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Florida star

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Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla
Creation Date:
November 21, 2009
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00947

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Florida star
Uniform Title:
Florida star (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Alternate Title:
Florida star news
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Florida Star Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville, Fla
Creation Date:
November 21, 2009
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 12, no. 13 i.e. 39 (Jan. 6, 1962)-
General Note:
"Florida's statewide black weekly."
General Note:
Publisher: Eric O. Simpson, Feb. 14, 1981-

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02261130
lccn - sn 83045218
issn - 0740-798X
System ID:
UF00028362:00947

Related Items

Preceded by:
Florida star and news

Full Text






aSta
S 6a R d, I a
PERMITNO. 317 M
Blessed and 'T iofi


Winning
Publication,
serving you
since 1951.
Rated "A" by
the Better
Business Bureau


TIHE


SFLORIDA-


www.thefloridastar.com


.


IeaU I Ine niriuo
and Georgia Star
Newspapers.
Listen to IMPACT
Radio Talk Show.
WWW.thefloridastar.com
Still the people's
choice, striving to
make a difference.


S2 N E R ,0O 5N 30 N


Two Charged in Sunday's

Shooting Death

It happened Sunday n
on Red Robin Drive on
Westside.
Neighbors heard guns]
at an abandoned house
found Jervey Ar
Crocker, 21, dead in
front yard. But the nej
borhood did not allow
Christopher Holmes, 21 and Kevin Rushing, incident to go without 1
22, charged with the murder of former prison ing help to the police
inmate.
was able to identify
vehicle that had left the area. The suspects had bound the legs and a
of the victim and had placed duct tape on his mouth. The three
known each other as inmates in a prison.
When the officers spotted the red Cadillac Monday that had b
described by witness, they pursued it and was able to apprehend Ke
Rushing but Christopher ran through a cemetery and got away.
turned himself in Tuesday.
The gun used in the shooting as well as duct tape and some of Jerve
items were found in the vehicle that had been driven by Holmes
Rushing. Both have been charged with the murder.
Body of Missing Five Year did Was Found

.E.





if Antoinette Nicole Davis, mother, Mario
Andrette McNeil, last seen with Shaniya.
Antoinette Nicole Davis reported
__, & daughter, Shaniya Davis, 5, mission
Shaniya Davis, 5 Tuesday from a mobile home coipml
in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Shan
father, Bradley Lockhard had been raising his daughter but last mi
decided to let her stay with her mother now that she had a job.
Shortly after she reported her daughter missing someone spotted
child at a motel with Mario Andrette McNeil. At that point, the mc
was arrested and charged with child abuse involving prostitution an
filing a false police report.
Body Continued on AG
International Women's Group Visits


Jacksonville Seeking

. y


Advice


Precious in Jacksonville Friday Oprah is

With Red Carpet Premier I Leaving


*Gabourey Sidie is getting rave
reviews for her first movie role
as Precious Jones, an over-
weight, undereducated, 16-year
old in the Oprah Winfrey and
Tyler movie, "Precious."
n- Gabby has Jacksonville ties.
Her aunt is Dorothy Hughes,
owner of Gateway Bookstore.
Dorothy in another of her many
efforts to help, is sponsoring the
premier red carpet occasion for
,the movie Friday in Jacksonville
to help students at Raines and
Ribault get mentors See A-7
Gabourey'Sidie as Preciouss See A-7

Publix Again in the Top 10

of Best Places to Work
With unemployment
o'' e. over 10%, Florida's
S .. based Publix, is known as
Nw one of the best places to

Magazine.
According to Fortune,
Publix has never had a
layoff and it provides
good pay and benefits for its workers. Instead of laying off workers,
the 81-year-old company uses the method of not replacing employees
when others leave.unless absolutely necessary. Publix experienced
an increase in income during the first nine months of 2009 and they


have no debt. Publix' stock is not publicly traded.

Sher IRS is Looking to Return
g on
nity $123.6 Million in Refunds
iya's
month, The Internal Revenue Service is looking for tax-
payers who are due to receive a combined $123.5
d the million in the form of 107,831 refund checks that
other were returned to the IRS by the U. S. Postal Service
d for due to mailing address errors.
All a taxpayer has to do is update his or her address
7 once. The IRS will then send out all checks due.
Taxpayers checking on a refund over the phone will
be given instructions on how to update their
addresses.
You may call 1-800-829-1954 for information.

President Had Short

Visit with Half Brother


I, k ij'


Andrea Hartley from the International Visitor Corps of Jacksonville,
asked Councilwoman Glorious Johnson to speak to a delegation of
female political leaders from Northeast Africa who are visiting
Jacksonville. Some of the women came from Jordan, Sudan, Yemen,
Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, and Casablanca. On Monday, November
9th, Councilwoman Johnson spoke with the ladies, discussing women's
access in politics, education, and community economic development,
transparency, ethics and the Sunshine Laws as they pertain to city gov-
ernment. The women were so impressed with Councilwoman Johnson's
energy, candor, enthusiasm and her knowledge of the political issues,
until they invited her to come to their country and speak at their univer-
sities and to the government leaders.


President Obama and his half brother Mark Ndesandjo
While in China this week, President Obama had a
brief meeting with his brother who lives in China.
The brother, Mark Ndesandjo, recently wrote a
semi-autobiographical novel about their abusive
Kenyan father.
The president said he met his brother for the first
time a couple of years ago.
Mr. Obama said any one who has read his book,
'Dreams from My Father,' knows that his father had
some problems. Barack Obama Sr. abandoned the
president when he was a young child. He said he
does not spend time brooding over it.


After 25 years as the
Number One Daytime
talk show host, achieving
the title as the richest
African American in the
United States, Oprah
Winfrey has decided to
leave her daily talk show.
She has many other ven-
tures but had not say at
the time of this writing
what she will do after
leaving the task of host-
ing a television show five
days a week.
It has been stated by
Harpo Productions that
she will end her show in
2011.
The Chicago billionaire
has been very active dur-
ing her career, helping
people and communities.
The Oprah Winfrey
Show is out of Chicago.


National Recording
Artist in South Georgia
National
Recording
Artist, Rev.
Luther
Barnes of
Ro c ky
Mount,

Carolina led
a citywide
. Rev. Luther Barnes revival at the
Word of
Faith Freewill Baptist Church located at
3409 Gordan Street in Brunswick the
week of November 18-20.
Bishop Vincent Williams, host pastor
said that Rev. Barnes provided a message,
"It's Like Fire, Shut up In My Bones" and
led many souls to Christ through his mes-
sage and his music.
Rev. Barnes said that the rumors that
preachers don't have saved children, is
truly a rumor. He is the son of a bishop
and has been serving all of his life.
Pastor Williams agreed as he has served
as a pastor for twelve to fourteen years.
Some of Rev. Barnes most listened to
songs are: They said I Would Not Make
It, I'm So Satisfied and It's Your Time.

Florida Department of Children and
Families said that there is a record
number of people in the
Jacksonville area now on food
stamps. The number is now one
out of every four children, up 23
percent from last year.


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Church .... I .... ...... A-3
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Stati-National ....
S Entertalnm6nt ............... A-6
Prop F;Wp ........... ..... ..B-5 & 6-
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I1 L L, 0 /ltNR


PAGE A-2


-CLARA JACKSON McLAUGHLIN
PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
LONZIE LEATH, MANAGING
DENNIS WADE
SALES & MARKETING
MAY FORD, LAYOUT EDITOR
SPECIAL SECTIONS
CHERYL COWARD
DESIGN AND WEB SITE EDITOR
BETTY DAVIS
LIFESTYLE/ SOCIETY COLUMNIST


TEL: (904) 766-8834
FAX: (904) 765-1673
infoq@thefloridastar.com
(912) 264-6700 Georgia
Serving St. Johns, Clay, Duval, Nassau,
Alachua, Flagler, Marion, Mclntosh,
Camden And Glynn County
TheFloridaStar.com
The Florida Star Newspaper is an
independent newspaper published
weekly in Jacksonville, Florida
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
*One Year-$35.00
Half Year-$20.00
Send check or money order
with subscription amount to:
The Florida Star,
P.O. Box 40629,
Jacksonville, Florida 32203
The Florida Star will not be responsiblefor
the return of any solicited
or unsolicited manuscripts or photos.
Opinions expressed by columnists in this
newspaper do not necessarily represent the
policy of this paper
MEMBERSHIPS:
Florida Press Association
National Newspaper Association
National Newspaper
Publishers Association
Amalgamated Publisher, Inc.
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
First Coast African American
Chamber of Commerce


MIKE BONTS, SPORTS EDITOR
DAVID MILLER
SALES & MARKETING

DANIEL EVANS, SALES EXECUTIVE
LIZ BILLINGSLEA
OFFICE/ACCOUNTS MANAGER

TIA AYELE, SPECIAL SECTIONS

DISTRIBUTION
JAMES GREEN


SAAPA

SOUTHEASTERN
AFRICAN AMERICAN
PUBLISHER'S ASSOCIATION




National Newspaper
Publishers Association


VERIFICATION
C0U NlllI Ll


Political leaders need to sig-
nal a "Code Blue" as we face
poverty and its side effects.
If America improves the
economy, crime will become
more manageable for law
enforcement. By leaving the
economy in the gutter, it
does not matter how many
drug dealers you take out,
more will take their places.

Poverty is the boogieman
that politicians and 'other
mainstream leaders avoid
having to address, further
concealing the real issues
such as terrible schools,
crime, drug abuse and
healthcare. Poverty is grow-
ing across the United States.
Many communities are
affected. Yet a number of
studies suggest that African
Americans' in general have
been hit harder than others
have.

Grassroots community lead-
ers are seeing poverty and
the recession pulling its
communities backwards and
with this a rising crime rate
directly related to the deteri-
orating economy.

I often visit communities of
run-down homes, apartment
buildings and ugly neigh-
borhoods, often less than a
square mile from downtown
government buildings and


beautiful landscapes. Over
the last several months I
have visited impoverished
communities and churches
throughout the 1-95 corridor,
from Florida to Delaware,
often feeling as if I might be
in a third world country.
Locals have taken time to
discuss social and economic
concerns of their neighbor-
hoods and communities, but
the horrific stories told
about their conditions and
their long struggles to shake
these daily atrocities are
mind-boggling.

Some suggested that local
leaders had forgotten or did
not care about the poor and
disenfranchised, while oth-
ers indicate gangs, drugs,
violence, poor education and
unemployment as being the
root causes of their contin-
ued struggles. Many agree
that.the violence and most of
the crime is directly related
to drugs and poverty.

Young and old alike suggest
that they fear political and
law enforcement leaders
with their interests in filling
prisons and jails and their
lack of concern for educa-
tion, employment and social
ills. Many states have bud-
geted billions each year for
Department of Corrections,
therefore, it is easy to see


Desperation and Poverty


TH E FLOI DA STA


why there is such distrust
between citizens, political
leaders and law enforce-
ment. While some political
leaders have no problem
slashing school accounts,
and proposing more funding
for prisons and corrections,
many of our communities
continue its social demise.

Sadly, I have spoken to
many young veterans who
are facing extreme poverty
and/or have served time in
prison. The veterans that
served in 1980's or later,
were among the most likely
to be poor, on drugs or
homeless; however, being
mindful of our current
national status, we know
that this situation will
become dreadfully worst.

The Side Effects of Poverty:

Poverty caused by whatever
source, causes a lot of other
side effects and other prob-
lems, which can stay within
the area or community long
after the economic and
financial problems, are
solved. Firstly and most
dangerously, high levels of
poverty will always increase
crime by a massive amount,
as desperate people will turn
to crime just to feed them-
selves and support their
families.

