1982 422 Nixon Street On December 24, 2010 the listed victim, Carlton Yarbrough, was found shot at 422 Nixon Street. The victim was transported to a local hospital where he was pronounced deceased. This is an active investigation and there is no more information available. Anyone with any information about these homicides is asked to contact the Jacksonville Sheriffs Office at 904-630-0500 or email us at JSOCrimeTips@jaxsheriff.org. To remain anonymous and receive a possible reward, contact Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS or email them at rewards@fccrimestoppers.com

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C&J4 C M Y K MOST WANTED MOST WANTED Criminal Line-Up Criminal Line-Up Name: Brian Brookins Age: 27 Offense: Burglary, Grand Theft RECENT ARRESTS RECENT ARRESTS Name: Sheena Adams Age: 21 Offense: Grand Theft, Forgery Name: Greg Mcfarlane Age: 32 Offense: Assault on Officer Name: Darren Anderson Age: 45Offense: Rape Name: Terrill Banks Age: 29 Offense: Child Molestation PREDATOR ALERT PREDATOR ALERT Name: Curtis Jones Age: 27 Offense: Sale of Cocaine Name: Vernon Odom Age: 27 Offense: Probation Violation Name: Andrae Fullwood Age: 29 Offense: Sale of Cocaine Name: Wesley Bailey, Jr. Age: 21 Offense: Drug Trafficking Name: Kelvin ReeceAge: 23 Offense: Probation Violation Name: Andy Richards Age: 23 Offense: Probation Violation BACK ON THE STREET BACK ON THE STREET Citizens with tips are encouraged to call Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS. You can remain anonymous and become eligible for a reward. Name: Henry Bradley Age: 48 Offense: Lewd w/Child Name: Lynn Boykins Age: 45 Offense: Sex. Battery w/Minor Name: Quan Boatwright Age: 30 Offense: Lewd w/Child Name: John Gadsden Age: 38 Offense: Unlawful Contact Name: Michael DallasAge: 41 Offense: Rape Name: Desmond Bryant Age: 41 Offense: Child Sex. Assault Name: Dalevon Allen Offense: Grand Theft Name: Willie Baynard Offense: Rape Name: Anthony Armstrong Offense: Criminal Damage Name: Wayne Brown Offense: Armed Robbery Name: Akeem Bessent Offense: Grand Theft January 15, 2011THE STARC&J Page A-4

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C&P1 C M Y K Internal MedicineŽA Florida woman has given new meaning to the term "internal medicine." Law enforcement officials in Florida say they saw a bag of drugs fall from between Elizabeth Athenia Progris's legs after she showered in a county jail. The 22-year-old, identified as a "dancer/housewife," was drying off when a deputy reportedly saw a clear bag drop "from her genital area to the floor by her feet." The bag contained pills which were later identified as Xanax. Dumbest Criminals Dumbest CriminalsFlorida and Georgias Finest January 15, 2011THE STARC&P Page B 1 Tagged, Therefore BaggedTattoos aren't just a form of body modification -they're also a form of body identification. Just ask police, or the Florida theft suspect with the words "I'm me" tattooed on his forehead. Detectives didn't have a hard time tracking down suspect Joseph Williams, 19, after media reports about his distinctive facial tattoo. Williams is suspected of snatching iPhone from more than a dozen cellphone shops. Middle School MVPAccording to police, Julious Javone Threatts got taken down after he tried a trick play. The 21-year-old allegedly lied about his age, claiming he was 14 years old so he could play in a youth football league in Florida. Officials finally called a penalty when Threatts tried to register for middle school under his teenage alias, "Chad Jordan." He's been charged with obstruction by a disguised person, trespassing on school grounds, and violation of probation. Lets face it dumb or smart, there are criminals everywhere. The best defense is a good offense: a solid strategy and being s marter than the bad guy (or dumb one). € Invest in a home security system and keep it on and monitored 24/7/365. € Make sure it has glass break sensors, monitors doors, windows and has motion sensors. € Be sure to protect basement windows all the way up to the highest level windows and porch doors for maximum home safety. € Install at least a 4-16 cameras surveillance system that can be accessed from the web and has full night vision. € Remove or lock up exterior ladders preventing the bad guy from gaining access. € Lock all doors and windows when you are home and away, especially at night and in the summer months, too.

PAGE 22

Pharmacist Charged With Theft Pharmacist Charged With Theft of Prescription Painkillers of Prescription PainkillersA Northeast Florida pharmacist has been charged by Blackshear police with stealing more than 7,000 prescription painkiller pills with a street value of $25,000 to $35,000. John Pearson, 46, of Fleming Island, Fla., is charged with felony theft by taking, unlawful distribution of controlled substances and possession of hydrocodone, which is a Scheduled III controlled narcotic. Officials at the Rite Aid on U.S. 84 in Blackshear launched an internal investigation when inconsistencies during a recent pharmacy inventory were uncovered. Pearson was taken into custody on Friday and was released on $6,000 bail from Pierce County Jail. According to police, Pearson stole 110 bottles of hydrocodone, a controlled narcotic pain reliever, over a two year period beginning about the time Pearson went to work at the drug store in October 2009. According to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, Hydrocodone is the most frequently prescribed opiate in America but also one of the most abused narcotic painkillers. Anyone with more information about the case is asked to call Blackshear police at (912) 449-7011. Callers may remain anonymous. C&J PAGE B-2 THE STAR January 15, 2011 Crime Watch Crime Watch Advertising Deadline: Advertising Deadline: TUESDAYS @ 5 p.m. TUESDAYS @ 5 p.m. To place an ad: Call: (904) 766-8834 or Email: ad@thefloridastar.com Georgia Doctor Faces Federal Narcotics Georgia Doctor Faces Federal Narcotics Charges ChargesA doctor in Alma, Ga. has been charged for illegally dispensing a controlled narcotic cough syrup. The promethazine/codeine syrup, when mixed with carbonated beverages or sometimes even hard candy, is known on the street as "purple drankŽ. William Morris Williams, who practices family medicine, is facing two counts of federal narcotics charges. According to a criminal complaint filed by prosecutors Dec. 28 in U.S. District Court, Williams committed the crime on two separate occasions in November 2009. He is accused of providing the syrup to a person identified in the complaint only by the initials D.H., on Nov. 10 and Nov. 11. The syrup is the key ingredient in "purple drank," an illegal recreational drink made with a mixture of lemon-lime soda or hard fruit-flavored candy. In both forms, the syrup creates a certain euphoria in its users while also depressing the nervous system. The cough syrup itself is a combination antihistamine and cough suppressant that can cause severe breathing problems in children, especially those 6 and younger. Williams has been licensed to practice medicine in Georgia since 1965. His office, Total Health Services, a family practice and urgent care clinic, was at 204 S. Dixon St., Alma. A Medical College of Georgia graduate, Williams' medical license is set to expire on Nov. 30. Although state records show that Williams had staff privelages at Bacon County Hospital, the chief executive of its health system said that Williams has not been associated with its hospital for years. Williams will be arraigned Jan. 25 and if convicted, he faces up to one year in prison and a fine up to $100,000 on each count. Judges To Testify in JaxPort Judges To Testify in JaxPort Corruption Trial Corruption TrialSenior U.S. District Judge Henry Adams and Duval County Judge James Ruth have been tapped as character witnesses for former JaxPort Chairman Tony Nelson. Nelsons lawyer, Curtis Fallgatter, was recently granted approval for this motion by U.S. District Judge Timothy Corrigan. Former Jacksonville Mayor John Delaney had previously been listed as a defense witness and possible expert for the trial. Fallgatter contends Nelson's relationship with the dredging operator, Lance Young, broke no laws. Young has pleaded guilty to conspiracy and is expected to testify against Nelson. The trial is scheduled to begin on Jan. 18.

PAGE 23

Man Indicted for $500,000 Medicare SchemeA former Brunswick, Ga. man has been charged with attempting to steal more than $500,000 from Medicare through two medical equipment suppliers in Brunswick and Houston. Samuel Curtis III, 37, operated Preferred Prosthetics and Orthotics in Brunswick and Team Orthotics and Prosthetics Inc. in Houston, where he now lives. According to the indictment filed Tuesday, both companies claimed to be suppliers of ankle braces, knee braces, back braces and other medical devices. It later came to light that Curtis, assisted by others, routinely billed Medicare for medical devices that were never provided to patients, not medically necessary, or not prescribed by a physician. They stole the identification information of Medicare patients and their doctors and used it to submit more than $500,000 worth of phony claims.Curtis faces up to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $250,000. Mans Foot Found in Woods of St. Johns CountyCitizens came upon a grotesque discovery early Friday morning when they found what appeared to be a mans boot containing what police believed to be the remains of a human foot. The boot and its contents were found in the dense woods off State Road 16, just west of Interstate 95. Investigators and crime scene technicians were dispatched to the site near Whisper Ridge Drive. Authorities have reason to believe that the boot may have been moved to this location and was later found by animals, as was indicated by the advanced level of decomposition. Police informed the media that it seemed to be a man's boot, size 11 or 12. It will be up to the medical examiner's office to determine the victim's identity, but without more remains, that may be unlikely if not impossible. Investigators have decided to return to the site with more personnel and cadaver dogs to conduct a more thorough search, as the area is very large and is known to be used by transients. C&J PAGE B-3 THE STAR January 15, 2011 In Your Neighborhood In Your Neighborhood Elderly Georgia Man Shot and Killed A 78-year-old mans death marks the first homicide of the year for Savannah, Ga. John Green was leaving Chu's Market with the bread he had just purchased Saturday morning at about 9:45 a.m. An unidentified assailant then walked up to him and shot him before rifling through his clothes and stealing his money and valuables. According to police, Green staggered backward through the market doors, bleeding profusely before he collapsed. Alarmed employees inside the store immediately called 911. Green was rushed to Memorial Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Police are searching for suspects in the killing and are asking any potential witnesses to come forward. Church Recruiter Kidnaps Boy from WalmartThe middle-aged owner of a church staff recruiting firm has been arrested for kidnapping a boy from Walmart and performing a sexual act in the childs presence. 55-year-old Gordon E. Libby surrendered early Sunday after being featured in a local television news report. He was recorded on the Walmarts surveillance cameras taking the boy from Walmart. Afterward, he drove to another parking lot, where he performed a sexual act on himself while the boy was forced to watch. The boy was not harmed. According to authorities, Libby owns a recruitment firm called Pastors4U that connects ministers of all religions to church jobs. Libby has also served as a youth and lay leader at several churches in South Florida and Osceola County. He is being held without bail in the Osceola County Jail.

PAGE 24

C&P4 C M Y K Have You Seen Us? Have You Seen Us?Missing Persons January 15, 2011 THE STARC&P Page B 4 MARCUS CRENSHAW Last Seen: Nov 13, 2010 City: Deerfield Beach, FL Description: Black male, 17y/o, 510Ž, 125lbs, black hair, brown eyes. May still be in local area. JOSHUA JOHNSON Last Seen: June 4, 2009 City: Atlanta, GA Description: Black male, 17y/o, 54Ž, 145lbs, black hair, brown eyes. May still be in local area. BETHANY DAVIS Last Seen: Mar 9, 2010 City: Savannah, GA Description: Black female, 16y/o 5'6Ž, 155lbs, black hair, brown eyes. Has a tattoo on her abdomen and may have a pierced navel. PHYLICIA BARNES Last Seen: Dec 28, 2010 City: Baltimore, MD Description: Black female, 17y/o, 56Ž, 120lbs, black hair, brown eyes. Has tattoo of rose on her lower right leg. Last seen wearing blue coat. For Tips Or Sightings, Please Call 1 800 THE LOST


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:01048

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:01048

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news


This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

Al uM K


I OTEATF RDSOLET ARGESTSIMOST RADAFRICANAMERIAN ONEDNE SPAPE


-____ ATHE _





FLORIDA -STAR"


www.thefloridastar.com


IJAN UARY 15 -JANUARY 21, 2011 AAAL.16 N.850CET


Breaking the Law


When the New York Post staff person drew this car-
toon which was published in their paper, many were
upset and some attorneys said that a drawing such as
this which alludes to shooting the president of the
United States is a criminal violation. There is a law
that prohibits a person from inciting a crime or vio-
lence. This drawing was published in February 2009.
The complaint that many have is the fact that nothing
was done about this incident. Therefore, a number of
other such acts were committed and still the law
enforcement officers and the people stood by, citing
the right of free speech and the right to carry arms.
Many of the right wing politicians and common citi-
zens, some quietly and some very vocal appeared to be
agreeing with this behavior. In fact, when those who
did not agree but also did not go out to vote, it made it
appear that most Americans agreed that this, called by
some, criminal and disrespectful behavior was what
most wanted. If there is no punishment for misbehav-
ior, one would get comfortable and go even further.
When so call American leaders, politicians and busi-
ness persons say and do certain things publicly and the
comments are aired through all of the many outlets,
control is lost. You can't say if a person who commit
such a crime as this past weekend is mentally ill or evil.
Now we have political leaders resigning from their
jobs or positions expressing fear of the tea party and/or
the general public.
President Obama made a very strong speech at the
memorial service while others from his administration
read scriptures. What many really wanted to hear was
that law enforcement departments all over the country
would begin immediately, enforcing the laws that are
already in place that has gotten out of hand.
Saturday's shootings caused death, pain and possibly
permanent damage for those who were shot, for their
family, friends, and ordinary people.
Please, law enforcement officers, enforce the law. We
don't need to see or hear about more of this.

