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Florida star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:01035

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African American newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates:
30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981- .

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000581378
oclc - 02261130
notis - ADA9536
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:01035

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Full Text



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LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY 4205
OR CURRENT RESIDENT
PO BOX I 17007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007
Winning
Publication,
serving you
since 1951. M
Rated "A" by I
the Better I .. -
Business Bureau


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Read The Florida
and Georgia Star
Newspapers.
Listen to IMPACT
Radio Talk Show.
WWW.thefloridastar.com
Still the people's
choice, striving to
make a difference.


I 25,2010AND, -JANUAR1V .60


News in Brief

135 Arrested in Pill Operation
About 17,000 prescription pills and more than $3.6
million was seized in Operation Growing pains. In
this operation, 135 people were arrested, utilizing law
enforcement agencies in 10 North Florida drug traffick-
ing areas.
This was a 14-week investigation which began on
September 1 and culminated on December 15.
29 Candidates Qualified via Petition
January 10-14, 2011 is the qualifying period for all
citywide candidates for the Jacksonville first election
on Tuesday, March 22, 2011. With 527,079 active reg-
istered voters in Duval County, a person running for
mayor must receive at least 1% of the total number of
voters in the area represented in order to be eligible to
qualify. Candidates who do not qualify by petition
must pay 3% of the annual salary of the office they are
seeking.
For mayor, Alvin Brown, Mike Hogan and Warren
Lee qualified through the petition process.
Ken Jefferson, who is seeking the position of sheriff,
also received enough signatures to qualify. Each of
these candidates received at least 5,271 signatures.

Officer Shot at Man eight times

Reginald Henley, 27 was shot at 8 times by a
Jacksonville Sheriff officer when he refused to pull
Over and then ran in the Lem Turner Road, Trout River
area early Tuesday morning. He was asked to stop
because high headlights were out. But rather than stop,
according to the officer, he continued, then later ran
from the vehicle in the Sherwood area.
The officer said he thought Henley had a gun.
Neighbors and Hurting Families held a protest
regarding the matter since Henley was unarmed.
Henley was booked on charges of assault and battery
and possession of cocaine, marijuana, resisting arrest
and reckless driving. His injury is not life threatening.
GO TO CRIME & JUSTICE, SECTIONS A & B
for more information on such matters.

Civil rights groups seek
review of Texas Schools
The Texas NAACP and Texas League of United Latin
American Citizens on Monday contended that the cur-
riculum changes passed in May "were made with the
intention to discriminate" and would have a "stigmatiz-
ing impact" on African-American and Latino students.
The organizations said that the state is failing to pro-
vide many of its minority students with equal educa-
tional opportunities and have sought a federal review
of public school education in Texas, accusing the state
school administrators of violating federal civil rights
laws after the changes were made.
Texas schools are also changing their text books in a
manner that many feel will eliminate black and
Hispanic history.

Local Emergency Dispatch
Operator Honored
--dAnna~ is the nnh- nerson to


Emergency Dispatch
Operator


t X1111d 16 U WHY1. U bVA VI LL?
receive a Life Saver Award
working with ADT.
She helped saved the lives
of an Ohio family (couple
and two children) when
their house caught fire.
They lost everything but
Anna's swift action saved
their lives. The came to the
city to honor her.


8 5106900151 0


2010 The Good, The Bad, The Sad of Year

The Good The Bad The Sad


Pride,Praise and Progress It was not good
President Said in January 2010 Earthquakes in Haiti
"I Don't Quit." Hait
"I Don't Quit." .


No Congress since 1960s has impact on public
as 11lth, according to reports and studies.
Before leaving for Christmas with his family,
the President signed into law the ban on gays
openly serving in the military. The lllth
Congress made more law affecting more
Americans since the "Great Society" legislation
of the 1960s.
This Congreess took the biggest step since
President Theodore Roosevelt for a national
health-care system giving 32 million Americans
access to insurance.
Before adjourning, they approved legislation to
help rescuers and clean-up (See A-7
Couple Wanted One, Received Six


Mia and Rozonno Jr., tried tor five years to give
birth but now they have four boys and two girls. It
took 50 medical staff members to deliver the
infants. The first weighted a little over two pounds
and the smallest was a pound and 12 ounces.
Together, they weighted nine and one half pounds.
The family lives in Ohio.

Black Farmers Finally Get Justice
~8~Jim-


Black farmers, in their efforts to receive justice,
used a mule in Manhattan and a tractor at the
Capitol and their efforts finally paid off. The farm-
ers finally received approval for a settlement
designed to remedy decades of discrimination by
the Department of Agriculture and the Claims
Resolution Act was finally approved and signed by
President Obama.
First Ship Named After a Black
The USS Gravely, a guided
missile destroyer, was com-
missioned in November and
named after Vice Admiral
Samuel L. Gravely, Jr. It's
?I America's first.


Thousands lost their lives and
all of their worldly goods.
World wide help was given but
country still needs help.

Six People, 3
Generations


Those we lost








Dorothy Height, civil
rights icon, longtime
president of the National
Council of Negro Women,
died in April.
D.C. post office was
renamed after her this
week. President Obama
signed bill Wednesday.


Rev. Dr. Benjamin Hooks.
first Black chairman of the
Federal Communications
Commission; 15 years as
chairman of the NAACP.


Brenda Edwards, 57,
Jacksonville, Melissa Mitchell,
39, Georgia, a 16, 11, and 4 year
old, three generations, killed
when a speeding car clipped
them and their van was struck
by a car, on their way to spend
Easter with family.
Bishop Eddie Long's
Battle Grows
Bishop
Eddie Long
of one of the
nation's
largest Black
churches.
The church is
in Georgia.
Bishop Long has been
accused of sexual misconduct
with young men in his church.
Now, he is being investigated
for financial misconduct.
Rapper T.I. and Tiny



, ,"





PP.

Rapper T.I. and his new
wife, were in Los Angeles
shortly after saying their "I
do." They were pulled over by
an LA. officer and were
arrested for breaking his pro-
bation and having drugs with
him. He is now serving 11
more months in prison.


Gary Coleman, otimedian-
actor, mostly known
as"Arnold."


Bishop Tom
senior pastor
Missionary
Jacksonville,
death.
.'. *'-J
*"


Diamond,
Abyssinia
Baptist,
sudden


Lena Home, 92, Singer-
Actress, civil rights
activist, dancer, died May
9, 2010.


Pastor Charles Bryant of
O Street Church of God,
Brunswick, a golden soul.
Died in June.


2010 See A-5


Wisht;iveusa
Cal (04 76-83 o Snditto


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DECEMBER 25, 2010 and JANUARY1, 2011


MIKE BONTS, SPORTS EDITOR
RICHARD McLAUGHLIN, SPORTS


MANAGEMENT YOLANDA KNUCKLE, COLUMNS
ERIC C. LEE LIZ BILLINGSLEA
SALES & MARKETING DIRECTOR OFFICE/ACCOUNTS MANAGER
DAN EVANS, DENNIS WADE, SALES
TIA AYELE, SPECIAL SECTIONS
MA\' FORD, LAYOUI' EDITOR
CRIME & JUSTICE, JULIA BOWLES MARKETING
GEORGIA MARKETING
ALLEN PROCTOR, WEBSITE SITE ANGELA FAVORS MORRELL
BETTY DAVIS DISTRIBUTION
LIFESTYLE/ SOCIETY COLUMNIST HERMAN ROBINSON
Investigative Reporter: Lonzie Leath, Features: Dementrious Lawrence
Reporters/Photographers: Marsha Phelts, Carl Davis, Laurence Greene,
F. M. Powell III, Michael Phelts, Richard McLaughlin, Andrea F. K. Ortiz,
Angela Morrell, Joseph Lorentzon, Scott Jurrens, Cheryl Williams
Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Ester Davis, lucius Gantt,
Deanna, Cynthia Ferrell, Delores Mainor Woods, Farris Long
Distribution and Sales: Dan & Pat Randolph, Abeye Aycle, Cassie
Williams, Angela Beans. Tony Beans, Herman Robinson, David Scott


rEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
info(tlliheloridastar.conll
(912) 264-3137 Georgia
Serving St. Jolns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Alachua, Flagler, Marion, McIntosh,
Camnden And Glynn County
TheFloridaStarcom
The Florida and Georgia Star
Newspapers are independent news-
papers published weekly in
Jacksonville, Florida
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One Year-$35.00
Half Year-$20.00
Send check or money order or call
with VISA.AmEX,MASCD, DISCOVER
and subscription amount to:
The Florida Star, The Georgia Star
P.O. Box 40629
Jacksonville. Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not he responsiblefor
the return of an, solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
police of this paper
MEMIBERSHIlIS:
Floridai Press Association
National Nvspaper Assorisation
National Nerspaper
Publishers Association
\nalgaiaited Pullblisher. Inc.
Jacksonville Chaluber of Coniu aer
First Coast African American
Cllanmber of Commierce


FAB






SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION



_- -
National Newspaper
Publishers Association


VERIFICATION


Christmas Compassion


--CL.ARA JACKSON McLAUGIILIN
SOWNER/PUBLISHER
LONZI I.E LXIIIH, RINETl'A M. FEFIE


I U


More brand new live local tal


thanon oher adi









station! i~~c i~IIi I ~

,1I ~r~ Check out1 E~ III111[


WJSJ = FM 10531~~1(~==III~~~~I(~~





North Florida & Southern Georgia~ll I
















Some of our localshows include And


PA-GE A-2


THE STAR


THE FLOIDASTA
THIERI STA


By: Jessie Palatucci

This is going to be a melancholy Christmas for my family. My grandfather, who is 92 and has lived a very full
and wonderful life, is winding down his final days. It is an odd feeling the sensation of grief mixed with the
cheer of Christmas.

Though personally challenging this experience has helped me to better understand why, for some, the holidays
are so difficult. This occasion that is supposed to be sojoyous can be an emotional minefield. And I worry this
year will be particularly hard for many.

Some, like my family, will be dealing with their first holiday following the loss of a loved one. For others it will
be an older heartbreak. An absence that while not fresh, is painful and impossible to ignore.