Over time, this will develop
into gang cultures, massive
and widespread drug prob-
lems, violence between war-
ring factions to control areas


tha o ohe rdi




stations!~)C[~



Check ou


WJJ FIV 0-3 othFoid ouhmGeri

WFJO FM 92.5 Folkston, Georgia & Jacksonvill


The Other Side of Jacksonville
The Florida Star has been asked by some Jacksonville citizens to allow some
views to be presented weekly. We have agreed to do so with the understanding
that the articles written would not promote violence or hate. Let it be known that
the views and opinions expressed are not those of The Florida Star owner or
staff It is being accepted because some writers and readers feel their feelings
and fears are not being heard.
IT IS TIME FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT TO BE PUT IN CHECK

No doubt everyone should be concerned with the safety of the community of
Jacksonville and adjacent counties. It is good and important that at Police Officer
returns home to his family after having to deal with the criminals on the streets. It
is even good that crime is down in Jacksonville by 11 percent. It is good that vio-
lent offenders are in jail where they belong. But, it is not good that citizens of the
4th Judicial District that includes Jacksonville, Duval and adjacent counties are
not treated equally with justice. The Sheriff Offices and 4th Judicial District
arrest, beat, profile, convict and sentence unequally by race. They allow the
Sheriff Office of Jacksonville and the internal affairs office to routinely brutalize,
harass, intimidate, tazer and kill innocent citizens. Why? They allow the internal
affairs office to accept Police Officer statements even if they are lies. Why? There
is a bond in the fraternal order of police and among police officers that says "us
against them." Why? The Sheriff Offices of Duval and adjacent counties are no
longer community police officers; they are more Para-military in training, actions
and mentality. Is there a bright side to all of this? Did anyone get 50 million for
community police efforts in Jacksonville? Maybe, they will start rendering serv-
ice and equal justice to all citizens in NE Florida under the 4th Judicial District.
Wait, the crime rate is down by 11% in Jacksonville, but the arrest rate is off the
chain the shooting of citizens has elevated. Why? They use American of African
descent mostly and other citizens to justify there search and destroy missions.
Wait, click, did you say search and destroy? Jerome Miller said it in his book
Search and Destroy about Jacksonville as having one to the worst judicial system
in America and I guest everyone is happy. Has anyone heard your City Council
or State Representative say anything about all of this yet? It is time for a differ-
ent and positive change in Jacksonville. No, we do not want crime and fear to run
through our neighborhoods and at the same time, it is time to demand your rights,
and seek justice for all. We got a new Courthouse, but do we get equal justice.
They want a new jail, but will be get equal justice? We got a new Distiict
Attorney, but are we. getting equal justice? Click, I wonder why the public defend-
ers are telling those who they are suppose to defend to plea bargain, you are guilty.
This is not always the case.. It is better to seek a fair trail then to plea your life
away through fear. It is time for the 4th Judicial District, Sheriff Offices, and
Internal Affairs in Jacksonville specifically to be put in check. How? A citizen
review board, Governors Intervention, direct action,. Justice Department
Investigation and a consent decree.


tor crime and drug sales, and
violence against average cit-
izens as well. Overall pover-
ty is a kind of black hole that
will ultimately turn an entire
community into blight.
These conditions can be
very hard to reverse, as peo-
ple begin to choose the life
of gang member or criminal,
even when the area is regen-
erated and more jobs
become available.

In light of this crisis, our
nation' must "act together"
now, or risk continued
cycles of poverty, and
despair. In the midst of a
-global recession and ongo-
ing inflation in the prices of
food, gas, housing, educa-
tion, and incarceration,
things can deteriorate fright-
eningly fast. I am urging our
leaders on all levels to look
beyond short-term measures
and agree on a set of policy
decisions that would revital-
ize and re-enfranchise the
poor and promote social and
economic change for all.


"At no time do we condone
wrongness on either side of
the wall"


Investigative Reporter: Lonzie Leath
Reporters/Photographers: Marsha Phelts, Carl Davis, Laurence Green, F.
M. Powell, Michael Phelts, Richard McLaughlin, Andrea Franklin,
Delores Mainor Woods, Joseph Lorentzon, Scott Jurrens
Columnists: Ulysses Watkins, Jr., M.D., Ester Davis, Lucius Gantt,
Deanna, Cynthia Ferrell
Distribution and Sales: Dan Randolph, Pat Randolph, Abeye Ayele, Cassie
Williams, Angela Beans


Founded In April 1951 By Eric O. Simpson
First African American Inducted Into
The Florida Press Hall Of Fame


Richard P. Burton,
Director

P.O. BOX 440248
Jacksonville, FL 32244
Bus: 904-786-7883
Cell: 610-349-3358
E-mail:
richbrenfl@msn.com


I


NOVEMBER 21, 2009


THE STAR
















Faith. In Our Community

Schedule ofEvents and Services

EPIPHANY BAPTIST CHURCH 13TH ANNUAL
THANKSGIVING FEAST, Saturday, November 21,
2009 at 663 South McDuff Ave. from 12 Noon to 3:00
p.m. Clothes will be given away. For more details, call
384-8129. Free
BETHSAIDA TEMPLE MINISTRIES, 1544 West
22nd St., with Pastor Wayne L. Wilson, Sr. will have their
Annual Thanksgiving Service, Sunday, November 22,
2009 at 11:30 a.m., followed by dinner cooked by Florida
and Georgia's BEST Cooks. The Master Chef (Pastor
Wayne L. Wilson, Sr.) will Feed the Soul with a WORD
from on HIGH. Then, there will be Food for the Body.
Transportation provided. Please call 904-314-3804 a day
in advance.
GREATER MASEDONIA BAPTIST CHURCH locat-
ed at 1880 West Edgewood Avenue, with Pastor, Dr.
Landon L. Williams, Sr. is having their Thanksgiving Day
Worship, Thursday, November 26, 2009 at 10:00 a.m.
Free and everyone is invited to attend. For more informa-
tion, call (904) 764-9257.
GREATER LOVE PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS
CHURCH, located at 1434 Oakhurst Avenue, corerr of
Oakhurst and Tallahassee St.), is having "A Day of Prayer
for All Illnesses and a FREE Fish Dinner," Saturday,
November 21, 2009 at 9:00 a.m.
WEST ST.MARK MISSIONARY BAPTIST
CHURCH, located at 1435 West State Street is having a
Winter Concert given by Bro. Willie Nathan, Jr. Sunday,
November 28, 2009 at 4:00 p.m.
12 TRIBES OF ISRAEL coming to NEW FOUNTAIN
CHAPEL AME CHURCH, located at 737 Jessie St.
November 29, 2009 at 3:00 p.m. Rev. Louis Kirkland,
Pastor; Sister Joyce Jackson, Chairperson. Call (904) 358-
2258 for more information.
A JOINT THANKSGIVING SERVICE will be held
with Summerville Baptist Church, Mt. Lilla Baptist
Church, and Silas Baptist Church. This grand occasion
of praise and worship will be held at SILAS BAPTIST
CHURCH, located at 3000 Buckman Street, Thursday,
November 26, at 10:00 a.m.
I CAN REMEMBER WHEN
LIFE WAS SIMPLER
I can remember when age sixty was old. My mom
died when she was sixty. Her father died when he was
sixty. Having just turned sixty this summer, well... you
start to think about those things.
Old is a relevant thing. My St. Cloud, Florida friend
and neighbor, Charlie Barcib s 105 years old, and he is
just as sharp as guys a third his age.
We can thank medical science for extending life
expectancy. The pace of change is so great today. can
remember when it took five minutes for a television to
warm up. I can remember when everybody had a huge
antenna on top of their houses.
I can remember when nobody owned a pure bred
dog. I can remember when kids not only worked but
they were expected to. Now we have child labor laws. I
can remember when they threatened to keep a kid back
if he failed in school- and then did.
I can remember when no one had air conditioning in
their home, only attic fans. And speaking of air, I can
remember when it was free at the local gas station and
the attendant not only pumped the gas for you, but he
also checked your tires and under the hood.
And they also gave you green stamps when you bought
gas.
I can remember when there was only AM-radio and
nobody had a facemask on a football helmet. I can
remember when toothpaste was in metal tubes. I can
remember when Cracker Jacks had a very good prize in
the box. I can remember when only dead Presidents had
sideburns. I can remember when ole Doc Liverman
came to our home to check on me for Chicken Pox ten
minutes after my mom called him.
I can rememberplaying tag or hide-and-go-seek on a
summer evening. r can remember catching lightening
bugs in a jar and how we pinched off the glowing end
andput it on your finger like a ring.
I can remember when you always hung your clothes
on a line to dry. I can remember roller skates with keys,
coonskin caps, hula hoops, 45 records, cherry cokes,
penny loafers, drive-in movies, playing jacks and
monopoly and penny candy.
I can remember when Pepsi hit the spot and 12 full
ounces was a lot. I can remember when a double-dip
was only a dime and when there were things that cost a
nickel at the 5 & 10 Cents Store. I remember when Roy
Rogers was my hero, and we could get into a Saturday
morning movie in my home town of Lexington, SC for
only a nickel.
I can remember when we drank water from a pump,
and a joint was a bad place. I can remember when teach-
ers used switches and.nobody dared talk back or you
would get a whipping at school and another when you go
home.
I can remember when my banker actually knew my
name and I did not have to provide ID. I can remember
when men would stand when a lady entered the room. I
can remember when Japan made junk and the US made
quality; now the roles seem to have reversed.
I can remember when the Dodgers were in Brooklyn,
and we got to see the Yankees play every weekend on
television. I can remember when the good guys won. I
even remember when it was okay to give candy to chil-
dren, and it did not have to be Halloween.
I can remember when I knew the lyrics to every song
on the radio. I can remember when black and white tel-
evision was the only television and you were lucky if
you picked up two channels. I remember sitting on the
front porch and counting cars and betting on the
over/under. I remember the milk man delivering choco-
late milk to our house from the local dairy.
I remember bedtime, climbing trees, a zillion mos-
quito bites and sticky fingers. I remember threatening to
run away from home and making it to my grandparent's
house (right next door).
I remember playing cops and robbers, cowboys and
Indians, pillow fights and being tickled to death. I
remember laughing so hard your stomach hurt.
I can remember all these things and so many more.
Life was nice during simpler times.


THE FIRST A.M.E.
CHURCH OF PALM
COAST "The Church
Where the Spirit Flows"-
The WOMEN'S MIS-
SIONARY SOCIETY is
again sponsoring a clothing
drive Saturday, November
28, 2009 from 10:00 a.m. to
2:00 p.m. at the Education
Building on 91 N. Old
Kings Rd., Palm Coast, FL.
The Thanksgiving
Sharing clothing drive
will offer: Free
Transportation, Soup and
Franks while you look at
Clothes, Food to take
home, Clothing for
Women, Men, Children,
some Household items will
be available. All are FREE.
Limelight Theatre
KidzfACTory and A
Classic Theatre (ACT)
present "A Holiday Gift
to St. Augustine" -
Limelight Theatre
Kidzfactory will perform
"Do you See What I See"
on December 4th, 5th and
6th. You are invited to
enjoy this wacky mini
musical that will have you


TO OBSERVE
59th ANNIVERSARY
'i 11 mI INEW


E r The Church Directory
SRY "Come and Worship With Us"


' I1


BISHOP
EVERLENA DUNN
Bishop Everlena
Dunn, noted religious
Leader and Founder of
Dunn's Temple, will cel-
ebrate the 59th year of
the organization, Sunday
afternoon, at 3:00 p.m.
November 22, 2009 in
the Mary L. singleton
Senior Center 1-50 East
1st Street.
An interesting pro-
gram has been planned
for your employment.
Bishop Larry Boston will
be the Speaker. The
Public is invited.


