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Mr. William Earl BillŽ Shelton, Jr., age 74, of Amelia Island, FL passed away on Thursday, March 31, 2011 at his home. Mr. Shelton was a pioneer of Sports Management. He was the first African-American Sports Agent to manage world class tennis athletes including Andre Bell South. He was not only a manager and advisor for the best in the world but was a coach, mentor and friend for both young and seasoned athletes, including Arthur Ashe. He was oftentimes sought out for simple guidance and direction. He not only cared about the athletes immediate career posture but was equally concerned about their future professional lives, after having reached their pinnacle in sports. Upon graduation with a Bachelors of Arts Degree from St. Pauls University in Columbia SC, Mr. Shelton enlisted in the U.S. Army and remained until being honorably discharged in 1964. Bill was Vice President of Richard Clarke Associates in New York City a head hunting agency. He then began a long and distinguished career in Sports Management starting as Vice President of All American Sports. In the late 1970s, he met his future wife, Yolanda Raven; a veteran of ten Broadway shows, and an accomplished international Fashion Model, known as Raven. Continuing his career as a Sports Agent, he moved to Advantage International in Washington, DC. After managing athletes such as, Andre Agassi, Zena Garrison, Vince Carter and Paul Anacone In 1994 he opened Bill Shelton & Associates, Inc in Alexandria, Va. After years of visiting and enjoying the Amelia Island Bausch and Lomb Tournaments, Mr. Shelton and his wife, Raven, made their home here in 2004. Mr. Shelton leaves behind his wife of 32 years, Raven, their son, Jeffrey A.Shelton, three sisters, numerous cousins, nieces and nephews. Celebration of Life Memorial for Mr. Shelton will be held on Amelia Island at the American Beach Community Center at 1:00 p.m., Saturday May 7, 2011. You have the opportunity to make a difference based upon knowledge and information. Mayoral candidates Alvin Brown and Mike Hogan who came out as the top two candidates of the large numberwho ran for the position of mayor of Jacksonville last month. Alvin Brown is a Democrat and is currently Executive in Residence at Jacksonville Universitys School of Business. He has worked as a senior advisor for President Clinton and Vice President Gore. He has an MBA from Jacksonville University. His goal is to create jobs, grow the economy, improve the schools and have an efficient and effective government for the city. Mike Hogan, a Republican retired from BellSouth and has served two terms as Tax Collector, two terms as a city councilman and two terms as a state representative. Hogan received a BA degree from the University of South Florida and wishes to restore fiscal order, rebuild citizens; trust and create economic growth and jobs in Jacksonville. They will debate on April 15 at the First Coast Tiger Bay Club, 904-396-6454 and on Channel 4 from 8 to 9 p.m. on April 25. Early voting begins May 2 and May 17 is election day. The cry is, Let us take back our country.Ž This cry was only heard after President Obama was elected, even though the spending of money and all of the programs that led the country to fall on its knees continued to grow with financial deals and tax right offs that only benefited a few. We witnessed an unjustified war that was doubled as the assets of the country at war were torn down, rebuilt, and torn down again. We watched while sitting on our hands, the outsourcing of jobs and many other factors that caused the financial problems the United States is facing. The question that comes to the mind of many as we face another shutdown of the government, is how long will it last. Many feel if it does occur, it will not last long because those in Washington who are holding out know that once they were elected and served at least one term, they will always have a salary. They dont have to worry about retirement funds or social security checks. They do not have to worry about health care. They are elected officials, running our country. But those military personnel who went to or still are at war, wont get a pay check and definitely not for the rest of their lives like the politicians that agreed on having a war A senior White House official said the impact of a shutdown will be immediately felt on the economy. Republicans and Democrats say they are about $5 billion apart in what is desired to reach a deal. It is clear to many that the intent of most of the Tea Party which is not an official party with no desire to become such, is to shut down the federal government. They dont want health care reform, planned parenthood, Pell Grants, NPR and PBS. Such items are too beneficial to too many Americans. Why, those Americans dont deserve such benefits. Americans should be ashamed if they allow such extremists to go back to those days that we have read about 100 years ago but that is where we are headed. Something can be done. It begins when we vote. On March 19, 2011 around 5 p.m. police were dispatched in the vicinity of Beaver Street and McDuff Avenue in reference to a sexual battery. Investigation revealed the suspect entered the victims home, displayed a weapon and sexually battered her. The drawing fits the description of the male who appears to be in his 40s, 59Ž, 250 pounds, dark skin, unshaven with some gray in beard, balding or receding hairline, missing an upper side tooth, wearing a dirty black shirt, long pants, dirty white tennis shoes and riding a mountain bike. Below is Horace Dempsey who hit his grandmother with a hammer several times and fled from Orange City, Texas on April 4, 2011. Horace is 18 years of age, 59Ž with brown eyes, black hair. He is believed to be in the Jacksonville area, driving a white Ford Mustang, Texas tag #JKH-747, with tinted windows and damage to the right rear quarter panel. Please call 1-866=845-TIPS to help in these cases. yyy0vjghnqtkfcuvct0eqo Nqqmkpi"hqt"ewuvqogtu"vq"rcvtqpk|g"{qwt dwukpguu"qt"wvknk|g"{qwt"ugtxkeguA"Kh"{qw cpuygtgf"[GU."vjgp"{qw"pggf"vq"rnceg"cp"cf kp"Vjg"Hnqtkfc"qt"Igqtikc"Uvct#""ECNN ;261988/::56"vq"rnceg"{qwt"cf"VQFC[## Check, Money Order, Or Credit Cards Accepted PQTVJGCUV"HNQTKFC‘U"QNFGUV."NCTIGUV."OQUV"TGCF"CHTKECP"COGTKECP"QYPGF"PGYURCRGT K P U K F G Editorial....................A-2 Church....................A-3 Lifestyle..................A-4 State-National..................A-5 Entertainment..............B-3 Prep Rap................BPR1-4 Local.....................B-1 Columns...................B-2 Sports....................B-4 Crime & Justice......A..C&J Classified & Business... B-6 Rtguqtvgf"Uvcpfctf W0U0"Rquvcig"Rckf Lcemuqpxknng."HN Rgtokv""Pq0"5839 CRTKN";"/"CRTKN"37."4233 """""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""" XQN0"82"PQ0"72 """"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""72" EGPVU Cp"Cyctf Ykppkpi Rwdnkecvkqp. ugtxkpi"{qw ukpeg"3;730" Tcvgf"‰C“"d{ vjg"Dgvvgt Dwukpguu"Dwtgcw Ykuj"vq"ikxg"wu"c"Pgyu"Uvqt{A Ecnn"*;26+"988/::56"qt"Ugpf"kv"vq< kphqBvjghnqtkfcuvct0eqo Tgcf" Vjg"Hnqtkfc cpf"Igqtikc"Uvct Pgyurcrgtu0 Nkuvgp vq"KORCEV Tcfkq"Vcnm"Ujqy0YYY0vjghnqtkfcuvct0eqoStill the peoples choice, striving to make a difference. Cant Get to the Store Have The Star Delivered Vjg"Hnqtkfc"Uvct R0"Q0"Dqz"6284; Lcemuqpxknng."HN"54425 Vjg"Hnqtkfc"Uvct. Vjg""Igqtikc"Uvct# Korcev"Tcfkq 32709"("CO3582 *;26+"988/::56 YCPVGF Vjg"Egpuwu"Tgrqtv Nkhg"Uv{ng"/""Rcig"C/6 Urqtvu"/"Rcig"D/6 Hktuv"Chtkecp"Cogtkecp Vgppku"Urqtvu"Cigpv"Fkgu To get a true picture of what the population will be in these United States twenty years from now, you must look at our babies. Americas child population grew more far diverse during the past decade with a decline in white children and a growth of Asians and Hispanics. The number of non-Hispanic whites fell in 46 states and 86 of the largest metropolitan areas. In 10 states, white children are now the minority. In 23 states, minorities make up mor than 40% of the child population. The number of black and Native American children declined but by far smaller degree than whites according to an analysis of 2010 Census data released Wednesday by the Brookings Institution. Nguu"vjcp"46"Jqwtu"cpf"Ujwvfqyp Dncem"Octtkcig"Fc{ Lcemuqpxknng‘u"Dwhhcnq Uqnfkgtu ONM"KKK."Cpftgy"[qwpi"Eq/ Hqwpfgtu"qh"Dncem"Vgngxkukqp Pgvyqtm Martin Luther King III and civil rights icon Andrew Young are among the founders of a television network aimed at African-Americans set to launch this fall. Bounce TV will air round the clock, targeting blacks ages 25 to 54, airing movies, sports, documentaries, faith-based programs and original programming. They have already acquired rights to almost 400 movies with black appeal. Uwurgev"hqt"ctogf ugzwcn"Dcvvgt{ V{tc"Dcpmu"vq"Gptqnn"kp Jctxctf‘u"Dwukpguu"Uejqqn She is a television star and a model and appears to have a handle on how to handle money. Yet, it has been reported that Tyra Banks is about to enter the Harvard Business School. What this tells us that Ms. Banks would certainly not agree with the proposed cut backs many communities and states are suggested when it comes to education. Tyra Banks is 37 years of age and is already a very successful entrepreneur. Besides being a model and doing television, she has now written a book, Model LandŽ which is due to be released this fall. She also has a fashion Website It is reported that Tyra Banks company, Bankable Productions, is worth more than $90 million. Tyra Banks move to further her education is just another plus for her. Jqtceg"Fgorug{."uwu/ rgev."ciitcxcvgf"dcvvgt{ Ykknnkco"‰Dknn“"Ujgnvqp Dki"Oc{qtcn"Ecpfkfcvgu Fgdcvg"Eqokpi"Wr Cnxkp"Dtqyp Okmg"Jqicp V{tc"Dcpmu

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By Marjorie Valbrun Americas Wire WASHINGTON„When the landmark welfare reform law was enacted in 1996, the political rallying cry was ending welfare as we know it.Ž Today, a move is underway to rescind some of the laws punitive measures, such as provisions that permit states to deny welfare benefits and food stamps to people convicted of felony drug crimes. These provisions were intended to prevent selling or trading food stamps for drugs, but widespread budget deficits and steep recidivism rates are prompting state governments that enforce the benefit bans to rethink the policy amid high unemployment and escalating prison costs. New Jersey and South Dakota are the latest states to reverse course and allow drug felons to receive public assistance. Advocates for former felons are seizing the moment to make the case that the restrictions are counterproductive in tough economic times, and they are urging state and congressional lawmakers to remove the benefits ban. Convicted felons have difficulty getting jobs even in good economic times, and public assistance and food stamps are critical income supports during the transition from prison, the advocates say. When individuals with drug convictions are denied food stamps and cash benefits, establishing economic stability upon reentry becomes more difficult, and it becomes more likely that they may return to criminal activity and drug use instead of maintaining sobriety and obtaining gainful employment,Ž says Elizabeth Farid, deputy director of the Legal Action Center's National H.I.R.E. Network. The network seeks to increase job opportunities for those with criminal records, advocating for ending public policies and employment practices that further penalize felons who have served their time. Opponents of the restrictions say the ban has disproportionately affected women and people of color, who are more likely than whites to be charged and convicted for drug crimes. Many states have opted out of the law banning drug felons from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), as the food stamp program is now called, and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the welfare program. Other states have modified the bans and made them less punitive. Because the federal government fully funds food stamps, allowing felons to receive them does not burden state budgets. Ten states still have the food stamp ban. Lawmakers in three of them„West Virginia, Missouri, and Delaware„have proposed legislation that would remove the ban. Eleven states maintain the TANF ban. In Georgia, where the 67 percent recidivism rate is one of the highest in the country and where more than 50,000 people are in its state prison facilities, lawmakers have maintained the ban. Democratic State Sen. Emanuel Jones, chairman of the Georgia Legislative Black Caucus, introduced a bill during the last session that proposed restoring eligibility for food stamp and welfare benefits for drug felons who had served their time. It didnt get any traction at all,Ž he says, adding that he plans to introduce a measure this year proposing restoration just of food stamp benefits. Regarding its prospects, however, Jones says, I think the chances are very slim.Ž We lock up a lot of people here, and we apparently want to keep them there,Ž he says, referring to the high recidivism rate. Henrie Treadwell, director of Community Voices and Men's Health Initiative at the Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, is optimistic that the benefits will eventually be restored for former felons. Her program works to improve access to health care and other services for those transitioning from prison. I serve on the Georgia Board of Corrections, and everything that I see and hear says we are moving in that direction,Ž says Treadwell, who is also a research professor at Morehouses Department of Community Health & Preventive Medicine. Our new governor has made reduction of recidivism one of his priorities. Now the question becomes how far we will go.Ž On the national front, proponents of sentencing reforms are actively lobbying Congress to repeal the bans. Two pieces of legislation to do that have been introduced in Congress but have not moved. Rep. Barbara Lee, DCalif., introduced H.R. 329, which has eight co-sponsors and would repeal the food stamp ban, and Rep. Andr Carson, D-Ind., introduced H.R. 3053, which would repeal the TANF ban and has 19 co-sponsors. What we see all too often are restrictions that fail to promote public safety, that frequently run counter to integrating formerly incarcerated people into the community and that are based on political posturing rather than behaviorally based analysis,Ž Marc Mauer, executive director of The Sentencing Project, told a House Judiciary subcommittee last June. He also noted that the ban does not apply to people convicted of murder, armed robbery, rape or child abuse. This ban disproportionately affects women and children, by far the overwhelming proportion of recipients of such benefits,Ž Mauer said at the hearing. The impact of the ban means that a woman returning home from prison who may gain temporary employment but is then laid off during a recession is left with no safety net. And further, children are essentially punished for the acts of their parents.Ž Although children of felons remain eligible to receive public assistance, restrictions for felons mean that benefits decline for an entire household. Its unrealistic to think that the restriction will only reduce the quality of life of the parent while maintaining the rest of the familys overall level of comfort,Ž Farid says. Celia Cole, a senior policy analyst at the Center for Public Policy Priorities in Austin, Texas, has been working on this issue since 1999. During that time, six bills proposing that food stamp benefits be provided to ex-felons were introduced and died in the state legislature. With state reintegration programs for former inmates being cut for budgetary reasons, Cole said she hopes that budget-conscious lawmakers will give new legislation a better reception. Our position has always been that food assistance is critical to successful re-integration into society,Ž she says. We see being able to feed themselves as way to being able to rebuild their lives.Ž But Texas lawmakers, and those in other politically conservative states that support the restrictions, tend to take a dim view of entitlement programs and an even dimmer view of criminals. Were a pull-yourself-up-by-the-bootstrap state, so theres limited support for food stamps to begin with,Ž Cole says. Theres also this knee-jerk reaction to people with felony drug convictions. Lawmakers dont want to appear soft on crime.Ž Outraged lawmakers originally pushed for the lifetime ban because some food stamp recipients, though not the majority, traded stamps for drugs or sold them to obtain money for drugs. But food stamp benefits are now distributed electronically and accessed with a debit card that makes selling or trading benefits more difficult. Unlike old food stamp coupon books, the electronic cards can be traced, leading to substantially less fraud and abuse nationally. In 2008, for example, Texas reported no instances of food stamp fraud, Cole says. Who are we to say, You made a mistake. You paid your debt to society. Were letting you re-enter society, but you cant eat?Ž she adds. It doesnt make sense.Ž ****(Stories from Americas Wire are available free of charge for publication by websites, newspapers, news wires and other media outlets. To see more of our stories, please visit our website at www.americaswire.org. Americas Wire is made possible through a grant from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. For more information, contact Michael K. Frisby at 202625-4328.) PAGE A-2THE STAR APRIL 2 2011 Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson First African American Inducted Into The Florida Press Hall Of Fame OPINION --CLARA JACKSON McLAUGHLIN OWNER/PUBLISHER LONZIE LEATH, RINETTA M. FEFIE MANAGEMENT ERIC LEE, DIRECTOR SALE,S & MARKETING G. ABRAMS, DENNIS WADE, DAN EVANS MAY FORD, LAYOUT EDITOR JULIA BOWERS, CRIME & JUSTICE ALLEN PROCTOR DESIGN AND WEB SITE PARTNERInvestigative Reporter: Lonzie Leath, Features: Dementrious Lawrence Reporters/Photographers: Marsha Phelts, Carl Davis, Laurence Greene, F. M. Powell III, Michael Phelts, Richard McLaughlin, Andrea F. K. Ortiz, Angela Morrell, Joseph Lorentzon, Scott Jurrens, Cheryl Williams Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Ester Davis, Lucius Gantt, Deanna, Cynthia Ferrell, Delores Mainor Woods, Farris Long Distribution and Sales: Dan & Pat Randolph, Abeye Ayele, Cassie Williams, Angela Beans, Tony Beans, Herman Robinson, David Scott TEL: (904) 766-8834 FAX: (904) 765-1673 info@thefloridastar.com (912) 264-3137 Georgia Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Alachua, Flagler, Marion, McIntosh, Camden And Glynn CountyTheFloridaStar.comThe Florida and Georgia Star Newspapers are independent newspapers published weekly in Jacksonville, Florida SUBSCRIPTION RATES One Year-$35.00 Half Year-$20.00Send check or money order or call with VISA,AmEX,MASCD, DiSCOVER and subscription amount to: The Florida Star, The Georgia Star P.O. Box 40629 Jacksonville, Florida 32203 The Florida Star will not be responsible for the return of any solicited or unsolicited manuscripts or photos. Opinions expressed by columnists in this newspaper do not necessarily represent the policy of this paperMEMBERSHIPS: Florida Press Association National Newspaper Association National Newspaper Publishers Association Amalgamated Publisher, Inc. Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce First Coast African American Chamber of Commerce THE FLORIDA STAR THE GEORGIA STAR BETTY DAVIS LIFESTYLE/ SOCIETY COLUMNIST MIKE BONTS, SPORTS EDITOR YOLANDA KNUCKLE, COLUMNS LIZ BILLINGSLEA OFFICE/ACCOUNTS MANAGER TIA AYELE, SPECIAL SECTIONS GEORGIA MARKETING ANGELA FAVORS MORRELL DISTRIBUTION HERMAN ROBINSON, DAVID SCOTT National Newspaper Publishers Association TUNE IN TO IMPACT LISTEN AND TALK Monday, FM 105.7 -WHJX 5:30 P.M. Tuesday, AM 1360 WCGL 8:30 P.M.Clara McLaughlin and IMPACT Call and Talk Monday, 5:30 pm 904-564-1834FM 105.7 Listen on the Web: www.radiofreejax.com Tuesday, 8:30 pm 904-766-9285 AM 1360 Serving since 1951 Vjg"Hnqtkfc"Uvct"/"Vjg"Igqtikc"Uvct"/"Vjg"Rgqrng‘u"Ejqkeg Budget-Conscious States Rethink Food Stamp Ban for Drug Felons Oqtg"dtcpf"pgy"nkxg"nqecn"vcnm vjcp"qp"cp{"qvjgt"tcfkq uvcvkqp#Ejgem"qwvHO"32709""/"YJLZPqtvj"Hnqtkfc"("Uqwvjgtp"IgqtikcSome of our nqecn"ujqyu include Cpf{ Lqjpuqp Dtqvjgt"Uvcp the Union Man, Vtwem EnctcOeNcwijnkp for The Florida and Georgia Star, Rtqitguukxg"Tqqvu K<"vjg"Kpf{"Owuke Ujqy# Some of our pcvkqpcn"ujqyu" include Gf"Uejwnv|."Vjqo"Jctvocpp"cpf Uvgrjcpkg"Oknngt EDU"Tcfkq"Pgyu"/"Gxgt{"jcnh/jqwtEcnn"kp"<""*;26+"786/3:56 Qpnkpg< yyy0tcfkqhtgglcz0eqo Rtqitguukxg"Vcnm"Tcfkq"/"46"jqwtu fckn{0""Cnn"rtqitcou"ctg"uvtgcogf qp"vjg"ygdYcpv"vq"CfxgtvkugA""Ecnn<""*;26+"78:/298; Oc{"39."4233