DON'T LEAVE YOUR CAR

RUNNING IT IS ILLEGAL
The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office issued a statement
advising that the cold weather does not make it legal
for you to leave your motor running, and keys in the
ignition. Therefore, when the weather report advises
that the temperature is going to be very low, and you
wish to warm up your car before leaving put on a lot
of warm clothing and stay with your vehicle. To leave
it is not safe. You could get a ticket or the vehicle could
get stolen. Be Safe!
Join the Ritz Chamber Players
Wednesday to Present Carla Harris the
MLK Award


People to Watch in Florida & Georgia -2011
As the year ends we begin to think of what will happen in the next year regarding our life, the lives of our chil-
dren, our families and our friends. We expect changes and work, hope and pray that all of the changes we expe-
rience will be positive, We know that we can't do it all alone and that there are people around us that may be of
benefit to our daily lives such as politicians, doctors, preachers and lawyers, as well as our environment such as
our stores, our living conditions. Below are people we can watch and call on for help, comfort and motivation.


Lt. Gov. of
President Cong Corrine Cong Allen Fl. Jennifer
Barack Obama Brown West Carroll


Jax City
Council


ur. Jonnny
Gaffney, Jax
City Council


Jones, Jax
City


Isian Kumlin, 'Elder Donald r~cnaru
NAACP Foy, MAD Danford
DADS Urban League


Brown, Jax
City Council


Rev. R.L.
Gundy,
SCLC


Fl State Sen
Tony Hill


Rep Mia Jones, Betty Davis,
JWN &FLJax, Rep Audrey
Gibson


Interim Chief James Brooks Cornell Harvey,
Tobe Green, Brunswick Brunswick
Brunswick Commissione Commissioner


Johnson, City
Council


Kosaiyii
Phillips, COJ,
Admin


JTA,Chairman Rev. James 'Bishop Pastor Mark
& CEO Sampson, McKinley Baker, Greater
Michael President, Young, AME Works,
Blaylock. Florida Baptist District Brunswick


LaVerne Cooper Alvin Brown, Pat Lockett- Ken Jefferson, JaCoby Nat Glover, for- Betty Burney
Dir, Minority Willie Gary Felder, Retired from Pittman-Peele, mer sheriff, Duval County
Outreach, Foundation, Community, JSO, Dir., Clara Interim School Bd
Coastal Georgia formerly with Former City Community White Mission President, EWC
College Pres.Clinton Council Worker


S' ....Tonyaa
Clara McLaughlin Deborah Maiden, Weathersbee,
Florida & Georgia Star General Manager, Editorial Board
Newspapers, Impact WCGL Radio Times Union
Radio Show


Terrance Patterson,
Ritz Chamber
Players,
Founder and CEO


Darryl Hall, Stage Bill Lester,
Aurora NASCAR Driver
Theatrical Co.
Director & Founder


Sherri Fine, FM
South Georgia


92.7,


Kev. Harola Hair,
Negro League
Baseball


Jackie Perry,
Manager
Beaver Street
Enterprise


P*
David Gerrarc
Quarterback,
Jacksonville
Jaguars


I vaIJllld l, UW11I
6 Domino's in
Brunswick,


Dr. Charles
Moreland, Fire
Chief,
Jacksonville FRD


Carla Harris, at
Times Union
Center, January
19 at 7:30 p.m.


Carla Harris heads the Emerging
Manager Platform at Morgan stan-
ley, providing financial advice to
corporations. She is Chairman of
their Foundation and has received
numerous awards nationwide. She
has received business awards for
many institutions, including
Harvard.
In her other life, she is a singer and
has produced a gospel album, "Joy is
Waiting, featured on BET.


111 111
51069 D0151


Wish to give us a0Ne6. sStry


An Award





sin ce1951.


E editorial .................... A -2
C hurch .................... A -3
Lifestyle .................. A -4
State-National .................. A-5
Entertainment .............. A-6
Prep Rap .................. B-5 & 6
L o ca l ..................... B -1
Columns ................... B-2
D Sports .................... B-4
Did You Hear? ................ B-3
Classified & Business ... B-7


A


JA


I









THE STAR


JANUARY 15, 2011


CLARA JACKSON McLAUGHLIN MIKE BONTS, SPORTS EDITOR
OWNER/PUBLISHER RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, SPORTS
LONZIE LEATH, RINETTA M. FEFIE
MANAGEMENT YOLANDA KNUCKLE, COLUMNS
ERIC A. LEE LIZ BILLINGSLEA
SALES & MARKETING DIRECTOR OFFICE/ACCOUNTS MANAGER
MAY FORD, LAYOUT EDITOR TIA AYELE, SPECIAL SECTIONS
CRIME & JUSTICE, JULIA BOWLES
ALLEN PROCTOR GEORGIA MARKETING
DESIGN AND WEB SITE PARTNER ANGELA FAVORS MORRELL
BETTY DAVIS DISTRIBUTION
LIFESTYLE/ SOCIETY COLUMNIST HERMAN ROBINSON/DAVID SCOTT
Investigative Reporter: Lonzie Leath, Features: Dementrious Lawrence
Reporters/Photographers: Marsha Phelts, Carl Davis, Laurence Greene,
F. M. Powell III, Michael Phelts, Richard McLaughlin, Andrea F. K. Ortiz,
Angela Morrell, Joseph Lorentzon, Scott Jurrens, Cheryl Williams
Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Ester Davis, Lucius Gantt,
Deanna, Cynthia Ferrell, Delores Mainor Woods, Farris Long
Distribution and Sales: Dan & Pat Randolph, Abeye Ayele, Cassie
Williams, Angela Beans, Tony Beans, Herman Robinson, David Scott


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
info@thefloridastar.com
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Serving St Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Alachua, Flagler, Marion, Mclntosh,
Camden And Glynn County
TheFloridaStar.com
The Florida and Georgia Star
Newspapers are independent news-
papers published weekly in
Jacksonville, Florida
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
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Send check or money order or call
with VISA,AmEX,MASCD, DiSCOVER
and subscription amount to:
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The Florida Star will not be responsiblefor
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


FAB






SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION


National Newspaper
Publishers Association


Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


A CALL TO


THE BLACK CHURCH

By: Bruce A. Davis


One evening I stood on a corner and watched a lot of young black males sell drugs while a caravan of
cars pulled up to the same house as if they were placing orders at a fast food pickup window.
Directly across the street I saw a Black Church. The members were in the parking lot greeting one anoth-
er before they attended service. No one bothered to even look across the street.
I don't think Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. would have turned his head to the negative activity in his back-
yard were he alive today. He probably would have walked across the street and talked to the black males
and found out what kind of level they were on before trying to raise their conscienceness. I wouldn't have
been surprised either if many of them stopped their activities to at least hear what he had to say.
At the turn of the century, secular organizations The National Association for the Advancement of
Colored People (NAACP), The Garvey Movement, and the Nation of Islam became prominent proponents
for the black cause. The Black Church was referred to as do-nothing institutions because its influence had
waned.
The civil rights movement sparked a resurgence in the Black Church. The movement was led by Dr. King,
who transformed it from a passive institution to an instrument for social change.
Dr. King preached and argued that religion has a social as well as a spiritual mission, and that it should
be concerned with the whole person and not just the soul.
Noted black scholar Eric Lincoln wrote in his analysis of the Black Church, The State of Black America,
"[t]he Black Church is alive, alert, addressed to the realities of our times." A lot has waned in fourteen
years.
During the Jim Crow era the Black Church became the most important economic institution in the black
community. It had to steel itself against the economic woes brought on by the Jim Crow laws. As a result,
insurance companies, mutual associations, banks, and educational institutions were created. When the
Civil War ended, the Black Church immediately stepped forth to construct educational institutions for the
black community.
The same impetus is needed now more than ever if the Black Church is to become a great institution pro-
ducing programs and solutions for our ravished and impoverished communities.
Long before the government implemented social and welfare programs the Black Church was serving as
a social institution, a social clearing house for the betterment of its people.
It might benefit the black community to delve into the civil rights era and understand better the role the
Black Church played socially in our communities. We could probably create more solutions to combat the
social ills that fluctuate daily in our communities. After all, Dr. King's dream wasn't only about civil rights
or race; it was also targeted at the chaos in the black community.


than o othe radi







NothForda&Sothr Gori


Some of ourlocal showsinclude And


MAKE TUESDAY YOUR DAY OF EXTRA KNOWLEDGE


TUNE IN TO IMPACT LISTEN AND TALK
FM 105.3 -WJSJ 5:30 P.M. AND 11:30 P.M.

AM 1360 WCGL 8:30 P.M.

Clara McLaughlin and IMPACT

Clara's Guest for Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Dr. Teresa Hairston

Publisher Gospel Today Magazine


Call and Talk 5:30 pm 904-854-8255; 8:30 pm 904-766-9285
Listen on the Web:
5:30 p.m. and 11:30 p.m.
105.3-www.radiofreejax.com
8:30 p.m.-www.WCGL1360
The Florida Star The Georgia Star The People's Choice
Serving since 1951


PAGE A-2









.!A A-,.RV5 2011AT-IAF STyAR PAE A-
IiI ll___ V___YU__ ____


CHURCH


Faith In Our Community

Schedule of Events and Services


Tillman Valentine Consistory to Celebrate the
History of Prince Hall Scottish Rite Masonry in
Jacksonville and its Past Leaders
Past Commander-in-Chiefs to be Honored at
Tillman Valentine Consistory's 38th Annual
Election Banquet


ill. Arther J. Mincey, Sr. 33, commander In ChleJ; ill. Konald
G Williams, 32, 1st Lt. Commander Ill. Melvin E Wright, 33,
Keeper of the Seal; Ill. Duane A. Richardson, 33, 2nd. Lt.
Commander Ill. Jessie L. Wilcox, 33, Treasurer; Ill. James
Douglas, 33, Overseer
Jacksonville, FL, January 3,2011- Arther J. Mincey,
33- Commander in Chief of Tillman Valentine
Consistory #22 announced today that the organization
will honor all Past Commanders at their 38th. Annual
Election Banquet to be held on January 15th, 2011,
7:30pm at the Wilbur Fernander Scottish Rite Center
located at 29 West 6th. Street- Jacksonville, Florida
32206.
Tillman Valentine Consistory #22 is the local
Scottish Rite Body of the Prince Hall Masonic Family,
operating under the direction of The United Supreme
Council of the Sovereign Grand Inspector General of
the 33rd and Last Degree of the Ancient and Accepted
Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, Prince Hall Affiliation,
Southern Jurisdiction of the United States of America.
For more information regarding the Election
Banquet & the History of Tillman Valentine Consistory
#22, please contact Ill. Peer, Arther J. Mincey, 33,
Commander-in-Chief at 904 813-5288.


ST. PAUL A.M.E. CHURCH and The Rev. Dr. Marvin
C. Zanders, II extend a warm welcome to friends,
churches and the public to share in a special worship
service. The "Fresh Start Worship and Revival Service
will be held on Tuesday, January 18, 2011 at 7:00 p.m.
The preacher for the hour is Bishop Stephen B. Hall, the
acclaimed pastor of Rhema Christian Fellowship,
Atlanta, GA. St Paul is located at 6910 New Kings Rd.
Please contact the church at 764-2755 for additional
information.


EMANUEL MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH -
2407 S. L. Badger, Jr. Cir., E. Saturday, January 22,
2011 at 5:00 p.m. The Gospel Cavaliers, Christian
Comedy Rev. Charles of Atlanta, GA, The Gospel
Tones of Jacksonville, FL, Victor Speight & The
Endtime Messengers of Kinston, NC, and more. For
more information, call 904-234-6427 or 904-803-2178.
RETIREMENT CELEBRATION for Pastor Willie J.
Jones, to be held at West St. Mark, 1435 West State St.,
Sunday, January 16, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. Featuring
Michael D. Walker Mass Choir. Deacon Curtis Staples,
President, Sis. Genease Staples, Choir Director.
Michael D. Walker, Pastor of Pleasant Grove Primitive
Baptist Church.
GREATER NEW MOUNT MORIAH MISSION-
ARY BAPTIST CHURCH, 1953 West 9th St., with
Pastor Percy Jackson, Sr. invites you to join them
January 23rd at 6:00 p.m. as they "Praise God in Song."
Featured guests will be The Anointed Sisters of Praise,
The Men of Praise, and The Scott Family Gospel
Singers. For more information, call 904-475-0141 or
904-401-9003.

THE

*FLORIDA STAR


ADVERTISING DEADLINE:
For the Church Page
Wednesday @ 2:00 P.M.