laughing and singing to
your favorite holiday songs. Enjoy holiday treats at inter-
mission and then comeback for A Classic Theatre's rendi-
tion of A Child's Christmas in Whales. The second half of
the program is presented by A Classic Theatre (ACT) and
is a true holiday rarity.., a reading of A Child's Christmas
in Wales by Dylan Thomas, one of the greats of the
English language poets. This playful stage reading of
Dylan Thomas' renowned lyrical poem will take audience
members of all ages on a journey into the magical world
of a child's imagination. One of the great pleasures of this
work is the musicality of the language that paints delicious
pictures that pop into mind as the prose bubbles along.
Bring the entire family to experience a time of magic,
music and holiday entertainment.Directed by Jean Rahner,
the cast includes Robert Gill, Anne Kraft, Joe Marx, Tom
Rahner, and Anne Wiegand. Showtime is at 7:30pm on
Friday and 2:00pm on Saturday. Sunday will be the
KidzfACTory production only at 2:00pm. There are no set
ticket prices for this Christmas production. Donations
appreciated.
Listings are due the Tuesday before the next issue. Email sub-
missions preferred. Send to: info@thefloridastar.com

K. ANTHONY ADKINS
Pastor Lecturer Public Relations
Political Consultant
113 Village Creek Way
St. Simon Island, GA 31522
912-222-9655 Cell 912-634-5895 Home
www.KAADKINS.com
PastorKenneth47@yahoo.com


BELL, Keith J., diea
November 11, 2009.
BROWN, Hanson, died
November 16, 2009.
CURRY, Susie May,
died November 11, 2009.
DANIELS, Mary, died
November 12, 2009.
DAVIS, Mary, 85, died
November 15, 2009.
FOOTMAN, Virginia,
died November 9, 2009.
GAITHERS, Sarah J.,
died November 11, 2009.
GOLPHIN, Beatrice,
died November 12, 2009.
JOHNSON, Master
Jadyn R., died November
10, 2009.
JOHNSON, Leonard,
Sr., 75, died November


13, 2UUY. Alphonso West
Mortuary, Inc.
LEE, Jerry, died
November 14, 2009.
MALCOLM, Ms. Violet
E., 91, died November 2,
2009.
NEALY, Ms. Lisa, died
November 11, 2009.
OLIVER, Mrs. Ojetta,
died November 12, 2009.
PALMER, Mr. Richard,
93, died November 12,
2009.
SHEPPARD, Ms.
Winifred, 63, died
November 16, 2009.
SIMS, John M., died
November 12, 2009.
TRAYLOR, Peter, died
November 11, 2009.


New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church
1824 Prospect Street Jacksonville, FL 32208
Sunday School .....................................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning ,
Intercessory Prayer.................... 10:45 a.m. '
Morning Worship ......................11:00 a.m.
Youth Church
2nd & 3rd Sundays (Old Sanctuary)
Tuesday Pastoral Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m.
Bishop Eric Lee, Pastor
Rev. Joe Calhoun, Pastor Emeritus..
(904) 764-5727 Church

Historic Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
Sunday
Worship Service ................... ................ 10:00 a.m.
Church School .................................... 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday
"Glory Hour" Bible Study .......................... 10:00 a.m.
"Jehovah Jirah" Bible Study .... .................... 6:30 p.m.
2nd & 4th Thursday "Young at Heart Ministry .......... 10:00 a.m.
Friday
Joy Explosion Ministry .............................. 6:30 p.m.
201 East Beaver St. (904) 355-9475
Rev. F.D. Richardson Jr., Pastor

GREATER EL-BETHEL DIVINE HOLINESS CHURCH
"The Church Where Everybody Is Somebody"
Bishop Lorenzo Hall., Pastor
Street Address: 723 W. 4th St. Jacksonville, Florida 32209
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 3575, Jacksonville, Florida 32206
Church Telephone: (904) 359-0661 Home: (904) 358-8932 Cell: 710-1586
Sunday School........................................ .................... ..... 9:30 a.m .
M morning W orship.................................... ........................1.1:00 a.m.
Tuesday.......................:.....................Prayer Meeting & Bible Study,7:00 p.m.
Thursday......................... .................................. Joy Night,7:00 p.m.
"Email: Gospell75@aol.com
Website: Greaterelbethel.org


PENTECOSTAL CHURCH of GOD
"Jesus Loves Sinners Church Folk Don't"
Elder Joseph Rice

Sunday School ----------------------------------- 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ----------- 12:00 Noon & 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study ----------- ----Tuesday & Friday------ 7:00 p.m.

(912) 267-6395 (912) 996-4864 Cell
2705 MLK Blvd., Brunswick, GA 31520

Paynes ChapelA.M.E. Church
1, 2200 Albany Street, PO Box:.70PBrunsw ick. GA 31520
S(912).16.' .
S e'"er Richard Hii 6on, Plsor ,.
a ,Worship Oppo i-.... ,
Sunday Church School
"A Life Changing pen ce" ..... 9:15 -10:55 a.n '.
hiung Wor p'Servd ic.. .. . .. p11:00-
l i Chdrc! at Study (Weekly Bible Studv) y .
Monday Nights................... .':0t0 830 p.m.
Join L's as li Study the. ford of God and Enrich Our Souls!


Subscribe to

The Florida Stari

It has All of The
News You C. Use"


(904) 766-8834




Tune In To











Clara McLaughlin Yvonne Brooks
Host Co-Host



IMPACT

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from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.



WCGL*AM 1360

The Florida Star and Impact
Striving To Make A Difference!


I I








Af -4 A-N E1


Who knew? Getting everything together for a
turkey dinner doesn't have to be so complicated.
Use the recipes we've provided, along with this
sequence, to streamline your holiday dinner.
Log on to publix.com for more recipes and ideas.


For an 8-12 Ib turkey (6-8 servings), preheat oven,
prepare turkey following our recipe (or package
instructions); and begin to roast about 3 1/2 hours
before you would like to serve.


About 45 minutes before your turkey is done roasting,
prepare green beans, mashed potatoes, or other
family-favorite side dishes. Prepare Apple Sage
Dressing (recipe included) for baking.


ENJOY SAVINGS O'N THE FINEST INGREDIENTS:

FOR YOLRO THANKSGIVING MEAL.





.ub. 691




Publix Young Turkey
We have a wide variety of sizes of young,
broad-breasted, USDA-Inspected, Grade A
S. frozen turkeys so you can choose the
one perfect for your gathering.
8-lbs and up Limit five.
SAVE UP TO .60 LB
(More Than 5 Publix Turkeys ... Ib .99)








I









PUBLIC WILL BE CLOSED THANKSGIVING DAY, NOVEMBER 26
We're taking the day off so our associates can spend time with their families and loved ones.
We will be open regular store hours on Wednesday, November 25 and Friday, November 27.


Publix Baby F
Cut and Peeled Carrots.... Fiee
California-Grown, High in Vitamin A, 1 to 3-lb bag
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 1.79


Publix 1
Sweet Cream Butter .. .....I
Salted or Unsalted,
Four Quarters, 16-oz box
SAVE UP TO 1.09


Potato Rolls, 149
12-C ount....................................... ........ L i-
Baked Fresh Daily, Soft Tasty Rolls, From the Publix Bakery,
15-oz pkg.
SAVE UP TO .50


iit~


Jimmy Dean K n00
Sausage.. ................. .rR)5--
Assorted Varieties, 9.6 to 16-oz pkg.
SAVE UP TO .98 ON 2


Pepperidge Farm A O0
S tu tffi n g ...................................................
Assorted Varieties, 12 or 14-oz bag
SAVE UP TO 1.38 ON 2


,,1


Swanson
B roth ... ..............................5 9
Assorted Varieties, 14-oz can
SAVE UP TO .50


CARVING THE TURKEY
IS EASY WITH THESE
EXPERT TIPS.
See the complete video of how to prepare and carve
your turkey-even make gravy!-at publix.com


-S..

Ir


When your turkey is done,
remove it from the oven, cover with foil,
and let it sit for 15-20 minutes before
placing on a clean cutting surface.


Separate the drumsticks from the
thighs by holding the tip of each
drumstick and cutting through the
joint where it meets the thighbone.


--To-------
Hold each drumstick by the tip,
resting the larger ends on the cutting board.
Slice parallel to the bones until
all meat is sliced.


.-P


NOVEMBER 21, 2009


THE STA R


PDAG A4


~cr~ ~e









NOVEMBER..... 21.2T S


Remove your turkey from the oven when your
meat thermometer-inserted into the thickest part
of inner thigh and breast (not touching bone)-
reaches 1650F. After you've removed your turkey,
let it stand 15-20 minutes before carving.


Increase oven temperature to 450OF and
bake dressing. Put the final touches on your
side dishes and carve the turkey.


Remove dressing from oven and use the residual
heat in the oven to warm rolls for dinner
and pie for dessert. Serve.


WE CAN HELP MAKE THANKSGIVING DINNER EASIER.

AND MAKE SURE IT TASTES JUST AS DELICIOUS AS IT SHOULD.


ONE-PAN TURKEY, VEGETABLES, AND GRAVY
Prep and Cook: 3 1/2 hours
(Makes 8 servings)


3 medium parsnips (rinsed)
5 medium carrots (rinsed)
4 celery ribs (rinsed)
2 large onions (rinsed)
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
4 oz unsalted butter (1 stick)
1/2 cup flour
2 (14-oz) cans reduced-sodium
chicken broth
1 (12-lb) turkey (thawed, following
package instructions)
1 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1/2 teaspoon pepper
aluminum foil

VFcS


1. Preheat oven to 325"F. Peel parsnips and carrots. Cut parsnips, carrots, and celery into
1-inch-long pieces. Remove ends and peel skin from onions; cut both into quarters.
Place vegetables, bay leaves, and 1/2 teaspoon of the salt into turkey roasting pan.
2. Place butter in microwave-safe bowl; cover and microwave on HIGH 30 seconds or
until melted. Whisk in flour and 1 can of the chicken broth until blended. Pour into pan
over vegetables. Place wire roasting rack in pan over vegetables.
3. Remove turkey from packaging (remove giblets and neck for another use).
Sprinkle turkey evenly with poultry seasoning, pepper, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt.
Place on roasting rack, breast side up; (wash hands). Roast turkey about 2 hours.
4. When turkey is golden brown, cover loosely with foil. Roast 1 more hour or just until
internal temperature reaches 165F. Use a meat thermometer to accurately ensure done-
ness. (Ovens and size of turkeys vary; adjust time, as much as 30 minutes, as needed.
Refer to packaging to determine time for larger turkey.) Transfer turkey to carving board;
let stand 15-20 minutes before carving. Transfer vegetables to serving dish; remove and
discard bay leaves (cover to keep warm).
5. Thin the reserved gravy in the roasting pan, if needed, by heating the remaining
chicken broth (up to 1 can) in microwave or on stovetop. Gradually whisk heated broth
into gravy until desired consistency. Transfer gravy to serving dish. Carve turkey and serve.


APPLE SAGE DRESSING
Prep and Cook: 40 minutes
(Makes 8 servings)
1-lb ground pork sausage with sage
8-oz trinity mix (fresh diced onions, peppers, celery)
1/2 cup dried berry medley (berries and raisins)
1 large Granny Smith apple (rinsed)
1 tablespoon flour
1 (14-oz) can reduced-sodium chicken broth
1 (6-oz) box or 2 cups cornbread stuffing mix
cooking spray
1. Preheat oven to 450TF. Preheat large saut6 pan on medium-high 2-3
minutes. Crumble sausage into pan (wash hands); stir in trinity mix and
berries. Cook 5-7 minutes, stirring often, until meat is browned and
vegetables are tender. Meanwhile, peel apple; cut into small pieces.
2. Stir flour into sausage mixture; cook 2 minutes, stirring often, until
flour is hot and well blended into mixture.
3. Stir in apple, troth, and stuffing mix. Coat 2-quart baking dish
with cooking spray; add stuffing mixture. Bake 20-25 minutes or
until internal temperature reaches 165F. Use a meat thermometer to
accurately ensure doneness. Let stand 5 minutes before serving.


