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Florida star

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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.,
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
alephbibnum - 000581378
issn - 0740-798X
lccn - sn 83045218
System ID:
UF00028362:00954

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.,
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
alephbibnum - 000581378
issn - 0740-798X
lccn - sn 83045218
System ID:
UF00028362:00954

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Full Text




NOTESTFOISODET ARET MS EA*FICAN AMERICAN OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Florida Star
P. 0. Box 40629
Jacksonville, FL 32203


An 80-year Celebration
See Pages A-4
50 Years and 3rd Wedding in
same dress See page B-1


TIIF


IANUA- 1-ANUARY,2,01 VL.59NO 3 5:CNT


Remembering


Author Rodney Hurst, Featured Speaker
Rodney Hurst, author of the acclaimed book "It was
never about a hot dog and a Coke" was the Keynote
Speaker at the 23rd Annual City of Jacksonville Dr.
Martin Luther King breakfast. Hurst who was the
President of the Jacksonville Youth Council NAACP
during the sit-in demonstrations in 1960 reminded the
more than 1400 attendees of the role young people
played in the civil rights movement.
Mr. Hurst told the audience "...most sit-inners were
students from the campuses of historical Black colleges
and universities Remembering Continued on A-7

Teddy Pendergrass Dies, 59
Teddy Pendergrass
was a sex symbol
because of his music
and his appearance,
even after his car
accident that left him
paralyzed from the
Teddy Pendergrass waist down in 1982.
The sexy R&B
artist died Wednesday after a brief fight with colon can-
cer.
His music as a soloist and with Harold Melvin & the
Blue Notes, will long be remembered.
Study Shows Too Much TV
May Make Your Life Shorter
It was recently reported
that every hour you spend
SL watching television raises
. our risk for an early death
t ',5- from heart disease by 18
B percent.
-- The 6 and one half study
by Australians researchers
said that people who watch television for four or more
hours a day increase their risk of dying from cardiovas-
cular disease 80 percent more than those who watch
only about two hours per day.
The study contributes this to obesity and too much
sitting.

Criminal Charges Made
Against Single Mom by Army
When Spc. Alexis Hutchinson,
21, and a cook in the U. S.Army
was told she had to go to
Afghanistan last year, she refused
to do so because she said she did
not have a family able to take
care of her son.
The Army said Wednesday that
Spc. Alexis they will now file charges
Hutchinson, 21, withagainst her.
her baby. against her.


Haiti Receives World Wide Help

This Haitian-born Canadian leader, thanked her country for their rapid response to
help her earthquake ravaged birth place. There were no "Rush Limbaughs or Pat
Robertsons in Canada to criticize her or describe her homeland on a Christian TV
station to say that the people of Haiti "were under the heel of the French.. and togeth-
er swore a pact with the devil," which justifies the earthquake and hardships.
"Fly Jock", Tom Joyner, took his crew to Haiti to broadcast the Tom Joyner
Morning Show and to set up an Internet cafe' so that Haitians could get in touch with
Canada's Gov.-General their families. World wide, help went to Haiti where it is reported that over 50,000
Michaelle Jean, Haitian-born are believed to have died in this histori-
cal earthquake. Joyner said we learned
S' that we cannot sit back and wait for any-
one to do for us what we can and must
do for ourselves. On his show earlier,
,. listeners were encouraged to call "The
-, '700 Club" to tell Pat Robertson that
they were praying for him to become a
'real' Christian.
're CMLimbaugh displayed his displeasure
with President Obama, which is not
unusual, because of the president's quick response to help the Haitians and many Haiti Continued on A-7


Officer Killed in Accident
...Kris Caudilla was driving his
I SUV in the wrong direction and ran
."head-on with St. Johns County
., Deputy James Louis Anderson, 44,
S and father of four, causing his
death. Caudilla is still in the hospi-
tal but in critical condition.
Sheriff Shoar of St. Johns
Sheriff's Office said that Anderson
served 20 years in the United States
Deputy James Louis Marine Corps (1984-2004), and
Anderson, Jr., 44 was employed with The Putnam
County Sheriff's Office prior to
becoming a deputy with them. He received the Lifesaving
Medal while at Putnam and was hired at St. Johns Sheriff's
office in 2007. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

Local NAACP Grades Hospitality
Industry Jacksonville Industry
Received a Grade of "D"
The Jacksonville Branch of the
NAACP's Economic Reciprocity initia-
tive survey again in 2009, the hospitali-
ty industry of this area because it is
Florida's number one industry generat-
ing nearly 60 billion dollars per year to
the state's economy and employing
D is almost one million people.
Denni Wade, The survey-study was to determine
how much of the African American
community was receiving a reasonable return of their $5 bil-
lion support to be returned to that community, and graded
accordingly.
After the returns were evaluated, the organization gave the
industry a grade of "D" because of the lack of African
Americans and other minorities in management positions,
and the lack of African Americans and minority advertising
and marketing vendors. The response to the survey was very
low, which added to the low grade given.
JCCI and the NAACP have both attempted to evaluate this
industry and neither received a cooperative response.
Also, they did not receive support from the Jacksonville
Convention and Visitors Bureau and the Jacksonville Hotel
Motel Association. The Jacksonville Restaurant Association
was not included in this survey.
The Economic Reciprocity Initiative industry survey was
led by Dennis Wade, a board member and officer of the
Jacksonville NAACP. Mr. Wade said that the NAACP will
continue to monitor the Jacksonville area hospitality indus-
try as well as other industries, for progress and advance-
ments.


Rep. Jennifer Carroll
Responds to Racial
Comments on Twitter
Representative Jennifer ...A
Carroll, chairman of the : i
Republican Party of Florida
released a statement because
of comments made by St.
Petersburg Times reporter
Adam Smith. Smith posted
a comment, "U know you're
at the wrong Rosen Hotel -
for FL GOP confab, when Rep. Jennifer
Carroll
lobby loaded with Af-
Amercns checking in."
The State Representative said that more than a
year after African Americans have achieved the
highest levels she is appalled that one of our
esteemed journalists would have such a myopic
view of African Americans. She added, African
Americans can assemble and participate in any
organization they desire. assembling of African
Americans in any venue should not astonish any
one.
Setting Tracks for History
of Florida's First Black
Hospital
H os.......City Councilwoman
Glorious Johnson, in a
.meeting in an effort to
ensure the first floor of
the historical Brewster
Hospital be used as a
museum, showcasing
the Brewster Hospital's
history met Thursday on
City Councilwoman the matter. The city had
Glorious Johnson planned to offer both
floors of the building for lease after spending
about $2.3 million to renovate it after being
vacant since the 1960s.
Brewster was the first hospital in the State of
Florida used to provide medical care for African
Americans during segregation. It was also used
to train nurses.
Ms. Johnson's desire is to have the entire build-
ing utinder the Ritz Theater & LaVilla Museum.
The city agreed to allow the present contract to
be revised.
Former nurses trained at Brewster, wish to see
the historical value remain.


I notheford asta0.co..


b -


a 0 4


w n ii,
P fiscal i6n,
serving you,
since 1951.
Rated "'A" by
the Beftdr
Business Bureau


Editorial .................... A-2
Church .................... A-3
N Lifestyle .................. A-4
State-National ................. A-5
S Entertainment .............. A-6
Prep Rap .................. B-5 & 6
Local ..................... B-1
Columns ................... B-2
D Sports .................... B-4
E Did You Hear? ................ B-3
Classified & BU31ness ... B-7


l T o r,-








PU(,E -1-2 THE STAR JANUARY 16, 2010


S'I. .
--CLIARA JACKSON McLAUGHLIN MIKE BONTS, SPORTS EI)ITOR
IPUBLISIIER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF DAVID MILLER
LONZIE LEATi, MIANAGEMENTr SALES & MARKETING


DENNIS WADE
SALES & MARKETING
MAY FORD, LAYOUT EDITOR
SPECIAL SECTIONS
CHERYL COWARI)
DESIGN AND WEB SITE EDITOR
BETTY DAVIS
LIFESTYLE/ SOCIETY COLUMNIST
Investigative Reporter: Lonzie Leath


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
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Serving St. Johns, Clay. Duval, Nassau,
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the return of any solicited
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Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
police of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
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Publishers Association
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VERIFICATION
!lM i I ill]


Founded In April 1951 By Eric 0. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


DANIEL EVANS, SALES EXECUTIVE
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
OFFICE/ACCOUNTS MANAGER

TIA AYELE, SPECIAL SECTIONS
DISTRIBUTION
JAMES GREEN


Dr. Benjamin Todd
Jealous, NAACP
Dr. Martin Luther King
was a moral giant and
cherished hero of the
world. He was a tireless
champion of the poor and
oppressed against the
powerful. He understood
the inescapable mutability
of our fates and entreated
the nation to embrace
peace, justice and equali-
ty. He called on us to love
humanity and one another
and to fight for a just soci-
ety. He was a man of
vision and prescience.
Sadly, many of his
speeches are just as rele-
vant today as they were
over 40 years ago.
Dr. King courageously
raised his voice against
war. He spoke of the
destructive impact of the
Vietnam war draining
resources from the fight
against poverty and
exhorted people to see the
war as "an enemy of the
poor and to attack it as
such." He spoke on
behalf of the Vietnamese
people that we were fight-
ing, "They must weep as
the bulldozers roar
through their areas
preparing to destroy the


precious trees. They wan-
der into the hospitals with
at least twenty casualties
from American firepower
for one Vietcong-inflicted
injury. So far we may
have killed a million of
them, mostly children.
They see the children sell-
ing their sisters to our sol-
diers, soliciting for their
mothers. It is clear to
them that we are on the
side of the wealthy, and
the secure, while we cre-
ate a hell for the poor."
Today, we are at war in
two nations.
Much of Dr. King's work
was to end the scourge of
poverty and he began to
question the essence of
our prevailing economic
system. "We must ask
the question why there are
forty million poor people
in America; and when you
begin to ask that question,
you are raising questions
about the economic sys-
tem, about a broader dis-
tribution of wealth. When
you ask that question, you
begin to question the cap-
italistic economy."
Today the forty million
of poor Dr. King spoke of
has barely decreased with
39.2 million Americans
living in poverty. The
greed and excesses of our


system has led to one of
the worst recessions in
history.
Dr. King championed
labor describing the labor
movement as the "princi-
pal force that transformed
misery and despair into
hope and progress. When
in the thirties the wave of
union organization crest-
ed over our nation, it car-
ried to secure shores not
only itself but the whole
society," he said.
Today, the laws on union
organizing have been
weakened and the per-
centage of unionized
workers has fallen from
36 percent in 1945 to 12.4
percent of American
workers, only 7.6 percent
in the private sector. \
And Dr. King asked us
all to give of our time and
our voice to change the
injustice around us. "Our
lives begin to end the day
we become silent about
things that matter," he
said.
Dr. King would be
deeply satisfied at the
progress we have made.
The historic election of
our nation's first African
American president, the
rise of many prominent
Black Americans to the
pinnacle of politics and


a a


Statement of NAACP President and CEO on

Dr. Martin Luther King Day:


business. But Dr. King
was a man of the poor and
he would remind us that
the struggle is not over.
The dream has not yet
been achieved. That the
disparities in the criminal
justice system, in poverty,
in health and in employ-
ment that still plague our
communities means that
we have a long way to go.
Dr. King won a Nobel
Peace Prize, and the
hearts and minds of mil-
lions of people around the
world. He changed our
country and our world for
the better. He offered us a
shining paragon that we
can strive for and ideals
that we should endeavor
to live up to. Today we
can best honor Dr. King's
life and commemorate his
death by continuing his
noble work for a just soci-
ety with equal opportunity
for all, humankind,
peace, economic democ-
racy and a political sys-
tem within which the
rights of all are enshrined.
"In the end", said Dr.
King, "we will remember
not the words of our ene-
mies, but the silence of
our friends.....Injustice
anywhere is a threat to
justice everywhere."