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JACKSONVILLE, FL (AREA DEATHS)ALLEN David Wynne, 95, died April 1, 2011. BAKER Alton, died March 24, 2011. BEAM Ivan E., died April 3, 2011. CLARK Frances, 110, died April 4, 2011. DANIELS Desaree Patterson, died April 2, 2011. Alphonso West Mortuary, Inc. DUNPHY Christina M., 27, died March 29, 2011. EVERETT Willie A., died March 30, 2011. GARVIN Dorothy Dempsey, 70, died March 28, 2011. GEOGHAGAN Floyd L., 77, died April 1, 2011. HARTLEY Jean Honey,Ž Daniels, died April 2, 2011. Alphonso West Mortuary, Inc. HUNTER Ulysses, 86, died March 30, 2011. JOINS Margaret Theresa Dawson., died March 29, 2011. KOONTZ James Leland, 59, died March 29, 2011. MARTIN Robert, died April 3, 2011. McMULLAN Dorothy Edna Ward, 91, died March 31, 2011. NEWHAM William Lee, 61, died April 2, 2011. PARRIS Michelle Diane Bowden, died March 28, 2011. PITTMAN Johnny, died April 1, 2011. POLIDOR Shelia, died April 2, 2011. ROBINSON Elouise, died April 3, 2011. SMITH Thomas Milton, Buddy,Ž Sr., 76, died March 31, 2011. TURNER Samuel Phillip, 84, died March 29, 2011. VUJKO Slavka, died April 1, 2011. WATSON Evelyn H., 87, died March 31, 2011. WILLIAMS John Tillman, 63, died March 24, 2011. WOOTSON John J., died March 31, 2011. YEARTIE Cornolia, 68, died March 28, 2011.~*~GEORGIA DEATHS BROWN I. E., 85, died April 5, 2011. BUCHAN James Edward Jim,Ž 77, died April 3, 2011. CHENEY Doyle, Jr., died April 3, 2011. DARRITH Thomas D., 59, died April 3, 2011. GIBSON Rae Jean Jeanie,Ž 71, died April 5, 2011. GREEN Retired U.S. Army Major Robert Yates, 77, died April 3, 2011. PRINCE Ramona F., 57, died April 1, 2011. RAY Truman G., 64, died April 2, 2011. ROBINSON Elouise Doll,Ž died April 3, 2011. SMITH Weyman M. Skip,Ž 47, died April 2, 2011. Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church 201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475 Rev. Pearce Edwing, Sr. Sunday Worship Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m. Church School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:30 p.m. Wednesday Glory HourŽ Bible Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10:00 a.m. Jehovah JirehŽ Bible Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Thursday Young at Heart Ministry . . . . . .10:00 a.m. Friday Joy Explosion Ministry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 p.m. The Church DirectoryCome and Worship With UsŽ New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208Sunday School ƒ..............ƒƒƒƒƒƒ..9:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Intercessory Prayer...............ƒ..10:45 a.m. Morning Worship ......................11:00 a.m. Youth Church 2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary) Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m. Elder Arnitt Jones, Acting Pastor Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus (904) 764-5727 Church GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCHThe Church Where Everybody Is SomebodyŽBishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586Sunday School.......................................................................................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship.................................................................................11:00 a.m. Tuesday................................................Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m. Thursday...............................................................................Joy Night,7:00 p.m.Email: Gospell75@aol.com Website: Greaterelbethel.org Faith In Our CommunitySchedule of Events and ServicesPAGE A-3 THE STAR APRIL 9, 2011 Tune In To IMPACT IMPACTTuesday and Thursday from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.WCGL-AM 1360The Florida Star and Impact Striving To Make A Difference! Clara McLaughlin Host Yvonne Brooks Co-Host CHURCH Paynes Chapel A.M.E. Church2200 Albany Street, P.O. Box 759, Brunswick, GA 31520 (912) 261-9555 Rev. Richard Hutcherson, Pastor Worship Opportunities: Sunday Church School A Life Changing ExperienceŽ . . 9:15 10:55 a.m. Morning Worship Service . . . . . . 11:00 a.m. Church at Study (Weekly Bible Study) Monday Nights . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 8:30 p.m. Join Us as We Study the Word of God and Enrich Our Souls! DEATH NOTICES DEATH NOTICES FELLOWSHIP CONCERTS Central Metropolitan C.M.E. Church4611 North Pearl St., Jacksonville, FL 32206 Ofc (904) 354-7426 Fax (904) 354-0934 Rev. Clarence Kelby Heath, PastorGo ye therefore, and teach all nations, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you; and, lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world. Amen.Ž Mathew 28:19-20 Sun Church School 9:30a.m. Sun Morning Worship -10:45 a.m. Tues Eve Bible Study-6:30 p.m. Wed Bible Study-12 Noon Wed Feeding Ministry 2:00 p.m. ~ Worship Service ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS Lion of the Tribe of Judah Ministries, Inc. PASTOR Dr. Sirretta Williams (Temporary services held) 623 Beechwood St., Jacksonville, FL 32206 Sunday School.......10:00 a.m. ~ Sunday Worship .......11:00 a.m. Every 5th Sunday Friends and Family Day Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Direct Phone: 904.866.7047 Office Phone: 904.356.4226 Seeing Beyond The Lifestyle To Save A Life Website: www.lottojm.com Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email submissions preferred. Send to: info@thefloridastar.com Ask Us About OurALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.4409 Soutel Dr. Jacksonville, FL 32208 Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: (904) 766-2354 DIRECTORSDeborah West Alphonso West Jacqueline Y. Bartley If there had been a death in your family yesterday, what would you be doing today?FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED Since 1988Pre-Need ForeThought Funeral Planning ProgramIm sorry to have to tell you this...Ž ANNIVERSARIES NEW BIRTH CHRISTIAN ASSEMBLY celebrates their 9th Annual Church Anniversary, Sunday, April 10, 2011 at 4:00 p.m. Guest Speaker: Rev. Levy White, III, Pastor of New Birth Missionary Baptist Church of Jacksonville, FL. Singing songs of Zion: The New Birth Missionary Baptist Church Mass Choir, The United Brothers in Christ and many more great singers. The theme is: God Is Able.Ž The church is located at 2185 Jernigan Rd. For more information call 904-3964949. The 5th Annual Power Awards' "You Are The Power Concert" Featuring Chrisette Michele, Trin-itee 5:7 and Brian Courtney Wilson to Be Held at the Historic Apollo Theater in New York City on Friday, May 6. Most Powerful Voices Compilation Features Music by Kim Burrell, Trin-i-tee 5:7, Vanessa Bell Armstrong, Brian Courtney Wilson, Micah Stampley and Winners of the Most Powerful Voices Gospel Music Competition. Music World Gospel Partners with the American Heart Association and GMC (Gospel Music Channel) for Gospel Competition. The 5th Annual Power Awards Weekend will also include the Power Networking Presentation's "Traits for Success" on Saturday, May 7 at the Intercontinental New York Times Square Hotel, with keynote speaker Mathew Knowles. A portion of the proceeds from the CD will benefit the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's (AHA/ASA) Power To End Stroke Movement. SUMMERVILLE BAPITST CHURCH is having a Garage and Bake Sale...Everything Must Go! Saturday, April 9, 2011 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. To Support the Building Fund Ministry. To be held at 2842 Mars Ave. For more information call 904-993-2498. FELLOWSHIP (contd) GREATER HARVEST CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP, located at 9113 Ridge Boulevard in Northwest Jacksonville is having a Palm Sunday Celebration on Sunday April 17th at their 10:00 a.m. Worship Service. There will be Food, Fun, Games, Live Music Waterslides and Bouncers for the kids. Free and open to the community. Rev. Johnny A. Legons, Pastor. Contact Elder Charlsetta Franklin at 904-923-2775 for more information. EVANGELIST HOLINESS TEMPLE, 6601 Norwood Ave, with Bishop Robert Morris as Overseer, warmly invite everyone to their Palm Sunday Program April 17, 2011 at 3:00 p.m. The soulful voice of Evangelist Ernest Setgler, the blessed voice of Evangelist Sandy Goosby, the anointed preaching of minister David Scott, Evangelist Clarence Perkin, the JesusŽ Dance Team, and much more. The host for the evening is Brother Nathaniel Goosby. For transportation call 904-442-0275. NEW BETHEL A.M.E. CHURCH (New Berlin), Rev. Roger J. Burton, Pastor will be presenting a special program entitled THREE NIGHTS OF PRAISE AND WORSHIP.Ž The services will be Wednesday, Thursday and Friday---April 13th, 14th and 15th beginning at 7:00 P.M. nightly and will feature fantastic choirs and singers from throughout the area rendering heart and soul touching music and song. Various preachers will be delivering the message.The church is located at 9864 New Berlin Rd. Jacksonville, FL. (At the foot of the Dames Point Bridge.) For more information you may contact Bro. Wendel L. Washington at (904)576-2346 or the church at (904)751 9813.

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L L IFE IFE S S TYLE TYLE A4 C M Y K Socially SpeakingBy Betty Asque Davis / Photos by F.M. Powell Theres Always Something Happening On The First CoastŽ Theres Always Something Happening On The First CoastŽPAGE A-4THE STAR APRIL 9, 2011(Unless otherwise specified) Thank you for sharing your events and stories for the column each week! Because of you readers are there with you each week. Fo r column entries you may contact me directly at 904-571-1182, Toll Free Fax 866-488-6407 or by e-mail at: badavis@watsonrealtycorp.com SEE YOU IN THE PAPER SEE YOU IN THE PAPER ! 2011 Women of Distinction Honored at Luncheon The Girl Scouts of Gateway Council honored six local women at the 23rd annual Women of Distinction fundraising luncheon at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront, March 30, 2011. The event recognized women whose accomplishments in careers and community service exemplify the values of Girl Scouts. The 2011 Women of Distinction honorees were: Mesdames Robin J. Albaneze, Betty Asque Davis, Dr. Davalu Parrish, Dr. Judith C. Rodriguez, Laine Silverfield, and Cindy Stover. In addition, Women of Distinction alumna Mrs. Delores Barr Weaver was presented with the Lois T. Graessle Community Impact Award. This award is named for Mrs. Lois Thacker Graessle, a former president of Girl Scouts of Gateway Council, who committed her life to advocating and volunteering on behalf of children, women, the poor and the terminally ill. The first recipient of the award, Mrs. Weaver was honored for her substantial service to our community and support of Girl Scouts. Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence and character, who make the world a better place. Girl Scouts of Gateway Council, Inc. serves more than 18,000 girl members and more than 7,000 adult members annually in sixteen counties in North Florida. Membership is open to all girls grades K … 12 and adults age 18 or older, regardless of race, color, ethnicity, creed, national origin, socio-economic status, or disability.Betty Asque Davis’ Women of Distinction RemarksTo the distinguished members of the dais, past Women of Distinction Honorees and other honored guests Happy Wednesday! To the Girl Scouts of Gateway Council, my sincere thanks to you for selecting me for this awesome honor. I must also thank you for Girl Scouts contribution to my development and growth during my youth. Although you are recognizing me, the true honorees are my wonderful parentsmy father, the late Obie Lorn Asque, my mother, Mrs. Inez Christopher Asque, the loving Village of family, Church, caring friends AND my Girl Scout leaders Mrs. Ruth Ray Mrs. Eugenia Brown and the late Mrs. Jessie Meuse. I know that my late father who sold tons of Girl Scout cookies, my late Aunt, Mrs. Pearl Christopher Cohen, my late Godmothers Dr. Hortense Williams Gray and Mrs. Ethel Moman Powell, are each here in spirit. I can feel their glow!! As a Girl Scout I learned Teamwork, Salesmanship, Positive Persuasion, Leadership, Goal Setting, Writing, Singing, Entertaining, the Love of Reading, Public Speaking, Perseverance, and Cooking. What I learned then has carried me throughout my adult life. I am proud to have had Girl Scouts in my family for three (3) generations. My daughter and six granddaughters have all been Girl Scouts and my late grandson was a Boy Scout. To my family, especially my husband Carl (The Wind Beneath My Wings), my dear friends and my extended family of organizational sisters of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, The Jacksonville Links, and The Jacksonville Moles and professional colleagues, thank you so much for sharing this marvelous celebration! In tribute to my parents and the countless troop leaders, both past and present, who volunteered their time ensuring that young ladies would have the wonderful opportunity to be a Girl Scout, I close with the lyrics of Mother Machree written by Rida Johnson Young and taught to me by my Girl Scout leader Mrs. Eugenia Brown: There's a spot in my heart, Which no other may own. There's a depth in my soul, Never sounded or known; There's a place in my mem'ry, My life, that you fill, No other can take it, No one ever will. Ev'ry sorrow or care In the dear days gone by, Was made bright by the light Of the smile in your eye, Like a candle that's set In the window at night, Your fond love has cheered me And guided me right. Sure, I love the dear silver That shines in your hair, And the brow that's all furrowed, And wrinkled with care. I kiss the dear fingers, So toil-worn for me, Oh, God bless you and keep you, Mother Machree. THANK YOU SO MUCH!Ž 2011 Women of Distinction Honoree with Girl Scouts of Gateway Council CEO 'Sam' Tysver, Martha Barrett, Luncheon Co-Chair, Teala Milton Johnson, Luncheon Co-Chair and James A. Richardson, II-Board Chair, Girl Scouts of Gateway Council. Honoree Robin J. Albaneze and Girl Scout Gold Award Recipient Ana Bautista. Honoree Betty Asque Davis and Gold Award Recipient Kayla Lewis. Honoree Laine Silverfield and Girl Scout Gold Award Recipient Ana Bautista. Honoree Cindy Stover and Girl Scout Gold Award Recipient Kayla Lewis. Right Photo: Honoree Dr. Davalu Parrish and Girl Scout Gold Award Recipient Ana Bautista. Left Photo: Honoree Dr. Judith Rodriguez and Girl Scout Gold Award Recipient Kayla Lewis. Honoree Betty Asque Davis with Jacksonville Links Sisters, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Sisters, Jacksonville Moles Sisters and Friends. Photo by F.M. Powell Honoree Betty Asque Davis with her Girl Scout Leaders Mrs. Ruth Ray and Mrs. Eugenia Brown and her Mother Mrs. Inez Christopher Asque. Mesdames Bonnie AtwaterPresident Gamma Rho Omega Chapter, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Mary Brown-Vice President Gamma Rho Omega Chapter Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Christella Witsell Bryant with the Cliff Colemans. Honoree Betty Asque Davis with her family-The Mark Singletons, James 'Carl Davis, Sr., Mrs. Dolores Lorick Christopher and Mrs. Inez Christopher Asque.

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APRIL 9, 2011 THE STAR PAGE A-5 NE Florida and SE Georgias Best Talk StationOn-air:(904) tar!Please () ()One $40.00 () O:The FL-40629 Down to B usiness Andy Johnson African American Men with Prostate Cancer Any African American Black Men who have had a diagnosis of prostate cancer in state 1 or 2 within the last 3 years. African American prostate cancer survivors will volunteer to answer questions about their experiences and feelings about dealing with their prostate cancer diagnosis, treatment and recovery. Men will be asked to talk about their health experiences both with cancer and other issues and to discuss their views and experiences related to their relationships when dealing with prostate cancer. Each participant will complete a face-to-face interview lasting roughly 1-2 hours. Men will be compensated $25 for their time. If you are eligible and would like to participate, please call or e-mail the Study Director to discuss the possibility of scheduling an interview. Please leave your name, phone number(s), e-mail address, and the best time to call you.Lauren R. Gilbert, Sociology Department, University of Florida

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PAGE A-6THE STAR APRIL 9, 2011 C a pleasure is part of the deal.Even when youre shopping on a budget, you dont have to give up the experience you deserve. At Publix, youll “ nd hundreds of items on sale every day, while you still enjoy the service you cant quite put a price on. Go to publix.com/save right now to make plans to save this week. to save here.

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Story by Juliann M. Blackmon Rev. & Mrs. Michael Mitchell led the way as St. Stephen AME Church Married Couples Ministry celebrated the ninth annual Black Marriage Day on Sunday, March 27, 2011 with a ReAffirmation of Wedding Vows Ceremony Black Marriage Day celebrates matrimony in the black community. The ceremony took place at the end of the mornings service with Bishop R. V. Webster officiating. It was a beautiful ceremony as 30 couples from the church re-affirmed their vows in an array of African attire. B1 C M Y KAPRIL 9, 2011 THESTAR LOCAL FL GA SECTION B Buffalo Soldiers City Council Resolution by Yvonne BrooksJacksonville City Councilman Dr. Johnny Gaffney presented a resolution to the city council on Thursday, March 24, 2011 on behalf of the Buffalo Soldiers Motorcycle Club of Jacksonville. The resolution proclaims that July 28 … 31, 2011 is Buffalo Soldiers weekend here in Jacksonville. The National Association of Buffalo Soldiers and Troopers Motorcycle Club (NABSTMC) will hold its annual convention in Jacksonville during this weekend. The Jacksonville Chapter president Joe Hot WingŽ Tillmon is very proud that Jacksonville was chosen as the location of the annual meeting and shared that the host hotel is sold out. Hot Wing expects between 1200 … 2000 Buffalo Soldiers to be in town during this weekend of the convention. So as Jacksonville rolls out the red carpet for the Buffalo Soldiers Motorcycle and Troopers clubs expect to see a lot of gold and black around town as those are the clubs primary colors. The Buffalo Soldiers is inviting all of Jacksonville to come out and support this weekend event. Many of the activities will take place downtown at the Jacksonville Landing beginning with the meet and greet Bike Nite on Thursday night at the Landing. The clubs motto is We gather in Honor and Ride for PrideŽ in honor of the 9th and 10th calvary. 9th Annual Black Marriage Day at St. Stephen A.M.E. Church