ENTERTAINING MADE EVEN EASIER
Pick up our free Start Something party-planning guide and create a delicious menu from our Publix Deli,
Publix Bakery, and Seafood platters. Then stop by your neighborhood Publix and place your order.
Our associates will take care of the rest.


$ :i ~6


C e le ry ................................................... .......... 6 9
Tender, Western-Grown, Great for Stuffing, each
SAVE UP TO 1.00


St. Francis
Chardonnay Wine......
750-ml bot. Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 14.99


.*Free


Pumpkin or 2 00
-Sweet Potato Pie .......................
Each Pie Made From Fresh Harvest Pumpkins
or Sweet Potatoes With Just the Right Spices,
From the Publix Bakery, 24-oz size
SAVE UP TO 5.98 ON 2


Granny Smith rr
A p ples............................... ....... 9 9 1b
Excellent for Snacking, Salads, Pies, or for Baking
SAVE UP TO .70 LB


Ocean Spray e
Cranberry Sauce........ .. Free
Jellied, Whole Berry, or Cran-Raspberry, 14-oz can .
luBg Quantity rights reserved. l
SAVE UP TO 1.55


Cool Whip
Whipped Topping......
Assorted Varieties, 8-oz bowl
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 2.07


Make a deep horizontal cut
into the breast meat just
above the wing.


From the outer top edge of each breast,
continue to slice from the top down to the
horizontal cut made during the previous step.
Repeat steps 4-5 on the other side.


Remove wings by cutting
through the joints where the
wing bones and backbone meet.


Prices effective Thursday, November 19
through Wednesday, November 25, 2009.
Only in Only in Orange, Seminole, Brevard,
Flagler, Columbia, Volusia, Marion, Alachua,
Duval, Clay, Nassau, Putnam and St. Johns
Counties in Fla. Quantity rights reserved.


S;/ VSA 9
publix.com/ad


Publix.


E

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. FIree


PAGE A-5


THE STAR


NOVEMBER 212009


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Champagne, Cupcakes & Jazz

Conceptions!



















Cheers! You are invited to ring in the season with the cool
jazz, hot vibes and spirited tunes of the Jazz Conceptions
Orchestra on December 4, 2009 at Theatre Jacksonville, 2032
San Marco Blvd. It doesn't get much better than this ... a compli-
mentary champagne and cupcake reception with the artists at 6
p.m. followed by the fabulous second concert of Lee Brown's pop-
ular Jacksonville Jazz Series presented by Eleven-July Arts and
Entertainment.
"We attended Eleven-July's first Jacksonville Jazz Series
Concert in October, and we loved it," declares jazz enthusiast
Roslynn League. "My husband, Robert, and I were blown away
by the quality of the sound and the caliber of talented musicians
that. performed that night!
Theatre Jacksonville is the perfect intimate venue for a great
evening of good jazz!"
Emceed by Bob Bednar, host of WJCT's This is Jazz, the
first concert in Eleven-July's Jacksonville Jazz Series featured
some of Northeast Florida's hippest musicians including The John
Ricci Quartet, EvenStill, and the Dot Wilder Quartet, all of whom
have a national following and a jazz connection to the University
of North Florida.
The December 4th concert featuring New York based Jazz
Conceptions Orchestra also has a bit of a local flavor, as a few of
the ensemble's musicians met at UNF. Highly regarded as a
gutsy nine-piece ensemble that "takes risks" by playing some
great tunes outside of the typical scope of jazz, The Jazz
Conceptions Orchestra also enjoys honoring the legacy of jazz
through fresh, imaginative arrangements of standards. "It prom-
ises to be a spirited evening of jazz that swings!" says Lee Brown,
who hopes to give Jazz artists and fans an ongoing opportunity to
enjoy the genre, over, above and beyond the annual Jazz
Festival.
"My goal is to keep an eye out for those up-and-coming
jazz musicians, as well as dive into the huge pool of talent we
have here on the First Coast," said Brown, adding that it is his
dream to "awaken the sleeping giant in Jacksonville that is Jazz!"
"Robert and I look forward to the Jazz Festival every year,
and we are thrilled that Lee Brown is following his dream of cre-
ating a series of jazz concerts year-round," said Roslynn League.
"We can't wait for December 4th!"
Artist's reception at 6 p.m. features complimentary cre-
ations by Chefs for a Night and will introduce Eleven-July's
Champagne and Cupcakes! Concert begins at 7 p.m. Tickets:
vibe@elevenjuly.com $20 in advance or $25 at the door. Visit
www.elevenjuly.com for updates on future concerts in the
Jacksonville Jazz Series, or call Lee Brown at 904-483-3837.


NOVEMBER 21, 2009


TFFE STA R


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lVfrlvP1IJRI2 21,n Z1 l0 TI fl 1) 4STRPG A-


Precious Continued from A-1
and other support to help them pass exams to avoid the schools con-
tinuing on the "F" grade path. Ms. Hughes' goal is for students to
develop the theme, 'Learning to Love to Read.'
The Red Carpet movie event will be at the Hollywood River City
14 Theater in Jacksonville. All are invited.
Precious, according to reviews, is a story of pain and triumph and
many feel it is Oscar bound. More than 300 fourth graders are
expected to walk the red carpet Friday. It is hoped that many will
attend to sign up as volunteers to work with our youth and even work
with Ms. Susan Taylor and her mentoring program.

Florida Continued from A-1

The five-year-old was found early Monday afternoon about 100 feet
off a road. The Fayetteville Police would not discuss a cause of death
or the condition of Shaniya's body.
Shaniya's mother has been charged with human trafficking and
felony child abuse since it is believed that she had offered the five
year old for prostitution.
The mother requested a court appointed attorney and did not enter a
plea. Mario McNeill, 29, was charged with kidnapping and his attor-
ney said he will plead not guilty.


It's in Our Hands

Jacksonville South Local
Census Office
Temporary, part time positions
Census Takers
Crew Leaders
Crew Leaders Assistants
Recruiting Assistants
Census Clerks
Census jobs offer:
/ $11.25-16.50/hr
/ paid training
Sflex hrs up to 40/wk
mileage reimbursement
work near your home
You may qualify if you:
are 18 or older
have a valid SSN
pass a background check
/ take and pass written test
V can work up to 40 hrs per
week during the day
Call 1-866-861-2010
or visit
www.2010censusiobs.gov
U.S. Census Bureau is an
Equal Opportunity Employer
US CENSUS BUREAU


Live in
Georgia?
VOTE
EARLY!
No
Excuse
Needed
Last
Day
Dec. 1,


WHAT IS PROBATE?
Ask an Attorney
By Burney Bivens, Esq., LFD

Probate, generally, is a court-supervised process for identifying and gathering the assets of a deceased
person, paying taxes, claims and expenses of administration, and distributing assets to the beneficiar-
ies. This is accomplished by a personal representative who is appointed by Court. The person who
entitled to serve as personal representative in a case where there is a will, is the person nominated to
serve in the will. If there is no will, the personal representative is the surviving spouse or if there is no
spouse, the person elected by majority of the beneficiaries.
There are two types of probate administration under Florida Law: A. Formal Administration: Which
is more lengthy in process and more expensive. B. Summary Administration: Which is a simplified
process and is much shorter and less expensive.
In both cases, the attorney fees and the cost of administration are paid out of the proceeds out of the
estate.
There is also a non-court supervised administration proceeding called "Disposition of Personal
Property Without Administration." This type of administration applies in very limited circumstances
and will not be discussed here.

WHY IS PROBATE NECESSARY

Probate is necessary to pass ownership of the property from the deceased to the beneficiaries. For
example, if there is a house or other real estate, somebody must sign a deed to transfer the property.
The Court appoints a personal representative, who is then authorized by Court Order to sign a deed and
make the transfer. The same is true for title to an automobile or the transfer of bank accounts or other
assets owned by the deceased. If the deceased person left a valid will, unless the will is admitted to
probate in Court, it will be ineffective to pass title of the decedent's property to the beneficiaries. If
the decedent has no will, probate is necessary to pass ownership to the decedent's assets to those per-
sons who are to receive them under laws of distribution in the State of Florida.
Probate is also necessary to wind up the decedent's financial affairs after his or her death. Before any
assets are distributed to the beneficiaries, the claims against the estate must be paid. Florida laws out-
line a priority in which claims are paid and the Court will insure that their priorities are followed. Only
if the claims have been paid or settled and if their remains enough assets for distribution, then there
would be distribution to the beneficiaries.
There is a process to exempt and set aside certain assets from the claims of creditors, and there is a
process in which claims may be defeated through an objection. Those processes will be discussed in
a later article. This gives you a general idea of what probate is, how it works, and why it is necessary.
Please keep in mind that this is a general overview; an attorney is required to pursue a probate case and
for your specific questions or for your specific case, please be certain that you contact competent legal
counsel.


This article is submitted by Burney Bivens, Esquire, LFD and the law firm of Bivens, Jones and Associates
AND Aaron and Burney Bivens Funeral Home. During the next several months a series of articles will appear regard-
ing legal issues and funeral service related issues. Mr. Bivens has practiced law in North Florida for 27 years and has
provided legal representation to the funeral service industry for more than 25 years and is also a licensed funeral direc-
tor with his son. For questions on legal issues call the law office at 904-264-3412. For questions regardingfimneral
services call Aaron and Burney Bivens Funeral Home at 9,04-264-1233


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SaFT

Saft is one of the world's largest developers and manufacturers ofNi Cd batteries with
operations in 17 countries around the world and is headquartered in Paris, France. We
are seeking the following candidate to join our team of professionals at our Jacksonville,
Florida location:
Senior Buyer
This position is a start up position and is responsible for all facets of purchasing to
include performing all purchasing functions for the site; review, comprehend and
ascertain purchasing situation relative to number of suppliers, terms, alternative sources,
and quality; recommend plans for changes to yield savings and improve deliveries;
ascertain new sourcing needs, source such materials and services in order to grow both
the sales and service aspects of the site; manage the cost of new products, minimizing the
supplier base, identifying suppliers that produce prototype parts; identify high
performance, cost effective suppliers; drafting request for quotations or proposals; and
analysis of quotations and proposals to determine the most prudent alternative;
negotiating the most favorable prices and terms; placement and administration of
purchase orders and implementing mfg/pro purchasing as well as negotiation skills with
senior contacts at domestic and international suppliers.
Requirements: Bachelors degree from an accredited college or university. The position
requires a minimum of four years of recent progressive purchasing experience in a
manufacturing environment.
Qualified candidates may apply by email to hr(),saftbatteries.com.
Saft is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


AFTER 27 YEARS
IN BUSINESS
I KNOW WHAT COUNTS


SERVICE AND PRICE

COME AND SEE
FOR YOURSELF





find Cmwfor He rr
Aaron and Btirney Bivens
FUNERAL HOME
A aind
CRHAL-VnTON SERVICES

529 Xingaley Avenue Bumey Bivenis, ERquire, LPtD
Orange Paik, PL 32073 Attorney at Law
Phone: (904) 264-1233 Licen ed Funeral Director
FisLiT ar WaQbs it: Funeroal DimctOs:
wriutnsfieahome.cm AAmt'on T. Bivens,LFD
Buny Bivens, Esq., IFD
Goidon Aimstro~ng, ID



Tuesday, Listen and Talk!
IMPACT Radio Talk Show
FM 105.3-WJSJ- 5:30 and 12:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m., WCGL-AM 1360
with
Clara McLaughlin and IMPACT


Call and talk: FM 105.3 (904) 854-TALK
Tuesday, from 5:30 to 6:00 p.m.
Call and talk: AM-1360 (904) 766-9285
Tuesday, from 8:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
"The Florida Star, The Georgia. Star and Impact -
Striving to Make a Difference."
wwwaradiofreejax.com
www.WCGL1360.com
The Florida Star Still "The People's Choice"
Serving since 1951