Others will be celebrating Christmas with the people they love deployed overseas in war zones. Many, many
people will face a holiday separated from their families by economic circumstances that have forced them to
migrate to a different state or to a different country to find work and provide for the ones they love.

It is a struggle sometimes, especially in such a busy time of year, to take enough time to notice the suffering of
those around us. There are so many distractions. Toys to buy, gifts to wrap, events to plan, traveling to do. I
am as guilty as anyone of letting my excitement about the holiday blind me to the pain of my neighbors.

And perhaps it's worse now. The country seems to be in a moment of division. People are increasingly anxious
to put up walls between each other. Barriers of race, religion, class, and nationality have been sharpened by the
scarcity and fear that has dominated 2010.

If you will humor me, it is my Christmas wish that we all take a moment this week to genuinely reflect and feel
for those suffering this December, in your immediate vicinity and beyond. Regardless of your politics take a
moment to think about what it might be like for the undocumented immigrants in your community. Perhaps wak-
ing up alone, thousands of miles from family, friends, and familiar customs. Similarly, consider the great sacri-
fice of our troops overseas, far from safety and their loved ones.

Send them your thoughts. Send them your prayers. And I encourage you to set a little bit of time aside to actu-
ally do something. Bake an extra pan of lasagna and bring it to a family you know is struggling emotionally or
financially. Send a letter to a deployed service member. Share the abundance in your life with some of your
neighbors at your food shelf, shelter, or day laborer center.

The New Year is just around the corner, and we have so little time left to do something good in 2010. Won't you
take a moment to make a better, more compassionate world possible?


Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


.:.0 ''- ..-."- Q --*-.'. .' -, i. :-:;



MAKE TUESDAY YOUR DAY OF EXTRA KNOWLEDGE


TUNE IN TO IMPACT LISTEN AND TALK
FM 105.3 -WJSJ 5:30 P.M. AND 11:30 P.M.

AM 1360 WCGL 8:30 P.M.

Clara McLaughlin and IMPACT

Clara's Guest for Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Eating Healthy in 2011 Dr. Ulysses Watkins

5:30 p.m. and 11:30 p.m.
105.3-www.radiofreejax.com
8:30 p.m.-www.WCGL1360

The Florida Star The Georgia Star The People's Choice
Serving since 1951


~n~rr'~.~~;JR~' :~dZn*;~PF~FN~:~,~?g~~R~~


'











F CHURCH


Faith In Our Community

Schedule ofEvents and Services


CHRISTMAS DAY WORSHIP AT GREATER
GRANT -will be held on Saturday morning, December
25, 2010 beginning at 9:30 a.m. Everyone is invited to
join in the praise and celebration service honoring the
birth of Jesus Christ.
CATHEDRAL BASILICA OF ST. AUGUSTINE,
Vigil Masses will be celebrated at 4:00 pm and 7:00
p.m. A choir made up of children of the parish will be
singing at the 4:00 p.m. Mass. On Christmas Day,
Mass at Dawn, traditionally known as "The Shepherds
Mass," will be held at 8:00 a.m. in St. Benedict the
Moor Catholic Church (86 Martin Luther King Ave.).
Also on Christmas Day in the Cathedral Basilica,
Masses will be at 9:00 and 11:00 a.m.


FAITH UNITED MIRACLE TEMPLE 1860 West
5th St., with Bishop Desso Benjamin, Host Pastor and
Dr. Rhonda Mitchell-Addo, Coordinator. The North
Eastern Emancipation Celebration Association kicks
off its 1ST SOUTHERN CELEBRATION, January 1,
2011 at 12 Noon. "148 Years of Freedom- Lets We
Forget." All people welcome. For more information
call 904-647-5981. Come and relive the day of freedom.
WEST FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH'S
Minister, Dr. Rev. Timothy L. Cole announce that Holy
Communion will be observed every Sunday during the
month of December at 10:00 a.m. during Morning
Worship. Sunday School begins at 9:00 a.m. The
church is located at 945 Carrie St. The public is cordial-
ly invited to all services.


FAUST TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST,
3328 Moncrief Rd., end-of-year Revival with Pastor
Carlos Hutchison, an anointed man of God from
Panama City, FL, at Faust Temple COGIC, Bishop R.
L. Dixon, Pastor. Revival begins Wednesday, December
29th thru Friday, December 31st. Wednesday and
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. and Friday, Watch Night at 10:00
p.m. Please come out and be Revived, Delivered and set
free and start the New Year out Praising and Blessing
God for his wonderful works.
Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue.
Email submissions preferred. Send to: info@
thefloridastar.com


Ask Us About Our


f there had been a death
in your family 'esterdatr.
'hatU would. ou be doing
today?


Pre-Need


Fore-

Thought


Funeral

planning


I'm sorr' '-. -1-.-
to have rg ram


FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED
Since 1988
ALPHONSO WEST MORTUARY, INC.
4409 Soutel Dr. Jackson ille. FL 32208
Tel: (904) 766-9671 Fax: 1904) 766-2354
DIRECTORS


Deborah \\est


Alphonso \\est


Jacqueline Bartley


THE

FLORIDA -STAR,


ADVERTISING DEADLINE:
For the Church Page
Wednesday @ 2:00 P.M.

Call: (904) 766-8834 ask for Liz

or EMAIL: info@thefloridastar.com


S a A STAR
THE GE (lIA STAR
., a ..^y


__ _


.



2010 Northeast Florida Kwanzaa Celebrations
Kwanzaa is a weeklong celebration held in the United
States honoring universal African-American heritage and
culture, observed from December 26 to January 1 each
year. It features activities such as the lighting of a kinara
and libations, and culminates in a feast and gift giving. It
was created by Maulana Karenga and was first celebrated
from December 26, 1966 to January 1, 1967. For infor-
maton about the history, symbols, and principles of
Kwanzaa, http://www.officialkwanzaawebsite.org
Sunday, December 26, 2010 Umoja (Unity) Honoring
The Cultural Activists in Jackosnville, 6:00pm Edward
Waters College Milne Auditorium, 1658 Kings Rd.
Featuring music, art and special photo exhibit of
Kwanzaa celebrations in northeast Florida and cultural
activists (Carter Woodson Institute, The Kemet House,
Nefertiti Books and Gifts, etc). Free and open to the pub-
lic, presented by nokturnalescape.com and The Kemet
House, email info@nokturnalescape.com for more info.
Monday, December 27, 2010 Kujichagulia (Self-deter-
mination) TBA; Tuesday, December 28, 2010 Ujima
(Collective Work and Responsibility); The Black Candle,
a film by M.K. Asante Jr. and narrated by Maya Angelou,
will be shown at 3:00pm and 5:00pm. The Community
Gathering will begin at 6:00 pm.Ritz Theatre and
Museum, 829 North Davis" St.; Wednesday, December
29, 2010 Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics) Creating
Prosperity with Spirit, Mind, Body Alignment Tools for
Money and Abundance, 1647 N Laura St. For more info
call 904 955-7058. Visit the website for days leading to
January 1, 2011.


MiPDEATH OTIC


JACKSONVILLE. FL
(AREA DEATHS)
BRETT, Thomas F., 64,
died December 16, 2010.
COLEMAN, Freddie,
Jr., died December 16,
2010.
CROOMS, Benjamin
Chet, Sr., 77, died
December 18, 2010.
DAWSON, Richard
Allen, III, 53, died
December 18, 2010.
DONALDSON, Isiah,
Jr., 73, funeral service
will be held December
28, 2010.
DUKES, Faith R., died
December 19, 2010.
FOREHAND, Fred W.,
89, died December 17,
2010.'
HARDEN, Janice E., 51,
died December 18, 2010.
HARDY, Daisy Esdell,
72, died December 18,
2010.
HARRIS, Rose, 89, died
December 19, 2010.
HASTINGS, Linda, died
December 19, 2010.
HENDERSON, Gladys
B., 96, died December
20, 2010.
JACKSON, Calvin H.,
died December 19, 2010.
JUDD, Freda B., 91, died
December 18, 2010.
LENTON, Alfreda, died
December 19, 2010.
NEIL, Mary Frances,


died December 19, 2010.
PAYNE, Mattie L., died
December 19, 2010.
PINDER, Clintricia
Richardson, died
December 18, 2010.
POOLER, Yvonne D.,
died December 16, 2010.
RICKS, Walter, 87, died
December 18, 2010.
ROBY, Clarice M., 70,
died December 19, 2010.
RUSSELL, Joanna Beal,
94, died December 19,
2010.
SHADE, Burl, 77, died
December 12, 2010.
SIMMONS, Michael,
58, died December 16,
2010.
STAFFORD, Emilia, 91,
died December 19, 2010.
TURNER, Maderline S.,
85, died December 19,
2010.
WILKERSON, Edwin,
died December 18, 2010.



GEORGIA DEATHS
DURDEN, Mary, 90,
died December 21, 2010.
FAIRELL, Lester P.,
died December 20, 2010.
HUGGINS, Juanita, 66,
died December 20, 2010.
LEE, Lucy Ann, died
December 16, 2010.
TUNSTILL, James, 68,
died December 21, 2010.


The Church Directory
"Come and Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School ......................................9:30 a.m .
Sunday Morning .
Intercessory Prayer...................10:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Youth Church
2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary)
Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ............... 7:00 p.m. I
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus : -'
(904) 764-5727 Church '

Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service .................................. 10:00 a.m.
Church School .................................... 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday
"Glory Hour" Bible Study .......................... 10:00 a.m.
"Jehovah Jireh" Bible Study ......................... 6:30 p.m.
2nd & 4th Thursday "Young at Heart Ministry .......... .10:00 a.m.
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry ............................ 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
StreetAddress: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School....................................9:30 a.m.
M morning W orship................................................................ .. 11:00 a.m.
Tuesday............................................. Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday................. ...... ... ......................................Joy Night,7:00 p.m .
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org

Paynes ChapelA.M.E. Church
2201 Albany Street. PO Box 759. Bruni% %ick, GA 31520
19121 261-9555
SRcn Richard Hutcherson, Pasin
Worship Opportunities:
SundaJ Church School
"A Life Changing Experience' 9-15 10-55 a.m :
Morrun Worship Serace .. I1-00 a-m:
Church at Srud IWeekly' Bible Study)
Monday Nighls ... ... ............. 7.00 8.30 p m
Join Us as We Study the Word of God and Enrich Our Souls'


I :lODUCEYO
CHURCH


Tune In To

*~ iML^


Clara McLaughlin
Host


Yvonne Brooks
Co-Host


IMPACT


Tuesday and Thursday

from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.