Reporters/Photographers: Marsha Phelts, Carl Davis, Laurence Green, F.
M. Powell III. Michael Phelts, Richard McLaughlin, Andrea Franklin,
Delores Mainor Woods, Joseph Lorentzon, Scott Jurrens
Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Ester Davis, Lucius Gantt,
Deanna, Cynthia Ferrell
Distribution and Sales: Dan Randolph, Pat Randolph, Abeye Ayele, Cassie
Williams, Angela Beans


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The Ritz Chamber Players

In Rememberance of the Dream























The Ritz Chamber Players,
in their annual Concert, in honor of
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Recognizes Dr. David C. Driskell
Wednesday, January 20, 2010 at 7:00 p.m.
Times Union Center for the Performing Arts,
Jacoby Symphony Hall
Support the Ritz Chamber Players, the nation's premier all African-American
chamber ensemble. Though internationally known, this group originated in
Jacksonville, Florida by artistic director Terrance Patterson.
Tickets available. Call: 904-354-5547

KICK OFF BLACK HISTORY MONTH 2010
by joining Bishop Eric Lee of
New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church on
Wednesday, February 3, 2010 at 7:00 p.m.
at Abyssinia Missionary Baptist Church
with author and producer, Reggie Bullock of
'A WAR FOR YOUR SOUL'
This is an event you don't want to miss and you don't want your
children to miss. See the video, meet the producer.
For Information as a church or individual, call: 904-614-4842


JANUARY16,2010


PI GE 4-2


THE STAR












CHURCH


Faith In Our Community
Schedule of Events and Services I


THE GOSPEL CAVALIERS of Jacksonville First
Anniversary 2010, Saturday, January 16 at 5:00 p.m.
Emanuel Missionary Baptist Church, 2407 S. L. Badger
Jr. Circle E., Jacksonville with Rev. Anderson, Pastor.
Featuring: Rev. Robert Jackson and Spiritual Travelers,
The Singing Trumpets, Melissa McCarthan, Sunbeam
Gospel Singers, New Creation Gospel Singers, and
Mistress of Ceremony Sister Doris Wilson. For more
information, call (904) 356-9371.
FIRST QUARTERLY REVIVAL OF HOLY TAB-
ERNACLE CHURCH 6416 Miriam St. The church
is extending an invitation to the public to come and
worship with them in their quarterly revival. The speak-
er will be Prophetess Carolyn Clark Lathers. She is a
woman sent by God. Come and hear her for yourself,
January 15 17, 2010. Friday and Saturday nights 7:30
p.m. ad Sunday morning at 11:00 a.m. For more infor-
mation contact Min. Horace Bell at (904) 708-5331 or
the church at (904) 764-3754.
CITY WELCOMES GRAND SHRINE CONVEN-
TION -The Saint Christopher Grand Temple and Kora
Grand Court of International Free & Accepted Modern
Masons and Order of Eastern Stars will hold its Annual
Grand Shrine Convention in Jacksonville on January 15
- 17. The Convention will be held at the Holiday Inn &
Convention Center on Baymeadows Rd. The Shrine
Department's goal is to help people who are in need.
The organization continues to go above and beyond the
call of duty in their pursuit of making the lives of oth-
ers more livable. For additional information contact Sis.
Ruth A. Pearson at (904) 765-0175.
THE SIXTH ANNUAL SOUTHERN MARYLAND
MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. PRAYER BREAK-
FAST will be held Monday, January 18, 2010, in the
Great Room of St. Mary's College of Maryland's
(SMCM) Campus Center. The program will feature
William Yoast, the high school football coach portrayed
in the film "Remember the Titans," Lieutenant
Christiliene Whalen, who graduated from Great Mills
High School during the desegregation era, and John W.
Franklin, of the new Smithsonian National Museum of
African American History. A full breakfast will be
served, starting at 7:00 a.m. The program will begin at
8 a.m. Tickets are $7 and are available at the door. Early
arrival is recommended as space is limited; advance
registration is not required. For more information, con-
tact Marc Apter at 301-904-3690.
Baptist Ministers' Conference of Duval and
Adjacent Counties Presents: DR. MARTIN
LUTHER KING, JR. CELEBRATION SERVICES
& PRAYER BREAKFAST HONORING THE
MEMORY OF REV. S.L. BADGER, JR. -12th
Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration
Services, Monday, January 18th, 7:00 p.m. at St.
Johns Missionary Baptist Church, 135 Brickyard
Rd., Middleburg, FL, Rev. Dr. C.E. Preston, Pastor.
Speaker: Rev. Richard Curry, Pastor of Mt. Ararat of
Lake City.
11TH ANNUAL DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.
PRAYER BREAKFAST -Saturday, January 16th, 8:00
a.m. at Emanuel Multi-Purpose Center, 2407 S. L.
Badger Jr., Cir. E., Jacksonville, FL. Speaker:
Congressman Kendrick Meeks, Candidate for U.S.
Senate.
SAINT GABRIEL'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH 5235
Moncrief Rd (near Soutel). You are cordially invited to
a "King Holiday Observance," Monday, January 18,
2010 at 11:00 a.m. Remember! Celebrate! Act! A day
on, Not a Day Off! Special Guests: The Ribault High
Poetry Club and The Jacksonville Chapter of the
Boylan-Haven Alumnae Association. As we celebrate
Dr. King's legacy and recognize those individuals who
have made a difference in our community.
EPIPHANY BAPTIST CHURCH'S SIXTH ANNU-
AL "A Tribute to a King Celebration." Saturday,
January 16, 2010 at 6:00 p.m. 663 South McDuffAve.
Theme: "Start the Love Stop the Violence." Keynote
Speaker: Rev. R. L. Gundy, Pastor Mount Sinai
Missionary Baptist Church, Jacksonville. Presentation:
Silent Face For Christ Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist
Church, For Your Child Only Choir, Jacksonville.
Sponsored by: Men and Young Men of Epiphany. Rev.
William L. Robinson, Pastor. Refreshment will be
served and the event is free.
AL LETSON'S SUMMER IN SANCTUARY,
Saturday, January 30, 7:00 p.m. South Jacksonville
Presbyterian Church...Fellowship Hall, 2137
Hendricks Avenue. You don't just watch Summer in
Sanctuary......Al Letson's one-man play based on his
experience as a summer camp counselor at The
Sanctuary on 8th Street... It's something you feel... By
sharing his experience of that summer, Al tells his own
life story and the stories of the inner-city children he
worked with there. You will laugh and you will cry and


r


DEATH NOTICES


ANDERSON, Charles
died January 8, 2010.
ANDERSON, John died
January 11, 2010.
BARNUM, Mrs. Lillie
M., 89, died January 10,
2010.
BON, Jorge L., 66, died
January 12, 2010.
BOSWELL, Wendell 0.,
Jr., 54, died January 8,
2010.
CLACK, Lila M., died
January 11, 2010.
CHILDERS, Michael
A., died January 11,
2010.
DAVIS, Mrs. Essie Mae,
died January 10, 2010.
DOLLISON, Curtis,
died January 7, 2010.
FELDER, Cedric B.,
died January 8, 2010.
GRANT, James, died
January 11, 2010.
HOLLOWAY, Joseph,
died January 8, 2010.


JOHNSON, J.C., died
January 7, 2010.
LOTT, Ronald, 59, died
January 7, 2010.
McDANIEL, Patrick
died January 8, 2010.
MITCHELL, Robert E.,
died January 8, 2010.
RUCKER, Wilbert, died
January 12, 2010.
SMITH, Gregory died
January 7, 2010.
STANGLISH, Richard
died January 8, 2010.
STEPHENS, Mrs.
Juliette B., died January
9, 2010.
TERRY, Ms. Genevia
died January 9, 2010.
THOMAS, Tibbye died
January 8, 2010.
WALLACE, Edward G.,
Jr., died January 10,
2010.
WORTH, Barbara died
January 12, 2010.


~, ,~:f~?7~1"-~- ~ -....- .- -
...J t...


you will come away with a better understanding of a
troubling yet hopeful world.
Al has performed Summer in Sanctuary around the
country, including Off-Broadway in New York City,
where it will return for a run in 2010. In addition to his
role as playwright, poet and actor, Al also created and
hosts NPR's newest national radio show, State of the
RE:Union. Tickets $20. Call: 356.3588, Email:
Sanctuaryon8th@aol.com Web site/Paypal:
Sanctuaryon8th.org
SWEETFIELD MISSIONARY BAPTIST
CHURCH, 1365 Harrison St., Dr. Richard R. Russ,
Pastor. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration -We
invite you out to reflective the works of Dr. King
through songs, dance and a Spiritual play as his stride
toward freedom has brought us a mighty 'long way.
Sunday, January 17, 2010 at 4:00 p.m. For additional
information, please contact Sis. Nicolla Mack at 226-
6437.
BISHOP JOSEPH A FORD & HIGHER
GROUNDS INTERNATIONAL WORSHIP CEN-
TER -Preparing to Rule Revival Crusade, January 21 -
22, 2010 at 7:30 p.m. Thursday & Friday at the Clarion
Hotel Airport Conference Center in Jacksonville. Come
and experience the Power of God as Bishop Ford
expounds upon Kingdom principles that will Change
Your Life! For more information, contact Mrs. Belinda
Davis at 1-888-253-6730. Free and open to the public.
FRIENDSHIP PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH,
1106 Pearce St., Elder Bobbie Sheffield, Pastor -and the
members of the church Male Chorus will be celebrating
our 15th Anniversary on Saturday, January 23, 2010 at
5:00 p.m. We would like to invite your Male Chorus to
come and bless us with a selectionss. For more infor-
mation, call (904) 353-7734.
Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email sub-I
missions preferred. Send to: info@thefloridastar.com


I have a dream
that one day
S this nation will rise
S -" up and live out
the true meaning
of its creed:
"We hold these
truths to be self-evident:
That all men are
created equal."

I Have a Dream speech, delivered in
Washington, D.C. August 28, 1963.



Almighty God, Father of all mercies and giver of
all comfort: Deal graciously, we pray thee, with
those who mourn, that casting every care on thee,
they may know the consolation of thy love,
H| through Jesus Christ our LORD.


It has All of The

"News You Can Use

(904) 766-8834


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Clara McLaughlin Yvonne Brooks
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IMPACT


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from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.



WCGLAM 1360

The Florida Star and Impact
Striving To Make A Difference!


The Church Directory
"Come and Worship With Us"

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School .................... ..............9:30 a.m .
Sunday Morning
Intercessory Prayer.....................10:45 a.m .
Morning Worship .....................11:00 a.m.
Youth Church o
2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary)
Tuesday- Pastoral Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m. ..-
Bishop Eric Lee, Pastor
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus
(904) 764-5727 Church

Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
W orship Service ................................. 10:00 a.m .
Church School . . . . . ..... ....... 8:30 p.m .
Wednesday
"Glory Hour" Bible Study ...................... .. . 10:00 a.m.
"Jehovah Jireh" Bible Study ........................ 6:30 p.m.
2nd & 4th Thursday "Young at Heart Ministry .......... .10:00 a.m.
Friday
Joy Explosion M ministry ........................ . ... 6:30 p.m .
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School.............. ....................................................... 9:30 a.m .
M morning W orship...... .................... .............................................. 11 :00 a.m .
Tuesday........................ .................. Prayer M meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday........ ....... ...... ..................... Joy Night,7:00 p.m .
"Email: Gospell175@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org
....... -- ........... .t .......... _.....
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH of GOD
"Jesus Loves Sinners Church Folk Don't"
Elder Joseph Rice

Sunday School -- ----------------------- 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship -------------------------12:00 Noon & 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study ---------------------Tuesday & Friday------ 7:00 p.m.
(912) 267-6395 (912) 996-4864 Cell
2705 MLK Blvd., Brunswick, GA 31520

Paynes ChapelA.M.E. Church
22001 AlIbjn Snreet,. PO Bo 759. Buris ick. G \ 315 0
Q912) 261-955
RL i Ri la,'t Hiutcherson, Pastur,
\\orship Opportunities:
Suida'. Church School
'A Life Changing E\perience". 9 15 10:55 ..m
Morning Worship Sern. ice 11:00 a in
Chwich at Stuidi (\\eekl Bible Stud' I
Mundx', Niughit .. ... .. .. ... .i0 S 3 p m
i'rli I. "u lit. SiiJ 11 li" : ti ,u J/ iJ i Godi and,i E in,ii Oii Sonis


Subscribe to

SThe Florida Star:
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PAGEA-3


JANUARY16,2010


m


THE STAR








PAGE A-4


"There's Always


Something Happening On The First Coast" I


Matt and Dr. Shellie Thompson with FLAJAX and Ii -i a
Mrs. Jean Downing FLAJAX and Mrs. Edward Robinson with family and friends


FlaJax Club's
80th Anniversary Dance

The FLAJAX Club's 80th Annual Dance was
beautiful, well attended and immensely pleasurable!!
Music from The Elite Band kept everyone dancing
the entire evening with their updated repertoire. As
always the FLAJAX members were gracious and
splendid hosts for the entire evening. At this year's
dance FLAJAX Club president J. Carl Davis, Sr,
introduced Delaney Williams as a new addition to the
organization. FLAJAX Williams is a retired educator
and serves as a Deacon at Bethel Baptist Institutional
Church.
FLAJAX President Davis also announced that the
organization is adopting Highland Middle School in
its community outreach action and introduced Victor
and Mrs. Carla Harris Franklin, from Montclair,
NJ. Hailed as a phenomenal woman, Mrs. Harris-
Franklin, a graduate of Bishop Kenny High School
and Harvard University is an author, recording artists
and Managing Director with Wall Street's Morgan
Stanley. She 'pays it forward' through scholarship for
scholars at Bishop Kenny High School and Harvard.
Her book "Expect to Win" is a best seller. "She works
consistently to makes things better for young people,
stated FLAJAX President during his introduction.
Mrs. Harris-Franklin is a featured writer at this year's
Much Ado About Books.
"It is with a profound sense of pride that I stand
before you as president of the FLAJAX Club of
Jacksonville celebrating our 80TH Annual Christmas
Dance. Over the years of our club's existence, the
FLAJAX CLUB and its Annual Christmas Dance has
endured and remained constant. The 26TH of
December is a date to remember each year. Our FLA-
JAX Club is the oldest most respected men's social
club in our community. We as FLAJAX men are
bound together to continue the traditions as set forth
by our founders. And let us never forget that all that
we do as FLAJAX men is backed up by our FLA-
JILLS, stated FLAJAX president J. Carl Davis, Sr.
during his remarks.
It was great sharing the dance with some very spe-
cial friends. How wonderful it is that this holiday tra-
dition continues. Special kudos to this years' dance
chair CMS (Ret.) Henry Sellers. With the loving
support of his wife Mrs. Sharon Speights Sellers and
his club brothers, FLAJAX Sellers coordinated a
superb dance. Yes, superb indeed!