3:0 t 5:0 m





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Most Heatd, Most rescient


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PAGE A-7


NOVEMBER 21 2009


I


THE FLORIDA AND GEOR R





















MRS. GWENDOLYN ALTHEA HUNTER
WITSELL CELEBRATES HER 90th

Mrs. Witsell
Talented, Faithful, Loyal
Lover of Melodies, Harmonies, and Rhythms
Bursting with Superior Musicality
Organist, Choir Director, Contralto
Gwen
Sitting quietly and prayerfully in the Nave
And on her favorite per
She -in apparent peace--communes with God
And all the company of Heaven
Allowing the ceremony and the Word to move her soul
She turns inward and receiving God's blessings
And glows with a brilliant radiance
Her mantra: Praise through Prayer and Music
The joy of her life is sound-
The complex and simple sounds of
Voices in harmony; souls in accord
And soft organ music; and organs blaring
With all stops open, All feelings bare
When singing she becomes one with
The music-the spirit of the music-
The spirit and the music
Her smooth, yet demanding alto...
Teasing the contralto in her vocal chords
,A sweet, whole, rounded, sacred sound
It is a gift of the angels,Sung by a sweet spirit
For the healing of hearing souls
And the giving of a precious gift
Playing the organ, she is at peace
Massaging the keys, she is consoled
Striking the notes, she is demanding
Demanding consonance, understanding dissonance
Welcoming musical contradiction
Relishing in the miracle of sound
Gwen
Patient, Cordial, Peaceful
With an Ear for Cadence and Concordance
Believing in Musical Integrity
Critic, Musicians, Alto
Mrs. Witsell
Peace, Dr. Roy Singleton
This past Sunday, Mrs. Witsell, surrounded by her
family and friends, was honored on her 90th birthday at
her beloved Church, St. Phillip's Episcopal. Mrs; Witsell,
who served as the church's organist and choir director for
over forty years received a proclamation from her
Councilwoman Ms. Denise Lee. In her honor her daugh-
ter and son-in-law Mrs. Harriett Witsell and Eugene
Bowens sang In This Room, Ms. Pennela Chapman per-
formed a Liturgical Dance and the choir sand the concert
arrangement of Here I am Lord.
Following the services and prior to the Reception in
Mrs. Witsell's honor, the church's Rector, the Reverend
Hugh Chapman blessed the newly named Gwendolyn
Witsell Choir Room.


Mrs. Witsell receives Proclamation from
Councilwoman Denise Lee.
- r


Rector Reverend Hugh Chapman


City Mrs. Witsell with her children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren.




-
T ,,
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\ -


Mrs. Gwendolyn Althea Hunter Ms. Pennela Chapman performs
Witsell Liturgical Dance in honor of Mrs.
Witsell


I







NOVEMBER 21. 2009 THE STAR PAGE B-




SThe FL/GA Star *




LOCAL SECTION-B


VETERAN'S DAY PARADE)


Story and photos by Frank M. Powell, The Florida Star
Congresswoman Corrine Brown received a portrait of
Cathy Williams, the first and only female to serve with the
famed "Buffalo Soldiers" in 1867. The awards ceremony
was held at the Florida Times Union Performing Arts
Center. Staff from the Veterans Center presented the por-
trait to Ms. Brown in recognition of her service on the
House Veterans Affairs Committee and her commitment
and dedication to Veterans.
"Congresswoman Brown has been a long time support-
er of the Jacksonville Veterans Center and the Readjustment
Counseling Services honored by her continuous dedication
to our Nation's \Veterans"
I


S a



, '


Reginald Lawrence Veterans Center presented
portrait to Brown.


amas and Lorrine


Hallie Williams, Past Commander, Post 4761 Veterans of Foreign
Wars (VFW), Alpha Ganious the oldest (86) and original Montford
Pointer Marine, from June 1943 to February 1946 in WWII. He had
over 30,000 hours in the VFW with 65 years of service, making him
the oldest in Florida. He was also honored as one of the Veterans
Day Parade Marshals by the Mayor, Mr. Ganious. His birthday was
Sunday, November 15, 2009. Shown are Congresswoman Corrine
Brown, Rev. Raymond Bentley, U.S. Army Retired 1
1956 to 1976, Reginald Lawrence Veterans' Center,
and First Sergeant Michael E. Jones U.S. Marine
Corps Blount Island.


Congresswoman Corrine Brown and
Former Florida Representative Willye
Dennis.


Rosalyn Mixon-Phillips Chief Community
Officer City of Jacksonville and
Congresswoman Corrine Brown


Edward Ilater College


rida Star Joseph Lorent-son


Congresswoman Corrine Brown, and
Mother DeVoe Paxon High School ROTC


*IS: ^flLQ


Jacob llixson


,PI I I n MI !i n sA s" I a' i
'--- -


Tommie Merrin ,1P .3 I ____
Ladies .Auxiliarr. Southern
Region Vice President lives Cutting ofthe Cake Guest ofHonor Dr. James YoungPrincipal Jean
in Atlanta, GA. Ribault High School Oldest SSgt Veteran Alpha Gainous, and the
The Montford Point youngest MSgt Ret James R. Smith, II.
Marine Association is a non-
profit Veteran's organization,
established to perpetuate the
legacy of the first African
Americans who entered the
United States Marine Corps
from 1942 to 1949, at
Montford Point Camp, New
River, North.
The purpose of the
Association is to support
educational assistance pro-
grams, veterans programs,
and promotion of communi-
ty services. The Association
works to improve the social
conditions of our veterans,
local families, youth and the
growing population of senior '
citizens.P
Throughout the year, the
Association is busy with Keriyae Williams, Latara F Chiues, and Adam Hill Jean Ribault
activities that create cama- High School MCJROTC.
raderie, goodwill, and esprit de corps, both locally and nationally. The activities vary from
chapter to chapter and include, but are not limited to youth programs, visits to various organ-
izations and veterans support agencies as well as delivering food and much needed items to
the sick and shut in during times of distress.
Montford Point Marine Association also consists of the Ladies Auxiliary. Membership in
the Ladies Auxiliary is open to wives, daughters, sisters, and mothers of members or former
members of the United States Armed Forces.


I U


Joe irottie


James n. lippins, ine montjora roint
Marine Association Chapter #29 Jacksonville
President.


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NOVEMBER 21, 2009


PAGE B-2 STAR


- .~ -


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


A -


a r e V -W V
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"W


Announcements, meetings, happenings, and community events
scheduled in Jacksonville and the surrounding area.


Supply,'Inc on New Your City's highly-
profiled 125th street. One of the
Florida organizers of Women for
Obama.
7T BA b portrait of Dorothy Hughes and
Gloria Steinem hangs in the National
SPortrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.


STAR


PAGE B-2


Florida Attorney Chris Chestnut and Native of Jacksonville
Helps Feed Families for Thanksgiving

Attorney Chris Chestnut teams with Dr. John Allen Newman to host the first
annual Thanksgiving "We Care Campaign" in Jacksonville, Florida.
November 18, 2009 Jacksonville, FL -The Chestnut Law Firm, along
with local volunteers from The Sanctuary at Mt. Calvary Church in
Jacksonville, Florida, will be preparing boxes filled with Turkeys, Stuffing,
Collard Greens and Cranberry Sauce on Monday, November 23rd from 5 pm
7 pm at the church during an event called the "We Care Campaign". The
church is pastored by Dr. John Alien Newman and is located at 4751
Walgreen Road in Jacksonville, Florida.
Attorney Chris Chestnut will be meeting and greeting the community dur-
ing the event. Chestnut, a Florida native and graduate of Florida State and
University of Florida's Levin School of Law, is one of the most skillful young
attorneys in the country. Acknowledged by President Barack Obama as a
National Emerging Leader, Chris Chestnut, Esq. is America's next great voice
for legal justice. Chestnut has a heart for the people and founded the "We Care
Campaign", "To show the people in the community that we care about them,
especially during the holidays," says Chestnut.
Event Sponsors include: The Chestnut Firm, The Sanctuary at Mt. Calvary
Church, McGowan Spinal Rehabilitation Center, Holmes Glover Solomon
Funeral Home, TS Warden Mortuary, C.L. Page Mortuary, Orsborn
Orthodontic, Transformation with Tonya Robinson, Sharp Cutz, DR DR,
Generation Chiropractic, Phase 2 Barber Shop, Darryl McKenzie, Rize and
Shine, Bold City Printing, Telli Griffin, Marcus Lett, Kathy Winkleman,
Lawanna Cook, Robin Campbell, Samantha Wright and Alphonso McClendon.

About Chestnut Law Firm, LLC
The Chestnut Firm, with offices in Gainesville-Jacksonville-Miami-
Orlando, Florida is dedicated to providing a fidl service law practice that is
capable, prepared. and qualified to serve its clients. The firm seeks to make its
clients whole regardless of the legal challenges they may face and provides
comprehensive guidance and critical advocacy to its clients. Founded in 2006
by Chris IM. Chestnut, Esq., the young firm has emerged as a nationally recog-
nized law firm proven to be relentless it the pursuit of justice. Visit:
http.-:,. t'w.chesrnutirrm.comr


GATEWAY BOOKSTORE OWNER DOROTHY PITMAN HUGHES
ADVOCATES FOR JACKSONVILLE'S SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS
Office of Procurement, Transparency, Inclusion & Compliance Opens
JACKSONVILLE,
FL -Amidst growing
signs that Jacksonville's ,
Northwest area small
and emerging businesses
will be excluded from
American Recovery &
Reinvestment Act
(ARRA) funding oppor-
tunities, veteran activist,
Dorothy Pitman Hughes
opened the Office of
Pro curement,
Transparency, Inclusion
and Compliance
(OPTIC) in the Gateway
Bookstore at 5238-22 Dorothy Pitman Hughes Greenling Institute
Norwood Avenue, memberBen Bernankem
Jacksonville, Florida
32208.
Dorothy Hughes is applying her lifelong experience as a community organiz-
er to help combat poverty in Northwest Jacksonville. She holds fast to anunwa-
venng message she communicates to her fellow business owners in the Gateway
Town Center, "President Obama is working to end the recession, but he's not com-
ing down here to Jacksonville to fix our problems. We have to work together to
make our own change and end poverty here in Jacksonville.
To that end Ms. Hughes organized the Northside Jacksonville businesses asthe
Gateway Economic Empowerment Coalition (GEEC), presented their needs and
grievances at the Jacksonville Town Hall meeting hosted by Councilwoman
Glorious Johnson then traveled to Washington and met with Timothy Geithner,
Secretary of the Treasury, Ben Bernanke, Chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank,
Barry Wides, Deputy Comptroller for Community Affairs in the Office of the
Comptroller of Currency, Congresswoman Barbara Lee and Jonathan Adelstein,
Commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission, Florida Minority
Community Reinvestment Coalition (FMCRC) and The Greenlining Institute,
Berkeley, CA on behalf of the small and emerging businesses in Northwest
Jacksonville. Following the meeting, requests were made for copies of supplemen-
tal information regarding the details of the OPTIC program.
After her return from meetings with cabinet-level presidential advisors, Ms.
Hughes attended the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Information
Summit hosted by Congresswoman Corrine Brown, where Ms. Hughes gathered
information to help her fellow small and emerging business owners compete for
stimulus funding.
Through the OPTIC, Ms. Hughes' office will track the stimulus funding
awards in Jacksonville including the number of new hires, the demographic mix
of new hires number of African Americans, Hispanics, other minorities, males,
females and how many businesses which are awarded stimulus-funded contracts
fall into those demographics. Additionally, through the OPTIC, Ms. Hughes' office
will provide consultation to small businesses in an effort to ensure that small busi-
nesses are not left out of the ARRA stimulus opportunities.
Businesses that want to compete for your share of the stimulus money are
invited to come to Ms. Hughes' stimulus office and review applications that are
presently on the short list for funding. This office will help you to apply for funds.
Ms. Hughes earned her expertise as an effective community organizer through
years of civil rights activism; her experience connects many significant events and
people in our nation's history.
Ms. Hughes: marched with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. worked with
Malcolm X founded the New York City Agency for Child Development co-
founded MS Magazine with Gloria Steinem co-founded the Women's Action
Alliance with Gloria Steinem, Brenda Feigen and Catherine Samuels. The
Women's Action Alliance mission was "to stimulate and assist women at the local
level to organize around specific action
projects aimed at eliminating concrete
manifestations of economic and social
discrimination." This organization
became Women Initiating Sel
Empowerment (WISE) in 1997. has
spent many years advocating for the
rights of African America business
owners. Much of her crusade is chroni-
cled in her book, Wake.Up and Smell
the Dollars! Whose Inner City Is This
Anvwavy! oened Harlem Office


AL


- -







IIvJ/l'vJL'D ,l, Z l TE TRA


From Actual Police Reports
ssSHHDid You Hear About?...