WCGL.AM 1360

The Florida Star and Impact
Striving To Make A Difference!
I Irnr- a~n a r a


r~lllll~llrsr~rs~a~nna


THE STAR


DECEMBER 252010


- S..












Socially Speaking

By Betty Asque Davis / Photos by J. Carl Davis, Sr. (Unlessotherwisespecified)

"'There's Always Somnething Happening On The First Coast"

Silver Sneakers Honor Trainer
The Silver Sneakers Class at the Johnson.
YMCA honored their trainer, Mrs. Linda White at a
holiday luncheon last weekend at the Red Apple Buffet.
It was a "December to Remember" affair. More than
sixty class members and guests attended the festive
affair.
The program included a Holiday Meditation .- ,
and Mixer, Dr. Norma White; Sing-A-Long; ;,
Entertainment, Clarence Von Bostick and Grace, Cleo S na M
e A n 'Silver Sneakers' Members
Jones. After'lunch, beautiful door prizes donated and Shown above with Mrs. White are the following committee members:
decorated by Mrs. Bertha Padgett were presented. The Seated from left to right Mrs. White, Trainer and Dr. Norma White, committee
highlight of the day was the presentation of the green S.- chairman.
tree made by Mrs. Padgett and presented to Mrs. Linda Standing from left to right are Lester Johnson, Mrs. Ruby Cogdell, Mrs. Donald
White, Class Trainer. The tree included gifts from class Anderson, Mrs. Betty Donald, Mrs. Cleo Jones, Mrs. Bertha Padgett, Dr. Joyce
members. Mrs. Linda White Holzendorf and Mrs. Robbie Adams. Not shown, Mrs. Barbara Baker.
Silver Sneakers is a fun, energizing program ,
that helps older adults take greater control of their .
health by encouraging physical activity and social
events. Some of the activities of the class include a
warm-up and rhythmic range of movement stretch,
work with resistance tools, cool down, final stretch and
relaxation segment. It is an equipment -based, multi-
level, total body conditioning class in which students
use hand-held weights, elastic tubing with handles,
balls and a chair for standing and/or seated support and IL
mats. Water aerobics are included during the summer Mrs. Sandra English, Vice President and Program
months. All exercises are executed with music. The Chairman, Mrs. Penny Kievet, Director of Human
early class meets daily at the YMCA from 8 a.m.-9 a.m. Resource Development, City Rescue Mission and Dr.
Norma Solomon White, President, DCREA
and the second class meets on Mondays, Wednesdays Ms. Leah Hudson and Samuel Hall, Newly Engaged.
and Fridays from 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m. The trainer,
Mrs. White is dedicated, enthusiastic, committed,.yet
firm and fair. It is her goal to involve the total class in
the activities and for everyone to experience success in
the program.

Duval Retired Educators Make
Presentation To City Rescue
Mission '
The Duval Retired Educators Association made The T. C. Newmans The Orrin Mitchells.
contributions to the City Rescue Mission for the 2010
Service Project. Members brought an array of useful
gifts and cash donations at the December meeting to
contribute to THE City Rescue Mission. Mrs. Penny
Kievel, Director of Resource Development was present
to make a presentation and receive the gifts. DCREA
selects a different community agency to shower with
gifts and financial donations during this season of the
year.
Mrs. Kievel informed us that City Rescue
Mission was established in 1946 by a group of
Christian businessmen who saw a need to help alco-
holics in the Jacksonville area. Their goal at the time
was to offer "soup, soap and salvation." What has Mesdames Felice Franklin, Ruby Newman, Sylvia Perry
Ms. Lana Suggs and Malcolm Champion.
evolved over all these years is a non-profit, privately and Thelicia Wilson.
funded organization whose mission is to rebuild the
lives of the homeless and needy through life building
programs.
City Rescue Mission, Inc is a 501(c) (3) corpo-
ration that provides food, clothing, shelter, emergency
services and residential recovery programs to homeless
men, women and women with children. CRM does not
receive government funding. Financial support of the
Mission comes from donations made generously by
concerned individuals.

SA Holiday Soir6e At The Beach "
Newly engaged, Samuel Hall, Jr. and Mrs. Leah H. The Carswells. The Mikels..
Hudson hosted their Holiday Soiree' recently at the
Neptune Beach's Cobalt Moon Water Studio.
As guests arrived they were warmly greeted by
Sam and Leah and immediately captivated with live
jazz music. It was a very special evening. The couple
announced their engagement with wedding plans for
November 2011. -
After feasting from a. bountiful buffet of
Southwestern Cuisine, guests were given the opportu-


nity to burn old worries and regrets in an outside fire
and as they left they were given a positive word to take
with them for the season and the year ahead.
As it is each year, Ms. Hudson and Samuel Hall's
parties begin the holiday season with a 'bang'!
Our Congratulations to the engaged couple!! The Ira Danielses. The Noah Hendersons.


.C ,, ~.i. s r .'W, .'...- -.'.-- 7 .,I;


I" few r ubc'aw
db,"My 02, Tef


II I


PAGE A-4


THE STAR


DECEMBER 25. 2010









2010 continued from A-1


crews suffering from illnesses caused by the September
11 terrorist attacks. The Senate approved it on a voice
vote and the House by a vote of 206-60. The two sena-
tors from New York, Charles Schumer and Kristen
Gillibrand, called the approval a "Christmas miracle."
This 11 th Congress witnessed a voter-backlash
caused by the 9.6 percent unemployment rate. This
condition made the Democrats lose control of the House
as well as diminished their Senate majority.
According to records, this is the most productive ses-
sion of Congress since the 1960s.
As what is referred to as the 'lame duck' Congress,
Wall Street firms began to position themselves to com-
I I


plete their best two ucars in revenue, GM emerged from
bankruptcy with more than $23 billion repaid to the
U.S. Treasury, and American Inernational Group (AIG),
Inc. was able to sell $2 billion of bonds in its first offer-
ing since the company's 2008 bailout.
The S&P 500 Index had a 38.9 percent gain since
Congress convened in January 2009 which was the
biggest increase for a two-year congressional session
since 1997-1998.
The stimulus money did create and saved jobs, helped
strapped state government retain their workforces and
created 122,000 jobs for teachers, police officers and
construction workers.


The 11 th Congress pushed to reverse three decades
of deregulation that started under President Reagan.
Congress had its first big accomplishment with the
stimulus bill.
The health-care bill is designed to help curb soaring
costs.
Don't forget the equal pay for women, the repeal of the
"don't ask, don't tell", food safety overhaul and the help
that much of the public will not see the achievements
for a few years but, they are there and ready to be uti-
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DECEMBER 25, 2010 and JANUARY 1, 2011


THE STAR


PAGE A-5












S COMMUNITY -


ST AUGUSTINE FREEDOM FIGHTERS

FREED: AFTER 45 YEARS

By G. Henry Williams
.: Freelance Writer

Florida Governor Charlie
Crist read a proclamation that
erased all of the arrest records of
the "St. Augustine Fighters" who
staged Civil Rights demonstration
Between 1963-64. These demon-
u stations were the last held before
the Passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act
under President Lyndon B. Johnson. The
Massachusetts Governor's mother arrest
in St Augustine convinced the President to
push Congress to pass this historic Act.
t i An enormous delegation from St.
Augustine traveled to be present: at last
Thursday's Executive Clemency Board led
by Gov. Crist, Atty General Bill McCollum,
Chief Financial Officer Alex Sink and the
Commissioner of Agriculture Charles S.
Bronson.
Also present was Dr. Robert Hayling who
led the Civil Rights Movement in St. Augustine, several of
the freedom fighters, and Stetson Kennedy, History Writer
and Florida Senator Tony Hill (D-Jax) was given most of
the credit for moving the enactment of this Proclamation
of freedom.
Sen. Hill gave credit to two members of the Florida
Parole Commissioner Jane Tillman and Will Kendrick for
suggesting the idea to him.
After the Proclamation ceremonies ended, in the
Cabinet Room of the State Capital, the entire delegation
moved to the Senate Office Building, in a conference
room to give testimonies of their 1963-64 experiences; including being humiliated by cat-
tle prods, abusive police officer, spit upon by citizens hostile to the demonstrators.
Dr. Robert Hayling, a Tallahassee native said, "This is an honor that I never
thought of, I feel like I've come home". The "40th ACCORD" an organization led by Mrs.
Gwendolyn Duncan also played a huge part in rallying the people involved in the 1963-
64 Movement to travel to Tallahassee for this occasion. The "40th ACCORD" holds activ-
ities to keep these past in justices alive. It is a biracial organization, something St.
Augustine has never seen.
"The Movement for human dignity is still alive and kicking."