Ken Johnson and his guest with FLA-
JAX and Mrs. Troy Cannady


FLAJAX Dr. and Mrs. William Scott
Jr.


St. Augustine FL's Vice Mayor The
Honorable and Mrs. Errol Jones


(a


Mrs. Dorothy Borrough enjoyed the
Annual Dance with relatives


FLAJAX Dr. and Mrs.
Charles Flowers


FLAJAX and Mrs. Edgar Mathis with thier guests The
Mitchells and Williamses


< .-
*


VjIV and Mrs. Robert,


U


Flornol,'iviiihfiaillr


X and Mrs. J. Carl Davis


FLAJAX Henry and Dr. Menia Speights with family and friends


The Brinsons and The Morris
Rogerses


FLAJAX Neil and Mrs. Frink with their guests FLAJAX George Barnes daughters and son


Dr. Geri Smith Dr.


Dr. Geri Smith Dr.
Josh Joneses


Roy Singleton and The


FLAJAX Jerry Iszard with his son


rLAJAA ana Mrs. John Edwards


The Iszards


FLAJAX William Boddie with guests


Thank you for sharing your events and stories for the column each week! Because of you readers are there with you each week. For column entries you may con-
tact me directly at 904 571-1182, Toll Free Fax 866 488 6407 or by e-mail at: badavis@watsonrealtycorp.com. I


THE STAR JANUARY 16, 2010





Socially Speaking
By Betty Asque Davis / Photos by J. Carl Davis, Sr. J (Unless otherwise specified)


FLAJAX President J. Carl Davis, Sr. with The Taylors, The ,
Franklins, Ms. Carla Harris and Mrs. Andrea Kemp

I.,SK VJ i^^


X Dr. and Mrs. Alvin White


11


I


:71


19


chop
- jv


-dsh














A Around The Area


R. JAI GILLUM
APPOINTED TO FLORIDA COMMISSION
ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN BY CFO SINK

TALLAHASSEE Florida CFO Alex Sink today
announced her appointment of R. Jai Gillum to the
Florida Commission on the Status of Women. Gillum,
who began her term on January 1, 2010 and will serve
until December 31, 2013, is 31 years old and the youngest
woman currently on the commission. She joins other
CFO appointees Shellie Sachs Levin and Monica Russo.
"I feel that it is important to have a diverse commis-
sion capable of representing the many different women of
Florida," said CFO Sink. "As a young African-American
professional who has shown a great level of compassion
and service to her community, I believe R. Jai will be an
excellent addition to this important group."
"I am honored by my appointment to the Florida
Commission on the Status of Women and thank CFO
Sink for this opportunity," said Gillum. "I look forward to
offering a fresh perspective to best serve the women of
R. Jai Gillum Florida."
Gillum is the Director of Appointments for the Office
of Boards, Commissions and Residual Markets for CFO
Sink, and also serves as Staff Director to the Financial Literacy Council and a liaison to
the Florida Healthy Kids Corporation.
In addition, Gillum has numerous civic involvements, and her leadership roles in the
community include serving on the boards of the Friends of the Leon County Public
Library, the Brokaw-McDougall House, the National Selective Service System,
Leadership Tallahassee, and the Junior League. She is also Chair of the BEST Project
Leadership Team for the United Way of the Big Bend.
Gillum holds a Master of Public Health and a Bachelor of Science from Florida A &
M University. She lives in Tallahassee with her husband, Tallahassee City Commissioner
Andrew Gillum.
The Florida Commission on the Status of Women is a non-partisan group dedicated to
empowering women. The Governor, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, the
President of Senate and the Attorney General appoint four members and the Chief
Financial Officer and Commissioner of Agriculture each appoint three members for a term
of four years. Appointees make recommendations to the Governor, Cabinet and
Legislature on issues affecting women in an annual report.
As a statewide elected officer of the Florida Cabinet, CFO Alex Sink oversees the
Department of Financial Services. A successful businesswoman with nearly three decades
of experience in the private sector, Sink is serving her first term as Florida's CFO.
As CFO, Sink's priorities include using her business experience to cut wasteful govern-
ment spending, cracking down on financial and insurance fraud and reforming the state
government's contracting practices. Sink also serves as the State Fire Marshal.


nse


Kicking Off the
Seventh Tax Season
for Real$ense!
For the third year in a row,
Jacksonville Jaguars Defensive
r RBack Rashean Mathis and his moth-
er, Oletha, are helping kick off tax
season for the Real$ense Prosperity
Campaign. On television and radio
ads, bus banners, billboards and in
print media, the famous football champion and his mother team up to shout their
praises of "filing for free and saving the fee."
"Times were hard back when I was a single mom raising four kids," recalls
Oletha Mathis, "and times are hard now for a lot of people. Real$ense wasn't
around back then. I paid a lot of money to file my taxes early and get that
refund." Remembering those days of sacrifice and hard work, Oletha Mathis
is glad to say that her devotion to giving her children a solid foundation has
paid off She taught her kids to take responsibility and be good citizens and she
is so proud that now Rashean wants to give back to the community where he
grew up. "We advise low-to-moderate income families that the best thing they
can do is contact Real$ense and learn how to manage their money right, "says
Oletha. "We've been there and we know how hard it is to make ends meet."
Volunteer tax preparers at sites in seven counties (Duval, St. Johns, Putnam,
Clay, Nassau, Baker and Bradford) work in partnership with the Internal Revenue
Service to help qualified wage earners get what's coming to them, including
Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) dollars.
On Saturday, January 16, 2010, select Real$ense tax sites will open at the
locations listed below. All other sites will open by the first week of February.
Gateway WorkSouce
Florida State College at Jacksonville North Campus
Florida State College at Jacksonville Kent Campus
Potter's House Christian Fellowship
Jacksonville Housing Authority at Fairway Oaks
Heart of Putnam
904-632-0600
or visit www.realsensejax.org to get locations, hours of operation
and appointment lines for tax sites now open.
The RealSense Prosperity Campaign will host a Tax Season Kickoff Celebration,
Networking Lunch and Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony with Special Guests, on Friday,
January 29, 2010 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at Bank of America Campus, 9000
Southside Blvd., Jacksonville, FL 32246 (Building 500, Multi-purpose room 1st Floor).
RSVP: 904-390-3276 Fax: 904-390-7373


Answer to puzzle on page B-4


I Clara's




Ai ND OLD SCHOOL
ca ring to the mature crowd





Sail on the Princess II



/*0



Dates: January 29th
Location: Behind Crown Plaza on the South Bank
Music by DJ ULTIMATE and Live Entertainment
Board at: 6:30pm
Sail at: 7:00 pm .


$30.00

DINNER OPTION
CASH BAR
Groups Welcome!
For ticket information call
(904) 354-4162
"FOOD FOR TODAY. SKILLS FOR LIFE"
This benefit supports students enrolled in the Clara White Mission Culinary Arts and Janitorial Training Programs.
WE LOOK FORWARD TO YOU JOINING US. BOOK YOUR SEAT TODAY!
Next scheduled dates are: February 26'h and March 26th


"Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day"

l ei Crossword Puzzle

1 2
3

5 6 7


8
9
10

11
12 13
14 15
16

918

19 7- ------I

Across
3. Mahatma __ was someone who practiced nonviolent resistance in India to bring about
change. King studied this man's life and his accomplishments.
5. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 authorized the United States government to enforce of
public accommodations.
10. The focused much attention on the nonviolent methods of protest and some of the
violent responses. As a result of the people around the world learned of the injustice
that was taking place.
11. King believed that individuals had the moral right and responsibility to disobey
laws.
12. Despite having his house bombed, King believed and persuaded others to remain
14. Henry David was a man who lived from 1817-1862 and believed strongly in not
supporting a government that permitted slavery. Martin Luther King Jr. paid special attention
to the writings of this man.
17. The __ Rights Act was passed in 1965. This law made it illegal to require people to
know how to read before they could register to vote.
18. King gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech in 1963. His speech and the 200,000
people who came to protest helped pressure Washington to pass the __ Rights Act in 1964.
19. The __ laws in many southern cities required black bus riders to sit in the back of the
bus and give up their seats to white riders.
Down
1. In 1963 hundreds of children marched along with King and others down the streets
of downtown Birmingham. They were violently stopped by attack dogs, police officers, and
firefighters.
2. In 1965 King won the peace price.
4. She refused to give up her bus seat to a white person. As a result, she was arrested and
jailed. (2 words)
6. In 1956 the United States ruled that segregation on public buses was not legal.
(2 words)
7. King's life came to an end when he was in 1968.
8. King led many of these, such as the one he led at an Atlanta department store lunch
counter.
9. King spoke out against the war with this country that the United States was involved in.
King believed it would not be right to protest against racial violence without also speaking
against the violence of war.
13. King's memoir Stride Toward Freedom (1958) focused on the boycott.
15. When King was only 6 he had an experience with this. The parents of two of his white
friends said that King could not play with them because of his skin color.
16. In 1959 King went to this country to study Gandhi's ideas.


JANUARY16,2010


THE STAR


PAGEA-5







PAUL. L I- '.T4


KATHERNE J. TAYLOR

AN ALL PURPOSE ACTRESS!
BY RYCH MCCAIN/ FEEDBACKRYCH@SBCGLOBAL.NET
PHOTO BY MIKKI WILLIS


Hollywood is a stopping
place for many wannabe actresses
but far too few come fully loaded in
the area of total preparedness.
From the looks of her resume and
bio, one could easily arrive at the
conclusion that actress Kathern J.
Taylor has it all i.e., the looks, talent
and academic credentials. By no
means did she arrive in town with
no back up like many do. Born in
Chicago and reared in Memphis,
Taylor matriculated to Southeast
Missouri State University following
her graduation from Memphis East
High School on a track scholarship
where she earned a BA in
Psychology. During her undergrad
tenure, Taylor was named as a
three time Division II indoor/outdoor
All-American in track and was
named her university's NCAA
Female Athlete of the Year. She V
was also a Presidential Scholar,
recipient of the Minority Student
Academic Excellence Award and a
Delta sorority member. Taylor
moved on to grad school at
Emporia State U and obtained a
masters degree in Clinical
Psychology. She also won the Miss
Kansas USA title and competed in
the national Miss USA Pageant. Taylor also has a
brown belt in Kenpo Karate.
After grad school, Taylor clocked a little
time in Kansas City, Missouri where she did local
radio and TV commercials, industrials, print ad
modeling and theatre. But as with any artist with
true ambition, Taylor sought bigger fish to fry and
made the trek to Los Angeles. Since her arrival,


she has appeared in numerous commercials such
as McDonald's, TJ Maxx, Lincoln/Mercury, Petco
and print ads for Coca Cola, Adidas, Procter &
Gamble, The Disney Catalogue to name some.
Her many TV credits include "Samantha Who,"
"The Game," "Girlfriends," "Monk" and others. She
has even formed her own company "KaShKe
Productions" with fellow actresses Keena


Ferguson and Shonelle Blake and serves
as a motivational speaker nationally as
well.
In Taylor's latest film "Consinsual,"
she plays the evil sister in a daring drama
that explores the subject of rape within
marriage. With an advance degree in clin-
ical Psychology Taylor had it made in
terms of a safe high paying day job. So
why did she peruse acting? She explains,
"I was always acting and it has always
been my passion. I started out in typical
high school drama clubs and was doing
performances like that. Then I went into
college and was part of an African
American Theatre Troop called "The
Ebony Players" at my college. Again, I'm
in college to get a degree in Psychology
so I had never thought about earning a
living or making that my career choice. It
was just a hobby and I really loved to do
it. It wasn't until after I moved to Kansas
City and got my first commercial agent
and booked my first commercial and I
thought wow, you can make money doing
this? I didn't know that you made money
doing commercials and voice over's. All I
knew was superstars in the movies and I
had never really aspired for that kind of
lifestyle."
Taylor began a dual lifestyle in
Kansas City as a clinical psychologist
during the day while moonlighting as an actor by
night. With an accumulation of experience and
local dramatical success, it didn't take long for that
arrangement to reverse order and for Taylor to
hop on the next stage out of Dodge bound for
Tinsel Town.
www.kathrynjtaylor.com