CONVICTED FELON STRIKES AGAIN

Officer was dispatched to Brownwood Rd., in reference to a burglary to
automobile. In route to the scene, dispatch provided information that the listed si
pects had fled the scene in a silver vehicle: "Complainant advises black male, I
shirt, blue Jeans and white female dark shirt, running from residence...silver car o
side this residence. They were last seen on Temple towards University."
Upon arrival an officer met with the first Witness. Witness #1 lives next to the re
dence of Victim #2. She stated that she heard her car alarm activate and she went
the window and observed a silver vehicle parked in front of Brownwood Road. S
also.observed Suspect #1 (Bethel) entering Vehicle #2. Witness #1 observed Suspc
#2 (Thompson) walk to the passenger window and peer into the vehicle. Witness
explained that she observed Suspect Bethel sitting inside the vehicle in the dri
seat. After a minute, both suspects returned to the silver vehicle, and fled the scel
Witness #1 immediately notified the police.
Witness #2 lives across the street. He was outside when he observed a sib
vehicle park on the street in front of Brownwood Rd. Witness #2 observed the t
suspects walk over to Vehicle #2. After a minute or two, he observed the suspe
enter the sliver vehicle, which sped away.
While officer was speaking with the witnesses, he received notice that ]
Officer Short conducted a traffic stop at the intersection of Powers and Universi
The vehicle and occupant description matched the descriptions given by the witne
es. After the suspects were detained, Suspect Thompson (owner of the vehicle), g
verbal consent to search the vehicle. A keltic 380 was located inside the vehi,
behind the passenger seat.
A show up with the witnesses and suspects was conducted at 3362 Pow(
Ave. Both of the witnesses positively identified the suspects.
Post-Miranda, Suspect #2 (Thompson), stated that Suspect #1 (Bethel) h
stolen a gun from another vehicle. Suspect Thompson was very cooperative and to
the officer to the residence where the vehicle was parked. He spoke with the re
dence, (Victim), and he inspected the vehicle and found that the gun had been stol
Suspect Thompson also stated that he and Suspect Bethel went to Brownwood R
where Suspect Bethel entered a vehicle. Post-Miranda, Suspect #1 (Bethel) admit
that she stole a gun from a vehicle.
Both suspects were arrested and transported to the PTDF for interview. Bi
suspect were Interviewed at the PTDF by a Detective. During the interviews, bi
suspects admitted to committing the crimes and presented written statemer
Suspect Thompson's vehicle was seized for forfeiture. The recovered gun was pla(
in the property room. It should also be noted that the Suspect Bethel is a convic
felon for carrying a concealed firearm convicted on 3/13/07.

FIGHT OVER A MOUNTAIN BIKE

On Tue/11-10-09 at 0316, Officer was dispatched to a large fight at 234
State St., City Rescue Mission.
Upon arrival, he located Ron (Victim). Officer asked
who had been fighting and he advised that a black male had
just chased him over here and started beating on him with a
traffic cone. He also advised the officer that this suspect was
wearing red shorts and a black shirt and another suspect i
stole his bicycle. There were 20 to 30 individuals outside :
that backed up his account and they said the two went west
on W. State Street. The two officers immediately located
both individuals and the bicycle on N. Pearl St. just north of
W. State St.
Suspect Hughes was in the driver's seat of a red Jeep
Cherokee with the keys in the ignition. Suspect McKinney
was missing a shoe, his shorts were hanging down and
ripped, and he was bleeding from several places on his face. The Jackso
Both suspects were detained. joining force
A further interview with the victim revealed that he
was riding his bicycle eastbound on the sidewalk on the
north side of W. State St. when he observed both suspects
walking westbound towards him. Both suspects said some-
thing to him causing him to think they wanted to fight so he W A
got off his bicycle. Suspect McKinney said something else the increase
when he got off the bicycle causing the victim to drop the within Afric
bicycle and begin running across W. State St. to the front
door of the City Rescue Mission. He began to beat on the THE QUES
front door trying to get inside and have them call the police
when suspect McKinney picked up a traffic cone and began an m
to hit him about the head about 4 or 5 times before-the vic- and drug a
tim began to fight back. The victim was able to fight
McKinney off him and McKinney finally took off running Where: 1
towards Pearl St. While suspect McKinney was fighting the and New Ki
victim, suspect Hughes got on the victim's bicycle and rode
off on it. Every person outside the City Rescue Mission the Parade R
officer asked advised him that was exactly how the incident
happened. The victim complained about bumps on his head Edward We
from being hit with the traffic cone. 13 St.); in
Both suspects were advised of their Miranda
Warnings and asked about this incident. Suspect McKinney
originally advised that he was not in any fight. He later
changed his story to both suspects were walking on the side-
walk when the victim came up to them and wanted to fight Blessed ai
them for no reason. He said he was attacked by the victim
even though he could not explain how the fight occurred
across the street. Suspect Hughes originally advised that we
didn't have anything on him. He couldn't tell me who the
vehicle belonged to that he was driving and remained
extremely irate and violent. Once at the jail, he admitted that
he took the victim's bicycle because he ran away like "a lit-
tle bitch". He said he didn't even need the bicycle because he


had the Jeep but he took it just to show him he could.
The owner of the Jeep was contacted but could not
respond to take possession of the vehicle so it was towed by
Universal Towing. The bicycle was returned to the victim.


ARIES
Put something away in case of
an emergency. Invest wisely.
Your personal life could have
you tied up in knots. Romantic
opportunities are evident if
you get involved in large
groups or organizations. You
will do extremely well if you
get involved in competitive
activities this week.
CANCER
You can enjoy short trips. If
your lover tries to curtail
your freedom, it may lead to
conflict. You may be emo-
tional and quick to judge oth-
ers. You need to spend some
time with individuals who
have more experience than
you.
1.L LIBRA
Changes in your domestic sit-
uanon will prove to be favor-
able in the long run. Channel
your energy into projects that
will enhance your home. You
need to spend less tune day-
dreaming and more time
accomplishing. You must be
careful not to trust just any-
one.

J CAPRICORN

Don't bother getting even;
they'll make themselves
look bad. Be sure to keep
communication open with
those you live with.
Opportunities to make
advancements through
good business sense are
evident. You can meet
potential new mates, but
make sure that they aren't
already committed to
someone else.


LdJ


TAURUS


Rely on yourself and you will
look good to superiors. An
older member of the family
may need assistance. Don't get
intimately involved. with a
coworker. Plan to visit friends
or relatives.

-A LEO
Your involvement with
children will be most
rewarding. Don't cause a
scene, but when you get
home let your partner know
how you feel and why.
Fitness or weight loss pro
grams will help your self
esteem. Secret affairs may
be brought out in the open.
f; oSCORPIO
Your personal life il still be
experiencing difficulties and
you are best to avoid the issues
for the time being. You need to
be careful not to make promises
that you can't fulfill. Changes in
your home may be disruptive
and upsetting. An older member
of your family may have left
you with a pressing situation.
r-_ AQUARIUS

You may attract attention if
you get out socially You
may find yourself in an
uncomfortable situation if
you have overloaded your
plate unintentionally. Go
out \with friends who are
positive and supportive.
Chronic health problems
are likely to surface if you
are keeping your problems
locked up inside.


GEMINI
Do the necessary chores and
then do things that please you.
Your stability will aid you in
getting support from your fel-
low workers. You will be high-
ly sensitive to comments made
by your lover. You would be
wise to socialize with as many
people as possible.
011 VIRGO
You can expect to have prob-
lems with your mate if you've
been spending too much time
away from home. Get help to
finish a project if you need it.
You may have a problem with
someone you live with if you
don't include them in your
gathering. New romantic part-
ners may attend a function
that puts you in the limelight.
.- I SAGITTARIUS
Focus on your own domes-
tic problems. Try to under-
stand their point of view
You may want to sign up
for lectures or courses that
will bring you mental stim-
ulation You can bet that
you'll draw attention to
yourself.
i PISCES

You may make someone else
look bad. Take the time to do
your job correctly or you may
find yourself looking for a
new one. You must not let
others talk you into doing
things that will probably limit
you financially at a later date.
Be cautious when dealing
with foreigners.


-. .- : ,.
,'...'t "-
)nville Chapter of MAD DADS and; Families of Slaih. Children are
es to host the "PUMP UP THE LOVE!" Community Parade!

WHEN: Saturday, December 12, 2009

community Awareness: To consistently and effectively address
sing black on black crime, particularly homicides taking place
an American neighborhoods.

mTION: What can be done to "Pump up the Love!" within the
erican Community that will lead to a reduction in crime, violence
buse?

rhe line-up will take place at 9:30 AM- at the corner of Division
ings Rd.

route: The parade will proceed down New Kings Rd. passed
Iters College, to Myrtle (left onto Myrtle); to 13 St. (right onto
ito the Stanton College Preparatory High School Stadium.

Each band will be given 10 minutes to perform.

Scriptural basis for the parade:
re the Peacemakers, for they shall be called the children of God. Matt 59.

BLACK ON BLACK LOVE IS NOT A CRIME,


IT'S AN EVERLASTING CELEBRATION!


For additional information or to register for the parade
Contact MAD DADS at 904 781-0905 for a Parade Application
Registration Deadline: November2 20 200


AiMDAS AIffiKiHILE
HBHBH A iB ,itflH PROJECT


Your Weekly

HOROSCOPE
November 16, 2009 November 22, 2009


I '


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PAGE B-3


THFE STAR


NOVEMBER 212009







- I


With wins in three of the last four games, the Jaguars return bome to battle AFC East foe Buffalo for the fourth consecutive season.
"Obviously this is a big home game, AFC opponent coming, a team that we played I believe four or five years in a row. It's a team that's done
a nice job with defense, taking the football away. They've been very good the first quarter of games jumping out on people. We saw the way the
season opened when the jumped all over New England and then let that get away, but it's a very capable football team," said head coach Jack Del
Rio.
The Jaguars began the second half of their season with a 24-22 win against the New York Jets at the Meadowlands last Sunday. QB David
Garrard engineered a 12-play, 80-yard drive to set up a 21-yard game-winning field goal by Josh Scobee as time expired. Maurice Jones-Drew
rushed for 123 yards including a 33-yard touchdown run.
CB Rashean Mathis and DE Quentin Groves had interceptions and Mathis forced a fumble that was recovered by LB Clint Ingram in the third
quarter.