FUNERAL HOME DIRECTOR SPREADS THE SPIRIT
OF CHRISTMAS


Submitted By: Cheryl Williams


Jacksonville, Fl., On a cold Jacksonville night outside of a funeral home there was
the sound of children's laughter. In side of the home
you hear shouts of joy and you see lots of smiles. For
five years the C L Page Funeral Home held their
annual Spirit of Christmas Event on December 16. An
estimated 800 people were given gifts. The lines were
so long, they wrapped around Moncrief. No one went
home empty handed. The person repondsisible for
this event is Carla Page, the Funeral Director and
owner of C.L. Page Mortuary.
"This event all started because of a family came
to me during the Christmas season in my first year
and saw that they had a great need," Said Carla
Page," So I bought them a whole wardrobe and every-
thing for Christmas.... From toys to dinner. My heart
was blessed by. blessing them."
Page said this one act of giving; led some one
else to suggest that she sponsor horse carriage rides
and a party the next year. The person said, she would
pay half for the carriage rental. So, the Spirit Of
Christmas Event was born. This year on December 14
for two hours C.L. Page Mortuary gave away 25 bikes,
600 tins of popcorn, a room full of toys, two bus loads
of clothing and shoes, hundreds of bushels of fresh
from the farm collard greens, a truck load of dried beans, rice, cereal, strawberry drink gal-
lons and dried milk. They fed an estimated 1000 grilled hot dogs, coffee, sodas and hot
chocolate. There were three horse carriages, three super space jumpers, live music... and
a live Santa Claus. Santa Claus was a Black Man.
"Although we donated most of the gifts, I buy items all year long. People caught the
spirit of giving. Someone from my mother's church in Dixie Georgia donated the collard
greens. Another family donated two vans full of clothes." Ms. Page further states.
Audrey Throckmorton, a volunteer said," Its all about family. The popcorn tins are
intended toget families to share the popcorn and talk. I think it is great that someone can
bring the community together like this."
The organizers said that the people were given 3 bags per person to gather howev-
er much toys and food they could carry out. The bicycles were raffled off. A bike was a par-
ticular blessing to one mother. With tears streaming down her eyes Janice said," I have
been having a very hard time and I had asked God to bless my daughter with a bike.
Because... that is all she wanted for Christmas. I told the Lord if we got a bike, I would go
home. As I was in the clothes room, I heard our name being called. I got the bike and went
home. But, I just had to come back and thank you all for this event."
Mario Adkins, a local choir director, sums up the event by saying, "It was a spectac-
ular event. It is obvious that there is a need. This is what Christmas is all about. God gave
his greatest gift, His only son. We all should be inspired and compelled to do the same all
year long."


INTERNATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS WALK OF FAME
ANNOUNCES 2011 INDUCTEES

FOOTSTEPS OF CIVIL RIGHTS LEADERS PLACED
IN HISTORIC SITE DURING ANNUAL TRUMPET
AWARDS










1,
Atlanta, GA (December 16,
2011). Footsteps often new revered civil -
rights icons will be added to the
International Civil Rights Walk of Fame
during the 2011 Trumpet Awards events.
This induction ceremony is
scheduled for Friday, January 28, 2011
at 10:00 a.m. at the Martin Luther King,
Jr. National Historic Site, National Park
Service, located at 450 Auburn Avenue
(Atlanta, GA). The program preceding
the induction ceremony will be held at
the Ebenezer Baptist Church.
The ceremonial host for this year's occa-
sion is Frank Ski with WVEE FM
(V103) Radio. The program and unveil-
ing of the footsteps are free and open to
the public.
The 2011 honorees in this dis-
tinguished group include Arthur Blank,
James Brown, The Reverend Dr.
Gerald Durley, Bishop Neil C. Ellis,
Leon Hall, Bishop Barbara King, Marc
H. Morial, Mayor Carl Stokes,
Congressman Louis Stokes and Henry ;
"Hank" Thomas.
The International Civil Rights ,.
Walk of Fame was created in 2004 to give recognition to the foot sol-
diers of justice who sacrificed and struggled to make equality a reality
for all. This extraordinary display has become one of the most visited
tourist attractions in the city of Atlanta and has enriched the heritage of
the civil rights movement. The shoes used to create the footsteps will
also be on display during the unveiling program.
The International Civil Rights Walk of Fame, now in its eighth
year, is sponsored by the Trumpet Awards Foundation, Inc., and was
created and designed by Xernona Clayton, founder and executive pro-
ducer of the renowned Trumpet Awards. Ms. Clayton states, "This is a
permanent testimony to those who have dedicated themselves to human
progress. Many of the shoes we use in the display remain on exhibition
within the Visitors Center for those who visit the King Complex."
Congressman James E. Clyburn, Judge Damon J. Keith, The
Reverend Samuel Billy Kyles, National Newspaper Publishers
Association, Eugene C. Patterson, The Reverend Albert Sampson, Rita
Jackson Samuels, and Congresswoman Diane E. Watson were inducted
in 2010; The Reverend Dr. C.M. Alexander; Danny J. Bakewell, Sr.; Dr.
Erieka Bennett; Roberto Goizueta; Cathy Hughes; Earvin "Magic"
Johnson; The Links, Incorporated; the Honorable Sam Massell; the
Honorable Ernest N. Morial; Father Michael L. Pfleger; the Reverend
Al Sharpton, Congressman William L. Clay, Sr. and the Reverend C. T.
Vivian were installed in 2009. Dr. Maya Angelou; Senator Edward W.
Brooke; Tyrone L. Brooks, Sr.; Sammy Davis, Jr.; Jesse Hill, Jr.; Dr.
Benjamin Hooks; Attorney Clarence B. Jones; Tom Joyner; The Right
Honorable Prime Minister Michael Manley; Herman Russell, Sr.; and
Dr. Wyatt Tee Walker were installed in 2008. Lerone Bennett, Jr.; Tony
Bennett; Marian Wright Edelman; Mayor Shirley Franklin; Attorney
Frankie Freeman; Joe Louis; Dr. Otis Moss, Jr.; Sir Lynden Pindling;
Sir Sidney Poitier; Dr. Otis W. Smith; Congresswoman Maxine Waters;
The Honorable L. Douglas Wilder; and Jean Childs Young were the
2007 assemblage of inductees. Reverend Joseph E. Boone; Reverend
William Holmes Borders; Xernona Clayton; President William Clinton;
Lena Homie; John E. Jacob; Reverend James Orange; The Honorable
Bernard Parks; Archbishop Desmond Tutu; and Stev ic Wonder were
inducted in 2006. Henry Aaron, Ted Turner, H-larry Belafonte,
Congressman John Conyers, Jr., Dick Gregory. Mayor Maynard H.
Jackson, Jr., Ralph E. McGill, Reverend Fred L. hlihule',\\ ihl, Judge
Elbert P. Tuttle, Sr., Nancy Wilson, and Revercnd Addie L. Wyatt,
inducted in 2005. Juanita J. Alei nahlh,. Reverend Ralph David
Abernathy, Sr.; Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.; Julian Bond; President Jimmy
Carter; Medgar Evers; Dorothy Height; Reverend Jesse L. Jackson. Sr.;
Judge Frank M. Johnson; President Lyndon Baines Johnson;
Congressman John Lewis; Evelyn G. Lowery: Reverend Joseph E.
Lowery; Justice Thurgood Marshall; Rosa Parks: Reverend Hosea
Williams; and Ambassador Andrew Young were placed at the site in
2004.
The roll of honorees is growing year by year and others will be
added to the International Civil Rights Walk of Fame. "We will contin-
ue to build upon this commemorative memorial to the civil rights strug-
gle that depicts the tireless efforts and passionate concern of these deter-
mined individuals whose footsteps appear in this Walk of Fame," said
Ms. Clayton.


THE STAR


PAGE A-6


DECEMBER 252010






DECEMBER 25. 2010 THE STAR


Eliza Atwater President Pi Eta Omega Chapter, Jennifer Carroll Lieutenant
Governor Elect and Bonnie Atwater President Gamma Rho Omega
Chapter, Inc. and Alpha Jax Foundation.


Senate Tony Hill, Florida House of Representatives Mia Jones,
Jennifer Carroll Lieutenant Governor Elect and Florida House of
Representatives Joe Gibbons.


Betty Burney Mistress of Ceremonies Duval County School
Board.


Ava L. Parker Board JaLckonviille Transportation -4uthorinr .
Florida House ol Reprewentatives Joe Gibbons, and Rosali'n
Phillips City of JacA sonvill .lMayor office.


WeovixvV'; c-ow


February 4-6
Savannah International Trade & Convention Center


Alvin Brown for Mayor with family and Jennifer Carroll Lieutenant Governor Elect




i'x


Food l


I Lifestyle


Dr: Norma Solomon White 25th International President, Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority, Inc.


f


%,see.


SOUTHERN
WOMEN'S
SHOW
Facebook



\ Menloral
Unr.dCly I ARCH NNIrr
Cr ClHARCH4NNIi.


The Florida Star
Elect


Frank M. Powell, III and Jennifer Carroll Lieutenant Governor


Happy Holidayj:
frieo
The Florida & Georgi : .6crJ.:


*i ,.-
k'