WAS SUP IN HOLLYHOOD

By Rych McCain/ feedbackrych@sbcglobal.net


Key to Miami:
Haitian born actor/humanitarian Jimmy Jean-Louis (NBC's
"Heroes") was presented with the key to the City of Miami/Dade
County, Florida along with Haitian Ambassador to The United
States His Excellency Raymond Akade Joseph by Miami Mayor
Carlos Alverez during the 5th annual Haitian Independence
Month Celebration. Our prayers and well wishes go out to the
Haitian earthquake victims. Contact your local Red Cross if you
wish to donate money or supplies. These are our Black Afrikan
brothers and sisters.
TV:
The CW Network will premiere a new series called "Life
Unexpected" on next Monday; Jan 18, 2010 at 9 EST. NBC has
a big mess on their hands between The Tonight Show with
Conan O'Brien and The Jay Leno Show shifting time slots. Both
shows have sagging ratings and Conan has said he won't make
the time switch. Stay Tuned!
Michelle Fires Mathew:
Singer/actress Michelle Williams released a press release
stating; "After much prayer and consideration I have decided to
part ways from my management team, Mathew Knowles and
Music World Entertainment. From my time in Destiny's Child to


my solo career, I am grateful for everything Mathew and his team
have done for me. We've shared great success together.
However, as I move in a new direction in my career, I felt it was
time. I wish Mathew Knowles and the Music World Entertainment
family the best." Williams will return in a limited engagement as
Roxie Hart in the Tony Award winning stage musical Chicago as
well as maintaining her minority part ownership of the WNBA
team The Chicago Sky.. As for Mathew, it only gets deeper after
his long time wife Tina recently filed for
divorce due to his alleged infidelities.
Film:
Martin Lawrence is geared up to make Big Momma's
House 3 with director John Whitesell who directed BMH 2.
Principal photography is set to begin in April in Atlanta.
Party:
Actor/Singer Tyrese and soul crooner Tank joined forces to
celebrate their birthdays together last Sunday, Jan 10th at a fly
and flashy super exclusive extravaganza complete with celebri-
ty red carpet arrivals at "My House" in Hollywood!
Hit me up at feedbackrych@sbcblobal.net
Study, Observe and Win!
Rych


~I'4~V7.~* -


JANUARY 16. 2010


THF STAR


r A A r"~ A A


- *.-u^^V








JANUARY 16, 2010 THE FLORIDA AND GEORGIA STAR PAGE A-7 I


Haiti Continued from A-1
Americans either visiting or living in the country.
Jacksonville and Brunswick residents immediately poured in help and
Congresswoman Corrine Brown appeared on station 105.3 to voice her support and
to give instructions on how to help.
Even though it has been reported that Tiger Woods whereabouts were unknown,
Russell Simmons advised the New York Daily News that Woods is in the process of
getting together a mobile hospital with 50 EMT's to go set up a triage. According
to Simmons, Woods is planning to make a $3 million contribution.
After Robertson's statement, it was explained that the reason Haiti is poor is
because Europe imposed a blockade on trade after the slave revolt in 1804.
Presently, it is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere and has had many nat-
ural and man made miseries. Haiti has a population of 9 million people and has the
second largest overall income gap between the very rich and the very poor, some-
thing America's present administration is working to prevent.
Even though many are helping, more help is needed. Reports say that there is other
danger for Haiti because of the prospect of aftershocks bringing down buildings.


Talking To An Attorney
BY BurneY Bivens, Esq.. LFD
AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE-FULL COVERAGE

Many times when a person purchases an automobile insurance coverage they are told or
they otherwise believe they have full coverage on their policy. Because it is not clear exact-
ly what full coverage means, this article will discuss the types of insurance coverage avail-
able on a policy and what is actually covered when such coverage is selected.
BODILY INJURY COVERAGE this is insurance that you purchase that will pay for
injuries to another person when you are the cause of the accident. The maximum amount
payable under your policy depends on the coverage actually selected.
PROPERTY DAMAGE LIABILITY COVERAGE this covers damage to someone
else's property for an accident that was caused by you. Again, the limits vary and the
amount of the premium that you pay will be determined by the amount of coverage that you
purchase. For both, bodily injury coverage toanother person and property damage liabili-
ty to someone else's property, if the amount of their claim is greater than the amount of cov-
erage that you selected, you may be personally responsible for the excess.
NO FAULT COVERAGE this is generally known as Personal Injury Protection or PIP.
This coverage is required for every automobile that is registered in the State of Florida and
it covers the driver and in some cases the passengers of your automobile. PIP pays up to a
maximum of $10,000.00. Generally the coverage is only $10,000.00 and the following
items are covered:
Up to $5,000.00 for funeral expenses in case of a death and 80% of medical expenses and
60% of lost wages. These items may be allocated but generally the maximum coverage
for a single PIP claim is $10,000.00. These benefits are paid by your policy regardless of
who was at fault for the cause of the accident.
MEDICAL PAYMENTS you may select medical payments with various limits.
Generally, the medical payments provision of your automobile policy will pay for your
medical treatment that is not covered by Personal Injury Protection up to the maximum of
the limits that you selected. In many cases, after PIP pays for 80% of your medical treat-
ment, then the remaining 20% is paid by medical payments coverage.
COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE comprehensive coverage pays for damage to your
automobile caused by fire, wind, storm, vandalism and other acts beyond your control. This
pays up to the maximum of the limits that you selected.
COLLISION COVERAGE this pays for damages to your automobile that was caused
by you and pays the actual cost of repairs (minus any deductibles that you selected) up to
the maximum amount of coverage that you selected.
UNINSURED MOTORIST COVERAGE this is coverage that is purchased on your
policy that pays for bodily injury damages to you when the person who caused the accident
did not have any bodily injury coverage. As stated above, when you purchase bodily injury
coverage on your policy, that pays for damages to somebody else for an accident caused by
you. Likewise, when someone else causes an accident that injures you, their bodily injury
coverage would pay for your injuries is they have that coverage available. If they do not
have bodily injury coverage available and you purchased uninsured motorist coverage on
your policy, then you may be able to collect the same sums of money from your policy that
you would have collected from them.
As you can see, when you purchase automobile insurance on the assumption that
you have full coverage, you need to work with your agent for a detailed listing of specifi-
cally what you are buying including the amounts of coverage to be provided and any
deductibles that apply.
This article is submitted by Burney Bivens, Esq., LFD of the law firm Bivens, Jones & Associates and
Aaron and Burney Bivens Funeral Home. During the next several months a series of articles will
appear regarding legal issues and funeral service related issues. Mr Bivens has practiced law in
North Florida for 27 years and has provided legal representation to the funeral service industry for
more than 25 years and is also a licensed funeral director with his son. For questions on legal issues
call the law office at 904-264-3412. For questions regarding fimeral services call Aaron and Burney
Bivens Funeral Home at 904-264-1233.


Remembering Continued from A-1
(HBCU). However, in Jacksonville, most of the 1960 Jacksonville youth council
NAACP sit-in demonstrators came from Northwestern Junior Senior high school,
New Stanton high school, Matthew William Gilbert high, and Douglas Anderson
junior senior high school-all segregated black high schools in Jacksonville. Other
demonstrators were college students home for the summer and some young adults".'
Though most persons had never heard of Ax Handle Saturday he reminded those in
attendance "...how the peaceful protests of those teenagers and young adults who
dared to challenge segregation in Jacksonville led to their being attacked by more
than 200 whites with baseball bats and ax handles on August 27, 1960".
He gave the background on the Jacksonville sit-ins by explaining "the civil rights
movement.. Retail stores throughout the country, would accept your money at one
counter, but would deny your money at another.
Disregarding their personal physical peril, members of the Jacksonville youth coun-
cil NAACP made the decision to confront Jacksonville's segregated policies and its
accompanying Jim Crow laws. They simply said, "enough is enough." These young
people endeavored to leave a legacy of which we all can be proud.


AARON AND BURNEY BIVENS

FUNERAL HOME

is pleased to announce that


MARVA Y. WATKINS
Has joined our staff
Contact her at the funeral home (904) 264-1233
or on her cell phone (904) 349-1361


j Find ffCotfort Here
Aaron and Burney Bivens
FUNERAL HOME
N and
CREMATION SERVICES
"...thy rod and thy staff
they comfort me"
Psalms 23:4


Aaron and Burney Bivens
Funeral Home

529 Kingsley Avenue
Orange Park, FL 32073

Phone: (904) 264-1233

www.bivensfuneralhome.com


Tuesday, Listen and Talk!
IMPACT Radio Talk Show
FM 105.3-WJSJ 5:30 and 11:30 p.m.
WCGL-AM 1360 8:30 p.m.

with

Clara McLaughlin and IMPACT
Call and talk: FM 105.3 (904) 854-TALK
Tuesday, from 5:30 to 6:00 p.m.
Call and talk: AM-1360 (904) 766-9285
Tuesday, at 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

"The Florida Star, The Georgia Star and Impact -
Striving to Make a Difference."
www.radiofreejax.com
www.WCGL1360.com
The Florida Star Still "The People's Choice"


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Kaaio t-ree jaCKSonviiie
On-air: (904) 854-TALK
Andy's email:
downtobusinessandy@yahoo.com

I www.radiofreejax.com I


JANUARY 16, 2010


PAGE A-7


THE FLORIDA AND GEORGIA STAR










PAGE A-8JNUAY1, 01


229

Bottom Round Roast
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JANUARY16,2010


THE ST4R


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The Star




LOCAL, AiIv r a SECTION-m


Golden Anniversary Celebrated by Noah H. and Luvenia Quarterman Newman


Story by Marsha Dean Phelts, Pictures by Michael R.
Phelts and Rhonda Silver
When Luvenia Quarterman and Noah Newman were
wed on December 22, 1959 they were committed to the
vows made in the Name of God for a life time. Reverend J.
W. Johnson, pastor of Philadelphia Baptist Church officiat-
ed at the first wedding ceremony performed in the then new
church that the congregation moved to in 1959 at 5577
Moncrief Road. The reception was held at the swanky pri-
vately owned/members only Club Eldorado for the couple's
hundreds of family members and friends.
Twenty-five years later, December 1984, the Newmans
who now were parents of two sons, renewed their vows with
the majority of the original party. Fifty years later, the
Newmans once again renewed their vows. This time, a new
pastor, Rev. Johnny Johnson of Philadelphia Baptist
Church, along with Noah's brother, Rev. Dr. Cornelius
Newman, pastor of Petar Missionary Baptist Church offici-
ated. The celebration was held at the Romona Pavilion on
the nineteenth day of December. This was a beautiful day,
the time set for the renewal of vows between Luvenia and
Noah took place at 5:00 p.m. As day slipped into evening,
the wintry sun beamed its brightest rays just before setting,
the sun was most beautiful.
Mrs. Newman was escorted on the arms of their two
sons, Noah, Jr. and Kevin Newman, she radiated down the
aisle in the very white floor length gown of imported
Chantilly lace that she first wore fifty years ago, December
22, 1959. Oh how everyone marveled that Mrs. Newman
had the dress, also of how glorious she looked and the fact
that the gorgeous gown she wore in 1959 and again in 2010
fit so well and looked so good.
Mrs. Newman's gown, an original rose medallion
design was covered with the sheerest of tulle net (France)
poised over layers of ruffled net and "I do taffeta." The
Sabrina neckline of the gown is embroidered with deep lace
scallops in floral sprays of iridescent sequins and seed
pearls. The gown's long lace sleeves tapered to Calla Lily
Points were fastened by rows of tiny lace-covered buttons.
Amazingly, ten members of the Newman's original
wedding party of fourteen participated in this celebration.
Annie Pearl Smith Griffin and Charliette Washington
Holland who served the couple as junior bridesmaids were
now bridesmaids. Mr. Newman's sister, Vivian Newman
Turnbull, a junior bridesmaid in the original wedding, now
served as a Matron of Honor. Juanita Wright Tunstall also
was a bridesmaid in 1959 and Matron of Honor for the 50th
Anniversary. Joyce Smith White, the flower girl fifty years
ago and Leroy Smith who served as the ring bearer now
served the couple as bridesmaid and groomsman. Brothers
of the groom, Theodore Newman and Paul Newman also
served as groomsmen each time the couple celebrated. This
time, Larry McMillian served as the Best Man.
Sylvia (Mrs. Kevin) and Dana (Mrs. Noah, Jr.)
Newman, showed themselves to be extraordinary Wedding
Coordinators. These talented daughters-in-law, performed
Herculean tasks as they and a team of hostess and ushers
expertly carried out this special event that served dinner to
nearly 300 guests. As guests were escorted to their seats,
each was presented with a gold covered boxed souvenir tea
candle encased in a gold and white holder. Guests also
received a commemorative ball point pen that at a click
gave four different messages, #1-the couple's name, #2-
wedding date, #3-the occasion, and #4-their motto, THE
LOVE OF GOD IS #1 IN OUT LIVES. Dana Newman
acknowledged Ernestine Poole and Thelma Geiger, col-
leagues of Mrs. Newman who addressed all of the invita-
tions for the wedding in 1959. Sylvia Newman made the
most beautiful gold and white bouquets and boutonnieres
and decorated the arch to the couple's delight. The bride's
attendants for the Golden Anniversary were dressed in
Champaign gowns and wore sparkling gold high heel shoes.
While the bride was as beautiful as she was 50 years
ago, the groom couldn't have been happier to take her hand
again and again and again. In unison when Reverend
Johnson and Reverend Newman asked, "Who gives this
woman to be married to this man?" Their only children,
Noah, Jr. and Kevin answered in unison, "We do," then
stepped aside leaving their mother at their father's side.
After the couple danced to her favorite, Danny Boy, as
crooned by Jackie Wilson, then his favorite, The First Time
Ever I Saw Your Face, sung by Roberta Flack, the crowd at
the Ramona Pavilion rocked the night away. Disc Jockey,
Nelson Moore revved the tempo up bringing people to the
dance floor first with the Electric Slide. The Newman broth-
ers, family and friends took to the dance floor like they were
back in the Club Eldorado or the grand ballroom at the
"Two Spot." The dancing intensified as the DJ brought on
the cha-cha slide and the reception guests went into full
swing in the spirit of the wedding and holiday celebration.
Best Wishes and excellent opportunities to fellowship
with a range of colleagues was once again enjoyed by all.
The Newman's 50th Anniversary seemed like a homecom-
ing. There were loads of Noah's post office colleagues, and
a number of ministers, for Luvenia a huge number of bridge
club members turned out as well as colleagues in the educa-
tion arena.
Others in the 50th Anniversary Wedding Party
Celebration were soloist Joyce Thomas and the organist
Brandon Byers. Rev. Ernest Griffin gave the blessing of the
food. The hostesses and ushers were Carolyn Colonel, Alisa
Newman, Shaakera Thomas, John Colonel, Ernest Cooks
and Noah Newman, III. Receptionists included: Phylis
Gatson, Bernice Holmes, Lucretia McBride and April
Newman. The programs were designed by Shirley Simon
and Rhonda Silver and Ernest Cooks recorded this solemn
event through photographs and videography.