I F V The Jaguars rank 10th in the NFL in offense (358.9), sixth in rushing (140.1) and 23rd in defense (357.6). Jones-Drew continues to lead the
Mike Bonts
Sports Editor NFL in touchdowns with 12 and ranks fourth with 860 rushing yards. WR Mike Sims-Walker leads the team with 39 receptions for 603 yards and
five touchdowns and three 100-yard receiving games.
"It's great to see Mike as hard as he's worked. When the guys who were here in the room, there were a few guys that were here when Mike arrived on the scene, and
his first practice was like, 'Wow, we might have something here. This guy is real natural, he's big, he's athletic, he's fast, he's got great hands," said Del Rio of Sims-Walker.
LB Daryl Smith has a team-high 84 tackles, 1.5 sacks and three forced fumbles. The Jaguars will be without Mathis this week after he injured his groin last Sunday.
WHAT TO WATCH FOR: WR Torry Holt needs 54 yards to surpass Andre Reed (13,198) for 10th place in NFL history for most receiving yards. Holt would become
only the seventh player to rank in the top 10 for most receiving yards and receptions.
* Holt needs one reception to extend his streak of consecutive games with a reception to 163, the second-longest streak among active players. 41
* Jones-Drew can record his fifth 100-yard rushing game of the season and mark the second time this season with back-to-backV V
100-yard rushing games. The five 100-yard rushing games would rank tied for the fourth-most in team history for a season.
* Jones-Drew needs one rushing touchdown to extend his streak to five consecutive games, the second-longest streak in team history. Jones-


The Florida & Georgia Star
Correspondent: Scott Jurrens


The University of Florida Gators rumbled to another win over the University of
South Carolina Gamecocks in Columbia South Carolina Saturday night, November
14, 2009 with the final score of 24-14.
The Gators opened the scoring in the game in the 1st quarter with a 68-yard
bomb from quarterback Tim Tebow to wide receiver Riley Cooper and with the
kicker Caleb Sturgis extra point kick good; Florida led 7-0 with 12:04 remaining in
the quarter. The Gamecocks responded with 5:51 left in the quarter with a 1-yard
touchdown plunge by running back Brian Maddox and with kicker Spencer Lanning
extra point kick, the game was tied at 7-7. When the next Gator offensive drive
stalled, Sturgis nailed a 32-yard field goal to put Florida in the lead 10-7 at the end
of the 1st quarter.
Early in the second quarter, Gators running back Emmanuel Moody scampered
17-yards for another Florida touchdown and with the Sturgis point after kick good,
the Gators extended their lead to 17-7 with 10:28 left to play in the first half. The
Gamecocks came roaring back with a touchdown of their own on a quarterback
Stephen Garcia 9-yard pass completion to Weslye Saunders. With the Lanning point
after kick good, the Gators now led 17-14 at the end of the first half.
The 3rd quarter was a series of defensive stops and offensive bumbles as neither
team added any points to the score. .It appeared momentum was shifting to the
Gamecocks going into the 4th quarter.
In the 4th quarter, the Gamecocks were driving on the Gators for a game tying
field goal or possible touchdown to take the lead when quarterback Garcia faded
back to pass on the Gator 22-yard line and the football gods smiled on the Gators.
Garcia's pass was batted into the air and Gator lineman Justin Trattou intercepted
the ball and rumbled 53-yards towards the Gamecock goal line.
Four plays later, the Gator offense scored the final touchdown of the game with
a Tim Tebow 1-yard plunge to secure the win with 13:25 left to play in the game.
The Gator defense was inspired in the rest of the final quarter to sack the Gamecocks
quarterback four times and with 2:00 minutes left to play in the game, the Gators
cornerback Joe Haden intercepted the Gamecocks to seal the win. The game final
was Gators 24; Gamecocks 14.
This Florida win was the 4th straight in a row over their former and current
Gamecock coach, Steve Spurrier and Florida's 20th straight win, a school record and
nations best. Florida completes a perfect SEC season at 10-0 with the win and
Tebow ties the all time SEC career touchdown record with LSU running back, Kevin
Faulk.
The Gamecocks uniforms were black camouflage uniforms and in lieu of their
names, had words like "Integrity", "Service" and "Courage" on their jerseys in order
to salute wounded US veterans. The coaches praised the efforts put forth by both
teams in the game.
Gamecock head coach Spurrier commented, "I'm proud of the effort of our play-
ers. A lot of guys played their hearts out tonight, especially our defensive guys in the
second half. We were in position late in the quarter to maybe tie it up. One play
seemed to doom us. We were trying to throw it to (Jason Barnes) on the right, and
Stephen thought he saw something on the left. It bounced off (someone), and they
got the ricochet. That's not what we were trying to do. After that we went backwards
every time we touched it, taking sack after sack."
Florida head coach Urban Meyer reciprocated in his comments. He said," "I
always like to start by saying how much respect we have for the coach at South
Carolina and for their entire team. This environment is SEC football, and you never
take that for granted. For those of you that only cover SEC football, I guess you get
a little spoiled with stadiums like this, and the noise level was real. That was real,
and for our team to come out on the road and take control.
With that pass to Riley Cooper, we felt like we had control, but then [South
Carolina] ran the ball very well with over 200 yards in the first half. The second half
was just dominance with defense as well as I have seen. I think Brandon James got
loose a little bit finally with our special teams, and we played field position. With
our kickoffs, we did a good job other than the one that went out of bounds.
I am not sure we punted very much, but our punt coverage was tremendous, and
we played field position football. We did not play perfect, and I am not sure we have
played perfect in quite awhile, but I think that is 20 [conference wins] in a row, and
I am awfully proud of our team. As much respect we have for the Southeastern
Conference, to do what those young people are doing is pretty special."
Florida (10-0) takes on Florida International University Golden Panthers (3-7)
on Saturday, November 21, 2009 at Ben Griffin Stadium in Gainesville at 12:30 PM
EST. The game will be televised on pay per view and outside of the state; it will be
seen on ESPN Gameplan. The Golden Panthers are coming off a homecoming win
over North Texas 35-28 after being down 28-14.
This game will be another chance for the Gators to add more records to the
books and a tune up for the final game of the regular season against the Florida State
University (FSU) Seminoles (5-5) on November 28 in The Swamp.


Drew holds the franchise record with eight consecutive games with a rushing score
from 11/12/06 to 12/31/06.
a Jones-Drew needs two rushing touchdowns to tie Fred Taylor (14, 1998) for the
franchise's single-season record.
* Jones-Drew needs 82 rushing yards to establish a career-high (941, 2006).
* Sims-Walker needs 80 receiving yards to have the second-most by a Jaguars WR
since 2005 (Matt Jones, 761, 2008).
* TE Marcedes Lewis needs one reception of 25-plus yards to tie Kyle Brady (12)
for the most by a Jaguars tight end.
m Garrard can record his third consecutive game with a 100-plus passer rating, the
second-longest streak of his career (4. 2007).
A Jaguars win would improve their record to 6-4. the fifth time in seven seasons
under head coach Jack Del Rio the club would be above
.500 after 10 games. The Jaguars would have wins in four of their first five home
games for the third time under Del Rio (2005, 2006).












SC, STATE TUSKEGEE STAY ON TOP IN HSR'S TOP




(Hartly, DE) For the fourth consecutive week South Carolina S. (9-1) and
Tuskegee (8-2) are on top in the Heritage Sports Radio Network (HSN) Division
-FCS and Division II Top-10 polls. The Top-10 polls are selected each week during
the season by the HSRN staff and writers, ranking Historical Black College Football
Championship Sub-Division (FCS) Division I and NCAA Division II & NAIA Div.
I teams.
The Bulldogs of South Carolina St. received all of the first place votes for the
fifth consecutive week and held on to the number one position after their 37-13 win
over Morgan St. The Panthers of Prairie View defeated Alcorn State 34-14 and held
on to number two and Florida A&M was upset by Hampton 25-0 and dropped to
number four. Hampton moved into the Top-10 at number nine and Bethune
Cookman also moved into the poll for the first time this season after their 21-10 win
over Howard. There was no other movement as Southern, Grambling State, Norfolk
State and Alabama A&M held on to their positions at five, six, seven and eight
respectively.
In Division II action, Tuskegee was idle and held on to their number one posi-
tion and Shaw moved up one to number two after Fayetteville State loss in the play-
offs 42-13 to California (PA). Fayetteville State dropped one spot to number three
and Albany State held on to the number four despite their upset loss in the playoffs
to West Alabama 24-22. Langston held on to number five, Ft. Valley State number
six, Elizabeth City St. number seven, Morehouse number eight, Benedict number
nine and Bowie State round out the top 10.

HSRN Division I-FCS


School (1st Place Votes)
South Carolina St. (15)
Prairie View7-1 135
Arkansas Pine Bluff
Florida A&M 7-3
Southern 6-3 94
Grambling St. 6-4
Norfolk St. 6-4 61
Alabama A&M 6-4
Hampton 5-5 22
Bethune Cookman 5-5
Others Receiving Votes:


Record
9-1 150


2
5-3
95


PointsLast Wk
1


96 4
3


5
87 6
7
57 8
NR
16 NR
Morgan St.


10, Texas Southern 2


SPORTS


NOVEMBER 21, 2009


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JARED'S 1ST ART SHOW WIN


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FLORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY MARCHING
"100" SELECTED TO PARTICIPATE IN 2010
HONDA BATTLE OF THE BANDS
INVITATIONAL SHOWCASE

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. Florida A&M University's (FAMU)
Marching "100" has been chosen as part of the 2010 lineup of march-
ing bands for the eighth annual Honda Battle of the Bands Invitational
Showcase scheduled for Saturday, January 30, 2010 at the Georgia
Dome in Atlanta. Eight Historically Black College and University
(HBCU) marching bands have been chosen to participate through a
combination of online voting by fans and a selection process involv-
ing HBCU band directors and university presidents. The 2010 lineup
includes the following:
Florida A&M University "Marching 100" (Tallahassee, Fla.)
Albany State University "Marching Rams" (Albany, Ga.)
Clark Atlanta University "Mighty Marching Panthers" (Atlanta,
Ga.)
North Carolina Central University "Marching Sound Machine"
(Durham, N.C.)
Prairie View A&M University "Marching Storm (Prairie View,
Texas)
Southern University "Human Jukebox Marching Band" (Baton
Rouge, La.)
Tuskegee University "Marching Crimson Pipers" (Tuskegee, Ala.)
Virginia State University "Trojan Explosion Marching Band"
(Petersburg, Va.)
The Honda Battle of the Bands is the only event where the
HBCU marching bands act as the show headliners. The FAMU
Marching "100" will have the opportunity to perform for 12 minutes
and showcase their musical skills, dancing talents and creativity.
The Honda Battle of the Bands is designed to showcase the
amazing talents of student musicians and celebrate the musical
prowess represented at our nation's HBCUs," said Marc Burt, senior
manager, Office of Inclusion and Diversity for American Honda.
"This event is not only about entertainment, it's also about highlight-
ing the importance of music education and shining a spotlight on vital
skills which are learned through band participation like effective com-


.< '


Photo caption: Derek Webber, director of Promotions and
Operations for Urban Sports and Entertainment Group, (first on left);
Erika Braxton-White, communications administrator for Corporate
Social Responsibility, Corporate Affairs and Communications,
American Honda Motor, Co., (second from right left); and John
Morris, promotions and event manager for Urban Sports and
Entertainment Group (first on right) presents Shelby Chipman, assis-
tant director of bands (second from left) and Julian White, director of
bands and chairman of the Department of Music, with the official
plaque inviting the Marching "100" to participate in the Honda Battle
of the Bands.

munication and teamwork. Honda is proud and honored to be able to
bring this enriching experience to every marcher on the field and
every band fan in the stands."
The Honda Battle of the Bands is the only national scholarship
program that showcases an important facet of HBCU heritage and cul-
ture music education. The eight winning band programs chosen to
participate in this year's Invitational Showcase will be awarded
$20,000 by American Honda for their music programs in addition to
the $1,000 grant they received for participation in the pre-qualifying
fall campus event tour. Through this program Honda is awarding a
total of $205,000 in scholarships to HBCU music programs for the
2009-2010 academic year, and since the beginning of the program,
has awarded grants in excess of $1 million.