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Dearest, Today while meditating on this week's motivation, I came across a beautiful quote from one of my favorite films, Into The Wild: "Happiness is not real unless it is shared." Who are you sharing your happiness with? If you're not sharing it, when will you start? The film is about a young man who lives his life from a place of sadness, misery, unhappiness and unforgiveness, until he goes out into nature to "find himself". While we may not all have the opportunity to escape our immediate surroundings; the idea of happiness being real only when shared is worth discussion, no? Dearest, when was the last time you shared a moment of joy with a friend, family member, and loved one? Or are you still surrounding yourself with people who are not helping you get Elevated? The theme for this year is Elevation, by ANY means necessary! This means walking away from hurt, pain, drama, unhappiness, and anything else that pulls us down rather than lift us up. The question is, are you ready to share those uplifting moments, or are you all talk? January is over for New Years resolutions. What will You do to Elevate yourself and your lifestyle this week? Stay tuned for my next video, in which I will show you how to do this... Always Impeccable, Andrea K. Ortiz, MA http://www.andikconsulting.com Are You On Cloud 9 Yet?PAGE B 2THE STAR APRIL 9, 2011 Community Activities NEW STANTON SR. HIGH SCHOOL CLASS 1963 will meet the third Sunday of each month at the Highlands Branch Library, 1826 Dunn Avenue at 3:00-500 pm. Preparing for Class 50th Reunion in the year 2013. Contact Gracie Smith Foreman @ 904 766-5221. NO MEETINGS JUNE & JULY. Library closed Sundays for those months "KUUMBA AFRICAN/AFRICAN-AMERCIAN CULTURAL ARTS AND MUSIC FESTIVAL" Please support our fund raising efforts in the year 2012 by placing your newspaper prints, magazines and catalogs in our Paper Retrieving Recycling bin located in the parking lot at the Winn Dixie Supermarket on Soutel Drive and Moncrief Rd, 5250 Moncrief Rd, Store #194. YOUR ARMS TOO SHORT TO BOX WITH GOD The show is set to gospel music and revolves around the story of Jesus from the book of Matthew. April 9, 7:30 p.m.at the Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum 7th Annual Team Hope Walk for HUNTINGTON'S DISEASE. This 1-mile walk/run along the river unites people in the fight against Huntington's disease, a degenerative brain disorder for which there is no known effective treatment or cure. April 9, 1 p.m.at The Jacksonville Landing EQUAL PAY DAY LUNCHEON TO FEATURE SPIRIT OF ROSIE AWARD WINNERS. April 12, 2011 has been designated as "Equal Pay Day Ž The event will be held from 11:30 AM … 1: 00 PM at the Advanced Technology Center of Florida State College at Jacksonville, rooms T-140 & T-141. Please RSVP to the Womens Center of Jacksonville at 722-3000 x 201. Space is limited CANNING WORKSHOP. Wednesday, April 13, 2011 9:00 AM Noon Jacksonville Canning Center, 2525 Commonwealth Avenue, Jacksonville, Fl 32254. For more information call Jeannie at 387-8850 or email crosbyj@coj.net. FREE CHOLESTEROL AND DIABETES SCREENINGS offered from 12:00 pm 5:00 pm April 14 at Winn-Dixie Pharmacy, 8650 Argyle Forest Blvd, Jacksonville, FL. For more information call Cholestcheck: 800-713-3301 (NoAppointments) ANNUAL 5K CHARITY WALK. Local Church Aides In The Educational Crisis. The walk begins promptly at 8:30 a.m. on April 16, 2011, with on-site registration beginning at 7:30 a.m. at the church which is located at 2763 Dunn Avenue, Jacksonville, FL. To register for the charity walk or vendor booth, call the church at (904) 766-5797 or register online at www.oacfchurch.com. CUMMER MUSEUM OF ART & GARDENS presents A Genius for Place: American Landscapes of the Country Place Era opening April 29. This exhibit features large-format photographs of many well-known American estates by photographer Carol Betsch. For more information visit www.cummer.org. MEET THE JAZZ FESTIVAL POSTER ARTIST. Learn about exciting performances including Natalie Cole, Herbie Hancock and Eddie Palmieri along with activities for this years festival held May 26-29 in the heart of downtown. For more information, call (904) 630-3690 or email events@coj.net THE FEMALE DR. PHIL, ANDI K., MA IS A LEADING PROFESSIONAL IN SOCIAL EDUCATION AND CONSULTING. Please check out the latest video additions on YouTube://www.youtube.com/user/AndiKConsulting editingSend your feedback to 972.591.3883 (Phone) or http://www.andikconsulting.com ULYSSES W. WATKINS JR., MD HEALTH NOTES STREP THROAT (Streptococcal Sore Throat) GENERAL INFORMATION DEFINITION : Infection and inflammation of the pharynx by streptococcal bacteria. Strep throat is contagious. One out of 4 family members usually catches it within 2 to 7 days after exposure. BODY PARTS INVOLVED : Throat; tonsils. SEX AND AGE MOST AFFECTED : Both sexes; all ages. SIGNS & SYMPTOMS *Fever. *Rapid onset of throat pain. *Throat pain that is worse when swallowing. *Appetite loss. *Headache. *General ill feeling. *Ear pain when swallowing (sometimes). *Swollen glands in the neck. *Bright-red tonsils that may have specks of pus. CAUSES: Streptococcal bacteria. RISK INCREASES WITH *Recent strep infection in the household. *Smoking. *Fatigue. *Cold, wet weather. *Crowded living conditions. HOW TO PREVENT: Avoid contact with infected people. WHAT TO EXPECT APPROPRIATE HEALTH CARE *Self-care after diagnosis. *Doctors treatment. DIAGNOSTIC MEASURES *Your own observation of symptoms. *Medical history and physical exam by a doctor. *Laboratory studies, such as throat culture and blood count. A throat culture is the only way to diagnosis a strep-throat infection. This is an inexpensive, quick painless procedure in a doctors office. POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS *Dehydration (if throat is too sore to swallow liquid). *The following complications can be prevented with at least 10 days of treatment with penicillin or other effective antibiotics: Abscess next to the tonsil. Rheumatic fever. Glomerulonephritis. PROBABLE OUTCOME: Usually curable in 10 to 12 days with antibiotic treatment. HOW TO TREAT GENERAL MEASURES *For adults or children old enough to gargle, prepare a soothing tea gargle. Double the strength of the tea, and gargle warm or cold as often as it feels good. *Use a cool-mist humidifier to provide moisture. This relieves the dry, tight feeling the throat. *Use warm soaks to relieve the pain in swollen glands. MEDICATION: Your doctor may prescribe penicillin or another antibiotic to take orally or by injection. ACTIVITY *You may read or watch TV. *After treatment, resume normal activity as symptoms improve. Children may return to school 5 days after beginning antibiotics and the fever is normal for 24 hours. DIET: A liquid diet may be necessary when the throat is sore. Drink as many fluids as possible, milk shakes, soups, teas, carbonated drinks and iced coffee. Any type and amount of solid food is acceptable as soon as it can be swallowed without too much pain. CALL YOU DOCTOR IF *You have symptoms of a strep-throat. *The following occurs during treatment: Temperature is normal for 1 or 2 days, then fever develops. New symptoms appear, such as: nausea; vomiting; earache; cough; swollen glands; skin rash; severe headache; nasal drainage; or shortness of breath. Joints become red or painful. Dark urine, rash, chest pain or fatigue (may occur as much as 3 to 4 weeks later). Health Notes Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area PUBLIC NOTICE

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PAGE B-3 THE STAR APRIL 9, 2011 2011 BP, E&P One year later. Our commitment continues. facebook.com/BPAmerica twitter.com/BP_America youtube.com/bp Soon a year will have passed since the Deepwater Horizon accident in the Gulf. From the beginning, we have taken responsibility for the cleanup. Our commitment to the Gulf remains unchanged, as does our responsibility to keep you informed. Committed to the Gulf No oil has ”owed into the Gulf since July 15th. As our efforts continue, nearly 100% of the waters are open and the beaches are clean and open. To ensure its safety, Gulf seafood has been more rigorously tested by independent researchers and experts than any other seafood in the world. To date, BP has spent more than $13 billion in clean-up costs. Restore the Environment An additional $282 million has been spent on environmental issues, including wildlife rescue and restoration of wildlife refuges across the region. We have also committed $500 million to the Gulf of Mexico Research Institute to fund scienti“c studies on the potential impact of the spill. Help to Rebuild the Economy $5 billion in claims have already been paid. Weve committed $20 billion to an independent fund to pay for environmental restoration and all legitimate claims, including lost incomes. More than $200 million in grants have been made to the Gulf Coast States to promote tourism and seafood. Learn and Share the Lessons This was a tragedy that never should have happened. Our responsibility is to learn from it and share with competitors, partners, governments and regulators to help ensure that it never happens again. We know we havent always been perfect but we are working to live up to our commitments, both now and in the future. For more information, please visit bpamerica.com.

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Texas A&M won the program's first ever women's basketball national championship Tuesday, defeating Notre Dame 76-70 in a matchup of two No. 2 seeds who sprung upsets of top seeds in the national semifinals. Danielle Adams led the Aggies, scoring 30 points on 13-of-22 shooting and grabbing nine rebounds to earn Most Outstanding Player. Tyra White added 18 points for Texas A&M, which shot 54.7 percent from the field. White's 3pointer with 1:07 to go just beat the shot clock and put the Aggies up by five, a deficit from which Notre Dame couldn't rally. "I knew they couldn't stop me inside so that's what I did, I took it inside," said Adams, who scored 22 points in the second half. We tried, said Notre Dame, we just couldnt stop her. A lawsuit has been filed and a Lockout is in place which frightens some but not all. Jaguars Senior Vice President, Macky Weaver said that once the lockout was announced, Jaguars ticket sales slowed down. Nearly 70 percent of season ticket holders are not waiting to find out what is going to happen. They have already purchased their tickets. However, there is need for more sales to avoid our home games to be blocked out. Therefore, the Jaguars extended the deadline for season ticket holders to April 29, 2011. NFLs first day to draft is April 28. The word, buy your tickets. PAGE B-4 THE STAR APRIL 9, 2011 URQTVU RCIG"D6""E"O"["M Lcemuqpxknng"Wpkxgtukv{‘u"Ctvku"Iknoqtg"Gngevgf"vq"Jcnn"qh"Hcog With a record-setting college career and a stellar professional career that included being named an all-star in three different leagues, Artis Gilmore will be enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fames Class of 2011. Gilmores career has been legendary from the beginning … starting with taking Jacksonville University on a Cinderella run to the national title game in 1970. From there, he was drafted by the Kentucky Colonels of the ABA … leading them to the title in 1975, earning Most Valuable Player honors in the playoffs. After the merger, Gilmore was the first pick in the ABA dispersal draft by the Chicago Bulls, playing 12 seasons in the NBA with Chicago, San Antonio and Boston. He will be inducted into the Hall during the annual enshrinement ceremony set for Aug. 11-13 in Springfield, Mass. Fgppku"Tqfocp"Gngevgf"vq"Jcnn"qh"Hcog Dallas native, Barry Browder coached the little league basketball team when Dennis Rodman played. He said Rodman was a shy youngest and did not like his own looks, but he played hard and he as a coach was proud of him. Rodman is a graduate of South Oak Cliff High School and made a lot of changes after graduation. Some we like, some we dont like said some Dallas residents. Anyway, he has truly made.it. Dennis Rodman's going to the Hall of Fame, and he's freaking out. Which is so unlike him. From NBC Sports: "I thought it was a joke," the five-times NBA champion and defensive wizard told a news conference on Monday when asked about his initial reaction to learning of his selection. "I never even dreamed of this. I never even thought of being in the Hall of Fame ... When I played, I did my job, had fun, and entertained the crowd. This right here, I'm trying to soak it all in." WEqpp"5tf"Pcvkqpcn"Ejcorkqpujkr The running of the fans began at 4:45 p.m. Tuesday, when the doors at Gampel Pavilion swung open for UConn's championship rally. And for 45 minutes, the festive crowd of about 6,000 or 7,000 chanted and cheered as the UConn band played and the cheerleaders performed. Highlights of UConn's title game victory over Butler played on the video board fans cheered as they final seconds ticked off the clock and UConn players began celebrating fans snapped pictures. Finally at 5:30, radio voice Joe D'Ambrosio took the microphone. The crowd erupted when he referenced a sign on Rt. The fans watched a video tribute, which ended with UConns third national championship. PHN"Pqy"Yckvkpi"/"Lciwctu"Vkemgv Jqnfgtu"Yckvkpi"hqt"Cpuygtu Vgzcu"C"("O"Yqogp‘u"Dcumgvdcnn"Ykpu"Pcvkqpcn"Ejcorkqpujkr

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APRIL 9, 2011 THESTAR PAGE B-5 Subscribe toThe Florida or Georgia Star NewspaperCall (904) 766-8834or go to:www.TheFloridaStar.com CLASSIFIEDS Place Your Ad We also accept Cash and Money Orders Call Liz 904-766-8834To Advertise Order by Tuesday @ 4:00 p.m. Artwork in by Wednesday @ 4:00 p.m. FOR RENT FINANCIAL SERVICES THOMAS PLUMBING REPAIRS Low Rates. (904) 764-9852 HANDYMAN Minor Home Repairs, Painting interior/exterior, Pressure Washing, Exp. & Reasonable Rates Call: 904.768.7671 LIGHTEN YOUR LOAD with W & W Moving & Delivery Service An Experienced & Proud Moving Service Same Day Delivery to Any Local Point Low Hourly or Flat Rate *FREE ESTIMATES CALL TO SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT! (904) 563-5656 Get Your Ad Noticed Here and in Over 100 Papers throughout Florida for One Low Rate. Advertising Networks of Florida, Put us to work for You! (866)742-1373 www.floridaclassifieds.com. MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES OUT OF AREA REAL ESTATE ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call (888)203-3179, www.CenturaOnline.com AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769. Change Your Life. Your Future. You have the power to change your future. And you can do it right here at Florida State College at Jacksonville To learn about employment opportunities that are available, please visit our website at Jobs.FSCJ.edu. NOTICE OF POSITIONS AVAILABLE The Florida Star Newspaper The Georgia Star NewspaperSales, Marketing, Distribution, Layout, Reporter Jacksonville, Starke, Waldo, Gainesville, Archer, Alachua, St. Augustine, Palatka, Palm Coast, Savannah, Hinesville, Darien, Brunswick/Kingsland Call: (904) 766-8834 email: clara@thefloridastar.com BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES "Can You Dig It?" Heavy Equipment School. 3wk training program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Trackhoes. Local job placement asst. Start digging dirt Now. (866)362-6497 AUCTIONS CALL NOW! Top 5% Pay! Excellent Benefits. 300 New T660's. Need CDL-A & 3 mos recent OTR. (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Drivers Earn Up to 39¢/mi HOME SEVERAL NIGHTS & WEEKENDS 1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. Call: (800)572-5489 Susan ext. 227 Pam ext. 238 SUNBELT TRANSPORT, LLC DriverPlenty of miles. Recession proof freight. $1000 Sign-on for experienced CO's and incentives for O/O's. Driver Academy Refresher Course available. Recruit@ffex.net. (855) 2892217. CDL TRAINING OPPORTUNITY: Truck driver jobs are back for graduates of National Truck Driver School. No experience necessary for our Graduates. (800)488-7364, Orange Park, FL EMPLOYMENT Absolute Auction Industrial Zoned, 4951 Woodlane Circle Tallahassee, FL 32303. 1 acre w/office and shop. 3 parcels sell as 1 unit for one price. Live event on April 28th at 11:00 am EDT. Info and Online Bidding Now: www.abalauction.com (850)510-2501 AB2387 AU 3239 DO YOU EARN $800.00 IN A DAY? Your Own Local Candy Route 25 Machines and Candy All for $9995.00 All Major Credit Cards Accepted (877)915-8222 AINB02653 ALABAMA WATERFRONT GRAND OPENING4/2 only-2 for 1 SALE! Buy $39,900 Riverfront lot, get RV lot ABSOLUTELY FREE! Direct Gulf access; Limited supply.(888)392-9944 MISC. ITEMS FOR SALE SAN CARLOS LEARNING CENTER needs LEAD PRESCHOOL TEACHER, who will be responsible for the statewide quality of developmentally and culturally appropriate education components for program children including infant, toddler, and pre-school; plans/implements activities to promote social, physical and intellectual growth of children. Requires BACHELORS DEGREE IN EDUCATION or related field with at least TWO (2) years related experience. Send your application and CV to:Rebecca Catingub, School Director 2045 Gilmore St.,Jacksonville, Fl 32204 Tel#904-359-0130 Email: info@sancar loslearningcenter.com ANNOUNCEMENTS RUG LIQUIDATION SALE! 75% Off Every Rug. FREE SHIPPING/BUY NOW. 200,000 Rugs Must Go www.eSaleRugs.com (866)647-3965 CASH NOW! Cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866494-9115. Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. SCHOOLS & INSTRUCTION INCREASE YOUR BUSINESS INCOME Advertise (904) 766-8834 $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$ As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com SAWMILLS -Band/Chainsaw -SPRING SALE Cut lumber any dimension, anytime. MAKE MONEY and SAVE MONEY In stock ready to ship. Starting at $995.00 www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N (800)5781363 Ext.300N EMPLOYMENT (contd) PRIVATE TENNIS LESSONS Interested in private tennis lessons-AllLevels Contact Mr. Nate Thompson 407-365-2990 Own Your Own Business Interested in owning your own business and making $1500 a month Part Time Contact John Elac 386-822-5426 KNOW REAL SECRETS... Causing Obesity!!! 1-888-842-6443 St. John Missionary Baptist ChurchMiddleburg, FLTaking applications for musiciansCall 272-5100 for more info. New Business Notice is hereby given that Gordon Agenor desiring to do business as Agenor Landscaping Services located in Jacksonville, FL (Duval County) New Business Notice is hereby given that Kaun Roberts desiring to do business as Kaptured Vizions located in Jacksonville, FL (Duval County)

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PAGE B-6 THE STAR APRIL 9, 2011 TGCN"GUVCVG

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APRIL 9, 2011THE STARPR 1 PREP RAP PREP RAP Youth Section Youth Section TALLAHASSEE, Fla. … The Florida A&M University (FAMU) National Alumni Association (NAA) Annual Convention is scheduled for May 18-22, 2011 in Orlando, Fla. The theme for this event is Back to the Basics: Energizing that ole Rattler Spirit.Ž The conference is a time to plan for the upcoming year,Ž said FAMUs National Alumni Association President Thomas L. Mitchell Sr. Its important to get alumni to rally beyond this conference so that we may get more support for the university. The focus is membership. We need our alumni to stand up and give our university the support it needs.Ž The FAMU-NAA National Convention Committee, under the leadership of first Vice President Greg Clark, Florida Region Vice President Seabon Dixon and Orlando Chapter President Charles Lewis have worked diligently to orchestrate a high quality, informative and enjoyable set of workshops and activities that will remind the FAMU community of their responsibility to the future of the university. The excitement is truly building for the 2011 Convention in Orlando,Ž said Director for Alumni Affairs Carmen Cummings-Martin. Orlando has so much to offer and is a convenient and economical travel hub for many of our alums in the sunshine state and other points around the country who may be journeying there for the big meeting. National Alumni President Thomas Mitchell, first Vice President Clark and Florida Region Vice President Dixon have taken the lead to develop what is sure to be an interesting atmosphere of dialogue aimed at building a stronger FAMU. Tributes to our legendary Dr. William P. Foster are planned as well as panel discussions featuring key university administrators who will shed light on the vision for sustaining this great institution in an ever-changing economic climate.Ž An array of events have been planned to ensure that guests have the opportunity to reconnect with friends and take pleasure in the many offerings of The City Beautiful.Ž The tentative schedule for the 2011 convention is as follows: Wednesday, May 18 1 p.m.…5 p.m. Convention Golf Tournament 6 p.m.-Midnight Hospitality Suite Thursday, May 19 … Rattler Sports Day 9:15 a.m.…9:45 a.m. Convention Kickoff Celebration honoring William P. Foster featuring The Marching 100Ž 10 a.m.…11:45 a.m. Coaches Forum and Panel Discussion Noon …2 p.m. Rattler Sports Luncheon honoring the Rattler Hall of Fame Inductees Keynote Speaker: Derek Horne, FAMUs athletic director 2:15 p.m.…4:15 p.m. Regional Meetings 6 p.m.…Midnight Welcome Reception 8 p.m.…Midnight Hospitality Suite Friday, May 20 … Rattler Academic Day 8:30 a.m.…10:30 a.m. Deans Breakfast and Panel Discussion 9 a.m.…6 p.m. Convention Job Fair and Business Expo (free and open to the public) 10:50 a.m.…Noon Alumni Affairs Workshop 12:15 p.m.…2:15 p.m. Presidential luncheon honoring past FAMU presidents 2:30 p.m.…4:30 p.m. F AMU NAA Executive Board Meeting 6 p.m.…Midnight Hospitality Suite 7 p.m.…Midnight Life Members Night Out at B.B. Kings Blues Club 7 p.m.…Midnight Alumni Social Event Saturday, May 21 8:30 a.m.…1 p.m. Breakfast and General Body Meeting 9 a.m.…6 p.m. FAMU Recruitment Fair and Business Expo Admission is free and open to the general public. 6 p.m.…7 p.m. Scholarship Gala Reception 7 p.m.…Midnight Scholarship Gala In an effort to foster a spirit of loyalty, fraternity and scholarship, the mission of the FAMU-NAA is to promote the continuous active interest in and support of FAMU, to effect united action on behalf of and for the general welfare of FAMU as an educational institution of higher learning. With more than 60 chapters located throughout the country, the FAMUNAA has provided more than $1 million in scholarship money and other financial support to the university. Florida A&M University National Alumni Association to host Annual Convention