Bride and Groom 2010


Kevin and Noah Newman, Jr. escorting the Bride


Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Smith


by Gracie


Cover picture of Newmans

-K~^


Marian Walker Evelyn Hughes Sylvester Bossard Richie
Fluker


Eva Lamar with Ann Bodison and Eleanor Hughes


Rev. Leroy Kelly, mother Mrs. Isabell Kelly with Rev. Ernest
Griffin


-


THE STAR


P4GE R-1


JANUARY 16 2010








PAG.UEL DB-...


AskDeana
Real eopl, Rel Adic


Ask Deanna! Is an advice column known for its
fearless approach to reality-based subjects!


Dear Deanna!
My mother is being taken advantage of by her best friend. My
mother is retired has plenty of money saved up and she's
enjoying the finer things in life. Her best friend is a moocher
and makes my mom pay for everything. My mother is lonely
and doesn't have any friends so she thinks nothing of it. This
woman is going through her money left and right and I know she's going to look up
and one day be broke. How do I get through to her?
Concerned Daughter Oklahoma City, OK

Dear Daughter:
Your mother is enjoying life and her friend. Before you place judgment or get in the
middle of things ask your mom if she's preparing for a rainy day. If she is, you can
rest assured that she knows what she's doing and is planning her finances wisely.
You're on the outside looking in and have no idea of their friendship. You can calm
down and chill and let you mom and her girlfriend do their thing and feel secure
knowing that if she needs you, she'll let you know.

Dear Deanna!
I broke up with my boyfriend over something silly and now I regret my actions. I
thought he was cheating on me with my best friend but they were actually buying
me a gift. I said some horrible things to both of them and they're not speaking to
me. I want to get back with him but I think he is looking at my friend because she
seems more mature than me. What should I do if they start dating? 1 know it's my
fault but it's going to tear me apart.
Made a Mistake Atlanta, GA

Dear Mistake:
You obviously have trust issues if you can't feel secure with your mate or your
friends. Your foolish tongue has caused you to lose your relationship and your
friend. The only thing you can do is apologize to both parties and ask your boyfriend
for another chance. If he says no and goes with your buddy, then you learned a valu-
able lesson and if they'll do this in your face, you didn't need them anyway.

Dear Deanna!
I allowed myself to get pregnant because my boyfriend convinced me that we would
be together and we were going to get married. Now I am almost ready to deliver the
baby and he has changed his mind. He moved out of my house and now he's not
working and living with his mother. I am so upset and don't know what to do. How
do I handle this situation?
Anika On-Line Reader

Dear Anika:
You lost your sense when you decided to fall for the oldest trick in the book. There
is no way you should've become pregnant without a husband and a plan. You're get-
ting ready to be stuck with a baby, a bill for 18 years and a stupid looking dead beat
dad. You need to look at your resources, get your money and education together and
grow up. When the baby is born, have a DNA test, get your child support and be
ready to raise your child and keep it moving.

Ask Deanna is written by Deanna M. Write Ask Deanna! Deanna M, 264 S. La Cienega, Suite 1283,
Beverly Hills, CA 90211orEmail: askdeannal@yahoo.com Website: www.askdeanna.com





Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.


CERTIFIED CONCEALED WEAPON LICENSE (Permit) Course Satisfies
Florida State Statute 790.06 for Application to Lawfully Carry a Concealed
Weapon. 1 Hour Course, $35.00 by Appt. in Callahan, Nassau County, FL. Call
Gary Belson (904)491-8358 for information.
TILLMAN VALENTINE CONSISTORY #22 will honor Illustrious Prince,
Alto W. Bell, 320, for a Lifetime of Masonic & Civic Services during their 37th
Annual Election Banquet on January 16, 2010, at 7:30 p.m. at the Wilbur
Fernander Scottish Rite Center located at 29 West 6th Street.
The Milions More Movement,Jacksonville Local Organizing Committee
Inc., a non-profit organization is in the process of gathering children, women,
men, shoes, jackets, shirts, suits, dresses, skirts, blouses all sizes, etc. for our
next 'Clothes Give-A-Way'. If you have the items listed above, and are in the
process of cleaning out your closets, give them to us. We need them. We also
accept cash donations. Call us for pickups, or bring them to 916 N. Myrtle
Avenue., Monday through Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Visit our website:
www.jaxloc.org or call us at 904-240-9133.
HEALTH FAIR!!! Free Cholesterol and Diabetes Screenings offered from
12:00 pm 5:00 pm January 19 at Winn-Dixie Pharmacy, 11380-8 Beach Blvd.,
Jacksonville, FL., For more information call Cholestcheck: 800-713-3301 (No-
Appointments)
THE SIXTH ANNUAL SOUTHERN MARYLAND MARTIN LUTHER
KING, JR. PRAYER BREAKFAST will be held Monday, January 18, 2010,
in the Great Room of St. Mary's College of Maryland's (SMCM) Campus
Center. The program will feature William Yoast, the high school football coach
portrayed in the film "Remember the Titans," Lieutenant Christiliene Whalen,
who graduated from Great Mills High School during the desegregation era, and
John W. Franklin, of the new Smithsonian National Museum of African
American History. A full breakfast will be served, starting at 7:00 a.m. The pro-
gram will begin at 8 a.m. Tickets are $7 and are available at the door. Early
arrival is recommended as space is limited; advance registration is not required.
For more information, contact Marc Apter at 301-904-3690.
11TH ANNUAL DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. PRAYER BREAK-
FAST -Saturday, January 16th, 8:00 a.m. at Emanuel Multi-Purpose Center,
2407 S. L. Badger Jr., Cir. E., Jacksonville, FL. Speaker: Congressman
Kendrick Meeks, Candidate for U.S. Senate.
AL LETSON'S SUMMER IN SANCTUARY, Saturday, January 30, 7:00
p.m. South Jacksonville Presbyterian Church...Fellowship Hall, 2137
Hendricks Avenue. You don't just watch Summer in Sanctuary......Al Letson's
one-man play based on his experience as a summer camp counselor at The
Sanctuary on 8th Street... It's something you feel... By sharing his experience of
that summer, Al tells his own life story and the stories of the inner-city children
She worked with there. You will laugh and you will cry and you will come away
with a better understanding of a troubling yet hopeful world. Al has performed
Summer in Sanctuary around the country, including Off-Broadway in New
York City, where it will return for a run in 2010. In addition to his role as play-
wright, poet and actor, Al also created and hosts NPR's newest national radio
show, State of the RE:Union. Tickets $20. Call: 356.3588, Email:
Sanctuaryon8th@aol.com Web site/Paypal: Sanctuaryon8th.org


1 r




after a period of remission or you develop fever or other signs of infection. R
P *********************** i
Dr. Watkins can be heard live Sundays at 7:05 pm EST on IC
www.KCOHRadio.com. He is a 330 Mason and Grand Medical Director for !
the United Supreme Council. S. J. and Imperial Council (Black Shriners E
Nationwide) 713-433-4536. E|
S[rQSBSBMBSB5B5B5B5_5BSBMBSBSSQS@SBS@M_!@_SSS@_BRSBSom


MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR QUOTES

The Negro and the Constitution (in The Cornellian, May
1944) -We cannot be truly Christian people so long as we flaunt the
central teachings of Jesus: brotherly love and the Golden Rule.
The spirit of Lincoln still lives; that spirit born of the teachings
of the Nazarene, who promised mercy to the merciful, who lifted the
lowly, strengthened the weak, ate with publicans, and made the cap-
tives free. In the light of this divine example, the doctrines of dem-
agogues shiver in their chaff.
America experiences a new birth of freedom in her sons and
daughters; she incarnates the spirit of her martyred chief. Their loy-
alty is repledged; their devotion renewed to the work He left unfin-
ished. My heart throbs anew in the hope that inspired by the exam-
ple of Lincoln, imbued with the spirit of Christ, they will cast down
the last barrier to perfect freedom. And I with my brother of black- / -
est hue possessing at last my rightful heritage and holding my head -. .
erect, may stand beside the Saxon--a Negro--and yet a man! .
Address at March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom
(Aug 1963) -Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of
God's children.
I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of
its creed we hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal.
This will be the day, this will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing
with new meaning "My country 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land
where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim's pride, from every mountainside, let freedom
ring!"
And when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from
every tenement and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed
up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles,
Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro
spiritual, "Free at last, free at last. Thank God Almighty, we are free at last."
Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech (Dec 1964) -I still believe that one day mankind will
bow before the altars of God and be crowned triumphant over war and bloodshed, and non-
violent redemptive goodwill will proclaim the rule of the land.
Most of these people will never make the headlines and their names will not appear in
Who's Who. Yet when years have rolled past and when the blazing light of truth is focused
on this marvelous age in which we live -- men and women will know and children will be
taught that we have a finer land, a better people, a more noble civilization -- because these
humble children of God were willing to suffer for righteousness' sake.



HEALTH o 3f lf-
By Ulysses W. Watkins, Jr, M.D.
SICKLE-CELL ANEMIA or
SICKLE-CELL TRAIT
GENERAL INFORMATION)
DEFINITION: An inherited blood disorder that caus-
es anemia, episodes of severe pain, low resistance to infection and chronic poor
health. It is not contagious.
BODY PARTS INVOLVED: Bone marrow; lymph glands; spleen; liver;
thymus.
SEX OR AGE MOST AFFECTED: Usually begins around 6 months of
age and lasts a lifetime.
SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
Anemia with shortness of breath, rapid heartbeat, fatigue and jaundice.
Episodes of pain in joints, chest, abdomen and back. Frequent infec-
tions, especially pneumonia. Nerve impairment. Delayed growth and devel-
opment. Skin ulcers, especially on the legs.
CAUSES: This disease is hereditary. Persons with the gene may pass it on
to their children. Red blood cells change from round to sickle shapes, which
causes blockage in the capillaries. Low oxygen in the tissues is partly respon-
sible for the changed shape. The change occurs in attacks that cause pain and
disability. The disease occurs mostly in Black people.
RISK INCREASES WITH: Family history of sickle-cell anemia.
The following may aggravate symptoms:
Ascending to high altitude, as in driving up a mountain or flying.
Pregnancy. Surgery. Injury.
HOW TO PREVENT: If you have a family history of sickle-cell anemia,
ask your doctor to test you. If the condition is present, obtain genetic counsel-
ing before starting a family. A less serious condition, sickle-cell trail, may be
present. It will not cause the disease, but genetic counseling is still desirable.
WHAT TO EXPECT
APPROPRIATE HEALTH CARE
Doctor's treatment. If a child has the condition, seek special treatment
from a pediatrician with special knowledge of this condition. Psychotherapy or
counseling maybe helpful in adapting to this condition, especially for children.
Hospitalization at times of severe attacks.
DIAGNOSTIC MEASURES
Your own observation of symptoms. Medical history and physical exam
by a doctor. Laboratory blood studies. Simple screening tests are also avail-
able. They may be done at birth if there is a family history of sickle-cell anemia. a
X-rays of bones and lungs.
POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Persons with sickle-cell trait may be at risk of sudden death while engaged
in strenuous exercise. Infections of lungs and bones. Kidney failure. Eye dis-
ease. Stroke.
PROBABLE OUTCOUME: Sickle-cell anemia is incurable and life
Expectancy is reduced. A few patients reach adulthood. Most patients die prema-
turely of infection or stroke.
HOW TO TREAT
S GENERAL MEASURES
During an attack, stay wannrm. Apply warm compresses to painful areas.
Maintain your immunization schedule, including a pneumonia vaccine.
S* Don't fly, even in pressurized planes, without oxygen. Check with your
Airline.
Wear a Medic-Alert bracelet or pendant.