Call: (904) 766-8834 ask for Liz

or EMAIL: info@thefloridastar.com


THE GEa

THE GEd
a *


iA STAR.
^ ^ *


WEST FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH Annual
Homecoming will be observed during the month of
January. Rev. Timothy L. Cole, Sr. is the Pastor. This
year's theme is: "Dress Apparel." 2nd Sunday, January
9, 2011 is Black & White; 3rd Sunday, January 16, 2011
will be Armed Forces Day; on January 23, 2011
Inside/Out, Mix Match; Sunday, January 30, 2011 is
"Old" shirts & uniforms day. 945 Carrie St.
EL-BETH-EL COME TOGETHER DAY -we, the
pastor officers and members wish to invite you to wor-
ship with us and be our special guest on our Come
Together Day Celebration January 23rd at 3:00 P.M. A
great program has been planned for this occasion. The
guest speaker will be Attorney Seth Rothstein for this
occasion. There will be several civic and political lead-
ers to share with us and bring greetings for this occa-
sion. If you have any questions, please contact our pas-
tor Bishop Dr. Lorenzo Hall Sr. at 904-710-1586 or the
office manager Miguel Zapata at 904-374-3940.
Dinner will be served after service.
Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue.
Email submissions preferred. Send to: info@
thefloridastar.com

SST. JOHN MISSIONARY BAPTIST:
* *0
:CHURCH MDG, FL. MUSICIAN NEED-:
:ED. PLEASE CALL: 904-272-5100 For:
:Interview. *
* *0*00 0 g S** **0**00*0 *0*0 00**


DEATH NOTICES
Ilm i l ilj|


JACKSONVILLE. FL
(AREA DEATHS)
BAKER, Mrs. Eddie
Lee, died January 8,
2011.
BUTLER, Dorothy Lee,
died January 9, 2011.
CHARLESTON, Fetita
died January 11, 2011.
CHIEVES, Cheryl E.,
funeral service was held
January 14, 2011.
JOHNSON, Betty Clark,
funeral service will be
held January 15, 2011.
COLEMAN, Alphonso,
died January 5, 2011.
CONNOR, Dianne A.,
66, died January 10,
2011.
COOPER, Ruby Lee,
died January 7, 2011.
DIXON, Ruth, 70, died
January 11, 2011.
FOY, Annie I., died
January 10, 2011.
HOLZENDORF, Quinn,
died January 7, 2011.
HRYCIW, John, 87, died
January 10, 2011.
IVEY, Yvonne Louise,
died January 9, 2011.
JOHNSON, Marcus R.,
29, died January 7, 2011.
LOGAN, Alfred Francis
"Butch,"III, 56, died


January 8, 2011.
LUGO, Dana C., 32, died
January 9, 2011.
MANN, Shakaria, died
January 8, 2011.
McDANIEL, Vernon D.,
"Mack," 79, died January
11,2011.
MEYER, William
Marvin, 84, died January
10, 2011.
PETRICOLA, Michael
J., 91, died January 9,
2011.
SKINNER, Henry Earl,
76, died January 6, 2011.
VAUGHAN, James
Comer, 52, died January
9, 2011.
WATTS, Diane Patrice,
55, died January 7, 2011.
WILLIAMS, Retha, died
January 11, 2011.



GEORGIA DEATHS

CORNWELL, Sharon
Ann, 48, died January 11,
2011.
HAWKINS, Zemmie
Lee, 85, died January 10,
2011.
STEVENS, Richard,
died January 7, 2011.
WORTHY, Mary, died
January 11, 2011.


*


SThe Church Directory
"Come and Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School ..................................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning
Intercessory Prayer..................10:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ......................11:00 a.m.
Youth Church
2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary)
Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m.
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus -
(904) 764-5727 Church ,-.r,,

Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service ............... .................. 10:00 a.m.
Church School ............... .................... 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday
"Glory Hour" Bible Study ............... ........... 10:00 a.m.
"Jehovah Jireh" Bible Study ............... .......... 6:30 p.m.
2nd & 4th Thursday "Young at Heart Ministry .......... .10:00 a.m.
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry..............................6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School.................................. .................... 9:30 a.m .
M morning W orship..................... ........................ ............... 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday........................................Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday................. ....................................................Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org

Pa ries ChapelA.M.E. Church
22iII .Ih.iin' Street, P.O. Bo'\ *'iS Biiin.i ick i. I! 521
.... (9121 261( 955?
IF ,' RA v. Richard liit', ir.'i,; a,,.. ,,
"' Worship Opportunitities:
Sunday hInch scli t ;I
| A L it t 'l i'.II'rll -' \| iil i'" '' 15f III 55
i..:. \1, I I" III'" ', \\>i"l i' i-'l', Ii.- 1 --, -I *nil 'jjj" M''
if .

[ C htinit lu.iS rud,i I \\cckl,. Biiic NStudlJ'. i"-e.
SniiiJ., Nii, '" 'I 8:30 p.m.
Join Us as We \i,,i i, I ,,IJ of God and Enrich Our Souls!


Tune In To





---



Clara McLaughlin Yvonne Brooks
Host Co-Host


IMPACT

Tuesday and Thursday

from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.



WCGL.AM 1360

The Florida Star and Impact
Striving To Make A Difference!


L


JANUARY RV .2 117


THE STA R


PAGE A-3




A4 M K


THE STA R


JANUARY 152011


LIFESTYLE
Socially Speaking
By Betty Asque Davis / Photos by J. Carl Davis, Sr. (Unless otherwise specified)

"There's Always Something Happening On The First Coast"


C. Ronald and Mrs. Gloria Belton. Mrs. Belton was inducted into
The MOLES this past weekend.


THE JACKSONVILLE MOLES
INDUCT GLORIA ROACHE
BELTON

The Jacksonville MOLES, the only chapter
of The MOLES located in Florida, recently induct-
ed Mrs. Gloria Roache Belton as its newest mem-
ber. Mrs. Belton adds her splendor to the other
members of The Jacksonville MOLES.
Earning a Bachelor of Science in Home Economics
and Early Childhood Education in 1970, Mrs.
Belton's professional experience as an educator
covers more than forty years. She has taught in
the local schools of Duval County since 1976 and
at Neptune Beach Elementary School since 1986.
In addition to her dedication as a teacher she has
served as Kindergarten Grade Level Chairperson.
Her professional memberships include: The North
East Florida and Sunshine State Chapters of
English for Speakers of Other Languages, the
Duval Reading Council and the Parent and
Teachers Association.
Mrs. Belton is active in numerous civic and service
organizations that include: St Philip's Episcopal
Church, where she is a member of the Vestry and
Cursillo. She is a past president of the
Jacksonville Chapters of Links, Incorporated and
Jack and Jill of America, Incorporated. An ardent
Bridge Players she is active with the Les Finesses
Bridge Club.
Mrs. Belton is married to C. Ronald Belton and is
very proud of her three adult children and three
grandchildren. As she plans for her upcoming
retirement international travel will become more
frequent.
Our congratulations to Mrs. Gloria Roache Belton.


The Jacksonville MOLES P :


Mesdames Hilda Myers and Dr.
'Menia' Speights.


/Ii,

' I

~t-! C


The James 'Carl' Davises, Sr. Mrs. Davis is a co-organiz-
er of The Jacksonville MOLES Chapter and National
Financial Secretary of The MOLES National Organization.


r



'i
i


The Joseph Jacksons.


The Henry Speightses.


Ask. L
The Orrin Mitchells. The Edgar L. Mathises, Sr.
The William 'Bill' Codys.


*EIFhll kLIyou for shaing yo I'LII ~kLJ IIur eent adIsores forM( tUhe clumn I]11111eachweekB!L.BecauselkiII ofK yolu readers are there I flki IIwith yo eachweekBi.V For lcolumn]11111entries M you~L
ma onat edietl t 0-51112 Tl Fe Fx86-88607o b -mi a:baai* watsonrealycorp cmSEE YOU I


PAGE A-d


Mesdames Madeline Scales-Taylor, Dr. Barbara Darby, J. Pamela Grant-Adams,
Patricia Harley, Gail Cole Mathis, Tinye Dawkins, Janet Garrett Owens and Lydia
Dwight Wooden, Co-Organizer, The Jacksonville MOLES.


Mesdames Madeline Scales-Taylor, President, The
Jacksonville MOLES and Patricia Hill Mitchell, Vice-
President The Jacksonville MOLES.






PAGE A5 CMYK


JANUARY15, 2011 THE STAR PAGE A-5



F VNTTIih4It hdI*


Henrietta A. Haynes-Wolfe

90th Birthday January 8, 2011
Photos by Frank M. Powell, III of The
Florida Star ,

Over 100 family, friend and
Churches from Georgia and New Jersey
was in attendance to help celebrate Mrs. "
Henrietta A. Haynes-Wolfe's 90th birth- -----
day at The Crowne Plaza Jacksonville t'| 5 ,
Airport, 14670 Duval Road in
Jacksonville January 8, 2011.
Henrietta A. Haynes-Wolfe was born
January 9, 1921, in Hazlehurst, Ga. to
Henry and Carrie Magnolia Harris Orlen Wkerson, J
Haynes. .. Chrirtine Dawson, a
She met the love of her life and mar-
ried Irwin L. Wolfe on December 26,
1953 and moved to Havre Del Grace, HenriettaA. Haynes Wolfe 90th Birlthhay
Maryland. They later moved to
Pleasantiville, N.J.
After Her husband's death in 1986,
she returned to Hazlehurst in 1988. She
stayed there until 1998, then moved to .
Jacksonville, Florida.
She attended elementary thru junior
high in the St. Matthews community in
Hazlehurst, Ga. and graduated from Old
Stanton Senior High School in
Jacksonville, Florida in 1945.
She attended Edward Waters
College in Jacksonville, Florida from Arlee Coley, Godfrey Jenkins, Karen Jenkins, Sharron Patterson, Cynthia Baker, Frank
1945 -1947. Transferred to Karen Patterson, Bruce Haynes, Judith Miller, Bobbie Settles Joseph Bruce Upson, T
Morris Brown College in Atlanta, Ga.
and graduated in 1951 with a B.S. degree
in Home Economics.
She took additional classes at Clark
College in Atlanta, Ga. to obtain her
teaching credentials. (SHE WORKED
WHILE GOING TO SCHOOL AND
PAID HER EXPENSES)
Continuing education courses in
Home Economics at Fort Valley State
College in Fort Valley, Ga.
She attended Morgan State College
in Baltimore, Md. where she took cours- Neil Frink, Joyce Frink, Nicole Timley, Jose Robinson, Henrietta
in Baltimore, Md. where she took cours- Wolfe, Roslyn Burroughs, Lynnett Powell
es in Dietary Sciences. Completed a Irwin Overton, Etha
three year dietary internship at Irvingtonin
General Hospital in Irvington, NJ to
qualify for membership in the American .
Dietetic Association.
Her first teaching assignment was in
West Point, Ga, where she taught Home
Economics for three years. Substitute .
teacher in Havre del Grace, Maryland; "
Food Service Supervisor, Veterans
Hospital in Perry Point, Maryland;
Therapeutic and Head Dietitian,
Irvington General Hospital in Irvington,
NJ.; Dietary Consultant, Our Lady's
Residence, Pleasantville, N. J.; taught .. '
Residence, Pleasantville, N. J.; taught Paul Rex Haynes Ann Haynes, Zachary Rose Henrietta Wolfe,
Home Economics at Lower Cape May Stephanie Sellers, Carol James, Henry Sellers, Cynthia Upson,
Regional High School where she taught Sharon Sellers
until her retirement in 1985. She was one Lou
of the only African American teachers at R. I
Lower Cape May. Debi
Professional Membership: American
Dietetic Association; Religious
Affliations: Attended St. Matthews AME
Church, Hazlehurst, Ga.and Salem
United Methodist Church. She was bap-
tisted at Mt. Sinai Missionary Baptist .
Church in the early forties. *


oyce Cox, Alvene Starks, Sylvia Payne,
farian Simpkins, Prudence Williams


M. Powell, III, Joe Upson, Dale Upson,
'ravis Willis Powell, Ann Willis


Overton, Italy Overton, Lynette Wolfe
y, Madison Elise Collins


's P Payne Jr., Janet R. Payne, Barbara
Howard, Steve Haynes, Paul Haynes,
orah Haynes


To the left: Alamarie Miller, Jeffery Miller, Jacquelyn
Miller Jasmine Miller, Joann Buggs, and Atty. Harrel T
Buggs


N- h -- ;OR.

Pastor R.L. Gundy, Walette Gundy, Catherine Wilcox, Leonard Wilcox Mt. Sinai
Missionary Baptist Church


Virginia Washington, Darryl Hicks, Jeanette Dollar, Simon Brookins, Gwen Hagans,
Jesse Hagans, Pauline Williams, Georgianna Kurtz


i










PAGE_ A-6 THE STAR JANUARY 15.2011


CAROLINE SUNSHINE,

FUN TEEN LIVING HER DREAM!
By Rych McCain, feedbackrych@sbcglobal.net & facebook


Caroline Sunshine
Photo courtesy of SBPR


Happy New Year!
Another year has come and
gone. I would personally like to
thank the newspapers and websites
that run my weekly column. Without
you all this would not be possible. I
also thank my readers. We do this
for you! Hit me up via my e-mail
feedbackrych@sbcglobal.net and let
me know who and shat you want me
to feature. Have a safe holiday
weekend and a fruitful new year!
Condolences:
Kevin Ross' Radio Facts
Blog was the very first to break the
news of singer Teena Marie making
her transition on Sunday. According
to Radiofacts.com, Marie suffered
from grand ma seizures. The med-
ication she was taking made her
severely depressed and she stopped
taking it. Our condolences go out to
her family, friends and fans. She will
be truly missed. Perhaps Teena and
the late, super great Rick James can
re-team again in heaven.
Oscar Watch:
For those of you who are
into The Oscars, the ballots for
The 83rd Academy Awards were
mailed out last week and are due by
mail to PricewaterhouseCoopers by
5 P.M. PT on Friday, Jan 14, 2011.
The announcements for the final
nominees will air live on Tuesday,
Jan 25, 2011, at 5:30 AM PT from
the academy's Samuel Goldwyn
Theater. Now it's time for the
Oscar politrickin and promo activ-
ities to start.
Power Party:
Publicist Bernadette Holder,
owner of Quantum Public Relations
in Beverly Hills, threw a fabulous
private bash at her beautiful
Hollywood Hills home last weekend
for The All American Heavyweights
Boxing Team which is owned by
Michael King of World King
Productions who launched Oprah.
Mr. King and many industry power
brokers were on hand to enjoy
scrumptious food and drink after
entering via a press lined red carpet.
Comedy:
Bay area native and funny
lady comic Luenell will return home