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APRIL9, 2011THE STARPR 2 PREP RAP PREP RAP UNCF Needs Communities Across America to Help Students Graduate this Spring: Text "UNCF" to 50555 $1 Million Needed From Concerned Individuals, Corporations & Foundations PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -UNCF…the United Negro College Fund…the nation's largest and most effective minority education organization, needs communities' support across America to help thousands of economy-impacted college students short of funds to pay their tuition and room and board balances in order to graduate this spring. The UNCF Campaign For Emergency Student Aid is an initiative to help students at UNCF's 39 member historically black colleges and universities complete their senior year and get their diplomas. Nationally, UNCF has raised nearly $3 million toward its $4 million goal for this academic year to ensure that 2,600 at risk students graduate this spring. Concerned advocates for education are encouraged to join UNCF and the more than 10,000 individuals, corporations, organizations who have already signed on and made donations to ensure that students … who have done everything in their power to graduate … walk across the stage and receive their college diplomas. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20101110/UNCFLOGO) "Thousands of students are so close to crossing the finish line and getting their college degrees," said Michael L. Lomax, Ph.D., UNCF president and CEO. "They have worked hard but are falling short financially. It is critical for all Americans who understand the power of an education and the doors it can open, to join forces to help these students get the education they need and our nation needs them to have. Many of these students will not be able to graduate this year if those who understand don't step up to help." As the recession lingers, many students at UNCF schools continue to find themselves in financially vulnerable positions. Layoffs, pay cuts, and the disappearance of many private student loan programs have left students owing money for tuition, text books, and dormitory rooms--bills that must be paid before they can graduate. Education advocates, supporters and friends of UNCF can text "UNCF" to 50555 on their cell phones to donate $10 to help students walk the last mile of their education. To learn more and make an online donation, visit www.uncf.org and click on the Campaign for Emergency Student Aid icon. Individuals, corporations and foundations across America can help thousands of students finish the spring semester by contributing to the Campaign For Emergency Student Aid. At the UNCF "A Mind Is" Gala held March 7th, corporations like Corning, Aetna Inc and AT&T stepped up and donated $100,000 each to help students who have done everything in their power to graduate, to cross the finish line. Lowe's contributed $500,000 to the campaign this year. Many companies match their employees' donations, doubling the support for these deserving college seniors. Other companies, like ExxonMobil and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, have given CESA challenge grants--donations that UNCF matches--again effectively doubling the donation. All of them help a graduating senior complete the final year of their college education. Since its founding, UNCF has helped more than 400,000 students earn degrees from its 39 member colleges and universities. Today, 55,000 students attend UNCF member institutions each year. The McKenzie Noelle Wilson Foundation Encourages Local Teens to Spread KindnessJacksonville, FL … The McKenzie Noelle Wilson Foundation announced its initiative to encourage local teens to express kindness through the Random Acts of Kindness movement. The Random Acts of Kindness movement is part of the Foundations McKenzie Cares program. To facilitate the kindness movement amongst teens, the Foundation is giving out Random Acts of Kindness cards to students at local high schools. Upon performing an act of kindness, the giver will distribute the card to the recipient. It is the hope that the recipient will then use that card to "pass it on!" The Foundation has also created a blog for teenagers to share their stories of kindness. At www.mckenziecares.org teens can express what it means to be a considerate person. For more information on how to get your cards or the blog, go to www.caregivegrow.org. Random Acts of Kindness is a worldwide movement that encourages unique ways of spreading compassion either anonymously or to friends and neighbors. By revealing to teenagers that they can bring hope to our society through simple acts such as, showing a new student around campus, taking out a neighbors garbage, or even planning a food drive for a local food bank, the Foundation hopes to show teens that they can have a positive impact on todays world. The McKenzie Noelle Wilson Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization established in memory of McKenzie Wilson who passed away in 2010. The Foundation is dedicated to investing in our future by helping young people find their purpose in an increasingly complex and challenging world. Its mission is to support a variety of efforts to help young people identify and develop their talents, their character and their spirituality in order to become productive and fulfilled adults. It is currently building programs and resources to help young people recognize their full potential. For more information about the Foundation or how you can help, visit www.caregivegrow.org. GIANT ANTEATER BORN AT JACKSONVILLE ZOO AND GARDENS A giant anteater was born at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens on February 22. The mother (dam), named Stella-Abril, and her offspring are doing well. Stella was born on April 28, 1997, and this is her fifth offspring since arriving at the Jacksonville Zoo on May 6, 1998. Killroy, the father (sire), was born October 15, 1999 and arrived at the Zoo on August 16, 2000. This is the 15th giant anteater born at the Jacksonville Zoo. This was a highly anticipated birth, in part because veterinary and keeper staff had been performing routine ultrasounds, enabling close monitoring of fetal development. Stella was an excellent patient for these procedures, especially since they were completely voluntary and didnt require any sedation--just a steady supply of ripe avocado. Visitors may be able to see the dam carrying her young on her back in the afternoons starting today. The pair will go on exhibit full time daily within the next few weeks. The anteaters are located at the Zoos Rivers Edge exhibit in the Range of the Jaguar. Naming rights for the baby will be auctioned off at the Zoos annual ExZOOberation evening fundraiser on April 16, 2011 to help support zoo operations including animal care and conservation. Giant anteater births in zoos are still fairly rare, and Im proud of Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens prolific history with this fascinating speciesŽ, says Dan Maloney, the Zoos Deputy Director of Conservation and Education. Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) recommended the pairing and breeding of these two animals as part its giant anteater Yellow Species Survival Plan. Anteaters are listed as NT (near threatened) on the IUCN Red Data List. Anteaters are edentate animals„they have no teeth. Their long tongues are more than sufficient to lap up the 35,000 ants and termites they swallow whole each day. Giant anteaters use their sharp claws to tear openings into anthills so they can put their long snout and efficient tongue to work. However, their prey, the ants, will fight back with painful stings, so an anteater may spend only a minute feasting on each mound. They have to eat quickly, flicking their tongue up to 160 times per minute. Antaters are careful to never destroy a nest, preferring instead to return and feed again in the future. Giant anteaters are found in Central and South America, where they prefer tropical forests and grasslands. The Giant Anteater can reach seven feet long from tip of its snout to the end of its tail. They are not normally aggressive, but a cornered anteater can be fierce, rearing up on its hind legs using its tail for balance, and lashing out with dangerous claws that are some four incheslong. They can fight off even a puma or a jaguar.

PAGE 15

APRIL 9, 2011THE STARPR 3 PREP RAP PREP RAP

PAGE 16

Epa Administrator Lisa P. Jackson And Atlanta Mayor M. Kasim Reed To Keynote Famus 2011 Spring CommencementTALLAHASSEE, Fla. … Atlanta Mayor M. Kasim Reed will serve as the keynote speaker for Florida A&M Universitys (FAMU) 9 a.m. Spring Commencement ceremony and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa P. Jackson will serve as the 2 p.m. speaker. The ceremonies are scheduled for Saturday, April 30 in the Alfred Lawson Jr. Multipurpose Center and Teaching Gymnasium. Reed was elected in December 2009 as Atlantas 59th mayor. He is a former partner with the international law firm Holland & Knight LLP in Atlanta. After serving two terms as the state representative for House District 52, he was elected to the Georgia State Senate in November 2002. During his term in the Georgia State Senate, he was a member of the Senate Judiciary, Higher Education, Transportation, Ethics, and the State and Local Government Committees. He served as the campaign manager for Atlantas former Mayor Shirley Franklin in her successful effort to become the first female mayor of the City of Atlanta, and then served as co-chairman of Shirley Franklins Transition Team. His civic and professional leadership have been recognized by local and national publications such as the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the New York Times, and the Washington Post, among others. A former member of the Board of Directors for Sunrise Bank of Atlanta, Reed has also served as a member of the Board of the Metropolitan Atlanta Arts Fund, and the Board of the National Black Arts Festival. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of Howard University. Most recently, the Aspen Institute selected him as a Rodel Fellow. He earned both his B.A. and J.D. degrees from Howard University. Jackson leads EPAs efforts to protect the health and environment for all Americans. She and a staff of more than 17,000 professionals are working across the nation to usher in a green economy, addressing health threats from toxins and pollution and renewing public trust in EPAs work. Jackson is the first African American to serve as EPA administrator. In her first days in the position, she pledged to review critical decisions on auto emissions, initiated the monitoring of toxic air pollution around public schools and proposed new, targeted greenhouse gas reporting requirements. Jackson has made it a priority to focus on vulnerable groups including children, the elderly and low-income communities that are particularly susceptible to environmental and health threats. In addressing these and other issues, she has promised all stakeholders a place at the decision-making table. Before becoming EPAs administrator, Jackson served as chief-of-staff to New Jersey Gov. Jon S. Corzine and commissioner of the states Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). Prior to joining DEP, she worked for 16 years as an employee of the U.S. EPA. Jackson graduated summa cum laude from Tulane University and earned a masters degree in chemical engineering from Princeton University. She was born in Pennsylvania and grew in New Orleans, La. Jackson now resides in Washington, D.C. She is married to Kenny Jackson and is the proud mother of two sons, Marcus and Brian.APRIL 9, 2011THE STARPR 4 PREP RAP PREP RAP Youth Section Youth Section Duval County School Board recognizes employees, a student and community partner during monthly meetingDuring the presentation portion of the monthly meeting of the Duval County School Board, Superintendent Ed Pratt-Dannals and Board members recognized employees, a student and a community partner for their outstanding accomplishments and contributions toDuval County Public Schools: Three Duval County Public Schools employees were recognized for their impact with counseling programs both inside and outside the schools: Nan Worsowicz, supervisor of guidance services, was recognized for receiving the Florida Supervisor Advocacy Award; Beverly Walker, principal at Chaffee Trail Elementary, was recognized for receiving the Laurel Kaden Anderson Administrator Award; and Mike Rady, counselor at Mayport Middle, was recognized for receiving the Lucille Crysell Award; Danielle Cogdell, a student at James Weldon Johnson, was recognized for winning the Governors Recognition Scholarship Essay Contest sponsored by the Florida Prepaid College Foundation; HandsOn Jacksonville was recognized for their numerous contributions to Duval County public schools through individual school and district-wide projects. Duval County Public Schools operates 172 schools and serves approximately 123,000 students. The school district is committed to providing high quality educational opportunities that will inspire all students to acquire and use the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in a global economy, and culturally diverse world.

PAGE 17

Townspeople Place Blame on 11Year-Old Girl for RapeA rape case took a twisted turn when the residents of Cleveland, TX blamed an 11-year-old rape victim for the crime against her. The girl, who accused 19 men of raping her on four separate occasions, was the subject of a town meeting during which the locals blamed her for instigating the attacks. Some said the young girl lied about her age and engaged in sexual acts willingly with the men. Many also blamed the parents, saying that they should have been aware of their daughters whereabouts. According to reports, the girls mother suffers from a brain tumor and her father is on disability. The investigation began in December, when a friend of the girl told a teacher she had seen a cell phone video of her friend being sexually assaulted inside an abandoned trailer by multiple men. Two of the towns star high school athletes and several men with criminal records were among those arrested. They range in age from 16 to 27. C&J1 C M Y K Crime and Justice Crime and JusticeA Publication of the Florida Star and Georgia Star April 9, 2011THE STARVol. 1, No. 20 Former Duke University Rape Accuser Arrested for Stabbing BoyfriendThe woman who accused three Duke University lacrosse players of rape in 2006 was arrested Sunday for stabbing her boyfriend repeatedly with a knife. Crystal Mangum, 32, allegedly assaulted her 46-year-old lover at her south Durham, NC apartment and was charged with assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill. This arrest is the latest in a series of brushes with the law for Mangum. In February of 2010, Mangum was arrested and charged with attempted murder and arson after one of her children (at the time aged 3, 9 and 10) called the police to report domestic violence. Mangum gave the officers a false name and age and set her then-boyfriend's clothes on fire in the bathroom tub. She also slashed the tires of the mans car, as well as smashed in his windshield with a vacuum cleaner while the police were in her apartment. By December of that year, Mangum was convicted of felony arson, child abuse, vandalism and resisting a law enforcement officer for the incident. The felony arson charge was dismissed earlier this year. Mangum became known by the public after she falsely accused the three white lacrosse players, claiming they raped her at a party at which she worked as a stripper for an escort company. She never faced any charges for her false accusations. Teen Commits Suicide in High School RestroomA 15-year-old girl took her own life in the restroom of her high school Monday. The freshman at Leander High School in Texas brought a gun to school and shot herself while classes were in session. According to police, there were no other students present when she fired the gun. Police released no other details regarding the victim or the incident. As an African American newspaper, we basically report on offenses committed by African Americans. Please note that in our observations, weekly reports show that African Americans DO NOT commit the largest percentage of criminal offenses in this ar ea.Four of the 16 rape suspects Crystal Mangum Leander High School

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C&J PAGE A-2 THE STAR April 9, 2011 From Actual Police Reports From Actual Police ReportsDid You Hear About?... Did You Hear About?... SSSHH! EDITORS NOTE: All suspects are deemed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law. The Sheriffs Office reports are a matter of public record. The Star seeks to educate in the hope of keeping our community safe. Workplace Violence Workplace or occupational violence has become an increasingly serious problem throughout all segments of our society. Consider the following to understand the magnitude and seriousness of workplace violence: € Workplace violence is the fastest growing form of murder in the U.S. € In the U.S., 10.25% of men and 40.34% of women killed at work die of murder. € According to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, each year more than 1,600 people are murdered at work. € More than 2,000,000 people are assaulted on the job each year. € More than 6,000,000 people are threatened on the job each year. € According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, federal, state and government workers, who make up about 18% of the total U.S. workforce account for 30% of all workplace victims. Here are a few guides to help in the prevention of workplace violence: € Staff members should notify supervisors and security of domestic conflicts and violence. € Non-harassment policies should be clearly written and then read and signed by all employees. € Companies and businesses should have a consistent, well-publicized policy that allows for zero tolerance for weapons. € Minimize workplace stress. Your Safety Your Safety MURDER Jacksonville police officers responded to the 800 block of Franklin street in reference to a shooting. Officers soon learned that the victim, a young male, had been shot multiple times while attempting to run away from the suspect. The victim died at the scene. Police interviewed several witnesses who all claimed that the suspect in question was indeed the person who shot the victim and killed him. According to their statements, the victim, suspect, and the suspects brother had been engaged in a verbal altercation that had escalated to the point where witnesses intervened to separate the men. The suspect and his brother later returned to their nearby apartment, where the suspect jumped out of the second floor window with a revolver. The suspects brother attempted to bring the suspect back inside again, but on the way, the two of them encountered the victim in the hallway. The suspect engaged the victim in a verbal argument once more and the suspect shot the victim as he tried to run away. The suspect, who had fled, was later arrested and transported to jail.

PAGE 19

Cops Shut Down Shoplifting RingA shoplifting ring in Clay County was uncovered by county detectives and FDLE agents, leading to an arrest. According to police, two women are believed to have been providing "shopping lists" to professional shoplifters who would in turn steal the listed items from local retail stores. These items would then be sold to predetermined buyers for a profit. Police arrested one of the operation leaders, Nyota Z. McGriff. She is charged with four counts of initiating theft of property (fencing) plus one drug sale charge. A warrant was issued for McGriffs suspected accomplice, 28-year-old Dishawn D. Butler, who remains at large. Florida Cop Beats Girlfriend for Not Holding His HandA veteran Miami-Dade police officer was arrested for domestic violence after he assaulted his girlfriend for not holding his hand during a basketball game. According to police, an apparently offended Sgt. Reinaldo Ruiz forced his companion to catch a cab home from the Miami Heat game they had seen together. When the woman arrived at Ruizs home, Ruiz was already there, holding his semi-automatic service pistol. He put a bullet in the chamber and paced the room while the terrified woman tried to quickly pack her bags to leave the house. Ruiz dumped the woman's luggage and knocked the phone out of her hand as she tried to call 911. Then he grabbed the woman by her hair and dragged her around the house. When she finally broke free, she ran to a closet with a phone while Ruiz upgraded his weaponry and pulled out an AR-15 assault rifle. He grabbed her and threw her out of the house just before police arrived. The 47-year-old officer is charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and has been relived of duty with pay by the Miami-Dade police department pending an investigation of the incident. C&J PAGE A-3 THE STAR April 9, 2011 In Your Neighborhood In Your Neighborhood Lawn Worker On Trial for Murdering EmployerA Jacksonville man is on trial this week for the killing of his employer during a robbery. 82-year-old Renie Telzer-Bain was found dead on the floor of her bedroom four days after Christmas in 2009. Her daughter-in-law, Lisa Telzer, discovered the elderly womans body and noticed that the bedroom had been ransacked. 41-year-old Cecil King is accused of brutally murdering the woman, using a hammer to beat Telzer to death. He hit her at least 17 times before stealing her car and jewelry and fleeing the scene. Police believe that because King knew Telzer well, he also knew she would be an easy target. Jax Housing Authority Worker Charged with TheftThe former director of Human Resources for the Jacksonville Housing Authority was arrested for theft. 40-year-old Quintin Brett Miller was fired from his job in early March after police say he falsified documents to steal more than $20,000 from the business tuition reimbursement program. The Chief Financial Officer for the agency came across forged checks filled out by Miller. The checks were made out to Miller and signed with his co-workers names, who were unaware their names were being used to obtain the checks. The agency offered to allow Miller to repay the money in lieu of criminal charges being filed against him, but Miller never signed the agreement. He later told police that he stole the money to pay for expensive medical bills. Crime Watch Crime Watch Nyota McGriff

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C&J4 C M Y K MISSING PERSONS MISSING PERSONS Criminal Line-Up Criminal Line-Up Name: Chanise DavisAge: 16Height: 56Ž Weight: 177lbs Last seen 03/09/11 in Marietta, GA. May be with juvenile female. May travel to Santee, SC. DUMBEST CRIMINALS DUMBEST CRIMINALS Name: Christine Jackson Age: 15Height: 54Ž Weight: 135lbs Last seen 03/13/11 in West Palm Beach, FL. May still be in local area. Name: Donald Jackson Age: 1Height: 23Ž Weight: 18lbs Last seen 06/16/10 in Golden Gate, FL. May be with mother in New York, Canada, or Jamaica. Name: Aaron Johnson Age: 16Height: 59Ž Weight: 140lbs Last seen 02/12/11 in Miami, FL. Name: Tyreshia Jones Age: 14Height: 52Ž Weight: 130lbs Last seen 03/08/11 in Orlando, FL. Has multiple tattoos. May still be in local area. MOST WANTED MOST WANTED He Loves the SauceA Jacksonville man found it unforgivable when a sandwich shop left the sauce off his favorite sandwich so much so that he called the police to complain. Reginald Peterson then called 911 again soon after because they apparently werent moving fast enough to come to his aid. The shop employees made sure to lock him out of the restaurant until police showed up. Paper TrailA bank robber in Ocala, FL made it easy for police to track him down when he left a personal check with his address on it at the scene of the crime. Patrick Johnson gave a teller a note demanding money at a Bank of America on 34th Street, but the note was written on the back of his check. He took off in a cab but didnt get far when he was nabbed by police. PREDATOR ALERT PREDATOR ALERT Citizens with tips are encouraged to call Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS. You can remain anonymous and become eligible for a reward. Name: Robert Smith Age: 52 Offense: Burglary Name: Sherika Walker Age: 37 Offense: Fraud Name: Antonio Williams Age: 23 Offense: Racketeering Name: Shawn Bryant Age: 35 Offense: Contempt of Court Name: Ronald SlaughterAge: 25 Offense: Failure To Appear Name: Dejon Kearse Age: 19 Offense: Probation Violation Name: Vernon MosleyOffense: Stat. Rape Name: Eric Cooper Offense: Rape Name: Tierra Carrol Offense: Aggrv. Assault Name: Thomas SimmonsOffense: Molestation Name: Renford Roberts Offense: Molestation April 9, 2011THE STARC&J Page A-4 BACK ON THE STREET BACK ON THE STREET RECENT ARRESTS RECENT ARRESTS Name: Tyrone Brown Offense: Burglary


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:01041

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:01041

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news


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I OTEATF RDSOLET ARGESTSIMOST RADAFRICANAMERIAN ONEDNE SPAPE


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Have The Star Delivered


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Winning
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since 1951.
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WANTED Less than 24 Hours and Shutdown


I I IA I& I / w


Suspect for armed
sexual Battery


Horace Dempsey, sus-
pect, aggravated battery

hair. He is believed to


On March 19, 2011 around
5 p.m. police were dispatched
in the vicinity of Beaver Street
and McDuff Avenue in refer-
ence to a sexual battery.
Investigation revealed the
suspect entered the victim's
home, displayed a weapon and
sexually battered her.
The drawing fits the descrip-
tion of the male who appears to
be in his 40's, 5'9", 250
pounds, dark skin, unshaven
with some gray in beard, bald-
ing or receding hairline, miss-
ing an upper side tooth, wear-
ing a dirty black shirt, long
pants, dirty white tennis shoes
and riding a mountain bike.
Below is Horace Dempsey
who hit his grandmother with a
hammer several times and fled
from Orange City, Texas on
April 4, 2011.
Horace is 18 years of age,
5'9" with brown eyes, black
be in the Jacksonville area, driv-


ing a white Ford Mustang, Texas tag #JKH-747, with
tinted windows and damage to the right rear quarter
panel.
Please call 1-866=845-TIPS to help in these cases.

The Census Report
To get a true picture of what the population will be in
these United States twenty years from now, you must
look at our babies.
America's child population grew more far diverse
during the past decade with a decline in white children
and a growth of Asians and Hispanics.
The number of non-Hispanic whites fell in 46 states
and 86 of the largest metropolitan areas. In 10 states,
white children are now the minority. In 23 states,
minorities make up mor than 40% of the child popula-
tion.
The number of black and Native American children
declined but by far smaller degree than whites accord-
ing to an analysis of 2010 Census data released
Wednesday by the Brookings Institution.


Tyra Banks to Enroll in
Harvard's Business School
She is a television star and
a model and appears to have
a handle on how to handle
money. Yet, it has been
reported that Tyra Banks is
about to enter the Harvard
Business School. What this
tells us that Ms. Banks
WI. would certainly not agree
with the proposed cut backs
Tyra Banks
many communities and
states are suggested when it comes to education.
Tyra Banks is 37 years of age and is already a very
successful entrepreneur. Besides being a model and
doing television, she has now written a book, "Model
Land" which is due to be released this fall. She also
has a fashion Website .
It is reported that Tyra Banks' company, Bankable
Productions, is worth more than $90 million.
Tyra Banks move to further her education is just
another plus for her.