MEDICATION: No medications are yet available to control this condition.
For severe attacks, intravenous fluids, blood transfusions and pain relievers are
helpful.
ACTIVITY: Avoid strenuous exercise and exposure to cold temperatures.
SRest in bed during acute attacks.
DIET: Drink at least 8 glasses of water a day-more if you have a fever.
This helps keep blood cells from collecting and blocking capillaries.
CALL YOUR DOCTOR IF
Your child has signs and symptoms of sickle-cell anemia. You want to
Know if you have the sickle-cell gene. You have the disease and symptoms recur


JAN"RY 16,2010


THE STAR


P i- R" D 2








.JAN(JARY 16. 2010 THE STAR PAGE B-3


I -I,


sSSHH!


From Actual Police Reports

Did You Hear About?...


A GRANDMOTHER IS BEATEN INFRONT OF
GRANDCHILDREN

Officer was dispatched to Deason Ave. in reference to a domestic disturbance.
Upon arrival he spoke with Victim who reported the following: She got into a verbal
altercation with her husband, Suspect. According to the victim, the suspect yelled at
her and told her to wash the dishes in the sink. The victim told the suspect that she
had chronic pain in her hands and was unable to wash the dishes at this time. The
suspect continued to yell at the victim accusing her of not keeping the kids fed and
the dishes washed. At this time, the victim became angry at the suspect and told him
that he could leave because she did not want him anymore. The suspect ran towards
the victim and began choking her with both of his hands. The victim stated that she
scratched the suspect on his face so he would let her go. When the suspect let the vic-
tim go, she went to sit down so she could catch her breath. At this time, the suspect
began kicking the victim on her legs. After kicking the victim the suspect fled the
scene on foot. The victim stated that she never lost consciousness while the suspect
was choking her.
Officer spoke with the victim's grandson, Witness#l, who reported the fol-
lowing: He heard the suspect yelling at the victim. He stated that he never saw the
suspect choking the victim because they were standing in the hallway arguing. He
stated that he did see the suspect punch the victim on her arms. He also saw the sus-
pect kick the victim on her legs.
Officer spoke with Witness#2 who is also the victim's grandson. He reported
the following: He observed the suspect yelling at the victim. He then observed the
suspect choking the victim and pushed her into the bedroom.
There were no visible signs of injury on the victim; therefore an evidence
technician was not requested. The victim refused rescue and refused to be housed in
a safe place.
Officer will be continuing this investigation by attempting to contact the state
attorney. Case not cleared (patrol follow up).

ASSAULT /DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

A dispatch to the intersection of Franklin and Phelps St was made in refer-
ence to a domestic battery. In this incident Mr. B (suspect) was charged with aggra-
vated domestic battery (kicking pregnant female in the stomach), due to Victim being
six months pregnant with his child.
Officer was dispatched to the Williamsburg Apartments located in reference
to the listed suspect making threats towards the listed victim in regards to her drop-
ping the aggravated domestic battery charge.
According to the victim, she has received several threatening phone calls
from the suspect. She stated that he threatened to kill her and her family if she does
not drop the listed charge. She stated that he stated to her that he will hurt her chil-
dren when they walk to school if she does not met him at his grandmother's house to
talk about what happened during the aggravated battery.
Officer gave the victim a State Attorney card and informed her on the filing
procedures. It should be noted that the victim and suspect do not live together in the
same residence. As a result, the suspect did not pose an immediate threat towards this
victim during investigation.
It should be noted that the mentioned victim's children were not present dur-
ing this incident and did not witness or hear any of the suspect's threats, via cell
phone, towards the listed victim.
The victim signed a signature form, but refused to make a written statement
about this incident. She stated that she would take her cell phone with the saved mes-
sages from the suspect and present it as evidence when she files this case with the
Assistant State Attorney's office.
Officer gave the victim a case information card and told her to contact the
police back if she acquires any pertinent case information. He also advised the listed
victim about the Hub House in regards to transporting her to a safe undisclosed loca-
tion, but the victim refused to be transported. She stated that she would seek an
injunction against the suspect when she files this case.


Fatal Fire


A Police Officer was dispatched to 2229 Cato Rd. in reference to assisting
Fire Control with a residential fire. He was the first emergency services unit to arrive.
The house was fully engulfed and there were neighbors across the street advising that
there were people inside the house.
Fire Control arrived and extinguished the fire. The firefighters found two
individuals inside and brought them outside into the front yard. It was outside that
they announced both deceased. Mike Benoit (Rescue 13), Tim Kirkland (Engine 21),
Gene Klingbel (Ladder 21) and Allen Mallard (Ladder 4) pulled the victim's out of
the home.
Several Officers responded to the scene to help with the victims and assist
with traffic control.
Patrol efforts were suspended.


K


Your Weekly

HOROSCOPE

January 18. 2010 January 24. 2010


*" I ARIES
You will find that you are able
to clear up a number of small
but important details. You
need to get involved in groups
that offer physical activities.
Take care of any dealings with
government agencies. You
may not be too pleased with
the actions of those you live
with.
Z CANCER
Try to communicate if you
wish to help. You may be
sensitive to a point of absurd-
ity. Unexpected bills will
leave you a little short. Your
intellectual charm will win
hearts and bring opportuni-
ties that you least expect.
LIBRA

Be careful while traveling.
You need some help this
week. Problems with peers is
apparent. You need to take a
long, hard look at yourself
and your personal situation.
Your lucky day this week will
be Monday.

.i/ CAPRICORN
You may not be too
pleased with the actions of
those you live with. You
should get involved in
competitive sports this
week. Emotional decep-
tion is evident. Cutbacks
at work will be a cause for
worry.


- ,.


'Cu


TAURUS


Advancement can be yours if
you put your efforts into work
related matters. Moves or the
possibility of having someone
different living with you may
be difficult at first. Children
may be less than honest with
you. You can buy or sell if
you're so inclined.
L LEO
Face any emotional prob-
lems head-on to avoid situ-
ations getting out of hand.
Get rich quick schemes will
not be successful. You will
meet new romantic partners
through the company you
keep. You are best to con-
centrate on work.
Z SCORPIO
Travel and communication will
be lucrative for you. Don't
expect others to live up to their
promises and you won't be dis-
appointed or find yourself stuck
with delays. Talk to an older,
established individual about
your present situation. Stabilize
your own position by locking
up your savings.
J A AQUARIUS
Visit someone who hasn't
been feeling well lately.
Control your emotions and
everything will fall into
place. Your confidence will
stabilize your position.
Don't bend to the pressure.
Your lucky day this week
will be Sunday.


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THE STAR


PAGE B-3


JANUARY16,2010


GEMINI
Travel may change your atti-
tudes with regard to your phi-
losophy. You will have a
greater involvement in groups;
however, they may not be to
your advantage. Get involved
in activities that will be fun for
the whole family. Take time to
talk things over. Travel for
business or pleasure.
j VIRGO
Difficulties with children will
surface if you try to break a
promise you made. Don't for-
get that you've only heard one
side of the story. Control your
anger. You would be wise to
socialize with as many people
as possible.

SAGITTARIUS
Lack of cash might be part-
ly to blame for the prob-
lems at home. Try to be
understanding. Do what's
best for the people you
love most. You can expect
opposition at work. Don't
let your competition be
privy to information that
could be in criminating.

S-P PIECES

Spend time by yourself to
avoid any conflicts with fam-
ily members. You always
seem to spend more than you
make. Be careful to avoid
wrong doings. Be prepared to
jump quickly if you wish to
stay in the forefront of your
industry this week.


/A










......TH.TA JNU R 16,21



SPORTS


SPECIAL TO THE
FLORIDA STAR
At the Louisiana
Superdonme on January
1st, EWC BASKETBALL
Tigers drop an 83-70
decision to Eagles in
Daytona Beach
DAYTONA BEACH,
Fla. The Embry-Riddle
men's basketball team
closed out its six-game
home stand with an 83-70
victory over Edward
Waters as play continued
in The Sun Conference on
Tuesday.
The Eagles, ranked
17th in the latest NAIA
national poll released on
Monday, improved to 2-0
in league play and 13-3
overall, while the Tigers
dropped to 7-8 on the
year and 1-1 in the con-
ference.
Ronnie Weston was
the leading scorer for the
Tigers with 17 points,
which included four from
long range. Charles
Evans contributed 14
points and eight boards to
the Tiger effort.
The Eagles sprinted
out to an 11-0 lead to start
the game.
Blake Touchard who
had a lay-up, an assist, a
rebound, two free throws
and a pair of three-point
baskets in the first four


points on the night to go
with five rebounds, two
assists and two steals.
Lorenzi led all scorers
with 21 points, while Ray
Graham (12 points),
David Butler (13 points)
and Glenn Dalcourt (10
points) rounded out the
Eagle scorers in double
figures. Butler and
Graham accounted for 15
of the Eagles' 39
rebounds with eight and
seven, respectively, and
Butler finished just one
block shy of his season
best with seven blocks in
the game.
(Photos by Rachel
Ridder, Embry-Riddle
University)


' I


Embry Riddle began the game on an 11-0 run. But the
Tigers fought back.


and a half minutes of play
led ERAU. The hosts also
played solid defense in
the opening minutes,
holding the Tigers score-
less until the 16:02 mark
when Carlton Darling put
Edward Waters on the
board with a lay-up.'
The lay-up jump-
started the Tigers' offense
and they managed to con-
vert on five of their next
11 attempts, but they
were not able to cut into
the lead as the Eagles
held a commanding 23-11
advantage on the boards
and shot 53.3 percent
from the field, including
5-of-10 from beyond the
arc, to take a 49-33 lead
into the intermission.
Edward Waters got
off to a better start offen-
sively in the second half,
scoring the first four
points of the frame. Eric
Lorenzi countered with
one of his two three-
pointers on the night to
build the lead back up to
15 points.
Over the next seven
minutes, the Eagles strug-
gled to find their rhythm,
turning the ball over four
times and scoring just
seven points during that
stretch. On the other side
of the ball, Edward
Waters made the most of


FROM THE FLORIDA
STAR

Delaware State
University announced that
it will eliminate two sports
programs to address budg-
etary issues and to help the
institution's other athletics
programs become more
competitive within its
Mid-Eastern Athletic
Conference (MEAC).
The University will
drop the men's tennis and
women's equestrian pro-


grams at the end of the
2009-2010 athletics year.
The university will contin-
ue to honor its financial
commitment to the stu-
dent-athletes who are
impacted by this decision
and will assist those inter-
ested in transferring to
another institution of high-
er education.
The DSU athletics
budget is approximately
$12 million during the
current 2009-2010 athlet-
ics year the largest budg-


et among institutions with-
in the conference. DSU
Athletics Director Derek
Carter said that the Board
of Trustees has recom-
mended that the athletics
budget be reduced to a
level that is more compa-
rable with the top teams in
the MEAC.
"The five MEAC insti-
tutions that are below
DSU in what they spend
on athletics all have budg-
ets that are $8 to $9 mil-
lion this year," said Mr.