Being fifteen can be a handful for the average girl,
especially if the right ingredients are not present in the mix
of her life such guiding supportive parents, good family,
teachers and friends. On the for real side, however nice
those things may be, they still don't guarantee a positive
outcome. But when you add a teen with a dream who has the
work ethic and determination to realistically achieve it, you
definitely have a success story in the making. Caroline
Sunshine is an actress who has discovered at a young age
that a dream is just not something to fantasize about and
when you do make it happen you must continue the hard
work to keep it going. Sunshine became involved with the
arts at age three taking ballet lessons and landing her first
play lead as Goldilocks in Kindergarten. Sunshine was born
in Atlanta, Georgia but reared in Southern California. In
keeping with her training, she danced competitively with
The South Coast Performance Arts Studio in Tustin, CA.
and during her six grade year, she booked her first commer-
cial for "Amazing Allysen, The Talking Doll."
2010 turned out to be a stellar year for Sunshine.
She had her first feature movie released where she plays
Barbara Winslow in last summer's hit "Marmaduke" for
20th Century Fox Pictures, based on the dog in the famous
cartoon strip. She also is a regular cast member of the
Disney TV Channel smash hit show "Shake It Up" where
she plays European exchange student Tinka Hessenheffer
who has a twin brother Gunther played by Kenton Duty.
What is the set like when her and Duty, who also has the
right energy and fire, come together? Sunshine laughs, "It's
amazing! Oh my God! On the projects that I have worked on
before "Shake It Up," they didn't have a lot of kids my own
age so meeting Kenton was really awesome. He plays my
bother on the show but we kind of
have that same like relationship off the
SN OTE S! set. It's really been just a lot of fun.
Cele teThat's how I kind of describe it I
Celeb Intervie s
guess."
When doing a TV show an actor


for a ripped, fuel laughing experi-
ence when she performs a New
Year's Eve show at the historic Bal
Theatre in San Leandro, CA. The
show is presented by Tommy T's
Comedy Steakhouse.
Movies:
I Will Follow. Forward
Moving Films; Starring Salli
Richardson-Whitfield, Blair
Underwood, Omari Hardwick,
Beverly Todd, Tracie Thoms, Dijon
Talton, Michole White and Damone
Roberts. Written, Directed and
Produced by Ava DuVernay. The
idea here is letting go when a close
loved one passes. Salli Richardson-
Whitfield plays a niece who was
closer to her aunt than the aunt's
own daughter. When the aunt made
her transition the two survivors
clashed. The acting was first rate
and the film was thought provoking.
Kaboom. IFC Films, Why
Not U.S. Productions. Starring
Thomas Dekker, Haley Bennett,
Roxane Mesquida, Juno Temple,
Chris Zylka, Andy Fischer-Price,
Nicole LaLiberte, Jason Olive,
James Duval, Brennan Mejia and
Nicole Lynch. Written and Directed
by Gregg Araki. Produced by Gregg
Araki and Andrea Sperling. If you
are into cults, homosexuality, incest,
gay sex with more gay sex and some
straight sex that turns out to be
incest (between a half brother and
sister), his may be your cup of tea. A
cult is planning to destroy the world
and be the only one's left to rule
earth. This flick has a slow start and
is very weird in many places but
almost makes sense by the end. This
is one of those late night can't sleep
specials. Save it for rental or cable.
Hit me up at feedback-
rych@sbcglobal.net.
Study, Observe and Win!
Rych


must always prepare for the unexpected particularly script
lines which change many times during the week before the
final draft is done. Sunshine sighs, "That's one of the chal-
lenges of working on a TV sitcom. The script is always
changing. We're always trying to make it as funny as possi-
ble, put the best script forward. The funny thing is that we
go to a table read in the morning and then we go to rehearse
at two o'clock and the script has already changed. Then we
get home and the script has changed again. So it's a lot of
working on it and working on it, working at it to make it
right. But when you get it right, and you get like oh that's
exactly how I wanted that line to be and that's exactly how
I wanted that scene to go, it feels incredible."
The way Sunshine describes her audition for this
part actually details her work ethic and determination. She
paints the picture, "I always say that auditioning is the work
and then getting the job is kind of like the icing on the cake.
I went to the audition then went to a call back and then a
final call back. On my first audition I was the only one there.
On my final audition there were three other girls in the wait-
ing room. It's always so interesting to be face to face with
your competition. When I read the first sides for Tinka I just
knew that I had to do this part. I wasn't going to have it any
other way. I think of myself as a very determined person and
when I read the sides I just thought this is an extraordinary
character. I just saw so many unique traits and little quarks
and I could picture her in my head. When I read sides for the
first time I visualize the characters in my head and their
mannerisms and how they would look on me and different
things like that. I just felt so in click with the character so I
decided to into the audition and put my best foot forward
and now I get to live my dream of playing Tinka on "Shake
It Up" and it's amazing!"


RYCH MCCAIN'S HOLLYHOOI
By' Rych McCain. feecdbackrych@sbcglobal.net. Facebook


_ _


___j


PAGE A-6


THE STAR


JANUARYIS5 2011








JANUARY 15, 2011 THE STAR PAGE A-7


INVITATION FOR BIDS
Install Water System Improvements
Dames Point Marine Terminal
JAXPORT PROJECT NO.: D2010-02
JAXPORT CONTRACT NO.: C-1332
Sealed bids will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority until 2:00 PM, EST, February
10, 2011, at which time they shall be opened in the Public Meeting Room of the Port Central
Office Building, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida, for Install Water System
Improvements.
All bids must be submitted in accordance with specifications and drawings for Contract No. C-
1332, which may be examined in the Procurement Department of the Jacksonville Port
Authority, located on the second floor of the Port Central Office Building, 2831 Talleyrand
Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206. (Please telephone 904/357-3017 for information.)
A MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE AND SITE VISIT WILL BE HELD ON
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2011, AT 10:00 AM, IN THE PUBLIC MEETING ROOM,
FIRST FLOOR OF THE PORT CENTRAL OFFICE BUILDING LOCATED AT ADDRESS
STATED ABOVE. ATTENDANCE BY A REPRESENTATIVE OF EACH PROSPECTIVE
BIDDER IS REQUIRED. A BID WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED FROM ANY BIDDER WHO IS
NOT REPRESENTED AT SUCH CONFERENCE.
PLEASE VISIT HTTP://WWW.JAXPORT.COM/ABOUT/PROJECTS.CFM TO DOWNLOAD
BIDDING DOCUMENTS OR CALL THE PROCUREMENT DEPARTMENT AT (904) 357-
3017.
Bid and contract bonding are required.
This project will be partially funded by the FDOT State of Florida grant program.







The Federal Transit Administration and the

Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA)

announce a public hearing to review the Environmental Assessment (EA), an environmental document
for the BRT North Corridor project.The"BRT North Corridor project"is located north of downtown
Jacksonville, Florida, and extends 9.28 miles north of downtown Jacksonville to 1-295.

Tuesday, February 15, 2011
Open House: 4:30 p.m.- 7 p.m.
Formal Presentation: 6 p.m.
Gateway Mall (near bus transfer site)
5258 Norwood Ave.
Jacksonville, FL 32208

Purpose
The purpose of the public hearing is to share project information and seek comments in a formal
setting (public hearing) for the proposed Environmental Assessment for the Bust Rapid Transit (BRT)
North Corridor project. All interested persons will have the opportunity to express their views
concerning the location, conceptual design and social, economic and environmental effects of the
proposed improvements.


Proposed Improvements Involve
a 9,28-mile alignment on existing surface streets and predominantly within existing right of way. The
proposed alignment extends north from Broad Street and State Street in downtown Jacksonville
along Boulevard Street to Golfair Boulevard, then extends west along Golfair Boulevard and north
along Brentwood and Norwood Avenues to Lem Turner Road, ending approximately at Armsdale Road
(south of 1-295), These improvements will allow JTA to provide improved service, minimize costs and
improve transit operations.


Environmental Assessessment (EA) Drafts
and supporting documentation will be available for review January 14,2011 through February
25,2011. All comments received at the hearing and until the close of the comment period will
be included in the final EA document. Copies of the EA can be reviewed on the JTA website,
www.jtafla.com, and at the locations below starting January 14, 2011.


JTA Offices
Administration Building
100 North Myrtle Avenue
Jacksonville, FL 32204


Tax Collector's Office
Gateway Shopping Center
910 W. 44th Street
Jacksonville, FL 32208


Northwest Library
1755 Edgewood Ave. W
Jacksonville, FL 32208


Accessibility
Anyone requiring special accommodations should contact Winova Hart-Mayer at
(904) 630-3185 or email whart@jtafla.com no later than seven days prior to the meeting.
Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin,
disability, or familial status.














4e h Jacksonville Transportation Authority

U- Regional Transportation Solutions

100 North Myrtle Avenue, Jacksonville Florida 32204
Tel (904) 630-3185 www.jtafla.com
Tel (904) 630-3185 www.jtafla.com


NOTICE TO PUBLIC
January 16, 2011
NOTICE OF AMENDMENT TO CONSOLIDATED PLAN-ACTION PLAN
24 CFR Part 91.505 requires an amendment be made to the Consolidated Plan-Action Plan when changes
occur in the way the jurisdiction carries out its activities. These changes must be made available for public
comment. In compliance with this regulation, the City of Jacksonville's Community Development Division of the
Housing and Neighborhoods Department announces the following revisions to the plan that may include the use
of unexpended balances remaining from completed or cancelled projects approved in previous years.
Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing (HPRP) funds will be used for the following activities to continue to
provide assistance in homeless prevention financial assistance, homeless prevention relocation and
stabilization, rapid re-housing, financial assistance and rapid re-housing relocation and stabilization.
The following agencies will receive reprogrammed funds to continue to reach the goals of the HPRP Program:
Clara White Mission $50,000 HUD Activity #4155 HPRP funds will be used to provide additional funds
for homeless prevention financial assistance.
Community Rehabilitation Center $50.000 HUD Activity #4158 HPRP funds will be used to provide
additional funds for homeless prevention financial assistance.
Catholic Charities Bureau $50,000 HUD Activity #4149 HPRP funds will be used to provide additional
funds for homeless prevention financial assistance.
Jacksonville Area Legal Aid -$50,000 HUD Activity #4175 HPRP funds will be used to provide legal
services for relocation and stabilization services.
Northeast Florida Community Action Agency $50,000 HUD Activity #4162 HPRP funds will be used to
provide additional funds for homeless prevention financial assistance.
Gateway Community Services $20,000 HUD Activity #4157 HPRP funds will be used to provide
homeless prevention, relocation and stabilization services.
Community Connections $50,000 HUD Activity #4151 HPRP funds will be used to provide additional
funds for homeless prevention financial assistance.
Comments from affected citizens regarding the revisions are welcome and should be submitted in writing to
Wight Greger, Director, Housing and Neighborhoods Department at the address of 214 N. Hogan St, 8th floor,
Jacksonville, FL 32202 no later than February 14, 2011. Once the 30-day comment period has passed, this
activity will be amended into the document.


Wight Greger, Director
Housing & Neighborhoods Department


UI


Down to Business


JOHN PEYTON
MAYOR


Andy Johnson
\ J


donate 10% of my paid Subscription to the non-profit organization listed













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JANUARY 15, 2011


THE STAR


PAGE A-7


~lfi





PAGE A-8 THE STAR JANUARY 15, 2011


HERE'S TO A MAN WHOSE

CONTRIBUTIONS
ARE STILL

IMMEASURABLE.
Happy Birthday to a great man who poured his life into improving
the lives of others.


Publix Celebrates Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 2011


Publixo


JANUARY 15, 2011


PAGE A-8


THE STAR





B1 M K


JANUARY15. 2011


THE STAR


ty viarsna uean rnelts
When I awoke on Christmas morning I was over
4,000 miles from my home on American Beach. A few
days earlier my niece, Ivory Jo Rosier and I had made
our first pilgrimage to the land of our ancestors on the
west coast of Africa. Departing from Dulles Airport in
freezing temperatures, we were eager to be leaving
behind snow and ice covered grounds. We had board-
ed South African Airways led with a crew of three
African pilots and eight attendants for a seven-hour
nonstop flight to the other side of the Atlantic. The 777
wide body jet landed moments before daybreak with
the moon shinning brightly on the lovely seaport town
of Dakar, the capitol of Senegal. Our coats, wool
scarves and gloves were quickly shed as we rushed to
bask in the 86 degree temperatures and warm sea
waters on the western shores of the Atlantic Ocean.
The city of Dakar is similar in many ways to the
Florida First Coast. Our million mark populations are
comparable, Dakar is a port city; the people were as
warm and friendly as the people of Femandina
Beach/Amelia Island. The variety of couscous, rice,
vegetable, chicken, lamb, fish, seafood, desserts, bev-
erages and other dishes were most delicious and thus I
felt quite at home.
The invitation to attend a three week long 3rd
World Festival of Black Arts and Cultures initiated
from a tour and talk on American Beach that I had
recently given to a 14 member delegation of politicians
and journalists from West and Central Africa. As
guests of Monsieur Moussa SY, Mayor of Parcelles
Assainies, a Ville in Dakar and President du Groupe
Liberal, we were thrilled to participate in the 2nd
Edition Festival of Arts. The city of Parcelles Assainies
showcased the talents of over 125 residents in the
municipal stadium at the site of the Mayor's office.
The ribbon cutting ceremony with Mayor SY, and
Madame Ndeye Khady Diop, Ministre d' Etat Ministre
de le famille, launched the opening of the cultural fes-
tival and art market place where local artists sold their
wares were among many highlights for local residents.
We enjoyed several evenings of historical and cultural
arts performances.
My niece and I also were Mayor SY's VIP guests
at the nation's 3rd World Festival of Black Arts and
Cultures. During the festivals we met quite a number
of the 2,000 top cultural artists from more than 60
countries worldwide. International renowned perform-
ing artists included architects, actors and actresses,
dancers, film makers, musicians, photographers,
painters, scholars, writers and various other art disci-
plinarians. We were privileged to attend a Round
Table Forum held in our hotel where the Honorable
Abdoulaye Wade, President of the Republic of Senegal
presided. Activities were held in several of the nine-
teen villes of Dakar including, Saint-Louis Island and
Goree Island. Accessible only by boat, and once there
the only means of getting around is pedestrian trans-
portation, the 45-acre Gorre Island is most noted as the
Holocaust from 1544-1848 where Africans were sold
in the Atlantic slave trade.
One glorious day after another we experienced
amazing adventures, joys, marvels and wonders.
Scheduled activities began at 9:00 a.m. with the last
venue concerts or theatre ending long after midnight.
Senegal's 3rd Word Festival of Black Arts served as a
gathering for thousands of African Diaspora attending
from America, Belgium, Brazil, Bermuda, Canada, the
Caribbean, Cuba, France, Germany, Haiti, the
Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, the United
Kingdom, Venezuela, the Virgin Islands and other
nations who made the Journey Home to talk and heal
with our African kinsmen. These words of Nelson
Mandella to Randall Robinson seemed the universal
threads that have held the Diaspora together after cen-
turies in exile and over countless miles. "The blood
that unites us is thicker than the water that divides us."
In Senegal we walked on the "Red Carpet," the
Pageant "Runway" and experienced a "Magic Carpet
Ride" of our lifetime. To Mother Africa, 'we shall
return,'ASAP.