The cry is, "Let us take back our country." This cry
; by 5 was only heard after President Obama was elected, even
Though the spending of money and all of the programs that
A led the country to fall on its knees continued to grow with
financial deals and tax right offs that only benefited a few.
We witnessed an unjustified war that was doubled as the
assets of the country at war were torn down, rebuilt, and
torn down again. We watched while sitting on our hands,
the outsourcing of jobs and many other factors that caused
the financial problems the United States is facing.
by 25w o: moe The question that comes to the mind of many as we face
another shutdown of the government, is how long will it
last. Many feel if it does occur, it will not last long
because those in Washington who are holding out know
that once they were elected and served at least one term, they will always have a salary. They don't have to worry
about retirement funds or social security checks. They do not have to worry about health care. They are elected
officials, running our country. But those military personnel who went to or still are at war, won't get a pay check
and definitely not for the rest of their lives like the politicians that agreed on having a war
A senior White House official said the impact of a shutdown will be immediately felt on the economy.
Republicans and Democrats say they are about $5 billion apart in what is desired to reach a deal. It is clear to
many that the intent of most of the Tea Party which is not an official party with no desire to become such, is to
shut down the federal government. They don't want health care reform, planned parenthood, Pell Grants, NPR
and PBS. Such items are too beneficial to too many Americans. Why, those Americans don't deserve such ben-
efits.
Americans should be ashamed if they allow such extremists to go back to those days that we have read about -
100 years ago but that is where we are headed. Something can be done. It begins when we vote.


Big Mayoral Candidates

Debate Coming Up

You have the
opportunity to
I IAD make a differ-
ence based upon
knowledge and
information.
Mayoral can-
didates Alvin
Alvin Brown Mike Hogan Brown and Mike
Hogan who
came out as the top two candidates of the large number-
who ran for the position of mayor of Jacksonville last
month.
Alvin Brown is a Democrat and is currently
Executive in Residence at Jacksonville University's
School of Business. He has worked as a senior advi-
sor for President Clinton and Vice President Gore. He
has an MBA from Jacksonville University. His goal is
to create jobs, grow the economy, improve the schools
and have an efficient and effective government for the
city.
Mike Hogan, a Republican retired from BellSouth and
has served two terms as Tax Collector, two terms as a
city councilman and two terms as a state representative.
Hogan received a BA degree from the University of
South Florida and wishes to restore fiscal order, rebuild
citizens; trust and create economic growth and jobs in
Jacksonville.
They will debate on April 15 at the First Coast Tiger
Bay Club, 904-396-6454 and on Channel 4 from 8 to 9
p.m. on April 25. Early voting begins May 2 and May
17 is election day.

MLK III, Andrew Young Co-
Founders of Black Television
Network
Martin Luther King III and civil rights icon Andrew
Young are among the founders of a television network
aimed at African-Americans set to launch this fall.
Bounce TV will air round the clock, targeting blacks
ages 25 to 54, airing movies, sports, documentaries,
faith-based programs and original programming. They
have already acquired rights to almost 400 movies with
black appeal.


First African American

Tennis Sports Agent Dies






Mr. Shelton was a pioneer of
Sports Management. He was
the first African-American
/ Sports Agent to manage world
Wiilliam "Bill" Shelton class tennis athletes including
Andre Bell South. He was not
only a manager and advisor for the best in the world but
was a coach, mentor and friend for both young and sea-
soned athletes, including Arthur Ashe. He was often-
times sought out for simple guidance and direction. He
not only cared about the athlete's immediate career
posture but was equally concerned about their future
professional lives, after having reached their pinnacle
in sports.
Upon graduation with a Bachelors of Arts Degree
from St. Paul's University in Columbia SC, Mr.
Shelton enlisted in the U.S. Army and remained until
being honorably discharged in 1964.
Bill was Vice President of Richard Clarke Associates
in New York City a head hunting agency. He then
began a long and distinguished career in Sports
Management starting as Vice President of All American
Sports. In the late 1970s, he met his future wife,
Yolanda Raven; a veteran of ten Broadway shows, and
an accomplished international Fashion Model, known
as Raven. Continuing his career as a Sports Agent, he
moved to Advantage International in Washington, DC.
After managing athletes such as, Andre Agassi, Zena
Garrison, Vince Carter and Paul Anacone In 1994 he
opened Bill Shelton & Associates, Inc in Alexandria,
Va.
After years of visiting and enjoying the Amelia Island
Bausch and Lomb Tournaments, Mr. Shelton and his
wife, Raven, made their home here in 2004. Mr.
Shelton leaves behind his wife of 32 years, Raven, their
son, Jeffrey A.Shelton, three sisters, numerous cousins,
nieces and nephews.
Celebration of Life Memorial for Mr. Shelton will be
held on Amelia Island at the American Beach
Community Center at 1:00 p.m., Saturday May 7, 2011.


Editorial A 2
ChurchA3
L if r: I 1 .%
Stair-=-NalionaI A-5
EnIr:ar[ain nenI B- 3
Prrp Rap 6- PR 1-4
Lcal B-I
Co in-Inn 6-2
Sports 6-4
Crime & JLIIICC C U C&J
CIassifid & BLusiness B-6


8 5106900151 0


b Iie I iz yoursevIiIIces? If yo
answred ESthenyou eedto pace n a


I


I









PAGE A-2 THE STAR APRIL 2, 2011


1luaget-conscious states KetilnK rooa Stamp Ban lor vrug elons


--CLARA JACKSON McLAUGHLIN BETTY DAVIS
OWNER/PUBLISHER LIFESTYLE/ SOCIETY COLUMNIST
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Williams, Angela Beans, Tony Beans, Herman Robinson, David Scott


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By Marjorie Valbrun
America's Wire

WASHINGTON-When the landmark welfare reform
law was enacted in 1996, the political rallying cry was
"ending welfare as we know it." Today, a move is
underway to rescind some of the law's punitive meas-
ures, such as provisions that permit states to deny wel-
fare benefits and food stamps to people convicted of
felony drug crimes.
These provisions were intended to prevent selling or
trading food stamps for drugs, but widespread budget
deficits and steep recidivism rates are prompting state
governments that enforce the benefit bans to rethink the
policy amid high unemployment and escalating prison
costs. New Jersey and South Dakota are the latest states
to reverse course and allow drug felons to receive pub-
lic assistance.
Advocates for former felons are seizing the moment to
make the case that the restrictions are counterproduc-
tive in tough economic times, and they are urging state
and congressional lawmakers to remove the benefits
ban. Convicted felons have difficulty getting jobs even
in good economic times, and public assistance and food
stamps are critical income supports during the transi-
tion from prison, the advocates say.
"When individuals with drug convictions are denied
food stamps and cash benefits, establishing economic
stability upon reentry becomes more difficult, and it
becomes more likely that they may return to criminal
activity and drug use instead of maintaining sobriety
and obtaining gainful employment," saysElizabeth
Farid, deputy director of the Legal Action Center's
National H.I.R.E. Network.
The network seeks to increase job opportunities for
those with criminal records, advocating for ending pub-
lic policies and employment practices that further
penalize felons who have served their time.
Opponents of the restrictions say the ban has dispropor-
tionately affected women and people of color, who are
more likely than whites to be charged and convicted for
drug crimes.
Many states have opted out of the law banning drug
felons from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance
Program (SNAP), as the food stamp program is now
called, and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
(TANF), the welfare program. Other states have modi-
fied the bans and made them less punitive. Because the
federal government fully funds food stamps, allowing
felons to receive them does not burden state budgets.
Ten states still have the food stamp ban. Lawmakers in
three of them--West Virginia, Missouri, and
Delaware-have proposed legislation that would
remove the ban. Eleven states maintain the TANF ban.
In Georgia, where the 67 percent recidivism rate is one
of the highest in the coun-
f e h a and ma e in l ss p nit e. e


t5r ai w0iere more ttian
dI/ illU WII I IIIU: Llldl
,000 people are in its
state prison facilities, law-
makers have maintained
the ban.
Democratic State Sen.
Emanuel Jones, chairman
of the Georgia Legislative
Black Caucus, introduced a
bill during the last session
that proposed restoring eli-
gibility Tor food stamp and
welfare benefits for drug
felons who had served their
time. "It didn't get any
traction at all," he says,
adding that he plans to
introduce a measure this
year proposing restoration
lust of food stamp benefits.
Regarding its prospects,
however, Jones says, "I
think the chances are very
slim."
"We lock up a lot of people
here, and we apparently
want to keep them there,
he says, referring to the
high recidivism rate.
Henrie Treadwell, director
of Community Voices and
Men's Health Initiative at


the Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, is opti-
mistic that the benefits will eventually be restored for
former felons. Her program works to improve access to
health care and other services for those transitioning
from prison.
"I serve on the Georgia Board of Corrections, and
everything that I see and hear says we are moving in
that direction," says Treadwell, who is also a research
professor at Morehouse's Department of Community
Health & Preventive Medicine. "Our new governor has
made reduction of recidivism one of his priorities. Now
the question becomes how far we will go."
On the national front, proponents of sentencing reforms
are actively lobbying Congress to repeal the bans. Two
pieces of legislation to do that have been introduced in
Congress but have not moved. Rep. Barbara Lee, D-
Calif., introduced H.R. 329, which has eight co-spon-
sors and would repeal the food stamp ban and Rep.
Andr6 Carson, D-Ind. introduced H.R. 3053, which
would repeal the TANF ban and has 19 co-sponsors.
"What we see all too often are restrictions that fail to
promote public safety, that frequently run counter to
integrating formerly incarcerated people into the com-
munity and that are based on political posturing rather
than behaviorally based analysis," Marc Mauer, execu-
tive director of The Sentencing Project, told a House
Judiciary subcommittee last June.
He also noted that the ban does not apply to people con-
victed of murder, armed robbery, rape or child abuse.
"This ban disproportionately affects women and chil-
dren, by far the overwhelming proportion of recipients
of such benefits," Mauer said at the hearing. "The
impact of the ban means that a woman returning home
from prison who may gain temporary employment but
is then laid off during a recession is left with no safety
net. And further, children are essentially punished for
the acts of their parents."
Although children of felons remain eligible to receive
public assistance, restrictions for felons mean that ben-
efits decline for an entire household.
"It's unrealistic to think that the restriction will only
reduce the quality of life of the parent while maintain-
ing the rest of the family's overall level of comfort,"
Farid says.
Celia Cole, a senior policy analyst at the Center for
Public Policy Priorities in Austin, Texas, has been
working on this issue since 1999. During that time, six
bills proposing that food stamp benefits-be provided to
ex-felons were introduced and died in the sfate legisla-
ture.
With state reintegration programs for former inmates
being cut for budgetary reasons, Cole said she hopes
that budget-conscious lawmakers will give new legisla-
tion a better reception.
"Our position has always been that food assistance is
critical to successful re-integration into society," she
says. "We see being able to feed themselves as way to
being able to rebui d their lives."
But Texas lawmakers, and those in other politically
conservative states that support the restrictions, tend to
take a dim view of entitlement programs and an even
dimmer view of criminals.
"We're a pull-yourself-up-by-the-bootstrap state, so
there's limited support for food stamps to begin with,"
Cole says. "There's also this knee-jerk reaction topeo-
ple with felony drug convictions. Lawmakers don't
want to appear soft on crime."
Outraged lawmakers originally pushed for the lifetime
ban because some food stamp recipients though not the
majority, traded stamps for drugs or sold them to obtain
money for drugs. But food stamp benefits are now dis-
tributed electronically and accessed with a debit card
that makes selling or trading benefits more difficult.
Unlike old food stamp coupon books, the electronic
cards can be traced leading to substantially less fraud
and abuse nationally. In 2008, for example, Texas
reported no instances of food stamp fraud, Cole says.
"Who are we to say, 'You made a mistake. You paid
your debt to society. We're letting you re-enter society
but you can't eat'?' she adds. "It doesn't make sense.'

(Stories from America's Wire are available free of charge for publication
by websites, newspapers, news wires and other media outlets. To see more
of our stories, please visit our website at www.americaswire.org.
America's Wire is made possible through a grant from the W. K. Kc/in,,',
Foundation. For more information, contact Michael K. Frisby at 202-
625-4328.)


E


May 17, 2011


TUNE IN TO IMPACT LISTEN AND TALK

Monday, FM 105.7 -WHJX 5:30 P.M.

Tuesday, AM 1360 WCGL 8:30 P.M.

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Call and Talk

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APRIL 2, 2011


PAGE A-2


THE STAR

















Faith In Our Community

Schedule of Events and Services


NEW BIRTH CHRISTIAN ASSEMBLY celebrates
their 9th Annual Church Anniversary, Sunday, April 10,
2011 at 4:00 p.m. Guest Speaker: Rev. Levy White, III,
Pastor of New Birth Missionary Baptist Church of
Jacksonville, FL. Singing songs of Zion: The New
Birth Missionary Baptist Church Mass Choir, The
United Brothers in Christ and many more great singers.
The theme is: "God Is Able." The church is located at
2185 Jemigan Rd. For more information call 904-396-
4949.



SUMMERVILLE BAPITST CHURCH is having a
Garage and Bake Sale...Everything Must Go! Saturday,
April 9, 2011 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. To Support
the Building Fund Ministry. To be held at 2842 Mars
Ave. For more information call 904-993-2498.


The 5th Annual Power Awards' "You Are The
Power Concert" Featuring Chrisette Michele, Trin-i-
tee 5:7 and Brian Courtney Wilson to Be Held at the
Historic Apollo Theater in New York City on Friday,
May 6. Most Powerful Voices Compilation Features
Music by Kim Burrell, Trin-i-tee 5:7, Vanessa Bell
Armstrong, Brian Courtney Wilson, Micah Stampley
and Winners of the Most Powerful Voices Gospel
Music Competition. Music World Gospel Partners with
the American Heart Association and GMC (Gospel
Music Channel) for Gospel Competition. The 5th
Annual Power Awards Weekend will also include the
Power Networking Presentation's "Traits for Success"
on Saturday, May 7 at the Intercontinental New York
Times Square Hotel, with keynote speaker Mathew
Knowles. A portion of the proceeds from the CD will
benefit the American Heart Association/American
Stroke Association's (AHA/ASA) Power To End Stroke
Movement.


EVANGELIST HOLINESS TEMPLE, 6601
Norwood Ave, with Bishop Robert Morris as Overseer,
warmly invite everyone to their Palm Sunday Program
April 17, 2011 at 3:00 p.m. The soulful voice of
Evangelist Ernest Setgler, the blessed voice of
Evangelist Sandy Goosby, the anointed preaching of
minister David Scott, Evangelist Clarence Perkin, the
"Jesus" Dance Team, and much more. The host for the
evening is Brother Nathaniel Goosby. For transporta-
tion call 904-442-0275.

NEW BETHEL A.M.E. CHURCH (New Berlin),
Rev. Roger J. Burton, Pastor will be presenting a spe-
cial program entitled "THREE NIGHTS OF PRAISE
AND WORSHIP." The services will be Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday---April 13th, 14th and 15th begin-
ning at 7:00 P.M. nightly and will feature fantastic
choirs and singers from throughout the area rendering
heart and soul touching music and song. Various
preachers will be delivering the message.The church is
located at 9864 New Berlin Rd. Jacksonville, FL. (At
the foot of the Dames Point Bridge.) For more informa-
tion you may contact Bro. Wendel L. Washington at
(904)576-2346 or the church at (904)751 9813.
II 1I


Ask Us About Our


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in your family yesterday,
what would you be doing
today?


Pre-Need


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Tc planning

_ ,^ ^-Program


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Since 1988
ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
44119 Sonrel Dr. .: ackl oin ille. FL 322118
Tel: I(914) 766-9671 Fax: i(9l4) 766-2354
DIRECTORS


Dehorinh 1est


AlphonoAedI


I Jacqueline Y. Bartle%


GREATER HARVEST CHRISTIAN FELLOW-
SHIP, located at 9113 Ridge Boulevard in Northwest
Jacksonville is having a Palm Sunday Celebration on
Sunday April 17th at their 10:00 a.m. Worship Service.
There will be Food, Fun, Games, Live Music
Waterslides and Bouncers for the kids. Free and open to
the community. Rev. Johnny A. Legons, Pastor. Contact
Elder Charlsetta Franklin at 904-923-2775 for more
information.

Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue.
Email submissions preferred. Send to: info@the-
floridastar.com

In Loving Memory of:


RICKIE D. ABRAMS, SR.
(a.k.a. Bungie)














12-2-71 to 4-11-02

We miss you. We love you. Memories
of you transcends from generation to
generations. You will forever be in our
hearts. Continue to rest in peace with
the Lord.
Be Useful Never Give In, Ever!

STOP THE VIOLENCE
USE YOUR TALENTS





DEATH NOTICES
[n] nr:fgf'frfjgr:1]"r:1,["]rj'nfrffrff [n]


JACKSONVILLE, FL
(AREA DEATHS)

ALLEN, David Wynne,
95, died April 1, 2011.
BAKER, Alton, died
March 24, 2011.
BEAM, Ivan E., died April
3,2011.
CLARK, Frances, 110,
died April 4, 2011.
DANIELS, Desaree
Patterson, died April 2,
2011. Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc.
DUNPHY, Christina M.,
27, died March 29, 2011.
EVERETT, Willie A.,
died March 30, 2011.
GARVIN, Dorothy
Dempsey, 70, died March
28, 2011.
GEOGHAGAN, Floyd
L., 77, died April 1, 2011.
HARTLEY, Jean
"Honey," Daniels, died
April 2, 2011. Alphonso
West Mortuary, Inc.
HUNTER, Ulysses, 86,
died March 30, 2011.
JOINS, Margaret Theresa
Dawson., died March 29,
2011.
KOONTZ, James Leland,
59, died March 29, 2011.
MARTIN, Robert, died
April 3, 2011.
McMULLAN, Dorothy
Edna Ward, 91, died
March 31, 2011.
NEWHAM, William Lee,
61, died April 2, 2011.
PARRIS, Michelle Diane
Bowden, died March 28,
2011.
PITTMAN, Johnny, died
April 1, 2011.
POLIDOR, Shelia, died


April 2, 2011.
ROBINSON, Elouise,
died April 3, 2011.
SMITH, Thomas Milton,
"Buddy," Sr., 76, died
March 31, 2011.
TURNER Samuel Phillip,
84, died March 29, 2011.
VUJKO, Slavka, died
April 1, 2011.
WATSON, Evelyn H., 87,
died March 31, 2011.
WILLIAMS, John
Tillman, 63, died March
24, 2011.
WOOTSON, John J., died
March 31, 2011.
YEARTIE, Comolia, 68,
died March 28, 2011.

~*

GEORGIA DEATHS
BROWN, I. E., 85, died
April 5, 2011.
BUCHAN, James Edward
"Jim," 77, died April 3,
2011.
CHENEY, Doyle, Jr., died
April 3, 2011.
DARRITH, Thomas D.,
59, died April 3, 2011.
GIBSON, Rae Jean
"Jeanie," 71, died April 5,
2011.
GREEN, Retired U.S.
Army Major Robert Yates,
77, died April 3, 2011.
PRINCE, Ramona F., 57,
died April 1, 2011.
RAY, Truman G., 64, died
April 2, 2011.
ROBINSON, Elouise
"Doll," died April 3, 2011.
SMITH, Weyman M.
"Skip," 47, died April 2,
2011.


SThe Church Directory
"Come and Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School ..................................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning ';;.
Intercessory Prayer....................10:45 a.m. ;
Morning Worship ......................11:00 a.m.
Youth Church
2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary) '
Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ............... 7:00 p.m.
Elder Arnitt Jones, Acting Pastor; -
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus ,.
(904) 764-5727 Church -"

Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
W orship Service .............. ................. 10:00 a.m.
Church School .................................... 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday
"Glory Hour" Bible Study .............. ........... 10:00 a.m.
"Jehovah Jireh" Bible Study .......................... 6:30 p.m.
2nd & 4th Thursday "Young at Heart Ministry .......... 10:00 a.m.
Friday
Joy Explosion M ministry ........................... 6:30 p.m .
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. Pearce Edwing, Sr.

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School........................................................................... ..9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship................................. 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday..............................................Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday.... ............. ...................................................Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org

Pa ries ChapelA.M.E. Church
"lii1u A.ll II'n Street, P.O. Bo'\ '"S Buiintin,\ ick I 21i
.... (912 1 (261-9559
.: .. vA. Richard /llii~ b,'i.; [a', ..,
Worship Opportuntities:
Sunday C'lichi, S ,h I
Lite t lI.ir.ll.-'\ |I liA'" 15 In 55

i ( C luc.it Srud', \\cckl'. Bilc Smtu', i
tnd., Ni.l. '" 'I 8:30 p.m .
Join Us as We i,,i i, ,11. ,,IJ of God and Enrich Our Souls!