Carter. "Couple that with
the tough economic times
that this University is fac-
ing, it is impossible to jus-
tify such a disparity
between DSU and the
other top institutions' ath-
letics spending."
Mr. Carter said that
DSU regrets the impact
this decision will have on
the affected student ath-
letes. "We know today's
announcement is not good
news for our Men's Tennis
and Equestrian team mem-


bers, their dedicated
coaches and their faithful
supporters," the DSU ath-
letics director said. "While
we hope that the student-
athletes from the affected
teams will continue to
attend DSU, we will
understand if they decide
to transfer to another insti-
tution and are prepared to
assist them any way we
can."
The DSU athletics
director said he recom-
mended making the


announcement at this time
to give the student-athletes
as much opportunity as
possible to weigh their
future directions.
The elimination of
men's tennis and women's
equestrian will reduce the
number of DSU intercolle-
giate athletics teams to 15.
In 2009, the University
dropped its wrestling pro-
gram. There are no plans
to eliminate any additional
DSU sports programs at
this time, Mr. Carter said.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL NOTEBOOK
By MIKE BONTS, Sports Editor


UGA'S JAMES NAMED FRESHMAN OF THE WEEK -Georgia's Jasmine James was tabbed the SEC
Freshman of the Week for women's basketball. James, a 5-9, guard from Memphis, Tenn., has now earned the
accolade for four of the eight occasions it has been awarded during the 2009-10 season. In the process, James
also equaled the most Freshman of the Week recognition by a Lady Bulldog established by Ashley Houts dur-
ing the 2006-07 campaign. Last week, James averaged 14.0 points, 3.0 rebounds, 2.0 assists and 1.5 steals in
leading Georgia to victories over Kentucky and Florida. James hit the game-winning three-pointer with 17 sec-
onds remaining in overtime in the Lady Bulldogs' 61-60 victory over the Wildcats on Thursday. On Sunday,
she scored a game-high 17 points in Georgia's 61-52 decision over the Gators.
MSU'S THOMPSON SELECTED MEAC DEFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE WEEK-Morgan State soph-
omore Kevin Thompson was named the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) Defensive Player of the
Week. Thompson, the 2009 MEAC Defensive Player of the Year, has been named four times Defensive Player
of the Week so far this season.Bethune-Cookman's CJ Reed and Mike Phillips earned Player of the Week and
Rookie of the Week respectively. James Cotton of Maryland Eastern Shore was named Rookie of the Week.
Thompson collected a combined 21 rebounds in two outings last week for the Bears. The 6-foot-8 forward
grabbed a game-high 12 rebounds to go along with nine points and one blocked shot in the Bear's loss to
Baylor. He followed that outing by pulling down nine boards in Morgan State's victory over Howard.
Thompson, a former Walbrook HS standout, is one of the steadiest post players in the country and has record-
edl6 career double-doubles and currently leads the MEAC in rebounds and ranks 3rd in the nation averaging
12.5 rebounds per game. Other Top Performances: Reggie Holmes (MSU) averaged 22.5 points, four rebounds,
and three steals in two games last week for the Bears. DeWayne Jackson (MSU)
scored 19 points, connecting on 8-of-9 shots, including 2-of-3 from long range, in Answer to MLK Crosswo
a 90-58 win over Howard. Brandon Bryant (FAMU) scored 19 points, shooting 5- Across: 3. GANDHI 5. DE
of-10 from the field and hit two clutch free-throws to help the Rattlers earn their Down: 1. SINGING 2. NO
first MEAC victory. 18. SIT-IN 9. VIETNAM 13


Georgia women's basketball player Jasmine James was tabbed
the SEC Freshman of the Week. (Photo courtesy of UGA)

rd Puzzle on page A-5
SEGREGATION 10. MEDIA 11. UNJUST
tOREAU 17. VOTING 18. CIVIL 19. SEGREGATION
BEL 4. ROSAPARKS 6. SUPREMECOURT 7. ASSASSINATED
. BUS 15. RACISM 16. INDIA


its scoring chances and
pulled to within nine on
William Walter-Brown's
long-range shot at the
11:32 mark.
The Tigers' success
prompted EWC head
coach Anthony Mosley to
call a timeout to discuss
strategy for the last 10
minutes, but it was the
Eagles whose game plan
out of the timeout proved
most effective. David
Butler collected a
Touchard miss at the
10:52 mark and his ensu-
ing jumper sparked a 20-8
run over the next eight
minutes, with back-to-
back threes by Touchard
and Danny Krazit adding
the exclamation -
point at the end of
the run.
The Tigers
took 41 shots to
the Eagles 26 in
the second and
outscored the
Blue and Gold
37-34 in that
frame, but the
first-half deficit
proved to be too
big for Edward
Waters to over-
come, resulting in
the Eagles' 13-
point victory.
Touchard fin- EWC
ished with 16 Confe\


7 The Eagles held a 23-11 advantage on the
dropped to 7-8 on the season and 1-1 in Sun boards and shot 53.3 percent from the fleld.
rence play.


THE STAR


JANUARY16,2010


PAGE B-4


ruo-I
Am- Y-0








PA GE B-5 i ,,,x.............. .., .Ulu



PREP RAP


FAMU'S MARCHING "100" WILL PERFORM IN

SUPER BOWL XLIV PREGAME SHOW


,7 %. . director for the National Football League
Ac ordnotifying him that the "100" had been
S*- selected.
"We are extremely honored and
She proud to be selected by the National
Football League to perform during the
pregame show," said White. "To be invit-
ed for a third time in only five years is con-
firmation that we give a quality perform-
ance."
When asked what will the "100"
Dep. a t o perform to dazzle the audience, White
Boa td quickly responded by saying they will
salute the King of Pop.
A t"We will do another production to
l t honor Michael Jackson," said White. "It is
opment_7only fitting that we salute the King of Pop
for the world to see."
The "100" performed in the follow-
a e n ing Super Bowls:
1969 Super Bowl III Half time per-
formance in Miami, Fla.;
1983 Super Bowl XVII Half time per-
formance in Tampa, Fla.;
2005 Super Bowl XXXIX Pregame per-
formance in Jacksonville, Fla.; and
2007 Super Bowl XLI Half time per-
formance with Prince in Miami, Fla.
According to White, the past year has been really electrifying for the
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. Florida A&M University's (FAMU) Marching "100."
"100" has been selected to perform in the Super Bowl XLIV pregame show "The weekend prior to the Super Bowl on January 30, the "100" will
scheduled for Sunday, February 7, at Dolphin Stadium in Miami Gardens, participate in the 8th Annual Honda Battle of the Bands in Atlanta, Ga.,"
Fla. This is the third time in five years that the Marching "100" has been invit- White said. "Just last year in January 2009, the Marching "100" was prepar-
ed to participate in a Super Bowl. ing to participate in President Barack Obama's inaugural parade. A year
According to Julian White, director of bands and chair of FAMU's later, we are preparing to perform at the Super Bowl. We are indeed
Department of Music, he received a telephone call from the entertainment America's favorite college band."

Duval County Public Schools, School h

Board and Union sign Memorandum

of Understanding for Florida's Race

to the Top Application

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -Today, Duval County Public Schools, the
Duval County School Board and Duval Teachers United signed aWA
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and Addendum for Florida's Race to
the Top application. This allows the parties to begin discussions in the devel-
opment of a plan to meet the federal guidelines.
Race to the Top is a competitive grant program to encourage and
reward States that are implementing significant reforms in the four education
areas: enhancing standards and assessments, improving the collection and
use of data, increasing teacher effectiveness and achieving equity in teacher
distribution, and turnaround schools.
"The actions required in the Race to the Top effort are crucial to our
mission, and we have already implemented many of the ideas within this
grant longer than any other district in the state of Florida," said Duval County
Public Schools Superintendent Ed Pratt-Dannals. "I commend the
Commissioner of Education for demonstrating a willingness to work with the
district on a locally appropriate plan to implement the Race to the Top require-
ments."
The District included an addendum that outlined the understanding .
from a meeting with Florida Commissioner of Education, Eric Smith earlier
this month. The addendum will be included with the MOU sent to the state,
and includes a preliminary scope of work.
"I think the most important part of this is that we respect everyone's
support and role, especially the teachers," said Board Chair Brenda Priestly
Jackson. "The addendum is imperative, as it captures all of our concerns,
most importantly the academic programs and the ability to sustain those pro- .. .
grams in order to continue to move students. .
Duval County Public Schools is signing a separate MOU with the ti ,, i.-.r. -..u. -iI., .,L- .
Union which outlines that the agreements made in the grant will only last for r i-, .:,m: 'an 4)I, s r 4' J .Jo ,s. >.j aj. .
the lifetime of the grant. The Board also agreed to not impose any require- e 2f'-v1:.. ... tL .
ments of Race to the Top on the bargaining unit. u-..i;, ,u~u ,, .._-._.:_ .,
"We are excited with caution," said Duval Teachers United President .w-t-.J. -. .J'j-1.|,t/n-. Jk.- a .
Terrie Brady. "This will open the door for additional opportunities for our coun-


ty, and we will continue to work collaboratively to craft a plan that has the . ,
highest impact on student achievement and the teaching profession." a A -,, -I ..
Duval County Public Schools operates 166 schools and serves
approximately 123,000 students. The school district is committed to providing
high quality educational opportunities that will inspire all students to acquire
and use the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in a global economy,
and culturally diverse world.


JANIJARY16.2010


hT7,, Sltm.







IPA "J FL -- TA1


PREP RAF


10 KIDS' HEALTH
ISSUES TO WATCH IN
2010

Nemours annual list spotlights
important trends affecting families in
the year ahead

As 2010 begins, Nemours, one of
the nation's premier pediatric health sys-
tems, looks ahead with its annual list of
"10 Kids' Health Issues to Watch." The
physicians and editors of Nemours'
KidsHealth.org have sifted through
scores of health issues affecting children
and families to choose 10 important
trends to keep tabs on in the new year.
The issues chosen represent a wide range
of concerns some may hit close to
home while others may be more far
reaching. Of course, these are not the
only important issues affecting chil-
dren's health far from it but
Nemours feels that in the midst of many,
these are notable:


10 Kids' Health Issues to
Watch in 2010

Earliest Signs of Autism
Identified in Babies: With about 1 in
every 150 children being diagnosed with
a condition in the "autism spectrum,"
there's been an upsurge in autism aware-
ness and research. New research, which
finds that the earliest signs of autism can
be detected in babies, will help improve
screening efforts for autism. Babies who
get an earlier diagnosis get the interven-
tions they need sooner.
Obesity and Kids, What
Parents Should Understand: Why are
so many kids today overweight or obese?
Many factors are involved, from out-of-
control portion sizes and eating on the go
to sedentary lifestyles and parental
uncertainty about what kids should
weigh. It's important for parents to be
good role models for their kids by eating
well and exercising often. But beyond
that, moms and dads also need to educate
themselves regarding where kids should
fall on a growth chart and how their child
compares with peers on these charts.
Many Kids Missing Out on
CHIP Benefits: A recent study conclud-
ed what seems obvious kids who lack
regular pediatric care often don't get the
medical services they need. Although it's
uncertain how well current health care
reform initiatives will help meet kids'
needs, there is help available for millions
of uninsured children via the Children's
Health Insurance Program, or CHIP. So
what's the problem? Most of the 11 mil-
lion eligible kids still haven't been
enrolled.
H1N1 Flu Pandemic Affecting
Kids the Hardest: Worry over the
H1N1 virus has let up a bit in recent
weeks and the peak of the outbreak
appears to have passed, but experts cau-
tion that cases could surge again. So it's
important for parents to remain vigilant
and do their best to protect their families,
especially since kids and teens were
especially hard hit by the recent H1N1
pandemic.
Texting & Driving: Just Say
No: As irritating as cell phone and tex-
ting proficiencies can be for "old-school"
parents, they can be more than just
annoying. On the road, these distractions
can be deadly. One report estimates that
teens are four times more likely than
adult drivers to get into an accident relat-
ed to cell-phone use. Another found that
texting was, by far, the most potentially
dangerous and lethal activity related to
cell phone use on the road.
The Importance of Vitamin D:
Most of us know that vitamin D is cru-
cial to bone health, but now it's been
shown that insufficient levels can cause
or increase the risk of developing a num-


ber of health problems. Recent studies
report that about 70% of kids in the
United States have low vitamin D levels.
Traditionally, milk has been the main
source of vitamin D for kids, but fewer
kids now drink milk every day. Another
likely risk factor is the 3-4 hours of TV
and computer time many kids get each
day. Ultraviolet rays absorbed by the
skin help the body make a usable form of
vitamin D so kids who are parked
inside day after day aren't getting these
natural "doses" of vitamin D the way
kids did in the past.
The Toll of Constant Social
Networking: Does it seem like your kids
are always online? Are their status
updates on Facebook seemingly a matter
of life and death? If so, you're far from
alone. And what was once the domain of
older kids and teens is skewing younger
and younger. Most experts think that
kids are smart enough by their early
teens to know what, and who, to avoid.
Younger kids, though, need more
parental supervision.
The Impact on Concussions: In
the wake of head injuries among some of
the NFL's most high-profile players,
concussions and their treatment have
become big news. Because the treatment
of concussions relies heavily on symp-
tom reporting by those who incur them
rather than more obvious signs, many
athletes have been encouraged to "play
through" head injuries. This is especially
troubling for younger athletes, in whom
repeat concussions can be serious. So it's
important to prevent concussions from
happening in the first place and, if they
do, to know the signs and how to make
sure a child recovers completely.
Pregnancy, STDs Increasing
Among U.S. Teens: The CDC reports
that, following declines from 1991 to
2005, birth rates among U.S. teens are
increasing, and more than 25% of 14- to
19-year-old girls had one of four sexual-
ly transmitted diseases in 2008. And in a
new study, the AAP reports that many
parents aren't talking to their kids about
sexual development until it's "too late"
- more than 40% of kids already had
sexual intercourse before any discussion
with their parents about STDs, condom
use, birth control, or what to do if a part-
ner refuses to use a condom.
Smoking, Good News and Bad
News: The U.S. smoking rate has
dropped sharply, from around 40% in the
mid-1960s to a little over 20% now.
That's the good news. The bad news is
that according to the American Lung
Association, each day 6,300 American
kids try their first cigarette and nearly
2,000 of them will become daily smok-
ers. But it's not just conventional ciga-
rettes and other tobacco products that
parents need to watch out for. Gaining
traction are electronic cigarettes (or e-
cigarettes), marketed as the "healthier
alternative" to regular smoking, with
many brands offering free trial kits
through online promotions that kids can
easily access.
To read more about each issue or
to share your feedback about other
notable issues in 2010, visit:
http://www.nemours.org/e-serv-
ice/kidshealth.html.