Bilhat a. 1lhaite. lvorio RovihOier llar%\l Lh Dom Phieh widl
illaivor.IJII%%gl SY iviil, tue, o//iti( a1/, tromIaAar.


Moustapha Diop Director of the Festival Parcelles Arts, Ndeye Khady
Diop Ministre d' Etat Ministre de le 20famille, the man with the uni-
form is Alhousseynou, and the man in the black suit is the body guard
of Nddye Khady, to the far right is Mayor Moussa Sy.


Ia. .0 *


Above pic: Marsha Dean Phelts with Miss Senegal -. Mbaye Garmi and Ndm j
and Miss Parcelles Assainies ofDakar Thiam they are griots present
To the right: Paul Dakobejournalistfrom Germany ingtheartistsonstage.
with Dr. Chrisine Glover-Walton from the Virgin
Islands and Cameroon designer, Ngoua Jean
Marcel at artist Village in Dakar.


The world's tallest statute
Monument of the African
Renaissance. Unveiled April 3,
2010.


ivew York artist, actor, Key-
board musician Nick Rolfe
with singer Maria de Barros of
Senegal who now lives in Los
Angeles.


Bebe Manga a Cameroonian
makossa singer voted one of the
best African artists of all time
whose recording of "Amio" is
an international hit.


ocwttViYpK


Wovvxv%'4 vtow

February 4-6
Savannah International Trade & Convention Center


Food F

Health


I Celebrity Guests

I Lifestyle


ISOIHERi %g-


SOUTHERN
WOMEN'SI

1 Facebook




Mie morn ia

.-CLF ARCUI-INNE.L
DiscoutTces vial a rce


S 0*0
D_ -


- a,


LOCAL


SECTION B


I FLORI A


I


I








PAGE B 2 THE




By: Lucius Gantt

Its 2011, a new year and politically speak-
ing, America's Black citizens are looking for new polit-
ical answers.
If you take a rudimentary glance at the governmen-
tal workings of any ethnic group compared to Blacks
and you will see obvious differences in what is desired
and what is accomplished by ethnic representatives.
Jews in Congress, state legislatures and in local
government commissions or councils demand that
interest groups hire Jewish lobbyists, they demand
government contracts for Jewish businesses, they rise, stand up and speak
out about any issues that would reflect negatively on Jewish culture and his-
torical events like the Holocaust.
Cubans have the same demands for Cubans. Even Haitian elected offi-
cials do as much as they can for America's Haitian residents and communi-
ties.
Every racial group in office today other than our representatives realizes
that elected officials main tasks are to divide up the money! Nothing is
required of elected officials except they must pass appropriation bills that
will allocate money to schools, law enforcement, environmental protection,
health care and so forth.
OK, while other ethnic groups can point to jobs, contracts, museums, sta-
diums, highways and things like that, what are our claims to governmental
fame?
Black elected officials love to campaign on symbolism!
Don't get me wrong, there are a handful of health centers and other gov-
ernment entities that were created and funded by government but most
office holders are proudest of basically nothing.
Can I prove it? Yes!
You tell me if you've heard something like the following, "Vote for me. I
voted for a Black holiday. Vote for me, I passed a "Pants on the Ground" bill
to arrest Black youth with saggy pants. Vote for me. I passed a bill that will
place pictures of Black people acceptable to whites in a corner of the
Capitol or in City Hall."
And, the biggest claim to fame of all is, "Vote for me. I got the name of a
street changed".
Well, it's no secret, I do have brain damage, but it seems to me. Our com-
munity needs services, we need jobs and we need money!
No matter what government calls our neighborhoods we make up our
own names anyway. Anybody that has lived in Atlanta more than 40 years
knows where Buttermilk Bottom is, or was. Miami natives know where
Overtown is. LA residents can tell you where South Central is. We named
Auburn Avenue "Sweet Auburn". We named Tobacco Road.
When Jesus was in the wilderness, Satan offered Jesus the Kingdoms
of the world. Jesus didn't need Kingdoms from Satan. The Kingdoms
already belonged to the Father of Jesus! We don't need modern day devils
to do something for us that we can do for ourselves.
We don't need government to hand pick our community heroes so gov-
ernment can make sure no Muslims, Yorubas, Black Nationalists, freedom
fighters or revolutionaries are recognized.
We need the same things from government that other racial and ethnic
groups get. We need some of the tax dollars that we pay to government to
come back to Black communities in the form of jobs, contracts, better
schools, accessible health care programs and the like.
We will trade government symbolism for government money any day of
the week.
Instead of fighting for holidays, maybe one day our elected officials will
fight for reparations so Black people can get paid for the way we've been
treated for more than 400 years! (This Black History Month get a copy of
Gantt's book "Beast Too: Dead Man Writing". Contact Lucius at
www.allworldconsultants.net)







By: Andi K

Happy New Year! I want you to take a moment and ask
yourself, "What are My intentions for 2011?" Before you
answer that, I want you to keep in mind that intention is
the difference between thought and action, planning and
accomplishing, and failure versus success.

As such, it is essential that You maintain a firm aware-
ness of what your intentions are at all times.
My personal theme for 2011 is "Elevation"; I plan to ele-
vate each and every aspect of my life in an effort to live
to my fullest potential.

As your life coach, this means that I am committed to working with you to help
you to achieve your personal goals this year. Let's begin! If you have not done
so, take a moment to visit www.andikconsulting.com to see what's new, and if you
are interested in learning more download and complete the intake forms. I look
forward to our first session!


Always Impeccable,

Andrea K. Ortiz, MA
CEO & Social Entreprenuer
Andi K. Consulting, Inc.
972.591.3883 (Phone)
http://www.andikconsulting.com


JA A RVYIS -f271


DEFINITION: "A corn i, a thickening I( ump 1 olf ihe outer
skill In ver. titiau all\ o\ r c hion area, ,ich a. toc joinlt.s.
"A callusI a painless thickening of ,kin caused I repealed pressure or
irTitation.
BODY PARTS INVOLVED:
Corn: toe joint, and skin hbetl\cn tocs.
'Callus: any palrt of the hod\. e ,pecially hands. feet or knees, that
elnduires repeated presIii. e or irritation.
SEX OR AGE MOST AFFECTED: All ayge exceptl infant,.
SIGNS & SYMPPTOMS:
'C'orn: A ,mall. lender and painful. raised bunmp on the side or o\r tilhe
joint of a toe. Corns are uia ial' 3mm lto 10mm in diameter and ha\e a
hard center.
'Callus: .A rough. thickened area of skin that appear, alter repeated
pressure or irritation.
CAULSES: Corn, and calluses form to protect a skin area from injury caused hI
repeated irritation (rubbing or squeezing. Presutre cases cells in ihe irritated area
to gro a al a faster rate. leading lo o\ ergro th.
RISK INCREASES \WITH:
'Shoes that fit poorl-.
"Those \\ ith occupations that in\ol\c pressure on the hands or knees.
such as carpenterI. w\\riters. uitar plaCers or tile la cr.
HOW TO PREVENT:
'Dont \\ ar shoes that fit poorl..
"A\ oid acti\ itie- that create constant pressure on specific skin areas.
"\'hen possible. \\ear protecti\e Cgear. such as glo\ces or knee pads.
WHAT TO EXPECT
APPROPRIATE HEALTH CARE:
*Self-care.
:'Docltor's treatments.
DIAGNOSTIC MEASURES:
'"YouL o\\ n obsei\ action of s.\ mp1oms.
'Mlcdical history and phl ,ical exam b\ a doctor of medicine or podia
trist.
PROBABLE OLITCONIE: Liuially curalle if tihe undcrl ing cause can ec
removed. Allow\ 3 weeks s for reco\eri. Recurring is likel-e\en \\ith trealmenl-
if' the cauc is not remo\ ed.
HOW TO TREAT
GENERAL MEASURES:
'li \ou ha\ e diahietes or poor circulation, consider con ulting a podiatriti
for treatment.
Remo\ e the ouirce oif pressure. il poib'le. Dicard ill fitting shoes.
"LlIe corn and callusi pads to reduce pressure on irritated areas.
Peel or rub the thickened area w\ ith a pumice tlone to remote\ it. Don't
cuti it \\ith a razor. Soak the area in a\\rm wl water to soften it before
peeling.
"Ask tihe hoe repairman to ,e\\ a metatarsal har onto your lhoce to use
whilee a corn i, healing.
A\ oid surge. It doe nol rcmoI\ the cauec. Post-surgical scarring is
painful and ma\ complicate healing.
MEDICATION:
AIlter peeling he upper laers of the corn once or t\\ ice a da\. app-l
oinlment. Use a non-precription 5". or i".. (, lilicic ointment. Co\ er
\ ith adhei\ ce tape.
"Your doctor rma\ inijct a corn or callus \\ith cortisone medicine to
suppreIs inflammation or pain.
ACTIVI TY: Reume \ our normal acti\itiec as soon a symptoms impro e.
DIEt: No lpcciil dict.
CA.\LL iOURi DOCTOR IF:
':YoI h 11 C Olll.s 0 c lllu.s.0s thltI perCI ,t. ,ICpcs[tc .C lft-tIcItI1ncnt.
:'A-l\ ofn f CinIteLtIIn. Cll h ,,- CLIilc ,,M., s, ellif l, [ Ipn. he, .t ,'r
tcndelc .,'.,, d v\ 0elop IlO .lllu d dI c 0lll or 1 c1Illui,.







Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.

MATTHEW W. GILBERT JR./SR. HIGH SCHOOL ALUMNI COMMIT-
TEE is proud to announce its 13th annual students/teachers grand reunion cele-
bration on January 28 & 29, 2011. two exciting events will be held at the hyatt
riverwalk hotel. tickets are sale now, no tickets sold at the door. for more infor-
mation please contact class leaders or lydia jackson-bell at (904) 713-0973.
The Jacksonville Children's Chorus presents the Second Annual Martin
LutherKing, Jr. Day "Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing" Concert, which will be held
on Monday, January 17, 2010 at 6:30 p.m. in the Times-Union Center for the
Performing Arts, Jacksonville
The Boylan-Haven Alumnae Association will hosts their 25th Annual
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Observation at the St. Gabriel's Episcopal
Church located at 5235 Moncreief Road W. The celebration program will be
begin at 11:00 A. M. on Monday, January 17, 2011 and is free and open to the
public.
Come Together Day Celebrationat The Greater El Beth-el Divine Holiness
Church on January 23rd at 3:00 P.M. Dinner will be serving after service.
If you have any questions please contact pastor Bishop Dr. Lorenzo Hall Sr. at
904-710-1586 or the office manager Miguel Zapata at 904-374-3940.
Free Cholesterol & Diabetes Screening 12:00 pm 5:00 pm, on January 21
Phone: 800-713-3301 .Location:Winn-Dixie Pharmacy 8775 Old Kings Road
South, Jacksonville, FL














S COMMUNITY O


Teaching Tolerance in Our Schools

By: Maureen Costello

Sometimes the most important lessons learned at school don't come from a class-
room. They come from how a school reacts to ugly incidents of bias and prejudice. When
a principal learns that nasty slurs are being used in the school or that students are being
bullied because of their race or ethnicity, it can be tempting to deny it.
It can be tempting to resort to the old refrain, "That doesn't happen at our
school." But it does. And when it happens, it must be addressed.
Recently, a principal in the metro Atlanta area had to address bias on campus.
Where other school leaders might have denied or minimized the incidents, this one set a
positive example by confronting the situation head-on. And it wasn't a pretty situation:
A teacher was accused of referring to Latino students as "beaners." At the same school,
which will not be named here due to the nature of these allegations, a student was being
bullied because she is Latina.
It's enough to upset any parent. Not surprisingly, a parent met with the principal
about it. She was accompanied by Jerry Gonzalez, executive director of the Georgia
Association of Latino Elected Officials.
The principal and teacher profusely apologized. The teacher said she didn't real-
ize the term she used was derogatory, noting that she picked it up from the students. It
was a remarkable example of how an intolerant atmosphere can grow within a school,
even among adults when they don't recognize a term as hurtful and offensive.
The teacher pledged to stop using the term and the principal agreed to add it to
the list of curse words students can't use at the school. These actions send a clear mes-
sage to students that such language is not acceptable. The principal also pledged to inves-
tigate the behavior of some students to get to the bottom of the bullying issue.
He even indicated that he's willing to taking additional steps to curb future inci-
dents. The Southern Poverty Law Center's Teaching Tolerance program has offered free
diversity training to the staff as a result.
The school's quick, no-nonsense response is commendable. The principal recog-
nized a key responsibility for educators -- ensuring all students feel safe and welcome at
school.
This includes recognizing hurtful language that singles out students because of
their race, ethnicity, religion or sexual orientation. If adults don't stop intolerant behav-
ior, students will assume it's acceptable and engage in it. All too often, bullying begins
with name-calling and the casual use of slurs.
That's not to say addressing this issue isn't difficult. Race and ethnicity are sen-
sitive subjects for people. No one wants to bring negative attention to their school. But
children learn -- and learn to use wisely -- vocabulary through instruction. Without direc-
tion, these incidents can occur in any school. That's why it is so important for educators
to be prepared to address them.
The greater offense is for a school to deny that there's a problem and allow an
atmosphere of intolerance to take root. That's something that shouldn't happen in any
school.
GEORGIA FORUM


Models on the Move






















I
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I | I Fashions Provided by


Models and Fashions Directed by
Karen Washington & Company


I, SOU^NidSouthern Women's Shows
Saturday, February 5; Sunday, February 6 at
1:00 p.m.