(Temporary services held)
623 Beechwood St., Jacksonville, FL 32206
Sunday School.......10:00 a.m. ~ Sunday Worship .......11:00 a.m.
Every 5th Sunday Friends and Family Day
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m.
Direct Phone: 904.866.7047 Office Phone: 904.356.4226
Seeing Beyond The Lifestyle To Save A Life


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Clara McLaughlin
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Co-Host


IMPACT

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THE STAR


APRIL 9, 2011


LIFESTYLE
Socially Speaking
By Betty Asque Davis / Photos by F.M. Powell (Unlessotherwisespeciied)

"There's Always Something Happening On The First Coast"
2011 WOMEN OF DISTINCTION HONORED AT
LUNCHEON


The Girl Scouts of Gateway Council honored six local women at the 23rd
annual Women of Distinction fundraising luncheon at the Hyatt Regency
Jacksonville Riverfront, March 30, 2011.
The event recognized women whose accomplishments in careers and com-
munity service exemplify the values of Girl Scouts. The 2011 Women of
Distinction honorees were: Mesdames Robin J. Albaneze, Betty Asque Davis, Dr.
Davalu Parrish, Dr. Judith C. Rodriguez, Laine Silverfield, and Cindy Stover.
In addition, Women of Distinction alumna Mrs. Delores Barr Weaver was
presented with the Lois T. Graessle Community Impact Award. This award is
named for Mrs. Lois Thacker Graessle, a former president of Girl Scouts of
Gateway Council, who committed her life to advocating and volunteering on behalf
of children, women, the poor and the terminally ill. The first recipient of the award,
Mrs. Weaver was honored for her substantial service to our community and support
of Girl Scouts.
Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence and character, who make
the world a better place. Girl Scouts of Gateway Council, Inc. serves more than
18,000 girl members and more than 7,000 adult members annually in sixteen coun-
ties in North Florida. Membership is open to all girls grades K 12 and adults age
18 or older, regardless of race, color, ethnicity, creed, national origin, socio-eco-
nomic status, or disability.

BETTY ASQUE DAVIS' WOMEN OF DISTINCTION REMARKS

"To the distinguished members of the dais, past Women of Distinction
Honorees and other honored guests Happy Wednesday!
To the Girl Scouts of Gateway Council, my sincere thanks to you for select-
ing me for this awesome honor. I must also thank you for Girl Scout's contribution
to my development and growth during my youth.
Although you are recognizing me, the true honorees are my wonderful par-
ents- my father, the late Obie Lorn Asque, my mother, Mrs. Inez Christopher Asque,
the loving 'Village' of family, Church, caring friends AND my Girl Scout leaders
Mrs. Ruth Ray Mrs. Eugenia Brown and the late Mrs. Jessie Meuse.
I know that my late father who sold tons of Girl Scout cookies, my late
Aunt, Mrs. Pearl Christopher Cohen, my late Godmothers Dr. Hortense Williams
Gray and Mrs. Ethel Moman Powell, are each here in spirit. I can feel their glow!!
As a Girl Scout I learned Teamwork, Salesmanship, Positive Persuasion,
Leadership, Goal Setting, Writing, Singing, Entertaining, the Love of Reading,
Public Speaking, Perseverance, and Cooking. What I learned then has carried me
throughout my adult life.
I am proud to have had Girl Scouts in my family for three (3) generations.
My daughter and six granddaughters have all been Girl Scouts and my late grand-
son was a Boy Scout.
To my family, especially my husband Carl (The Wind Beneath My Wings),
my dear friends and my extended family of organizational sisters of Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority, The Jacksonville Links, and The Jacksonville Moles and profes-
sional colleagues, thank you so much for sharing this marvelous celebration!
In tribute to my parents and the countless troop leaders, both past and pres-
ent, who volunteered their time ensuring that young ladies would have the wonder-
ful opportunity to be a Girl Scout, I close with the lyrics of Mother Machree writ-
ten by Rida Johnson Young and taught to me by my Girl Scout leader Mrs. Eugenia
Brown:


2077 Women or Distinction Honoree with Girl Scouts or Gateway Council CtO 'Sam'
Tysver, Martha Barrett, Luncheon Co-Chair, Teala Milton Johnson, Luncheon Co-Chair
and James A. Richardson, II-Board Chair, Girl Scouts of Gateway Council.

Honoree Robin J.
Albaneze and Girl
Scout Gold Award
Recipient Ana
Bautista.


Tonoree Betty
4sque Davis and
Gold Award
Recipient Kayla
.ewis.


Honoree Betty Asque Davis with JacKsonville LinKs Sisters, Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority Sisters, Jacksonville Moles Sisters and Friends. Photo by FM. Powell


"There's a spot in my heart,
Which no other may own.
There's a depth in my soul,
Never sounded or known;
There's a place in my memory,
My life, that you fill,
No other can take it,
No one ever will.
Ev'ry sorrow or care
In the dear days gone by,
Was made bright by the light
Of the smile in your eye,
Like a candle that's set
In the window at night,
Your fond love has cheered me
And guided me right.

Sure, I love the dear silver
That shines in your hair,
And the brow that's all furrowed,
And wrinkled with care.
I kiss the dear fingers,
So toil-worn for me,
Oh, God bless you and keep you,
Mother Machree.


Honoree
Laina
Silverfielc
and Gir
Scout Golc
Aware
Recipien;
A n a
Bautista.


Honoree Betty Asque Davis with her Girl Scout Leaders M
Eugenia Brown and her Mother Mrs. Inez Christopher Asque.


Mesdames Bonnie Atwater- President Gamma Rho Omega Chapter, Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority, Mary Brown-Vice President Gamma Rho Omega Chapter Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority, Christella Witsell Bryant with the Cliff Colemans.


Honoree Cindy Stover and Girl Scout
Gold Award Recipient Kayla Lewis.


THANK YOU S(
MUCH!"


Honoree Betty Asque Davis with her family-The Mark Singletons, Jam
Sr., Mrs. Dolores Lorick Christopher and Mrs. Inez Christopher Asque.


Right Photo: Honoree
Dr. Davalu Parrish and
Girl Scout Gold Award
RecipientAna Bautista.
Left Photo: Honoree
Dr. Judith Rodriguez
and Girl Scout Gold.
Award Recipient Kayla .
Lewis. aa


*EIFhll kLIyou for shaing your eventsII and storI'UiI i es forM( tUhe clumn I]11111eachweekB!L.BecauselkiII ofK yolu readers are there I flki IIwith yo eachweekBi.V For lcolumn]11111entries M you~L
ma onat edietl t 0-51112 Tl Fe Fx86-88607o b -mi a:baai* watsonrealycoj ~comSEE YOU I


PAGE A-4









I _I I


IPA: C-1338
REHABILITATE WHARF STRUCTURE BERTH 4 & 5
AT THE
TALLEYRAND MARINE TERMINAL

Sealed bids will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority until 2:00 PM (EST), TUESDAY, MAY
10, 2011, at which time they shall be opened in the Public Meeting Room of the Port Central Office
Building, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206, to Rehabilitate Wharf Structure -
Berth 4 & 5.
All bids must be submitted in accordance with specifications and drawings for Contract No. C-1338,
which may be examined at the Procurement Department of the Jacksonville Port Authority, located
on the second floor of the Port Central Office Building, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville,
Florida 32206.
A MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE AND SITE VISIT WILL BE HELD ON THURSDAY APRIL
14, 2011, AT 10:00 AM, IN THE PUBLIC MEETING ROOM, FIRST FLOOR OF THE PORT
CENTRAL OFFICE BUILDING LOCATED AT ADDRESS STATED ABOVE. ATTENDANCE BY A
REPRESENTATIVE OF EACH PROSPECTIVE BIDDER IS REQUIRED. A BID WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED FROM ANY BIDDER WHO IS NOT REPRESENTED AT SUCH CONFERENCE. THE
JAXPORT SHUTTLE WILL TAKE BIDDERS TO THE SITE VISIT FOLLOWING THE PRE-BID
CONFERENCE. BIDDERS SHOULD BRING A SAFETY VEST AND HARD HAT FOR THE SITE VISIT.
Contract Documents and Specifications can be downloaded from;
http://www.Jaxport.com/about/projects.cfm. Call the procurement department at (904) 357-
3017, prior to the bid opening to determine if any addenda have been released on this contract.
Bid and contract bonding are required.
This project will be partial funded by the FDOT State of Florida grant program.




wrld AR IL 28 -MAY 1, 2011

OF NATIONS Metropolitan Park
C E L E B R A T IO N Jacksonville, Florida U.S.A.


For festival times, ticket prices, or more information call
(904) 630-3690 or visit www.MakeASceneDowntown.com.


91 Like the World of Nations Celebration on Facebook!


ere Florjdd Begosm

-IN~J


l*Fm-kilr`11


a


WJXX NBC
WJXX WTLV


(j~~~j~~ Ohe fida giiues-Won
go jacksonville~com


Do you dream of your child going to college? If so, KIPP Impact Middle School
may be the key to success for you and your 4th grader. Our free, open enrollment
school is backed by a national record of helping children climb the mountain
to college.
KIPP provides a safe and disciplined learning environment that allows our
students to learn at extremely high levels within a longer school day. In KIPP's
99 schools across the nation, over 85% of KIPP students go on to college.
The same results are possible for your 4th grader in Jacksonville.
KIPP Impact Middle School is now enrolling current 4th graders
for next school year's 5th grade class.
You are invited to attend a parent information meeting at our school. You will be
able to learn more about our program, meet our staff, and see why KIPP has
been praised by the United Negro College Fund, the Oprah Winfrey Show, and
the Florida Times-Union.

*rr S - S 'Sr)


f I've never seen schools that operate with the level
of discipline, structure, enthusiasm and rigor that
I've seen at these KIPP schools around the country. l
They create a total, high-demand education culture.0 O
Michael Lomax, CEO, United Negro College Fund


Become a fan of KIPP impact Middle School


IIMPAC.
IDDLppjax.oCHrg

www.kippjax.org


Wanted for University Study

African American Men with Prostate Cancer


Who is Eligible?

Any African American Black Men who have had a diagnosis
of prostate cancer in state 1 or 2 within the last 3 years.

What is the Study About?

African American prostate cancer survivors will volunteer to
answer questions about their experiences and feelings about
dealing with their prostate cancer diagnosis, treatment and
recovery. Men will be asked to talk about their health experi-
ences both with cancer and other issues and to discuss their
views and experiences related to their relationships when
dealing with prostate cancer.

Each participant will complete a face-to-face interview
lasting roughly 1-2 hours.
Men will be compensated $25 for their time.

How to Arrange an Interview?

If you are eligible and would like to participate,
please call or e-mail the Study Director to discuss the
possibility of scheduling an interview. Please
leave your name, phone numberss, e-mail address,
and the best time to call you.

Lauren R. Gilbert, Sociology Department, University of Florida
Phone: 414-617-1377 or E-mail: l.r.gilbert@ufl.edu




Down to Business 3 Andy Johnson




























Why Wait?

LET THE POST OFFICE DELIVER
THE FLORIDA or
GEORGIA STAR TO YOU
I want a One Year Subscription to The Florida or Georgia Star! Please
donate 10% of my paid Subscription to the non-pr ofit organization listed
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SEND TO:


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Cash, Money
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Accepted


I


APRIL 9, 2011


THE STAR


PAGE A-5


J







PAGEA-6THESTA APIL 211


a pleasure is part of the deal.



Even when you're shopping on a budget, you don't

have to give up the experience you deserve. At

Publix, you'll find hundreds of items on sale every

day, while you still enjoy the service you can't quite

put a price on. Go to publix.com/save right now

to make plans to save this week.






o sve here.


e-nsoto save here. a


presents
pel iuWsZic WYorkilshop ofAmnerica

(Founded in 1967 by the late Rev. James Cleveland)


Wyndham Hotel Jacksonville Riverfront
Also Featuring


rT ,\


1 A


Delegates $25 I l eC s ". Non-Delegates $35
"il urit Doeve lop"me';U dunc" cil
(Included in registration for MWUGL Delegates -with Badge)


The Most Worshipful Union Grand Lodge
Prince Hll Affiliated
Florida; Belize, Central America: and St. John, U.S.V.I. &
Jurisdictions, Inc.


hosts
A Reception in Honor Of
The Most Worshipful Grand Master
Anthony T. Stafford, Sr., 330


Saturday, April 16, 2011
5:30p.m. 7:00p.m.
Wyndham Hotel Jacksonville Riveifront


Delegates: $25


Non-Delegates: $35


-~Gospel Concert included~~
(Included in registration for MWUGL Delegates with Badge)

inolol Deelonpmnt lCouncil


I I


Sons of Gospel
Miami, FIL
.h- I


PAGE A-6


THE STAR


APRIL 9, 2011




B1 M K


APRIL 9, 2011 THE STAR



LOCAL
SECTION B


by Yvonne Brooks
Jacksonville City Councilman Dr. Johnny Gaffney presented a resolution to the city coun-
cil on Thursday, March 24, 2011 on behalf of the Buffalo Soldiers Motorcycle Club of
Jacksonville.
The resolution proclaims that July 28- 31, 2011 is Buffalo Soldiers weekend here in
Jacksonville. The National Association of Buffalo Soldiers and Troopers Motorcycle Club
(NABSTMC) will hold it's annual convention in Jacksonville during this weekend.
The Jacksonville Chapter president Joe "Hot Wing" Tillmon is very proud that Jacksonville
was chosen as the location of the annual meeting and shared that the host hotel is sold out.
Hot Wing expects between 1200- 2000 Buffalo Soldiers to be in town during this week-
end of the convention. So as Jacksonville rolls out the red carpet for the Buffalo Soldiers
Motorcycle and Troopers clubs expect to see a lot of gold and black around town as those are
the clubs primary colors.
The Buffalo Soldiers is inviting all of Jacksonville to come out and support this weekend
event. Many of the activities will take place downtown at the Jacksonville Landing beginning
with the meet and greet Bike Nite on Thursday night at the Landing.
The clubs motto is "We gather in Honor and Ride for Pride" in honor of the 9th and 10th
calvary.


9th Annual Black Marriage Day

at St. Stephen A.M.E. Church


S. , i 1 i 1 r ,:] -


a' .t .=.. ". i.


Story by Juliann M.
Blackmon
Rev. & Mrs. Michael
Mitchell led the way as
St. Stephen AME
Church Married
Couples Ministry cele-
brated the ninth annual
Black Marriage Day
on Sunday, March 27,
2011 with a Re-
Affirmation of
Wedding Vows
Ceremony. Black
Marriage Day cele-
brates matrimony in
the black community.
The ceremony took
place at the end of the
morning's service with
Bishop R. V. Webster
officiating. It was a
beautiful ceremony as
30 couples from the
church re-affirmed
their vows in an array
of African attire.


LI


MOST'WOlSHIFhl UlIii


141st GRAND COMMUNICATION

APRIL 17, 2011


SUNDAY MORNING
(Palm Sunday)


ISE & WORSHIP SERVE

11:00AM
5TH FLOOR AUDITORIUM


MASONIC TEMPLE
410 Broad Street

BA. Randall Gavin

Praise Team Leader


,L ARE WELCOME !!!!


==NMI


I "


9 --









PAGE B 2


INVITATION FOR BIDS
Replace HVAC System at the Security Access Building
Blount Island Marine Terminal
JAXPORT PROJECT NO.: 003.2035.175
JAXPORT CONTRACT NO.: C-1364
Sealed bids will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority until 2:00 PM (EST).
Thursday. April 28. 2011. at which time they shall be opened in the Public Meeting Room
of the Port Central Office Building, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida, to
Replace HVAC System at the Security Access Building.
All bids must be submitted in accordance with specifications and drawings for Contract No.
C-1364, which may be examined in the Procurement Department of the Jacksonville Port
Authority, located on the second floor of the Port Central Office Building, 2831 Talleyrand
Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206. (Please telephone 904/357-3017 for information.)
A MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE AND SITE VISIT WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY.
APRIL 12. 2011. AT 4:15 PM (EST). IN THE SECURITY ACCESS BUILDING WAITING
ROOM, 9620 DAVE RAWLS BLVD, JACKSONVILLE, FL 32226. THE HVAC SYSTEM WILL
BE SHUT DOWN SO THAT INSPECTIONS CAN BE CONDUCTED AFTER THE MEETING.
ADDITIONAL SHUTDOWNS FOR INSPECTIONS WILL NOT BE ALLOWED. ATTENDANCE
BY A REPRESENTATIVE OF EACH PROSPECTIVE BIDDER IS REQUIRED. A BID WILL
NOT BE ACCEPTED FROM ANY BIDDER WHO IS NOT REPRESENTED AT SUCH
CONFERENCE.
PLEASE VISIT HTTP://WWW.IAXPORT.COM/ABOUT/PROIECTS.CFM FOR CONTRACT
SPECIFICATIONS.
Bid and contract bonding are required.



SR 9A/SR 105 (Heckscher Drive) Interchange
Financial ID: 209168-7
Duval County, Florida
The Florida Department of Transportation invites you to attend a public hearing to
discuss proposed improvements to the SR 9A/SR 105 (Heckscher Drive)
Interchange in Duval County. This hearing will be held Thursday, April 21,2011, at
6:30 p.m., at the Holiday Inn Express & Suites, 10148 New Berlin Road,
Jacksonville, Florida.
For your convenience, the public hearing will be an open house format between
4:30p.m. and 6:30p.m. so you can review and discuss the exhibits and have your
questions answered by one of our staff. Then at 6:30p.m., the Department will open
the hearing to provide an opportunity for public comments. It is the policy of the
Florida Department of Transportation's District Two to prohibit materials and/or
exhibits in our public workshops, meetings and hearings that are not the property of
the Department. Therefore, no outside party will be allowed to display or hand out
materials in any of these events.
Currently, modifications are being proposed for the SR 9A/SR 105 (Heckscher Drive)
Interchange. These modifications will provide direct access to New Berlin Road from
southbound SR 9A and direct access from New Berlin Road to northbound SR 9A.
Limited access right of way will be required forthe proposed modifications-
As of March 30, 2011, project information for the proposed interchange
improvements will be available for inspection and review during normal business
hours at Highlands Regional Library, 1826 Dunn Avenue, Jacksonville.
This hearing is being conducted to inform the public of the project and afford the
public the opportunity to express views concerning the location, conceptual design
and social, economic and environmental effects of the proposed improvements.
Economic and environmental effects of the proposed improvements are in
accordance with Federal Executive Orders 11990 and 11988.
Those who wish to submit written statements may do so at the hearing or mail them to
the address below no later than May 2, 2011. All comments received by May 2, 2011,
will become part of the public hearing record.
Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age,
national origin, disability or family status. Persons who require special
accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require
translation services (free of charge) should contact Mr. Stephen Browning at the
number below at least seven (7) days prior to the hearing.
All interested persons are invited to attend the public hearing to review and discuss
this important transportation project. If you need project information or if you have
any questions please contact:
Mr. Stephen Browning, P.E.
Florida Department of Transportation 1-800-749-2967
1109 S. Marion Avenue, MS 2007 or (386) 961-7455
Lake City. FL 32025-5874 Stephen.browning@dot.state.fl.us





Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area
NEW STANTON SR. HIGH SCHOOL CLASS 1963 will meet the third
Sunday of each month at the Highlands Branch Library, 1826 Dunn Avenue at
3:00-500 pm. Preparing for Class 50th Reunion in the year 2013. Contact Gracie
Smith Foreman @ 904 766-5221. NO MEETINGS JUNE & JULY. Library
closed Sundays for those months
"KUUMBA AFRICAN/AFRICAN-AMERCIAN CULTURAL ARTS AND
MUSIC FESTIVAL" Please support our fund raising efforts in the year 2012 by
placing your newspaper prints, magazines and catalogs in our Paper Retrieving
Recycling bin located in the parking lot at the Winn Dixie Supermarket on Soutel
Drive and Moncrief Rd, 5250 Moncrief Rd, Store #194.
YOUR ARMS TOO SHORT TO BOX WITH GOD The show is set to gospel
music and revolves around the story of Jesus from the book of Matthew. April 9,
7:30 p.m.at the Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum
7th Annual Team Hope Walk for HUNTINGTON'S DISEASE. This 1-mile
walk/run along the river unites people in the fight against Huntington's disease, a
degenerative brain disorder for which there is no known effective treatment or
cure. April 9, 1 p.m.at The Jacksonville Landing
EQUAL PAY DAY LUNCHEON TO FEATURE SPIRIT OF ROSIE
AWARD WINNERS. April 12, 2011 has been designated as "Equal Pay Day"
The event will be held from 11:30 AM 1: 00 PM at the Advanced Technology
Center of Florida State College at Jacksonville, rooms T-140 & T-141. Please
RSVP to the Women's Center of Jacksonville at 722-3000 x 201. Space is limited
CANNING WORKSHOP. Wednesday, April 13, 2011 9:00 AM Noon
Jacksonville Canning Center, 2525 Commonwealth Avenue, Jacksonville, Fl
32254. For more information call Jeannie at 387-8850 or email crosbyj@coj.net.
FREE CHOLESTEROL AND DIABETES SCREENINGS offered from 12:00
pm 5:00 pm April 14 at Winn-Dixie Pharmacy, 8650 Argyle Forest Blvd,
Jacksonville, FL. For more information call Cholestcheck: 800-713-3301 (No-
Appointments)
ANNUAL 5K CHARITY WALK. Local Church Aides In The Educational
Crisis. The walk begins promptly at 8:30 a.m. on April 16, 2011, with on-site reg-
istration beginning at 7:30 a.m. at the church which is located at 2763 Dunn
Avenue, Jacksonville, FL. To register for the charity walk or vendor booth, call the
church at (904) 766-5797 or register online at www.oacfchurch.com.
CUMMER MUSEUM OF ART & GARDENS presents A Genius for Place:
American Landscapes of the Country Place Era opening April 29. This exhibit
features large-format photographs of many well-known American estates by pho-