LOCAL


SECTION


Marian Simpkins and Jennifer Carroll Lieutenant
Governor Elect


'FLORIDA


THE STAR


DECEMBER 25. 2010


- B







DECEMBER 25. 2010


PAGF R 2


When is "I changed my mind" an appropriate ,C,
excuse foi lies told, promises broken and commitments _
ignored?
Long lasting relationships take hard work. A fake smile
and the words "We tried" is not a satisfactory explanation
when one party in a relationship tried their best and the
other didn't try much at all to work out or address any con-
cerns.
At the first time you lay eyes on someone, you can tell
if they are attractive to you or not. After the first 15 minutes
of your first conversation, you can tell if the person you are
talking to is worthy of future discussion or consideration.
If there is any question as to whether a relationship will lead to marriage, you
almost know the answer immediately. In the rare cases that you don't know if mar-
riage or long-term relations are possible you still know right away if it is worth any
time doing further consideration.
OK, you date for a while and for whatever reason, you want to stop dating.
That's understandable. But at that exact moment, men should stop romancing a
woman and women should refuse to accept any money or anything of value from
the man.
Why? Because someone will eventually feel they gave more in the relationship
than they received from their partner. Someone will feel they have been pimped!
Smart daters know that friends can remain friends, lovers can become friends,
spouses can have a friendly relationship after divorce but it is very difficult for
daters to be friends.
The main reason is because you were supposed to be "friends" while dating.
You could assume that people dating cared about each other, shared with each
other and respected each other. If all, or some, of that was perceived to be a lie,
you can't be friends.
Another reason for the difficulty in being friends is the way one person decides
to breakup. If you tell a man or woman that they are bad for you, you can't take
relating to them anymore, don't call me and there is nothing I want to hear about
any reconciliation, who would want to be "friends" with someone that dislikes them
so much but can't say exactly why, can't say when the dislike began and can't say
they are sorry if they hurt you. A bad ending dating friendship is not conducive to
having a good post-relationship friendship.
If people aren't perfect, relationships can't be perfect. There will be things said
and done that will be sweet and bitter. There will be good days and bad days, rich-
er days and poorer days, sick days and healthy days.
You can't be friends with someone that seeks your respect but doesn't respect
you. You can be friends with someone quick to talk about drama and negativity and
slow to talk about good things or enjoy and desire romance and affection. You can't
be friends with someone constantly looking for a reason to end the friendship when
you're always looking for ways to enhance, strengthen and embellish the relation-
ship and consummate a marriage.
You can't be a good spouse or good partner or a good friend to someone that
has no clue what those things are. A good friend is not someone that you can con-
trol or does what you say do, talks how you say talk, acts how you say act or live
like you say live.
A good friend is trustworthy, dependable, responsible, considerate, cooperative,
understanding, compromising, loving, caring, helpful, thankful, accepting, appre-
ciative and things like that.
If someone is designated as your BFF (best friend forever) they will accept you,
adjust for you, sacrifice for you, pray for you, they will fight for you, they may even
risk their lives or die for you.
If someone wants you to beg them to have a friendly relationship, a good friend-
ship is impossible to realize.
You can't tell someone they are terrible and then say "We are friends".
Friendships are like tangos. It takes two to tango and it takes two people that
desire to be friends to have a friendly relationship. Real friends are friendly to each
other, not to themselves.
Sometimes "broken" is good. That's why God chose an alcoholic Noah, a mur-
derous Moses and a womanizing David to do God's will. (Become a friend of The
Gantt Report on Facebook. Buy Gantt's book "beast Too: Dead Man Writing" and
contact Lucius at www.allworldconsultants.net)





By: Justin L. Mabrie, MBA

When There Is Less To Enjoy .

Excitement often exists at the beginning of every venture we
take part in life. This uncontrollable feeling stems from not
knowing what to expect and being pleasantly surprised by the
unknown effects. At some point a solid rapport and feeling is '
developed about an individual after several interactions. If
you avoid the gray area of your thoughts, you determine that
you either like the individual or not. From that established
connection, progressive interactions will exist. Time will
either bring more pleasant memories or it will allow less joy-
ous moments to snowball to serve as an alert for a relation-
ship evaluation.
It can get confusing the longer you are with someone because you begin to truly care
for the individual. In the midst of the rapport you may ignore the actual deterioration of
the relationship. Although you care for someone, it does not justify nor compensate for
reoccurring moments of despair and questions. Without vows of a marriage, you do not
owe anyone your time if moments with him or her do not bring you peace and pleasure.
A partnership should be based on uncompromising efforts to your benefit in which you
will find natural for you to reciprocate, and in turn creating an equal effort balance. It
may seem like a selfish way of thinking but you do not want to jeopardize your peace
with hope of improvement.
When you are not married, you should always where a promise ring for yourself. With
this ring you should make a pact to follow and listen to your gut. Initially, it may
appear to be superficial to leave a relationship because the flame is not there anymore.
You must keep in mind that if disagreements and frustrating moments pile and become
the surrounding theme, that is not healthy.
When you are friends with someone and you determine it is becoming too much work
and/or you realize he or she is becoming a cancer to your spirit, you must remove them
from your life.
As your partner should be your friend first, you should follow the same rule of thumb.
The love and sense of caring can still exist, but do not submit yourself to continued
moments that prevent inspiration and peace.
Remember: A relationship pain killer is removing yourself from the presence of
continuous less joyous moments.


I I


I


I IJ"1J 1


The processes used m making alcoholic beverages
determine the amount of alcohol that is present. There are
three main processes:
*Fennented juices containing natural sugars. Wines
are made by this process; they contain 6 to 14 percent alcohol by vol
une.
*Fermented malt beverages. Beer. which h is made from fermented malt.
has about 4 percent alcohol by volume, while ale has slightly more.
*Distilled liquids. The alcohol content of whiskey, gin, rum, brandy,
vodka and other distilled liquids range from 40 to 50 percent by volume.

Wines, made by fennenting fruit juices. usually come from grape juice.
However, other fruits such as currants, plums and berries also are used. The
process of fermentation begins when the juice is placed in open containers.
Yeast starts the fermentation. The juice is drained off and placed in wooden
kegs after 10 days. Fermentation continues 'for several months. In the final
stage of fermentation, air does not reach the fermenting mixture. When the
alcohol kills the yeast, the fermentation stops. If some sugar is left after fennen-
tation the wine is "sweet". If very little sugar is left, the wine is "dry".

Fermented malt beverages include BEER and ALE. These malt bever-
ages are made from such grains as corn, rye and barley. Barley grains which
have sprouted, been dried, and powdered make the malt. To make beer, the
brewer adds ground grain and water to the malt. This mixture is called a mash.
An enzyme in the malt changes the starch m the grain into sugar. Which dis-
solves in water. The liquid portion, caled the wort, is drained off. The wort
and hops (a small, flowering plant) are boiled, and the fluid is strained offinto a
fermentation tank and cooled. Brewer's yeast, which causes the mixture to fer-
ment, is added. For ten days the yeast changes part of the sugar into alcohol and
carbon dioxide. The head, or foam, on a glass of beer is the result of some of
the carbon dioxide that did not escape during the fermentation process. The
final product is then stored for several weeks. Bottled beer contains from 3.5 to
5 percent alcohol by volume. Ale, made by similar process. has from 6 to 8 per-
cent alcohol by volume.

Distilled liquors are produced by boiling fermented liquor and condens-
ing the alcohol and water vapors in a cooling tube. WHISKEY. is usually made
from corn, barley or rye. The ground grain is mixed with water and boiled. malt
and brewer's yeast are added, and the resulting mixture is distilled. Raw
whiskey consists of alcohol, water, flavoring matter, and a small amount of col-
ored material. It is aged in charred oak barrels from two to seven years. The
whiskey takes up certain substances from the wood. It becomes darker in color
during the aging process, and the flavor changes. Whiskey contains 40 to 50
percent of alcohol by volume. When talking about liquor, the phrase "one hun-
dred proof' means that it contains 50 percent alcohol by volume.


Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.
Historic Mt. Zion AME Services, December 25- 9:30 a.m. Historic Mt. Zion
AME

Jacksonville Jaguars v. Washington Redskins. Cheer the Jaguars to win with
this game that could send them to the playoffs!December 26 atj 1 p.m.EverBank
Field

The Black Candle" is a timely illumination on why the seven principles of
Kwanzaa are relevant today.December 28 3 p.m.Ritz Theatre & LaVilla
Museum

Ricky Smiley is a comic like no other. Get a taste of the humor that made him
famous at this live show. December 31, 8 p.m.Times Union Center for the
Performing Arts

Budweiser Tailgate Party. Game day begins at the Budweiser Tailgate party
complete with interactive games, a variety of food vendors, live entertainment
including bands and cheerleaders from both universities. December 31- 10:30
a.m.EverBank Field

New Year's Eve Fireworks, Ring in the New Year in Downtown Jacksonville
with live entertainment, Gator Bowl team pep rallies and more.December 31 at
The Jacksonville Landing

MICHIGAN TO PLAY MISSISSIPPI STATE. IN THE JANUARY 1, 2011
GATOR BOWL

Jacksonville Giants v. Georgia Gwizzlies. Support your ABA team as they
take on the Gwizzlies. January 2, 5 p.m.at Veterans Memorial Arena

Free Cholesterol & Diabetes Screening, 12:00 pm 5:00 pm- January 6 at
Winn-Dixie Pharmacy, 2261 W. Edgewood Avenue, Jacksonville, FL. For more
information call 800-713-3301

The Jacksonville Children's Chorus presents the Second Annual Martin
Luther King, Jir Day "Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing" Concert, which will be
held on Monday, January 17, 2010 at 6:30 p.m. in the Times-Union Center for
the Performing Arts, Jacksonville


By: Lucius Gantt r ,


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TULYSSES W. WATKINS JR., M.D.

TYPES OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES


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THE STAR


PAGE B-3


rorm-'nr1Z W lMn







1iU ~ -I U -T ..........


Gators honored in 2010

SEC Teams and

Outback Bowl Preview

The Florida and Georgia Star
Correspondent: Scott Jurrens
Photographer: Joseph Lorentzson

Earlier in the month, the SEC
announced the 2010 All-SEC team.
Defending national champion Alabama
and SEC Western Division runner-up
LSU had the most representatives on the
2010 All-Southeastern Conference
Coaches' Football Team, the league office
announced on Tuesday. Alabama had 12
total members, while LSU had eight.
Nine of the twelve SEC colleges
had a member on the first-team All-SEC
squad. LSU led with five first-teamers,
while SEC Champion Auburn tied
Alabama with four selections on the first
team.
Arkansas, Georgia and South
Carolina each had six members on the
annual list. Auburn had four, while
Florida and Mississippi State each had
three. Alabama led with eight selections
on the second team. Every SEC squad
had at least one student-athlete represent-
ed on the first and second teams. Coaches
were not permitted to vote for their own
players.
The All-SEC squad had 12 first-
team seniors, 12 juniors, two sophomores
and one freshman. South Carolina run-
ning back Marcus Lattimore was the only
freshman. LSU junior Patrick Peterson
made the first team twice once as a
return specialist and once as a defensive
back. Trent Richardson of Alabama and
Randall Cobb of Kentucky were also both
recognized at two positions. Nick Bell of
Mississippi State was named honorary
captain of the 2010 All-SEC squad.
Gators safety Ahmed Black
earned first team All-SEC Defense hon-
ors, cornerback Janoris Jenkins earned
second team All-SEC defensive honors


and punter Chas Henry earned first team
All-SEC special team's honors.
For the All-Freshman SEC team
honors, the Gators had five players hon-
ored which included on offense, Trey
Burton; defensive players Sharrif Floyd,
Jelani Jenkins, Ronald Powell and special
teams player Andre DeBose.
The Florida Gators (7-5, 4-4 SEC)
will play the Penn State Nittany Lions (7-
5, 4-4 Big Ten) in the Outback Bowl in
Tampa, FL at 1:00 PM EST on January 1,
2011 to be televised on ABC. This will be
Gator coach Urban Meyer's last game per
his retirement announcement on
December 11, 2010. Of course, Meyer
retired in 2009 but reversed his decision
days later to retain his position of head
coach at University of Florida.
His team will face the Penn State
Nittany Lions coached by Joe "Pappa"
Paterno who at 83 years young, doesn't
plan on retiring anytime soon. The Gators
have beaten the Lions both times they
have faced off in New Year's Day bowl
games, the last Gator win in the 1998
Citrus Bowl 21-6.
Meyer's record in bowl games is
6-1 but this is the first year sans Tim
Tebow and he is facing Patemo who is
coaching in his 25th New Year's Day
bowl game. Penn State won the 2010
Capital One Bowl game over LSU 19-17.
Penn State has gone 3-0 when
playing in The Outback Bowl while
Florida's record is 1-2. With the Gators
Jeff Demps still nursing a sore foot and
Janoris Jenkins questionable at playing
cornerback in this game, Penn State looks
to go 4-0 in the 2011 Outback Bowl.