THE GE IA STAR
Cr~ ~ `r


Ministers for Excellent
Communities/Government and
Excellent Schools Sponsored the
2011 Emancipation Proclamation
Observance Day which was held
at noon, Saturday, January 1 at
Johnson Temple First Born
Church in Brunswick, Georgia-
Elder Malissia Johnson, Pastor.
Saturday's presentation marked
the 149th anniversary of the
Emancipation Proclamation.
Sis. Bridgett Wiliams, Bishop Williams, Elder On September 22, 1862,
Malissia Johnson, Bishop WL. Johnson, Rev.President Lincoln announced
Todd Rhodes, Sr. that he would issue a formal
emancipation of all slaves in any
state of the Confederate States
of America that did not return to
Union control by January 1,
1863. The actual order was
signed and issued
Jan. 1, 1863. Abolitionists
and slaves reportedly gathered
together on what was called
"Freedom's Eve" to await and
watch what the new year would
Front: Minister Juanita Campbell, Elder Malissia bring. This act would eventually
Johnson, Rev. Leonard Jackson, Rev. James become known as Watch Night.
Brooks- City Commissioner, Back: Rev. Craig
Campbell, Rev. Michael Alston, Rev. Kenneth Many black churches continue
Adkins, Rev. Todd Rhodes, Bishop Vincentthe tradition of reading the
Williams Emancipation Proclamation dur-
ing this church service and then
gather on New Year's Day for the
Emancipation Proclamation
S" Observance.
Joining in support of the
goal of improving reading skills,
as part of some broader efforts
by the Ministers for Excellent
Communities/Government and
Excellent Schools the coalition is
throwing its support to highlight
this year's effort to award college
Kathie Perkins- Red Cross, Venus Holmes
scholarships to African American
Students in Glynn County.
Bishop Vincent Williams,
Pastor of Word of Faith Church,
Brunswick, delivered the
Sermon and Ms. Venus Holmes
presented the Emancipation
Proclamation Speech. The con-
gregation gave way to the spirit
as they worshiped to soul-stir-
ring selections by The Golden
Isles Elite Singers and The
Bethel Evangel Choir,
Ms. Venus E. Holmes, Bishop Vincent Williams, Brunswick, Rev. Paul McKenzie,
Elder Malissia Johnson
Pastor ministered to the hearts
and soul and has established
themselves as one of Southeast
Georgia's premier choir.
In addition to great
singing, and the inspiring mes-
sage, The Battle of the Gospel
Groups was held at 6:00PM at
Shiloh Baptist Church-
Brunswick, Rev. Tod Rhodes,
Pastor. This Service showcased
1st Place Winner of Battle of the Gospel Groups-
Buddy Wiliams and the Sons of the Temple rousing performances by the 1st
Place Winner -The Sons of The
Temple, of Holy Band of
Inspiration Church, Brunswick
and 2nd Place Winners The
"Heirs," an Acapella Gospel
Singing Group, of Camden
County. The Judges were Mr.
Danny Clay and Deacon Dennis
Wiley.
23 African American
Dennis Wiley(Judge), Starlette Reeder, Fredrick Churches in Glynn County
Myers, Jackie Wade, Danny Clay(Judge) Contributed A Cash Donation to
z 4 the American Red Cross which
was presented to Kathie Perkins
by Venus Holmes, founder of
the Ministers for Excellent
Communities and Excellent
School. Ms. Holmes may be
contacted at e-mail address,
Pastor Paul S. McKenzie, Sr., and The Bethel venus.holmes321 @comcast.net
Evangel Christian Church Choir


Ministers for Excellent Communities/Government
and Excellent Schools Observe 149th
Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation


S.. Booth 246 Across from Stage
i Uwww.VTh, GeorgiaS tiar.con,
The Florida Star-The Georgia Star and Impact Radio Show-WJSJ-FM 105.3
and WCGL-AM 1360, "Striring to Make A Difference."


THE STAR


PAGE B-3


JANUAIARY 15,2011


;
i






PAGEB4 CMYK


THE STAR


JANUARY15. 2011


NBA'S MAGIC MAKE THEIR MARK

Internal Autograph Session Raises Thousands for Organizations

On Tuesday, Jan, 4, at the Amway Center, Orlando Magic players
and coaches participated in an internal autograph session for items to
be distributed to non-profit organizations, schools and charity events
throughout Central Florida. Each year the autographed items impact
more than 1,000 local organizations and raises an estimated $100,000
for area charitable activities.
Orlando's NBA franchise since 1989, the Magic's mission is to be
world champions on and off the court, delivering legendary moments
every step of the way. On the court, Orlando has won five division
championships (1995, 1996, 2008, 2009, 2010), had six 50-plus win
seasons, and won the Eastern Conference title in 1995 and 2009. Off
the court, on an annual basis, the Orlando Magic gives more than $2
million to the local community by way of sponsorships of events,
donated tickets, autographed merchandise, scholarships and grants.
Orlando Magic community relations programs impact an estimated
75,000 kids each year, while a Magic staff-wide initiative provides
more than 6,000 volunteer hours annually. In addition, over the last
21 years nearly $16 million has been distributed to local non-profit
community organizations via the Orlando Magic Youth Fund
'.i (OMYF-MFF), a McCormick Foundation Fund since 1994, which
serves at-risk youth. Ticket highlights in the new Amway Center
include: 2,500 seats priced $15 or less, 7,000 seats priced $25 or less,
and for the first time ever a $5 per game ticket while supplies last. For
ticket information log on to www.orlandomagic.com or call 407-89-
MAGIC.
Through the National Basketball Association's NBA Cares pro-
gram, the league, players and teams have donated more than $145
million to charity, provided more than 1.4 million hours of hands-on
service to communities around the world, and created more than 525
places where kids and families can live, learn, or play. The NBA is
broadcast in 215 countries and territories in 41 languages.




Williams YMCA receives USTA Florida Grant to expand 10-under tennis

By MIKE BONTS
Sports Editor

Jacksonville's Williams Family YMCA has received a $1,000 grant for 10-and-Under Tennis equipment from the United States Tennis Association-Florida's (USTA Florida)
"Share the Love" grant initiative to grow the game with beginning children.
"In the past there has been a high demand for our beginner junior tennis programs," said Tennis Director John Dister. "We want to meet the needs of the community by offer-
ing programs that incorporate the 10-and-Under Tennis format. Once small children start lessons they can quickly lose interest in tennis. This is often because younger chil-
dren are unable to learn and enjoy tennis from the beginning when standard-sized equipment and courts are being used."
The 10-and-under Tennis play format is designed for children featuring smaller court sizes, racquet sizes, foam and decompressed balls, a simple scoring system, and net
heights adjusted to ease kids into the sport. Similar mini-tennis formats have long been popular in Europe, where current stars such as Roger Federer, Justine Henin and Kim
Clijsters first learned the game with age-adjusted racquets, balls and court sizes. To see a video of the 10-and-under Tennis play format in action go to: http://10andunderten-
nis.usta.com.
"The 10-and-Under Tennis program will allow the YMCA to scale the game down to the children's sizes," Dister said. "Also, the program will allow young children to enjoy
and be successful in tennis from the beginning."
USTA Florida annually directs 90% of member dollars back into the community to support tennis programs and projects throughout Florida. USTA Florida's Share the Love
grant program helps fund tennis programs and projects throughout Florida communities during challenging economic times. Funding priorities include 10-and-under Tennis
and Jr. Team Tennis (coordinator training, start-up, etc.), public facility funding (schools, parks, conversion to permanent 10-and-under play format courts, etc.), communi-
ty tennis awareness (innovative pro-active start-ups, program expansion), school programs and senior tennis programs/projects.
"We look forward to hearing of the further success of this program," said USTA Florida Director of Community Tennis Linda Curtis. "It is with USTA membership dollars
that we are able to offer program grants to communities like these."



Jacksonville has the Giants


OPPONENT
San Francisco Rumble
Haiti Relief Tea m
Savannah Storm
Fayetteville Flight
Savannah Storm
Heartland Prowl
Georgia Gwizzlies
@ Florida Makes
Florida Thundercats
Orlando Kings
Florida Makos
Orlando Kings
@ Savannah Storm
@ Heartand Prowl
Heartland Prowl
@ Orlando Kings
Seven Cities
@ Florida Makes
@ Savannah Storm
@ Fayetteville Flight
Orlando Kings
@ San Francisco Rumble
@ California Sea Kings
@ Sacramento Heatwave
Mobile Hurricanes
@ Seven Cities
@ Florida Makes
@ Mobile Hurricanes
@ TBA


TIP OFF
8:00pm
5:00pm
7:00pm
5:00pm
7:00pm
7:30pm
5:00pm
7:30pm
7:30pm
5:00pm
7:30pm
5:00pm
TBA
4:00pmr
5:00pm
TBA
1:00pm
6:00pm
TBA
TBA
7:00pm
TBA
TBA
TBA
5;00pm
TBA
TBA
TBA


SCORE
182- 124
168 84
151- 90
151 94
133- 108
116 84
206- 102
187 123
160 85
174- 117


WIN/LOSS
1-0
2-0
3-0
4-0
5-0
6-0
7-0
8-0
9-0
10- 0


laats X ifmfes ublecl Ic tanae
JaceksAoD'Ullel iants.cvm 1 .3C .&3 1


Jacksonville may be a
little disappointed
because the Jaguars did
not make the playoff, but
the city still has other rea-
sons to feel proud in the
area of sports. Of course,
we still love the Jags.
The Jacksonville Suns is
getting a new coach and
now the city has acquired
an ABA team. It is not the
NBA but with the way the
team is playing, maybe
even it can become a
NBA team.
The Jacksonville Giants
played their first game on
December 1 and will be
playing their eleventh
game at home on January
15 and another on January
16. If they can keep the
same momentum of hav-
ing not lost a game yet,
we are on our way.
The Giants are (10-0)
and are number two in the
American Basketball
Association. The fan base
is growing. All home
games will be at Veterans
Memorial Arena here in
Jacksonville. Go Giants!


PAGE B-4


U_ H


SPORTS


jAIP dk 2010 2011 Schedule
GIANTS,24-mJclksou"V11140 Cloats


DATE
Saturday, Dec. 4, 2010
Sunday, Dec. 5, 2010
Sunday, Dec. 12, 2010
Sunday, Dec. 19, 2010
Sunday, Dec. 26, 2010
Saturday, Jan. 1, 2011
Sunday, Jan. 2, 2011
Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011
Saturday, Jan. 8, 2011
Sunday, Jan. 9, 2011
Saturday, Jan. 15, 2011
Sunday. Jan. 16, 2011
Friday, Jan. 21, 2011
Sunday, Jan. 23, 2011
Sunday, Jan. 30, 2011
Friday, Feb. 4, 2011
Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011
Saturday, Feb. 12, 2011
Sunday, Feb. 13, 2011
Friday, Feb. 18, 2011
Saturday, Feb. 19, 2011
Monday, Feb. 21, 2011
Tuesday Feb. 22, 2011
Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2011
Sunday, Feb,27, 2011
Wednesday, Mar. 2, 2011
Friday, Mar. 4, 2011
Saturday, Mar. 5, 2011
Sunday, Mar. 6, 2011














* PREP RAP


DRUMLine Live Brings
Marching Band Tradition to
Moran Theater Stage

Marching band theatrical parades in to
Jacksonville on January 22


DRUMLine Live, the show-stop-
ping attraction created by the music
team behind 20th Century Fox's hit
movie Drumline, will parade on to the
Times-Union Center Moran Theater
stage on January 22 at 8 p.m.
Complete with dazzling choreog-
raphy and explosive percussion,
DRUMLine Live is a thrilling spectacle
that pays homage to the show-style
marching popularized at historically
black colleges and universities
(HBCUs). With riveting rhythms, bold
beats and ear-grabbing energy, the
staged show is a synchronized musical
showcase of the HBCU experience.
"We've taken the excitement of
an HBCU football game halftime show,
increased the intensity by a thousand
watts, and created a musical journey that
will touch every emotion," says Don P.