2010 Honda Battle of the Bands Is
Hottest Ticket in Atlanta

Hip-Hop Icon "Ludacris" Makes Special Appearance, Joins Top Eight
HBCU Marching Bands at January Invitational Showcase

A Hip-Hop Icon, 1,800 student musicians, an aspiring vocalist and
more than 60,000 fans will converge in Atlanta's Georgia Dome, January 30,
2010, to celebrate music, community and creative expression at the world's
largest and best-known marching band showdown the 2010 Honda Battle
of the Bands Invitational Showcase.
The Invitational Showcase Line-Up
This year's dynamic three-hour show kicks-off promptly at 3 p.m. on
Jan. 30, and features a special guest performance by "Ludacris," along with
performances from the country's top eight Historically Black College and
University (HBCU) Marching Bands. Atlanta's own Clark Atlanta University
opens the show and leads the "great eight" band performances in the follow-
ing order:
1. Clark Atlanta University "Mighty Marching Panthers"
2. Virginia State University "Trojan Explosion Marching Band"
3. North Carolina Central University "Marching Sound Machine"
4. Prairie View A&M University "Marching Storm"
5. Southern University "Human Jukebox Marching Band"
6. Albany State University "Marching Rams"
7. Tuskegee University "Marching Crimson Pipers"
8. Florida A&M University "Marching 100"
Atlanta's Own Ludacris to Perform
Hip-hop music icon and actor, Ludacris, will be on hand as a special
guest performer. The Atlanta native is best known for his extensive musical
library and performances in the Oscar-winning film Crash, and the Academy
Award-nominated film, Hustle & Flow.
Who's Got Talent? -Atlanta Residents Invited to Audition for National
Anthem
This year the Honda Battle of the Bands National Anthem will be per-
formed by a talented local vocalist selected through a promotional radio con-
test. WVEE/WAOK-FM, Atlanta's top-ranked urban radio station is teaming
up with the Honda Battle of the Bands to invite listeners to flex their vocal
skills for a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to open the 2010 Honda Battle of
the Bands. Five finalists will be selected by a panel of judges at an open
audition on Sat., Jan. 16, 2010. Fellow Atlanta residents can then log on to
the station's web site and vote for their favorite performer's rendition of the
National Anthem. The winner will be announced on-air Jan. 22, 2010, and
will open the showcase on January 30th.
Grants, Internships, and More
As the largest and most highly anticipated musical event of its kind, the
Honda Battle of the Bands serves as a platform to shine a rare spotlight on
the pageantry, pride and showmanship of HBCU music and culture. It is also
the only national music scholarship program of its kind. For the 2010 pro-
gram, the 45 participating HBCU marching bands in the "Road To the
Honda" qualifying program were each awarded a $1,000 grant for their
music programs, with an additional $20,000 awarded to the eight winning
institutions selected by national opinion polls to participate in the Invitational
Showcase.
In addition, the event will include the announcement of the third
annual Honda Battle of the Bands Fox Music Experience award winner. The
Fox Music Experience provides one lucky Invitational Showcase student
musician the opportunity to spend a few weeks in the summer interning on
the Twentieth Century Fox studio lot in Los Angeles learning film and televi-
sion music production first-hand. Also, for the fifth year in a row, the HBOB
program also will include the Honda Battle of the Bands HBCU College
Recruitment Fair.
For more information on the Invitational Showcase, Fox Music
Experience music internship program and HBCU Recruitment Fair, visit
www.HondaBattleoftheBands.com, the official online destination and clear-
inghouse for all HBOB information including Invitational Showcase updates,
voting, polling status, photos and video footage.
Group and individual tickets for the show are still available, but going
fast. They can be purchased at the Georgia Dome Box Office,
Ticketmaster.com or www.HondaBattleoftheBands.com for just $10 and
$12.


- -~D friY~~,.4~"2';M ,-. .... -


THE STAR


JAN"RY 16, 2010


PAGE B-6







JANUARY 16, 2010


THE STAR


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ozamny&dmiiteassi3iesasndlasmastartomyfdkAlon.
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you .IEtherhkiburemtrtyoicies'alje

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SCal1 Today, Tol Free.

1-866-244-3809


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For Real

Pain Therapy...


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It Really Works...Compare and SAVE.


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L-IHEzLIEVES OM-At
miYi,LE sTfroJN ANID
fIF. ACriY MUSC~itLES~.
GREASaEL55S %IWILL NOT STMrN CALI) I HINIG
-Call: 904-766-8834 Liz


Place Your Ad We also
accept Cash and Money Orders
Call Liz 904-766-8834


'F~~-~'


Homes For Sale
FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION 200+ FLORI-
DA HOMES! Auction: Jan 23 REDC | View Full
Listings www.Auction.com RE No. CQ 1031187

20 ACRE LAND FORECLOSURES Near
Growing El Paso, Texas. No Credit Checks/Owner
Financing. $0 Down, Take over $159/mo. payment.
Was $16,900, NOW $12,856. (800)755-8953
www.texaslandforeclosures.net

ABANDONED UPSTATE NY FARM Absolute
sale- Jan 23rd!! 10 acres strean $39m900! Lake
region, woods, fields. Solid investment! Terms! NO
CLOSING COSTS! Virtual tour:
www.newyorklandandlakes.com

Real Estate
***FREE Foreclosure Listings*** Over 400,000
properties nationwide. LOW Down Payment. Call
NOW! (800)860-4064

LAND OR DEVELOPMENTS WANTED. We
buy or market development lots. Mountain or
Waterfront Communities in NC, SC, AL, GA and
FL. Call (800)455-1981, Ext.1034

Real Estate Auctions

FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION 200+ FLORI-

DA Homes Auction: Jan 23 REDC View Full

Listings www.Auction.com RE No. CQ 1031187

Wanted To Buy

WANTED GOLD & SILVER Top prices paid for

your jewelry and coins. Local Investor Call

(904)405-0729 or visit our website for nearest

location www.buygoldiacksonville.com


momntonal-cassitids~cm


INVITATION FOR BIDS
PACECO CRANE REHABILITATION
AT THE BLOUNT ISLAND MARINE TERMINAL
JAXPORT Project No. B2009-12
JAXPORT Contract No. EQ-1308
January 14, 2010

Sealed bids will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority unbil 2:00 PM, local time,
February 18, 2010, at which time they shall be opened in the Public Meeting Room of the
Port Central Office Building, 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida, for PaaCrane
All bids must be submitted in accordance with specifications and drawings for Contract No, EQ-
1308, which may be examined In, or obtained from the Procurement Department of the
Jacksonville Port Authority, located on the second floor of the Port Central Office Building, 2831
Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206. (Please telephone 904/357-3018 for
infrb abon )
MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE AND SITE VISIT WILL BE HELD ON JANUARY
28. 2010, AT 10:00 AM. IN THE PUBLIC MEETING ROOM, FIRST FLOOR OF THE PORT
CENTRAL OFFICE BUILDING LOCATED AT ADDRESS STATED ABOVE. ATTENDANCE
BY A REPRESENTATIVE OF EACH PROSPECTIVE BIDDER IS REQUIRED. A BID WILL
NOT BE ACCEPTED FROM ANY BIDDER WHO IS NOT REPRESENTED AT SUCH
CONFERENCE,
Bfd and contract bonding are required.
The mandatory JSEB Participation Goal established for this project is 0%.


Loulsraranjo
Director of Procurement Services
Jackisonoille Port Authority
REIJ.'l IFOR IFIJPOSAL,-
PROPOSAL. NUMBER
10-03
ON-DEMAND TAXI ANI) SlHUTrLE SERVICES
FORTH
JACKSONVILLE PORT AUTHORITY
Proposals will be received by the Jickonville Portn Auhoriiy (JAXPOR'T) until 2:00 p m. klocal lime m
January 21, 2010. at which time prnipoils will be opened in the First Floor Conf-rence Room,. 2831
Talleyrand Acnmie, Jacksonvdile, Flonda 32206.
All Pmrposals must be subinitcd in accordance with Specmiication Number 10-03. which may be obtained
on January 8. 20111 lom our wcbsitc. iltpi/vww.axport.conm/about/prmjects.cim.
Jacksonville Port Authority
Procurement and Contract Serices
P. 0. Box 3005
Jaconel ville. Florid. 32206


USE THE BIG REACH TO INCREASE
YOUR CUSTOMER BASE
ADVERTISE IN THE FLORIDA STAR

ADVERTISE IN THE GEORGIA STAR

904-766-8834


1 4 ~i ~ I


I HOU~S IN


HOME TO SHARE

Near 48th and Pearl

Neat, Employed Male


Call: 924.0662


DISH Network $19.99/mo

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Ci 100+ Channels,
SI rWO FREE 4-Room Install, FREE HD-DVR
Plus $600 Sign-up BONUS!

V c,1-877-473-5033

Place your new or growing busi- Vii A
ness on the path to success.
Advertise in the area's oldest, largest and
most read Black-owned media. Call. We
work with and for you. 904-766-8834


PAGE R-7


ROOMS FOR RENT
Cable TV. $100 -
$125
+ deposit.
904-355-8917

U72rU0 (0


Change Your Life.
Your Future.
You have the power to
change your future. And
you can do it right here at
Florida State College at
Jacksonvile. To learn
about employment opportu-
nities that are available
please visit our website at
Jobs.FSCJ.edu.
FARM WORKERS
NEEDED
Tom Meeks of Alma, GA
is hiring 12 temporary
Farm Workers needed 1-
24-10 through 8-01-10.
Duties include: raking,
gathering & bailing pine
straw & harvesting blue-
berries. Wage is $725/hr.
work week or the prevail-
ing wage rates.
Minimum guarantee 3/4
of total hours offered.
Furnished work tools,
supplies and equipment.
Free housing provided for
worker's convenience if
needed. Transportation
and subsistence upon
completion of 50% of
work contract.
Interested workers
should apply for this job
at the nearest Georgia
Dept. of Labor Office
with a copy of this Ad.
Refer Job Order
#GA7814802.

Youth Development
Specialist: Duval
County
The Youth Development
Specialist position is
responsible for providing
social services and assis-
tance to improve the func-
tioning of children and their
families. The specialist is
responsible for maximizing
the family well-being and
the academic functioning of
children in schools by
addressing such problems
as teenage pregnancy, mis-
behavior, and truancy.
Applicant must possess a
college degree in Sociology
or Psychology, or related
fields with a minimum of 2
yrs. experience in Social
Service or a combination of
education and experience.
Must have computer skills
and knowledge of various
types of software.
Apps/Resumes may be
mailed or faxed to NFCAA
Attn: HR Dept., P.O. Box
52025, Jacksonville, FL
32201 or fax: (904) 398-
7480. Phone: (904) 398-
7472 ext. 206.


CUSTOM DESIGNED & INSTALLED
SCREEN ROOMS
GLASS AND VINYL ENCLOSURES
ALUMINUM AWNINGS
PATIO COVERS
CARPORTS AND CANOPIES
#SCC 055764
Web site:
generalmetalsandplastics.com
email:
generalmetalsandplastics
@comcast.net







THOMAS PLUMBING
REPAIRS
Low Rates.
764-9852

HANDYMAN
*Minor Home Repairs
*Painting interior/exterior
*Pressure Washing
*'Exp. & Reasonable Rates
Call: 904.768.7671




Hundreo Lss Than Plastic Coverups

$1119501


Muast present couponn. jCkw nmi
nxin 1.976




WHEN YOU NEED
HEALTH CARE HELP
WITH LOVE ONES.
FOR LOW COST CARE.
WILL ACCEPT
MEDICARE PAYMENTS-
26 YEARS IN NURSING
CARE. Lic. Additional
Info Available.
Call: 401-1982 E.A.M. CO

Deadline for Ads:
Reserve Space:
Monday @ 5 p.m.
Camera Ready Copy:
Tuesday @ 5 p.m.

Call: (904) 766-8834
ad@thefloridastar.com
www.thefloridastar.com


FOR SALE
HYLINE 1998 Trailer
38ft w/ 2 Slides. $8,500

METAL CARPORT
20 X 31 Ft., $1,500.
Both located in Yulee.
1-770-542-9001


I












PAGE -8 TE STA JANARY16-201


RIBAULT RIVER HOME


S .. 11 pnd ith nearly new appliances. Floing- both tile and
S...
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23etty Asque1 RDavisBGRIULT SCENIC DRIVE

$175,000

L and.. l. ill President's Aw aith nearly new appliances. Flooring- both tile and
:,rp:iric Foi,rri.I Li< jrr.J DR Breakfast Nook & Breakfast Bar, Pantry. Fireplace
. n ,ii l', F'n i ,. ,..,:10111 .. rd,.,'A treatments, high ceilings, split bedrooms. Fenced







SE W O. : 7 u 1.11 1 Watson Realty Corp.


.. I j ur house Is cu ently listed this is noto ended as a sojldation An Equal Housing
S ortuity BGRI, oke
S*. a 0 2009 PTosp-t-PLtUS'


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THE STAR


JANUARY16,2010


PAGE B-8