Vo

Jacksonville Giants
B, Farris Lone

Attornie Ron Sholes lhas taken on
another venture Tins one is focused on the
entllrlle an11111 It is no secret that his Ie;iir;lll ie
the C'itN Hall Pub. is a great place to eperi-
ence 2aood food. and rieat \\eekl entertain-
ment It di a%% i the o1ei 21 crot) d ee \\ei-"!ek
to a fun atmosphere idih 16 flat screens, Ili e
bands and more Bul Iii.s ne~et t entire hua
broLight the Anmerican Baiketbal As-socia tionii
(ABA) to ouL tlar cit) in thie form o tlihe
Jacksonm ille Gialnts He- lias partnered \ ith a ..
tUli 1bI el ,pool tin i ll o1 like Sign-A- pr i.
RlImI Loc'alEdge Media. Asolhie Medical
clinicc and otheis it bring I'ln fili i ot the
.IJackonl ille l Veteins Mlemorial Aren.a
JaIckson\ ille is not a cit,,\ thiat i noted
tei its \hioleliearted stipport of its sports
tclni. This is e\ idemt by the lo\\ ticket ,ales
year after year for the Jaguars home games
And although the first three games for the
Giants averaged only about 4000 attendees.
the games were remarkable. In the first game .. *
alone, the Giants reached 100 points against
the San Fransisco Rumble before the close of
the first half. Final score was 182- 124. The
second game played against the Haiti Relief
team was no different. The energy of the
crowd was electrifying and pushed the Giants
to another great win
with a final score that B.
once again exceeded the
century mark (168-84)
Their third game again & A
the Savannah Storm '
started out a little rough ..
At times it seemed as -it
the Storm was going to .
blow the Giants over. In
the end with a score of
151-90, it was the m
Giants who stole the
thunder from the Storm.
Needless to sax.
the only thing that i,
low about these games -
is the ticket prices. Ron
Sholes and his team
have made a night farom-
ly bonding and fun vert
affordable. So far atel -
every game, the playeti,.
and coaches greet the _
fans, sign autographs
and sometimes take pic-
tures. It is certainly an ,
experience that
Jacksonville definitely .
should not miss!!!


ALBANY STATE'S


JENNINGS NAMED CANDIDATE FOR NATIONAL
FOOTBALL AWARD


Albany State University quarterback Stanley Jennings is
a nominee for the National Division II Football Player of the
I Year Award, presented by The Heritage Sports Radio Network
(HSRN). He is one of four nominees for the national f ,,rib.ll
fan poll award which will honor the most outstanding player
'fom an NCAA Division II school for the 2010 season.
.J In his first season as a Golden Ram, the junior from
Marietta, Ga. led the Golden Rams to impressive 11-1 overall
and 10-0 perfect regular season finishes. Jennings and the
Golden Rams captured the 2010 SBN National Black College
Football Championship, the SIAC Championship title and a
berth in the NCAA Division 11 playoffs.
The offensive powerhouse and key anchor of the Golden
Rams "Gold Rush" offense completed 139 of 253 passes for 2,392 yards and 26 TDs.
Jennings also rushed for 142 yards on 106 carries for two touchdowns on the season. He
is ranked No..1 in the SIAC and No. 11 in the nation in passing efficiency with an effi-
ciency rate of 159.58. He is first in the SIAC in total offense and No. 56 in the nation.
Jennings also led the SIAC in almost every major passing category, including passing
yards, yards per game and touchdowns. Under Jennings, the Golden Rams finished first
in the SIAC in pass efficiency, passing offense and total offense.
Jennings was named the SIAC's 2010 Most Valuable Player and Offensive
Player of the Year. He was Super Regional Two finalist for the 2010 Harlon HIill Trophy
as the NCAA Division II College Football Player of the Year. He won the -ISRN fan poll
National Player of the Week award twice after his performances against Morehouse
College on Oct. 23 and Kentucky State University in the season opener on Aug. 28.
Football fans across the country can cast their votes for Jennings as the -ISRN
National Player of the Year by visiting www.HSRN.com. Voting will be available on tlhe
HSRN.com home page (Fan Poll) until Wednesday, Dec. 29, at 2 p.m. (1 p.m. CST).
HSRN honored the top-performances on the gridiron for Division I FCS and )Division II
each week during the 2010 season. The nominees are players of the year from each of
the HBCU conferences.
Other Division II nominees for the HISRN Player of the Year Award are Walter
Sanders of St. Augustine's, CIAA Offensive Player of the Year; Malcolm Jenkins of
Elizabeth City State University, CIAA Defensive Player of the Year; and D)errin Nettles
of Morehouse College, SIAC Defensive Player of the Year.


Albany State women's basketball player receives SIAC honor
An Albany State University Lady Ram has been named
the SIAC Women's Basketball Player of the Week. Symone
Wilkerson, a 5-5 junior guard from Bonaire, Ga., received
the honor after her outstanding performances in victories
against Claflin University on Dec. 16 and Valdosta State
University on Dec. 17.
Wilkerson led the Lady Rams with 12 points in their 74-
52 win over Claflin, and 13 points in the 70-66 victory over
Valdosta State. She averaged 12 points, 5.5 rebounds, and
five assists in the two games. Defensively, she averaged 2.5
steals.
Tuskegee guard Lorell Friend was named SIAC Men's Basketball Player of the
Week, and Lemoyne-Owen juniors A.J. Nance and Georgette McCuller were named
SIAC Newcomers of the Week.
WILDCATS' STARLING NAMED MEAC PLAYER OF THE WEEK
NORFOLK, Va. For the first time in the 2010-11 season, the Wildcats of
Bethune-Cookman basketball pick up honors from the conference, Mid-Eastern Athletic
Conference officials (MEAC) announced Monday, with the naming of Alexander
Starling as the MEAC Player of the Week.
Starling finished with a combined 25 points and 19 rebounds in the Wildcats two
non-conference games last week against Baylor and Akron. The senior forward from
Miami was one rebound shy of a double-double with .19 points and nine rebounds in the
overtime loss to Akron. Overall, Starling shot 53-percent from the field (9-of-17), 50-
percent from long range (1-of-2) and 75-percent (6-of-8) from the charity stripe, while
averaging 36.5 minutes of play this week.
The Wildcats have earned their short holiday break with a rigorous travel sched-
ule, returning to the court on December 30th against Jacksonville. The road game is set
to tip-off at 7:30 p.m.
'i .'& 7 ", ,;'-'* .?"* r- ,.-- ,. ,,' -.'. _, ', "-.


DECEMBER 25, 2010


THE STAR


PAGFR R_








PAGE R-5 1ij .,, AK





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JPA: C-1319B
BIMT TRACK REHABILITATION FOR THE
JACKSONVILLE PORT AUTHORITY
Sealed bids will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority
until 2:00 P.M. (EST), THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2011, at
which time they shall be opened in the Public Meeting Room of
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All bids must be submitted in accordance with specifications and
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PROSPECTIVE BIDDER IS REQUIRED. A BID WILL
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REPRESENTED AT SUCH CONFERENCE.
Bid and contract bonding are required.
Federal Funds (EDA Award No. 04-79-06277) are being utilized
on this project.

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TI v 4crA 0


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^^








PAGE B-8 THE STAR DECEMBER 25, 2010 AND JANUARY 1,2011


I'm Just Sayin.....


Whatever you hold in your mind will
occur in your life. If you continue to
believe as you've always believed,
you'll continue to act as you've always
acted. If you continue to act as you've
always acted, you'll continue to get
what you've always gotten. If you want
different results in your life try chang-
ing your ...mind. What we think deter-
mines what happens to us. Free your mind and the rest
will .... I'm just sayin.....