Roberts, DRUMLine Live's creator and
director. "DRUMLine Live is a high-
octane musical roller coaster ride that
will keep the entire family cheering for
more."
The legendary HBCU band
experience comes alive with
DRUMLine Live's world-class cast of
percussionists, musicians and dancers.
The 39-member cast of performers
honed its unrivaled talent with years of
training in marching band programs
across the United States such as Florida
A&M, Tennessee State, and Clark
Atlanta University, just to name a few.
Incorporating original composi-
tions and soul-infused interpretations of
top 40 hits, DRUMLine's musical jour-
ney infuses colorful, choreographed rou-
tines with vibrant costumes and heavy
doses of drum riffs and cadences.
Audiences across the globe have been
brought to their feet by the stirring sound
of trumpets and incredible feats of ath-
leticism; and have been astonished by
the precision, creativity, and pulsing
force in the climatic
percussion battle.
With musical high-
lights from hip-hop,
American soul,
gospel, jazz and
other music genres,
DRUMLine Live
brings a unique
style of drumming,
mesmerizing musi-
cianship, and lively
choreography never
seen on stage
before.
Roberts was
inspired to create
DRUMLine Live
after serving as
executive band con-
sultant for the 2002
movie Drumline
starring Nick
Cannon. Drumline
was one of the first
major motion pic-
tures to capture the
electricity of the
black college
marching band
experience. DRUMLine Live had a suc-
cessful 70-performance international
tour in 2008-2009 with sold-out shows
throughout Asia.
For those who attended HBCUs,
and for those who have never had a
chance to catch black college football
games, the energy and the talent in
DRUMLine Live are simply going to
blow you away."
DRUMLine Live is co-produced
by Halftime Live, LLC, and Columbia
Artists Management, Inc (CAMI).
CAMI is an internationally producer of
live entertainment including many
award winning Broadway and Off-
Broadway productions such as FELA,
Chicago and Blue Man Group.
Tickets for DRUMLine Live at
the Times-Union Center Moran Theater
are on sale now and can be purchased
online at www.artistseriesjax.org or
www.ticketmaster. com.


Featuring the Voices of:
The Jacksonville Children's Chons, Dougl Andersn Chore
FS Coa O Hi School M en Chars. Edwa d aBr Concert Choir
Ritz Chamber Playe. Perfect Sths, Besk Baptit Instltutlnal Church Choir
ad Shiloh Mebplitan Baptist Church Minstry of Music and Wrship Arts.


SPONSORED BY: &brnm -Iun
-urrikum


JACKSONVILLE
lLPft ORoVM


FOURTH GRADE STUDENTS PARTICIPATE
IN WRITING WORKSHOP


What: The fourth-grade students at Louis Sheffield Elementary
will participate in a writing workshop with local author Jane Wood as part
of the school's Author Writing program. Ms. Wood will discuss the
process of publishing a book and will work with the students in compos-
ing their own class book.

When: Tuesday, January 18, 2011, from 9 a.m. to 2:15 p.m.

Wednesday, January 19, 2011, from 9 to 11 a.m.

Where: Louis Sheffield Elementary, 13333 Lanier Rd.,
Jacksonville, FL 32226


THE STAR


PAGE B-5


JANUARYIS5 2011







PAGE B-6 THE STAR JANUARY 15. 2011_
II El


PREP RAF


We'restudying lands of cold and snow... and the animals that live there.

ers r m.vo

www.readingclubfun.com Annimills LLC 2011 V8-N3


SmooseI n Landsor
Seals, hares,30. 0
oxen, foxes and 3
squirrels are some polar bear d and
animals that can
live in cold, snowy 5
climates. Do you I
know other animals \ j -no
that live in lands of snowy owl walrus
ice and snow? Many cP


1. This bird cannot fly. He uses his "wings" to swim and dive. 4
2. This bird with snow-white feathers is mostly active during the daytime.
3. This is the largest of all northern deer. It is found in the Arctic forests
of North America. .
4. This animal will hunt down young caribou or any separated from the group.
5. This large sea animal is hunted for its hide, ivory tusks and oil. o
6. This is a large, powerful white bear.


wofI live on the edge
of snowy lands and in
the icy waters. I am a
wonderful swimmer
S and diver! Who am I?
Wo Am 32

Who Am I?


~zQ


Follow the
dots to see
me!

28 29
27, .
026 *25
24
S23 '22


34


36 37
35 *
0


i


(


33 *


31,


*30
21


19
18


15

16


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01


Brrrrrrrrr!
I'm going
,4 backto
warmer
waters!
5 O
*6 0
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13 *7
*4
14 12


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10


A.


How Do Penguins Keep Warm?


OVit


There are many animals and birds living in the lands of cold, snow and ice. My cousin, Pearly the Polar Bear, lives up north in the
Arctic. Penguins do not live with the polar bears in the area near the North Pole. They live in areas further south. Some live in deep
cold, for example on the continent of Antarctica, near the South Pole. Some live in warmer areas around the world. Layers of fat and
feathers keep penguins warm. Penguins are one of my favorite animals. They are such fun to watch. I almost think that they know
they are putting on a show! Speaking of penguins and shows...can you fill in the blanks to answer my new joke below?

zi, ~ What did the penguins sing after putting on their best hats and "tails?"


20 8 5 18 5 19 14 15 2 21 19 9 14 5 19 19


12 9 11 5 19 14 15 23 2 21 19 9 14 5 19 19

A B C D E F G H I J K L M Hey! That sounds
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 a lot like that hit
song by the well-
N 0 P Q R S T U V W X Y Z known composer,
5 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Irving Berlin.


DoubleTake

DoubleTake


Study these penguins. Can you find and circle the 2 that are exactly alike?


Sme!


(Pick me!

o0A


Visit our web site to print out the newest puzzle about the South Poled
and Antarctica! Winter reading logs and certificate sets are ready too!
www.readingclubfun.com


I


THE STAR


PAGE B-6


JANUARYIS5 2011


1


C7















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Change Your Life. Your Future.
You have the power to change your future. And
you can do it right here at Florida State
College at Jacksonville. To learn about
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please visit our website at Jobs.FSCJ.edu.

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Camp Lejeune WIer Contamination
Informational Meeting
An informational meeting detailing the CAMP LEJEUNE WATER
CONTAMINATION effects will be held
When: Saturday, January 15, 2011
Time: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Where: Tampa Marriott Westshore
1001 N. Westshore Blvd.
Between 1957 and 2000, the US Military improperly disposed of chemical
degreasers and other toxic substances that ultimately contaminated the
drinking water at the Camp Lejeune Military facility in NC. Military
personnel, their families, and individuals living or working in the vicinity of
the base have been exposed and may suffer from serious health effects
caused by the contaminated water. These risks include:
Cancers
Reproductive disorders
Birth defects
If you believe your health or the health of a loved one has been affected
by exposure to the water at Camp Lejeune, you are invited to attend this
free informational seminar.
For more information, or to make a reservation contact:
Jerry Ensminger at ierrv.ensminger@tftptf.com
or vis;I our websile 31 www Iflplf com
===..=.


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As a licensed Florida Physician I have new prescription
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If you don't respond to the medication in my office on the
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90+ Florida Home Auctions Begin Jan 10th


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Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified Housing available. CALL
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ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical,
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ment assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if
qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (877)206-5165,
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JANUARY 15, 2011


PAGrEr R-7


THE STAR


,I
J*


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PAGE B-8 THE STAR JANUARY 15, 2011
U U - - r - *


Belly Asque DaViS, URI, CDPI -- uAI.TOK
Watson R caly Ponr Vedra Beadi Office
Direct 90W571-182
BA D avi b @, NReatRca lyCooTp-i


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United Negro College Fund Telethon
Saturday, January 29, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. FOX WAWS
My TVJax at 10:00 p.m.


Laurence Greene
photographer
904-553-7359/
904-444-4044


iUa!.J-r 1 -E-r!r Jid, irs'bi


Cr* j.


&
Jn,.
a 1.111 1 1.
II % 1 IIj 1 I ; I I
-.


Top 20 Playlist October-November 2010
Listen to WCGL AM 1360 LIVE at www.wcgll360.com!
1. Nobody Greater VaShawn Mitchell
2. It's All God The Soul Seekers Feat. Marvin Winans
3. I Won't Let You Fall Helen Miller & New Anointing
4. It's About Time For A Miracle Beverly Crawford
5. I Want To Say Thank You Lisa Page Brooks
6. Leave It In The Hands of the Lord The Supreme 7
7. I Chose To Worship Wess Morgan
8. On My Way Back Up Jimmy Hicks & VOI
9. Hold On The Brown Sisters
10. Jesus You Are April Nevels
11. Lord Do It Alvin Darling
12. Nobody Like You Fred Hammond
13. I Give Myself Away William McDowell
14. Turn It Over To Jesus The Second Chapter
15. Just for Me Shekinah Glory Ministry
16. Lord We Praise You Phoenix Mass Choir
17. Expect The Great Jonathan Nelson
18. Lord You're Mighty Youthful Praise feat. J.J. Hairston
19. He Wants It All Forever Jones
20. Just Stand Hope Chapel Mass Choir


L


THE STAR


PAGE B-8


JANUARY 15, 2011


;I!Aijil 57wid I'luu] Auu


J




C&J1 CM K


January 15, 2011


THE STAR


Vol. 1, No. 8


ii








Teen Kills High School Jacksonville Church Members
Principal In Revenge Arrested for Child Molestation

The motive was initially unclear in the
aftermath of a teen's murderous rampage at The congregation of Greater Refuge Temple in North-
Millard South High School in Omaha, Ne- west Jacksonville was rocked by the accusations that their
braska on Wednesday. pastor's son and his brother-in-law committed sex crimes
It was later revealed, however, that it against teenage members of their own church.
may have been revenge that caused Robert Paul Groover and his brother-in-law Darrell Moore
Butler, a transfer student, to murder the
vice-principal in cold blood and critically ave been accused of molestation and sexual battery that
wound the principal. according to court documents had been going on for a
The 17-year-old shooter was considered decade. Groover is not only the son of the church's pastor,
"normal" by students and teachers alike and but also the long-time custodian at the church.
had been well-liked and popular. Since the One victim told authorities Moore sexually assaulted
shooting police have discovered that But-


ler had been suspended from school by the
principal, after driving his car on the school's football field and track New Year's Day.
After calmly accepting the suspension, the troubled teen went home to speak with his
father and friends. After his father, a detective with the Omaha Police Department, left
home, Butler stole his .40-caliber semi-automatic pistol and went back to the school.
Butler then got in his car and posted an advance apology on Facebook for what he
was about to do.
He signed in at the assistant principal's office normally, and once inside the office
with the door closed, he shot her before walking across the hall and shooting the prin-
cipal.
Butler fled the scene, and police later found him in his car, dead from a self-inflicted
gunshot wound.
Butler was said to have had disciplinary problems when he lived with his remarried
mother in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Screaming Bank Robbery Suspect
Turns On Heist Crew

25-year-old Jerrica Duncan recently turned her accom-
plices in to police after she was arrested for the armed rob-
bery of a Synovus Bank.
Witnesses told police that a woman stormed into the
bank and began screaming at the top of her lungs that she
Wanted money before firing three shots from her gun into
Jerrica Duncan the ceiling. She then fled the scene with the money.
Police stopped her the following day, when she implicated
two others who were involved in several other robberies. All parties were arrested.


her while holding a knife and then threatened to kill her
if she spoke a word to anyone. Moore is also accused of
"inappropriately hugging" church members several dif-
ferent times, including during prayer.
Groover is charged with three counts of custodial sex-
ual battery after police said he molested a 13-year-old
boy. Groover admitted to having had at least 20 different
sexual encounters with the boy inside the church and sent
nude photos of himself to the victim. He told police that
he had a relationship with the young teen.
According to prosecutors, it was not the victims who
came forward in the case but an anonymous whistle-
blower.
Both men have pleaded not guilty to the charges.





n r 1 1THE STAR


Don't share your

credit with thieves.
As our lives become more integrated with
technology, keeping our private information
confidential becomes more and more difficult.
Electronic transactions can leave you vulnera-
ble to fraud and other crimes.

What About Those Passwords?

Whether on the Internet or using an online
banking program, you are often required to use
a password. The WORST ones to use are the
ones that you think of first-your own or your
spouse's name, maiden name, pets' and chil-
dren's names, etc. The BEST passwords mix
numbers with upper and lowercase letters. A
password not found in the dictionary is even
better. There are programs that will try every
word in the dictionary in an effort to crack your
security. Avoid breaks in your security by doing
the following:

* Change your password regularly.

* Memorize your password. If you have several,
develop a system for remembering them. If you
do write down the password, keep it at home or
hidden at work. Don't write your password on
a post-it note and stick it on your monitor or
hard drive.

* Set up a special account or set aside a differ-
ent computer at work for temporary help and
other unauthorized users.

* If you have the option of letting your com-
puter or a web site remember a password for
you, DON'T USE IT! Anyone who uses your
machine will have automatic access to infor-
mation that is password protected.


* WEAR reflective material so motorists can
see you more easily.

Using ATMs and Long Distance Phone
Cards

It is extremely important for you to protect
your Personal Identification Number (PIN). A
PIN is a confidential code that is issued to the
cardholder to permit access to that account.
Your PIN should be memorized, secured and
not given out to anyone-even family members
or bank employees. The fewer people who have
access to your PIN, the better.

* NEVER write your PIN on ATM or long-dis-
tance calling cards.

* DON'T write your PIN on a piece of paper
and place it in your wallet. If your wallet and
card are lost or stolen, someone will have
everything they need to remove funds from
your account, make unauthorized debit pur-
chases, or run up your long-distance phone bill.

* BE SURE to take your ATM receipt to record
transactions and match them against monthly
statements. Dishonest people can use your re-
ceipt to get your account number.

* NEVER leave the ATM receipt at the site.

When You Shop in Cyberspace

You can prevent problems BEFORE they occur
by:

* Doing business with companies you know and
trust. If you haven't heard of the company, re-
search it or ask for a paper catalog before you
decide to order electronically. Check with your
state consumer protection agency on whether
the company is licensed or registered. Fraudu-
lent companies can appear and disappear very


quickly in cyberspace.

* Check to see if your computer connection is
secure. In Internet Explorer, for example, you
should see a small yellow lock in the lower right
comer of the screen. In Netscape, a secure con-
nection is shown by a small lock highlighted in
yellow in the lower left corer of the screen.