APRIL 9, 2011


ULYSSES W. WATKINS JR., MD
HEALTH NOTES

STREP THROAT
(Streptococcal Sore Throat)

GENERAL INFORMATION
DEFINITION: Infection and inflammation of the pharynx by
streptococcal bacteria. Strep throat is contagious. One out of 4
family members usually catches it within 2 to 7 days after expo-
sure.
BODY PARTS INVOLVED: Throat; tonsils.
SEX AND AGE MOST AFFECTED: Both sexes; all ages.
SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
* Fever.
* Rapid onset of throat pain.
* Throat pain that is worse when swallowing.
* Appetite loss.
* Headache.
* General ill feeling.
* Ear pain when swallowing (sometimes).
Swollen glands in the neck.
* Bright-red tonsils that may have specks of pus.
CAUSES: Streptococcal bacteria.
RISK INCREASES WITH
* Recent strep infection in the household.
Smoking.
* Fatigue.
Cold, wet weather.
* Crowded living conditions.
HOW TO PREVENT: Avoid contact with infected people.
WHAT TO EXPECT
APPROPRIATE HEALTH CARE
Self-care after diagnosis.
* Doctor's treatment.
DIAGNOSTIC MEASURES
* Your own observation of symptoms.
* Medical history and physical exam by a doctor.
* Laboratory studies, such as throat culture and blood count. A throat culture is
the only way to diagnosis a strep-throat infection. This is an inexpensive, quick pain-
less procedure in a doctor's office.
POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
* Dehydration (if throat is too sore to swallow liquid).
* The following complications can be prevented with at least 10 days of treat-
ment with penicillin or other effective antibiotics:
Abscess next to the tonsil.
Rheumatic fever.
Glomerulonephritis.
PROBABLE OUTCOME: Usually curable in 10 to 12 days with antibiotic treatment.
HOW TO TREAT
GENERAL MEASURES
* For adults or children old enough to gargle, prepare a soothing tea gargle.
Double the strength of the tea, and gargle warm or cold as often as it feels good.
* Use a cool-mist humidifier to provide moisture. This relieves the dry, tight
feeling the throat.
* Use warm soaks to relieve the pain in swollen glands.
MEDICATION: Your doctor may prescribe penicillin or another antibiotic to take
orally or by injection.
ACTIVITY
* You may read or watch TV.
* After treatment, resume normal activity as symptoms improve. Children may
return to school 5 days after beginning antibiotics and the fever is normal for 24 hours.

DIET: A liquid diet may be necessary when the throat is sore. Drink as many fluids as
possible, milk shakes, soups, teas, carbonated drinks and iced coffee. Any type and
amount of solid food is acceptable as soon as it can be swallowed without too much
pain.


glands;


glands;


CALL YOU DOCTOR IF
You have symptoms of a strep-throat.
The following occurs during treatment:
Temperature is normal for 1 or 2 days, then fever develops.
New symptoms appear, such as: nausea; vomiting; earache; cough; swollen

skin rash; severe headache; nasal drainage; or shortness of breath.
Joints become red or painful.
Dark urine, rash, chest pain or fatigue (may occur as much as 3 to 4 weeks


later).


Dearest,


Today while meditating on this week's motivation, I came
across a beautiful quote from one of my favorite films, Into
The Wild: "Happiness is not real unless it is shared." Who are
you sharing your happiness with? If you're not sharing it,
when will you start?
The film is about a young man who lives his life from a
place of sadness, misery, unhappiness and unforgiveness,
until he goes out into nature to "find himself'.
While we may not all have the opportunity to escape our immediate surroundings; the
idea of happiness being real only when shared is worth discussion, no?
Dearest, when was the last time you shared a moment of joy with a friend, family mem-
ber, and loved one? Or are you still surrounding yourself with people who are not help-
ing you get Elevated?
The theme for this year is Elevation, by ANY means necessary! This means walking
away from hurt, pain, drama, unhappiness, and anything else that pulls us down rather
than lift us up. The question is, are you ready to share those uplifting moments, or are
you all talk? January is over for New Year's resolutions. What will You do to Elevate
yourself and your lifestyle this week? Stay tuned for my next video, in which I will show
you how to do this...

Always Impeccable,

Andrea K. Ortiz, MA
http://www.andikconsulting.com


tographer Carol Betsch. For more information visit www.cummer.org.
MEET THE JAZZ FESTIVAL POSTER ARTIST. Learn about exciting per-
formances including Natalie Cole, Herbie Hancock and Eddie Palmieri along with
activities for this years' festival held May 26-29 in the heart of downtown. For
more information, call (904) 630-3690 or email events@coj.net
THE FEMALE DR. PHIL, ANDI K., MA IS A LEADING PROFESSIONAL
IN SOCIAL EDUCATION AND CONSULTING. Please check out the latest
video additions on YouTube://www.youtube.com/user/AndiKConsulting.
editingSend your feedback to 972.591.3883 (Phone) or
http://www.andikconsulting.com


THE STAR









APRIL 9. 2011 THE STAR PAGE B-3


:.. .
".
~*:ci~l; i:;; .bd :i::i-lf:: ii:l:I:
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Soon a year will have passed since the Deepwater Horizon accident in the Gulf. From the beginning, we have
taken responsibility for the cleanup. Our commitment to the Gulf remains unchanged, as does our responsibility
to keep you informed.

Committed to the Gulf
No oil has flowed into the Gulf since July 15th. As our efforts continue, nearly 100% of the waters are open and the
beaches are clean and open. To ensure its safety, Gulf seafood has been more rigorously tested by independent
researchers and experts than any other seafood in the world. To date, BP has spent more than $13 billion in
clean-up costs.

Restore the Environment
An additional $282 million has been spent on environmental issues, including wildlife rescue and restoration of wildlife
refuges across the region. We have also committed $500 million to the Gulf of Mexico Research Institute to fund
scientific studies on the potential impact of the spill.

Help to Rebuild the Economy
$5 billion in claims have already been paid. We've committed $20 billion to an independent fund to pay for environmental
restoration and all legitimate claims, including lost incomes. More than $200 million in grants have been made to the
Gulf Coast States to promote tourism and seafood.

Learn and Share the Lessons
This was a tragedy that never should have happened. Our responsibility is to learn from it and share with competitors,
partners, governments and regulators to help ensure that it never happens again.

We know we haven't always been perfect but we are working to live up to our commitments, both now and in
the future.

For more information, please visit bpamerica.com.


facebook.com/BPAmerica
twitter.com/BP_America bp
youtube.com/bp $



W


S2011 BP, E&P


APRIL 9, 2011


THE STAR


PAGE B-3


T"I Kx''





PAGEB4 CMYK


THE STAR


APRIL 9.2011


I, H


SPORTS


Jacksonville University's Artis Gilmore Elected to Hall of Fame
With a record-setting college career and a stellar professional career that included being named an all-star in
three different leagues, Artis Gilmore will be enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame's Class
of 2011.
Gilmore's career has been legendary from the beginning starting with taking Jacksonville University on a
Cinderella run to the national title game in 1970. From there, he was drafted by the Kentucky Colonels of the ABA
- leading them to the title in 1975, earning Most Valuable Player honors in the playoffs. After the merger, Gilmore
was the first pick in the ABA dispersal draft by the Chicago Bulls, playing 12 seasons in the NBA with Chicago,
San Antonio and Boston.
He will be inducted into the Hall during the annual enshrinement ceremony set for Aug. 11-13 in Springfield,
Mass.



Dennis Rodman Elected to Hall of Fame
Dallas native, Barry Browder coached the little league basketball team when Dennis Rodman played. He said
Rodman was a shy youngest and did not like his own looks, but he played hard and he as a coach was proud of
him. Rodman is a graduate of South Oak Cliff High School and made a lot of changes after graduation. Some
we like, some we don't like said some Dallas residents. Anyway, he has truly made.it.
Dennis Rodman's going to the Hall of Fame, and he's freaking out. Which is so unlike him. From NBC Sports:
"I thought it was a joke," the five-times NBA champion and defensive wizard told a news conference on Monday
when asked about his initial reaction to learning of his selection.
"I never even dreamed of this. I never even thought of being in the Hall of Fame ... When I played, I did my job,
had fun, and entertained the crowd. This right here, I'm trying to soak it all in."


UConn 3rd National Championship NFL Now Waiting Jaguars Ticket


The running of the fans began at 4:45 p.m.
Tuesday, when the doors at Gampel
Pavilion swung open for UConn's champi-
onship rally.
And for 45 minutes, the festive crowd of
about 6,000 or 7,000 chanted and cheered as
the UConn band played and the cheerlead-
ers performed. Highlights of UConn's title
game victory over Butler played on the
video board fans cheered as they final sec-
onds ticked off the clock and UConn players
began celebrating fans snapped pictures.
Finally at 5:30, radio voice Joe
D'Ambrosio took the microphone. The
crowd erupted when he referenced a sign on
Rt.
The fans watched a video tribute, which
ended with UConn's third national champi-
onship.


Holders Waiting for Answers
A lawsuit has been filed and a Lockout is in place
which frightens some but not all.
Jaguars Senior Vice President, Macky Weaver said that
once the lockout was announced, Jaguars ticket sales
slowed down.
Nearly 70 percent of season ticket holders are not wait-
ing to
find out what is going to happen.
They have already purchased their \ I
tickets. However, there is need for
more sales to avoid our home
games to be blocked out. e -- -
Therefore, the Jaguars extended J-O
the deadline for season ticket
holders to April 29, 2011. J i
NFL's first day to draft is April S15 AL L-U- CAN -EAT s15
28. The word, buy your tickets. / 1 T TT


Texas A & M Women's Basketball Wins National Championship
Texas A&M won the program's first ever women's basketball national cham-
pionship Tuesday, defeating Notre Dame
ATM mle ENIn UIEi 76-70 in a matchup of two No. 2 seeds who sprung upsets of top seeds in the
national semifinals.
Danielle Adams led the Aggies, scoring 30 points on 13-of-22 shooting and
grabbing nine rebounds to earn Most Outstanding Player. Tyra White added 18
points for Texas A&M, which shot 54.7 percent from the field. White's 3- pointer with 1:07 to go just beat the shot clock
and put the Aggies up by five, a deficit from which Notre Dame couldn't rally. "I knew they couldn't stop me inside so
that's what I did, I took it inside," said Adams, who scored 22 points in the second half.
We tried, said Notre Dame, we just couldn't stop her.


& INTERNTIlOilr0L

DI F ACWION & 6, **1W




SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 2011


The rally will be held from 12 to 4PM at:

CITY HALL & HEMMING PLAZA

135 MONROE ST.

JACKSONVILLE, FL 32202
Over 100 cities will rally, teach-in, march,
demonstrate, and stand-up for justice.
WE WILL DEMONSTRATE AGAINST WAR IN LIBYA AND THESE URGENT AND PRESSING ISSUES:
Disunity, apathy, racism, violence, self genocide, poor health and health care, self hatred, ignorance,
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economic underdevelopment, corruption in government, attacks on school systems, integration, disorganization,
poverty, homelessness, lack of self responsibility, no knowledge of our history, a conspiracy to destroy Black men
abuse of Black women, inadequate land and property ownership, economic exploitation, weak self defense and military force,
uncle-tomism, neo-colonialism, imperialism and Zionism, neglect of our youth, blight in our communities,
political weakness, corrupt politicians, unfair budget cuts, criminal injustice system, political prisoners, and many more!
JOIN THE IDAY OF ACTION & UNITY IN YOUR AREA!!!




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PAGE B-4


1 I
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Cow

The Run to Number One
tE I~3ETmfU T Irrar EU JBE!
1iij4(110 lualjmngmO














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Change Your Life. Your Future.
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you can do it right here at Florida State
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employment opportunities that are available,
please visit our website at Jobs.FSCJ.edu.

[St. John Missionary Baptist Churchli
I Middleburg, FL |
Taking applications for musicians
Call 272-5100 for more info.
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Call (904) 766-8834
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Licensed & Insured L
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APRIL 9 2011


PA-GE R-5


THE STAR


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PRAYER FOR SICK


THE STAR


PAGE B-6


APRIL 9, 2011


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APRIL 9, 2011


PREP


RAP


Youth


-:..... i....

FLORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY NATIONAL ALUMNI

ASSOCIATION TO HOST ANNUAL CONVENTION


TALLAHASSEE, Fla. The Florida
A&M University (FAMU) National Alumni As-
sociation (NAA) Annual Convention is sched-
uled for May 18-22, 2011 in Orlando, Fla. The
theme for this event is "Back to the Basics: En-
ergizing that 'ole Rattler Spirit."
"The conference is a time to plan for
the upcoming year," said FAMU's National
Alumni Association President Thomas L.
Mitchell Sr. "It's important to get alumni to rally
beyond this conference so that we may get
more support for the university. The focus is
membership. We need our alumni to stand up
and give our university the support it needs."
The FAMU-NAA National Convention
Committee, under the leadership of first Vice
President Greg Clark, Florida Region Vice
President Seabon Dixon and Orlando Chap-
ter President
Charles Lewis have worked diligently to or-
chestrate a high quality, informative and en-
joyable set of workshops and activities that will
remind the FAMU community of their respon-
sibility to the future of the university.
"The excitement is truly building for the
2011 Convention in Orlando," said Director for
Alumni Affairs Carmen Cummings-Martin. "Or-
lando has so much to offer and is a convenient
and economical travel hub for many of our
alums in the sunshine state and other points
around the country who may be journeying
there for the big meeting. National Alumni
President Thomas Mitchell, first Vice Presi-
dent Clark and Florida Region Vice President
Dixon have taken the lead to develop what is
sure to be an interesting atmosphere of dia-
logue aimed at building a stronger FAMU.
Tributes to our legendary Dr. William P. Fos-
ter are planned as well as panel discussions
featuring key university administrators who will
shed light on the vision for sustaining this
great institution in an ever-changing economic
climate."
An array of events have been planned
to ensure that guests have the opportunity to
reconnect with friends and take pleasure in the


many offerings of "The City Beautiful."

The tentative schedule for the 2011
convention is as follows:


Wednesday, May 18
1 p.m.-5 p.m.
nament
6 p.m.-Midnight
Suite


Convention Golf Tour-

Hospitality


Thursday, May 19 Rattler Sports Day
9:15 a.m.-9:45 a.m. Convention Kickoff Cel-
ebration honoring William P. Foster
featuring The Marching "100"

10 a.m.-11:45 a.m. Coaches Forum and
Panel Discussion
Noon -2 p.m. Rattler Sports Lunch-
eon honoring the Rattler Hall of Fame In-
ductees
Keynote Speaker: Derek Home, FAMU's ath-
letic director


2:15 p.m.-4:15 p.m.
6 p.m.-Midnight
8 p.m.-Midnight


Regional Meetings
Welcome Reception
Hospitality Suite


Friday, May 20 Rattler Academic Day
8:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m. Dean's Breakfast and
Panel Discussion

9 a.m.-6 p.m. Convention Job Fair
and Business Expo (free and open to the pub-
lic)
10:50 a.m.-Noon Alumni Affairs Work-
shop
12:15 p.m.-2:15 p.m. Presidential
luncheon honoring past FAMU presidents

2:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. FAMU NAA Executive
Board Meeting
6 p.m.-Midnight Hospitality Suite
7 p.m.-Midnight Life Members Night
Out at B.B. Kings Blues Club
7 p.m.-Midnight Alumni Social Event


Saturday, May 21
8:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Body Meeting

9 a.m.-6 p.m.
Fair and Business Exi


Breakfast and General


FAMU Recruitment


Admission is free and open to the general
public.


6 p.m.-7 p.m.
ception
7 p.m.-Midnight


Scholarship Gala Re-

Scholarship Gala


In an effort to foster a spirit of loyalty,
fraternity and scholarship, the mission of the
FAMU-NAA is to promote the continuous ac-
tive interest in and support of FAMU, to effect
united action on behalf of and for the general
welfare of FAMU as an educational institution
of higher learning. With more than 60 chapters
located throughout the country, the FAMU-
NAA has provided more than $1 million in
scholarship money and other financial support
to the university.


THE STAR


PR- 1







APRIL, 2011 THE STAR PR-2


REP


RA I


UNCF NEEDS COMMUNITIES ACROSS AMERICA TO
HELP STUDENTS GRADUATE THIS SPRING: TEXT
"UNCF" TO 50555
$1 Million Needed From Concerned Individuals, Corporations &
Foundations
PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- UNCF-the United Negro Col-
lege Fund-the nation's largest and most effective minority education
organization, needs communities' support across America to help thou-
sands of economy-impacted college students short of funds to pay their
tuition and room and board balances in order to graduate this spring.
The UNCF Campaign For Emergency Student Aid is an initiative to
help students at UNCF's 39 member historically black colleges and uni-
versities complete their senior year and get their diplomas. Nationally,
UNCF has raised nearly $3 million toward its $4 million goal for this
academic year to ensure that 2,600 at risk students graduate this spring.
Concerned advocates for education are encouraged to join UNCF and
the more than 10,000 individuals, corporations, organizations who have
already signed on and made donations to ensure that students who
have done everything in their power to graduate walk across the stage
and receive their college diplomas. (Logo:
http://photos.pmewswire.com/prh/20101110/UNCFLOGO)
"Thousands of students are so close to crossing the finish line
and getting their college degrees," said Michael L. Lomax, Ph.D.,
UNCF president and CEO. "They have worked hard but are falling
short financially. It is critical for all Americans who understand the
power of an education and the doors it can open, to join forces to help
these students get the education they need and our nation needs them
to have. Many of these students will not be able to graduate this year if
those who understand don't step up to help."
As the recession lingers, many students at UNCF schools con-
tinue to find themselves in financially vulnerable positions. Layoffs,
pay cuts, and the disappearance of many private student loan programs
have left students owing money for tuition, text books, and dormitory
rooms--bills that must be paid before they can graduate. Education ad-
vocates, supporters and friends of UNCF can text "UNCF" to 50555
on their cell phones to donate $10 to help students walk the last mile of
their education. To learn more and make an online donation, visit
www.uncf.org and click on the Campaign for Emergency Student Aid
icon.
Individuals, corporations and foundations across America can
help thousands of students finish the spring semester by contributing to
the Campaign For Emergency Student Aid. At the UNCF "A Mind Is"
Gala held March 7th, corporations like Coming, Aetna Inc and AT&T
stepped up and donated $100,000 each to help students who have done
everything in their power to graduate, to cross the finish line. Lowe's
contributed $500,000 to the campaign this year. Many companies match
their employees' donations, doubling the support for these deserving
college seniors. Other companies, like ExxonMobil and the Andrew W.
Mellon Foundation, have given CESA challenge grants--donations that
UNCF matches--again effectively doubling the donation. All of them
help a graduating senior complete the final year of their college edu-
cation.
Since its founding, UNCF has helped more than 400,000 stu-
dents earn degrees from its 39 member colleges and universities. Today,
55,000 students attend UNCF member institutions each year.