I I


PAG R_-


NOVEMBER 21, 2009


On November 14, 2009, the
2nd Annual Downtown Sidewalk
Chalk Contest was held at The
Jacksonville Landing. This event
was sponsored by The
Concentric Arts Education Fund,
Inc.,a non profit organization cre-
ated specifically to allow the giv-
ing of scholarships to students of
all ages as well as grants to
artists, families, creative people,
and teachers.
The contest showcased thir-
teen different categories awarding
$500-$1500 in scholarships, grants,
and prizes! Among the winners
was aspiring artist, eleven year
old Jared Reed of Southside
Middle School who won a $500
future scholarship/U.S. Savings
Bond. When Jared was asked what
- inspired him to draw the
famous Blue Angels, his
response was "I attended this
years' Air Show on November
8th, and saw them fly across
the water at the beach. "I
thought that was cool!" Jared
has had a love for drawing
since the age of eight and
plans to audition for LaVilla
School of the Arts in January.
His goal is to become a world
famous artist and design his
own clothing line.


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SCHOLARSHIPS FOR MINORITY
CHEMISTRY STUDENTS AVAILABLE
FROM AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY
The American Chemical Society (ACS) Scholars Program is
now accepting applications from African-American, Hispanic/Latino
and American Indian students who are pursuing or intend to pursue
degrees in chemistry, biochemistry, chemical engineering, chemi-
cal technology or related majors.
Renewable awards of up to $5,000 per year are given to
qualified high school seniors, community college students and col-
lege freshmen, sophomores or juniors.
Applications will be accepted through March 1, 2010, for
the 2010-2011 school year. Additional information and an online
application form can be found on the ACS Scholars Program web-
site (www.acs.org/scholars), by calling 1-800-227-5558, extension
6250, or by mailing scholars@acs.org.
ACS President Thomas H. Lane, Ph.D., points out that with
a degree in chemistry you can change the world. "Whether you
apply that degree to medicine and drug design, environmental
studies, forensics, food, the search for alternate energy sources,
safeguarding national security, or creating new materials, you'll
have the satisfaction of knowing you are improving people's lives in
a very real way," Lane said.
ACS established the Scholars program in 1995 to attract
underrepresented minorities to the chemical sciences and to build
awareness of the value and rewards associated with careers in
chemistry. In addition to financial support, the program, provides
mentoring and research and networking opportunities that help stu-
dents acquire the skills and credentials needed for a successful
career. Since its inception, the ACS Scholars Program has award-
ed more than $11.7 million to more than 2,260 students. For the
2010-2011 academic year, the Society expects to award approxi-
mately $1 million to both new and continuing Scholars.
Program partners include founding partner, PPG Industries
Foundation, Inc.; GlaxoSmithKline; The Camille and Henry Dreyfus
Foundation; Schering-Plough; Xerox; Procter & Gamble; 3M;
AstraZeneca; Bayer; Dow Corning; Dow Chemical; DuPont; and
new partner for 2010, the Ciba Foundation. The program is also
supported through the generosity of many individual donors, ACS
local sections and ACS members, including more than 60 former
ACS Scholars.
The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization
chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 154,000 mem-
bers, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global
leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its
multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific confer-
ences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus,
Ohio.
Starting salaries in 2008 for newly graduated B.S. chemists
averaged $35,000.

GEORGIA SOUTHERN

UNIVERSITY TO HOST OPEN

HOUSE

STATESBORO, Ga., -- Nov. 11, 2009 Georgia Southern
University will host an open house for prospective students
Saturday, Nov. 21, 2009 beginning at 8 a.m. at Hanner
Fieldhouse.
Open House is an opportunity for high school students and
their parents to experience Georgia Southern University first-hand.
Not only do they see the campus, but they also meet and speak
with current students, faculty and staff. Parents and students find
out for themselves why Georgia Southern has earned the reputa-
tion of a large-scale, small-feel research university.
During the Open House, campus tours will be offered that
include visits to a residence hall and several academic buildings.
Information about admissions requirements, academic offerings
and student life will be available. Prospective students and parents
can also choose from a series of information sessions to attend.
Georgia Southern University has more than 19,000 students
enrolled and continues to receive national recognition. The
University has been featured in U.S. News & World Report
America's Best Colleges and Universities and was recently recog-
nized as one of the Top 100 Best Values among Public Colleges
and Universities by Kiplinger's Personal Finance. This fall, the
University's College of Business Administration was named one of
the Best 301 Business Schools in the country by Princeton Review.
Reservations are required to attend the Open House and
space is limited. Reservations can be made by visiting Georgia
Southern University's website at www.georgiasouthern.edu.
Georgia Southern University, a Carnegie Doctoral/Research
University, offers 115 degree programs serving more than 19,000
students. Through eight colleges, the University offers bachelor,
master and doctoral degree programs built on more than a century
of academic achievement. The University, one of Georgia's largest,
is a top choice of Georgia's HOPE scholars and is recognized for
its student-centered approach to education. Visit:
www.georgiasouthern.edu.


JACKSONVILLE COUNTRY DAY

SCHOOL 3RD GRADERS HONOR

VETERANS AT SHANDS HOSPITAL

Jacksonville Country Day School 3rd graders were invited to perform at Shands
Hospital on Tuesday, November 10. Thanh Hogan, a doctor at Shands and a parent
at JCDS, contacted Virginia Dickert, music specialist, about having the students sing
for the hospital's Veterans Day Celebration.
Every year JCDS has a Veterans day show. In addition to this year's show, the
3rd grade students expressed their appreciation to the veterans by performing at
Shands Hospital.
JCDS was excited about the. opportunity to perform at Shands Hospital and also
to honor the veterans in such a special way


NEW LAWSUIT DEMANDS ADEQUATE

FUNDING AND REAL PROGRESS FOR

FLORIDA EDUCATION

TALLAHASSEE Florida House Democratic Leader Franklin Sands (D-
Weston) issued the following statement in response to today's filing of a lawsuit in the
Second Judicial Circuit Court in Leon County that calls on the State of Florida to
revamp and adequately finance the state's public school system:
"For too long, children have suffered and Florida's economy has lagged due to
Republican policymakers' refusal to provide a competitive, high-quality public educa-
tion system.
"Florida House Democrats are hopeful that this new lawsuit will allow the courts
to intervene to require the Republican leadership in the Legislature to do what it should
have been doing all along---adequately funding Florida's schools as the state consti-
tution requires.
"The evidence is striking. The so-called education reforms of Republican
administrations have failed. Florida has low graduation rates and unremarkable test
scores. Republican legislators also have repeatedly shirked their responsibilities and
shamefully avoided political realities by shifting most of the burden of funding the state
school system onto local property owners and school districts.
"Not only are Florida schools inadequately funded, but the state's school
accountability system is in need of serious repair. It's high time for Florida's education
accountability system to be updated so that it no longer focuses so much on how stu-
dents perform on a single-day's standardized test. Hopefully, this lawsuit will help us
achieve the necessary changes for Florida to truly have the world-class education sys-
tem that our children deserve."


THE STAR


* NOVEMBER 21, 2009


PAGF 6 -








ST SRV B0-0


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on 61 acres. AUCTION Nov 17, 2009 at 11am (or ear-
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Miscellaneous

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice.
Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call (888)203-3179,
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Business Opportunities


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Cars for Sale

Police Impounds! Honda 1999 Civic $200! Nissan 2001
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1970 Buick LaSabre
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NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
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CALL OR STOP BY TODAY.
(904) 381-4877 TTY
3505 Corby Street, Jacksonville, FI 32205
Income & Age Restrictions Apply

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice of Termination of practice of Alexander Milanick,

DDS. Copies of records may be obtained in this county( Duvol}

by written request to his father, Mr. Milanick, P. O. Box 1724,

Flagler Beach, FL 32136-1724 (904) 347-3473. You may be

billed for the actual cost of copying, mailing, or delivering

records that shall be available at and within reasonable times.




Me E mbeprs saveIPr


Senior Community
Spacious Efficiencies & One Bedroom Apartments Available
Convenient to Shopping Planned Activities Onsite
Coordinator Invidually Controlled Heat and A/C Group
Outings HUD Subsidized

Hurley Manor...3333 University Blvd. N., 32277...744-6022
San Jose Manor............3630 Galicia Rd., 32217............739-0555
*TTY through Florida Relay Center Dial 711 or 1-800-955-8771*

INVITATION FOR BIDS
REFURBISH EXISTING BOILARDS
AT THE TALLEYRAND MARINE TERMINAL
JAXPORT Project No. T2010-07
JAXPORT Contract No. C-1312

Sealed bids will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority until 2:00
PM, local time, December 3, 2009, at which time they shall be opened in
the Public. Meeting Room of the Port Central Office Building, 2831
Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida, for Refurbish Existing Bollards.
All bids must be submitted in accordance with specifications and draw-
ings for Contract No. C-1312, which may be examined in, or obtained
from the Procurement Department of the Jacksonville Port Authority,
located on the second floor of the Port Central Office Building, 2831
Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206. (Please telephone
904/357-3018 for information.)
A MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE AND SITE VISIT WILL BE
HELD ON NOVEMBER 17( 2009 AT 10:00 AM, IN THE PUBLIC MEET-
ING ROOM, FIRST FLOOR OF THE PORT CENTRAL OFFICE BUILD-
ING LOCATED AT ADDRESS STATED ABOVE. ATTENDANCE BY A
REPRESENTATIVE OF EACH PROSPECTIVE BIDDER IS REQUIRED.
A BID WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED FROM ANY BIDDER WHO IS NOT
REPRESENTED AT SUCH CONFERENCE.

Bid and contract bonding are required.
The mandatory JSEB/MBE Participation Goal established for this project
is 00/0.



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A T4 800-257-4161
Minutes from Amelia Island and the Atlantic Ocean
1100AM-TwProsal Nuer:1 ber19
An ltripe't.-/Aiuw,!->0- lh ji fdii? Cnui"Vd*lMru 1 Mi uv; R44.6u









OF CCTV EQUIPMENT
Proposals will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority (JA-
-E Lbto.-taaes-1taheNrtL-oUwm
0.r1111CUDINEERS 8W257-4161
which time they will be opened in the First Floor Conferiggence Room








2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206.
A MANDATORY pre-proposal meeting will be held at 10:00 A.M. on
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
Proposal Number: 10-05
PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR SERVICES
OF CCTV EQUIPMENT
FOR THE
JACKSONVII.,LE PORT AUTHORITY
Proposals will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority (JAX-
PORT) until 2:00 PM (EST), on Thursday, December 17, 2009; at
which time they will be opened in the First Floor Conference Room,
2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206.
A MANDATORY pre-proposal meeting will be held at 10:00 A.M. on
Tuesday, December 1, 2009, First Floor Conference Room PCGB
located at 2831 Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206.
All Proposals must be submitted in accordance with the Specifications
of Proposal Number 10-05, which may be obtained on November 19,
2009, from the bidding opportunities website:
http://www.iaxport.comlaboutlprojects.cfm.
Procurement & Contract Services Department
P. 0. Box 3005
Jacksonville, Florida 32206
(904) 357-3017

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
SProposal Number: 10-06
LIABILITY INSURANCE BROKERAGE SERVICES
FOR THE
JACKSONVILLE PORT AUTHORITY
Proposals will be received by the Jacksonville Port Authority (JAX-
PORT) until 2:00 PM (EST), on Monday, November 30, 2009, at which
time they will be opened in the First Floor Conference Room, 2831
Talleyrand Avenue, Jacksonville, Florida 32206.
All Proposals must be submitted in accordance with the Specifications
of Proposal Number 10-06, which may be obtained on November 10,
2009, from the bidding opportunities website:
http://www.jaxport.comlabouttlprojects.cfm.
Procurment & Contract Services Department
P. O. Box 3005
Jacksonville, Florida 32206
(904) 357-3017

Advertise in over 100 papers

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info@national-classifieds.conm

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I AN F

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NOVEMBER 21, 2009


THE STAR


PAGE B 7


Hurley Manor Apartments "Celebrate
& Life with Us"
San Jose Manor Apartments n .


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NOVEMBER 21, 2009


PAGE B-8 THE STAR


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