* Using a secure interest browser that will en-
crypt or scramble purchase information. If there
is no encryption software, consider calling the
company's 800 number, faxing your order, or
paying with a check.

* Never give a bank account or credit card num-
ber or other personal information such as your
Social Security number and date of birth to any-
one you don't know or haven't checked out.
And DON'T provide information that is unnec-
essary to make a purchase. Even with partial in-
formation, con artists can make unauthorized
charges or take money from your account. If
you have an even choice between using your
credit card and mailing cash, check or money
order, use a credit card. You can always dispute
fraudulent credit card charges, but you can't get
cash back.


January 15, 2011


C&JPAGEA-2


THE STAR







ssSHH! From Actual Police Reports

Did You Hear About?...


MAKING THREATS Police
were dispatched to 1131 Maynard
St. in response to reports of a do-
mestic dispute.

The complainant, an older woman,
wanted her adult son, the defendant, .
to leave her home immediately. She
told police that because her son did
not contribute monetarily to the
household and was therefore not an
official resident, she wanted him out
of her house.

The defendant was extremely hostile toward the officer and remained so
even after he agreed to leave the premises and removed his property
from the house. This behavior continued to the point that the officer
asked the woman if she wanted her son physically removed from the
premises, to which she agreed.

As the defendant stood near the of-
ficer and spoke on the phone with
^ his sister, the officer overheard him
make what the officer took as a
threat to his person: "if this officer
S gets slick with me one more time,
I'm going to let him have it."

SThe officer immediately placed the
defendant into custody. The defen-
dant began to scream for his mother
as he was taken to the patrol car.
The officer advised him to stop and
get inside and when he would not,
the officer forcibly placed the man in the back seat.

The defendant requested that his property be released to sister, who ar-
rived on the scene a short time later. The defendant was transported and
booked into the PTDF.


JACKSONVILLE SHERIFF'S OFFICE
NEWS RELEASES

Case number 2011-22454
6650 103rd Street #902
Homicide

Victim:
Sulamin Allah-Muhammad Murray
Black Male 10/23/1982
Last known address: 6650 103rd Street #902

On January 9, 2011 the listed victim found with an apparent
gunshot wound at 6650 103rd Street. The victim was pro-
nounced deceased at the scene.

This is an active investigation and there is no more information
available.

Case number 1019450
422 Nixon Street
Homicide

Victim:
Carlton Yarbrough
BM 07/17/1982
422 Nixon Street

On December 24, 2010 the listed victim, Carlton Yarbrough,
was found shot at 422 Nixon Street. The victim was trans-
ported to a local hospital where he was pronounced deceased.

This is an active investigation and there is no more information
available.

Anyone with any information about these homicides is asked to
contact the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office at 904-630-0500 or
email us at JSOCrimeTips@jaxsheriff.org. To remain anony-
mous and receive a possible reward, contact Crime Stoppers at
1-866-845-TIPS or email them at
rewards@fccrimestoppers.com.


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ii r UP



MOST ANTE


Name: Brian Brookins
Age: 27
Offense: Burglary, Grand Theft


Name: Sheena Adams
Age: 21
Offense: Grand Theft, Forgery


Name: Greg Mcfarlane
Age: 32
Offense: Assault on Officer


Name: Darren Ai
Age: 45
Offense: Rape


Name: lerrill Banks
Age: 29
Offense: Child Molestation


Name: Curtis Jones
Age: 27
Offense: Sale of Cocaine


Name: Vernon Odom Name: Andrae Fullwood
Age: 27 Age: 29
Offense: Probation Violation Offense: Sale of Cocaine


Name: Wesley Bailey, Jr.
Age: 21
Offense: Drug Trafficking


Name: Kelvin Reece
Age: 23
Offense: Probation Violation


Name: Andy Richards
Age: 23
Offense: Probation Violation


Name: Henry Bradley
Age: 48
Offense: Lewd w/Child


Name: Lynn Boykins Name: Quan Boatwright
Age: 45 Age: 30
Offense: Sex. Battery w/Minor Offense: Lewd w/Child


Name: Desmond Bryant Name: Michael
Age: 41 Age: 41
Offense: Child Sex. Assault Offense: Rane


Age: 38
Offense: Unlawful Contact


I Cih itp ae ed to c i S r at You cnI In a y an b o e i for a r


W 1.I`
',


777 RECENT ARRESTS




C&P1 M K
January 15, 2011 THE STAR C&P Page B i










"Internal Medicine"

A Florida woman has given new meaning to the term "internal medicine."

Law enforcement officials in Florida say they saw a bag of drugs fall from between Elizabeth Athenia Pro-
gris's legs after she showered in a county jail. The 22-year-old, identified as a "dancer/housewife," was dry-
ing off when a deputy reportedly saw a clear bag drop "from her genital area to the floor by her feet." The
bag contained pills which were later identified as Xanax.





Tagged, Therefore Bagged

Tattoos aren't just a form of body modification -- they're also a form of body identification.

Just ask police, or the Florida theft suspect with the words "I'm me" tattooed on his forehead. Detectives didn't
have a hard time tracking down suspect Joseph Williams, 19, after media reports about his distinctive facial tat-
too.

Williams is suspected of snatching iPhone from more than a dozen cellphone shops.



Middle School MVP

According to police, Julious Javone Threatts got taken down after he tried a trick play. The 21-year-old allegedly
lied about his age, claiming he was 14 years old so he could play in a youth football league in Florida.

Officials finally called a penalty when Threatts tried to register for middle school under his teenage alias, "Chad
Jordan." He's been charged with obstruction by a disguised person, trespassing on school grounds, and violation of
probation.



Let's face it dumb or smart, there are criminals everywhere. The best defense is a good offense: a solid strategy and being smarter than the
bad guy (or dumb one).

* Invest in a home security system and keep it on and monitored 24/7/365.
* Make sure it has glass break sensors, monitors doors, windows and has motion sensors.
* Be sure to protect basement windows all the way up to the highest level windows and porch doors for maximum home safety.
* Install at least a 4-16 cameras surveillance system that can be accessed from the web and has full night vision.
* Remove or lock up exterior ladders preventing the bad guy from gaining access.
* Lock all doors and windows when you are home and away, especially at night and in the summer months, too.







January*m 1W 01TESaR t&JcEh-


Pharmacist Charged With Theft
of Prescription Painkillers

A Northeast Florida pharmacist has been charged by
Blackshear police with stealing more than 7,000 prescrip-
tion painkiller pills with a street value of $25,000 to
$35,000.
John Pearson, 46, of Fleming Island, Fla., is charged
with felony theft by taking, unlawful distribution of con-
trolled substances and possession ofhydrocodone, which is
a Scheduled III controlled narcotic.
Officials at the Rite Aid on U.S. 84 in Blackshear
launched an internal investigation when inconsistencies dur-
ing a recent pharmacy inventory were uncovered. Pearson
was taken into custody on Friday and was released on
$6,000 bail from Pierce County Jail.
According to police, Pearson stole 110 bottles of hy-
drocodone, a controlled narcotic pain reliever, over a two
year period beginning about the time Pearson went to work
at the drug store in October 2009. According to the U.S.
Drug Enforcement Administration, Hydrocodone is the
most frequently prescribed opiate in America but also one of
the most abused narcotic painkillers.
Anyone with more information about the case is
asked to call Blackshear police at (912) 449-7011. Callers
may remain anonymous.

Judges To Testify in JaxPort
Corruption Trial

Senior U.S. District Judge Henry Adams and Duval
County Judge James Ruth have been tapped as character
witnesses for former JaxPort Chairman Tony Nelson.
Nelson's lawyer, Curtis Fallgatter, was recently granted
approval for this motion by U.S. District Judge Timothy
Corrigan. Former Jacksonville Mayor John Delaney had
previously been listed as a defense witness and possible ex-
pert for the trial.
Fallgatter contends Nelson's relationship with the dredg-
ing operator, Lance Young, broke no laws. Young has
pleaded guilty to conspiracy and is expected to testify
against Nelson. The trial is scheduled to begin on Jan. 18.


Georgia Doctor Faces Federal Narcotics
Charges

A doctor in Alma, Ga. has been charged for illegally dispensing a controlled
narcotic cough syrup. The promethazine/codeine syrup, when mixed with carbonated
beverages or sometimes even hard candy, is known on the street as "purple drank".
William Morris Williams, who practices family medicine, is facing two counts
:f federal narcotics charges. According to a criminal complaint filed by prosecutors
Dec. 28 in U.S. District Court, Williams committed the crime on two separate occa-
sions in November 2009. He is accused of providing the syrup to a person identified
in the complaint only by the initials D.H., on Nov. 10 and Nov. 11.
The syrup is the key ingredient in "purple drank," an illegal recreational drink
made with a mixture of lemon-lime soda or hard fruit-flavored candy. In both forms.
the syrup creates a certain euphoria in its users while also depressing the nervous sys-
tem. The cough syrup itself is a combination antihistamine and cough suppressant
that can cause severe breathing problems in children, especially those 6 and younger.
Williams has been licensed to practice medicine in Georgia since 1965. His of-
rice, Total Health Services, a family practice and urgent care clinic, was at 204 S.
Dixon St., Alma. A Medical College of Georgia graduate, Williams' medical license
is set to expire on Nov. 30. Although state records show that Williams had staff priv-
-lages at Bacon County Hospital, the chief executive of its health system said that
Williams has not been associated with its hospital for years.
Williams will be arraigned Jan. 25 and if convicted, he faces up to one year in
prison and a fine up to $100,000 on each count.







Advertising Deadline:

TUESDAYS @ 5 p.m.

To place an ad:

Call: (904) 766-8834 or

Email: ad@thefloridastar.com


January 15, 2011


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Jan^In Your 15, 2011 THE STAR C&JPAGE


P_ Man Indicted for

$500,000

Medicare Scheme
SA former Brunswick, Ga. man has
i to been charged with attempting to steal
More than $500,000 from Medicare
through two medical equipment sup-
pliers in Brunswick and Houston.
Samuel Curtis III, 37, operated
Preferred Prosthetics and Orthotics in
Brunswick and Team Orthotics and Prosthetics Inc. in Houston, where he now lives.
According to the indictment filed Tuesday, both companies claimed to be suppliers of
ankle braces, knee braces, back braces and other medical devices. It later came to light
that Curtis, assisted by others, routinely billed Medicare for medical devices that were
never provided to patients, not medically necessary, or not prescribed by a physician.
They stole the identification information of Medicare patients and their doctors and
used it to submit more than $500,000 worth of phony claims.
Curtis faces up to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $250,000.


Man's Foot Found in Woods of St. John's

County
Citizens came upon a grotesque discovery early Friday morning when they
found what appeared to be a man's boot containing
what police believed to be the remains of a human
foot.
The boot and its contents were found in the
dense woods off State Road 16, just west of Inter-
state 95. Investigators and crime scene technicians
were dispatched to the site near Whisper Ridge
SDrive. Authorities have reason to believe that the
boot may have been moved to this location and was
-- later found by animals, as was indicated by the ad-
vanced level of decomposition.
'.. ... Police informed the media that it seemed to be a
'man's boot, size 11 or 12. It will be up to the med-
ical examiner's office to determine the victim's identity, but without more remains,
that may be unlikely if not impossible.
Investigators have decided to return to the site with more personnel and ca-
daver dogs to conduct a more thorough search, as the area is very large and is known
to be used by transients.


Elderly Georgia Man

Shot and Killed

A 78-year-old man's death marks the first homi-
cide of the year for Savannah, Ga.
John Green was leaving Chu's Market with the
bread he had just purchased Saturday morning at about
9:45 a.m. An unidentified assailant then walked up to him
and shot him before rifling through his clothes and steal-
ing his money and valuables.
According to police, Green staggered backward
through the market doors, bleeding profusely before he
collapsed.
Alarmed employees inside the store immediately
called 911. Green was rushed to Memorial Hospital,
where he was pronounced dead.
Police are searching for suspects in the killing and
are asking any potential witnesses to come forward.


Church Recruiter Kidnaps

Boy from Walmart

The middle-aged owner of a church staff recruit-
ing firm has been arrested for kidnapping a boy from Wal-
mart and performing a sexual act in the child's presence.
55-year-old Gordon E. Libby surrendered early
Sunday after being featured in a local television news re-
port.
He was recorded on the Walmart's surveillance
cameras taking the boy from Walmart. Afterward, he
drove to another parking lot, where he performed a sex-
ual act on himself while the boy was forced to watch. The
boy was not harmed.
According to authorities, Libby owns a recruit-
ment firm called Pastors4U that connects ministers of all
religions to church jobs. Libby has also served as a youth
and lay leader at several churches in South Florida and
Osceola County.
He is being held without bail in the Osceola County Jail.


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Have You Seen Us

M Po


MARCUS CRENSHAW
Last Seen: Nov 13, 2010
City: Deerfield Beach, FL
Description: Black male, 17y/o, 5'10", 1251bs, black hair, brown eyes.
May still be in local area.


PHYLICIA BARNES
Last Seen: Dec 28, 2010
City: Baltimore, MD
Description: Black female, 17y/o, 5'6", 1201bs, black hair, brown eyes.
Has tattoo of rose on her lower right leg. Last seen wearing blue coat.


JOSHUA JOHNSON
Last Seen: June 4, 2009
City: Atlanta, GA
Description: Black male, 17y/o, 5'4", 1451bs, black hair, brown eyes.
May still be in local area.


BETHANY DAVIS
Last Seen: Mar 9, 2010
City: Savannah, GA
Description: Black female, 16y/o 5'6", 1551bs, black hair, brown eyes.
Has a tattoo on her abdomen and may have a pierced navel.


For Tip OrSgtns laeCalI-80-TELS