Dementrious Lawrence


Top 20 Playlist October-November 2010
Listen to WCGL AM 1360 LIVE at www.wcg11360.coml
1. Nobody Greater VaShawn Mitchell
2. It's All God The Soul Seekers Feat. Marvin Winans
3. I Won't Let You Fall Helen Miller & New Anointing
4. It's About Time For A Miracle Beverly Crawford
5. I Want To Say Thank You Lisa Page Brooks
6. Leave It In The Hands of the Lord The Supreme 7
7. I Chose To Worship Wess Morgan
8. On My Way Back Up Jimmy Hicks & VOI
9. Hold On The Brown Sisters
10. Jesus You Are April Nevels
11. Lord Do It Alvin Darling
12. Nobody Like You Fred Hammond
13. I Give Myself Away William McDowell
14. Turn It Over To Jesus The Second Chapter
15. Just for Me Shekinah Glory Ministry
16. Lord We Praise You Phoenix Mass Choir
17. Expect The Great Jonathan Nelson
18. Lord You're Mighty Youthful Praise feat. J.J. Hairston
19. He Wants It All Forever Jones
20. Just Stand Hope Chapel Mass Choir
i^^^SSSii~sB^as^T^aa3


Watson Realty Corp. REALTORS'


Betty Asque Davis, GRI Multi-Million Dollar and President's
Business 904 571-1182
Fax 1-866488 6407 TOLL FREE
badavis@WatsonRealtyCorp.com
www.bettydavisrealtor.com


Award REALTOR


J. .


IL


, 7,


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Je'

ii-





'p


aurence Greene
photographer
904-553-7359/
904-444-4044


pp


- --r --II-----UC III~LI(


THE STAR


DECEMBER 25, 2010AND JANUARY 1, 2011


PAGE B-8






December 25, 2010


Georgia Teen Kills 7-year-

old in Murder-Suicide


-. Macon police are baffled by a murder-
,. -. suicide that was committed by a 19-year-
old teenager.
Authorities said that the shooter, whose
body was identified as Vonn Gibbons Jr.,
had been at his mother's home along with
S7-year-old Jalen Griffin early Saturday
When he shot the boy in the head.
After killing the child, Gibbons com-
mitted suicide by shooting himself in the
chest.
No one knows what prompted Gibbons
to commit such a violent act, but police said
that it appeared Gibbons shot Griffin inten-
tionally.
Cheryl Cole, Gibbons' mother, told police that she was in the home at the time of
the shooting but claimed she did not hear anything because she was asleep when the
shots were fired. Cole had been babysitting the child. She told police that she was not
even aware that her son had a gun in her house.
Cole was reportedly inconsolable at the crime scene as they took the bodies away
to be autopsied. Police took Cole into custody as well; she was questioned for about
two and a half hours before she was released Saturday. As of yet, police have not in-
formed the media if she has any connection to the incident.
According to family friends, Gibbons was a student enrolled at Macon State College.
The county coroner told police that at this time they have no idea why such a bright
boy would kill a child in what appeared to be cold blood and they have real doubt as
to if they will ever know what truly happened.


s. 1


Woman Sets Fire To Boyfriend's

Family Jewels


- ":- 1 Hell hath no tI n like a '.~A \om n corned -\ Biov. Ard
CO (- u t', ii 11an tell ilte lieat ici nilkt \\ hen hi; ii lt'! lend .il-
leeedl\ set lis pants on file.
S According' to policCe I ep.i tI.. thl co Iuple hld eCIen en-
,":._.ed in1 an~ aIL'LuIIIIenI \\ lien Slheldon Gon.I ale. di .:l ott
on Ilic' coti li, lie Ill..l I I tc .l \\.keilllvl Bei linl.i Di\on-
i Ne i.bhold, 3S. \\,i t,, nIdidln o\ci liin '.\ l .1 il lic.1 iII lhei
Berlinda Dixon Newbold hand, the flame to his crotch.
Gonzales was able to put the flames out with his hands.
Dixon-Newbold has been charged with aggravated assault with bail set at $6,500.


Suspected Killer's Conviction

Upheld in Supreme Court


After years of
legal appeals, sus-
pected serial killer
Paul Durousseau
will be getting the
death sentence
after all.
The former
Jacksonville taxi
cab driver was sen-
tenced to death for
the 1999 murder of
24-year-old Tyresa
Mack and was also
under indictment


in the killings of five other women in Jacksonville be-
tween 2002 and 2003.
Durousseau's lawyers had previously argued that
Florida's death penalty was in itself unconstitutional and
that the jury should not have been told about some of the
other murder charges.
Durousseau was sentenced to death by lethal injection
in December 2007. The ruling to uphold the conviction
was handed down Dec. 9.
The mother of one of Durousseau's alleged victims
said that she was very thankful that the conviction had not
been struck down and feels that justice had been served.
Her daughter, Shawanda McCalister, was three
months pregnant when she was killed.
Florida prosecutors said they dropped the other mur-
der charges in a legal maneuver to make Durousseau's
conviction better able to withstand appeal, and it appears
to have been successful.
Durousseau's new death date had not yet been re-
leased.


II I I


THE STAR


Vol. 1, No. 6


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D 25, 2R


Don givee more than

you mean to during the

holidays.
Homes jam-packed with glittering gifts.
Stores, malls, and downtown streets teeming
with unsuspecting shoppers. People rushing
around, stressed out and careless, looking for
last-minute gifts, trying to get everything done.
It's enough to make a crook giddy with holiday
joy.

Here are some tips on how to enjoy this hol-
iday season safely while reducing your chances
of being victimized.


If You Are Out for the Evening

* Turn on lights and a radio or TV so it looks
like someone's home.

* Be extra cautious about locking doors and
windows when you leave, even if it's just for a
few minutes.

* Don't display gifts where they can be seen
from outside.

If You Are Shopping

* Stay alert and be aware of what's going on
around you.

* Park in a well-lit space, and be sure to lock the
car, close the windows, and hide shopping bags
and gifts in the trunk.

* Avoid carrying large amounts -of cash; pay
with a check or credit card whenever possible.

* Deter pickpockets and purse-snatchers. Don't


overburden yourself with packages. Be extra
careful with purses and wallets. Carry a purse
close to your body, not dangling by the straps.
Put a wallet in an inside coat or front pants
pocket.

* Shopping with kids? Teach them to go to a
store clerk or security guard if you get sepa-
rated.

Protect Your Vehicle

Loading up on all those gifts is a sign of
progress in the holiday shopping. But if those
packages are left out in the open after they're in
the car, your car has become a likely target for
thieves.

* Remember the old cliche "Out of sight, out of
mind'?" The same idea applies to items in your
car. Always lock your vehicle and store all
items out of sight. Breaking into an empty car
isn't worth a thiefs time. However, anything left
in plain view from your holiday gifts to spare
change, sunglasses, CDs, cell phones or brief-
cases may tempt a thief.

* Help prevent your vehicle from being stolen
by always locking your car and using anti-theft
devices. And although it's cold, never leave
your vehicle running while you run inside your
home or a store even if for only a minute or
two.

If a Stranger Comes to the Door

Criminals sometimes pose as couriers de-
livering gifts. And it's not uncommon for peo-
ple to try to take advantage of others' generosity
during the holidays by going door-to-door for
charitable donations when there's no charity in-
volved. Ask for identification, and find out how
the funds will be used. If you aren't satisfied,
don't give. Help a charitable organization you


know and like instead. Or think about reaching
out in the spirit of the season and helping some-
one who's less fortunate or lonely. Do your part
to make the holidays a safe and happy time for
everybody-except con artists and other crim-
inals.

After You've Opened the Gifts
Burglars know that many households have
new, and oftentimes expensive, items in their
homes following the December holidays es-
pecially items such as new computers, stereo
components, televisions, cameras and other
electronic equipment. In too many-cases, resi-
dents make it easy for burglars to figure out
which homes to target by putting boxes that
identify their new gifts in plain view with their
other garbage.
Avoid becoming an easy target for posthol-
iday burglars by not leaving boxes for new elec-
tronics and other items in the alley or other
garbage pick-up locations for several days at a
time. Instead, break down any boxes you are
throwing out, put them in garbage bags or reuse
them.

Celebrate Responsibly

Drinking and driving is a danger to every-
one on the road. Remember that the risk isn't
worth it if you choose to drink alcohol at a
party, don't drive.


C&J PAGE A-2


December 25, 2010


THE STAR








ssSHH! From Actual Police Reports

Did You Hear About?...





DONIESTIC ABUiSE- Poli. \\ckr
sent to 1"N Br-ck lael- St in -. On September 23, 2010 at 2:03
sen tS

sponse 1t a domestic abuse c.ill '1 a.m. police were dispatched to

The licmi- \\.h 1111L 11lll '. vard and Beach Boulevard in ref-
cainm slic _poke \\ i. i in 1' 6erence to a person being shot.
form111ingL' 111h111 0 ,11 11 1C' .111d Ill'[ ,1,.L-1 11
-" .bo-ici-i .. IL -CO C C ...C Ill Upon arrival police determined
an ,11 L1 re ,dn p I- d the victim has been transported
dn / ^ --.,. -., to a local hospital by rescue with
dent.
S" a gunshot wound.
The duenc.r l"l b n 'r -c,..li-
Investigation revealed a witness
ing through the victunms cell phone
g through te v s cell phone and the victim stopped to get
before asking about a call she had made. When she refused to respond. gas and as the victim came out
it gas and as the victim came out
the suspect reportedly jumped on top of her, held her down by her shoul- of the store a black male wear-
ders and punched her once in the face and twice on her right side, just ing a red bandana around his
above the hip bone. Police observed that the victim had no visible in- face approached him. The sus-
uries and she declined a hospital visit. The suspect's brother, who was pect told the victim to "give it up"
in the home at the time, refused to speak to police. The victim was ad- ::. and then he shot him.
vised of a safe place.
O__n____" ______:." 1-'- We are asking help from the
On November 27, 2010 at 7:30 p.m. public to help us identify him.
police were dispatched to 8083 Old
Kings Road in reference to a strong Anyone with any information
armed robbery. about the identity or where-
abouts of the suspect is asked to
Upon arrival, the complainant said the contact the Jacksonville Sheriff's
suspect (pictured left) walked into the Office at 904-630-0500 or email
store and then to the counter. When the us at JSOCrimeTips@jaxsher-
register drawer was opened, the sus- iff.org.
pect reached into the drawer and
grabbed the cash. The complaint at-
tempted to push the suspect away but
he was unsuccessful. The suspect was
able to flee the store with the cash. The
suspect is described as a black male 5'6" 1751bs.