The McKenzie Noelle Wilson Foundation
Encourages Local Teens to Spread
Kindness

Jacksonville, FL The McKenzie Noelle
Wilson Foundation announced its initiative to en-
courage local teens to express kindness through
the Random Acts of Kindness movement. The
Random Acts of Kindness movement is part of the
Foundation's McKenzie Cares program. To facil-
itate the kindness movement amongst teens, the
Foundation is giving out Random Acts of Kind-
ness cards to students at local high schools. Upon
performing an act of kindness, the giver will dis-
tribute the card to the recipient. It is the hope that
the recipient will then use that card to "pass it on!"
The Foundation has also created a blog
for teenagers to share their stories of kindness. At
www.mckenziecares.org teens can express what it
means to be a considerate person. For more infor-
mation on how to get your cards or the blog, go to
www.caregivegrow.org.
Random Acts of Kindness is a world-
wide movement that encourages unique ways of
spreading compassion either anonymously or to
friends and neighbors. By revealing to teenagers
that they can bring hope to our society through
simple acts such as, showing a new student around
campus, taking out a neighbor's garbage, or even
planning a food drive for a local food bank, the
Foundation hopes to show teens that they can have
a positive impact on today's world.
The McKenzie Noelle Wilson Founda-
tion is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization estab-
lished in memory of McKenzie Wilson who
passed away in 2010. The Foundation is dedicated
to investing in our future by helping young people
find their purpose in an increasingly complex and
challenging world. Its mission is to support a va-
riety of efforts to help young people identify and
develop their talents, their character and their spir-
ituality in order to become productive and fulfilled
adults. It is currently building programs and re-
sources to help young people recognize their full
potential. For more information about the Foun-
dation or how you can help, visit www.caregive-
grow.org.
GIANT ANTEATER BORN AT
JACKSONVILLE ZOO AND
GARDENS

A giant anteater was bor at the Jack-
sonville Zoo and Gardens on February 22. The
mother (dam), named Stella-Abril, and her off-
spring are doing well. Stella was bor on April
28, 1997, and this is her fifth offspring since ar-
riving at the Jacksonville Zoo on May 6, 1998.
Killroy, the father (sire), was bor October 15,


1999 and arrived at the Zoo on August 16, 2000.
This is the 15th giant anteater bor at the Jack-
sonville Zoo. This was a highly anticipated birth,
in part because veterinary and keeper staff had
been performing routine ultrasounds, enabling
close monitoring of fetal development. Stella was
an excellent patient for these procedures, espe-
cially since they were completely voluntary and
didn't require any sedation--just a steady supply
of ripe avocado. Visitors may be able to see the
dam carrying her young on her back in the after-
noons starting today. The pair will go on exhibit
full time daily within the next few weeks. The
anteaters are located at the Zoo's River's Edge ex-
hibit in the Range of the Jaguar. Naming rights
for the baby will be auctioned off at the Zoo's an-
nual ExZOOberation evening fundraiser on April
16, 2011 to help support zoo operations including
animal care and conservation.
"Giant anteater births in zoos are still
fairly rare, and I'm proud of Jacksonville Zoo and
Gardens' prolific history with this fascinating
species", says Dan Maloney, the Zoo's Deputy Di-
rector of Conservation and Education.
Association of Zoos and Aquariums
(AZA) recommended the pairing and breeding of
these two animals as part its giant anteater Yellow
Species Survival Plan. Anteaters are listed as NT
(near threatened) on the IUCN Red Data List.
Anteaters are edentate animals-they
have no teeth. Their long tongues are more than
sufficient to lap up the 35,000 ants and termites
they swallow whole each day. Giant anteaters use
their sharp claws to tear openings into anthills so
they can put their long snout and efficient tongue
to work. However, their prey, the ants, will fight
back with painful stings, so an anteater may spend
only a minute feasting on each mound. They have
to eat quickly, flicking their tongue up to 160
times per minute. Antaters are careful to never de-
stroy a nest, preferring instead to return and feed
again in the future.
Giant anteaters are found in Central and
South America, where they prefer tropical forests
and grasslands. The Giant Anteater can reach
seven feet long from tip of its snout to the end of
its tail. They are not normally aggressive, but a
cornered anteater can be fierce, rearing up on its
hind legs using its tail for balance, and lashing out
with dangerous claws that are some four inches
long. They can fight off even a puma or a
jaguar.


APRIL9. 2011


THE STAR


PR 2





APRIL 9, 2011 THE STAR PR-3


E P


RI


What does sour school and town do to) .) ...recycle i ems now yo


wNe s. ri n.
www.readingclubfun.com Annimills LLC 2011 V8-N15


Homework
Complete
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Students are "going
green" to help keep the
environment clean. To
save paper, our homework
assignments now come in daily emails.
Everyone has learned what items can
be recycled and they put them into bins.
Read my clues to fill in my puzzle
with things kids may do to help: ,,
1. use _, sandwich boxes, thermoses
and reusable water/sports bottles
2. sort bottles and cans into bins for
3. turn off all and electronics when n
4. use both sides of (may make into
5. school uniforms, gym clothes for
6. read and do __ on computers
7. create a ___ where students can pin u
share their ideas for recycling
8. bike, take a bus or carpool with o
9. have a swap at school to things th
are done with for "new" stuff
10. use items for a new or ___ purpose -
call this "repurposing") old school clothe
art projects, a box made into a game yo


Earth Day 2011 computers fresh
motion 2 toilets 1
My puzzle is about how
schools are helping to conserve.
Some are built from recycled recycled10
materials, and have features to 6
save energy, such as motion- daylight Ipack a
activated lights and faucets. 3 I "waste free
Fill in my puzzle'! lunch" everyday.
packaging cleaner r

RECYCLE
E 9 6 1. panel rooftops
7 paper 1 2. -activated faucets
Forest 8 3. waterless or low-flow
Puzzlewalk 4. buy from companies that use less
donate lights 5. use food service company that
ot using 2 0 uses ___ vegetables and fruits
notepads) 6. more ___ in classrooms gives an "energy" boost
others trade 4 7. wireless tablet___ and energy saving monitors
recycling 8. buying __ paper
p and 3 5 9. better airflow and filters to keep air
10. rooftop ___ to keep heat in or out, and for
others 10 people to study life cycle of plants
at you Visit our web site to print out our new fun puzzles:
Earth Day, Civil War Era and 50 Fun Things.
(some assignments board
is cut for Print out the newest reading log and certificate set:
u invent different lunchboxes www.readingclubfun.com


u nep


,.
_ I_( r I ___I_ ~___I I I_ 1_ _1_1_1 1


I


I I


APRIL 9, 2011


THE STAR


PR 3





APRIL 9, 2011


Epa Administrator Lisa P. Jackson And Atlanta
Mayor M. Kasim Reed
To Keynote Famu's 2011 Spring Commencement


from toxins and pollution and renewing public trust in EPA's work.
Jackson is the first African American to serve as EPA administrator.
In her first days in the position, she pledged to review critical decisions on
auto emissions, initiated the monitoring of toxic air pollution around public
schools and proposed new, targeted greenhouse gas reporting requirements.
Jackson has made it a priority to focus on vulnerable groups includ-
ing children, the elderly and low-income communities that are particularly
susceptible to environmental and health threats. In addressing these and other
issues, she has promised all stakeholders a place at the decision-making table.
Before becoming EPA's administrator, Jackson served as chief-of-staff to
New Jersey Gov. Jon S. Corzine and commissioner of the state's Department
of Environmental Protection (DEP). Prior to joining DEP, she worked for 16
years as an employee of the U.S. EPA.
Jackson graduated summa cum laude from Tulane University and
earned a master's degree in chemical engineering from Princeton University.
She was born in Pennsylvania and grew in New Orleans, La. Jackson now re-
sides in Washington, D.C. She is married to Kenny Jackson and is the proud
mother of two sons, Marcus and Brian.


TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -Atlanta Mayor M. Kasim Reed will serve as
the keynote speaker for Florida A&M University's (FAMU) 9 a.m. Spring During th pr esnttion p motion of the monthly meeting of the Dval
Commencement ceremony and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ad- Conty Schoo Board, Sup rintennt Ed Ptt-Dannals d Board member r-
ministrator Lisa P. Jackson will serve as the 2 p.m. speaker. The ceremonies oid eplo a tudt ad a community prtnr for their outstanding
are scheduled for Saturday, April 30 in the Alfred Lawson Jr. Multipurpose compli shmnt an contribution toDval County Public Shool:
Center and Teaching Gymnasium.
Reed was elected in December 2009 as Atlanta's 59th mayor. He is a former public school employee r rco ed their i
partner with the international law firm Holland & Knight LLP in Atlanta. p with cunselin program both inside and out th school
After serving two terms as the state representative for House District 52, he
was elected to the Georgia State Senate in November 2002. ..-, t . A .
During his term in the Georgia State Senate, he was a member of the
Senate Judiciary, Higher Education, Transportation, Ethics, and the State and B rly N alk pripal at haff Trail E a r I fo
Local Government Committees. He served as the campaign manager forAt- ,
lanta's former Mayor Shirley Franklin in her successful effort to become the
first female mayor of the City of Atlanta, and then served as co-chairman of Nik Ry coun t Mayport Midd rconized fo receiving the
Shirley Franklin's Transition Team. His civic and professional leadership Lcill Crvsell Aw
have been recognized by local and national publications such as the Atlanta
Journal-Constitution, the New York Times, and the Washington Post, among anielle Cogdell, a student at iJames Welon Johnson, was recognized for win-
others. ing the Governor's Rcognition Scholarship Essay Contest sponsored by the
A former member of the Board of Directors for Sunrise Bank ofAt- Flori Prepaid College Foundation
lanta, Reed has also served as a member of the Board of the Metropolitan
Atlanta Arts Fund, and the Board of the National Black Arts Festival. He is HandsOn iJcksonville wa reconid for their numero contribution to
a member of the Board of Trustees of Howard University. Most recently, the Duvl Count public school through individual school and istrict-wid project
Aspen Institute selected him as a Rodel Fellow. He earned both his B.A. and Dal county Public School opa 172 school and sr approxi-
J.D. degrees from Howard University. lately 12,000 student. Th school district i committed topriding high qal-
Jackson leads EPA's efforts to protect the health and environment for ity e tional opportunities that ill inspire all tunt to acquire and s the
all Americans. She and a staff of more than 17,000 professionals are work- knoled7Ie and kills needed to scceed in a global economy, and cultull diver s
ing across the nation to usher in a green economy, addressing health threats wold


THE STAR


PR-4




C&J1 C M K


April 9, 2011


THE STAR


Vol. 1, No. 20


CliI an Jutc

A Pbicaili of

th Foida Sta an Ge i Star


Former Duke University Rape Accuser Arrested for
Stabbing Boyfriend


The woman who accused three
Duke University lacrosse players of rape
in 2006 was arrested Sunday for stabbing
her boyfriend repeatedly with a knife.
Crystal Mangum, 32, allegedly as-
saulted her 46-year-old lover at her south
Durham, NC apartment and was charged
with assault with a deadly weapon with
intent to kill.
SThis arrest is the latest in a series
of brushes with the law for Mangum.
In February of 2010, Mangum
was arrested and charged with attempted
murder and arson after one of her chil-
Crystal Mangum dren (at the time aged 3, 9 and 10) called
the police to report domestic violence.
Mangum gave the officers a false name
and age and set her then-boyfriend's clothes on fire in the bathroom tub. She also slashed
the tires of the man's car, as well as smashed in his windshield with a vacuum cleaner
while the police were in her apartment.
By December of that year, Mangum was convicted of felony arson, child abuse,
vandalism and resisting a law enforcement officer for the incident. The felony arson
charge was dismissed earlier this year.
Mangum became known by the public after she falsely accused the three white
lacrosse players, claiming they raped her at a party at which she worked as a stripper for
an escort company. She never faced any charges for her false accusations.


School Restroom


A 15-year-old girl took her own life in the rest-
room of her high school Monday.
..." The freshman at Leander High School in Texas
S brought a gun to school and shot herself while classes
F were in session. According to police, there were no other
students present when she fired the gun.
Leander High School Police released no other details regarding the vic-
tim or the incident.


Townspeople Place Blame on 11-
Year-Old Girl for Rape


Four of the 16 rape suspects


A rape case took a twisted turn when the residents
of Cleveland, TX blamed an 11-year-old rape victim for
the crime against her.
The girl, who accused 19 men of raping her on
four separate occasions, was the subject of a town meet-
ing during which the locals blamed her for instigating the
attacks.
Some said the young girl lied about her age and
engaged in sexual acts willingly with the men. Many also
blamed the parents, saying that they should have been
aware of their daughter's whereabouts.
According to reports, the girl's mother suffers
from a brain tumor and her father is on disability.
The investigation began in December, when a
friend of the girl told a teacher she had seen a cell phone
video of her friend being sexually assaulted inside an
abandoned trailer by multiple men.
Two of the town's star high school athletes and
several men with criminal records were among those ar-
rested. They range in age from 16 to 27.


m


m








ssSHH! From Actual Police Reports

Did You Hear About?...

EDITOR'S N
Al upcsaedee noetulspoe ult nacuto a.TeSeifsOfc eot
I,, 'I I' ,', ''I-'




xr *m~we fnhlc ecr Te~~i sikvtooeeyt i te on rca muhum e-,-


MURDER Jacksonville police
officers responded to the 800 block
of Franklin street in reference to a
shooting. I -

Officers soon learned that
the victim, a young male, had been
shot multiple times while attempt-
ing to run away from the suspect.
The victim died at the scene.

Police interviewed several
witnesses who all claimed that the
suspect in question was indeed the person who shot the victim and killed
him.

According to their statements, the victim, suspect, and the sus-
pect's brother had been engaged in a verbal altercation that had escalated
to the point where witnesses intervened to separate the men. The suspect
and his brother later returned to their nearby apartment, where the sus-
pect jumped out of the second floor window with a revolver.


7WE
FLORIDA STAR








CONNECTION
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ones on lock down in jail, or prison? Anyone gone but
not forgotten that you want to encourage? Get connected
and keep a CONNECTION through our new CONNECTION
spot starting April 16.
Call, Write, Email, or Fax to us titled: CONNECTION
$10 -3 Lines of text only (Total 18 words)
With PICTURE included $25.
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correspondents to P.O. Box 40629 Jacksonville, FL 32203


The suspect's
brother attempted to
bring the suspect
back inside again,
but on the way, the
two of them encoun-
tered the victim in
the hallway. The sus-
pect engaged the vic-
tim in a verbal
argument once more
and the suspect shot
the victim as he tried
to run away.

The suspect, who
had fled, was later ar-
rested and trans-
ported to jail.


Workplace Violence

Workplace or occupational violence has become an increasingly se-
rious problem throughout all segments of our society. Consider the fol-
lowing to understand the magnitude and seriousness of workplace
violence:

* Workplace violence is the fastest growing form of murder in the U.S.

* In the U.S., 10.25% of men and 40.34% of women killed at work die
of murder.

* According to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health,
each year more than 1,600 people are murdered at work.

* More than 2,000,000 people are assaulted on the job each year.

* More than 6,000,000 people are threatened on the job each year.

* According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, federal, state and gov-
ernment workers, who make up about 18% of the total U.S. workforce
account for 30% of all workplace victims.

Here are a few guides to help in the prevention of workplace vio-
lence:

* Staff members should notify supervisors and security of domestic con-
flicts and violence.

* Non-harassment policies should be clearly written and then read and
signed by all employees.

* Companies and businesses should have a consistent, well-publicized
policy that allows for zero tolerance for weapons.

* Minimize workplace stress.


April 9. 2011


THE STAR


C&J PA GE A-2





Apriln 9,ur 2011 THE STAR C&JPAG 3


Cops Shut Down Shoplifting Ring


A shoplifting ring in Clay County was un-
covered by county detectives and FDLE agents, lead-
ing to an arrest.
According to police, two women are be-
lieved to have been providing "shopping lists" to pro-
fessional shoplifters who would in turn steal the listed
items from local retail stores. These items would then
be sold to predetermined buyers for a profit.
Police arrested one of the operation lead-
ers, Nyota Z. McGriff. She is charged with four
counts of initiating theft of property (fencing) plus
one drug sale charge.
A warrant was issued for McGriff's sus-
Nyota McGriff pected accomplice, 28-year-old Dishawn D. Butler,
who remains at large.


Lawn Worker On Trial for

Murdering Employer

A Jacksonville man is on trial this week for the
killing of his employer during a robbery.
82-year-old Renie Telzer-Bain was found dead on
the floor of her bedroom four days after Christmas in
2009. Her daughter-in-law, Lisa Telzer, discovered the
elderly woman's body and noticed that the bedroom had
been ransacked.
41-year-old Cecil King is accused of brutally mur-
dering the woman, using a hammer to beat Telzer to
death. He hit her at least 17 times before stealing her car
and jewelry and fleeing the scene.
Police believe that because King knew Telzer
well, he also knew she would be an easy target.


CrMime Watch^I'm


Florida Cop Beats Girlfriend for Not

Holding His Hand

A veteran Miami-Dade police officer was arrested for domestic violence after he
assaulted his girlfriend for not holding his hand during a basketball game.
According to police, an apparently offended Sgt. Reinaldo Ruiz forced his com-
panion to catch a cab home from the Miami Heat game they had seen together. When
the woman arrived at Ruiz's home, Ruiz was already there, holding his semi-automatic
service pistol. He put a bullet in the chamber and paced the room while the terrified
woman tried to quickly pack her bags to leave the house.
Ruiz dumped the woman's luggage and knocked the phone out of her hand as she
tried to call 911. Then he grabbed the woman by her hair and dragged her around the
house.
When she finally broke free, she ran to a closet with a phone while Ruiz up-
graded his weaponry and pulled out an AR-15 assault rifle. He grabbed her and threw
her out of the house just before police arrived.
The 47-year-old officer is charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon
and has been relived of duty with pay by the Miami-Dade police department pending
an investigation of the incident.


Jax Housing Authority

Worker Charged with Theft

The former director of Human Resources for the
Jacksonville Housing Authority was arrested for theft.
40-year-old Quintin Brett Miller was fired from
his job in early March after police say he falsified docu-
ments to steal more than $20,000 from the business' tu-
ition reimbursement program.
The Chief Financial Officer for the agency came
across forged checks filled out by Miller. The checks were
made out to Miller and signed with his co-workers names,
who were unaware their names were being used to obtain
the checks.
The agency offered to allow Miller to repay the
money in lieu of criminal charges being filed against him,
but Miller never signed the agreement. He later told po-
lice that he stole the money to pay for expensive medical
bills.


April 9. 2011


THE STAR


C& JPAGE A-3




C&J4 M K


April 9, 2011


THE STAR


C&JPae A-4


Criina U
MISNGPRSN


Name: Chanise Davis
Age: 16 Height: 5'6"
Weight: 1771bs
Last seen 03/09/11 in Marietta,
GA. May be with juvenile female.
May travel to Santee, SC.


Name: Christine Jackson Name: Donald Jackson
Age: 15 Height: 5'4" Age: 1 Height: 2'3"
Weight: 1351bs Weight: 181bs
Last seen 03/13/11 in West Palm Last seen 06/16/10 in Golden
Beach, FL. May still be in local Gate, FL. May be with mother in
area. New York, Canada, or Jamaica.


Name: Aaron Johnson
Age: 16 Height: 5'9"
Weight: 1401bs
Last seen 02/12/11 in Miami, FL.


Name: Tyreshia Jones
Age: 14 Height: 5'2"
Weight: 1301bs
Last seen 03/08/11 in Orlando,
FL. Has multiple tattoos. May
still be in local area.


I I He Loves the Sauce I I Paper Trail


A Jacksonville man found it unforgivable when a
sandwich shop left the sauce off his favorite sandwich
- so much so that he called the police to complain.
Reginald Peterson then called 911 again soon after
because they apparently weren't moving fast enough to
come to his aid. The shop employees made sure to lock
him out of the restaurant until police showed up.


A bank robber in Ocala, FL made it easy for police
to track him down when he left a personal check with
his address on it at the scene of the crime.
Patrick Johnson gave a teller a note demanding
money at a Bank ofAmerica on 34th Street, but the note
was written on the back of his check. He took off in a
cab but didn't get far when he was nabbed by police.


Ilallll. IoIUUC I O11
Age: 52
Offense: Burglary


Name: Sherika
Age: 37
Offense: Fraud


Name: Antonio Willia
Age: 23
Offense: Racketeering


Name: Dejon Kearse Name: Ronald Slaughter Name: Shawn Bryant
Age: 19 Age: 25 Age: 35
Offense: Probation Violation Offense: Fniiur Tn Annonr Offense: Contempt of Court


.. . . AL R


Name: Vernon Mosley
Offense: Stat. Rape


Name: Renford Roberts
Offense: Molestation


Name: Thomas Simmons
Offense: Molestation


Name: Tyrone Brown Name: Tierra Carrol Name: Eric Cooper
Offense: Burglary Offense: Aggrv. Assault Offense: Rape


w ithip are ed to c i S r at ,I Yoc mI In a y an b o a r