Anyone who can identify the suspect or has information about this robbery
is asked to contact the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office at 904-630-0500 or
email us at JSOCrimeTips@jaxsheriff.org. To remain anonymous and re- "-
ceive a possible reward, contact Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS or
email them at rewards@fccrimestoppers.com. e .j


C&JPAGEA-3


December 25, 2010


THE STAR







December 25, 2010


THE STAl


C&J Pae A-4


.7 ; "IrIY' .7, g &r: ''2 .3 ',p~ .- : y*.,. j, r :r ..ir Aw ,.' ..' ,k T g- .tL _"
. p_,:.--,i' .'.--. ..-p: -.."M-Ldti... ....'. Z ....kM ...........................,..................................,..........................................
; "" '"" '. ..."%- : ": "-'........."._.........,.......".
.. .. .'. %
A.i i
dk5* AvI 11
: ~ ~ ~ 'es


Name: Essie Cobb
Age: 38
Offense: Grand Theft


I '






Name: Veron Caine
Age: 30
Offense: Fraud


Is-
Name: 1Tyrone Alexander
Age: 40
Offense: Aggravated Assault


I 11
Name: Cassie Clark
Age: 22
Offense: Armed Robbery


Name: Jerrick Gilmore
Age: 22
Offense: Aggravated Assault


Name: Kiashal Jolinson Nam nit: Darren Holland l Name: DL.Mond Jacob%
Age: 30 Age: 34 Age: 28
Offense: Drug Possession Offense:: Probation Violation Offense: Probation Violation


Name: Bruce Taylor Name: Demario Jackson Name: Anthony Daniels
Age: 49 Age: 30 Age: 44
Offense: Burglary Offense: Production Order Offense: Probation Violation


Age: 50 Age: 30


Name: OmarAb
Age: 47


Age: 19 Age: 36
Offense: Child Molestation Offense: Enticing a Child


I0 *'*' Pe' I I j


Ii *1 I I


Age: 57


_____~~__


?

















Midnight Snacks

Two men wandering through a Deltona neighborhood caught the attention of a deputy on his beat and asked for a
ride home. The deputy agreed, but only after he could search them. They said sure, and the deputy found cell
phones, GPS devices and a box of strawberry-flavored Pop Tarts stolen from neighborhood cars.They made a de-
tour at the local jail that night.


L'.0
-;# MR-- ':4:- e L; -
... ", ...,- .AM AN K .


Love on the Cheap

911 operators were reportedly harassed by a lonely man looking for love in Tampa, Fl. police say he repeatedly
called 911 looking for sex because it was the only number he could dial after running out of cell phone minutes.


Dirty Job

A Melbourne-area woman changed diapers for a man who was faking disabilities. The man, whom she met
through Craigslist, paid her $600 a week for the services. It took her three months to figure out he wasn't disabled.
Unfortunately for her, police could not intervene, as it was a case of "buyer beware".






Let's face it dumb or smart, there are criminals everywhere. The best defense is a good offense: a solid strategy and being smarter than the
bad guy (or dumb one).

* Invest in a home security system and keep it on and monitored 24/7/365.
* Make sure it has glass break sensors, monitors doors, windows and has motion sensors.
* Be sure to protect basement windows all the way up to the highest level windows and porch doors for maximum home safety.
* Install at least a 4-16 cameras surveillance system that can be accessed from the web and has full night vision.
* Remove or lock up exterior ladders preventing the bad guy from gaining access.
* Lock all doors and windows when you are home and away, especially at night and in the summer months, too.


911







De e 2TESTA
i !


Jax UPS Worker Steals $27,000
In Cell Phones

A 21 -year old man was recently arrested after it was
discovered that he had been stealing cell phones from the
UPS facility on the Northside.
Police said that Zachary Adam Scott stole 63 cell-
phones from July through December of this year. The
phones, which were from various cellphone carriers, xwere
being shipped to customers through the LIPS hub in Jack-
sonville. Scott would sneak the phones out of their shipping
boxes and into his steel-toe boots one at a time to get them
through the UPS metal detectors.
Scott would later sell the phones to a still-unnamed
friend for $75 or $100 per phone.
Scott's elaborate heist was discovered when a main-
tenance worker unearthed the empty shipping boxes Scott
had hidden on a ledge in the UPS terminal.
UPS confirmed the arrest and said that Scott had
been working the midnight shift at the time. Aside from that,
the company had no further comment on the matter other
than they were working with the Jacksonville Sheriffs Of-
fice.
Scott is charged with dealing in stolen property and
employee theft.


Officer Arrested for Slashing
Co-worker's Tires

It appears that a serious personal dispute led a JSO
police officer to slash the tires of a female co-worker.
40-year-old Megan Ray was caught puncturing the
front passenger's side tire of a fellow police officer several
times in the parking lot of the Police Memorial Building.
Ray later walked to the rear of the woman's car and
tried to pull the Fraternal Order of Police metal emblem off
the license plate with her fingers.
According to police, Ray, who has been with JSO
since 2003 and has been working in the Teleserve Unit, con-
fessed to her dastardly deed. She has been removed from
her regular assignment while the investigation continues.


Jacksonville Navy Exchange Employee
Embezzles $20,000

It took nearly six years for the Recreational and Social Committee of the Navy
Exchange to discover that one of their own had been stealing thousands of dollars
from their organization.
The 39-year-old woman, whose name is not being released, had worked as
an embroider for the Navy Exchange for the past ten years and was also a treasurer
for the committee.
According to police, she had taken about $20,000 in club funds and deposited
them into her personal bank account.
After being turned in to police by her fellow club members, the woman con-
fessed to taking the money and using it to pay her many bills, including $1,300 mort-
gage, $535 car note, $125 car insurance, $500 a month in groceries, $200 a month in
credit card payments, airline tickets, phone bill, cable, car repairs, and gas.
The woman told police that she took advantage of her position out of desper-
ation. saying that her husband had recently retired from the military and had recently
lost his other job, making her the sole bread-winner of the household.
The Navy Exchange spokesperson reported having no knowledge of the inci-
dent and remained mum on the investigation, telling police that no further informa-
tion would be released at a later time.
The woman is not listed in online arrest reports, and the police report did not
say if the woman was booked on any charges. It is not known if the woman has ha
any further ties to the Navy Exchange or the Recreational and Social Committee.







Advertising Deadline:

TUESDAY @ 5 p.m.

To place an ad:

Call: (904) 766-8834 or

Email: ad@thefloridastar.com


- I


December 25, 2010


C&J PAGE B-2


THE STAR






Deeme 25 201 TH STA C&JAG B-3-.I- I-


Florida Grinch Steals Christmas Presents
A Jacksonville woman was horrified to find all of
her children's Christmas presents had disappeared
From beneath the family's tree.
Audrey McCray had been preparing to go to
church when she noticed the toys she had arranged so
-. carefully amongst the tinsel and lights seemed to
.. ave vanished into thin air.
Bags of toys had lined the tree \\ith everything
ffroom video games to roller skates and shoes and
S socks. The only thing left were comforters and larger
items that the burglar most likely found too large and
awkward to escape with.
The children wonder aloud to their mother if they will have Christmas at all.
McCray told authorities that after how she saved and scrimped for the presents she had,
she was not sure herself. She reports being so depressed in the aftermath of the incident
that she cannot even muster enough energy to prepare Christmas dinner.
McCray said the crook took something from her that is far more valuable that
can never be replaced: her peace of mind.



Deadlocked Jury Means Mistrial for

Alleged Baby Murderer
A Georgia man who had been on trial for beating a 17-month-old girl to death
may find himself at the hands of a brand new jury
on additional charges of felony murder and first-
degree cruelty to children.
A Glynn County judge declared a mistrial after
the jury acquitted Daryl Keon Jones on a charge of
murder but declared itself deadlocked on the two
other charges. The jurors spent nearly five hours in
deliberations and still could not approach the judge
with a verdict.
Jones had been accused of beating Brianna
,, Kichelle Hester, the daughter of Jones' then live-in
.i. '' girlfriend, to death. Jones took the witness stand
SD *' n during the trial, saying that his then 8-year-old son
Daryl Keon Jones could have been the one who caused the face and
neck injuries doctors say contributed to the child's death. His lawyer told the jury that
Jones was innocent of all the crimes.
Jones, who has failing kidneys, was released to undergo dialysis treatments.
He remains out of jail on bond.


Flea Market Tenants

Shaken After $1 Million

Heist

Professional thieves ravaged the Norwood Plaza
Flea Market on Sunday, making off with about $1 mil-
lion in cash, clothes and fine jewelry.
Police found that the majority of the security
cameras had been sabotaged, but the one that survived
recorded six men in black hoodies and masks cutting
their way into one of four stores, then ransacking an
ATM machine and safe.
What the dead cameras missed was the burglars
cutting through the concrete walls and metal locks of
Peter's Gold, Men in Black, Hometown CD and Video
and ATM Solutions sometime before 2 a.m.
After cutting a hole in the outside fence and wall
of the market, the expert thieves bypassed the network
of security by damaging security cameras and render-
ing the motion sensors useless by painting over them.
The store owners arrived later that morning to
quite a shock along with the holes in the walls and the
damaged security cameras, someone had stolen a com-
puter and three .38-caliber guns from the flea market's
second-floor office. The computer hard drive for the
surveillance camera system was gone as well.
The jewelry store suffered the greatest; it was
ransacked and its safe cut into with an estimated $1 mil-
lion in jewelry stolen.



\ ^.J^..


C&J PAGE B-3


December 25, 2010


THE STAR






December 25, 2010


BRADRICK WYCKOFF
Last Seen: Nov 13, 2010
City: Clermont, FL
Description: Black male, 17y/o, 5'10", 1751bs, black hair, brown eyes.


ANDREA WINNINGHAM
Last Seen: Sep 2, 2010
City: Miami, FL
Description: Black female, 16y/o, 5'8", 1281bs, black hair, brown eyes.


TAVIUS FREEMAN
Last Seen: Nov 30, 2010
City: Austell, GA
Description: Black male, 17y/o, 5'6", 161 lbs, black hair, brown eyes.


TASHAMEN SMITH
Last Seen: June 10, 2010
City: Stone Mountain, GA
Description: Black female, 16y/o 5'2", 1 lObs. black hair, brown eyes.


Has multiple tattoos. He may go by the nickname "Tay". ]May still be in local area or may have traveled to Atlanta, GA.
I S i


I


THE STAR


C&PPa eB-


-;4 l